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Sample records for anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor

  1. Space magnetometer based on an anisotropic magnetoresistive hybrid sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.; Whiteside, B. J.; Beek, T. J.; Fox, P.; Horbury, T. S.; Oddy, T. M.; Archer, M. O.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sanz-Hernández, D.; Sample, J. G.; Cupido, E.; O'Brien, H.; Carr, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the design and development of a low resource, dual sensor vector magnetometer for space science applications on very small spacecraft. It is based on a hybrid device combining an orthogonal triad of commercial anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors with a totem pole H-Bridge drive on a ceramic substrate. The drive enables AMR operation in the more sensitive flipped mode and this is achieved without the need for current spike transmission down a sensor harness. The magnetometer has sensitivity of better than 3 nT in a 0-10 Hz band and a total mass of 104 g. Three instruments have been launched as part of the TRIO-CINEMA space weather mission, inter-calibration against the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model makes it possible to extract physical signals such as field-aligned current deflections of 20-60 nT within an approximately 45 000 nT ambient field.

  2. Space magnetometer based on an anisotropic magnetoresistive hybrid sensor.

    PubMed

    Brown, P; Whiteside, B J; Beek, T J; Fox, P; Horbury, T S; Oddy, T M; Archer, M O; Eastwood, J P; Sanz-Hernández, D; Sample, J G; Cupido, E; O'Brien, H; Carr, C M

    2014-12-01

    We report on the design and development of a low resource, dual sensor vector magnetometer for space science applications on very small spacecraft. It is based on a hybrid device combining an orthogonal triad of commercial anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors with a totem pole H-Bridge drive on a ceramic substrate. The drive enables AMR operation in the more sensitive flipped mode and this is achieved without the need for current spike transmission down a sensor harness. The magnetometer has sensitivity of better than 3 nT in a 0-10 Hz band and a total mass of 104 g. Three instruments have been launched as part of the TRIO-CINEMA space weather mission, inter-calibration against the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model makes it possible to extract physical signals such as field-aligned current deflections of 20-60 nT within an approximately 45,000 nT ambient field.

  3. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by 3 d transition-metal wires. We show that a gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symmetry filtering properties of the molecules. We further discuss how this molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance (MAMR) can be tuned by the proper choice of materials and their electronic properties.

  4. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  5. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  6. Anisotropic magnetoresistance in an antiferromagnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Fina, I; Marti, X; Yi, D; Liu, J; Chu, J H; Rayan-Serrao, C; Suresha, S; Shick, A B; Zelezný, J; Jungwirth, T; Fontcuberta, J; Ramesh, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in devices comprising metal antiferromagnets have demonstrated the feasibility of a novel spintronic concept in which spin-dependent phenomena are governed by an antiferromagnet instead of a ferromagnet. Here we report experimental observation of the anisotropic magnetoresistance in an antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr2IrO4. Based on ab initio calculations, we associate the origin of the phenomenon with large anisotropies in the relativistic electronic structure. The antiferromagnet film is exchange coupled to a ferromagnet, which allows us to reorient the antiferromagnet spin-axis in applied magnetic fields via the exchange spring effect. We demonstrate that the semiconducting nature of our AFM electrode allows us to perform anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements in the current-perpendicular-to-plane geometry without introducing a tunnel barrier into the stack. Temperature-dependent measurements of the resistance and anisotropic magnetoresistance highlight the large, entangled tunabilities of the ordinary charge and spin-dependent transport in a spintronic device utilizing the antiferromagnet semiconductor.

  7. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling). PMID:26569263

  8. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-11-12

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling).

  9. Anisotropic magnetoresistance in manganites: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Fuhr, J D; Granada, M; Steren, L B; Alascio, B

    2010-04-14

    We present measurements of the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of La(0.75)Sr(0.25)MnO(3) films deposited on (001) SrTiO(3) substrates, and a model that describes the experimental results. The model, based on the electronic structure of manganites plus the spin-orbit coupling, correctly accounts for the dependence of the AMR on the direction of the current to the crystalline axes. We measure an AMR of the order of 10(-3) for the current I parallel to the [100] axis of the crystal and vanishing AMR for I , in agreement with the model predictions. Further, we calculate the planar Hall effect and show its connection to AMR.

  10. Anisotropic magnetoresistance dominant in a three terminal Hanle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malec, Christopher; Miller, Michael M.; Johnson, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Experiments are performed on mesoscopic nonlocal lateral spin valves with aluminum channels and Permalloy electrodes. Four-terminal magnetoresistance and Hanle measurements characterize the spin accumulation with results that compare well with published work. Three-terminal Hanle measurements of the Permalloy/aluminum (Py/Al) interfaces show bell-shaped curves that can be fit to Lorentzians. These curves are three orders of magnitude larger than the spin accumulation. Using anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements of individual Permalloy electrodes, we demonstrate that the three-terminal measurements are dominated by anisotropic magnetoresistance effects unrelated to spin accumulation.

  11. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-12-05

    We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 × 10⁵% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 × 10⁶% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal semiconductor-like transition in NbSb₂. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed tomore » the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field in addition to the high mobility metal.« less

  12. Highly sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistance magnetometer for Eddy-current nondestructive evaluation.

    PubMed

    He, D F; Tachiki, M; Itozaki, H

    2009-03-01

    Using a commercially available anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) sensor of HMC1001, we developed a sensitive magnetometer. It could operate in amplifier mode or feedback mode. The magnetic field sensitivity of the AMR sensor was about 3.2 mV/V G. When the AMR sensor was biased by a voltage of 24 V, the magnetic field resolutions of the AMR magnetometer were about 12 pT/square root(Hz) at 1 kHz and 20 pT/square root(Hz) at 100 Hz. We used the AMR magnetometer for Eddy-current nondestructive evaluation in unshielded environment.

  13. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance State Space of Permalloy Nanowires with Domain Wall Pinning Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Corte-León, Héctor; Nabaei, Vahid; Manzin, Alessandra; Fletcher, Jonathan; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Schumacher, Hans W.; Kazakova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The domain wall-related change in the anisotropic magnetoresistance in L-shaped permalloy nanowires is measured as a function of the magnitude and orientation of the applied magnetic field. The magnetoresistance curves, compiled into so-called domain wall magnetoresistance state space maps, are used to identify highly reproducible transitions between domain states. Magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic modelling are correlated with the transport measurements of the devices in order to identify different magnetization states. Analysis allows to determine the optimal working parameters for specific devices, such as the minimal field required to switch magnetization or the most appropriate angle for maximal separation of the pinning/depinning fields. Moreover, the complete state space maps can be used to predict evolution of nanodevices in magnetic field without a need of additional electrical measurements and for repayable initialization of magnetic sensors into a well-specified state. PMID:25116470

  14. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    PubMed Central

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; López-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.-W.; Park, B.-G.; Balcells, Ll.; Martí, X.; Jungwirth, T.; Martínez, B.

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature. PMID:27762278

  15. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal = Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  16. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Steven S.-L. Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-07

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  17. Anisotropic magnetoresistivity in structured elastomer composites: modelling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Mietta, José Luis; Tamborenea, Pablo I; Martin Negri, R

    2016-08-14

    A constitutive model for the anisotropic magnetoresistivity in structured elastomer composites (SECs) is proposed. The SECs considered here are oriented pseudo-chains of conductive-magnetic inorganic materials inside an elastomer organic matrix. The pseudo-chains are formed by fillers which are simultaneously conductive and magnetic dispersed in the polymer before curing or solvent evaporation. The SEC is then prepared in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, referred to as Hcuring. This procedure generates the pseudo-chains, which are preferentially aligned in the direction of Hcuring. Electrical conduction is present in that direction only. The constitutive model for the magnetoresistance considers the magnetic pressure, Pmag, induced on the pseudo-chains by an external magnetic field, H, applied in the direction of the pseudo-chains. The relative changes in conductivity as a function of H are calculated by evaluating the relative increase of the electron tunnelling probability with Pmag, a magneto-elastic coupling which produces an increase of conductivity with magnetization. The model is used to adjust experimental results of magnetoresistance in a specific SEC where the polymer is polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS, and fillers are microparticles of magnetite-silver (referred to as Fe3O4[Ag]). Simulations of the expected response for other materials in both superparamagnetic and blocked magnetic states are presented, showing the influence of the Young's modulus of the matrix and filler's saturation magnetization. PMID:27418417

  18. Gamma Irradiation of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Planetary Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Ruy; Fernández, Ana B.; Dominguez, Jose A.; Martín, Boris; Michelena, Marina D.

    2012-01-01

    A limited number of Anisotropic Magnetoresistive (AMR) commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) magnetic sensors of the HMC series by Honeywell, with and without integrated front-end electronics, were irradiated with gamma rays up to a total irradiation dose of 200 krad (Si), following the ESCC Basic Specification No. 22900. Due to the magnetic cleanliness required for these tests a special set-up was designed and successfully employed. Several parameters of the sensors were monitored during testing and the results are reported in this paper. The authors conclude that AMR sensors without front-end electronics seem to be robust against radiation doses of up to 200 krad (Si) with a dose rate of 5 krad (Si)/hour and up to a resolution of tens of nT, but sensors with an integrated front-end seem to be more vulnerable to radiation. PMID:22666039

  19. Interlayer transverse magnetoresistance in the presence of an anisotropic pseudogap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. F.; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2009-12-01

    The interlayer magnetoresistance of a quasi-two-dimensional layered metal with a d -wave pseudogap is calculated semiclassically. An expression for the interlayer resistivity as a function of the strength and direction of the magnetic field, the magnitude of the pseudogap, temperature, and scattering rate is obtained. We find that the pseudogap, by introducing low-energy nodal quasiparticle contours, smooths the dependence on field direction in a manner characteristic of its anisotropy. We thus propose that interlayer resistance measurements under a strong field of variable orientation can be used to fully characterize an anisotropic pseudogap. The general result is applied to the case of a magnetic field parallel to the conducting layers using a model band structure appropriate for overdoped Tℓ2201 .

  20. Large anisotropic magnetoresistance of ruthenium-based Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, S.; Ohnishi, T.; Douzono, A.; Nagata, Y.; Ozawa, T. C.; Samata, H.; Noro, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Anomalous magnetic behavior was found in the polycrystalline Heusler alloy system Ru2Mn1-xFexGe. Samples of x =0 and 1.0 show no magnetoresistance (MR); however, the anisotropic MR effect is observed for x =0.5 (MR ratios of -4% and +2% are observed under parallel and perpendicular configurations of applied field and applied current, respectively). Moreover, magnetic measurement revealed that the sample of x =0 is antiferromagnetic, whereas the samples of x =0.5 and 1.0 are ferromagnetic with Curie temperatures of 270 and 490 K, respectively. The saturation magnetization and coercivity at 5 K are 3.1μB/f.u. and negligibly small for x =1.0 and 1.8μB/f.u. and 0.1 T for x =0.5, respectively. The MR effect is explained by a model in which antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic domains coexist.

  1. Magnetoresistive sensors for surveillance and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalichaouch, Yacine; Perry, Alexander R.; Whitecotton, Brian W.; Moeller, Charles R.; Czipott, Peter V.

    2001-02-01

    Quantum Magnetics (QM) has developed a sensing array using small and lightweight magnetoresistive (MR) sensors. These sensors, which operate at room temperature with high sensitivity and wide bandwidth, provide new operational performance capabilities. The wide bandwidth makes them ideal for both passive and active detection techniques. Using a DSP-based electronics developed by QM, we have been able to operate these sensors with an unprecedented noise performance at low frequencies. Recent tests using an MR room temperature gradiometer show that its resolution equals that of a fluxgate room-temperature gradiometer we have previously developed. These results represent an important development for both attended and unattended ground sensor applications since MR sensors cost about ten times less than fluxgate sensors.

  2. Linearization strategies for high sensitivity magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana V.; Leitao, Diana C.; Valadeiro, João; Amaral, José; Freitas, Paulo P.; Cardoso, Susana

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors envisaged for applications on biomedical imaging require the detection of low-intensity and low-frequency signals. Therefore linear magnetic sensors with enhanced sensitivity low noise levels and improved field detection at low operating frequencies are necessary. Suitable devices can be designed using magnetoresistive sensors, with room temperature operation, adjustable detected field range, CMOS compatibility and cost-effective production. The advent of spintronics set the path to the technological revolution boosted by the storage industry, in particular by the development of read heads using magnetoresistive devices. New multilayered structures were engineered to yield devices with linear output. We present a detailed study of the key factors influencing MR sensor performance (materials, geometries and layout strategies) with focus on different linearization strategies available. Furthermore strategies to improve sensor detection levels are also addressed with best reported values of ˜40 pT/√Hz at 30 Hz, representing a step forward the low field detection at room temperature.

  3. Theoretical Study on Twofold and Fourfold Symmetric Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    We theoretically study the twofold and fourfold symmetric anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect [ 1 ] . We first extend our previous model [ 2 ] to a model including the crystal field effect [ 1 ] . Using the model, we next obtain an analytical expression of the AMR ratio, i.e., AMR (ϕ) =C0 +C2 cos (2 ϕ) +C4 cos (4 ϕ) , with C0=C2 -C4 [ 1 ] . Here, ϕ is the relative angle between the magnetization direction and the electric current direction and C2 (C4) is a coefficient of the twofold (fourfold) symmetric term. The coefficients C2 and C4 are expressed by a spin-orbit coupling constant, an exchange field, a crystal field, and s-s and s-d scattering resistivities. Using this expression, we analyze the experimental results for Fe4N [ 3 ] , in which | C2 | and | C4 | increase with decreasing temperature. The experimental results can be reproduced by assuming that the tetragonal distortion increases with decreasing temperature. [ 1 ] S. Kokado et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84 (2015) 094710. [ 2 ] S. Kokado et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81 (2012) 024705. [ 3 ] M. Tsunoda et al., Appl. Phys. Express 3 (2010) 113003.

  4. Gilbert damping and anisotropic magnetoresistance in iron-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.

    2016-07-01

    We use the two-current model of Campbell and Fert to understand the compositional dependence of the Gilbert damping parameter in certain iron alloys. In that model, spin-up and spin-down carriers have different resistivities ρ↑ and ρ↓. We emphasize the part of the Gilbert parameter, called Gsf, generated by spin-flip interband processes. Both Gsf and the anisotropic magnetoresistance Δρ are proportional to the square of the spin-orbit parameter, and also proportional to ρ↑. In bcc alloys of iron with V, Cr, Mo, etc. solutes on the left of iron in the periodic table, ρ↑ is increased by a scattering resonance (Gomes and Campbell, 1966, 1968). Then ρ↑, Δρ, and Gsf all exhibit a peak at the same moderate concentration of the solute. We find the best fit between this theory and existing experimental data of Gilbert damping for Fe-V epitaxial films at room temperature (Cheng, 2006; Scheck et al., 2007). At room temperature, the predicted Gsf peak is masked by a background arising from non-flip intraband processes. At elevated temperatures, the peak is expected to become more prominent, and less hidden in the background.

  5. Giant single-molecule anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Jun; Bai, Mei-Lin; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shi, Zhan; Zhang, Meng; Ding, Song-Yuan; Hou, Shi-Min; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2015-05-13

    We report an electrochemically assisted jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction approach to create reproducible and well-defined single-molecule spintronic junctions. The STM break junction is equipped with an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the electron transport direction. The conductance of Fe-terephthalic acid (TPA)-Fe single-molecule junctions is measured and a giant single-molecule tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (T-AMR) up to 53% is observed at room temperature. Theoretical calculations based on first-principles quantum simulations show that the observed AMR of Fe-TPA-Fe junctions originates from electronic coupling at the TPA-Fe interfaces modified by the magnetic orientation of the Fe electrodes with respect to the direction of current flow. The present study highlights new opportunities for obtaining detailed understanding of mechanisms of charge and spin transport in molecular junctions and the role of interfaces in determining the MR of single-molecule junctions. PMID:25894840

  6. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D. Z.; Wang, T.; Sui, W. B.; Si, M. S.; Guo, D. W.; Shi, Z.; Wang, F. C.; Xue, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature. PMID:26323495

  7. Magnetocardiography with sensors based on giant magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Parkkonen, L.; Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Polovy, H.; Fermon, C.; Fowley, C.

    2011-04-01

    Biomagnetic signals, mostly due to the electrical activity in the body, are very weak and they can only be detected by the most sensitive magnetometers, such as Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). We report here biomagnetic recordings with hybrid sensors based on Giant MagnetoResistance (GMR). We recorded magnetic signatures of the electric activity of the human heart (magnetocardiography) in healthy volunteers. The P-wave and QRS complex, known from the corresponding electric recordings, are clearly visible in the recordings after an averaging time of about 1 min. Multiple recordings at different locations over the chest yielded a dipolar magnetic field map and allowed localizing the underlying current sources. The sensitivity of the GMR-based sensors is now approaching that of SQUIDs and paves way for spin electronics devices for functional imaging of the body.

  8. Fractional modeling of the AC large-signal frequency response in magnetoresistive current sensors.

    PubMed

    Ravelo Arias, Sergio Iván; Ramírez Muñoz, Diego; Moreno, Jaime Sánchez; Cardoso, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; de Freitas, Paulo Jorge Peixeiro

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function Z(t)(JF) is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current, Z(t)(jf)= V(o, sensor)(jf)/I(sensor)(jf). The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), giant magnetoresistance (GMR), spin-valve (GMR-SV) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications. PMID:24351648

  9. Electric field modulation of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in tunnel junctions with antiferromagnetic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Minori; Nawaoka, Kohei; Miwa, Shinji; Hatanaka, Shohei; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2016-08-01

    We present electric field modulation of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) in MnIr|MgO|Ta tunnel junctions. TAMR enables direct observation of the antiferromagnetic spin direction at the MnIr|MgO interface. We found that the shape of magnetoresistance (MR) curve can be modulated by an electric field, which can be explained by electric field modulation of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy at MnIr|MgO.

  10. Fractional Modeling of the AC Large-Signal Frequency Response in Magnetoresistive Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Sergio Iván Ravello; Muñoz, Diego Ramírez; Moreno, Jaime Sánchez; Cardoso, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; de Freitas, Paulo Jorge Peixeiro

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function Zt(if) is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current, Zt(jf)=Vo,sensor(jf)/Isensor(jf). The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), giant magnetoresistance (GMR), spin-valve (GMR-SV) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications. PMID:24351648

  11. The MAGIC of CINEMA: first in-flight science results from a miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, M. O.; Horbury, T. S.; Brown, P.; Eastwood, J. P.; Oddy, T. M.; Whiteside, B. J.; Sample, J. G.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first in-flight results from a novel miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive space magnetometer, MAGIC (MAGnetometer from Imperial College), aboard the first CINEMA (CubeSat for Ions, Neutrals, Electrons and MAgnetic fields) spacecraft in low Earth orbit. An attitude-independent calibration technique is detailed using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), which is temperature dependent in the case of the outboard sensor. We show that the sensors accurately measure the expected absolute field to within 2% in attitude mode and 1% in science mode. Using a simple method we are able to estimate the spacecraft's attitude using the magnetometer only, thus characterising CINEMA's spin, precession and nutation. Finally, we show that the outboard sensor is capable of detecting transient physical signals with amplitudes of ~ 20-60 nT. These include field-aligned currents at the auroral oval, qualitatively similar to previous observations, which agree in location with measurements from the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) and POES (Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites) spacecraft. Thus, we demonstrate and discuss the potential science capabilities of the MAGIC instrument onboard a CubeSat platform.

  12. Lateral flow immunoassay using magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taton, Kristin; Johnson, Diane; Guire, Patrick; Lange, Erik; Tondra, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic particles have been adapted for use as labels in biochemical lateral flow strip tests. Standard gold particle lateral flow assays are generally qualitative; however, with magnetic particles, quantitative results can be obtained by using electronic detection systems with giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. As described here, these small integrated sensor chips can detect the presence of magnetic labels in capture spots whose volume is approximately 150 μm×150 μm×150 μm. The range of linear detection is better than two orders of magnitude; the total range is up to four orders of magnitude. The system was demonstrated with both indirect and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for protein detection of rabbit IgG and interferon-γ, respectively, achieving detection of 12 pg/ml protein. Ultimately, the goal is for the detector to be fully integrated into the lateral flow strip backing to form a single consumable item that is interrogated by a handheld electronic reader.

  13. Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Sensor Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of acceleration has been accomplished using several technologies in high-reliability applications such as guidance control, detonation, and shock/vibration measurement. Electromechanical, piezoelectric, piezoresistive, and capacitive acceleration sensors are available and the literature pertinent to giant magnetoresistive sensors (GMR) for the above applications are scanty.

  14. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic field response of the transport properties of novel materials and then the large magnetoresistance effects are of broad importance in both science and application. We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 × 105% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 × 106% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal-semiconductor-like transition, in NbSb2 single crystal. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed to the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field which is related to the Dirac-like point, in addition to orbital MR expected for high mobility metals. PMID:25476239

  15. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  16. Tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance in CoFeB|MgO|Ta junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hatanaka, S.; Miwa, S. Matsuda, K.; Nawaoka, K.; Tanaka, K.; Morishita, H.; Goto, M.; Mizuochi, N.; Shinjo, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-08-24

    We found that CoFeB|MgO|Ta tunnel junctions exhibit tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) at room temperature. The tunnel junctions exhibit positive magnetoresistance with the application of a magnetic field normal to the film plane. The dependencies on the applied magnetic field angle and MgO thickness reveal that the magnetoresistance originates from the TAMR, caused by the spin polarization and the spin-orbit interaction at the CoFeB|MgO interface. We also found that the TAMR can be used to detect ferromagnetic resonance in the CoFeB. This detection method could be useful for the characterization of nanomagnets that are free from the spin-transfer effect and the stray field of a reference layer, unlike conventional magnetic tunnel junctions.

  17. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy induced low field anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance in manganite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhaoliang; Huijben, Mark; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Guus

    2014-09-01

    La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 films with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy were coherently grown on NdGaO3 (110) substrates. The uniaxial anisotropy has strong effect on magnetoresistance (MR). A positive MR was observed when the current is along magnetic easy axis under the current-field perpendicular geometry. In contrast, no positive MR is observed when current is along the magnetic hard axis regardless of the field direction. Our analysis indicates that the anomalous anisotropic MR effect arises from the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy caused stripe domains which contribute to strong anisotropic domain wall resistivity.

  18. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co/AlOx/Au tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Liu, R S; Michalak, L; Canali, C M; Samuelson, L; Pettersson, H

    2008-03-01

    We observe spin-valve-like effects in nanoscaled thermally evaporated Co/AlOx/Au tunnel junctions. The tunneling magnetoresistance is anisotropic and depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization direction of the Co electrode with respect to the current direction. We attribute this effect to a two-step magnetization reversal and an anisotropic density of states resulting from spin-orbit interaction. The results of this study points to future applications of novel spintronics devices involving only one ferromagnetic layer. PMID:18254603

  19. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhel, Ahmed; Khan, Mohammed Asadullah; Cardoso, Susana; Leitao, Diana; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature. PMID:27164113

  20. Development of eddy current probes based on magnetoresistive sensors arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Decitre, J.-M.; Fermon, C.; Pelkner, M.; Reimund, V.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2014-02-01

    Eddy Current Technique is a powerful method for detection of surface notches and of buried flaws during inspection of metallic parts. Recent EC array probes have demonstrated a fast and efficient control of large surfaces. Nevertheless, when the size of flaws decreases or the defect is rather deep, traditional winding coil probes turn out to be useless. Magnetoresistive sensors present the advantages of flat frequency response and micron size. These sensors are hence very attractive for the detection of buried defects that require low frequencies because of skin depth effect. An optimization of the probe with magnetoresistive sensors as receivers has been made by simulations using CIVA software and finite elements methods with OPERA. EC probes for buried flaw detection have been designed. Experimental results have been compared with simulations.

  1. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications.

    PubMed

    Alfadhel, Ahmed; Khan, Mohammed Asadullah; Cardoso, Susana; Leitao, Diana; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature. PMID:27164113

  2. Anisotropic and strong negative magnetoresistance in the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, S.; Jost, A.; Fauqué, B.; van Dijk, J.; Meijer, M. J.; Khouri, T.; Pezzini, S.; Grauer, S.; Schreyeck, S.; Brüne, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Hussey, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We report on high-field angle-dependent magnetotransport measurements on epitaxial thin films of Bi2Se3 , a three-dimensional topological insulator. At low temperature, we observe quantum oscillations that demonstrate the simultaneous presence of bulk and surface carriers. The magnetoresistance of Bi2Se3 is found to be highly anisotropic. In the presence of a parallel electric and magnetic field, we observe a strong negative longitudinal magnetoresistance that has been considered as a smoking gun for the presence of chiral fermions in a certain class of semimetals due to the so-called axial anomaly. Its observation in a three-dimensional topological insulator implies that the axial anomaly may be in fact a far more generic phenomenon than originally thought.

  3. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance: a spin-valve-like tunnel magnetoresistance using a single magnetic layer.

    PubMed

    Gould, C; Rüster, C; Jungwirth, T; Girgis, E; Schott, G M; Giraud, R; Brunner, K; Schmidt, G; Molenkamp, L W

    2004-09-10

    We introduce a new class of spintronic devices in which a spin-valve-like effect results from strong spin-orbit coupling in a single ferromagnetic layer rather than from injection and detection of a spin-polarized current by two coupled ferromagnets. The effect is observed in a normal-metal-insulator-ferromagnetic-semiconductor tunneling device. This behavior is caused by the interplay of the anisotropic density of states in (Ga,Mn)As with respect to the magnetization direction and the two-step magnetization reversal process in this material. PMID:15447375

  4. Tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance due to antiferromagnetic CoO tunnel barriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Sanderink, J G M; Bolhuis, T; van der Wiel, W G; de Jong, M P

    2015-01-01

    A new approach in spintronics is based on spin-polarized charge transport phenomena governed by antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for AFM metals and semiconductors. We report tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) due to the rotation of antiferromagnetic moments of an insulating CoO layer, incorporated into a tunnel junction consisting of sapphire(substrate)/fcc-Co/CoO/AlOx/Al. The ferromagnetic Co layer is exchange coupled to the AFM CoO layer and drives rotation of the AFM moments in an external magnetic field. The results may help pave the way towards the development of spintronic devices based on AFM insulators.

  5. Interfacial exchange coupling induced anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance in epitaxial γ'-Fe₄N/CoN bilayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zirun; Mi, Wenbo; Wang, Xiaocha; Zhang, Xixiang

    2015-02-18

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of the facing-target reactively sputtered epitaxial γ'-Fe4N/CoN bilayers is investigated. The phase shift and rectangular-like AMR appears at low temperatures, which can be ascribed to the interfacial exchange coupling. The phase shift comes from the exchange bias (EB) that makes the magnetization lag behind a small field. When the γ'-Fe4N thickness increases, the rectangular-like AMR appears. The rectangular-like AMR should be from the combined contributions including the EB-induced unidirectional anisotropy, intrinsic AMR of γ'-Fe4N layer and interfacial spin scattering.

  6. Large anisotropic magnetoresistance across the Schottky interface in all oxide ferromagnet/semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Guo, B. L.; Bai, H. L.

    2011-06-01

    Over 80% fourfold symmetric anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) across the interface is observed in epitaxial Fe3O4 (001)/Nb:SrTiO3 (001) heterostructures, while the twofold symmetric AMR across the interface in epitaxial Fe3O4 (111)/ZnO (0001) heterostructures is rather small. The large AMR across the interface is considered to be induced by the assistance of magnetocrystalline anisotropic energy for the transport electrons while the applied voltage bias is near the height of Schottky barrier, which is further verified by the fact that a larger critical current is needed for the maximum AMR in the Fe3O4 (001)/Nb:SrTiO3 (001) heterostructures with heavier Nb-doping.

  7. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M.; Cao, G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  8. Stability of standing spin wave in permalloy thin film studied by anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanoi, K.; Yokotani, Y.; Cui, X.; Yakata, S.; Kimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the stability for the resonant spin precession under the strong microwave magnetic field by a specially developed detection method using the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. The electrically separated excitation and detection circuits enable us to investigate the influence of the heating effect and the nonuniform spin dynamics independently. The large detecting current is found to induce the field shift of the resonant spectra because of the Joule heating. From the microwave power dependence, we found that the linear response regime for the standing spin wave is larger than that for the ferromagnetic resonance. This robust characteristic of the standing spin wave is an important advantage for the high power operation of the spin-wave device.

  9. Four-fold symmetric anisotropic magnetoresistance of single-crystalline Ni(001) film

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2015-11-28

    Temperature, current-direction, and film-thickness dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements were performed on single-crystalline face-centered-cubic nickel films. An additional four-fold symmetry was confirmed besides the typical two-fold term even at room temperature. The angular-dependent longitudinal resistivity resolves into a two-fold term, which varies as a function of current direction, and a four-fold term, which is isotropically independent of current direction. The experimental results are interpreted well using an expression based on the phenomenological model. Both the two- and four-fold terms vary inversely proportional to film thickness, indicating that interfacial scattering can significantly influence the spin-dependent transport properties.

  10. Tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance due to antiferromagnetic CoO tunnel barriers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.; Sanderink, J. G. M.; Bolhuis, T.; van der Wiel, W. G.; de Jong, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach in spintronics is based on spin-polarized charge transport phenomena governed by antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for AFM metals and semiconductors. We report tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) due to the rotation of antiferromagnetic moments of an insulating CoO layer, incorporated into a tunnel junction consisting of sapphire(substrate)/fcc-Co/CoO/AlOx/Al. The ferromagnetic Co layer is exchange coupled to the AFM CoO layer and drives rotation of the AFM moments in an external magnetic field. The results may help pave the way towards the development of spintronic devices based on AFM insulators. PMID:26486931

  11. Stability of standing spin wave in permalloy thin film studied by anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, K.; Yokotani, Y.; Cui, X.; Yakata, S.; Kimura, T.

    2015-12-21

    We have investigated the stability for the resonant spin precession under the strong microwave magnetic field by a specially developed detection method using the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. The electrically separated excitation and detection circuits enable us to investigate the influence of the heating effect and the nonuniform spin dynamics independently. The large detecting current is found to induce the field shift of the resonant spectra because of the Joule heating. From the microwave power dependence, we found that the linear response regime for the standing spin wave is larger than that for the ferromagnetic resonance. This robust characteristic of the standing spin wave is an important advantage for the high power operation of the spin-wave device.

  12. Strongly Anisotropic Ballistic Magnetoresistance in Compact Three-Dimensional Semiconducting Nanoarchitectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Hao; van den Brink, Jeroen; Ortix, Carmine

    2014-11-01

    We establish theoretically that in nonmagnetic semiconducting bilayer or multilayer thin film systems rolled up into compact quasi-one-dimensional nanoarchitectures, the ballistic magnetoresistance is very anisotropic: conductances depend strongly on the direction of an externally applied magnetic field. This phenomenon originates from the curved open geometry of rolled-up nanotubes, which leads to a tunability of the number of quasi-one-dimensional magnetic subbands crossing the Fermi energy. The experimental significance of this phenomenon is illustrated by a sizable anisotropy that scales with the inverse of the winding number, and persists up to a critical temperature that can be strongly enhanced by increasing the strength of the external magnetic field or the characteristic radius of curvature, and can reach room temperature.

  13. Large and Anisotropic Linear Magnetoresistance in Single Crystals of Black Phosphorus Arising From Mobility Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhipeng; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Ding, Bei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Enke; Xi, Xuekui; Wu, Guangheng; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Black Phosphorus (BP) is presently attracting immense research interest on the global level due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential application in optoelectronics and flexible devices. It was theoretically predicted that BP has a large direction-dependent electrical and magnetotransport anisotropy. Investigations on magnetotransport of BP may therefore provide a new platform for studying the nature of electron transport in layered materials. However, to the best of our knowledge, magnetotransport studies, especially the anisotropic magnetoresistance (MR) effect in layered BP, are rarely reported. Here, we report a large linear MR up to 510% at a magnetic field of 7 Tesla in single crystals of BP. Analysis of the temperature and angle dependence of MR revealed that the large linear MR in our sample originates from mobility fluctuations. Furthermore, we reveal that the large linear MR of layered BP in fact follows a three-dimensional behavior rather than a two-dimensional one. Our results have implications to both the fundamental understanding and magnetoresistive device applications of BP.

  14. Large and Anisotropic Linear Magnetoresistance in Single Crystals of Black Phosphorus Arising From Mobility Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhipeng; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Ding, Bei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Enke; Xi, Xuekui; Wu, Guangheng; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2016-03-01

    Black Phosphorus (BP) is presently attracting immense research interest on the global level due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential application in optoelectronics and flexible devices. It was theoretically predicted that BP has a large direction-dependent electrical and magnetotransport anisotropy. Investigations on magnetotransport of BP may therefore provide a new platform for studying the nature of electron transport in layered materials. However, to the best of our knowledge, magnetotransport studies, especially the anisotropic magnetoresistance (MR) effect in layered BP, are rarely reported. Here, we report a large linear MR up to 510% at a magnetic field of 7 Tesla in single crystals of BP. Analysis of the temperature and angle dependence of MR revealed that the large linear MR in our sample originates from mobility fluctuations. Furthermore, we reveal that the large linear MR of layered BP in fact follows a three-dimensional behavior rather than a two-dimensional one. Our results have implications to both the fundamental understanding and magnetoresistive device applications of BP.

  15. Large and Anisotropic Linear Magnetoresistance in Single Crystals of Black Phosphorus Arising From Mobility Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zhipeng; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Ding, Bei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Enke; Xi, Xuekui; Wu, Guangheng; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Black Phosphorus (BP) is presently attracting immense research interest on the global level due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential application in optoelectronics and flexible devices. It was theoretically predicted that BP has a large direction-dependent electrical and magnetotransport anisotropy. Investigations on magnetotransport of BP may therefore provide a new platform for studying the nature of electron transport in layered materials. However, to the best of our knowledge, magnetotransport studies, especially the anisotropic magnetoresistance (MR) effect in layered BP, are rarely reported. Here, we report a large linear MR up to 510% at a magnetic field of 7 Tesla in single crystals of BP. Analysis of the temperature and angle dependence of MR revealed that the large linear MR in our sample originates from mobility fluctuations. Furthermore, we reveal that the large linear MR of layered BP in fact follows a three-dimensional behavior rather than a two-dimensional one. Our results have implications to both the fundamental understanding and magnetoresistive device applications of BP. PMID:27030141

  16. Large and Anisotropic Linear Magnetoresistance in Single Crystals of Black Phosphorus Arising From Mobility Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhipeng; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Ding, Bei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Enke; Xi, Xuekui; Wu, Guangheng; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Black Phosphorus (BP) is presently attracting immense research interest on the global level due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential application in optoelectronics and flexible devices. It was theoretically predicted that BP has a large direction-dependent electrical and magnetotransport anisotropy. Investigations on magnetotransport of BP may therefore provide a new platform for studying the nature of electron transport in layered materials. However, to the best of our knowledge, magnetotransport studies, especially the anisotropic magnetoresistance (MR) effect in layered BP, are rarely reported. Here, we report a large linear MR up to 510% at a magnetic field of 7 Tesla in single crystals of BP. Analysis of the temperature and angle dependence of MR revealed that the large linear MR in our sample originates from mobility fluctuations. Furthermore, we reveal that the large linear MR of layered BP in fact follows a three-dimensional behavior rather than a two-dimensional one. Our results have implications to both the fundamental understanding and magnetoresistive device applications of BP. PMID:27030141

  17. Very large tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance of a (Ga,Mn)As/GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As stack.

    PubMed

    Rüster, C; Gould, C; Jungwirth, T; Sinova, J; Schott, G M; Giraud, R; Brunner, K; Schmidt, G; Molenkamp, L W

    2005-01-21

    We report the discovery of a very large tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in an epitaxially grown (Ga,Mn)As/GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As structure. The key novel spintronics features of this effect are as follows: (i) both normal and inverted spin-valve-like signals; (ii) a large nonhysteretic magnetoresistance for magnetic fields perpendicular to the interfaces; (iii) magnetization orientations for extremal resistance are, in general, not aligned with the magnetic easy and hard axis; (iv) enormous amplification of the effect at low bias and temperatures. PMID:15698223

  18. Magnetoresistive-superconducting mixed sensors for biomagnetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Fermon, C.; Dyvorne, H.; Jacquinot, J. F.; Polovy, H.; Walliang, A. L.

    2010-05-01

    When coupled to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, a superconducting loop containing a constriction can be a very sensitive magnetometer. It has thermal noise levels of few fT/sqrt(Hz), comparable to low- Tc SQUID noise, with a flat frequency response. These mixed sensors are good candidates for detection of weak biomagnetic signals, like a cardiac or neuronal signature. Furthermore, being sensitive to the flux, mixed sensors can be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) especially at low fields. They are very robust and accept strong RF pulses with a very short recovery time compared to tuned RF coils, which allow measurements of broad signals (short relaxation time or multiple resonances). We will first present the last generation sensors having a noise level of 3 fT/sqrt(Hz) and we will show signals measured at low frequency (magnetocardiography-magnetoencephalography range) and at higher frequency (NMR signals). The use of additional flux transformers for improving the signal-to-noise will be discussed. Finally, we will present perspectives for low-field MRI, which can be combined with neural signal detection (MEG), especially for brain anatomy and temporal response on the same experimental setup.

  19. Unexploded ordnance detection using imaging giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiken, A., LLNL

    1997-05-06

    False positive detections account for a great part of the expense associated with unexploded ordnance (UXO) remediation. Presently fielded systems like pulsed electromagnetic induction systems and cesium-vapor magnetometers are able to distinguish between UXO and other metallic ground clutter only with difficulty. The discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) has led to the development of a new generation of integrated-circuit magnetic sensors that are far more sensitive than previously available room-temperature-operation electronic devices. The small size of GMR sensors makes possible the construction of array detectors that can be used to image the flux emanating from a ferrous object or from a non-ferrous object with eddy currents imposed by an external coil. The purpose of a GMR-based imaging detector would be to allow the operator to easily distinguish between UXO and benign objects (like shrapnel or spent bullets) that litter formerly used defense sites (FUDS). In order to demonstrate the potential of a GMR-based imaging technology, a crude magnetic imaging system has been constructed using commercially available sensors. The ability to roughly determine the outline and disposition of magnetic objects has been demonstrated. Improvements to the system which are necessary to make it into a high-performance UXO detector are outlined.

  20. Electrical detection of magnetic domain wall in Fe4N nanostrip by negative anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushi, Toshiki; Ito, Keita; Higashikozono, Soma; Takata, Fumiya; Oosato, Hirotaka; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Toko, Kaoru; Honda, Syuta; Suemasu, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic structure of the domain wall (DW) of a 30-nm-thick Fe4N epitaxial film with a negative spin polarization of the electrical conductivity is observed by magnetic force microscopy and is well explained by micromagnetic simulation. The Fe4N film is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a SrTiO3(001) substrate and processed into arc-shaped ferromagnetic nanostrips 0.3 μm wide by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching with Cl2 and BCl3 plasma. Two electrodes mounted approximately 12 μm apart on the nanostrip register an electrical resistance at 8 K. By changing the direction of an external magnetic field (0.2 T), the presence or absence of a DW positioned in the nanostrip between the two electrodes can be controlled. The resistance is increased by approximately 0.5 Ω when the DW is located between the electrodes, which signifies the negative anisotropic magnetoresistance effect of Fe4N. The electrical detection of the resistance change is an important step toward the electrical detection of current-induced DW motion in Fe4N.

  1. Multiple-stable anisotropic magnetoresistance memory in antiferromagnetic MnTe.

    PubMed

    Kriegner, D; Výborný, K; Olejník, K; Reichlová, H; Novák, V; Marti, X; Gazquez, J; Saidl, V; Němec, P; Volobuev, V V; Springholz, G; Holý, V; Jungwirth, T

    2016-01-01

    Commercial magnetic memories rely on the bistability of ordered spins in ferromagnetic materials. Recently, experimental bistable memories have been realized using fully compensated antiferromagnetic metals. Here we demonstrate a multiple-stable memory device in epitaxial MnTe, an antiferromagnetic counterpart of common II-VI semiconductors. Favourable micromagnetic characteristics of MnTe allow us to demonstrate a smoothly varying zero-field antiferromagnetic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with a harmonic angular dependence on the writing magnetic field angle, analogous to ferromagnets. The continuously varying AMR provides means for the electrical read-out of multiple-stable antiferromagnetic memory states, which we set by heat-assisted magneto-recording and by changing the writing field direction. The multiple stability in our memory is ascribed to different distributions of domains with the Néel vector aligned along one of the three magnetic easy axes. The robustness against strong magnetic field perturbations combined with the multiple stability of the magnetic memory states are unique properties of antiferromagnets. PMID:27279433

  2. Multiple-stable anisotropic magnetoresistance memory in antiferromagnetic MnTe.

    PubMed

    Kriegner, D; Výborný, K; Olejník, K; Reichlová, H; Novák, V; Marti, X; Gazquez, J; Saidl, V; Němec, P; Volobuev, V V; Springholz, G; Holý, V; Jungwirth, T

    2016-06-09

    Commercial magnetic memories rely on the bistability of ordered spins in ferromagnetic materials. Recently, experimental bistable memories have been realized using fully compensated antiferromagnetic metals. Here we demonstrate a multiple-stable memory device in epitaxial MnTe, an antiferromagnetic counterpart of common II-VI semiconductors. Favourable micromagnetic characteristics of MnTe allow us to demonstrate a smoothly varying zero-field antiferromagnetic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with a harmonic angular dependence on the writing magnetic field angle, analogous to ferromagnets. The continuously varying AMR provides means for the electrical read-out of multiple-stable antiferromagnetic memory states, which we set by heat-assisted magneto-recording and by changing the writing field direction. The multiple stability in our memory is ascribed to different distributions of domains with the Néel vector aligned along one of the three magnetic easy axes. The robustness against strong magnetic field perturbations combined with the multiple stability of the magnetic memory states are unique properties of antiferromagnets.

  3. Multiple-stable anisotropic magnetoresistance memory in antiferromagnetic MnTe

    PubMed Central

    Kriegner, D.; Výborný, K.; Olejník, K.; Reichlová, H.; Novák, V.; Marti, X.; Gazquez, J.; Saidl, V.; Němec, P.; Volobuev, V. V.; Springholz, G.; Holý, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial magnetic memories rely on the bistability of ordered spins in ferromagnetic materials. Recently, experimental bistable memories have been realized using fully compensated antiferromagnetic metals. Here we demonstrate a multiple-stable memory device in epitaxial MnTe, an antiferromagnetic counterpart of common II–VI semiconductors. Favourable micromagnetic characteristics of MnTe allow us to demonstrate a smoothly varying zero-field antiferromagnetic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with a harmonic angular dependence on the writing magnetic field angle, analogous to ferromagnets. The continuously varying AMR provides means for the electrical read-out of multiple-stable antiferromagnetic memory states, which we set by heat-assisted magneto-recording and by changing the writing field direction. The multiple stability in our memory is ascribed to different distributions of domains with the Néel vector aligned along one of the three magnetic easy axes. The robustness against strong magnetic field perturbations combined with the multiple stability of the magnetic memory states are unique properties of antiferromagnets. PMID:27279433

  4. Electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance in ferromagnet/n-GaAs heterostructures by tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Boyko, Y.; Geppert, C. C.; Christie, K. D.; Stecklein, G.; Crowell, P. A.; Patel, S. J.; Palmstrøm, C. J.

    2014-11-24

    We observe a dc voltage peak at ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in samples consisting of a single ferromagnetic (FM) layer grown epitaxially on the n-GaAs (001) surface. The FMR peak is detected as an interfacial voltage with a symmetric line shape and is present in samples based on various FM/n-GaAs heterostructures, including Co{sub 2}MnSi/n-GaAs, Co{sub 2}FeSi/n-GaAs, and Fe/n-GaAs. We show that the interface bias voltage dependence of the FMR signal is identical to that of the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) over most of the bias range. Furthermore, we show how the precessing magnetization yields a dc FMR signal through the TAMR effect and how the TAMR phenomenon can be used to predict the angular dependence of the FMR signal. This TAMR-induced FMR peak can be observed under conditions where no spin accumulation is present and no spin-polarized current flows in the semiconductor.

  5. Transverse anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in pseudo-single-crystal γ'-Fe4N thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Kokado, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    Transverse anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effects, for which magnetization is rotated in an orthogonal plane to the current direction, were investigated at various temperatures, in order to clarify the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry in a pseudo-single-crystal Fe4N film, which is predicted from the usual in-plane AMR measurements by the theory taking into account the spin-orbit interaction and crystal field splitting of 3d bands. According to a phenomenological theory of AMR, which derives only from the crystal symmetry, a cos 2θ component ( C2 tr ) exists in transverse AMR curves for a tetragonal system but does not for a cubic system. In the Fe4N film, the C2 tr shows a positive small value (0.12%) from 300 K to 50 K. However, the C2 t r increases to negative value below 50 K and reaches to -2% at 5 K. The drastic increasing of the C2 tr demonstrates the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry below 50 K in the Fe4N film. In addition, the out-of-plane and in-plane lattice constants (c and a) were precisely determined with X-ray diffraction at room temperature using the Nelson-Riely function. As a result, the positive small C2 t r above 50 K is attributed to a slightly distorted Fe4N lattice (c/a = 1.002).

  6. Strongly Anisotropic Ballistic Magnetoresistance in Compact Three-Dimensional Semiconducting Nanoarchitectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortix, Carmine; Chang, Ching-Hao; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, I will show that in non-magnetic semiconducting bilayer or multilayer thin film systems rolled-up into compact quasi-one-dimensional nanoarchitectures, the ballistic magnetoresistance is very anisotropic: conductances depend strongly on the direction of an externally applied magnetic field. This phenomenon originates from the curved open geometry of rolled-up nanotubes, which leads to a tunability of the number of one-dimensional magnetic subbands crossing the Fermi energy. The experimental significance of this phenomenon is illustrated by a sizable anisotropy that scales with the inverse of the number of windings, and persists up to a critical temperature that can be strongly enhanced by increasing the strength of the external magnetic field or the characteristic radius of curvature, and can reach room temperature. The financial support of the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) programme within the Seventh Framework Programme for Research of the European Commission, under FET-Open Grant Number: 618083 (CNTQC), is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Multiple-stable anisotropic magnetoresistance memory in antiferromagnetic MnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegner, D.; Výborný, K.; Olejník, K.; Reichlová, H.; Novák, V.; Marti, X.; Gazquez, J.; Saidl, V.; Němec, P.; Volobuev, V. V.; Springholz, G.; Holý, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-06-01

    Commercial magnetic memories rely on the bistability of ordered spins in ferromagnetic materials. Recently, experimental bistable memories have been realized using fully compensated antiferromagnetic metals. Here we demonstrate a multiple-stable memory device in epitaxial MnTe, an antiferromagnetic counterpart of common II-VI semiconductors. Favourable micromagnetic characteristics of MnTe allow us to demonstrate a smoothly varying zero-field antiferromagnetic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with a harmonic angular dependence on the writing magnetic field angle, analogous to ferromagnets. The continuously varying AMR provides means for the electrical read-out of multiple-stable antiferromagnetic memory states, which we set by heat-assisted magneto-recording and by changing the writing field direction. The multiple stability in our memory is ascribed to different distributions of domains with the Néel vector aligned along one of the three magnetic easy axes. The robustness against strong magnetic field perturbations combined with the multiple stability of the magnetic memory states are unique properties of antiferromagnets.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Sensor Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Olivas, J.; Stokes, S.; Wilson, W.; Generazio, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the fabrication aspects of a sensor device that is based on a sputter deposited multilayer giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor. The device consists of a micromachined microstructure (membrane), GMR sensor, and a sputtered hard magnetic thin film element on to microstructure.

  9. On the importance of sensor height variation for detection of magnetic labels by magnetoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Wang, Shan Xiang; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-07-21

    Magnetoresistive sensors are widely used for biosensing by detecting the signal from magnetic labels bound to a functionalized area that usually covers the entire sensor structure. Magnetic labels magnetized by a homogeneous applied magnetic field weaken and strengthen the applied field when they are over and outside the sensor area, respectively, and the detailed origin of the sensor signal in experimental studies has not been clarified. We systematically analyze the signal from both a single sensor stripe and an array of sensor stripes as function of the geometrical parameters of the sensor stripes as well as the distribution of magnetic labels over the stripes. We show that the signal from sensor stripes with a uniform protective coating, contrary to conventional wisdom in the field, is usually dominated by the contribution from magnetic labels between the sensor stripes rather than by the labels on top of the sensor stripes because these are at a lower height. We therefore propose a shift of paradigm to maximize the signal due to magnetic labels between sensor stripes. Guidelines for this optimization are provided and illustrated for an experimental case from the literature.

  10. On the importance of sensor height variation for detection of magnetic labels by magnetoresistive sensors

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Wang, Shan Xiang; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistive sensors are widely used for biosensing by detecting the signal from magnetic labels bound to a functionalized area that usually covers the entire sensor structure. Magnetic labels magnetized by a homogeneous applied magnetic field weaken and strengthen the applied field when they are over and outside the sensor area, respectively, and the detailed origin of the sensor signal in experimental studies has not been clarified. We systematically analyze the signal from both a single sensor stripe and an array of sensor stripes as function of the geometrical parameters of the sensor stripes as well as the distribution of magnetic labels over the stripes. We show that the signal from sensor stripes with a uniform protective coating, contrary to conventional wisdom in the field, is usually dominated by the contribution from magnetic labels between the sensor stripes rather than by the labels on top of the sensor stripes because these are at a lower height. We therefore propose a shift of paradigm to maximize the signal due to magnetic labels between sensor stripes. Guidelines for this optimization are provided and illustrated for an experimental case from the literature. PMID:26195089

  11. Large anisotropic normal-state magnetoresistance in clean MgB2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, B T; Hu, Y F; Chen, J; Gao, H; Shan, L; Wen, H H; Pogrebnyakov, A V; Redwing, J M; Xi, X X

    2006-04-28

    We report a large normal-state magnetoresistance with temperature-dependent anisotropy in very clean epitaxial MgB2 thin films (residual resistivity much smaller than 1 microOmega cm) grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition. The magnetoresistance shows a complex dependence on the orientation of the applied magnetic field, with a large magnetoresistance (Delta(rho)/(rho)0=136%) observed for the field H perpendicular ab plane. The angular dependence changes dramatically as the temperature is increased, and at high temperatures the magnetoresistance maximum changes to H||ab. We attribute the large magnetoresistance and the evolution of its angular dependence with temperature to the multiple bands with different Fermi surface topology in MgB2 and the relative scattering rates of the sigma and pi bands, which vary with temperature due to stronger electron-phonon coupling for the sigma bands.

  12. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance driven by resonant surface states: first-principles calculations on an Fe(001) surface.

    PubMed

    Chantis, Athanasios N; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; van Schilfgaarde, Mark

    2007-01-26

    Fully relativistic first-principles calculations of the Fe(001) surface demonstrate that resonant surface (interface) states may produce sizable tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions with a single magnetic electrode. The effect is driven by the spin-orbit coupling. It shifts the resonant surface band via the Rashba effect when the magnetization direction changes. We find that spin-flip scattering at the interface is controlled not only by the strength of the spin-orbit coupling, but depends strongly on the intrinsic width of the resonant surface states. PMID:17358794

  13. Temperature and thickness dependence of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in exchange-biased Py/IrMn/MgO/Ta stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichlová, H.; Novák, V.; Kurosaki, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Nishide, A.; Hayakawa, J.; Takahashi, H.; Maryško, M.; Wunderlich, J.; Marti, X.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thickness and temperature dependence of a series of Ni{}0.8Fe{}0.2/Ir{}0.2Mn{}0.8 bilayer samples with varying thickness ratio of the ferromagnet/antiferromagnet ({{t}}{{FM}}/{{t}}{{AFM}}) in order to explore the exchange coupling strengths in tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) devices. Specific values of {{t}}{{FM}}/{{t}}{{AFM}} lead to four distinct scenarios with specific electric responses to moderate magnetic fields. The characteristic dependence of the measured TAMR signal on applied voltage allows us to confirm its persistence up to room temperature despite an overlapped contribution by a thermal magnetic noise.

  14. GMR sensors: magnetoresistive behaviour optimization for biological detection by means of superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manteca, A; Mujika, M; Arana, S

    2011-04-15

    An immunomagnetic method for the selective and quantitative detection of biological species by means of a magnetoresistive biosensor and superparamagnetic particles has been optimized. In order to achieve this, a giant magnetoresistive [Co (5.10nm)/Cu (2.47 nm)](20) multilayer structure has been chosen as the sensitive material, showing a magnetoresistance of 3.60% at 215 Oe and a sensitivity up to 0.19 Ω/Oe between 145 Oe and 350 Oe. The outward gold surface of the sensor is biofunctionalized with a Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM). In addition, three different types of magnetic labels have been tested. 2 μm diameter magnetic carriers (7.68 pg ferrite/particle) have shown the best response and they have induced a shift in the magnetoresistive hysteresis loops up to 9% at 175 Oe. PMID:21382706

  15. Magnetic anisotropy and anisotropic magnetoresistance in strongly phase separated manganite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandpal, Lalit M.; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Siwach, P. K.; Gupta, Anurag; Awana, V. P. S.; Singh, H. K.

    2016-06-01

    The present study reports the impact of magnetic anisotropy (MA) on magnetotransport properties such as the magnetic transitions, magnetic liquid behavior, glass transition and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in epitaxial film (thickness 42 nm) of strongly phase separated manganite La5/8-yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y≈0.4). Angle dependent magnetization measurement confirms the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axes aligned in the plane of the film and the magnetic hard axis along the normal to the film plane. The more prominent divergence between the zero filed cooled (ZFC) and field cooled warming (FCW) and the stronger hysteresis between the field cooled cooling (FCC) and FCW magnetization for H ∥ shows the weakening of the magnetic liquid along the magnetic hard axis. The peak at Tp≈42 K in FCW magnetization, which characterizes the onset of spin freezing shifts down to Tp≈18 K as the field direction is switched from the easy axes (H ∥) to the hard axis (H ⊥). The glass transition, which appears at Tg≈28 K for H ∥ disappears for H ⊥. The easy axis magnetization (M∣∣) appears to saturate around H~20 kOe, but the hard axis counterpart (M⊥) does not show such tendency even up to H=50 kOe. MA appears well above the ferromagnetic (FM) transition at T≈170 K, which is nearly the same as the Neel temperature (TN) of M⊥ - T . The temperature dependent resistivity measured at H=10 kOe applied along the easy axis (ρ|| - T) and the hard axis (ρ⊥ - T) shows insulator metal transition (IMT) at ≈106 K and ≈99 K in the cooling cycle, respectively. The large difference between ρ⊥ - T and ρ|| - T during the cooling cycle and in the vicinity of IMT results in huge AMR of ≈-142% and -115%. The observed properties have been explained in terms of the MA induced variation in the relative fraction of the coexisting magnetic phases.

  16. Detection of current-driven magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowire by tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Mitsunobu; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Saito, Nobuo; Hayashi, Naoto; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2015-05-01

    Current-driven magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires have attracted a great deal of interest in terms of both physical studies and engineering applications. The anomalous Hall effect measurement is widely used for detecting the magnetization direction of current-driven magnetic domains in a magnetic nanowire. However, the problem with this measurement is that the detection point for current-driven domain wall motion is fixed at only the installed sensing wire across the specimen nanowire. A potential solution is the magnetic domain scope method, whereby the distribution of the magnetic flux leaking from the specimen can be analyzed directly by contact-scanning a tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor on a sample. In this study, we fabricated specimen nanowires consisting of [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]21/Ta(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on Si substrates. A tunneling magnetoresistive sensor was placed on the nanowire surface and a predetermined current pulse was applied. Real-time detection of the current-driven magnetic domain motion was successful in that the resistance of the tunneling magnetoresistive sensor was changed with the magnetization direction beneath the sensor. This demonstrates that magnetic domain detection using a tunneling magnetoresistive sensor is effective for the direct analysis of micro magnetic domain motion.

  17. Development and Application of Wide Bandwidth Magneto-Resistive Sensor Based Eddy Current Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Simpson, John

    2010-01-01

    The integration of magneto-resistive sensors into eddy current probes can significantly expand the capabilities of conventional eddy current nondestructive evaluation techniques. The room temperature solid-state sensors have typical bandwidths in the megahertz range and resolutions of tens of microgauss. The low frequency sensitivity of magneto-resistive sensors has been capitalized upon in previous research to fabricate very low frequency eddy current sensors for deep flaw detection in multilayer conductors. In this work a modified probe design is presented to expand the capabilities of the device. The new probe design incorporates a dual induction source enabling operation from low frequency deep flaw detection to high frequency high resolution near surface material characterization. Applications of the probe for the detection of localized near surface conductivity anomalies are presented. Finite element modeling of the probe is shown to be in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  18. Lab-on-chip cytometry based on magnetoresistive sensors for bacteria detection in milk.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana C; Duarte, Carla M; Cardoso, Filipe A; Bexiga, Ricardo; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P

    2014-08-21

    Flow cytometers have been optimized for use in portable platforms, where cell separation, identification and counting can be achieved in a compact and modular format. This feature can be combined with magnetic detection, where magnetoresistive sensors can be integrated within microfluidic channels to detect magnetically labelled cells. This work describes a platform for in-flow detection of magnetically labelled cells with a magneto-resistive based cell cytometer. In particular, we present an example for the validation of the platform as a magnetic counter that identifies and quantifies Streptococcus agalactiae in milk.

  19. Lab-on-Chip Cytometry Based on Magnetoresistive Sensors for Bacteria Detection in Milk

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Ana C.; Duarte, Carla M.; Cardoso, Filipe A.; Bexiga, Ricardo.; Cardoso, Susana.; Freitas, Paulo P.

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometers have been optimized for use in portable platforms, where cell separation, identification and counting can be achieved in a compact and modular format. This feature can be combined with magnetic detection, where magnetoresistive sensors can be integrated within microfluidic channels to detect magnetically labelled cells. This work describes a platform for in-flow detection of magnetically labelled cells with a magneto-resistive based cell cytometer. In particular, we present an example for the validation of the platform as a magnetic counter that identifies and quantifies Streptococcus agalactiae in milk. PMID:25196163

  20. Lab-on-chip cytometry based on magnetoresistive sensors for bacteria detection in milk.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana C; Duarte, Carla M; Cardoso, Filipe A; Bexiga, Ricardo; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometers have been optimized for use in portable platforms, where cell separation, identification and counting can be achieved in a compact and modular format. This feature can be combined with magnetic detection, where magnetoresistive sensors can be integrated within microfluidic channels to detect magnetically labelled cells. This work describes a platform for in-flow detection of magnetically labelled cells with a magneto-resistive based cell cytometer. In particular, we present an example for the validation of the platform as a magnetic counter that identifies and quantifies Streptococcus agalactiae in milk. PMID:25196163

  1. Spin polarization ratios of resistivity and density of states estimated from anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio for nearly half-metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Yuya; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2016-10-01

    We derive a simple relational expression between the spin polarization ratio of resistivity, $P_\\rho$, and the anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio $\\Delta \\rho/\\rho$, and that between the spin polarization ratio of the density of states at the Fermi energy, $P_{\\rm DOS}$, and $\\Delta \\rho/\\rho$ for nearly half-metallic ferromagnets. We find that $P_\\rho$ and $P_{\\rm DOS}$ increase with increasing $|\\Delta \\rho/\\rho|$ from 0 to a maximum value. In addition, we roughly estimate $P_\\rho$ and $P_{\\rm DOS}$ for a Co$_2$FeGa$_{0.5}$Ge$_{0.5}$ Heusler alloy by substituting its experimentally observed $\\Delta \\rho/\\rho$ into the respective expressions.

  2. Electrically tunable in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance in topological insulator BiSbTeSe2 nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Sulaev, Azat; Zeng, Minggang; Shen, Shun-Qing; Cho, Soon Khuen; Zhu, Wei Guang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Eremeev, Sergey V; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Shen, Lei; Wang, Lan

    2015-03-11

    We report tunable in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in nanodevices based on topological insulator BiSbTeSe2 (BSTS) nanoflakes by electric gating. The AMR can be changed continuously from negative to positive when the Fermi level is manipulated to cross the Dirac point by an applied gate electric field. We also discuss effects of the gate electric field, current density, and magnetic field on the in-plane AMR with a simple physical model, which is based on the in-plane magnetic field induced shift of the spin-momentum locked topological two surface states that are coupled through side surfaces and bulk weak antilocalization (WAL). The large, tunable and bipolar in-plane AMR in BSTS devices provides the possibility of fabricating more sensitive logic and magnetic random access memory AMR devices.

  3. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-04-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP.

  4. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors and Magnetic Labels for Chip-Scale Detection of Immunosorbent Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Millen, Rachel Lora

    2005-01-01

    The combination of giant magnetoresistive sensors, magnetic labeling strategies, and biomolecule detection is just beginning to be explored. New readout methods and assay formats are necessary for biomolecules detection to flourish. The work presented in this dissertation describes steps toward the creation of a novel detection method for bioassays utilizing giant magnetoresistive sensors as the readout method. The introduction section contains a brief review of some of the current methods of bioassay readout. The theoretical underpinnings of the giant magnetoresistive effect are also discussed. Finally, the more prominent types of giant magnetoresistive sensors are described, as well as their complicated fabrication. Four data chapters follow the introduction; each chapter is presented as a separate manuscript, either already published or soon to be submitted. Chapter 1 presents research efforts toward the production of a bioassay on the surface of a gold-modified GMR sensor. The testing of this methodology involved the capture of goat a-mouse-coated magnetic nanoparticles on the mouse IgG-modified gold surface. The second, third and fourth chapters describe the utilization of a self-referenced sample stick for scanning across the GMR sensor. The sample stick consisted of alternating magnetic reference and bioactive gold addresses. Chapter 2 is concerned with the characterization of both the scanning readout method and the binding and detection of streptavidin-coated magnetic particles to a biotinylated surface. Chapter 3 advances the sample stick readout with the use of the system for detection of a sandwich immunoassay with rabbit IgG proteins. Finally, simultaneous detection of three IgG proteins is demonstrated in Chapter 4. The dissertation is concluded with a brief summary of the research presented and a discussion of the possible future applications and direction of this work.

  5. High sensitivity detection of molecular recognition using magnetically labelled biomolecules and magnetoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Graham, D L; Ferreira, H A; Freitas, P P; Cabral, J M S

    2003-04-01

    Small magnetoresistive spin valve sensors (2 x 6 microm(2)) were used to detect the binding of single streptavidin functionalized 2 microm magnetic microspheres to a biotinylated sensor surface. The sensor signals, using 8 mA sense current, were in the order of 150-400 microV for a single microsphere depending on sensor sensitivity and the thickness of the passivation layer over the sensor surface. Sensor saturation signals were 1-2 mV representing an estimated 6-20 microspheres, with a noise level of approximately 10 microV. The detection of biomolecular recognition for the streptavidin-biotin model was shown using both single and differential sensor architectures. The signal data compares favourably with previously reported signals for high numbers of magnetic microspheres detected using larger multilayered giant magnetoresistance sensors. A wide range of applications is foreseen for this system in the development of biochips, high sensitivity biosensors and the detection of single molecules and single molecule interactions. PMID:12604266

  6. Configurational Statistics of Magnetic Bead Detection with Magnetoresistive Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect magnetic beads that, mediated by a target, have bound to a functionalized area. This area is often larger than the area of the sensor. Both the sign and magnitude of the average magnetic field experienced by the sensor from a magnetic bead depends on the location of the bead relative to the sensor. Consequently, the signal from multiple beads also depends on their locations. Thus, a given coverage of the functionalized area with magnetic beads does not result in a given detector response, except on the average, over many realizations of the same coverage. We present a systematic theoretical analysis of how this location-dependence affects the sensor response. The analysis is done for beads magnetized by a homogeneous in-plane magnetic field. We determine the expected value and standard deviation of the sensor response for a given coverage, as well as the accuracy and precision with which the coverage can be determined from a single sensor measurement. We show that statistical fluctuations between samples may reduce the sensitivity and dynamic range of a sensor significantly when the functionalized area is larger than the sensor area. Hence, the statistics of sampling is essential to sensor design. For illustration, we analyze three important published cases for which statistical fluctuations are dominant, significant, and insignificant, respectively. PMID:26496495

  7. Sign of the spin-polarization in cobalt-iron nitride films determined by the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Keita; Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Sanai, Tatsunori; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi; Imai, Yoji

    2014-08-07

    We present the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) properties in Fe{sub 4}N, Co{sub 3}FeN and Co{sub 4}N epitaxial thin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. A negative AMR effect was observed in the Fe{sub 4}N and Co{sub 3}FeN films below 300 K. This behavior was attributed to the negative spin-polarizations of both the electrical conductivity and density of states at the Fermi level. The sign of the AMR ratio changed at ∼140 K in the Co{sub 4}N film and was negative below 140 K. Diffraction lines corresponding to the (100) plane were clearly observed in the ϕ-2θ{sub χ} (in-plane) x-ray diffraction patterns for the Fe{sub 4}N and Co{sub 3}FeN films but not for the Co{sub 4}N film. This indicated that nitrogen atoms were present at the body center of each unit cell in the Fe{sub 4}N and Co{sub 3}FeN films, whereas they were lacking in the Co{sub 4}N film. This assumption is discussed with energetic calculations using a spin density-functional theory.

  8. Bead magnetorelaxometry with an on-chip magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Donolato, Marco; Strømme, Maria; Strömberg, Mattias; Svedlindh, Peter; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2011-01-21

    Magnetorelaxometry measurements on suspensions of magnetic beads are demonstrated using a planar Hall effect sensor chip embedded in a microfluidic system. The alternating magnetic field used for magnetizing the beads is provided by the sensor bias current and the complex magnetic susceptibility spectra are recorded as the 2nd harmonic of the sensor response. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal appears when a magnetic bead suspension is injected, it scales with the bead concentration, and it follows the Cole-Cole expression for Brownian relaxation. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal resembles that from conventional magnetorelaxometry done on the same samples apart from an offset in Brownian relaxation frequency. The time dependence of the signal can be rationalized as originating from sedimented beads.

  9. Nanoparticle-Structured Highly Sensitive and Anisotropic Gauge Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Luo, Jin; Shan, Shiyao; Lombardi, Jack P; Xu, Yvonne; Cartwright, Kelly; Lu, Susan; Poliks, Mark; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-09-16

    The ability to tune gauge factors in terms of magnitude and orientation is important for wearable and conformal electronics. Herein, a sensor device is described which is fabricated by assembling and printing molecularly linked thin films of gold nanoparticles on flexible microelectrodes with unusually high and anisotropic gauge factors. A sharp difference in gauge factors up to two to three orders of magnitude between bending perpendicular (B(⊥)) and parallel (B(||)) to the current flow directions is observed. The origin of the unusual high and anisotropic gauge factors is analyzed in terms of nanoparticle size, interparticle spacing, interparticle structure, and other parameters, and by considering the theoretical aspects of electron conduction mechanism and percolation pathway. A critical range of resistivity where a very small change in strain and the strain orientation is identified to impact the percolation pathway in a significant way, leading to the high and anisotropic gauge factors. The gauge anisotropy stems from molecular and nanoscale fine tuning of interparticle properties of molecularly linked nanoparticle assembly on flexible microelectrodes, which has important implication for the design of gauge sensors for highly sensitive detection of deformation in complex sensing environment or on complex curved surfaces such as wearable electronics and skin sensors.

  10. Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) Technology: Applications in Electrical Current Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reig, Candid; Cubells-Beltran, María-Dolores; Muñoz, Diego Ramírez

    2009-01-01

    The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics can be understood as a global recognition to the rapid development of the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR), from both the physics and engineering points of view. Behind the utilization of GMR structures as read heads for massive storage magnetic hard disks, important applications as solid state magnetic sensors have emerged. Low cost, compatibility with standard CMOS technologies and high sensitivity are common advantages of these sensors. This way, they have been successfully applied in a lot different environments. In this work, we are trying to collect the Spanish contributions to the progress of the research related to the GMR based sensors covering, among other subjects, the applications, the sensor design, the modelling and the electronic interfaces, focusing on electrical current sensing applications. PMID:22408486

  11. Development of a Magneto-Resistive Angular Position Sensor for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Robert; Schmidt, Tilo; Seifart, Klaus; Olberts, Bastian; Romera, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic microsystems in the form of magneto-resistive (MR) sensors are firmly established in automobiles and industrial applications. They are used to measure travel, angle, electrical current, or magnetic fields. MR technology opens up new sensor possibilities in space applications and can be an enabling technology for optimal performance, high robustness and long lifetime at reasonable costs. In some science missions, the technology is already applied, however, the designs are proprietary and case specific, for instance in case of the angular sensors used for JPL/NASA's Mars rover Curiosity [1]. Since 2013 HTS GmbH and Sensitec GmbH have teamed up to develop and qualify a standardized yet flexible to use MR angular sensor for space mechanisms. Starting with a first assessment study and market survey performed under ESA contract, a very strong industry interest in novel, contactless position measurement means was found. Currently a detailed and comprehensive development program is being performed by HTS and Sensitec. The objective of this program is to advance the sensor design up to Engineering Qualification Model level and to perform qualification testing for a representative space application. The paper briefly reviews the basics of magneto-resistive effects and possible sensor applications and describes the key benefits of MR angular sensors with reference to currently operational industrial and space applications. The key applications and specification are presented and the preliminary baseline mechanical and electrical design will be discussed. An outlook on the upcoming development and test stages as well as the qualification program will be provided.

  12. Anisotropic magnetoresistance of epitaxial Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} film

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X. G.; Yang, Y. B.; Wang, C. S.; Liu, S. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Han, J. Z.; Yang, Y. C.; Yang, J. B.

    2014-01-28

    The magnetic field and temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of the epitaxial grown Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} thin films was investigated. It was found that the magnetoresistance exhibited the characteristics of magnetic polaron hopping. A two-fold symmetric AMR occurred in the ferromagnetic region (∼220 K < T < ∼150 K), while a four-fold symmetric AMR appeared under a high magnetic field in the antiferromagnetic orbital ordered region (T < ∼150 K). The angular dependence of the resistance showed a hysteresis effect under magnetic field at low temperature. It is believed that these phenomena are attributed to the spin canting effect, which originates from the melting of orbital ordering under the external magnetic field in the antiferromagnetic region.

  13. Exchange Bias Tuning for Magnetoresistive Sensors by Inclusion of Non-Magnetic Impurities.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Albisetti, Edoardo; Monticelli, Marco; Bertacco, Riccardo; Petti, Daniela

    2016-07-04

    The fine control of the exchange coupling strength and blocking temperature ofexchange bias systems is an important requirement for the development of magnetoresistive sensors with two pinned electrodes. In this paper, we successfully tune these parameters in top- and bottom-pinned systems, comprising 5 nm thick Co40Fe40B20 and 6.5 nm thick Ir22Mn78 films. By inserting Ru impurities at different concentrations in the Ir22Mn78 layer, blocking temperatures ranging from 220 °C to 100 °C and exchange bias fields from 200 Oe to 60 Oe are obtained. This method is then applied to the fabrication of sensors based on magnetic tunneling junctions consisting of a pinned synthetic antiferromagnet reference layer and a top-pinned sensing layer. This work paves the way towards the development of new sensors with finely tuned magnetic anisotropies.

  14. Exchange Bias Tuning for Magnetoresistive Sensors by Inclusion of Non-Magnetic Impurities

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Albisetti, Edoardo; Monticelli, Marco; Bertacco, Riccardo; Petti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The fine control of the exchange coupling strength and blocking temperature ofexchange bias systems is an important requirement for the development of magnetoresistive sensors with two pinned electrodes. In this paper, we successfully tune these parameters in top- and bottom-pinned systems, comprising 5 nm thick Co40Fe40B20 and 6.5 nm thick Ir22Mn78 films. By inserting Ru impurities at different concentrations in the Ir22Mn78 layer, blocking temperatures ranging from 220 °C to 100 °C and exchange bias fields from 200 Oe to 60 Oe are obtained. This method is then applied to the fabrication of sensors based on magnetic tunneling junctions consisting of a pinned synthetic antiferromagnet reference layer and a top-pinned sensing layer. This work paves the way towards the development of new sensors with finely tuned magnetic anisotropies. PMID:27384565

  15. Report on demonstration project: imaging detection of unexploded ordinance using giant magnetoresistive sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiken, A., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate the feasibility of the detection of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. 3x3 and 5x5 arrays of off-the-shelf GMR sensors were purchased from Nonvolatile Electronics (NVE) and were interfaced with a data acquisition card and a personal computer. Magnetic images were obtained from a number of ferrous objects, such as threadstock, bolts, and rebar. These images can be interpreted in terms of the remanent magnetic state of the objects. The ability of the GMR sensor approach to discriminate among magnetic objects is assessed and the design of a more realistic UXO detection system is discussed.

  16. Superparamagnetic nanoparticle quantification using a giant magnetoresistive sensor and permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongwon

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are used in various biological applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biological separation, drug delivery or as biomarker. In the case of biomarker, the magnetic particle and a measurand are combined via biological reactions and then detected by magnetic field sensors for a qualitative or quantitative measurement. In the present work, we introduce a commercially available giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor for the quantitative measurement of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, which were injected into a glass capillary tube. A pair of permanent magnets standing diagonally opposite to each other was utilized to provide vertical and horizontal magnetic fields for particle magnetization and sensor bias, respectively. In addition, the permanent magnets solved the uniformity problem of generated magnetic fields in previous biomarker detection systems. Using the proposed measurement setup, an output signal change of 0.407 V was achieved for a 1 μg change in the magnetic particle mass. The detection limit was 43.5 ng.

  17. Magnetoresistive sensors for angle, position, and electrical current measurement in demanding environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doms, Marco; Slatter, Rolf

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, magnetoresistive (MR) sensors are used in a wide range of applications. In general, the MR-effect describes the change of the electrical resistance in an external magnetic field. MR sensors are not only used for measuring magnetic fields and rotational or linear motion, but also for non-contact switching applications and furthermore for highly dynamic current measurement. This is largely the result of increasingly complex demands on the sensors for e.g. high performance electrical drives. The sensors must not only be accurate and dynamic, but must also be robust under difficult operating conditions and exhibit very high reliability. Due to their physical working principle and their small size, MR sensors are especially suited to work in harsh environments like high or low temperature, radiation, pressure or mechanical shock. This paper describes the principle of operation, manufacturing process and benefits of MR sensors. This will be followed by a description of practical application examples from the automotive, oil and gas, renewable energy and space fields, where MR sensors are successfully applied in very small envelopes at very low /very high temperatures, under high pressure, high mechanical loading and under strong radiation.

  18. Apparatus and method for imaging metallic objects using an array of giant magnetoresistive sensors

    DOEpatents

    Chaiken, Alison

    2000-01-01

    A portable, low-power, metallic object detector and method for providing an image of a detected metallic object. In one embodiment, the present portable low-power metallic object detector an array of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. The array of GMR sensors is adapted for detecting the presence of and compiling image data of a metallic object. In the embodiment, the array of GMR sensors is arranged in a checkerboard configuration such that axes of sensitivity of alternate GMR sensors are orthogonally oriented. An electronics portion is coupled to the array of GMR sensors. The electronics portion is adapted to receive and process the image data of the metallic object compiled by the array of GMR sensors. The embodiment also includes a display unit which is coupled to the electronics portion. The display unit is adapted to display a graphical representation of the metallic object detected by the array of GMR sensors. In so doing, a graphical representation of the detected metallic object is provided.

  19. Fabrication and local laser heating of freestanding Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} bridges with Pt contacts displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, F.; Grundler, D.

    2014-04-28

    In spin caloritronics, ferromagnetic samples subject to relatively large in-plane temperature gradients ∇T have turned out to be extremely interesting. We report on a preparation technique that allows us to create freely suspended permalloy/Pt hybrid structures where a scanning laser induces ∇T on the order of a few K/μm. We observe both the anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature and the magnetic field dependent anomalous Nernst effect under laser heating. The technique is promising for the realization of device concepts considered in spin caloritronics based on suspended ferromagnetic nanostructures with electrical contacts.

  20. Conditions for efficient on-chip magnetic bead detection via magnetoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, E; Petti, D; Cantoni, M; Damin, F; Torti, A; Chiari, M; Bertacco, R

    2013-09-15

    A commonly used figure of merit of magnetoresistive sensors employed to detect magnetic beads labeling biomolecules in lab-on-chip applications is the sensor sensitivity (S0) to external magnetic fields in the linear region of the sensor. In this paper we show that, in case of lock-in detection and bead excitation by a small AC magnetic field, S0 is not the good figure of merit to optimize. Indeed, the highest sensitivity to the magnetic beads is achieved biasing the sensor in the region of its characteristics where the product between the DC bias field and the second derivative of the resistance with respect to the magnetic field is maximum. The validity of this criterion, derived from a phenomenological model of bead detection, is proved in case of magnetic tunneling junction sensors detecting magnetic beads with 250nm diameter. This work paves the way to the development of a new generation of sensors properly designed to maximize the bead sensitivity.

  1. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-02-26

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper.

  2. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  3. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  4. Current dependence of colossal anisotropic magnetoresistance in La 0.3 Pr 0.4 Ca 0.3 MnO 3 microbridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, J.; Jung, J.; Chow, K. H.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the bias current on the in-plane colossal anisotropic magnetoresistance (C-AMR) is investigated in spatially confined La 0.3 Pr 0.4 Ca 0.3 MnO 3 microbridges. Dramatic increases of the C-AMR are found when the bias current is reduced. For example, in one of the samples, the C-AMR changed from ˜900% to over ˜24 000% as the current is decreased from 1 μA to 10 nA. The results indicate that the bias current can be used to manipulate the C-AMR in spatially confined manganite thin films via changes to the nature of the anisotropic percolation within the samples.

  5. An efficient biosensor made of an electromagnetic trap and a magneto-resistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuquan; Kosel, Jürgen

    2014-09-15

    Magneto-resistive biosensors have been found to be useful because of their high sensitivity, low cost, small size, and direct electrical output. They use super-paramagnetic beads to label a biological target and detect it via sensing the stray field. In this paper, we report a new setup for magnetic biosensors, replacing the conventional "sandwich" concept with an electromagnetic trap. We demonstrate the capability of the biosensor in the detection of E. coli. The trap is formed by a current-carrying microwire that attracts the magnetic beads into a sensing space on top of a tunnel magneto-resistive sensor. The sensor signal depends on the number of beads in the sensing space, which depends on the size of the beads. This enables the detection of biological targets, because such targets increase the volume of the beads. Experiments were carried out with a 6 µm wide microwire, which attracted the magnetic beads from a distance of 60 μm, when a current of 30 mA was applied. A sensing space of 30 µm in length and 6 µm in width was defined by the magnetic sensor. The results showed that individual E. coli bacterium inside the sensing space could be detected using super-paramagnetic beads that are 2.8 µm in diameter. The electromagnetic trap setup greatly simplifies the device and reduces the detection process to two steps: (i) mixing the bacteria with magnetic beads and (ii) applying the sample solution to the sensor for measurement, which can be accomplished within about 30 min with a sample volume in the µl range. This setup also ensures that the biosensor can be cleaned easily and re-used immediately. The presented setup is readily integrated on chips via standard microfabrication techniques.

  6. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity and the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of electrodeposited Ni-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, B. G.; Péter, L.; Révész, Á.; Pádár, J.; Bakonyi, I.

    2010-05-01

    The electrical resistivity and the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) was investigated for Ni-Co alloys at and below room temperature. The Ni-Co alloy layers having a thickness of about 2 μm were prepared by electrodeposition on Si wafers with evaporated Cr and Cu underlayers. The alloy composition was varied in the whole concentration range by varying the ratio of Ni-sulfate and Co-sulfate in the electrolyte. The Ni-Co alloy deposits were investigated first in the as-deposited state on the substrates and then, by mechanically stripping them from the substrates, as self-supporting layers both without and after annealing. According to an X-ray diffraction study, a strongly textured face-centered cubic (fcc) structure was formed in the as-deposited state with an average grain size of about 10 nm. Upon annealing, the crystal structure was retained whereas the grain size increased by a factor of 3 to 5, depending on alloy composition. The zero-field resistivity decreased strongly by annealing due to the increased grain size. The annealing hardly changed the AMR below 50 at.% Co but strongly decreased it above this concentration. The composition dependence of the resistivity and the AMR of the annealed Ni-Co alloy deposits was in good quantitative agreement with the available literature data both at 13 K and at room temperature. Both transport parameters were found to exhibit a pronounced maximum in the composition range between 20 and 30 at.% Co and the data of the Ni-Co alloys fitted well to the limiting values of the pure component metals (fcc-Ni and fcc-Co). The only theoretical calculation reported formerly on fcc Ni-Co alloys yielded at T = 0 K a resistivity value smaller by a factor of 5 and an AMR value larger by a factor of about 2 than the corresponding low-temperature experimental data, although the theoretical study properly reproduced the composition dependence of both quantities.

  7. A Current Sensor Based on the Giant Magnetoresistance Effect: Design and Potential Smart Grid Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A−1, linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C−1 with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids. PMID:23202221

  8. A current sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect: design and potential smart grid applications.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X

    2012-11-09

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A(-1), linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C(-1) with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids.

  9. A current sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect: design and potential smart grid applications.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X

    2012-01-01

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A(-1), linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C(-1) with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids. PMID:23202221

  10. Investigation of contactless detection using a giant magnetoresistance sensor for detecting prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuecheng; Zhi, Shaotao; Lei, Chong; Zhou, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a contactless detection method for detecting prostate specific antigen with a giant magnetoresistance sensor. In contactless detection case, the prostate specific antigen sample preparation was separated from the sensor that prevented the sensor from being immersed in chemical solvents, and made the sensor implementing in immediately reuse without wash. Experimental results showed that applied an external magnetic field in a range of 50 Oe to 90 Oe, Dynabeads with a concentration as low as 0.1 μg/mL can be detected by this system and could give an approximate quantitation to the logarithmic of Dynabeads concentration. Sandwich immunoassay was employed for preparing PSA samples. The PSA capture was implemented on a gold film modified with a self-assembled monolayer and using biotinylated secondary antibody against PSA and streptavidinylated Dynabeads. With DC magnetic field in the range of 50 to 90 Oe, PSA can be detected with a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL. Samples spiked with different concentrations of PSA can be distinguished clearly. Due to the contactless detection method, the detection system exhibited advantages such as convenient manipulation, reusable, inexpensive, small weight. So, this detection method was a promising candidate in biomarker detection, especially in point of care detection. PMID:27379844

  11. Magnetic properties and anisotropic magnetoresistance of antiperovskite nitride Mn{sub 3}GaN/Co{sub 3}FeN exchange-coupled bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, H. Ando, H.; Kuroki, Y.; Kawai, S.; Ueda, K.; Asano, H.

    2015-05-07

    Epitaxial bilayers of antiferromagnetic Mn{sub 3}GaN/ferromagnetic Co{sub 3}FeN with an antiperovskite structure were grown by reactive magnetron sputtering, and their structural, magnetic, and electrical properties were investigated. Exchange coupling with an exchange field H{sub ex} of 0.4 kOe at 4 K was observed for Mn{sub 3}GaN (20 nm)/Co{sub 3}FeN (5 nm) bilayers. Negative anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect in Co{sub 3}FeN was observed and utilized to detect magnetization reversal in exchange-coupled Mn{sub 3}GaN/Co{sub 3}FeN bilayers. The AMR results showed evidence for current-induced spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic Mn{sub 3}GaN.

  12. Magnetoresistivity in a tilted magnetic field in p-Si/SiGe/Si heterostructures with an anisotropic g-factor. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Drichko, I. L.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Suslov, A. V.; Mironov, O. A.; Leadley, D. R.

    2012-09-15

    The magnetoresistance components {rho}xx and {rho}xy are measured in two p-Si/SiGe/Si quantum wells that have an anisotropic g-factor in a tilted magnetic field as a function of the temperature, field, and tilt angle. Activation energy measurements demonstrate the existence of a ferromagnetic-paramagnetic (F-P) transition for the sample with the hole density p = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. This transition is due to the crossing of the 0{up_arrow} and 1{down_arrow} Landau levels. However, in another sample with p = 7.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}, the 0{up_arrow} and 1{down_arrow} Landau levels coincide for angles {theta} = 0-70 Degree-Sign . Only for {theta} > 70 Degree-Sign do the levels start to diverge which, in turn, results in the energy gap opening.

  13. Bias voltage dependence of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO and Al2O3 tunnel barriers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Jiang, Xin; Yang, See-Hun; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2007-11-30

    Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) is observed in tunnel junctions with transition metal electrodes as the moments are rotated from in-plane to out-of-plane in sufficiently large magnetic fields that the moments are nearly parallel to one another. A complex angular dependence of the tunneling resistance is found with twofold and fourfold components that vary strongly with bias voltage. Distinctly different TAMR behaviors are obtained for devices formed with highly textured crystalline MgO(001) and amorphous Al2O3 tunnel barriers. A tight-binding model shows that a fourfold angular dependence can be explained by the presence of an interface resonant state that affects the transmission of the contributing tunneling states through a spin-orbit interaction. PMID:18233308

  14. Magnetoresistance sensitivity mapping of the localized response of contiguous and lead-overlaid sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Sandra

    2003-06-01

    Magnetoresistance sensitivity mapping (MSM) was used to investigate the local response of magnetic recording sensors without convolution of the writer, magnetic media and data channel. From a 2D map of the local sensor response, the intrinsic pulse shape and magnetic track profile are readily obtained. Pulse-width is a concern for high data rate since if pulse-width is too broad, individual transitions become difficult to distinguish. Track profiles are important because due to the small difference between magnetic write-width and magnetic read-width, side reading will lead to an increase in noise. Three experiments are discussed: the dependence of the pulse-width (PW50) of the standard contiguous junction (CJ) design on shield-to-shield spacing; a comparison of the pulse shape of lead-overlaid (LOL) and CJ designs; and a comparison of the magnetic track profile (including track-width and skirt ratio) of LOL and CJ designs. The LOL design offers an increased sensitivity; however, as seen from MSM, the penalties are broadening of the track and pulse profiles. These are a direct result of the finite current in the lead overlay region and an increased shield-to-shield spacing in that region. The MSM image shows a curvature, which is associated with the topography of the top shield due to the lead overlay.

  15. A non-invasive thermal drift compensation technique applied to a spin-valve magnetoresistive current sensor.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Moreno, Jaime; Ramírez Muñoz, Diego; Cardoso, Susana; Casans Berga, Silvia; Navarro Antón, Asunción Edith; Peixeiro de Freitas, Paulo Jorge

    2011-01-01

    A compensation method for the sensitivity drift of a magnetoresistive (MR) Wheatstone bridge current sensor is proposed. The technique was carried out by placing a ruthenium temperature sensor and the MR sensor to be compensated inside a generalized impedance converter circuit (GIC). No internal modification of the sensor bridge arms is required so that the circuit is capable of compensating practical industrial sensors. The method is based on the temperature modulation of the current supplied to the bridge, which improves previous solutions based on constant current compensation. Experimental results are shown using a microfabricated spin-valve MR current sensor. The temperature compensation has been solved in the interval from 0 °C to 70 °C measuring currents from -10 A to +10 A.

  16. A Non-Invasive Thermal Drift Compensation Technique Applied to a Spin-Valve Magnetoresistive Current Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Jaime Sánchez; Muñoz, Diego Ramírez; Cardoso, Susana; Berga, Silvia Casans; Antón, Asunción Edith Navarro; de Freitas, Paulo Jorge Peixeiro

    2011-01-01

    A compensation method for the sensitivity drift of a magnetoresistive (MR) Wheatstone bridge current sensor is proposed. The technique was carried out by placing a ruthenium temperature sensor and the MR sensor to be compensated inside a generalized impedance converter circuit (GIC). No internal modification of the sensor bridge arms is required so that the circuit is capable of compensating practical industrial sensors. The method is based on the temperature modulation of the current supplied to the bridge, which improves previous solutions based on constant current compensation. Experimental results are shown using a microfabricated spin-valve MR current sensor. The temperature compensation has been solved in the interval from 0 °C to 70 °C measuring currents from −10 A to +10 A. PMID:22163748

  17. A non-invasive thermal drift compensation technique applied to a spin-valve magnetoresistive current sensor.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Moreno, Jaime; Ramírez Muñoz, Diego; Cardoso, Susana; Casans Berga, Silvia; Navarro Antón, Asunción Edith; Peixeiro de Freitas, Paulo Jorge

    2011-01-01

    A compensation method for the sensitivity drift of a magnetoresistive (MR) Wheatstone bridge current sensor is proposed. The technique was carried out by placing a ruthenium temperature sensor and the MR sensor to be compensated inside a generalized impedance converter circuit (GIC). No internal modification of the sensor bridge arms is required so that the circuit is capable of compensating practical industrial sensors. The method is based on the temperature modulation of the current supplied to the bridge, which improves previous solutions based on constant current compensation. Experimental results are shown using a microfabricated spin-valve MR current sensor. The temperature compensation has been solved in the interval from 0 °C to 70 °C measuring currents from -10 A to +10 A. PMID:22163748

  18. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Trong-Hieu; Chao, Paul Chang-Po; Chien, Ping-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR) linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an “MR reader” stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs) and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB) over the input range of 0.5–2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm2, while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL) is −0.79–0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL) is −0.68–0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB) of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement measurement

  19. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trong-Hieu; Chao, Paul Chang-Po; Chien, Ping-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR) linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an "MR reader" stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs) and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB) over the input range of 0.5-2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm², while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL) is -0.79-0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL) is -0.68-0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB) of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement measurement error is within

  20. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trong-Hieu; Chao, Paul Chang-Po; Chien, Ping-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR) linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an "MR reader" stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs) and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB) over the input range of 0.5-2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm², while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL) is -0.79-0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL) is -0.68-0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB) of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement measurement error is within

  1. Slow Oscillations of In-plane Magnetoresistance in Strongly Anisotropic Quasi-Two-Dimensional Rare-Earth Tritellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinchenko, A. A.; Grigoriev, P. D.; Monceau, P.; Lejay, P.; Zverev, V. N.

    2016-04-01

    The slow oscillations of intralayer magnetoresistance in the quasi-2D metallic compounds TbTe_3 and GdTe_3 have been observed for the first time. These oscillations do not originate from small Fermi-surface pockets, as revealed usually by Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, but from the entanglement of close frequencies due to a finite interlayer transfer integral t_z , either between the two Te planes forming a bilayer or between two adjacent bilayers, which allows to estimate its values. For TbTe_3 and GdTe_3 , we obtain the estimate t_ z≈ 1 meV.

  2. Giant magnetoresistive sensor array for sensitive and specific multiplexed food allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-06-15

    Current common allergen detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and dip-stick methods, do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity and specificity for at-risk allergic patients. A method for performing highly sensitive and specific detection of multiple food allergens is thus imperative as food allergies are becoming increasingly recognized as a major healthcare concern, affecting an estimated 4% of the total population. We demonstrate first instance of sensitive and specific multiplexed detection of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and wheat allergen Gliadin using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. Commercialized ELISA kits for Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 report limits of detection (LODs) at 31.5 ng/mL and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the 96-well-based ELISA developed in-house for Gliadin was found to have a LOD of 40 ng/mL. Our multiplexed GMR-based assay demonstrates the ability to perform all three assays on the same chip specifically and with sensitivities at LODs about an order of magnitude lower than those of 96-well-based ELISAs. LODs of GMR-based assays developed for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Gliadin were 7.0 ng/mL, 0.2 ng/mL, and 1.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little to no cross-reactivity. These LODs are clinically important as some patients could react strongly against such low allergen levels. Given the limitations of current industrial detection technology, multiplexed GMR-based assays provide a method for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of any combination of food-product allergens, thus protecting allergic patients from life-threatening events, including anaphylaxis, by unintentional consumption.

  3. Giant magnetoresistive sensor array for sensitive and specific multiplexed food allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-06-15

    Current common allergen detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and dip-stick methods, do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity and specificity for at-risk allergic patients. A method for performing highly sensitive and specific detection of multiple food allergens is thus imperative as food allergies are becoming increasingly recognized as a major healthcare concern, affecting an estimated 4% of the total population. We demonstrate first instance of sensitive and specific multiplexed detection of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and wheat allergen Gliadin using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. Commercialized ELISA kits for Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 report limits of detection (LODs) at 31.5 ng/mL and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the 96-well-based ELISA developed in-house for Gliadin was found to have a LOD of 40 ng/mL. Our multiplexed GMR-based assay demonstrates the ability to perform all three assays on the same chip specifically and with sensitivities at LODs about an order of magnitude lower than those of 96-well-based ELISAs. LODs of GMR-based assays developed for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Gliadin were 7.0 ng/mL, 0.2 ng/mL, and 1.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little to no cross-reactivity. These LODs are clinically important as some patients could react strongly against such low allergen levels. Given the limitations of current industrial detection technology, multiplexed GMR-based assays provide a method for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of any combination of food-product allergens, thus protecting allergic patients from life-threatening events, including anaphylaxis, by unintentional consumption. PMID:26859787

  4. Angle dependence on the anisotropic magnetoresistance amplitude of a single-contacted Ni nanowire subjected to a thermo-mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melilli, G.; Madon, B.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Clochard, M.-C.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of thermoelastic and piezoelectric strain of an active track-etched β-PVDF polymer matrix on an electrodeposited single-contacted Ni nanowire (NW) are investigated at the nanoscale by measuring the change of magnetization (i.e. using the inverse magnetostriction effect). The magnetization state is measured locally by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The ferromagnetic NW plays thus the role of a mechanical probe that allows the effects of mechanical strain to be characterized and described qualitatively and quantitatively. The inverse magnetostriction was found to be responsible for a quasi-disappearance of the AMR signal for a variation of the order of ΔT ≈ 10 K. In other terms, the variation of the magnetization due to the stress compensates the effect of external magnetic field applied on the NW resistance. The induced stress field in a single Ni NW was found 1000 time higher than the bulk stress field (due to thermal expansion measured on the PVDF). This amplification could be attributed to three nanoscopic effects: (1) a stress mismatch between the Ni NW and the membrane, (2) a non-negligible role of the surface tension on Ni NW Young modulus, and (3) the possibility of non-linear stress-strain law. We investigate here the role of these different contributions using track-etched polymer membranes irradiated at various angles (αirrad) leading to, after electrodeposition, embedded Ni NWs of different orientations.

  5. Ultra-Sensitive Magnetoresistive Displacement Sensing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, John D. (Inventor); Lairson, Bruce M. (Inventor); Ramesham, Rajeshuni (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasensitive displacement sensing device for use in accelerometers, pressure gauges, temperature transducers, and the like, comprises a sputter deposited, multilayer, magnetoresistive field sensor with a variable electrical resistance based on an imposed magnetic field. The device detects displacement by sensing changes in the local magnetic field about the magnetoresistive field sensor caused by the displacement of a hard magnetic film on a movable microstructure. The microstructure, which may be a cantilever, membrane, bridge, or other microelement, moves under the influence of an acceleration a known displacement predicted by the configuration and materials selected, and the resulting change in the electrical resistance of the MR sensor can be used to calculate the displacement. Using a micromachining approach, very thin silicon and silicon nitride membranes are fabricated in one preferred embodiment by means of anisotropic etching of silicon wafers. Other approaches include reactive ion etching of silicon on insulator (SOI), or Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of silicon nitride films over silicon substrates. The device is found to be improved with the use of giant magnetoresistive elements to detect changes in the local magnetic field.

  6. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  7. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  8. High signal output in current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance sensors using In-Zn-O-based spacer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Tomoya; Mihajlović, Goran; Read, John C.; Choi, Young-suk; Childress, Jeffrey R.

    2015-09-01

    We report current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) sensors with a conductive Ag/In-Zn-O (IZO)/Zn trilayer as the spacer layer. Magnetoresistance ratios as high as 26% at resistance-area product (RA) = 60-120 mΩ µm2 were obtained in thin, polycrystalline spin valves suitable for modern read sensors of hard disk drives (HDDs). The large CPP-GMR values are attributed to the large spin-dependent scattering at the interfaces of the ferromagnet/IZO-based spacer junctions. The maximum voltage output of sensors with Ag/IZO/Zn spacers was ΔVmax = 11.3 mV, significantly larger than that observed for metallic AgSn spacers (2.3 mV). Such improved properties are important for HDD read heads with recording densities larger than 1 Tbit/in.2.

  9. Remote sensor response study in the regime of the microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-11-04

    A concurrent remote sensing and magneto-transport study of the microwave excited two dimensional electron system (2DES) at liquid helium temperatures has been carried out using a carbon detector to remotely sense the microwave activity of the 2D electron system in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure during conventional magneto-transport measurements. Various correlations are observed and reported between the oscillatory magnetotransport and the remotely sensed reflection. In addition, the oscillatory remotely sensed signal is shown to exhibit a power law type variation in its amplitude, similar to the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations.

  10. Quantitative analysis of anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co{sub 2}MnZ and Co{sub 2}FeZ epitaxial thin films: A facile way to investigate spin-polarization in half-metallic Heusler compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuraba, Y. Hirayama, Y.; Furubayashi, T.; Sukegawa, H.; Li, S.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Hono, K.; Kokado, S.

    2014-04-28

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect has been systematically investigated in various Heusler compounds Co{sub 2}MnZ and Co{sub 2}FeZ (Z = Al, Si, Ge, and Ga) epitaxial films and quantitatively summarized against the total valence electron number N{sub V}. It was found that the sign of AMR ratio is negative when N{sub V} is between 28.2 and 30.3, and turns positive when N{sub V} becomes below 28.2 and above 30.3, indicating that the Fermi level (E{sub F}) overlaps with the valence or conduction band edges of half-metallic gap at N{sub V} ∼ 28.2 or 30.3, respectively. We also find out that the magnitude of negative AMR ratio gradually increases with shifting of E{sub F} away from the gap edges, and there is a clear positive correlation between the magnitude of negative AMR ratio and magnetoresistive output of the giant magnetoresistive devices using the Heusler compounds. This indicates that AMR can be used as a facile way to optimize a composition of half-metallic Heusler compounds having a high spin-polarization at room temperature.

  11. Significant manipulation of output performance of a bridge-structured spin valve magnetoresistance sensor via an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Baiqian; Ou-Yang, Jun; Wang, Xianghao; Zhu, Benpeng; Chen, Shi; Yang, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Through principles of spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) effect and its application in magnetic sensors, we have investigated electric-field control of the output performance of a bridge-structured Co/Cu/NiFe/IrMn SV-GMR sensor on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate using the micro-magnetic simulation. We centered on the influence of the variation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K) of Co on the output of the bridge, and K was manipulated via the stress of Co, which is generated from the strain of a piezoelectric substrate under an electric field. The results indicate that when K varies between 2 × 104 J/m3 and 10 × 104 J/m3, the output performance can be significantly manipulated: The linear range alters from between -330 Oe and 330 Oe to between -650 Oe and 650 Oe, and the sensitivity is tuned by almost 7 times, making it possible to measure magnetic fields with very different ranges. According to the converse piezoelectric effect, we have found that this variation of K can be realized by applying an electric field with the magnitude of about 2-20 kV/cm on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate, which is realistic in application. This result means that electric-control of SV-GMR effect has potential application in developing SV-GMR sensors with improved performance.

  12. Enhanced response and sensitivity of self-corrugated graphene sensors with anisotropic charge distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yol Jeong, Seung; Jeong, Sooyeon; Won Lee, Sang; Tae Kim, Sung; Kim, Daeho; Jin Jeong, Hee; Tark Han, Joong; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Seok Jeong, Mun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a high-performance molecular sensor using self-corrugated chemically modified graphene as a three dimensional (3D) structure that indicates anisotropic charge distribution. This is capable of room-temperature operation, and, in particular, exhibiting high sensitivity and reversible fast response with equilibrium region. The morphology consists of periodic, “cratered” arrays that can be formed by condensation and evaporation of graphene oxide (GO) solution on interdigitated electrodes. Subsequent hydrazine reduction, the corrugated edge area of the graphene layers have a high electric potential compared with flat graphene films. This local accumulation of electrons interacts with a large number of gas molecules. The sensitivity of 3D-graphene sensors significantly increases in the atmosphere of NO2 gas. The intriguing structures have several advantages for straightforward fabrication on patterned substrates, high-performance graphene sensors without post-annealing process. PMID:26053892

  13. Enhanced response and sensitivity of self-corrugated graphene sensors with anisotropic charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yol Jeong, Seung; Jeong, Sooyeon; Won Lee, Sang; Tae Kim, Sung; Kim, Daeho; Jin Jeong, Hee; Tark Han, Joong; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Seok Jeong, Mun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a high-performance molecular sensor using self-corrugated chemically modified graphene as a three dimensional (3D) structure that indicates anisotropic charge distribution. This is capable of room-temperature operation, and, in particular, exhibiting high sensitivity and reversible fast response with equilibrium region. The morphology consists of periodic, “cratered” arrays that can be formed by condensation and evaporation of graphene oxide (GO) solution on interdigitated electrodes. Subsequent hydrazine reduction, the corrugated edge area of the graphene layers have a high electric potential compared with flat graphene films. This local accumulation of electrons interacts with a large number of gas molecules. The sensitivity of 3D-graphene sensors significantly increases in the atmosphere of NO2 gas. The intriguing structures have several advantages for straightforward fabrication on patterned substrates, high-performance graphene sensors without post-annealing process.

  14. Enhanced response and sensitivity of self-corrugated graphene sensors with anisotropic charge distribution.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Yol; Jeong, Sooyeon; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Daeho; Jeong, Hee Jin; Han, Joong Tark; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a high-performance molecular sensor using self-corrugated chemically modified graphene as a three dimensional (3D) structure that indicates anisotropic charge distribution. This is capable of room-temperature operation, and, in particular, exhibiting high sensitivity and reversible fast response with equilibrium region. The morphology consists of periodic, "cratered" arrays that can be formed by condensation and evaporation of graphene oxide (GO) solution on interdigitated electrodes. Subsequent hydrazine reduction, the corrugated edge area of the graphene layers have a high electric potential compared with flat graphene films. This local accumulation of electrons interacts with a large number of gas molecules. The sensitivity of 3D-graphene sensors significantly increases in the atmosphere of NO2 gas. The intriguing structures have several advantages for straightforward fabrication on patterned substrates, high-performance graphene sensors without post-annealing process. PMID:26053892

  15. Noise in small magnetic systems—applications to very sensitive magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier, M.; Fermon, C.; Le Goff, G.; Simola, J.; Kerr, E.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2005-04-01

    Reduction for 1/ f noise (or random telegraph noise) is a crucial issue for small magnetic sensors which is strongly related to structural properties and magnetic configuration. We show how it is possible to eliminate magnetic noise at low frequency in GMR/TMR sensors by a combination of cross anisotropies, window frame shapes and suitably designed magnetoresisitive stack. These sensors are superior to almost all existing field and flux sensors. Results are presented on a mixed sensor, where a superconducting loop acts as a flux-to-field transformer to the GMR sensor. This device is suitable for detection of biomagnetic signals, such as in magnetocardiography or in magnetoencephalography. Measurements on niobium-based and YBCO-based sensors are presented, leading to sensitivity of 30 fT/√Hz at 77 K for small samples. Sensitivity lower than 1 fT/√(Hz) is expected with appropriate design and use of TMR or CMR layers, which makes these a powerful alternative to SQUIDs.

  16. A nanoliter volume nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system using tunneling magneto-resistive (TMR) sensors to recognize biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Pablo

    The need to incorporate advanced engineering tools in biology, biochemistry and medicine is in great demand. Many of the existing instruments and tools are usually expensive and require special facilities. With the advent of nanotechnology in the past decade, new approaches to develop devices and tools have been generated by academia and industry. One such technology, NMR spectroscopy, has been used by biochemists for more than 2 decades to study the molecular structure of chemical compounds. However, NMR spectrometers are very expensive and require special laboratory rooms for their proper operation. High magnetic fields with strengths in the order of several Tesla make these instruments unaffordable to most research groups. This doctoral research proposes a new technology to develop NMR spectrometers that can operate at field strengths of less than 0.5 Tesla using an inexpensive permanent magnet and spin dependent nanoscale magnetic devices. This portable NMR system is intended to analyze samples as small as a few nanoliters. The main problem to resolve when downscaling the variables is to obtain an NMR signal with high Signal-To-Noise-Ratio (SNR). A special Tunneling Magneto-Resistive (TMR) sensor design was developed to achieve this goal. The minimum specifications for each component of the proposed NMR system were established. A complete NMR system was designed based on these minimum requirements. The goat was always to find cost effective realistic components. The novel design of the NMR system uses technologies such as Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS), Digital Signal Processing (DSP) and a special Backpropagation Neural Network that finds the best match of the NMR spectrum. The system was designed, calculated and simulated with excellent results. In addition, a general method to design TMR Sensors was developed. The technique was automated and a computer program was written to help the designer perform this task interactively.

  17. Magnetoresistivity and acoustoelectronic effects in a tilted magnetic field in p-Si/SiGe/Si structures with an anisotropic g factor

    SciTech Connect

    Drichko, I. L. Smirnov, I. Yu.; Suslov, A. V.; Mironov, O. A.; Leadley, D. R.

    2010-09-15

    Magnetoresistivity {rho}{sub xx} and {rho}{sub xy} and the acoustoelectronic effects are measured in p-Si/SiGe/Si with an impurity concentration p = 1.99 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} in the temperature range 0.3-2.0 K and an tilted magnetic field up to 18 T. The dependence of the effective g factor on the angle of magnetic field tilt {theta} to the normal to the plane of a two-dimensional p-Si/SiGe/Si channel is determined. A first-order ferromagnet-paramagnet phase transition is observed in the magnetic fields corresponding to a filling factor {nu} = 2 at {theta} {approx} 59{sup o}-60{sup o}.

  18. Mechanism of sign crossover of the anisotropic magneto-resistance in La0.7-xPrxCa0.3MnO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagoz, H. S.; Desomberg, J.; Taheri, M.; Razavi, F. S.; Chow, K. H.; Jung, J.

    2015-02-01

    Magneto-resistive anisotropy (AMR) has been studied in 45 nm thick La0.7-xPrxCa0.3MnO3 (LPCMO) manganite films (with Pr doping x between 0 and 0.40) deposited on LaAlO3 (LAO) and SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The AMR in compressively strained films undergoes a sign change from positive to negative at low temperatures, whereas its sign does not change in films subjected to tensile strain. Temperature dependence of magnetization in a magnetic field applied parallel and perpendicular to the (100)-plane of the films shows that at low temperatures strain-induced rotation of the easy-axis magnetization determines the sign of the AMR. At higher temperatures near the TMI the sign of the AMR is the same in both LPCMO/LAO and LPCMO/STO films, suggesting the dominating influence of percolative transport in the plane of these films at these temperatures.

  19. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Mitsunobu Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  20. Strong spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman spin splitting in angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rik; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Roy, Anupam; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Movva, Hema C. P.; Colombo, Luigi; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi2Te3 thin film with field up to 9 T over 2-20 K temperatures. The perpendicular field magnetoresistance has been explained by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory alone in a system with strong spin-orbit coupling, from which we have estimated the mean free path, the phase coherence length, and the spin-orbit relaxation time. We have obtained the out-of-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be small and the in-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be comparable to the momentum relaxation time. The estimation of these charge and spin transport parameters are useful for spintronics applications. For parallel field magnetoresistance, we have confirmed the presence of Zeeman effect which is otherwise suppressed in perpendicular field magnetoresistance due to strong spin-orbit coupling. The parallel field data have been explained using both the contributions from the Maekawa-Fukuyama localization theory for non-interacting electrons and Lee-Ramakrishnan theory of electron-electron interactions. The estimated Zeeman g-factor and the strength of Coulomb screening parameter agree well with the theory. Finally, the anisotropy in magnetoresistance with respect to angle has been described by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory. This anisotropy can be used in anisotropic magnetic sensor applications.

  1. Evolution and sign control of square-wave-like anisotropic magneto-resistance in spatially confined La0.3Pr0.4Ca0.3MnO3/LaAlO3(001) manganite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagoz, H. S.; Jeon, J.; Keating, S.; Chow, K. H.; Jung, J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated magneto-transport properties of a compressively strained spatially confined La0.3Pr0.4Ca0.3MnO3 (LPCMO) thin film micro-bridge deposited on LaAlO3. Angular dependence of the magneto-resistance R(θ) of this bridge, where θ is the angle between the magnetic field and the current directions in the film plane, exhibits sharp positive and negative percolation jumps near TMIT. The sign and the magnitude of these jumps can be tuned using the magnetic field. Such behavior has not been observed in LPCMO micro-bridges subjected to tensile strain, indicating a correlation between the type of the lattice strain, the distribution of electronic domains, and the anisotropic magneto-resistance in spatially confined manganite systems.

  2. Monte Carlo calculations of the magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayer structures with giant magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskiy, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo study of trilayer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects is carried out. The anisotropic Heisenberg model is used for description of magnetic properties of ultrathin ferromagnetic films forming these structures. The temperature and magnetic field dependences of magnetic characteristics are considered for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these multilayer structures. The methodology for determination of the magnetoresistance by the Monte Carlo method is introduced; this permits us to calculate the magnetoresistance of multilayer structures for different thicknesses of the ferromagnetic films. The calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance agrees very well with the experimental results measured for the Fe(0 0 1)-Cr(0 0 1) multilayer structure and CFAS-Ag-CFAS-IrMn spin-valve structure based on the half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5.

  3. Magnetoresistive chip cytometer.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, J; Andrade, P Z; Cardoso, S; da Silva, C L; Cabral, J M; Freitas, P P

    2011-07-01

    Although conventional state-of-the-art flow cytometry systems provide rapid and reliable analytical capacities, they are bulky, expensive and complex. To overcome these drawbacks modern flow cytometers have been developed with enhanced portability for on-site measurements. Unlike external fluorescent/optical detectors, magnetoresistive sensors are micro-fabricated, can be integrated within microfluidic channels, and can detect magnetically labelled cells. This work describes the real-time detection of single magnetically labelled cells with a magnetoresistive based cell cytometer. For Kg1-a cells magnetically labelled with 50 nm CD34 microbeads (Milteny) flowing through a 150 μm wide, 14 μm high microchannel, with speeds around 1 cm s(-1), bipolar signals with an average amplitude of 10-20 μV were observed corresponding to cell events. The number of cells counted by the spin valve cytometer has been compared with that obtained with a hemocytometer. Both methods agree within the respective error bars. PMID:21562656

  4. Extraordinary magnetoresistance: sensing the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Thomas H.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2012-06-01

    Simulations utilising the finite element method (FEM) have been produced in order to investigate aspects of circular extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices. The effect of three specific features on the resultant magnetoresistance were investigated: the ratio of the metallic to semiconducting conductivities ( σ M / σ S ); the semiconductor mobility; and the introduction of an intermediate region at the semiconductormetal interface in order to simulate a contact resistance. In order to obtain a large EMR effect the conductivity ratio ( σ M / σ S ) is required to be larger than two orders of magnitude; below this critical value the resultant magnetoresistance effect is dramatically reduced. Large mobility semiconductors exhibit larger EMR values for a given field (below saturation) and reduce the magnetic field required to produce saturation of the magnetoresistance. This is due to a larger Hall angle produced at a given magnetic field and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. Since practical magnetic field sensors are required to operate at low magnetic fields, high mobility semiconductors are required in the production of more sensitive EMR sensors. The formation of a Schottky barrier at the semiconductor-metal interface has been modelled with the introduction of a contact resistance at the semiconductor-metal interface. Increasing values of contact resistance are found to reduce the EMR effect with it disappearing altogether for large values. This has been shown explicitly by looking at the current flow in the system and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. The interface resistance was used to fit the simulated model to existing experimental data. The best fit occurred with an interface with resistivity of 1.55×10-4 m (overestimate). The EMR effect holds great potential with regard to its future application to magnetic field sensors. The design of any such devices should incorporate high mobility materials (such as graphene

  5. Extraordinary magnetoresistance: sensing the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Thomas; Kusmartsev, Feodor

    2012-06-01

    Simulations utilising the finite element method (FEM) have been produced in order to investigate aspects of circular extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices. The effect of three specific features on the resultant magnetoresistance were investigated: the ratio of the metallic to semiconducting conductivities (σ M/σ S); the semiconductor mobility; and the introduction of an intermediate region at the semiconductormetal interface in order to simulate a contact resistance. In order to obtain a large EMR effect the conductivity ratio (σ M/σ S) is required to be larger than two orders of magnitude; below this critical value the resultant magnetoresistance effect is dramatically reduced. Large mobility semiconductors exhibit larger EMR values for a given field (below saturation) and reduce the magnetic field required to produce saturation of the magnetoresistance. This is due to a larger Hall angle produced at a given magnetic field and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. Since practical magnetic field sensors are required to operate at low magnetic fields, high mobility semiconductors are required in the production of more sensitive EMR sensors. The formation of a Schottky barrier at the semiconductor-metal interface has been modelled with the introduction of a contact resistance at the semiconductor-metal interface. Increasing values of contact resistance are found to reduce the EMR effect with it disappearing altogether for large values. This has been shown explicitly by looking at the current flow in the system and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. The interface resistance was used to fit the simulated model to existing experimental data. The best fit occurred with an interface with resistivity of 1.55×10-4 m (overestimate). The EMR effect holds great potential with regard to its future application to magnetic field sensors. The design of any such devices should incorporate high mobility materials (such as graphene) along

  6. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kodzius, Rimantas; Li, Fuquan; Foulds, Ian G.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads® demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead® SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads® travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device. PMID:27571084

  7. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Kodzius, Rimantas; Li, Fuquan; Foulds, Ian G; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-08-26

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads(®) demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead(®) SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads(®) travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device.

  8. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Kodzius, Rimantas; Li, Fuquan; Foulds, Ian G; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads(®) demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead(®) SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads(®) travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device. PMID:27571084

  9. Strong spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman spin splitting in angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Rik Pramanik, Tanmoy; Roy, Anupam; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Movva, Hema C. P.; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Colombo, Luigi

    2014-06-02

    We have studied angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film with field up to 9 T over 2–20 K temperatures. The perpendicular field magnetoresistance has been explained by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory alone in a system with strong spin-orbit coupling, from which we have estimated the mean free path, the phase coherence length, and the spin-orbit relaxation time. We have obtained the out-of-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be small and the in-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be comparable to the momentum relaxation time. The estimation of these charge and spin transport parameters are useful for spintronics applications. For parallel field magnetoresistance, we have confirmed the presence of Zeeman effect which is otherwise suppressed in perpendicular field magnetoresistance due to strong spin-orbit coupling. The parallel field data have been explained using both the contributions from the Maekawa-Fukuyama localization theory for non-interacting electrons and Lee-Ramakrishnan theory of electron-electron interactions. The estimated Zeeman g-factor and the strength of Coulomb screening parameter agree well with the theory. Finally, the anisotropy in magnetoresistance with respect to angle has been described by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory. This anisotropy can be used in anisotropic magnetic sensor applications.

  10. Colossal Magnetoresistive Manganite Based Fast Bolometric X-ray Sensors for Total Energy Measurements of Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, G J; Kolagani, R M; Adhikari, S; Mundle, R M; Cox, D W; Davidson III, A L; Liang, Y; Drury, O B; Hau-Riege, S P; Gardner, C; Ables, E; Bionta, R M; Friedrich, S

    2008-12-17

    Bolometric detectors based on epitaxial thin films of rare earth perovskite manganites have been proposed as total energy monitors for X-ray pulses at the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. We demonstrate such a detector scheme based on epitaxial thin films of the perovskite manganese oxide material Nd{sub 0.67}Sr{sub x0.33}MnO{sub 3}, grown by pulsed laser deposition on buffered silicon substrates. The substrate and sensor materials are chosen to meet the conflicting requirements of radiation hardness, sensitivity, speed and linearity over a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude. The key challenge in the material development is the integration of the sensor material with Si. Si is required to withstand the free electron laser pulse impact and to achieve a readout speed three orders of magnitude faster than conventional cryoradiometers for compatibility with the Linac Coherent Light Source pulse rate. We discuss sensor material development and the photoresponse of prototype devices. This Linac Coherent Light Source total energy monitor represents the first practical application of manganite materials as bolometric sensors.

  11. OPTICAL FIBRES AND FIBREOPTIC SENSORS: Polarisation reflectometry of anisotropic optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, Yurii A.; Kryukov, Igor'I.; Pervadchuk, Vladimir P.; Toroshin, Andrei Yu

    2009-11-01

    Anisotropic, polarisation-maintaining fibres have been studied using a reflectometer and integrated optic polariser. Linearly polarised pulses were launched into the fibre under test at different angles between their plane of polarisation and the main optical axis of the fibre. A special procedure for the correlation analysis of these reflectograms is developed to enhance the reliability of the information about the longitudinal optical uniformity ofanisotropic fibres.

  12. Study of anisotropic magnetoresistance in the thermodynamic fluctuation regime of single crystals of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x}

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, G.; Lang, W. |; Wang, Xiao-Lin

    1996-11-01

    Measurements of the in-plane and out-of-plane magnetoresistance in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} single crystals with a critical temperature T{sub c} = 93 K are reported for temperatures between T{sub c} and 200 K and in magnetic fields up to 13 T. Both the transverse and the longitudinal in-plane magnetoresistance are positive and originate entirely from the suppression of superconducting fluctuations by the magnetic field. The longitudinal out-of-plane magnetoresistance is negative at all temperatures and magnetic fields. As possible origins two recent models are discussed, the reduction of the quasiparticle density of states due to condensation into superconducting fluctuations and thermally activated transport over an interplane pseudogap.

  13. Low temperature magnetoresistance studies in MBE grown topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rik; Roy, Anupam; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Rai, Amritesh; Majumder, Sarmita; Ghosh, Bahniman; Register, Leonard; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    We studied low temperature magnetoresistance in molecular beam epitaxy grown topological insulator Bi2Se3andBi2Te3 thin films. The surface and structural characterization of the grown films showed smooth epitaxial growth on Si(111). The magnetoresistance has been measured at low temperatures (2 - 20 K) with magnetic fields upto 9 T. The full range perpendicular field magnetoresistance has been explained with the original Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory. Altshuler-Aronov theory of localization has been used to understand the full range parallel field magnetoresistance. Various scattering times have been estimated by fitting the magnetoresistance data with the theory. It is shown that the Zeeman effect is not needed to explain the magnetoresistance and has not been considered in the theory either. The angle dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance has also been observed and explained using the above theories. This work is funded by NRI-SWAN.

  14. An in-depth noise model for giant magnetoresistance current sensors for circuit design and complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integration

    SciTech Connect

    Roldán, A. Roldán, J. B.; Reig, C.; Cardoso, S.; Cardoso, F.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P. P.

    2014-05-07

    Full instrumentation bridges based on spin valve of giant magnetoresistance and magnetic tunnel junction devices have been microfabricated and experimentally characterized from the DC and noise viewpoint. A more realistic model of these devices was obtained in this work, an electrical and thermal model previously developed have been improved in such a way that noise effects are also included. We have implemented the model in a circuit simulator and reproduced the experimental measurements accurately. This provides a more realistic and complete tool for circuit design where magnetoresistive elements are combined with well-known complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor modules.

  15. Magnetoresistance in nanostructured Tb/Ti and Tb/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Svalov, A. V.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Vas'kovskiy, V. O.; Sorokin, A. N.; Diercks, D.

    2011-01-15

    Magnetic, magnetoresistive and structural properties were studied for [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers which were prepared by rf-sputtering. The thickness of the Tb layers varied from 1.5 to 12 nm. The thickness of 2 nm nonmagnetic spacers of Ti or Si was kept constant. Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetoresistance was observed in [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers. A decrease in the thickness of the terbium layers led to a decrease in the anisotropic contribution to the total magnetoresistance. The negative isotropic magnetoresistanse in [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers can be attributed to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and/or high field isotropic magnetoresistance. The structure of the samples of both types enabled the existence of the GMR effect.

  16. Quantized magnetoresistance in atomic-size contacts.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Andrei; Zhang, Chunjuan; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Redepenning, Jody; Doudin, Bernard

    2007-03-01

    When the dimensions of a metallic conductor are reduced so that they become comparable to the de Broglie wavelengths of the conduction electrons, the absence of scattering results in ballistic electron transport and the conductance becomes quantized. In ferromagnetic metals, the spin angular momentum of the electrons results in spin-dependent conductance quantization and various unusual magnetoresistive phenomena. Theorists have predicted a related phenomenon known as ballistic anisotropic magnetoresistance (BAMR). Here we report the first experimental evidence for BAMR by observing a stepwise variation in the ballistic conductance of cobalt nanocontacts as the direction of an applied magnetic field is varied. Our results show that BAMR can be positive and negative, and exhibits symmetric and asymmetric angular dependences, consistent with theoretical predictions. PMID:18654248

  17. Magnetoresistance of nanosized magnetic configurations in single nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegrowe, J.-E.; Gilbert, S.; Doudin, B.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    1998-03-01

    The problem of studying spin configurations at nanoscopic level is that magnetic measurements at this scale cannot be performed using usual magnetometers. We have shown that anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) measured with micro-contacts allows spin configurations of a single nanowire to be studied in details. The nanowires are diameter 50 nm and length 6000 nm and are produced by a combination of electrodeposition in track-etched membrane templates and sputtering technics. Magnetoresistance of well-defined spin configurations in single nanowires, like Curling magnetization reversal modes or domain wall, are measured.

  18. Magnetoresistive nanosensors: controlling magnetism at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Leitao, Diana C; Silva, Ana V; Paz, Elvira; Ferreira, Ricardo; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P

    2016-01-29

    The ability to detect the magnetic fields that surround us has promoted vast technological advances in sensing techniques. Among those, magnetoresistive sensors display an unpaired spatial resolution. Here, we successfully control the linear range of nanometric sensors using an interfacial exchange bias sensing layer coupling. An effective matching of material properties and sensor geometry improves the nanosensor performance, with top sensitivities of 3.7% mT(-1). The experimental results are well supported by 3D micromagnetic and magneto-transport simulations. PMID:26658286

  19. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors. PMID:27322277

  20. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications.

    PubMed

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors. PMID:27322277

  1. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications.

    PubMed

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors.

  2. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  3. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  4. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  5. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R D; Rosa, P F S; Scott, B; Wakeham, N; Ghimire, N J; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Ronning, F

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  6. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] withoutmore » Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.« less

  7. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-19

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. As a result, a change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior ofmore » the magnetoresistance in WTe₂ was identified.« less

  8. Systematic Angular Study of Magnetoresistance in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungsik; Le, Brian; Watts, Justin; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ices are nanostructured two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic elements, where frustrated interactions lead to unusual collective magnetic behavior. Here we report a room-temperature magnetoresistance study of connected permalloy (Ni81Fe19) kagome artificial spin ice networks, wherein the direction of the applied in-plane magnetic field is systematically varied. We measure both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance in these structures, and we find certain transport geometries of the network show strong angular sensitivity - even small variations in the applied field angle lead to dramatic changes of the magnetoresistance response. We also investigate the magnetization reversal of the networks using magnetic force microscopy (MFM), demonstrating avalanche behavior in the magnetization reversal. The magnetoresistance features are analyzed using an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) model. Supported by the US Department of Energy. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by Seagate Technology, NSF MRSEC, and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme.

  9. Magnetoresistance of heavy and light metal/ferromagnet bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, Can Onur; Garello, Kevin; Mendil, Johannes; Ghosh, Abhijit; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gabureac, Mihai; Trassin, Morgan; Fiebig, Manfred; Gambardella, Pietro

    2015-11-09

    We studied the magnetoresistance of normal metal (NM)/ferromagnet (FM) bilayers in the linear and nonlinear (current-dependent) regimes and compared it with the amplitude of the spin-orbit torques and thermally induced electric fields. Our experiments reveal that the magnetoresistance of the heavy NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ta, W, and Pt) is phenomenologically similar to the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) of YIG/Pt, but has a much larger anisotropy of the order of 0.5%, which increases with the atomic number of the NM. This SMR-like behavior is absent in light NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ti and Cu), which present the standard anisotropic magnetoresistance expected from polycrystalline FM layers. In the Ta, W, and Pt/Co bilayers, we find an additional magnetoresistance directly proportional to the current and to the transverse component of the magnetization. This so-called unidirectional SMR, of the order of 0.005%, is largest in W and correlates with the amplitude of the antidamping spin-orbit torque. The unidirectional SMR is below the accuracy of our measurements in YIG/Pt.

  10. Features of the electric-field distribution in anisotropic semiconductor wafers in a transverse magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, V. V.; Bormontov, E. N.

    2013-07-15

    A macroscopic model of the Hall effects and magnetoresistance in anisotropic semiconductor wafers is developed. The results obtained by solving the electrodynamic boundary problem allow the potential and eddy currents in anisotropic semiconductors to be calculated at different current-contact locations, depending on the parameters of the sample material's anisotropy. The results of this study are of great practical importance for investigating the physical properties of anisotropic semiconductors and simulating the electron-transport phenomena in devices based on anisotropic semiconductors.

  11. Large, Tunable Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichao; Luo, Wei; Gu, Jiangjiang; Cheng, Xiang; Ye, Peide D; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoresistance, the modulation of resistance by magnetic fields, has been adopted and continues to evolve in many device applications including hard-disk, memory, and sensors. Magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic semiconductors has recently raised much attention and shows great potential due to its large magnitude that is comparable or even larger than magnetic materials. However, most of the previous work focus on two terminal devices with large dimensions, typically of micrometer scales, which severely limit their performance potential and more importantly, scalability in commercial applications. Here, we investigate magnetoresistance in the impact ionization region in InGaAs nanowires with 20 nm diameter and 40 nm gate length. The deeply scaled dimensions of these nanowires enable high sensibility with less power consumption. Moreover, in these three terminal devices, the magnitude of magnetoresistance can be tuned by the transverse electric field controlled by gate voltage. Large magnetoresistance between 100% at room temperature and 2000% at 4.3 K can be achieved at 2.5 T. These nanoscale devices with large magnetoresistance offer excellent opportunity for future high-density large-scale magneto-electric devices using top-down fabrication approaches, which are compatible with commercial silicon platform. PMID:26561728

  12. Modeling of Nanoparticular Magnetoresistive Systems and the Impact on Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Lisa; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Meyer, Judith; Schröder, Christian; Hütten, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The formation of magnetic bead or nanoparticle superstructures due to magnetic dipole dipole interactions can be used as configurable matter in order to realize low-cost magnetoresistive sensors with very high GMR-effect amplitudes. Experimentally, this can be realized by immersing magnetic beads or nanoparticles in conductive liquid gels and rearranging them by applying suitable external magnetic fields. After gelatinization of the gel matrix the bead or nanoparticle positions are fixed and the resulting system can be used as a magnetoresistive sensor. In order to optimize such sensor structures we have developed a simulation tool chain that allows us not only to study the structuring process in the liquid state but also to rigorously calculate the magnetoresistive characteristic curves for arbitrary nanoparticle arrangements. As an application, we discuss the role of magnetoresistive sensors in finding answers to molecular recognition. PMID:25903554

  13. Advanced giant magnetoresistance technology for measurement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Roland; Mattheis, Roland; Reiss, Günter

    2013-08-01

    Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors are considered one of the first real applications of nanotechnology. They consist of nm-thick layered structures where ferromagnetic metals are sandwiched by nonmagnetic metals. Such multilayered films produce a large change in resistance (typically 10 to 20%) when subjected to a magnetic field, compared with a maximum change of a few per cent for other types of magnetic sensors. This technology has been intensively used in read heads for hard disk drives and now increasingly finds applications due to the high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally these sensors are compatible with miniaturization and thus offer a high spatial resolution combined with a frequency range up to the 100 MHz regime and simple electronic conditioning. In this review, we first discuss the basics of the underlying magnetoresistance effects in layered structures and then present three prominent examples for future applications: in the field of current sensing the new GMR sensors offer high bandwidth and good accuracy in a space-saving open loop measurement configuration. In rotating systems they can be used for multiturn angle measurements, and in biotechnology the detection of magnetic particles enables the quantitative measurement of biomolecule concentrations.

  14. Quantitative current measurements using scanning magnetoresistance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takezaki, Taiichi; Sueoka, Kazuhisa

    2008-08-01

    We have demonstrated the capability of scanning magnetoresistance microscope (SMRM) to be used for quantitative current measurements. The SMRM is a magnetic microscope that is based on an atomic force microscope (AFM) and simultaneously measures the localized surface magnetic field distribution and surface topography. The proposed SMRM employs an in-house built AFM cantilever equipped with a miniaturized magnetoresistive (MR) sensor as a magnetic field sensor. In this study, a spin-valve type MR sensor with a width of 1 microm was used to measure the magnetic field distribution induced by a current carrying wire with a width of 5 microm and a spacing of 1.6 microm at room temperature and under ambient conditions. Simultaneous imaging of the magnetic field distribution and the topography was successfully performed in the DC current ranging from 500 microA to 8 mA. The characterized SV sensor, which has a linear response to magnetic fields, offers the quantitative analysis of a magnetic field and current. The measured magnetic field strength was in good agreement with the result simulated using Biot-Savart's law. PMID:18599218

  15. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  16. Magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  17. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  18. Negative magnetoresistivity in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya-Wen; Yang, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Negative magnetoresistivity is a special magnetotransport property associated with chiral anomaly in four dimensional chiral anomalous systems, which refers to the transport behavior that the DC longitudinal magnetoresistivity decreases with increasing magnetic field. We calculate the longitudinal magnetoconductivity in the presence of back-reactions of the magnetic field to gravity in holographic zero charge and axial charge density systems with and without axial charge dissipation. In the absence of axial charge dissipation, we find that the quantum critical conductivity grows with increasing magnetic field when the backreaction strength is larger than a critical value, in contrast to the monotonically decreasing behavior of quantum critical conductivity in the probe limit. With axial charge dissipation, we find the negative magnetoresistivity behavior. The DC longitudinal magnetoconductivity scales as B in the large magnetic field limit, which deviates from the exact B 2 scaling of the probe limit result. In both cases, the small frequency longitudinal magnetoconductivity still agrees with the formula obtained from the hydrodynamic linear response theory, even in the large magnetic field limit.

  19. Planar Hall magnetoresistive aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Sinha, B; Ramulu, T S; Kim, K W; Venu, R; Lee, J J; Kim, C G

    2014-09-15

    The use of aptamer-based assays is an emerging and attractive approach in disease research and clinical diagnostics. A sensitive aptamer-based sandwich-type sensor is presented to detect human thrombin using a planar Hall magnetoresistive (PHR) sensor in cooperation with superparamagnetic labels. A PHR sensor has the great advantages of a high signal-to-noise ratio, a small offset voltage and linear response in the low-field region, allowing it to act as a high-resolution biosensor. In the system presented here, the sensor has an active area of 50 µm × 50 µm with a 10-nm gold layer deposited onto the sensor surface prior to the binding of thiolated DNA primary aptamer. A polydimethylsiloxane well of 600-µm radius and 1-mm height was prepared around the sensor surface to maintain the same specific area and volume for each sensor. The sensor response was traced in real time upon the addition of streptavidin-functionalized magnetic labels on the sensor. A linear response to the thrombin concentration in the range of 86 pM-8.6 µM and a lower detection limit down to 86 pM was achieved by the proposed present method with a sample volume consumption of 2 µl. The proposed aptasensor has a strong potential for application in clinical diagnosis.

  20. Shape-coupled magnetoresistive structures: a new approach to higher sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyuzhev, N. A.; Yurov, A. S.; Preobrazhenskii, R. Yu.; Mazurkin, N. S.; Chinenkov, M. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    A new type of anisotropic magnetoresistive structures is proposed in which the shape of ferromagnetic elements repeats the shape of nonmagnetic conducting shunts. The results of numerical simulations with allowance for inhomogeneous magnetization distribution showed that these shape-coupled structures exhibit a significant (~70%) increase in sensitivity as compared to that of classical barber-pole structures.

  1. Magnetoresistance effect in (La, Sr)MnO3 bicrystalline films.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, G; Steren, L B; Pastoriza, H; Vega, D; Granada, M; Sánchez, J C Rojas; Sirena, M; Alascio, B

    2010-09-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetoresistance effect has been measured on bicrystalline La(0.75)Sr(0.25)MnO(3) films. The measurements have been performed on an electronically lithographed Wheatstone bridge. The study of the angular dependence of both the magnetoresistance and the resistance of single-crystalline and grain-boundary regions of the samples allowed us to isolate two contributions of low-field magnetoresistance in manganites. One of them is associated with the spin-orbit effect, i.e. the anisotropic magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic compounds, and the other one is related to spin-disorder regions at the grain boundary. Complementary x-ray diffraction, ferromagnetic resonance and low temperature magnetization experiments contribute to the characterization of the magnetic anisotropy of the samples and the general comprehension of the problem.

  2. Magnetoresistance effect in (La, Sr)MnO3 bicrystalline films.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, G; Steren, L B; Pastoriza, H; Vega, D; Granada, M; Sánchez, J C Rojas; Sirena, M; Alascio, B

    2010-09-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetoresistance effect has been measured on bicrystalline La(0.75)Sr(0.25)MnO(3) films. The measurements have been performed on an electronically lithographed Wheatstone bridge. The study of the angular dependence of both the magnetoresistance and the resistance of single-crystalline and grain-boundary regions of the samples allowed us to isolate two contributions of low-field magnetoresistance in manganites. One of them is associated with the spin-orbit effect, i.e. the anisotropic magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic compounds, and the other one is related to spin-disorder regions at the grain boundary. Complementary x-ray diffraction, ferromagnetic resonance and low temperature magnetization experiments contribute to the characterization of the magnetic anisotropy of the samples and the general comprehension of the problem. PMID:21403272

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of multilayer magnetic structures and calculation of the magnetoresistance coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    The Monte Carlo study of three-layer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects has been performed with the application of the Heisenberg anisotropic model to the description of the magnetic properties of thin ferromagnetic films. The dependences of the magnetic characteristics on the temperature and external magnetic field have been obtained for the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these structures. A Monte Carlo method for determining the magnetoresistance coefficient has been developed. The magnetoresistance coefficient has been calculated for three-layer and spin-valve magnetic structures at various thicknesses of ferromagnetic films. It has been shown that the calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance coefficient is in good agreement with experimental data obtained for the Fe(001)/Cr(001) multilayer structure and the CFAS/Ag/CFAS/IrMn spin valve based on the Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 (CFAS) Heusler alloy.

  4. Maximum non-saturating magnetoresistance in MoTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud; Gu, Zhehao; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Center for High Pressure Science; Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai, 201203, China Team

    The search for exotic materials with a linear magnetoresistance (MR) is one of the most challenging tasks of the condensed matter community and materials science. Here, we investigated the magnetoresistance behavior of high-quality single crystals MoTe2. A large linear non-staturated MR in a magnetic field of 60 T, was observed with a maximum at a temperature of T = 45 K. The detailed field and temperature dependencies will be presented. Our results not only provide a general scaling approach for the anisotropic MR but also are crucial for correctly understanding the mechanism of the linear MR, including the origin of the remarkable ``turn-on'' behavior in the resistance versus temperature curve.

  5. Noncontact vibration measurements using magnetoresistive sensing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.

    2016-06-01

    Contactless instrumentations is more and more used in turbomachinery testing thanks to the non-intrusive character and the possibility to monitor all the components of the machine at the same time. Performances of blade tip timing (BTT) measurement systems, used for noncontact turbine blade vibration measurements, in terms of uncertainty and resolution are strongly affected by sensor characteristics and processing methods. The sensors used for BTT generate pulses, used for precise measurements of turbine blades time of arrival. Nowadays proximity sensors used in this application are based on optical, capacitive, eddy current and microwave measuring principle. Pressure sensors has been also tried. This paper summarizes the results achieved using a novel instrumentation based on the magnetoresistive sensing elements. The characterization of the novel probe has been already published. The measurement system was validated in test benches and in a real jet-engine comparing different sensor technologies. The whole instrumentation was improved. The work presented in this paper focuses on the current developments. In particular, attention is given to the data processing software and new sensor configurations.

  6. Tunnel magnetoresistance of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-10-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of diamondoids has been predicted by first principles density functional theory. Diamantane was used as a basic molecular proxy for diamondoids because hydrogen atoms in the apical position are easily substituted for a thiol group. The pristine diamantane exhibited a low TMR ratio of 7%, and boron-substitution considerably decreased the TMR ratio. Conversely, nitrogen-substitution enhanced the TMR ratio by up to 20%. Heteroatom-substitution changes the tunneling probabilities by varying the molecular bond lengths. Furthermore, when the spins of the electrodes are parallel, the heteroatoms resulted in transmittance probabilities at an energy range near the Fermi level. Consequently, heteroatom-substitution can control the TMR ratios of diamondoids very well.

  7. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L. Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2014-12-14

    Classical magnetoresistance (MR) in nonmagnetic metals are conventionally understood in terms of the Kohler rule, with violation usually viewed as anomalous electron transport, in particular, as evidence of non-Fermi liquid behavior. Measurement of the MR of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms. Consequently, the Kohler rule should not be used to distinguish normal and anomalous electron transport in solids.

  8. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  9. A flexible strain gauge exhibiting reversible piezoresistivity based on an anisotropic magnetorheological polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietta, José L.; Jorge, Guillermo; Martín Negri, R.

    2014-08-01

    A flexible, anisotropic and portable stress sensor (logarithmic reversible response between 40-350 kPa) was fabricated, in which i) the sensing material, ii) the electrical contacts and iii) the encapsulating material, were based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites. The sensing material is a slide of an anisotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE), formed by dispersing silver-covered magnetite particles (Fe3O4@Ag) in PDMS and by curing in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. Thus, the MRE is a structure of electrically conducting pseudo-chains (needles) aligned in a specific direction, in which electrical conductivity increases when stress is exclusively applied in the direction of the needles. Electrical conductivity appears only between contact points that face each other at both sides of the MRE slide. An array of electrical contacts was implemented based on PDMS-silver paint metallic composites. The array was encapsulated with PDMS. Using Fe3O4 superparamagnetic nanoparticles also opens up possibilities for a magnetic field sensor, due to the magnetoresistance effects.

  10. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  11. Anomalous magnetoresistance in the spinel superconductor LiTi2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K.; He, G.; Zhang, X.; Maruyama, S.; Yasui, S.; Suchoski, R.; Shin, J.; Jiang, Y.; Yu, H. S.; Yuan, J.; Shan, L.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Greene, R. L.; Takeuchi, I.

    2015-05-01

    LiTi2O4 is a unique compound in that it is the only known spinel oxide superconductor. The lack of high quality single crystals has thus far prevented systematic investigations of its transport properties. Here we report a careful study of transport and tunnelling spectroscopy in epitaxial LiTi2O4 thin films. An unusual magnetoresistance is observed which changes from nearly isotropic negative to prominently anisotropic positive as the temperature is decreased. We present evidence that shows that the negative magnetoresistance likely stems from the suppression of local spin fluctuations or spin-orbit scattering centres. The positive magnetoresistance suggests the presence of an orbital-related state, also supported by the fact that the superconducting energy gap decreases as a quadratic function of magnetic field. These observations indicate that the spin-orbital fluctuations play an important role in LiTi2O4 in a manner similar to high-temperature superconductors.

  12. Nonlocal ordinary magnetoresistance in indium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pan.; Yuan, Zhonghui.; Wu, Hao.; Ali, S. S.; Wan, Caihua.; Ban, Shiliang.

    2015-07-01

    Deflection of carriers by Lorentz force results in an ordinary magnetoresistance (OMR) of (μB)2 at low field. Here we demonstrate that the OMR in high mobility semiconductor InAs could be enhanced by measurement geometry where two probes of voltmeter were both placed on one outer side of two probes of current source. The nonlocal OMR was 3.6 times as large as the local one, reaching 1.8×104% at 5 T. The slope of the linear field dependence of the nonlocal OMR was improved from 12.6 T-1 to 45.3 T-1. The improvement was ascribed to polarity-conserved charges accumulating on boundaries in nonlocal region due to Hall effect. This InAs device with nonlocal geometry could be competitive in B-sensors due to its high OMR ratio, linear field dependence and simple structure.

  13. Using granular C0-AI2O3 spacer for optimization of functional parameters of the FeMn/Fe20Ni80 magnetoresistive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkovenko, A. N.; Lepalovskij, V. N.; Adanakova, O. A.; Vas'kovskiy, V. O.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we studied the possibility of tailoring the functional properties of the multilayer magnetoresistive medium with unidirectional anisotropy and the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect (AMR). Objects of the research were composite Co-Al2O3 films and Ta/Fe20Ni80/Fe50Mn50/Fe20Ni80/Co-Al2O3/Fe20Ni80/Ta multilayers structures obtained by magnetron sputtering and selectively subjected vacuum annealing. Structure, magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of the films in the temperature range 77÷440 K were investigated.

  14. Pure spin-Hall magnetoresistance in Rh/Y3Fe5O12 hybrid.

    PubMed

    Shang, T; Zhan, Q F; Ma, L; Yang, H L; Zuo, Z H; Xie, Y L; Li, H H; Liu, L P; Wang, B M; Wu, Y H; Zhang, S; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report an investigation of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and anomalous Hall resistance (AHR) of Rh and Pt thin films sputtered on epitaxial Y(3)Fe(5)O(12) (YIG) ferromagnetic insulator films. For the Pt/YIG hybrid, large spin-Hall magne toresistance (SMR) along with a sizable conventional anisotropic magnetoresistance (CAMR) and a nontrivial temperature dependence of AHR were observed in the temperature range of 5-300 K. In contrast, a reduced SMR with negligible CAMR and AHR was found in Rh/YIG hybrid. Since CAMR and AHR are characteristics for all ferromagnetic metals, our results suggest that the Pt is likely magnetized by YIG due to the magnetic proximity effect (MPE) while Rh remains free of MPE. Thus the Rh/YIG hybrid could be an ideal model system to explore physics and devices associated with pure spin current. PMID:26639108

  15. Pure spin-Hall magnetoresistance in Rh/Y3Fe5O12 hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, T.; Zhan, Q. F.; Ma, L.; Yang, H. L.; Zuo, Z. H.; Xie, Y. L.; Li, H. H.; Liu, L. P.; Wang, B. M.; Wu, Y. H.; Zhang, S.; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-12-01

    We report an investigation of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and anomalous Hall resistance (AHR) of Rh and Pt thin films sputtered on epitaxial Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) ferromagnetic insulator films. For the Pt/YIG hybrid, large spin-Hall magne toresistance (SMR) along with a sizable conventional anisotropic magnetoresistance (CAMR) and a nontrivial temperature dependence of AHR were observed in the temperature range of 5-300 K. In contrast, a reduced SMR with negligible CAMR and AHR was found in Rh/YIG hybrid. Since CAMR and AHR are characteristics for all ferromagnetic metals, our results suggest that the Pt is likely magnetized by YIG due to the magnetic proximity effect (MPE) while Rh remains free of MPE. Thus the Rh/YIG hybrid could be an ideal model system to explore physics and devices associated with pure spin current.

  16. Pure spin-Hall magnetoresistance in Rh/Y3Fe5O12 hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Shang, T.; Zhan, Q. F.; Ma, L.; Yang, H. L.; Zuo, Z. H.; Xie, Y. L.; Li, H. H.; Liu, L. P.; Wang, B. M.; Wu, Y. H.; Zhang, S.; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report an investigation of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and anomalous Hall resistance (AHR) of Rh and Pt thin films sputtered on epitaxial Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) ferromagnetic insulator films. For the Pt/YIG hybrid, large spin-Hall magne toresistance (SMR) along with a sizable conventional anisotropic magnetoresistance (CAMR) and a nontrivial temperature dependence of AHR were observed in the temperature range of 5–300 K. In contrast, a reduced SMR with negligible CAMR and AHR was found in Rh/YIG hybrid. Since CAMR and AHR are characteristics for all ferromagnetic metals, our results suggest that the Pt is likely magnetized by YIG due to the magnetic proximity effect (MPE) while Rh remains free of MPE. Thus the Rh/YIG hybrid could be an ideal model system to explore physics and devices associated with pure spin current. PMID:26639108

  17. Mobility controlled linear magnetoresistance with 3D anisotropy in a layered graphene pallet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Peng; He, Xin; Li, Jun; Wen, Yan; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-ming; Yang, Yang; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.; Zhang, Xixiang

    2016-10-01

    A bulk sample of pressed graphene sheets was prepared under hydraulic pressure (~150 MPa). The cross-section of the sample demonstrates a layered structure, which leads to 3D electrical transport properties with anisotropic mobility. The electrical transport properties of the sample were measured over a wide temperature (2-400 K) and magnetic field (-140 ~\\text{kOe}≤slant H≤slant 140 ~\\text{kOe} ) range. The magnetoresistance measured at a fixed temperature can be described by R≤ft(H,θ \\right)=R≤ft({{\\varepsilon}θ}H,0\\right) with {{\\varepsilon}θ}={≤ft({{\\cos}2}θ +{{γ-2}{{\\sin}2}θ \\right)}1/2} , where γ is the mobility anisotropy constant and θ is the angle between the normal of the sample plane and the magnetic field. The large linear magnetoresistance (up to 36.9% at 400 K and 140 kOe) observed at high fields is ascribed to a classical magnetoresistance caused by mobility fluctuation ( Δ μ ). The magnetoresistance value at 140 kOe was related to the average mobility ≤ft(< μ > \\right) because of the condition Δ μ << μ > . The carrier concentration remained constant and the temperature-dependent resistivity was proportional to the average mobility, as verified by Kohler’s rule. Anisotropic dephasing length was deduced from weak localization observed at low temperatures.

  18. Anisotropic universe with anisotropic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra; Thakur, Snigdha E-mail: sukanta@iiserb.ac.in E-mail: snigdha@iiserb.ac.in

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the state space of a Bianchi-I universe with anisotropic sources. Here we consider an extended state space which includes null geodesics in this background. The evolution equations for all the state observables are derived. Dynamical systems approach is used to study the evolution of these equations. The asymptotic stable fixed points for all the evolution equations are found. We also check our analytic results with numerical analysis of these dynamical equations. The evolution of the state observables are studied both in cosmic time and using a dimensionless time variable. Then we repeat the same analysis with a more realistic scenario, adding the isotropic (dust like dark) matter and a cosmological constant (dark energy) to our anisotropic sources, to study their co-evolution. The universe now approaches a de Sitter space asymptotically dominated by the cosmological constant. The cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps due to shear are also generated in this scenario, assuming that the universe contains anisotropic matter along with the usual (dark) matter and vacuum (dark) energy since decoupling. We find that they contribute dominantly to the CMB quadrupole. We also constrain the current level of anisotropy and also search for any cosmic preferred axis present in the data. We use the Union 2 Supernovae data to this extent. An anisotropy axis close to the mirror symmetry axis seen in the cosmic microwave background data from Planck probe is found.

  19. CPP magnetoresistance of magnetic multilayers: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jack

    2016-06-01

    review is designed to provide a history of how knowledge of CPP-MR parameters grew, to give credit for discoveries, to explain how combining theory and experiment has enabled extraction of quantitative information about these parameters, but also to make clear that progress was not always direct and to point out where disagreements still exist. To limit its length, the review considers only collinear orientations of the moments of adjacent F-layers. To aid readers looking for specific information, we have provided an extensive table of contents and a detailed summary. Together, these should help locate over 100 figures plus 17 tables that collect values of individual parameters. In 1997, CIP-MR replaced anisotropic MR (AMR) as the sensor in read heads of computer hard drives. In principle, the usually larger CPP-MR was a contender for the next generation read head sensor. But in 2003, CIP-MR was replaced by the even larger Tunneling MR (TMR), which has remained the read-head sensor ever since. However, as memory bits shrink to where the relatively large specific resistance AR of TMR gives too much noise and too large an R to impedance match as a read-head sensor, the door is again opened for CPP-MR. We will review progress in finding techniques and F-alloys and F/N pairs to enhance the CPP-MR, and will describe its present capabilities.

  20. Giant magnetoresistance materials for magnetic recording technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.; Adams, C.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work focused on a class of transition-metal-oxide (TMO) materials (LaMnO{sub 3} doped with Ca, Ba, or Sr) that exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition near a ferromagnetic phase transition temperature. This yields a very large magnetoresistance; thus these materials may have important uses as magnetic sensors in a variety of applications, ranging from automobiles to read heads for magnetic storage. In addition, the transport current in the ferromagnetic state is likely to be very highly polarized, which means that additional device applications using the phenomena of spin-polarized tunneling can be envisioned. Use of these materials as magnetic sensors depends upon learning to control the synthesis parameters (principally temperature, pressure and composition) to achieve a specific carrier concentration and/or mobility. A second challenge is the high magnetic fields ({ge}1 Tesla) currently required to achieve a large change in resistance. The authors began an investigation of two novel approaches to this field-sensitivity problem, involving the development of multilayer structures of the TMO materials. Finally, they began to explore the use of epitaxial strain as a means of changing the transport properties in thin-film multilayers.

  1. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-01

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  2. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  3. Magnetoresistance behavior of UNiGe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakotte, H.; Lacerda, A.; Purwanto, A.; Havela, L.; Sechovsky, V.; Prokes, K.; Brueck, E.; Boer, F.R. de; Torikachvili, M.S.

    1995-05-01

    The authors have measured the temperature dependences of the magnetoresistance of single-crystalline UNiGe for both parallel (i//B//c-axis) and perpendicular configurations (i//a-axis, B//c-axis) in magnetic fields up to 18 T. Both configurations yield similar magnetoresistance behavior, which emphasizes the strong magnetic contribution to the resistivity in all directions. Crossing magnetic-phase boundaries causes anomalies in the magnetoresistance, which allowed a completion of the previously proposed magnetic phase diagram.

  4. Giant magnetoresistance in silicene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengyong; Luo, Guangfu; Liu, Qihang; Zheng, Jiaxin; Zhang, Zhimeng; Nagase, Shigeru; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lu, Jing

    2012-05-21

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we predict a giant magnetoresistance in zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) connecting two semi-infinite silicene electrodes through switch of the edge spin direction of ZSiNRs. Spin-filter efficiency of both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ZSiNRs is sign-changeable with the bias voltage. Therefore, potential application of silicene in spintronics devices is suggested.

  5. Polarisation reflectometry of anisotropic optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, Yurii A; Kryukov, Igor' I; Pervadchuk, Vladimir P; Toroshin, Andrei Yu

    2009-11-30

    Anisotropic, polarisation-maintaining fibres have been studied using a reflectometer and integrated optic polariser. Linearly polarised pulses were launched into the fibre under test at different angles between their plane of polarisation and the main optical axis of the fibre. A special procedure for the correlation analysis of these reflectograms is developed to enhance the reliability of the information about the longitudinal optical uniformity of anisotropic fibres. (optical fibres and fibreoptic sensors)

  6. Landau levels and longitudinal magnetoresistance in generalized Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Roy, Bitan

    The notion of axial anomaly is a venerable concept in quantum field theory that has received ample attention in condensed matter physics due to the discovery of Weyl materials (WSMs). In such systems Kramers non-degenerate bands touch at isolated points in the Brillouin zone that act as (anti)monopoles of Berry flux, and the monopole number (m) defines the topological invariant of the system. Although so far only simple WSMs (with m = 1) has been found in various inversion and/or time-reversal asymmetric systems, generalized Weyl semimetals with m > 1 can also be found in nature, for example double-Weyl semimetals in HgCr2Se4 and SrSi2 and triple-Weyl semimetals. In this work, we demonstrate the Landau level spectrum in generalized Weyl systems and its ramification on longitudinal magnetotransport measurements. We show that in the quantum limit generalized Weyl semimetals display negative longitudinal magnetoresistance due to the chiral anomaly. Moreover, the magnetoresistance has nontrivial dependence on the relative orientation of the external fields with the crystallographic axis, stemming from underlying anisotropic quasiparticle dispersion in the pristine system. Our theory can thus provide diagnostic tools to pin the quasiparticle properties in Weyl systems.

  7. Scanning magnetoresistive microscopy: An advanced characterization tool for magnetic nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, D.; Grobis, M.; Albrecht, M.

    2016-02-01

    An advanced scanning magnetoresistive microscopy (SMRM) — a robust magnetic imaging and probing technique — will be presented, which utilizes state-of-the-art recording heads of a hard disk drive as sensors. The spatial resolution of modern tunneling magnetoresistive sensors is nowadays comparable to the more commonly used magnetic force microscopes. Important advantages of SMRM are the ability to detect pure magnetic signals directly proportional to the out-of-plane magnetic stray field, negligible sensor stray fields, and the ability to apply local bipolar magnetic field pulses up to 10 kOe with bandwidths from DC up to 1 GHz. Moreover, the SMRM can be further equipped with a heating stage and external magnetic field units. The performance of this method and corresponding best practices are demonstrated by presenting various examples, including a temperature dependent recording study on hard magnetic L10 FeCuPt thin films, imaging of magnetic vortex states in an in-plane magnetic field, and their controlled manipulation by applying local field pulses.

  8. Scanning magnetoresistive microscopy: An advanced characterization tool for magnetic nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Mitin, D; Grobis, M; Albrecht, M

    2016-02-01

    An advanced scanning magnetoresistive microscopy (SMRM) - a robust magnetic imaging and probing technique - will be presented, which utilizes state-of-the-art recording heads of a hard disk drive as sensors. The spatial resolution of modern tunneling magnetoresistive sensors is nowadays comparable to the more commonly used magnetic force microscopes. Important advantages of SMRM are the ability to detect pure magnetic signals directly proportional to the out-of-plane magnetic stray field, negligible sensor stray fields, and the ability to apply local bipolar magnetic field pulses up to 10 kOe with bandwidths from DC up to 1 GHz. Moreover, the SMRM can be further equipped with a heating stage and external magnetic field units. The performance of this method and corresponding best practices are demonstrated by presenting various examples, including a temperature dependent recording study on hard magnetic L1(0) FeCuPt thin films, imaging of magnetic vortex states in an in-plane magnetic field, and their controlled manipulation by applying local field pulses. PMID:26931856

  9. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobaut, B.; Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Rafaqat, H.; Roddaro, S.; Rossi, G.; Panaccione, G.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.; Torelli, P.

    2015-12-01

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe1-xGax) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude.

  10. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films: dependence on Pt thickness and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiufeng; Dai, Zhiwen; Huang, Lin; Lu, Guangduo; Liu, Min; Piao, Hongguang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Yu, Seong-cho; Pan, Liqing

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the temperature and the Pt layer thickness dependence of the magnetoresistances (MRs) in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films. Based on the field dependent measurements, it can be seen that the spin-current-induced spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) plays the dominant role in the MRs in the Co2FeSi/Pt bilayers in the whole temperature range. Meanwhile, a quite small part of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) existed in the MRs. It proved to be originated from magnetic proximity effect (MPE) by measuring the Pt thickness and temperature dependence of the AMR. Moreover, the Co2FeSi layer thickness has much weaker effect on the SMR and AMR compared to the Pt layer thickness. These results indicate that the Co2FeSi/Pt interface is beneficial to be used in the spin-current-induced physical phenomena.

  11. A spin-valve-like magnetoresistance of an antiferromagnet-based tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Park, B G; Wunderlich, J; Martí, X; Holý, V; Kurosaki, Y; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, H; Nishide, A; Hayakawa, J; Takahashi, H; Shick, A B; Jungwirth, T

    2011-05-01

    A spin valve is a microelectronic device in which high- and low-resistance states are realized by using both the charge and spin of carriers. Spin-valve structures used in modern hard-drive read heads and magnetic random access memoriescomprise two ferromagnetic electrodes whose relative magnetization orientations can be switched between parallel and antiparallel configurations, yielding the desired giant or tunnelling magnetoresistance effect. Here we demonstrate more than 100% spin-valve-like signal in a NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt stack with an antiferromagnet on one side and a non-magnetic metal on the other side of the tunnel barrier. Ferromagneticmoments in NiFe are reversed by external fields of approximately 50  mT or less, and the exchange-spring effect of NiFe on IrMn induces rotation of antiferromagnetic moments in IrMn, which is detected by the measured tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our work demonstrates a spintronic element whose transport characteristics are governed by an antiferromagnet. It demonstrates that sensitivity to low magnetic fields can be combined with large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetotransport anisotropy using a single magnetic electrode. The antiferromagnetic tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance provides a means to study magnetic characteristics of antiferromagnetic films by an electronic-transport measurement.

  12. A spin-valve-like magnetoresistance of an antiferromagnet-based tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Park, B G; Wunderlich, J; Martí, X; Holý, V; Kurosaki, Y; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, H; Nishide, A; Hayakawa, J; Takahashi, H; Shick, A B; Jungwirth, T

    2011-05-01

    A spin valve is a microelectronic device in which high- and low-resistance states are realized by using both the charge and spin of carriers. Spin-valve structures used in modern hard-drive read heads and magnetic random access memoriescomprise two ferromagnetic electrodes whose relative magnetization orientations can be switched between parallel and antiparallel configurations, yielding the desired giant or tunnelling magnetoresistance effect. Here we demonstrate more than 100% spin-valve-like signal in a NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt stack with an antiferromagnet on one side and a non-magnetic metal on the other side of the tunnel barrier. Ferromagneticmoments in NiFe are reversed by external fields of approximately 50  mT or less, and the exchange-spring effect of NiFe on IrMn induces rotation of antiferromagnetic moments in IrMn, which is detected by the measured tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our work demonstrates a spintronic element whose transport characteristics are governed by an antiferromagnet. It demonstrates that sensitivity to low magnetic fields can be combined with large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetotransport anisotropy using a single magnetic electrode. The antiferromagnetic tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance provides a means to study magnetic characteristics of antiferromagnetic films by an electronic-transport measurement. PMID:21399629

  13. Magnetothermopower and magnetoresistance of single Co-Ni/Cu multilayered nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnert, Tim; Niemann, Anna Corinna; Michel, Ann-Kathrin; Bäßler, Svenja; Gooth, Johannes; Tóth, Bence G.; Neuróhr, Katalin; Péter, László; Bakonyi, Imre; Vega, Victor; Prida, Victor M.; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2014-10-01

    The magnetothermopower and the magnetoresistance of single Co-Ni/Cu multilayered nanowires with various thicknesses of the Cu spacer are investigated. Both kinds of measurement are performed as a function of temperature (50-325 K) and under applied magnetic fields perpendicular to the nanowire axis, with magnitudes up to -15% at room temperature. A linear relation between thermopower S and electrical conductivity σ of the nanowires is found, with the magnetic field as an implicit variable. Combining the linear behavior of the S vs σ relation and the Mott formula, the energy derivative of the resistivity is determined. In order to extract the true nanowire materials parameters from the measured thermopower, a simple model based on the Mott formula is employed to distinguish the individual thermopower contributions of the sample. By assuming that the nondiffusive thermopower contributions of the nanowire can be neglected, it is found that the magnetic-field-induced changes of thermopower and resistivity are equivalent. The emphasis in the present paper is on the comparison of the magnetoresistance and magnetothermopower results and it is found that the same correlation is valid between the two sets of data for all samples, irrespective of the relative importance of the giant magnetoresistance or anisotropic magnetoresistance contributions in the various individual nanowires.

  14. Rashba-Edelstein Magnetoresistance in Metallic Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Kanno, Yusuke; An, Hongyu; Tashiro, Takaharu; Haku, Satoshi; Nomura, Akiyo; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of magnetoresistance originating from Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in a metallic heterostructure: the Rashba-Edelstein (RE) magnetoresistance. We show that the simultaneous action of the direct and inverse RE effects in a Bi /Ag /CoFeB trilayer couples current-induced spin accumulation to the electric resistance. The electric resistance changes with the magnetic-field angle, reminiscent of the spin Hall magnetoresistance, despite the fact that bulk SOC is not responsible for the magnetoresistance. We further found that, even when the magnetization is saturated, the resistance increases with increasing the magnetic-field strength, which is attributed to the Hanle magnetoresistance in this system.

  15. Rashba-Edelstein Magnetoresistance in Metallic Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Kanno, Yusuke; An, Hongyu; Tashiro, Takaharu; Haku, Satoshi; Nomura, Akiyo; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of magnetoresistance originating from Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in a metallic heterostructure: the Rashba-Edelstein (RE) magnetoresistance. We show that the simultaneous action of the direct and inverse RE effects in a Bi/Ag/CoFeB trilayer couples current-induced spin accumulation to the electric resistance. The electric resistance changes with the magnetic-field angle, reminiscent of the spin Hall magnetoresistance, despite the fact that bulk SOC is not responsible for the magnetoresistance. We further found that, even when the magnetization is saturated, the resistance increases with increasing the magnetic-field strength, which is attributed to the Hanle magnetoresistance in this system. PMID:27661708

  16. Hybrid Molecular and Spin Dynamics Simulations for Ensembles of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetoresistive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Lisa; Schröder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The development of magnetoresistive sensors based on magnetic nanoparticles which are immersed in conductive gel matrices requires detailed information about the corresponding magnetoresistive properties in order to obtain optimal sensor sensitivities. Here, crucial parameters are the particle concentration, the viscosity of the gel matrix and the particle structure. Experimentally, it is not possible to obtain detailed information about the magnetic microstructure, i.e., orientations of the magnetic moments of the particles that define the magnetoresistive properties, however, by using numerical simulations one can study the magnetic microstructure theoretically, although this requires performing classical spin dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations simultaneously. Here, we present such an approach which allows us to calculate the orientation and the trajectory of every single magnetic nanoparticle. This enables us to study not only the static magnetic microstructure, but also the dynamics of the structuring process in the gel matrix itself. With our hybrid approach, arbitrary sensor configurations can be investigated and their magnetoresistive properties can be optimized. PMID:26580623

  17. Scanning magnetoresistance microscopy of atom chips.

    PubMed

    Volk, M; Whitlock, S; Wolff, C H; Hall, B V; Sidorov, A I

    2008-02-01

    Surface based geometries of microfabricated wires or patterned magnetic films can be used to magnetically trap and manipulate ultracold neutral atoms or Bose-Einstein condensates. We investigate the magnetic properties of such atom chips using a scanning magnetoresistive (MR) microscope with high spatial resolution and high field sensitivity. By comparing MR scans of a permanent magnetic atom chip to field profiles obtained using ultracold atoms, we show that MR sensors are ideally suited to observe small variations of the magnetic field caused by imperfections in the wires or magnetic materials which ultimately lead to fragmentation of ultracold atom clouds. Measurements are also provided for the magnetic field produced by a thin current-carrying wire with small geometric modulations along the edge. Comparisons of our measurements with a full numeric calculation of the current flow in the wire and the subsequent magnetic field show excellent agreement. Our results highlight the use of scanning MR microscopy as a convenient and powerful technique for precisely characterizing the magnetic fields produced near the surface of atom chips.

  18. Large linear magnetoresistance in a transition-metal stannide β-RhSn4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, X. Z.; Xu, C. Q.; Zhou, N.; Li, B.; Zhang, Jinglei; Shi, Z. X.; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Materials exhibiting large magnetoresistance may not only be of fundamental research interest, but also can lead to wide-ranging applications in magnetic sensors and switches. Here we demonstrate a large linear-in-field magnetoresistance, Δρ/ρ reaching as high as ˜600% at 2 K under a 9 T field, in the tetragonal phase of a transition-metal stannide β-RhSn4. Detailed analyses show that its magnetic responses are overall inconsistent with the classical model based on the multiple electron scattering by mobility fluctuations in an inhomogenous conductor, but rather in line with the quantum effects due to the presence of Dirac-like dispersions in the electronic structure. Our results may help guiding the future quest for quantum magnetoresistive materials into the family of stannides, similar to the role played by PtSn4 with topological node arcs.

  19. Room Temperature Giant and Linear Magnetoresistance in Topological Insulator Bi2Te3 Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi2Te3 topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  20. Room temperature giant and linear magnetoresistance in topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-29

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi(2)Te(3) topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  1. Giant magnetoresistance in silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chengyong; Luo, Guangfu; Liu, Qihang; Zheng, Jiaxin; Zhang, Zhimeng; Nagase, Shigeru; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lu, Jing

    2012-05-01

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we predict a giant magnetoresistance in zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) connecting two semi-infinite silicene electrodes through switch of the edge spin direction of ZSiNRs. Spin-filter efficiency of both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ZSiNRs is sign-changeable with the bias voltage. Therefore, potential application of silicene in spintronics devices is suggested.By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we predict a giant magnetoresistance in zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) connecting two semi-infinite silicene electrodes through switch of the edge spin direction of ZSiNRs. Spin-filter efficiency of both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ZSiNRs is sign-changeable with the bias voltage. Therefore, potential application of silicene in spintronics devices is suggested. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The total current contrasts between the AFM and FM configurations and the spin-resolved I-Vbias characteristics in the AFM and FM configurations of all the checked ZSiNRs as a function of bias voltage; the spin-resolved I-Vbias characteristics and SFEs of different-length 5-ZSiNR in the AFM and FM configurations as a function of bias voltage. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr00037g

  2. Hall magnetoresistivity response under microwave excitation revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Inarrea, Jesus

    2007-04-23

    The authors theoretically analyzed the microwave-induced modification of the Hall magnetoresistivity in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems. These systems present diagonal magnetoresistivity oscillations and zero-resistance states when subjected to microwave radiation. The most surprising modification of the Hall magnetoresistivity is a periodic reduction which correlates with a periodic increase in the diagonal resistivity. The authors present a model that explains the experimental results considering that radiation affects directly only the diagonal resistivity and that the observed Hall resistivity changes come from the tensor relationship between them.

  3. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in a canted ferrimagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Barker, Joseph; Schlitz, Richard; Piot, Benjamin A.; Ollefs, Katharina; Guillou, Francois; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Rogalev, Andrei; Opel, Matthias; Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2016-09-01

    We study the spin Hall magnetoresistance effect in ferrimagnet/normal metal bilayers, comparing the response in collinear and canted magnetic phases. In the collinear magnetic phase, in which the sublattice magnetic moments are all aligned along the same axis, we observe the conventional spin Hall magnetoresistance. In contrast, in the canted phase, the magnetoresistance changes sign. Using atomistic spin simulations and x-ray absorption experiments, we can understand these observations in terms of the magnetic field and temperature dependent orientation of magnetic moments on different magnetic sublattices. This enables a magnetotransport based investigation of noncollinear magnetic textures.

  4. Anisotropic transport and magnetic properties of arrays of sub-micron wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraux, L.; Dubois, S.; Ferain, E.; Legras, R.; Ounadjela, K.; George, J. M.; Maurice, J. L.; Fert, A.

    1997-01-01

    We report a comparative study of anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic properties in arrays of sub-micron Ni and Co wires electro-deposited in the cylindrical pores of track-etched polymer membranes. The variation of coercivity and squareness as a function of wire diameter for arrays of almost isolated sub-micron wires is reported in the range 30-500 nm. The Ni and Co-based systems demonstrate different magnetic and magnetoresistive behaviors except for the smallest diameter. It is believed that the observed difference originates from the presence of competing crystal anisotropy in the Co-based system.

  5. Characteristics of the dual-bridge giant magnetoresistance magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Jen-Tzong; Hsu, Ting-Yu

    2011-03-01

    The responsivity and the field noise characteristics of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) magnetometer driven by an alternating magnetic field are investigated. The harmonic spectrum of the sensor voltage shows that only the odd harmonics of excitation frequency are sensitive to the external dc field. To cancel out the even harmonics, the dual-bridge GMR magnetometer with the balanced output is proposed. With the dual-bridge configuration, the field-to-voltage transfer coefficient is doubled and the field noise is reduced by a factor of 1.4. The minimum field noise is 7 nT∕√Hz at 1 Hz with the ac excitation power of 5.5 mW. The proposed sensor is suitable for the electronic compass application.

  6. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  7. Tunneling magnetoresistance of silicon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-05-01

    The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of a silicon chain sandwiched between nickel electrodes was examined by using first-principles density functional theory. The relative orientation of the magnetization in a parallel-alignment (PA) configuration of two nickel electrodes enhanced the current with a bias less than 0.4 V compared with that in an antiparallel-alignment configuration. Consequently, the silicon chain-nickel electrodes yielded good TMR characteristics. In addition, there was polarized spin current in the PA configuration. The spin polarization of sulfur atoms functioning as a linking bridge between the chain and nickel electrode played an important role in the magnetic effects of the electric current. Moreover, the hybridization of the sulfur 3p orbital and σ-conjugated silicon 3p orbital contributed to increasing the total current.

  8. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-21

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  9. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  10. Giant magnetoresistance through a single molecule.

    PubMed

    Schmaus, Stefan; Bagrets, Alexei; Nahas, Yasmine; Yamada, Toyo K; Bork, Annika; Bowen, Martin; Beaurepaire, Eric; Evers, Ferdinand; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2011-03-01

    Magnetoresistance is a change in the resistance of a material system caused by an applied magnetic field. Giant magnetoresistance occurs in structures containing ferromagnetic contacts separated by a metallic non-magnetic spacer, and is now the basis of read heads for hard drives and for new forms of random access memory. Using an insulator (for example, a molecular thin film) rather than a metal as the spacer gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance, which typically produces a larger change in resistance for a given magnetic field strength, but also yields higher resistances, which are a disadvantage for real device operation. Here, we demonstrate giant magnetoresistance across a single, non-magnetic hydrogen phthalocyanine molecule contacted by the ferromagnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We measure the magnetoresistance to be 60% and the conductance to be 0.26G(0), where G(0) is the quantum of conductance. Theoretical analysis identifies spin-dependent hybridization of molecular and electrode orbitals as the cause of the large magnetoresistance. PMID:21336269

  11. Magnetoresistance from quantum interference effects in ferromagnets

    PubMed

    Manyala; Sidis; DiTusa; Aeppli; Young; Fisk

    2000-04-01

    The desire to maximize the sensitivity of read/write heads (and thus the information density) of magnetic storage devices has stimulated interest in the discovery and design of new magnetic materials exhibiting magnetoresistance. Recent discoveries include the 'colossal' magnetoresistance in the manganites and the enhanced magnetoresistance in low-carrier-density ferromagnets. An important feature of these systems is that the electrons involved in electrical conduction are different from those responsible for the magnetism. The latter are localized and act as scattering sites for the mobile electrons, and it is the field tuning of the scattering strength that ultimately gives rise to the observed magnetoresistance. Here we argue that magnetoresistance can arise by a different mechanism in certain ferromagnets--quantum interference effects rather than simple scattering. The ferromagnets in question are disordered, low-carrier-density magnets where the same electrons are responsible for both the magnetic properties and electrical conduction. The resulting magnetoresistance is positive (that is, the resistance increases in response to an applied magnetic field) and only weakly temperature-dependent below the Curie point.

  12. Tunable magnetoresistance in an asymmetrically coupled single-molecule junction.

    PubMed

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prüser, Henning; Sharp, John; Persson, Mats; Fisher, Andrew J; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F

    2015-03-01

    Phenomena that are highly sensitive to magnetic fields can be exploited in sensors and non-volatile memories. The scaling of such phenomena down to the single-molecule level may enable novel spintronic devices. Here, we report magnetoresistance in a single-molecule junction arising from negative differential resistance that shifts in a magnetic field at a rate two orders of magnitude larger than Zeeman shifts. This sensitivity to the magnetic field produces two voltage-tunable forms of magnetoresistance, which can be selected via the applied bias. The negative differential resistance is caused by transient charging of an iron phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule on a single layer of copper nitride (Cu2N) on a Cu(001) surface, and occurs at voltages corresponding to the alignment of sharp resonances in the filled and empty molecular states with the Cu(001) Fermi energy. An asymmetric voltage-divider effect enhances the apparent voltage shift of the negative differential resistance with magnetic field, which inherently is on the scale of the Zeeman energy. These results illustrate the impact that asymmetric coupling to metallic electrodes can have on transport through molecules, and highlight how this coupling can be used to develop molecular spintronic applications. PMID:25622229

  13. Tunable magnetoresistance in an asymmetrically coupled single-molecule junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prüser, Henning; Sharp, John; Persson, Mats; Fisher, Andrew J.; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2015-03-01

    Phenomena that are highly sensitive to magnetic fields can be exploited in sensors and non-volatile memories. The scaling of such phenomena down to the single-molecule level may enable novel spintronic devices. Here, we report magnetoresistance in a single-molecule junction arising from negative differential resistance that shifts in a magnetic field at a rate two orders of magnitude larger than Zeeman shifts. This sensitivity to the magnetic field produces two voltage-tunable forms of magnetoresistance, which can be selected via the applied bias. The negative differential resistance is caused by transient charging of an iron phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule on a single layer of copper nitride (Cu2N) on a Cu(001) surface, and occurs at voltages corresponding to the alignment of sharp resonances in the filled and empty molecular states with the Cu(001) Fermi energy. An asymmetric voltage-divider effect enhances the apparent voltage shift of the negative differential resistance with magnetic field, which inherently is on the scale of the Zeeman energy. These results illustrate the impact that asymmetric coupling to metallic electrodes can have on transport through molecules, and highlight how this coupling can be used to develop molecular spintronic applications.

  14. Analysis of the spin Hall magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althammer, Matthias; Meyer, Sibylle; Schreier, Michael; Weiler, Mathias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Kuschel, Timo; Klewe, Christoph; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Reiss, Günter; Gupta, Arunava; Chen, Yan-Ting; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Saitoh, Eiji; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-03-01

    Pure spin currents, i.e. the net flow of spin angular momentum without an accompanying charge current, represent a new paradigm for spin transport and spintronics. We have experimentally studied a new type of magnetoresistance effect, which arises from the interaction of charge and spin current flows in ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal hybrid structures. In more detail, we measured the resistance of yttrium iron garnet(YIG)/Pt, YIG/nonferromagnet/Pt, nickel ferrite/Pt, and magnetite/Pt hybrid structures as a function of the magnitude and the orientation of an external magnetic field. The resistance changes observed can be quantitatively traced back to the combined action of spin Hall and inverse spin Hall effect in the Pt metal layer, and are thus termed spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR). We show that the SMR is qualitatively different from the conventional anisotropic magnetoresistance effect arising in magnetic metals. Furthermore, the SMR enables us to quantify the spin Hall angle in our Pt layers. Financial support by the DFG via SPP 1538 (project no. GO 944/4) and the Nanoinitiative Munich (NIM) is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Tunneling magnetoresistive heads for magnetic data storage.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sining

    2007-01-01

    Spintronics is emerging to be a new form of nanotechnologies, which utilizes not only the charge but also spin degree of freedom of electrons. Spin-dependent tunneling transport is one of the many kinds of physical phenomena involving spintronics, which has already found industrial applications. In this paper, we first provide a brief review on the basic physics and materials for magnetic tunnel junctions, followed more importantly by a detailed coverage on the application of magnetic tunneling devices in magnetic data storage. The use of tunneling magnetoresistive reading heads has helped to maintain a fast growth of areal density, which is one of the key advantages of hard disk drives as compared to solid-state memories. This review is focused on the first commercial tunneling magnetoresistive heads in the industry at an areal density of 80 approximately 100 Gbit/in2 for both laptop and desktop Seagate hard disk drive products using longitudinal media. The first generation tunneling magnetoresistive products utilized a bottom stack of tunnel junctions and an abutted hard bias design. The output signal amplitude of these heads was 3 times larger than that of comparable giant magnetoresistive devices, resulting in a 0.6 decade bit error rate gain over the latter. This has enabled high component and drive yields. Due to the improved thermal dissipation of vertical geometry, the tunneling magnetoresistive head runs cooler with a better lifetime performance, and has demonstrated similar electrical-static-discharge robustness as the giant magnetoresistive devices. It has also demonstrated equivalent or better process and wafer yields compared to the latter. The tunneling magnetoresistive heads are proven to be a mature and capable reader technology. Using the same head design in conjunction with perpendicular recording media, an areal density of 274 Gbit/in2 has been demonstrated, and advanced tunneling magnetoresistive heads can reach 311 Gbit/in2. Today, the

  16. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2

    SciTech Connect

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-19

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. As a result, a change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe₂ was identified.

  17. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Gobaut, B.; Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Panaccione, G.; Torelli, P.; Rafaqat, H.; Roddaro, S.; Rossi, G.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.

    2015-12-15

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude.

  18. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface.

  19. Extraordinary magnetoresistance in two and three dimensions: Geometrical optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugsley, Lisa M.; Ram-Mohan, L. R.; Solin, S. A.

    2013-02-01

    The extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) in metal-semiconductor hybrid structures was first demonstrated using a van der Pauw configuration for a circular semiconductor wafer with a concentric metallic inclusion in it. This effect depends on the orbital motion of carriers in an external magnetic field, and the remarkably high magnetoresistance response observed suggests that the geometry of the metallic inclusion can be optimized to further significantly enhance the EMR. Here, we consider the theory and simulations to achieve this goal by comparing both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures in an external magnetic field to evaluate the EMR in them. New results for 3D structures are presented to show the feasibility of such modeling. Examples of structures that are compatible with present day technological capabilities are given together with their expected responses in terms of EMR. For a 10 μm 2D square structure with a square metallic inclusion, we find an MR up to 107 percent for an applied magnetic field of 1 T. In 3D, for a 10 μm cube with a 5 μm centered metallic inclusion, we obtain an MR of ˜104 percent, which is comparable with the 2D structure of equivalent dimensions. The results presented here for specific geometries are scalable to smaller dimensions down to the onset of ballistic effects in the transport. The present calculations open up the possibility of 3D magnetic field sensors capable of determining the magnitude and also direction of the magnetic field once a full characterization of the sensor response is performed.

  20. Dynamic Vehicle Detection via the Use of Magnetic Field Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Markevicius, Vytautas; Navikas, Dangirutis; Zilys, Mindaugas; Andriukaitis, Darius; Valinevicius, Algimantas; Cepenas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-01

    The vehicle detection process plays the key role in determining the success of intelligent transport management system solutions. The measurement of distortions of the Earth’s magnetic field using magnetic field sensors served as the basis for designing a solution aimed at vehicle detection. In accordance with the results obtained from research into process modeling and experimentally testing all the relevant hypotheses an algorithm for vehicle detection using the state criteria was proposed. Aiming to evaluate all of the possibilities, as well as pros and cons of the use of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) sensors in the transport flow control process, we have performed a series of experiments with various vehicles (or different series) from several car manufacturers. A comparison of 12 selected methods, based on either the process of determining the peak signal values and their concurrence in time whilst calculating the delay, or by measuring the cross-correlation of these signals, was carried out. It was established that the relative error can be minimized via the Z component cross-correlation and Kz criterion cross-correlation methods. The average relative error of vehicle speed determination in the best case did not exceed 1.5% when the distance between sensors was set to 2 m. PMID:26797615

  1. Dynamic Vehicle Detection via the Use of Magnetic Field Sensors.

    PubMed

    Markevicius, Vytautas; Navikas, Dangirutis; Zilys, Mindaugas; Andriukaitis, Darius; Valinevicius, Algimantas; Cepenas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-19

    The vehicle detection process plays the key role in determining the success of intelligent transport management system solutions. The measurement of distortions of the Earth's magnetic field using magnetic field sensors served as the basis for designing a solution aimed at vehicle detection. In accordance with the results obtained from research into process modeling and experimentally testing all the relevant hypotheses an algorithm for vehicle detection using the state criteria was proposed. Aiming to evaluate all of the possibilities, as well as pros and cons of the use of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) sensors in the transport flow control process, we have performed a series of experiments with various vehicles (or different series) from several car manufacturers. A comparison of 12 selected methods, based on either the process of determining the peak signal values and their concurrence in time whilst calculating the delay, or by measuring the cross-correlation of these signals, was carried out. It was established that the relative error can be minimized via the Z component cross-correlation and Kz criterion cross-correlation methods. The average relative error of vehicle speed determination in the best case did not exceed 1.5% when the distance between sensors was set to 2 m.

  2. Dynamic Vehicle Detection via the Use of Magnetic Field Sensors.

    PubMed

    Markevicius, Vytautas; Navikas, Dangirutis; Zilys, Mindaugas; Andriukaitis, Darius; Valinevicius, Algimantas; Cepenas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-01

    The vehicle detection process plays the key role in determining the success of intelligent transport management system solutions. The measurement of distortions of the Earth's magnetic field using magnetic field sensors served as the basis for designing a solution aimed at vehicle detection. In accordance with the results obtained from research into process modeling and experimentally testing all the relevant hypotheses an algorithm for vehicle detection using the state criteria was proposed. Aiming to evaluate all of the possibilities, as well as pros and cons of the use of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) sensors in the transport flow control process, we have performed a series of experiments with various vehicles (or different series) from several car manufacturers. A comparison of 12 selected methods, based on either the process of determining the peak signal values and their concurrence in time whilst calculating the delay, or by measuring the cross-correlation of these signals, was carried out. It was established that the relative error can be minimized via the Z component cross-correlation and Kz criterion cross-correlation methods. The average relative error of vehicle speed determination in the best case did not exceed 1.5% when the distance between sensors was set to 2 m. PMID:26797615

  3. Crossed Andreev reflection-induced magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Giazotto, Francesco; Taddei, Fabio; Beltram, Fabio; Fazio, Rosario

    2006-08-25

    We show that very large negative magnetoresistance can be obtained in magnetic trilayers in a current-in-plane geometry owing to the existence of crossed Andreev reflection. This spin valve consists of a thin superconducting film sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers whose magnetization is allowed to be either parallelly or antiparallelly aligned. For a suitable choice of structure parameters and nearly fully spin-polarized ferromagnets, the magnetoresistance can exceed -80%. Our results are relevant for the design and implementation of spintronic devices exploiting ferromagnet-superconductor structures. PMID:17026324

  4. Current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance in spin-valves with AgSn alloy spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J. C.; Nakatani, T. M.; Smith, Neil; Choi, Y.-S.; York, B. R.; Brinkman, E.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-07-28

    We investigate the use of AgSn alloys as the spacer layer in current-perpendicular-to-the-plane magnetoresistance devices. Alloying with Sn increases resistivity but results in a reasonably long (>10 nm) spin-diffusion length, so large magnetoresistance can be achieved with thin AgSn spacers. Compared to Ag thin films, AgSn forms smaller grain sizes, reduced roughness, and exhibits less interdiffusion upon annealing, resulting in decreased interlayer magnetic coupling in exchange biased spin-valves. AgSn also shows improved corrosion resistance compared to Ag, which is advantageous for nanofabrication, including magnetic recording head sensors. Combining a AgSn spacer with Co-based Heusler alloy ferromagnet in an exchange biased, polycrystalline trilayer thinner than 12 nm results in magnetoresistance values up to 15% at room temperature.

  5. Current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance in spin-valves with AgSn alloy spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. C.; Nakatani, T. M.; Smith, Neil; Choi, Y.-S.; York, B. R.; Brinkman, E.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the use of AgSn alloys as the spacer layer in current-perpendicular-to-the-plane magnetoresistance devices. Alloying with Sn increases resistivity but results in a reasonably long (>10 nm) spin-diffusion length, so large magnetoresistance can be achieved with thin AgSn spacers. Compared to Ag thin films, AgSn forms smaller grain sizes, reduced roughness, and exhibits less interdiffusion upon annealing, resulting in decreased interlayer magnetic coupling in exchange biased spin-valves. AgSn also shows improved corrosion resistance compared to Ag, which is advantageous for nanofabrication, including magnetic recording head sensors. Combining a AgSn spacer with Co-based Heusler alloy ferromagnet in an exchange biased, polycrystalline trilayer thinner than 12 nm results in magnetoresistance values up to 15% at room temperature.

  6. Alkanethiol capping-induced changes in the magnetoresistance of Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaus, Brad; Garzon, Samir; Crawford, Thomas M.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate that chemisorption of a ˜ 1 nm thick dodecanethiol (C12H25SH) self-assembled monolayer on the surface of an Au film alters the magnetotransport of an underlying Co film. Giant paramagnetism has been previously detected in Au thin films and nanoparticles capped with alkanethiols via SQUID magnetometry. By observing the impact of Au-thiol magnetism on a ferromagnetic thin film we avoid background subtraction and the influence of impurities. After thiolation, significant changes are observed in the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and planar Hall effect (PHE) from Co/Au bilayers (30 nm/5-60 nm) patterned into 1 x 5 mm^2 bars. Driven with nearly perpendicular external fields, we observed domain nucleation shifts of ˜0.65 T and changes in the FWHM of the AMR. We have also measured differences in the MR as a function of ambient exposure time presumably due to oxidation effects known to occur in alkanethiols. Effects of surface scattering were eliminated with the introduction of a 12nm Al2O3 insulation barrier between Co and Au. We have calculated that the effects of magnetostriction are too small by more than two orders of magnitude to explain our observations. We therefore hypothesize that Au-thiol magnetization acts as a source of magnetic field which biases the underlying Co film.

  7. Single molecule actuation and detection on a lab-on-a-chip magnetoresistive platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, R. C.; Bensimon, D.; Freitas, P. P.

    2011-03-01

    On-chip magnetic tweezers based on current loops were integrated with magnetoresistive sensors. Magnetic forces up to 1.0±0.3pN are produced to actuate on DNA anchored to the surface of a flow cell and labeled with micrometer-sized magnetic beads. The levitation of the beads stretches the immobilized DNA. The relative position of the magnetic beads is monitored using spin-valve sensors. A bead vertical displacement resolution of 60nm is derived for DNA molecular motor activity in a tweezer steady current regime.

  8. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  9. Magnetization and magnetoresistance of common alloy wires used in cryogenic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrecht, M.; Adare, A.; Ekin, J. W.

    2007-04-01

    We present magnetization and magnetoresistance data at liquid-helium and liquid-nitrogen temperatures for wire materials commonly used for instrumentation wiring of specimens, sensors, and heaters in cryogenic probes. The magnetic susceptibilities in Systeme International units at 4.2 K were found to be: Manganin 1.25×10-2, Nichrome 5.6×10-3, and phosphor bronze -3.3×10-5, indicating that phosphor bronze is the most suitable for high-field applications. We also show the ferromagnetic hysteresis loop of Constantan wire at liquid-helium temperature. The magnetoresistance of these four wires was relatively small: the changes in resistance at 4 K due to a 10 T transverse magnetic field are -2.56% for Constantan, -2.83% for Manganin, +0.69% for Nichrome, and +4.5% for phosphor bronze, compared to about +188% for a typical copper wire under the same conditions.

  10. Magnetization and magnetoresistance of common alloy wires used in cryogenic instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Abrecht, M; Adare, A; Ekin, J W

    2007-04-01

    We present magnetization and magnetoresistance data at liquid-helium and liquid-nitrogen temperatures for wire materials commonly used for instrumentation wiring of specimens, sensors, and heaters in cryogenic probes. The magnetic susceptibilities in Systeme International units at 4.2 K were found to be: Manganin 1.25x10(-2), Nichrome 5.6x10(-3), and phosphor bronze -3.3x10(-5), indicating that phosphor bronze is the most suitable for high-field applications. We also show the ferromagnetic hysteresis loop of Constantan wire at liquid-helium temperature. The magnetoresistance of these four wires was relatively small: the changes in resistance at 4 K due to a 10 T transverse magnetic field are -2.56% for Constantan, -2.83% for Manganin, +0.69% for Nichrome, and +4.5% for phosphor bronze, compared to about +188% for a typical copper wire under the same conditions.

  11. Anisotropic ray trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  12. Unusual magnetoresistance in cubic B20 Fe0.85Co0.15Si chiral magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. X.; Chen, Fei; Kang, Jian; Zang, Jiadong; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-06-01

    The B20 chiral magnets with broken inversion symmetry and C4 rotation symmetry have attracted much attention. The broken inversion symmetry leads to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya that gives rise to the helical and Skyrmion states. We report the unusual magnetoresistance (MR) of B20 chiral magnet Fe0.85Co0.15Si that directly reveals the broken C4 rotation symmetry and shows the anisotropic scattering by Skyrmions with respect to the current directions. The intimacy between unusual MR and broken symmetry is well confirmed by theoretically studying an effective Hamiltonian with spin–orbit coupling. The unusual MR serves as a transport signature for the Skyrmion phase.

  13. Magnetoresistive system with concentric ferromagnetic asymmetric nanorings

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, J. I. Tumelero, M. A.; Pasa, A. A.; Viegas, A. D. C.

    2015-03-14

    A structure consisting of two concentric asymmetric nanorings, each displaying vortex remanent states, is studied with micromagnetic calculations. By orienting in suitable directions, both the asymmetry of the rings and a uniform magnetic field, the vortices chiralities can be switched from parallel to antiparallel, obtaining in this way the analogue of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations found in bar magnets pairs. Conditions on the thickness of single rings to obtain vortex states, as well as formulas for their remanent magnetization are given. The concentric ring structure enables the creation of magnetoresistive systems comprising the qualities of magnetic nanorings, such as low stray fields and high stability. A possible application is as contacts in spin injection in semiconductors, and estimations obtained here of magnetoresistance change for a cylindrical spin injection based device show significant variations comparable to linear geometries.

  14. Dirac State in Giant Magnetoresistive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Jo, N. H.; Ochi, M.; Huang, L.; Mou, D.; Kong, T.; Mun, E.; Wang, L.; Lee, Y.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Trivedi, N.; Arito, R.; Kaminski, A.

    We use ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the electronic properties of materials that recently were discovered to display titanic magnetoresistance. We find that that several of these materials have Dirac-like features in their band structure. In some materials those features are ``ordinary'' Dirac cones, while in others the linear Dirac dispersion of two crossing bands forms a linear object in 3D momentum space. Our observation poses an important question about the role of Dirac dispersion in the unusually high, non-saturating magnetoresistance of these materials. Research was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358; Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation EPiQS Initiative (Grant No. GBMF4411); CEM, a NSF MRSEC, under Grant No. DMR-1420451.

  15. Magnetoresistance of Rippled Graphene in a Parallel Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Junichi; Sano, Tomoya

    2011-12-01

    The magnetoresistance of a monolayer graphene in a random magnetic field(RMF) with zero mean has been investigated. The RMF was produced by applying a magnetic field parallel to the graphene plane utilizing ripples. The magnetoresistance has shown the same magnetic field dependence and, unexpectedly, the same carrier density dependence as the conventional two-dimensional electron systems in random magnetic fields. The relation between the characteristic length of ripples and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance is discussed.

  16. Speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjian; Acton, Scott T

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides the derivation of speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD), a diffusion method tailored to ultrasonic and radar imaging applications. SRAD is the edge-sensitive diffusion for speckled images, in the same way that conventional anisotropic diffusion is the edge-sensitive diffusion for images corrupted with additive noise. We first show that the Lee and Frost filters can be cast as partial differential equations, and then we derive SRAD by allowing edge-sensitive anisotropic diffusion within this context. Just as the Lee and Frost filters utilize the coefficient of variation in adaptive filtering, SRAD exploits the instantaneous coefficient of variation, which is shown to be a function of the local gradient magnitude and Laplacian operators. We validate the new algorithm using both synthetic and real linear scan ultrasonic imagery of the carotid artery. We also demonstrate the algorithm performance with real SAR data. The performance measures obtained by means of computer simulation of carotid artery images are compared with three existing speckle reduction schemes. In the presence of speckle noise, speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion excels over the traditional speckle removal filters and over the conventional anisotropic diffusion method in terms of mean preservation, variance reduction, and edge localization.

  17. Giant magnetoresistance in organic spin-valves.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Z H; Wu, Di; Vardeny, Z Valy; Shi, Jing

    2004-02-26

    A spin valve is a layered structure of magnetic and non-magnetic (spacer) materials whose electrical resistance depends on the spin state of electrons passing through the device and so can be controlled by an external magnetic field. The discoveries of giant magnetoresistance and tunnelling magnetoresistance in metallic spin valves have revolutionized applications such as magnetic recording and memory, and launched the new field of spin electronics--'spintronics'. Intense research efforts are now devoted to extending these spin-dependent effects to semiconductor materials. But while there have been noteworthy advances in spin injection and detection using inorganic semiconductors, spin-valve devices with semiconducting spacers have not yet been demonstrated. pi-conjugated organic semiconductors may offer a promising alternative approach to semiconductor spintronics, by virtue of their relatively strong electron-phonon coupling and large spin coherence. Here we report the injection, transport and detection of spin-polarized carriers using an organic semiconductor as the spacer layer in a spin-valve structure, yielding low-temperature giant magnetoresistance effects as large as 40 per cent. PMID:14985756

  18. Fe/Bi2Te3/Fe Tunneling Magneto-Resistance with topological insulator barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Vallery; Seifu, Dereje

    2014-03-01

    Thin film tri-layer structure Fe/Bi2Te3/Fe was synthesized using magnetron DC / RF sputtering. This sample was synthesized at a substrate temperature of 100 °C. It was studied using in-house built magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) instrument. The operating principles of MOKE consist of measuring changes in polarization of light reflected from a magnetic sample. The bulk magnetization was measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and torque magneto meter (TMM). Topographic structure and magnetic domains were studied using atomic force microscope (AFM) and magnetic force microscope (MFM). Tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) effect occurs in a structure that is composed of two conductors separated by a thin insulator of the order of few nanometers, the insulator barrier in this case is a well known topological insulator, Bi2Te3. In this structure, electrons tunnel from one of the conductors to the other through the insulating barrier. This is a forbidden process in classical physics, tunnel magneto-resistance is a purely quantum mechanical effect which is key in developing magneto-resistive random access memory (MRAM), magnetic sensors, and novel logic devices. We would like to acknowledge the support by ARL #W911NF-12-2-0041 and by NSF #MRI -DMR-1337339.

  19. Mixture of Anisotropic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, W.; Maj, R.

    The recently introduced approach describing coupled quark and gluon anisotropic fluids is generalized to include explicitly the transitions between quarks and gluons. We study the effects of such processes on the thermalization rate of anisotropic systems. We find that the quark-gluon transitions may enhance the overall thermalization rate in the cases where the initial momentum anisotropies correspond to mixed oblate-prolate or prolate configurations. On the other hand, no effect on the thermalization rate is found in the case of oblate configurations. The observed regularities are connected with the late-time behavior of the analyzed systems which is described either by the exponential decay or the power law.

  20. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  1. Magnetoresistance in antiferromagnet-based spin tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungwirth, Tomas

    2012-02-01

    To date spintronics research and applications of magnetically ordered systems have focused on ferromagnets (FMs). There are, however, fundamental physical limitations for FM materials which may make them impractical to realize the full potential of spintronics. Metal FMs offer high temperature operation but the large magnetic stray fields make them unfavorable for high-density integration and metals are unsuitable for transistor and information processing applications. FM semiconductors on the other hand do not allow for high-temperature operation. We present a concept in which these limitations are circumvented in spintronics based on antiferromagnets. The concept is based on relativistic magnetic and magneto-transport anisotropy effects in nanodevices whose common characteristics is that they are an even function of the microscopic magnetic moment vector, i.e., can be equally strong in AFMs as in FMs. As a demonstration we present our experimental observation of >100% tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in a device with an IrMn AFM tunnel electrode [1]. We will also discuss candidate materials for high-temperature AFM semiconductor spintronics [2].[4pt] [1] B. G. Park, J.Wunderlich, X.Marti, V.Holy, Y.Kurosaki, M.Yamada, H.Yamamoto, A.Nishide, J.Hayakawa, H.Takahashi, A.B.Shick, T.Jungwirth, Nature Mat. 10, 347 (2011). [0pt] [2] T.Jungwirth, V.Nov'ak, X.Marti, M.Cukr, F.M'aca, A.B. Shick, J.Masek, P.Horodysk'a, P.Nemec, V.Hol'y, et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 035321 (2011).

  2. Polarization dependent asymmetric magneto-resistance features in nanocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-08-18

    Polar angle-dependence of magneto-resistance (AMR) in heavily nitrogen-incorporated ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films is recorded by applying high magnetic fields, which shows strong anisotropic features at low temperatures. The temperature-dependence of MR and AMR can reveal transport in the weak-localization regime, which is explained by using a superlattice model for arbitrary values of disorder and angles. While a propagative Fermi surface model explains the negative MR features for low degree of disorder the azimuthal angle-dependent MR shows field dependent anisotropy due to the aligned conducting channels on the layers normal to film growth direction. The analysis of MR and AMR can extract the temperature dependence of dephasing time with respect to the elastic scattering time which not only establishes quasi-two dimensional features in this system but also suggests a potential application in monitoring the performance of UNCD based quantum devices.

  3. Rectification of radio-frequency current in a giant-magnetoresistance spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietek, Sławomir; Ogrodnik, Piotr; Frankowski, Marek; Checiński, Jakub; Wiśniowski, Piotr; Skowroński, Witold; Wrona, Jerzy; Stobiecki, Tomasz; Żywczak, Antoni; Barnaś, Józef

    2015-01-01

    We report on a highly efficient spin diode effect in exchange-biased spin-valve giant-magnetoresistance (GMR) strips. In such multilayer structures, the symmetry of the current distribution along the vertical direction is broken and, as a result, a noncompensated Oersted field acting on the magnetic free layer appears. This field in turn is a driving force of magnetization precessions. Due to the GMR effect, the resistance of the strip oscillates following the magnetization dynamics. This leads to rectification of the applied radio-frequency current and induces a direct-current voltage Vdc. We present a theoretical description of this phenomenon and calculate the spin diode signal Vdc as a function of frequency, external magnetic field, and angle at which the external field is applied. Satisfactory quantitative agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental data has been achieved. Finally, we show that the spin diode signal in GMR devices is significantly stronger than in the anisotropic magnetoresistance permalloy-based devices.

  4. Towards sub-200 nm nano-structuring of linear giant magneto-resistive spin valves by a direct focused ion beam milling process

    SciTech Connect

    Riedmüller, Benjamin; Huber, Felix; Herr, Ulrich

    2014-02-14

    In this work, we present a detailed investigation of a focused ion beam (FIB) assisted nano-structuring process for giant magneto-resistive (GMR) spin valve sensors. We have performed a quantitative study of the dependence of the GMR ratio as well as the sensor resistance on the ion dose, which is implanted in the active region of our sensors. These findings are correlated with the decrease of magneto-resistive properties after micro- and nano-structuring by the FIB and reveal the importance of ion damage which limits the applicability of FIB milling to GMR devices in the low μm range. Deposition of a protective layer (50 nm SiO{sub 2}) on top of the sensor structure before milling leads to a preservation of the magneto-resistive properties after the milling procedure down to sensor dimensions of ∼300 nm. The reduction of the sensor dimensions to the nanometer regime is accompanied by a shift of the GMR curves, and a modification of the saturation behavior. Both effects can be explained by a micromagnetic model including the magnetic interaction of free and pinned layer as well as the effect of the demagnetizing field of the free layer on the sensor behavior. The results demonstrate that the FIB technology can be successfully used to prepare spintronic nanostructures.

  5. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  6. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jérôme

    2006-11-01

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  7. Magnetoresistive DNA chips based on ac field focusing of magnetic labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, H. A.; Cardoso, F. A.; Ferreira, R.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2006-04-01

    A study was made on the sensitivity of a magnetoresistive DNA-chip platform being developed for cystic fibrosis diagnostics. The chip, comprised of an array of 2.5×80 μm2 U-shaped spin-valve sensors integrated within current line structures for magnetic label manipulation, enabled the detection at 30 Hz of 250 nm magnetic nanoparticles from 100 pM down to the pM range (or a target DNA concentration of 500 pM). It was observed that the sensor response increased linearly with label concentration. Noise spectra obtained for these sensors showed a thermal noise of 10-17 V2/Hz with a 1/f knee at 50 kHz at a 1 mA sense current, showing that lower detection limits are possible.

  8. High-sensitivity two-terminal magnetoresistance devices using InGaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional channel on GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di-Cheng; Pan, You-Wei; Wu, Jenq-Shinn; Lin, Shih-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the two-terminal magnetic sensors exhibiting an extraordinary magneto-resistance effect by using an InGaAs quantum well channel with a metal-shunting structure. A high magneto-resistance of 17.3% and a sensitivity of 488.1 Ω/T have been obtained at 1 T and room temperature with our geometrical design. The two-contact configuration and the high-mobility electron transistor-compatible epitaxy structure make the devices promising for high-sensitivity magnetic sensing integration and applications.

  9. Dramatically decreased magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao; Pang, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Da-Jun; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y. B.; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Minghui; Liu, Zhongkai; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the layered semimetal WTe2 has attracted renewed interest owing to the observation of a non-saturating and giant positive magnetoresistance (~105%), which can be useful for magnetic memory and spintronic devices. However, the underlying mechanisms of the giant magnetoresistance are still under hot debate. Herein, we grew the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals to test the robustness of giant magnetoresistance. The stoichiometric WTe2 crystals have magnetoresistance as large as 3100% at 2 K and 9-Tesla magnetic field. However, only 71% and 13% magnetoresistance in the most non-stoichiometry (WTe1.80) and the highest Mo isovalent substitution samples (W0.7Mo0.3Te2) are observed, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic-field dependent magnetoresistance of non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals substantiates that both the large electron-hole concentration asymmetry and decreased carrier mobility, induced by non-stoichiometry, synergistically lead to the decreased magnetoresistance. This work sheds more light on the origin of giant magnetoresistance observed in WTe2.

  10. Hall effect and magnetoresistivity in the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Hall coefficient and magnetoresistance of sputtered films of Cu(x)Mo6S8 and PbMo6S8 have been measured, as well as the magnetoresistance in sintered samples of the same materials. Assuming a single band model, net carrier densities and mean mobilities are determined

  11. Dramatically decreased magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao; Pang, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Da-Jun; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y. B.; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Minghui; Liu, Zhongkai; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the layered semimetal WTe2 has attracted renewed interest owing to the observation of a non-saturating and giant positive magnetoresistance (~105%), which can be useful for magnetic memory and spintronic devices. However, the underlying mechanisms of the giant magnetoresistance are still under hot debate. Herein, we grew the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals to test the robustness of giant magnetoresistance. The stoichiometric WTe2 crystals have magnetoresistance as large as 3100% at 2 K and 9-Tesla magnetic field. However, only 71% and 13% magnetoresistance in the most non-stoichiometry (WTe1.80) and the highest Mo isovalent substitution samples (W0.7Mo0.3Te2) are observed, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic-field dependent magnetoresistance of non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals substantiates that both the large electron-hole concentration asymmetry and decreased carrier mobility, induced by non-stoichiometry, synergistically lead to the decreased magnetoresistance. This work sheds more light on the origin of giant magnetoresistance observed in WTe2. PMID:27228908

  12. Sign control of magnetoresistance through chemically engineered interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ciudad, David; Gobbi, Marco; Kinane, Christy J; Eich, Marius; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Hueso, Luis E

    2014-12-01

    Chemically engineered interfaces are shown to produce inversions of the magnetoresistance in spintronic devices including lithium fluoride interlayers. This behavior is explained by the formation of anti-ferromagnetic difluoride layers. By changing the order of deposition of the different materials, the sign of the magnetoresistance can be deterministically controlled both in organic spin valves and in inorganic magnetic tunnel junctions.

  13. Sign control of magnetoresistance through chemically engineered interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ciudad, David; Gobbi, Marco; Kinane, Christy J; Eich, Marius; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Hueso, Luis E

    2014-12-01

    Chemically engineered interfaces are shown to produce inversions of the magnetoresistance in spintronic devices including lithium fluoride interlayers. This behavior is explained by the formation of anti-ferromagnetic difluoride layers. By changing the order of deposition of the different materials, the sign of the magnetoresistance can be deterministically controlled both in organic spin valves and in inorganic magnetic tunnel junctions. PMID:25339373

  14. Large magnetoresistance in oxide based ferromagnet/superconductor spin switches.

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, V.; Nemes, N.; Visani, C.; Garcia-Barriocanal, J.; Bruno, F.; Arias, D.; Sefrioui, Z.; Leon, C.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Santamaria, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Complutense de Madrid; Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid

    2006-01-01

    We report large magnetoresistance (in excess of 1000%) in ferromagnet / superconductor / ferromagnet structures made of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} in the current in plane (CIP) geometry. This magnetoresistance has many of the ingredients of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic superlattices: it is independent on the angle between current and magnetic field, depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization in the ferromagnetic layers, and takes very large values. The origin is enhanced scattering at the F/S interface in the anti parallel configuration of the magnetizations. Furthermore, we examine the dependence of the magnetoresistance effect on the thickness of the superconducting layer, and show that the magnetoresistance dies out for thickness in excess of 30 nm, setting a length scale for the diffusion of spin polarized quasiparticles.

  15. Electrically tuned magnetic order and magnetoresistance in a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuocheng; Feng, Xiao; Guo, Minghua; Li, Kang; Zhang, Jinsong; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Yang; Wang, Lili; Chen, Xi; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Wang, Yayu

    2014-09-15

    The interplay between topological protection and broken time reversal symmetry in topological insulators may lead to highly unconventional magnetoresistance behaviour that can find unique applications in magnetic sensing and data storage. However, the magnetoresistance of topological insulators with spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry is still poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the transport properties of a ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film fabricated into a field effect transistor device. We observe a complex evolution of gate-tuned magnetoresistance, which is positive when the Fermi level lies close to the Dirac point but becomes negative at higher energies. This trend is opposite to that expected from the Berry phase picture, but is intimately correlated with the gate-tuned magnetic order. The underlying physics is the competition between the topology-induced weak antilocalization and magnetism-induced negative magnetoresistance. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and magnetoresistance facilitates future topological insulator based spintronic devices.

  16. Anisotropic resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwanger, J. V.; Pain, C. C.; Binley, A.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Worthington, M. H.

    2004-08-01

    Geophysical tomographic techniques have the potential to remotely detect and characterize geological features, such as fractures and spatially varying lithologies, by their response to signals passed through these features. Anisotropic behaviour in many geological materials necessitates the generalization of tomographic methods to include anisotropic material properties in order to attain high-quality images of the subsurface. In this paper, we present a finite element (FE) based direct-current electrical inversion method to reconstruct the conductivity tensor at each node point of a FE mesh from electrical resistance measurements. The inverse problem is formulated as a functional optimization and the non-uniqueness of the electrical inverse problem is overcome by adding penalty terms for structure and anisotropy. We use a modified Levenberg-Marquardt method for the functional optimization and the resulting set of linear equation is solved using pre-conditioned conjugate gradients. The method is tested using both synthetic and field experiments in cross-well geometry. The acquisition geometry for both experiments uses a cross-well experiment at a hard-rock test site in Cornwall, southwest England. Two wells, spaced at 25.7 m, were equipped with electrodes at a 1 m spacing at depths from 21-108 m and data were gathered in pole-pole geometry. The test synthetic model consists of a strongly anisotropic and conductive body underlain by an isotropic resistive formation. Beneath the resistive formation, the model comprises a moderately anisotropic and moderately conductive half-space, intersected by an isotropic conductive layer. This model geometry was derived from the interpretation of a seismic tomogram and available geological logs and the conductivity values are based on observed conductivities. We use the test model to confirm the ability of the inversion scheme to recover the (known) true model. We find that all key features of the model are recovered. However

  17. Giant magnetoresistance in organic spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Da-Li; Yin, Lifeng; Sun, Chengjun; Guo, Hangwen; Gai, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Ward, Thomas Z; Cheng, Zhaohua; Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial diffusion between magnetic electrodes and organic spacer layers is a serious problem in the organic spintronics which complicates attempts to understand the spin-dependent transport mechanism and hurts the achievement of a desirably high magnetoresistance (MR). We deposit nanodots instead of atoms onto the organic layer using buffer layer assist growth. Spin valves using this method exhibit a sharper interface and a giant MR of up to {approx}300%. Analysis of the current-voltage characteristics indicates that the spin-dependent carrier injection correlates with the observed MR.

  18. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Choi, Heonjin; Lee, Sangkwon; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kuykendal, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  19. Giant magnetoresistance in bilayer graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghadan, Rouhollah; Farekiyan, Marzieh

    2016-09-01

    Coherent spin transport through bilayer graphene (BLG) nanoflakes sandwiched between two electrodes made of single-layer zigzag graphene nanoribbon was investigated by means of Landauer-Buttiker formalism. Application of a magnetic field only on BLG structure as a channel produces a perfect spin polarization in a large energy region. Moreover, the conductance could be strongly modulated by magnetization of the zigzag edge of AB-stacked BLG, and the junction, entirely made of carbon, produces a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) up to 100%. Intestinally, GMR and spin polarization could be tuned by varying BLG width and length. Generally, MR in a AB-stacked BLG strongly increases (decreases) with length (width).

  20. Magnetization and magnetoresistance of a spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebenin, N. G.; Ustinov, V. V.

    2015-02-01

    Hysteresis of magnetization and magnetoresistance caused by a change in the orientation of the free layer of a spin valve has been investigated theoretically. It has been shown that the width of the hysteresis loop determined from the data on the dependence of the magnetic moment of the valve on the magnetic field can be less than the width of the loop determined from the resistive data. Formulas have been obtained that describe the dependence of the width of the hysteresis loop on the magnetic field at various values of the exchange field acting on the free layer.

  1. Direct visualization of lead corona and its nanomolar colorimetric detection using anisotropic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Charu; Chaudhary, Abhishek; Gupta, Abhishek; Nandi, Chayan K

    2015-03-11

    The study presents dithiothreitol (DTT) functionalized anisotropic gold nanoparticles (GNP) based colorimetric sensor for detection of toxic lead ions in water. Our results demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the developed sensor over various heavy metal ions with detection limit of ∼9 nM. The mechanism of sensing is explained on the basis of unique corona formation around the DTT functionalized anisotropic GNP.

  2. Direct visualization of lead corona and its nanomolar colorimetric detection using anisotropic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Charu; Chaudhary, Abhishek; Gupta, Abhishek; Nandi, Chayan K

    2015-03-11

    The study presents dithiothreitol (DTT) functionalized anisotropic gold nanoparticles (GNP) based colorimetric sensor for detection of toxic lead ions in water. Our results demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the developed sensor over various heavy metal ions with detection limit of ∼9 nM. The mechanism of sensing is explained on the basis of unique corona formation around the DTT functionalized anisotropic GNP. PMID:25719820

  3. Kondo effect goes anisotropic in vanadate oxide superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotella, H.; Pautrat, A.; Copie, O.; Boullay, P.; David, A.; Mercey, B.; Morales, M.; Prellier, W.

    2015-11-01

    We study the transport properties in SrVO3/LaVO3 (SVO/LVO) superlattices deposited on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. We show that the electronic conduction occurs in the metallic LVO layers with a galvanomagnetism typical of a 2D Fermi surface. In addition, a Kondo-like component appears in both the thermal variation of resistivity and the magnetoresistance. Surprisingly, in this system where the STO interface does not contribute to the measured conduction, the Kondo correction is strongly anisotropic. We show that the growth temperature allows a direct control of this contribution. Finally, the key role of vanadium mixed valency stabilized by oxygen vacancies is enlightened.

  4. Shield-related signal instability in magnetoresistive heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, K.; Narumi, S.; Kawabe, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, H.

    1999-04-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) heads with various upper shield materials were fabricated and their read-write performance was tested to clarify the shield-related effect on the signal instability in MR heads. Comparison of a head with an upper shield layer of higher magnetostriction and one with lower magnetostriction showed that the latter had better stability in the output signal of a repeated read-write test. The output amplitude of a head with an upper shield layer of Co52Ni27Fe21 film, which had a high magnetostriction of about +3×10-6, was varied by applying a low external longitudinal field, which affected just the shield layers. This change in the output corresponded well to the output variation in the repeated read-write test. The spin scanning electron micrograph image of this head revealed a distinct domain wall in the air bearing surface near the MR sensor. These results indicated that instability of the domain structure in a shield layer was one of the causes of the signal instability in MR heads; an unusual bias field from a domain wall of the shield layer, which could be moved easily by a repeated writing operation, caused a variation in the biased state of the MR layer which resulted in the signal variation, and that low magnetostriction was required for a shield material to achieve a stable head.

  5. Femtomolar limit of detection with a magnetoresistive biochip.

    PubMed

    Martins, V C; Cardoso, F A; Germano, J; Cardoso, S; Sousa, L; Piedade, M; Freitas, P P; Fonseca, L P

    2009-04-15

    In this paper the biological limit of detection of a spin-valve-based magnetoresistive biochip applied to the detection of 20 mer ssDNA hybridization events is presented. Two reactional variables and their impact on the biomolecular recognition efficiency are discussed. Both the influence of a 250 nm diameter magnetic particle attached to the target molecule during the hybridization event and the effect of a magnetic focusing system in the hybridization of pre-labeled target DNA (assisted hybridization) are addressed. The particles carrying the target molecules are attracted to the probe active sensor sites by applying a 40 mA DC current on U-shaped aluminium current lines. Experiments comparing pre-hybridization versus post-hybridization magnetic labeling and passive versus magnetically assisted hybridization were conducted. The efficiency of a passive hybridization is reduced by about 50% when constrained to the operational conditions (sample volume, reaction time, temperature and magnetic label) of an on-chip real-time hybridization assay. This reduction has shown to be constant and independent from the initial target concentration. Conversely, the presence of the magnetic label improved the limit of detection when a magnetically assisted hybridization was performed. The use of a labeled target focusing system has permitted a gain of three orders of magnitude (from 1 pM down to 1 fM) in the sensitivity of the device, as compared with passive, diffusion-controlled hybridization. PMID:19261460

  6. Three-dimensional Anisotropy and Kohler's Rule Scaling of the Magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Lei

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) was recently discovered to have extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) at low temperatures and exhibits a transformative 'turn-on' temperature behavior: when the applied magnetic field H is above a certain value, the resistivity versus temperature ρ (T) curve shows a minimum at a field dependent temperature T* (H) . Since WTe2 is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, it is typically considered to be a two dimensional (2D) material, whereby the anisotropic magnetoresistance is attributed only to the perpendicular component of the magnetic field. Moreover, the 'turn-on' temperature behavior has been interpreted as a magnetic-field-driven metal-insulator transition or attributed to an electronic structure change. In this talk I will report on two scaling behaviors of the magnetoresistance in WTe2. The first shows that the angle dependence of the magnetoresistance follows a conventional 3D anisotropy scaling and hence reveals the electrical 3D nature of WTe2. The second demonstrates that the ρ (T , H) curves, including those with 'turn-on' temperature behavior, can be scaled with Kohler's rule. The observed Kohler's rule scaling excludes the possible existence of a magnetic-field-driven metal-insulator transition or significant contribution of an electronic structure change to the low-temperature XMR in WTe2. It indicates that both the XMR and the 'turn-on' behavior originate from the high mobilities of the charge carriers, which are strongly temperature dependent in WTe2. We also derived quantitative expressions for the magnetic field dependence of the 'turn-on' temperature T* (H) and for the temperature dependence of the resistivity ρ (T* , H) at the onset of the XMR behavior. In collaboration with L. R. Thoutam, Z. L. Xiao, J. Hu, S. Das, Z. Q. Mao, J. Wei, R. Divan, A. Luican-Mayer, G. W. Crabtree, and W. K. Kwok This work was supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, BES

  7. Magnetoresistance of the new ceramic "Cernox" thermometer from 4.2 K to 300 K in magnetic fields up to 13 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, G.; Lang, W.

    Measurements of the resistance and the magnetoresistance of a new ceramic thin-film temperature sensor (Cernox-1080, Lake Shore Cryotronics Inc.) are reported for magnetic fields up to 13 T in the temperature range 4.2 to 300 K. The zero-field resistance changes monotonically over more than three orders of magnitude with a negative temperature coefficient. The magnetoresistance is small at temperatures above 10 K and exhibits partially compensating positive and negative components. The magnetic-field induced temperature reading error at 13 T is about 2% at 4.2 K and less than 0.3% at 10 K and above. In the temperature range 80 to 300 K, the magnetoresistance can be approximated by a fourth-order polynomial, allowing for an estimation and correction of the apparent temperature reading error of the Cernox thermometer in high magnetic fields.

  8. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  9. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  10. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Peres, M. L. Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF{sub 2} exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30 T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ΔR/ΔB is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF{sub 2} doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  11. Anisotropic Total Variation Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Grasmair, Markus; Lenzen, Frank

    2010-12-15

    Total variation regularization and anisotropic filtering have been established as standard methods for image denoising because of their ability to detect and keep prominent edges in the data. Both methods, however, introduce artifacts: In the case of anisotropic filtering, the preservation of edges comes at the cost of the creation of additional structures out of noise; total variation regularization, on the other hand, suffers from the stair-casing effect, which leads to gradual contrast changes in homogeneous objects, especially near curved edges and corners. In order to circumvent these drawbacks, we propose to combine the two regularization techniques. To that end we replace the isotropic TV semi-norm by an anisotropic term that mirrors the directional structure of either the noisy original data or the smoothed image. We provide a detailed existence theory for our regularization method by using the concept of relaxation. The numerical examples concluding the paper show that the proposed introduction of an anisotropy to TV regularization indeed leads to improved denoising: the stair-casing effect is reduced while at the same time the creation of artifacts is suppressed.

  12. Nonlocal Magnetoresistance Mediated by Spin Superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-10-01

    The electrical response of two diffusive metals is studied when they are linked by a magnetic insulator hosting a topologically stable (superfluid) spin current. We discuss how charge currents in the metals induce a spin supercurrent state, which in turn generates a magnetoresistance that depends on the topology of the electrical circuit. This magnetoresistance relies on phase coherence over the entire magnet and gives direct evidence for spin superfluidity. We show that driving the magnet with an ac current allows coherent spin transport even in the presence of U(1)-breaking magnetic anisotropy that can preclude dc superfluid transport. Spin transmission in the ac regime shows a series of resonance peaks as a function of frequency. The peak locations, heights, and widths can be used to extract static interfacial properties, e.g., the spin-mixing conductance and effective spin Hall angle, and to probe dynamic properties such as the spin-wave dispersion. Thus, ac transport may provide a simpler route to realizing nonequilbrium coherent spin transport and a useful way to characterize the magnetic system, serving as a precursor to the realization of dc superfluid spin transport.

  13. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Althammer, Matthias

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  14. Large magnetoresistance of insulating silicon films with superconducting nanoprecipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.; Fiedler, J.; Skorupa, W.

    2016-10-01

    We report on large negative and positive magnetoresistance in inhomogeneous, insulating Si:Ga films below a critical temperature of about 7 K. The magnetoresistance effect exceeds 300 % at temperatures below 3 K and fields of 8 T. The comparison of the transport properties of superconducting samples with that of insulating ones reveals that the large magnetoresistance is associated with the appearance of local superconductivity. A simple phenomenological model based on localized Cooper pairs and hopping quasiparticles is able to describe the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the sheet resistance of such films.

  15. Magnetoresistance in magnetic and nonmagnetic rare earth compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, E.; Maikis, M.; Bauer, E.; Nowotny, H.

    1995-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance Δρ/ ρ of selected magnetic and nonmagnetic RE compounds in fields up to 10 T has been measured. The discussion of the positive magnetoresistance is based on Kohler's rule. It was found that deviations from Kohler's rule at low temperatures depend on the magnitude of the individual residual resistivity. Ferromagnetic compounds exhibit negative values and a minimum in the vicinity of the Curie temperature in accordance to a model calculation of Yamada and Takada. The positive Δρ/ ρ contribution in the low temperature region, observed in all magnetic compounds, is due to the dominating classical magnetoresistance in this temperature range.

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the precise transduction mechanism in giant magnetoresistive biosensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Sato, Noriyuki; Bechstein, Daniel J B; Osterfeld, Sebastian J; Wang, Junyi; Gani, Adi Wijaya; Hall, Drew A; Wang, Shan X

    2016-01-05

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors consisting of many rectangular stripes are being developed for high sensitivity medical diagnostics of diseases at early stages, but many aspects of the sensing mechanism remain to be clarified. Using e-beam patterned masks on the sensors, we showed that the magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm located between the stripes predominantly determine the sensor signals over those located on the sensor stripes. Based on computational analysis, it was confirmed that the particles in the trench, particularly those near the edges of the stripes, mainly affect the sensor signals due to additional field from the stripe under an applied field. We also demonstrated that the direction of the average magnetic field from the particles that contributes to the signal is indeed the same as that of the applied field, indicating that the particles in the trench are pivotal to produce sensor signal. Importantly, the same detection principle was validated with a duplex protein assay. Also, 8 different types of sensor stripes were fabricated and design parameters were explored. According to the detection principle uncovered, GMR biosensors can be further optimized to improve their sensitivity, which is highly desirable for early diagnosis of diseases.

  17. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the precise transduction mechanism in giant magnetoresistive biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Sato, Noriyuki; Bechstein, Daniel J. B.; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Wang, Junyi; Gani, Adi Wijaya; Hall, Drew A.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors consisting of many rectangular stripes are being developed for high sensitivity medical diagnostics of diseases at early stages, but many aspects of the sensing mechanism remain to be clarified. Using e-beam patterned masks on the sensors, we showed that the magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm located between the stripes predominantly determine the sensor signals over those located on the sensor stripes. Based on computational analysis, it was confirmed that the particles in the trench, particularly those near the edges of the stripes, mainly affect the sensor signals due to additional field from the stripe under an applied field. We also demonstrated that the direction of the average magnetic field from the particles that contributes to the signal is indeed the same as that of the applied field, indicating that the particles in the trench are pivotal to produce sensor signal. Importantly, the same detection principle was validated with a duplex protein assay. Also, 8 different types of sensor stripes were fabricated and design parameters were explored. According to the detection principle uncovered, GMR biosensors can be further optimized to improve their sensitivity, which is highly desirable for early diagnosis of diseases.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the precise transduction mechanism in giant magnetoresistive biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Sato, Noriyuki; Bechstein, Daniel J. B.; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Wang, Junyi; Gani, Adi Wijaya; Hall, Drew A.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors consisting of many rectangular stripes are being developed for high sensitivity medical diagnostics of diseases at early stages, but many aspects of the sensing mechanism remain to be clarified. Using e-beam patterned masks on the sensors, we showed that the magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm located between the stripes predominantly determine the sensor signals over those located on the sensor stripes. Based on computational analysis, it was confirmed that the particles in the trench, particularly those near the edges of the stripes, mainly affect the sensor signals due to additional field from the stripe under an applied field. We also demonstrated that the direction of the average magnetic field from the particles that contributes to the signal is indeed the same as that of the applied field, indicating that the particles in the trench are pivotal to produce sensor signal. Importantly, the same detection principle was validated with a duplex protein assay. Also, 8 different types of sensor stripes were fabricated and design parameters were explored. According to the detection principle uncovered, GMR biosensors can be further optimized to improve their sensitivity, which is highly desirable for early diagnosis of diseases. PMID:26728870

  19. Impact location estimation in anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jingru; Mathews, V. John; Adams, Daniel O.

    2015-03-01

    Impacts are major causes of in-service damage in aerospace structures. Therefore, impact location estimation techniques are necessary components of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). In this paper, we consider impact location estimation in anisotropic composite structures using acoustic emission signals arriving at a passive sensor array attached to the structure. Unlike many published location estimation algorithms, the algorithm presented in this paper does not require the waveform velocity profile for the structure. Rather, the method employs time-of-arrival information to jointly estimate the impact location and the average signal transmission velocities from the impact to each sensor on the structure. The impact location and velocities are estimated as the solution of a nonlinear optimization problem with multiple quadratic constraints. The optimization problem is solved by using first-order optimality conditions. Numerical simulations as well as experimental results demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to accurately estimate the impact location using acoustic emission signals.

  20. A 256 pixel magnetoresistive biosensor microarray in 0.18μm CMOS.

    PubMed

    Hall, Drew A; Gaster, Richard S; Makinwa, Kofi; Wang, Shan X; Murmann, Boris

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic nanotechnologies have shown significant potential in several areas of nanomedicine such as imaging, therapeutics, and early disease detection. Giant magnetoresistive spin-valve (GMR SV) sensors coupled with magnetic nanotags (MNTs) possess great promise as ultra-sensitive biosensors for diagnostics. We report an integrated sensor interface for an array of 256 GMR SV biosensors designed in 0.18 μm CMOS. Arranged like an imager, each of the 16 column level readout channels contains an analog front- end and a compact ΣΔ modulator (0.054 mm(2)) with 84 dB of dynamic range and an input referred noise of 49 nT/√Hz. Performance is demonstrated through detection of an ovarian cancer biomarker, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), spiked at concentrations as low as 10 fM. This system is designed as a replacement for optical protein microarrays while also providing real-time kinetics monitoring.

  1. A 256 pixel magnetoresistive biosensor microarray in 0.18μm CMOS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Drew A.; Gaster, Richard S.; Makinwa, Kofi; Wang, Shan X.; Murmann, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanotechnologies have shown significant potential in several areas of nanomedicine such as imaging, therapeutics, and early disease detection. Giant magnetoresistive spin-valve (GMR SV) sensors coupled with magnetic nanotags (MNTs) possess great promise as ultra-sensitive biosensors for diagnostics. We report an integrated sensor interface for an array of 256 GMR SV biosensors designed in 0.18 μm CMOS. Arranged like an imager, each of the 16 column level readout channels contains an analog front- end and a compact ΣΔ modulator (0.054 mm2) with 84 dB of dynamic range and an input referred noise of 49 nT/√Hz. Performance is demonstrated through detection of an ovarian cancer biomarker, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), spiked at concentrations as low as 10 fM. This system is designed as a replacement for optical protein microarrays while also providing real-time kinetics monitoring. PMID:24761029

  2. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastiao, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 {mu}V amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  3. Giant magnetoresistive biosensors for molecular diagnosis: surface chemistry and assay development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Heng; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Xu, Liang; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2008-08-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biochips using magnetic nanoparticle as labels were developed for molecular diagnosis. The sensor arrays consist of GMR sensing strips of 1.5 μm or 0.75 μm in width. GMR sensors are exquisitely sensitive yet very delicate, requiring ultrathin corrosion-resistive passivation and efficient surface chemistry for oligonucleotide probe immobilization. A mild and stable surface chemistry was first developed that is especially suitable for modifying delicate electronic device surfaces, and a practical application of our GMR biosensors was then demonstrated for detecting four most common human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes in plasmids. We also showed that the DNA hybridization time could potentially be reduced from overnight to about ten minutes using microfluidics.

  4. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastião, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 μV amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  5. Sensors for noncontact vibration diagnostics in rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with electromagnetic sensors for noncontact vibration diagnostics in rotating machinery. The sensors were designed for operational measurements in turbomachinery by means of the tip-timing method. The main properties of eddy-current, Hall effect, induction and magnetoresistive sensors are described and compared. Possible arrangements of the experimental systems for static and dynamic calibration of the sensors are suggested and discussed.

  6. Anisotropic spinfoam cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennert, Julian; Sloan, David

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of a homogeneous, anisotropic universe are investigated within the context of spinfoam cosmology. Transition amplitudes are calculated for a graph consisting of a single node and three links—the ‘Daisy graph’—probing the behaviour a classical Bianchi I spacetime. It is shown further how the use of such single node graphs gives rise to a simplification of states such that all orders in the spin expansion can be calculated, indicating that it is the vertex expansion that contains information about quantum dynamics.

  7. Magnetic mesocrystal-assisted magnetoresistance in manganite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jan-Chi; He, Qing; Zhu, Yuan-Min; Lin, Jheng-Cyuan; Liu, Heng-Jui; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Wu, Ping-Chun; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lee, Shang-Fan; Chin, Yi-Ying; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, Chien-Te; Zhan, Qian; Arenholz, Elke; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2014-11-12

    Mesocrystal, a new class of crystals as compared to conventional and well-known single crystals and polycrystalline systems, has captured significant attention in the past decade. Recent studies have been focused on the advance of synthesis mechanisms as well as the potential on device applications. In order to create further opportunities upon functional mesocrystals, we fabricated a self-assembled nanocomposite composed of magnetic CoFe2O4 mesocrystal in Sr-doped manganites. This combination exhibits intriguing structural and magnetic tunabilities. Furthermore, the antiferromagnetic coupling of the mesocrystal and matrix has induced an additional magnetic perturbation to spin-polarized electrons, resulting in a significantly enhanced magnetoresistance in the nanocomposite. Our work demonstrates a new thought toward the enhancement of intrinsic functionalities assisted by mesocrystals and advanced design of novel mesocrystal-embedded nanocomposites.

  8. Evaluation of Magnetoresistive RAM for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidecker, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is a non-volatile memory that exploits electronic spin, rather than charge, to store data. Instead of moving charge on and off a floating gate to alter the threshold voltage of a CMOS transistor (creating different bit states), MRAM uses magnetic fields to flip the polarization of a ferromagnetic material thus switching its resistance and bit state. These polarized states are immune to radiation-induced upset, thus making MRAM very attractive for space application. These magnetic memory elements also have infinite data retention and erase/program endurance. Presented here are results of reliability testing of two space-qualified MRAM products from Aeroflex and Honeywell.

  9. Anomalous magnetoresistance in magnetized topological insulator cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-05-01

    The close coupling between the spin and momentum degrees of freedom in topological insulators (TIs) presents the opportunity for the control of one to manipulate the other. The momentum can, for example, be confined on a curved surface and the spin influenced by applying a magnetic field. In this work, we study the surface states of a cylindrical TI magnetized in the x direction perpendicular to the cylindrical axis lying along the z direction. We show that a large magnetization leads to an upwards bending of the energy bands at small |kz| . The bending leads to an anomalous magnetoresistance where the transmission between two cylinders magnetized in opposite directions is higher than when the cylinders are magnetized at intermediate angles with respect to each other.

  10. Anomalous magnetoresistance in magnetized topological insulator cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-05-07

    The close coupling between the spin and momentum degrees of freedom in topological insulators (TIs) presents the opportunity for the control of one to manipulate the other. The momentum can, for example, be confined on a curved surface and the spin influenced by applying a magnetic field. In this work, we study the surface states of a cylindrical TI magnetized in the x direction perpendicular to the cylindrical axis lying along the z direction. We show that a large magnetization leads to an upwards bending of the energy bands at small |k{sub z}|. The bending leads to an anomalous magnetoresistance where the transmission between two cylinders magnetized in opposite directions is higher than when the cylinders are magnetized at intermediate angles with respect to each other.

  11. Robustness of the magnetoresistance of nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, V.; Bascones, E.

    2011-08-01

    Recent work has found that the interplay between spin accumulation and Coulomb blockade in nanoparticle arrays results in peaky I-V and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) curves and in huge values of the TMR. We analyze how these effects are influenced by a polarization asymmetry of the electrodes, the dimensionality of the array, the temperature, resistance, or charge disorder, and long-range interactions. We show that the magnitude and voltage dependence of the TMR do not change with the dimensionality of the array or the presence of junction resistance disorder. A different polarization in the electrodes modifies the peak shape in the I-V and TMR curves but not their order of magnitude. Increasing the temperature or length of the interaction reduces to some extent the size of the peaks, the reduction being due to long-range interactions that are smaller in longer arrays. Charge disorder should be avoided to observe large TMR values.

  12. Low field magnetoresistance of gadolinium nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2014-02-07

    We report low field (μ{sub 0}H < 0.2 T) magnetoresistance (MR) studies on a single Gd nanowire patterned from a nano-structured film (average grain size ∼ 35 nm) by focused ion beam. For comparison, we did similar MR measurements on a polycrystalline sample with large crystallographic grains (∼4 μm). It is observed that in the low field region where the MR is due to motion of magnetic domains, the MR in the large grained sample shows a close relation to the characteristic temperature dependent magnetocrystalline anisotropy including a sharp rise in MR at the spin reorientation transition at 235 K. In stark contrast, in the nanowire, the MR shows complete suppression of the above behaviours and it shows predominance of the grain boundary and spin disorder controlling the domain response.

  13. High speed magneto-resistive random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high speed read MRAM memory element is configured from a sandwich of magnetizable, ferromagnetic film surrounding a magneto-resistive film which may be ferromagnetic or not. One outer ferromagnetic film has a higher coercive force than the other and therefore remains magnetized in one sense while the other may be switched in sense by a switching magnetic field. The magneto-resistive film is therefore sensitive to the amplitude of the resultant field between the outer ferromagnetic films and may be constructed of a high resistivity, high magneto-resistive material capable of higher sensing currents. This permits higher read voltages and therefore faster read operations. Alternate embodiments with perpendicular anisotropy, and in-plane anisotropy are shown, including an embodiment which uses high permeability guides to direct the closing flux path through the magneto-resistive material. High density, high speed, radiation hard, memory matrices may be constructed from these memory elements.

  14. Magnetoresistive properties of nanostructured magnetic metals, manganites, and magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, N. I.; Romashev, L. N.; Naumov, S. V.; Saranin, A. A.; Zotov, A. V.; Olyanich, D. A.; Kotlyar, V. G.; Utas, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We consider methods for controlling magnetoresistive parameters of magnetic metal superlattices, manganites, and magnetic semiconductors. By reducing the thickness of ferromagnetic layers in superlattices (e.g., Fe layers in Fe/Cr superlattices), it is possible to form superparamagnetic clustered-layered nanostructures with a magnetoresistance weakly depending on the direction of the external magnetic field, which is very important for applications of such type of materials. Producing Mn vacancies and additionally annealing lanthanum manganites in the oxygen atmosphere, it is possible to increase their magnetoresistance by more than four orders of magnitude. By changing the thickness of p- n junction in the structure of ferromagnetic semiconductors, their magnetoresistance can be increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  15. The suppression of the large magnetoresistance in thin WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jie; Woods, John; Cha, Judy

    The layered nature of WTe2 suggests the possibility of making a single layer WTe2 memory device that exploits the recently observed large magnetoresistance. Presently, the origin of the magnetoresistance is attributed to the charge balance between the electron and hole carriers, yet the exact underlying physical mechanism is unclear. Here we show a systematic suppression of the large magnetoresistance, as well as turn-on temperature, with decreasing thickness of WTe2. We attribute the thickness-dependent transport properties to undesirable parasitic effects that become dominant in thin films of WTe2. Our results highlight the increasing importance of characterizing the parasitic effects for 2D layered materials in a single- to a few-layer thick limit. Finally, our observations support the hypothesis that the origin of the large magnetoresistance may be due to the charge balance between the electron and the hole carriers.

  16. Quantum conductance in electrodeposited nanocontacts and magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhoussine, F.; Encinas, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.; Piraux, L.

    2003-05-01

    We present conductance and magnetoresistance measurements in magnetic Ni-Ni and Co-Ni nanocontacts prepared by electrodeposition within the pores of a track-etched polymer membrane. At room temperature, Ni-Ni constrictions show broad quantization plateaus of conductance during their dissolution into units of e2/h, as expected for ferromagnetic ballistic nanocontacts. Additionally, positive and negative magnetoresistance has been measured in Co-Ni nanocontacts.

  17. Anomalous magnetoresistance in NiMnGa thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Vladimir O.; Vovk, Andriy Ya.; Malkinski, Leszek; O'Connor, Charles J.; Wang, Zhenjun; Tang, Jinke

    2004-10-01

    The origin of anomalous negative magnetoresistance and its temperature dependence in polycrystalline Ni -Mn-Ga films prepared by pulse laser deposition was studied. The investigation of structural, transports, magnetic, and ferromagnetic resonance properties of the films suggests contributions of different mechanisms in magnetotransport. At low magnetic fields the main contribution to magnetoresistance is due to the transport between the areas with different orientation of magnetic moments, while at high fields it is an electron scattering of in spin-disordered areas.

  18. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Anisotropic thermal diffusion in magnetized plasmas is an important physical phenomena for a diverse set of physical conditions ranging from astrophysical plasmas to MFE and ICF. Yet numerically simulating this phenomenon accurately poses significant challenges when the computational mesh is misaligned with respect to the magnetic field. Particularly when the temperature gradients are unresolved, one frequently finds entropy violating solutions with heat flowing from cold to hot zones for χ∥ /χ⊥ >=102 which is substantially smaller than the range of interest which can reach 1010 or higher. In this talk we present a new implicit algorithm for solving the anisotropic thermal diffusion equations and demonstrate its characteristics on what has become a fairly standard set of test problems in the literature. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2013-5687A.

  19. Constraining anisotropic baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin

    2008-06-01

    We present an analysis of anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillations and elucidate how a mis-estimation of the cosmology, which leads to incorrect values of the angular diameter distance, dA, and Hubble parameter, H, manifest themselves in changes to the monopole and quadrupole power spectrum of biased tracers of the density field. Previous work has focused on the monopole power spectrum, and shown that the isotropic dilation combination dA2H-1 is robustly constrained by an overall shift in the scale of the baryon feature. We extend this by demonstrating that the quadrupole power spectrum is sensitive to an anisotropic warping mode dAH, allowing one to break the degeneracy between dA and H. We describe a method for measuring this warping, explicitly marginalizing over the form of redshift-space distortions. We verify this method on N-body simulations and estimate that dAH can be measured with a fractional accuracy of ˜(3/V)% where the survey volume is estimated in h-3Gpc3.

  20. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with ``flat'' (including toroidal) and ``open'' (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are ``flat'' or ``open''. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with ``flat'' or ``open'' topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  1. Anisotropic power-law inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro; Watanabe, Masa-aki E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2010-12-01

    We study an inflationary scenario in supergravity model with a gauge kinetic function. We find exact anisotropic power-law inflationary solutions when both the potential function for an inflaton and the gauge kinetic function are exponential type. The dynamical system analysis tells us that the anisotropic power-law inflation is an attractor for a large parameter region.

  2. Magnetic field microscopy of rock samples using a giant magnetoresistance-based scanning magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankard, Fatim; Gattacceca, JéRôMe; Fermon, Claude; Pannetier-Lecoeur, Myriam; Langlais, Benoit; Quesnel, Yoann; Rochette, Pierre; McEnroe, Suzanne A.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a new scanning magnetic microscope to image with micrometric resolution magnetic fields originating from room temperature polished samples. This microscope is based on a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor working at room temperature. These magnetic sensors are sensitive to the in-plane components of the magnetic field. The size of the sensing element is 9 μm × 36 μm. The noise of the GMR sensor is dominated by a low-frequency 1/f noise. The field equivalent noise of the sensors is 10 nT? at 1Hz and decreases to 0.3 nT? above 1 kHz for a 1 mA sensing current. The spatial resolution of the system is ˜20 μm, and its peak-to-peak noise during operation is ˜250 nT. Its high spatial resolution and a minimum sensor-to-sample distance of 30 μm compensate for its rather moderate field sensitivity. This room temperature small-sized and rugged magnetic microscope appears as a powerful instrument for small-scale rock magnetic investigations.

  3. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kats, C. M.

    2008-10-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are searching for colloidal materials with specific physical properties to better understand our surrounding world.Until recently research in colloid science was mainly focused on spherical (isotropic) particles. Monodisperse spherical colloids serve as a model system as they exhibit similar phase behaviour as molecular and atomic systems. Nevertheless, in many cases the spherical shape is not sufficient to reach the desired research goals. Recently the more complex synthesis methods of anisotropic model colloids has strongly developed. This thesis should be regarded as a contribution to this research area. Anisotropic colloids can be used as a building block for complex structures and are expected not only to lead to the construction of full photonic band gap materials. They will also serve as new, more realistic, models systems for their molecular analogues. Therefore the term ‘molecular colloids” is sometimes used to qualify these anisotropic colloidal particles. In the introduction of this thesis, we give an overview of the main synthesis techniques for anisotropic colloids. Chapter 2 describes the method of etching silicon wafers to construct monodisperse silicon rods. They subsequently were oxidized and labeled (coated) with a fluorescent silica layer. The first explorative phase behaviour of these silica rods was studied. The particles showed a nematic ordering in charge stabilized suspensions. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of colloidal gold rods and the (mesoporous) silica coating of gold rods. Chapter 4 describes the physical and optical properties of these particles when thermal energy is added. This is compared to the case where the particles are irradiated with

  4. Anisotropic Kepler and anisotropic two fixed centres problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Przybylska, Maria; Szumiński, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we show that the anisotropic Kepler problem is dynamically equivalent to a system of two point masses which move in perpendicular lines (or planes) and interact according to Newton's law of universal gravitation. Moreover, we prove that generalised version of anisotropic Kepler problem as well as anisotropic two centres problem are non-integrable. This was achieved thanks to investigation of differential Galois groups of variational equations along certain particular solutions. Properties of these groups yield very strong necessary integrability conditions.

  5. Magnetoresistivity and microstructure of YBa2Cu3Oy prepared using planetary ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrita, A.; Ben Azzouz, F.; Madani, A.; Ben Salem, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the microstructure and the magnetoresistivity of polycrystalline YBa2Cu3Oy (YBCO or Y-123 for brevity) embedded with nanoparticles of Y-deficient YBCO, generated by the planetary ball milling technique. Bulk samples were synthesized from a precursor YBCO powder, which was prepared from commercial high purity Y2O3, Ba2CO3 and CuO via a one-step annealing process in air at 950 °C. After planetary ball milling of the precursor, the powder was uniaxially pressed and subsequently annealed at 950 °C in air. Phase analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), granular structure examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microstructure investigation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were carried out. TEM analyses show that nanoparticles of Y-deficient YBCO, generated by ball milling, are embedded in the superconducting matrix. Electrical resistance as a function of temperature, ρ(T), revealed that the zero resistance temperature, Tco, is 84.5 and 90 K for the milled and unmilled samples respectively. The milled ceramics exhibit a large magnetoresistance in weak magnetic fields at liquid nitrogen temperature. This attractive effect is of high significance as it makes these materials promising candidates for practical application in magnetic field sensor devices.

  6. Positive magnetoresistance and large magnetostriction at first-order antiferro ferromagnetic phase transitions in RMn2Si2 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, E. G.; Mushnikov, N. V.; Koyama, K.; Kanomata, T.; Watanabe, K.

    2008-11-01

    The magnetostriction and magnetoresistance associated with the field-induced and spontaneous first-order antiferro-ferromagnetic (AF-F) phase transitions have been studied for quasi-single-crystalline samples of La0.25Sm0.75Mn2Si2, La0.25Y0.75Mn2Si2 and La0.27Y0.73Mn2Si2 compounds with natural layered ThCr2Si2-type structure. It was found that both the spontaneous and field-induced AF-F transitions are accompanied by a large volume magnetostriction ΔV/V≈2 × 10-3 and anisotropic linear changes of the lattice parameters Δa/a≈1.6 × 10-3, Δc/c≈-0.75 × 10-3. The field-induced AF-F magnetic phase transition has been observed in magnetic fields applied both along the c-axis and in the basal plane, and the magnetostriction value is virtually independent of the direction of applied field. It has been found also that the magnetoresistance is positive in these compounds (the value of the electrical resistance in the ferromagnetic state is higher than that in the antiferromagnetic state) for the fields applied both along the c-axis and in the basal plane. The value of the magnetoresistance observed along the c-axis is 30 times as high as that in the basal plane. The obtained results indicate that the electronic band structure changes are likely responsible for the AF-F magnetic phase transitions observed in the RMn2X2 compounds.

  7. Optical trapping of anisotropic nanocylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareil, Paul B.; Sheng, Yunlong

    2013-09-01

    The T-matrix method with the Vector Spherical Wave Function (VSWF) expansions represents some difficulties for computing optical scattering of anisotropic particles. As the divergence of the electric field is nonzero in the anisotropic medium and the VSWFs do not satisfy the anisotropic wave equations one questioned whether the VSWFs are still a suitable basis in the anisotropic medium. We made a systematic and careful review on the vector basis functions and the VSWFs. We found that a field vector in Euclidean space can be decomposed to triplet vectors {L, M, N}, which as non-coplanar. Especially, the vector L is designed to represent non-zero divergence component of the vector solution, so that the VSWF basis is sufficiently general to represent the solutions of the anisotropic wave equation. The mathematical proof can be that when the anisotropic wave equations is solved in the Fourier space, the solution is expanded in the basis of the plan waves with angular spectrum amplitude distributions. The plane waves constitute an orthogonal and complete set for the anisotropic solutions. Furthermore, the plane waves are expanded into the VSWF basis. These two-step expansions are equivalent to the one-step direct expansion of the anisotropic solution to the VSWF basis. We used direct VSWF expansion, along with the point-matching method in the T-matrix, and applied the boundary condition to the normal components displacement field in order to compute the stress and the related forces and torques and to show the mechanism of the optical trap of the anisotropic nano-cylinders.

  8. Anisotropic inflation with general potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, JiaMing; Huang, XiaoTian; Qiu, TaoTao

    2016-04-01

    Anomalies in recent observational data indicate that there might be some "anisotropic hair" generated in an inflation period. To obtain general information about the effects of this anisotropic hair to inflation models, we studied anisotropic inflation models that involve one vector and one scalar using several types of potentials. We determined the general relationship between the degree of anisotropy and the fraction of the vector and scalar fields, and concluded that the anisotropies behave independently of the potentials. We also generalized our study to the case of multi-directional anisotropies.

  9. Unusual magnetoresistance in cubic B20 Fe0.85Co0.15Si chiral magnets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, S. X.; Chen, Fei; Kang, Jian; Zang, Jiadong; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-06-24

    The B20 chiral magnets with broken inversion symmetry and C4 rotation symmetry have attracted much attention. The broken inversion symmetry leads to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya that gives rise to the helical and Skyrmion states.Wereport the unusual magnetoresistance (MR) of B20 chiral magnet Fe0.85Co0.15Si that directly reveals the broken C4 rotation symmetry and shows the anisotropic scattering by Skyrmions with respect to the current directions. The intimacy between unusual MR and broken symmetry is well confirmed by theoretically studying an effective Hamiltonian with spin–orbit coupling. In conclusion, the unusual MR serves as a transport signature for the Skyrmion phase.

  10. Positive magnetoresistance in Ca-doped cobaltites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S. M. Li, Y.; Guo, Y. Q.; Zhao, J. Y.; Shi, L.

    2014-12-08

    Transport properties of polycrystalline La{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.25) are systemically studied in this work. Three types of magnetoresistance (MR) effects are found in the Ca-doped cobaltites. Two negative MRs appear around high-temperature ferromagnetic transition and at low temperatures, which correspond to the conventional MR due to the field-induced suppression of spin-disorder scattering and the intergranular giant-MR due to spin-dependent transport between the ferromagnetic clusters, respectively. More interestingly, another exotic positive MR emerges at intermediate temperature region, which had not been previously reported in Sr- and Ba-doped cobaltites. It is found that this positive MR is associated with an abnormally magnetic transition and increases with the increase of x. For x = 0.25, the MR at low temperatures is dominated by the positive one, which is isotropic and nearly linear with the magnetic field. The possible origin of the positive MR in the Ca-doped cobaltites is discussed.

  11. Spin Hall Magnetoresistance in Metallic Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junyeon; Sheng, Peng; Takahashi, Saburo; Mitani, Seiji; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) is studied in metallic bilayers that consist of a heavy metal (HM) layer and a ferromagnetic metal (FM) layer. We find a nearly tenfold increase of SMR in W/CoFeB compared to previously studied HM/ferromagnetic insulator systems. The SMR increases with decreasing temperature despite the negligible change in the W layer resistivity. A model is developed to account for the absorption of the longitudinal spin current to the FM layer, one of the key characteristics of a metallic ferromagnet. We find that the model not only quantitatively describes the HM layer thickness dependence of SMR, allowing accurate estimation of the spin Hall angle and the spin diffusion length of the HM layer, but also can account for the temperature dependence of SMR by assuming a temperature dependent spin polarization of the FM layer. These results illustrate the unique role a metallic ferromagnetic layer plays in defining spin transmission across the HM/FM interface. PMID:26991195

  12. Linear unsaturating magnetoresistance in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ying Tong; Lara, Silvia; Love, Cameron; Ramakrishnan, Navneeth; Adam, Shaffique

    Theoretical works have shown that disordered systems exhibit classical magnetoresistance (MR). In this talk, we examine a variety of experimental systems that observe linear MR at high magnetic fields, including silver chalcogenides, graphene, graphite and Weyl semimetals. We show that a careful analysis of the magnitude of the MR, as well as the field strength at which the MR changes from quadratic to linear, reveal important properties of the system, such as the ratio of the root-mean-square fluctuations in the carrier density and the average carrier density. By looking at other properties such as the zero-field mobility, we show that this carrier density inhomogeneity is consistent with what is known about the microscopic impurities in these experiments. The application of this disorder-induced MR to a variety of different experimental scenarios underline the universality of these theoretical models. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01) and the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College through Grant Number R-607-265-01312.

  13. Nodal Quasiparticle in Pseudogapped Colossal Magnetoresistive Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Mannella, N.

    2010-06-02

    A characteristic feature of the copper oxide high-temperature superconductors is the dichotomy between the electronic excitations along the nodal (diagonal) and antinodal (parallel to the Cu-O bonds) directions in momentum space, generally assumed to be linked to the d-wave symmetry of the superconducting state. Angle-resolved photoemission measurements in the superconducting state have revealed a quasiparticle spectrum with a d-wave gap structure that exhibits a maximum along the antinodal direction and vanishes along the nodal direction. Subsequent measurements have shown that, at low doping levels, this gap structure persists even in the high-temperature metallic state, although the nodal points of the superconducting state spread out in finite Fermi arcs. This is the so-called pseudogap phase, and it has been assumed that it is closely linked to the superconducting state, either by assigning it to fluctuating superconductivity or by invoking orders which are natural competitors of d-wave superconductors. Here we report experimental evidence that a very similar pseudogap state with a nodal-antinodal dichotomous character exists in a system that is markedly different from a superconductor: the ferromagnetic metallic groundstate of the colossal magnetoresistive bilayer manganite La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Our findings therefore cast doubt on the assumption that the pseudogap state in the copper oxides and the nodal-antinodal dichotomy are hallmarks of the superconductivity state.

  14. Nodal quasiparticle in pseudogapped colossal magnetoresistive manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, N.; Yang, W. L.; Zhou, X. J.; Tanaka, K.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Zaanen, J.; Devereaux, T. P.; Nagaosa, N.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z. X.

    2006-03-01

    In this talk, the result of a recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation which allowed elucidating the controversial nature of the ferromagnetic metallic groundstate in the prototypical colossal magnetoresistive manganite bilayer compound La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 will be discussed [1]. The distribution of spectral weight in momentum space exhibits a nodal--antinodal dichotomous character. Quasiparticle excitations have been detected for the first time along the nodal direction (i.e. diagonal), and they are found to determine the metallic transport properties of this compound. The weight of the quasiparticle peak diminishes rapidly while crossing over to the antinodal (i.e. parallel to the Mn--O bonds) parallel sections of the Fermi surface, with the spectra strongly resembling those found in heavily underdoped cuprates high temperature superconductors (HTSC) such as Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2 [2]. This dichotomy between the electronic excitations along the nodal and antinodal directions in momentum space was so far considered a characteristic unique feature of the copper oxide HTSC. These findings therefore cast doubt on the assumption that the pseudogap state in the cuprate HTSC and the nodal-antinodal dichotomy are hallmarks of the superconductivity state. [1] N. Mannella et al., Nature 438, 474 (2005) [2] K. M Shen et al., Science 307, 901 (2005).

  15. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.; Haruyama, J.

    2014-11-01

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO2/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO2/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ˜100%.

  16. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.

    2014-11-03

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%.

  17. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.

    2015-08-01

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent ‘on’ and ‘off’, thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis.

  18. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers.

    PubMed

    Stamopoulos, D; Aristomenopoulou, E

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent 'on' and 'off', thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis.

  19. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers

    PubMed Central

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent ‘on’ and ‘off’, thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis. PMID:26306543

  20. Polarization sensitive anisotropic structuring of silicon by ultrashort light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingyu; Drevinskas, Rokas Beresna, Martynas; Kazansky, Peter G.

    2015-07-27

    Imprinting of anisotropic structures on the silicon surface by double pulse femtosecond laser irradiation is demonstrated. The origin of the polarization-induced anisotropy is explained in terms of interaction of linearly polarized second pulse with the wavelength-sized symmetric crater-shaped structure generated by the linearly polarized first pulse. A wavefront sensor is fabricated by imprinting an array of micro-craters. Polarization controlled anisotropy of the structures can be also explored for data storage applications.

  1. Read/write head having a GMR sensor biased by permanent magnets located between the GMR and the pole shields

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Samuel W.; Rottmayer, Robert Earl; Carey, Matthew J.

    1999-01-01

    A compact read/write head having a biased giant magnetoresistive sensor. Permanent magnet films are placed adjacent to the giant magnetoresistive sensor operating in the current-perpendicular-to the-plane (Cpp) mode and spaced with respect to the sensor by conducting films. These permanent magnet films provide a magnetic bias. The bias field is substantial and fairly uniform across sensor height. Biasing of the giant magnetoresistive sensor provides distinguishable response to the rising and falling edges of a recorded pulse on an adjacent recording medium, improves the linearity of the response, and helps to reduce noise. This read/write head is much simpler to fabricate and pattern and provides an enhanced uniformity of the bias field throughout the sensor.

  2. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  4. Stripe sensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Mladen; Vltava, Lvcian; Barrett, Christopher P; Emery, Teresa H; Scherer, Axel

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a general concept of tomographic imaging for the case of an imaging sensor that has a stripelike shape. We first show that there is no difference, in principle, between two-dimensional tomography using conventional electromagnetic or particle radiation and tomography where a stripe sensor is mechanically scanned over a sample at a sequence of different angles. For a single stripe detector imaging, linear motion and angular rotation are required. We experimentally demonstrate single stripe sensor imaging principle using an elongated inductive coil detector. By utilizing an array of parallel stripe sensors that can be individually addressed, two-dimensional imaging can be performed with rotation only, eliminating the requirement for linear motion, as we also experimentally demonstrate with parallel coil array. We conclude that imaging with a stripe-type sensor of particular width and thickness (where the width is much larger than the thickness) is resolution limited only by the thickness (smaller parameter) of the sensor. We give examples of multiple sensor families where this imaging technique may be beneficial such as magnetoresistive, inductive, superconducting quantum interference device, and Hall effect sensors, and, in particular, discuss the possibilities of the technique in the field of magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Large magnetoresistance anisotropy in a new class of amorphous ferromagnets: U sub 100 minus x minus y Sb sub x Mn sub y

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, P.P. Instituto de Engenharia de systemas e Computadores, R. Alves Redol 9-3, 1000 Lisbon ); Plaskett, T.S. )

    1990-05-01

    U{sub 100{minus}{ital x}{minus}{ital y}}Sb{sub {ital x}}Mn{sub {ital y}} amorphous ferromagnets were prepared that have an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) as high as 9.3% at 15 K and a 2-T field. This is a striking result, since the AMR of typical amorphous ferromagnets does not exceed 1%. These materials are random anisotropy ferromagnets, with large coercive fields ({ital H}{sub {ital c}} =1.2 T, 15 K) following a thermally activated regime at low temperature. The Curie temperatures range from 95 to 112 K. Resistivity values vary from 200 to 400 {mu}{Omega} cm and the Hall angle can reach 20{degree} at 15 K. For {ital T}{gt}{ital T}{sub {ital C}}, the resistivity follows a field-independent ln {ital T} behavior with {ital d}{rho}/{ital dT} showing a sharp anomaly at {ital T}{sub {ital C}}. Below {ital T}{sub {ital C}}, both these quantities are strongly anisotropic, depending on the angle between the magnetization and the current. Magnetization reversal process are inferred from the magnetoresistance hysteresis cycles---both coherent rotation and 180{degree} domain-wall motion occur.

  6. Large linear magnetoresistance in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Aamir, Mohammed Ali Goswami, Srijit Ghosh, Arindam; Baenninger, Matthias; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Tripathi, Vikram; Pepper, Michael

    2013-12-04

    We report non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterointerface in the strongly insulating regime. We achieve this by driving the gate voltage below the pinch-off point of the device and operating it in the non-equilibrium regime with high source-drain bias. Remarkably, the magnitude of MR is as large as 500% per Tesla with respect to resistance at zero magnetic field, thus dwarfing most non-magnetic materials which exhibit this linearity. Its primary advantage over most other materials is that both linearity and the enormous magnitude are retained over a broad temperature range (0.3 K to 10 K), thus making it an attractive candidate for cryogenic sensor applications.

  7. Active control of magnetoresistance of organic spin valves using ferroelectricity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dali; Fang, Mei; Xu, Xiaoshan; Jiang, Lu; Guo, Hangwen; Wang, Yanmei; Yang, Wenting; Yin, Lifeng; Snijders, Paul C.; Ward, T. Z.; Gai, Zheng; Zhang, X.-G.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Organic spintronic devices have been appealing because of the long spin lifetime of the charge carriers in the organic materials and their low cost, flexibility and chemical diversity. In previous studies, the control of resistance of organic spin valves is generally achieved by the alignment of the magnetization directions of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, generating magnetoresistance. Here we employ a new knob to tune the resistance of organic spin valves by adding a thin ferroelectric interfacial layer between the ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer: the magnetoresistance of the spin valve depends strongly on the history of the bias voltage, which is correlated with the polarization of the ferroelectric layer; the magnetoresistance even changes sign when the electric polarization of the ferroelectric layer is reversed. These findings enable active control of resistance using both electric and magnetic fields, opening up possibility for multi-state organic spin valves. PMID:25008155

  8. Active control of magnetoresistance of organic spin valves using ferroelectricity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dali; Fang, Mei; Xu, Xiaoshan; Jiang, Lu; Guo, Hangwen; Wang, Yanmei; Yang, Wenting; Yin, Lifeng; Snijders, Paul C; Ward, T Z; Gai, Zheng; Zhang, X-G; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Organic spintronic devices have been appealing because of the long spin lifetime of the charge carriers in the organic materials and their low cost, flexibility and chemical diversity. In previous studies, the control of resistance of organic spin valves is generally achieved by the alignment of the magnetization directions of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, generating magnetoresistance. Here we employ a new knob to tune the resistance of organic spin valves by adding a thin ferroelectric interfacial layer between the ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer: the magnetoresistance of the spin valve depends strongly on the history of the bias voltage, which is correlated with the polarization of the ferroelectric layer; the magnetoresistance even changes sign when the electric polarization of the ferroelectric layer is reversed. These findings enable active control of resistance using both electric and magnetic fields, opening up possibility for multi-state organic spin valves. PMID:25008155

  9. Active control of magnetoresistance of organic spin valves using ferroelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian

    Organic spintronic devices have been appealing because of the long spin lifetime of the charge carriers in the organic materials and their low cost, flexibility and chemical diversity. In previous studies, the control of resistance of organic spin valves is generally achieved by the alignment of the magnetization directions of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, generating magnetoresistance. Here we employ a new knob to tune the resistance of organic spin valves by adding a thin ferroelectric interfacial layer between the ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer: the magnetoresistance of the spin valve depends strongly on the history of the bias voltage, which is correlated with the polarization of the ferroelectric layer; the magnetoresistance even changes sign when the electric polarization of the ferroelectric layer is reversed. These findings enable active control of resistance using both electric and magnetic fields, opening up possibility for multi-state organic spin valves.

  10. Magnetoresistance and magnetic ordering in praseodymium and neodymium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, M. A.; Bogach, A. V.; Glushkov, V. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Samarin, N. A.; Filipov, V. B.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Sluchanko, N. E.

    2009-11-15

    The magnetoresistance {Delta}{rho}/{rho} of single-crystal samples of praseodymium and neodymium hexaborides (PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6}) has been measured at temperatures ranging from 2 to 20 K in a magnetic field of up to 80 kOe. The results obtained have revealed a crossover of the regime from a small negative magnetoresistance in the paramagnetic state to a large positive magnetoresistive effect in magnetically ordered phases of the PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6} compounds. An analysis of the dependences {Delta}{rho}(H)/{rho} has made it possible to separate three contributions to the magnetoresistance for the compounds under investigation. In addition to the main negative contribution, which is quadratic in the magnetic field (-{Delta}{rho}/{rho} {proportional_to} H{sup 2}), a linear positive contribution ({Delta}{rho}/{rho} {proportional_to} H) and a nonlinear ferromagnetic contribution have been found. Upon transition to a magnetically ordered state, the linear positive component in the magnetoresistance of the PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6} compounds becomes dominant, whereas the quadratic contribution to the negative magnetoresistance is completely suppressed in the commensurate magnetic phase of these compounds. The presence of several components in the magnetoresistance has been explained by assuming that, in the antiferromagnetic phases of PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6}, ferromagnetic nanoregions (ferrons) are formed in the 5d band in the vicinity of the rareearth ions. The origin of the quadratic contribution to the negative magnetoresistance is interpreted in terms of the Yosida model, which takes into account scattering of conduction electrons by localized magnetic moments of rare-earth ions. Within the approach used, the local magnetic susceptibility {chi}{sub loc} has been estimated. It has been demonstrated that, in the temperature range T{sub N} < T < 20 K, the behavior of the local magnetic susceptibility {chi}{sub loc} for the compounds under investigation can

  11. Anomalous rf magnetoresistance in copper at 4/degree/K

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Prodell, A.G.; Rogers, J.T.; De Panfilis, S.; Melissinos, A.C.; Moskowitz, B.E.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Wuensch, W.U.; Fowler, W.B.; Nezrick, F.A.

    1988-03-01

    We have measured the effect of a magnetic field on the surface resistance of polycrystalline Cu at f = 1.2 GHz and at 4.4/degree/K; under these conditions the surface resistance is well into the anomalous skin effect regime but has not reached its limiting value. We find that the transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance are an order of magnitude smaller than the DC magnetoresistance and depend quadratically on the field. At low fields we observe a decrease in surface resistance with increasing field which can be interpreted as a size effect of the TF surface current. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Structural and giant magnetoresistance characterization of Ag sbnd Co multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakeris, M.; Poulopoulos, P.; Valassiades, O.; Stoemenos, J.; Kalogirou, O.; Niarchos, D.; Flevaris, N. K.

    1997-01-01

    Ag sbnd Co multilayers were prepared on various substrates (Si, polyimide and glass) by e-beam evaporation under ultra high vacuum. X-ray diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy studies showed a deterioration of multilayer structure upon reducing the individual Co-layer thickness to 0.5 nm. Furthermore, the saturation field in the parallel field geometry increases, as SQUID magnetometry revealed, while magnetoresistance reaches 16% at room temperature and exceeds 30% at 30 K. Magnetoresistance values were found to depend strongly on individual layer thicknesses as well as on the total film thickness.

  13. Anisotropic artificial substrates for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahvarpour, Attieh

    The perfect electromagnetic conductor (PEMC) boundary is a novel fundamental electromagnetic concept. It is a generalized description of the electromagnetic boundary conditions including the perfect electric conductor (PEC) and the perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) and due to its fundamental properties, it has the potential of enabling several electromagnetic applications. However, the PEMC boundaries concept had remained at the theoretical level and has not been practically realized. Therefore, motivated by the importance of this electromagnetic fundamental concept and its potential applications, the first contribution of this thesis is focused on the practical implementation of the PEMC boundaries by exploiting Faraday rotation principle and ground reflection in the ferrite materials which are intrinsically anisotropic. As a result, this thesis reports the first practical approach for the realization of PEMC boundaries. A generalized scattering matrix (GSM) is used for the analysis of the grounded-ferrite PEMC boundaries structure. As an application of the PEMC boundaries, a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waveguide is experimentally demonstrated using grounded ferrite PMC (as particular case of the PEMC boundaries) side walls. Perfect electromagnetic conductor boundaries may find applications in various types of sensors, reflectors, polarization convertors and polarization-based radio frequency identifiers. Leaky-wave antennas perform as high directivity and frequency beam scanning antennas and as a result they enable applications in radar, point-to-point communications and MIMO systems. The second contribution of this thesis is introducing and analysing a novel broadband and highly directive two-dimensional leaky-wave antenna. This antenna operates differently in the lower and higher frequency ranges. Toward its lower frequencies, it allows full-space conical-beam scanning while at higher frequencies, it provides fixed-beam radiation (at a designable angle

  14. Local magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO/Si lateral spin valve at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki Koike, Hayato; Oikawa, Tohru; Suzuki, Toshio; Ando, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2014-02-03

    Room temperature local magnetoresistance in two-terminal scheme is reported. By employing 1.6 nm-thick MgO tunnel barrier, spin injection efficiency is increased, resulting in large non-local magnetoresistance. The magnitude of the non-local magnetoresistance is estimated to be 0.0057 Ω at room temperature. As a result, a clear rectangle signal is observed in local magnetoresistance measurement even at room temperature. We also investigate the origin of local magnetoresistance by measuring the spin accumulation voltage of each contact separately.

  15. Hybrid magnetoresistance in Pt-based multilayers: Effect originated from strong interfacial spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kangkang; Xiao, Jiaxing; Wu, Yong; Miao, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Jianhua; Jiang, Yong

    2016-02-01

    The hybrid magnetoresistance (MR) behaviors in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt, Mn1.5Ga/Pt and Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt multilayers have been investigated. Both planer Hall effect (PHE) and angle-dependent MR in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt revealed the combination of spin Hall MR (SMR) and normal anisotropic MR (AMR), indicating the large contribution of strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at the interfaces. When Pt contacted with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) metal Mn1.5Ga, the strong interfacial SOC modified the effective anomalous Hall effect. The MR in Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt is not a simple combination of SMR and AMR, but ascribed to the complicated domain wall scattering and strong interfacial SOC when Pt is sandwiched by the in-plane magnetized Co90Fe10 and the PMA Mn1.5Ga.

  16. Hybrid magnetoresistance in Pt-based multilayers: Effect originated from strong interfacial spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Kangkang; Xiao, Jiaxing; Wu, Yong; Miao, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Jianhua; Jiang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid magnetoresistance (MR) behaviors in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt, Mn1.5Ga/Pt and Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt multilayers have been investigated. Both planer Hall effect (PHE) and angle-dependent MR in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt revealed the combination of spin Hall MR (SMR) and normal anisotropic MR (AMR), indicating the large contribution of strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at the interfaces. When Pt contacted with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) metal Mn1.5Ga, the strong interfacial SOC modified the effective anomalous Hall effect. The MR in Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt is not a simple combination of SMR and AMR, but ascribed to the complicated domain wall scattering and strong interfacial SOC when Pt is sandwiched by the in-plane magnetized Co90Fe10 and the PMA Mn1.5Ga. PMID:26843035

  17. Effect of thermal deformation on giant magnetoresistance of flexible spin valves grown on polyvinylidene fluoride membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luping, Liu; Qingfeng, Zhan; Xin, Rong; Huali, Yang; Yali, Xie; Xiaohua, Tan; Run-wei, Li

    2016-07-01

    We fabricated flexible spin valves on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes and investigated the influence of thermal deformation of substrates on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) behaviors. The large magnetostrictive Fe81Ga19 (FeGa) alloy and the low magnetostrictive Fe19Ni81 (FeNi) alloy were selected as the free and pinned ferromagnetic layers. In addition, the exchange bias (EB) of the pinned layer was set along the different thermal deformation axes α 31 or α 32 of PVDF. The GMR ratio of the reference spin valves grown on Si intrinsically increases with lowering temperature due to an enhancement of spontaneous magnetization. For flexible spin valves, when decreasing temperature, the anisotropic thermal deformation of PVDF produces a uniaxial anisotropy along the α 32 direction, which changes the distribution of magnetic domains. As a result, the GMR ratio at low temperature for spin valves with EB∥ α 32 becomes close to that on Si, but for spin valves with EB∥ α 31 is far away from that on Si. This thermal effect on GMR behaviors is more significant when using magnetostrictive FeGa as the free layer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374312, 51401230, 51522105, and 51471101) and the Ningbo Science and Technology Innovation Team, China (Grant No. 2015B11001).

  18. Giant Magnetoresistance-based Biosensor for Detection of Influenza A Virus.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Venkatramana D; Wu, Kai; Perez, Andres M; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a simple and sensitive method for the detection of influenza A virus based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor. This assay employs monoclonal antibodies to viral nucleoprotein (NP) in combination with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Presence of influenza virus allows the binding of MNPs to the GMR sensor and the binding is proportional to the concentration of virus. Binding of MNPs onto the GMR sensor causes change in the resistance of sensor, which is measured in a real time electrical readout. GMR biosensor detected as low as 1.5 × 10(2) TCID50/mL virus and the signal intensity increased with increasing concentration of virus up to 1.0 × 10(5) TCID50/mL. This study showed that the GMR biosensor assay is relevant for diagnostic application since the virus concentration in nasal samples of influenza virus infected swine was reported to be in the range of 10(3) to 10(5) TCID50/mL. PMID:27065967

  19. Giant Magnetoresistance-based Biosensor for Detection of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Venkatramana D.; Wu, Kai; Perez, Andres M.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a simple and sensitive method for the detection of influenza A virus based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor. This assay employs monoclonal antibodies to viral nucleoprotein (NP) in combination with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Presence of influenza virus allows the binding of MNPs to the GMR sensor and the binding is proportional to the concentration of virus. Binding of MNPs onto the GMR sensor causes change in the resistance of sensor, which is measured in a real time electrical readout. GMR biosensor detected as low as 1.5 × 102 TCID50/mL virus and the signal intensity increased with increasing concentration of virus up to 1.0 × 105 TCID50/mL. This study showed that the GMR biosensor assay is relevant for diagnostic application since the virus concentration in nasal samples of influenza virus infected swine was reported to be in the range of 103 to 105 TCID50/mL. PMID:27065967

  20. Tuning spin transport properties and molecular magnetoresistance through contact geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana; Delin, Anna

    2014-01-28

    Molecular spintronics seeks to unite the advantages of using organic molecules as nanoelectronic components, with the benefits of using spin as an additional degree of freedom. For technological applications, an important quantity is the molecular magnetoresistance. In this work, we show that this parameter is very sensitive to the contact geometry. To demonstrate this, we perform ab initio calculations, combining the non-equilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory, on a dithienylethene molecule placed between spin-polarized nickel leads of varying geometries. We find that, in general, the magnetoresistance is significantly higher when the contact is made to sharp tips than to flat surfaces. Interestingly, this holds true for both resonant and tunneling conduction regimes, i.e., when the molecule is in its “closed” and “open” conformations, respectively. We find that changing the lead geometry can increase the magnetoresistance by up to a factor of ∼5. We also introduce a simple model that, despite requiring minimal computational time, can recapture our ab initio results for the behavior of magnetoresistance as a function of bias voltage. This model requires as its input only the density of states on the anchoring atoms, at zero bias voltage. We also find that the non-resonant conductance in the open conformation of the molecule is significantly impacted by the lead geometry. As a result, the ratio of the current in the closed and open conformations can also be tuned by varying the geometry of the leads, and increased by ∼400%.

  1. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  2. Low temperature magnetoresistance measurements on bismuth nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Ch; Weiss, G.; Cornelius, T. W.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.; Neumann, R.

    2009-05-01

    We present low temperature resistance R(T) and magnetoresistance measurements for Bi nanowires with diameters between 100 and 500 nm, which are close to being single-crystalline. The nanowires were fabricated by electrochemical deposition in pores of polycarbonate membranes. R(T) varies as T2 in the low temperature range 1.5 Kmagnetoresistance. The transverse magnetoresistance of all samples shows a clear B1.5 variation. Its size depends strongly on the diameter of the wires but only weakly on temperature. Finally, a steplike increase in the magnetoresistance of our sample with a wire diameter of 100 nm was found and this might be attributed to a transition from one-dimensional to three-dimensional localization.

  3. Microfluidic multiplexed partitioning enables flexible and effective utilization of magnetic sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Bechstein, Daniel J B; Ng, Elaine; Lee, Jung-Rok; Cone, Stephanie G; Gaster, Richard S; Osterfeld, Sebastian J; Hall, Drew A; Weaver, James A; Wilson, Robert J; Wang, Shan X

    2015-11-21

    We demonstrate microfluidic partitioning of a giant magnetoresistive sensor array into individually addressable compartments that enhances its effective use. Using different samples and reagents in each compartment enables measuring of cross-reactive species and wide dynamic ranges on a single chip. This compartmentalization technique motivates the employment of high density sensor arrays for highly parallelized measurements in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  4. Anisotropically structured magnetic aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiligtag, Florian J.; Airaghi Leccardi, Marta J. I.; Erdem, Derya; Süess, Martin J.; Niederberger, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture.Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Digital photographs of dispersions and gels with different water-to-ethanol ratios; magnetic measurements of an anatase aerogel containing 0.25 mol% Fe3O4 nanoparticles; XRD patterns of the iron oxide and

  5. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karčiauskas, Mindaugas

    2016-06-01

    The inflaton coupling to a vector field via the f(φ)2F μνFμν term is used in several contexts in the literature, such as to generate primordial magnetic fields, to produce statistically anisotropic curvature perturbation, to support anisotropic inflation, and to circumvent the η-problem. In this work, I perform dynamical analysis of this system allowing for the most general Bianchi I initial conditions. I also confirm the stability of attractor fixed points along phase-space directions that had not been investigated before.

  6. Fracture toughness of anisotropic graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.; Kehne, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Fracture toughness measurements have been made at 0, 30, 45, 60, and 90/sup 0/ from the extrusion axis on a reasonably anisotropic graphite, grade AGOT. It was found that the fracture toughness did not vary appreciably with orientation. An observed variation in strength was found to be the result of defect orientation.

  7. Giant magnetoresistive-based biosensing probe station system for multiplex protein assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Wei; Yu, Lina; Tu, Liang; Feng, Yinglong; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2015-08-15

    In this study, a sensitive immune-biosensing system capable of multiplexed, real-time electrical readout was developed based on giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor array to detect a panel of protein biomarkers simultaneously. PAPP-A, PCSK9, and ST2 have been regarded as promising candidate biomarkers for cardiovascular diseases. Early detection of multiple biomarkers for a disease could enable accurate prediction of a disease risk. 64 nano-size GMR sensors were assembled onto one 16 mm × 16 mm chip with a reaction well, and they could work independently and be monitored simultaneously. A detect limit of 40 pg/mL for ST2 antigen had been achieved, and the dynamic ranges for the three proteins detection were up to four orders of magnitude. The GMR sensing platform was also selective enough to be directly used in serum samples. In addition, a lab-based probe station has been designed to implement quick lab-on-a-chip experiments instead of wire bonding. It has a potential application in clinical biomarkers identification and screening, and can be extended to fit other biosensing schemes. PMID:25794959

  8. Spin rectification induced by spin Hall magnetoresistance at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Jiang, S. W.; Luan, Z. Z.; Zhou, L. F.; Ding, H. F.; Zhou, Y.; Tao, X. D.; Wu, D.

    2016-09-01

    We have experimentally and theoretically investigated the dc voltage generation in the heterostructure of Pt and yttrium iron garnet under the ferromagnetic resonance. Besides a symmetric Lorenz line shape dc voltage, an antisymmetric Lorenz line shape dc voltage is observed in field scan, which can solely originate from the spin rectification effect due to the spin Hall magnetoresistance. The angular dependence of the dc voltage is theoretically analyzed by taking into account both the spin pumping and the spin rectification effects. We find that the experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical model, further identifying the spin Hall magnetoresistance origin of the spin rectification effect. Moreover, the spin pumping and the spin rectification effects are quantitatively separated by their different angular dependence at particular experimental geometry.

  9. Enhancing magnetoresistance in tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate modified iron oxide nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhong-Peng; Luan, Zhong-Zhi; Cai, Pei-Yu; Wang, Tao; Li, Cheng-Hui; Wu, Di; Zuo, Jing-Lin; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-06-01

    We report a facile approach to stabilize Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) by using tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate (TTF-COO-) and to control electron transport with an enhanced magnetoresistance (MR) effect in TTF-COO-Fe3O4 NP assemblies. This TTF-COO-coating is advantageous over other conventional organic coatings, making it possible to develop stable Fe3O4 NP arrays for sensitive spintronics applications.We report a facile approach to stabilize Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) by using tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate (TTF-COO-) and to control electron transport with an enhanced magnetoresistance (MR) effect in TTF-COO-Fe3O4 NP assemblies. This TTF-COO-coating is advantageous over other conventional organic coatings, making it possible to develop stable Fe3O4 NP arrays for sensitive spintronics applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details; supplementary figures and tables. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03311c

  10. Co/Cu multilayers with reduced magnetoresistive hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubinski, D. J.; Holloway, H.

    1997-01-01

    Practical applications of Co/Cu multilayers (MLs) require copper thicknesses either ≈ 9 Å or ≈ 20 Å corresponding to the first or second antiferromagnetic maximum (AFM). The first AFM has much smaller magnetoresistive hysteresis than the second, but also has lower sensitivity. We discuss application of these MLs when low hysteresis is required. For the first AFM we may improve the sensitivity while retaining low hysteresis by increasing the cobalt thickness to 30-40 Å. At the second AFM we can reduce the magnetoresistive hysteresis by reducing the cobalt thickness to ˜ 3 Å. A particularly attractive combination of high sensitivity and low hysteresis is obtained at the second AFM by alternating such very thin Co layers with 15 Å thick Co layers.

  11. Negative Magnetoresistance in Viscous Flow of Two-Dimensional Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. S.

    2016-10-01

    At low temperatures, in very clean two-dimensional (2D) samples, the electron mean free path for collisions with static defects and phonons becomes greater than the sample width. Under this condition, the electron transport occurs by formation of a viscous flow of an electron fluid. We study the viscous flow of 2D electrons in a magnetic field perpendicular to the 2D layer. We calculate the viscosity coefficients as the functions of magnetic field and temperature. The off-diagonal viscosity coefficient determines the dispersion of the 2D hydrodynamic waves. The decrease of the diagonal viscosity in magnetic field leads to negative magnetoresistance which is temperature and size dependent. Our analysis demonstrates that this viscous mechanism is responsible for the giant negative magnetoresistance recently observed in the ultrahigh-mobility GaAs quantum wells. We conclude that 2D electrons in those structures in moderate magnetic fields should be treated as a viscous fluid.

  12. Theoretical study of disorder induced magnetoresistance in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Shaffique; Ping, Jinglei; Yudhistira, Indra; Ramakrishnan, Navneeth; Cho, Sungjae; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2014-03-01

    In this work we predict theoretically that carrier density inhomogeneity provides a new mechanism for classical magnetoresistance. For concreteness, we study the case of graphene where density inhomogeneity and carrier scattering is dominated by charged impurities, although the mechanism itself is quite general and applies to other systems in which there are large spatial fluctuations of the carrier density. Calculations using an effective medium approximation show that low-field magnetoresistance becomes a universal function of the ratio between the average carrier density and the fluctuations of the carrier density, and scales as a power-law when this ratio is large. Our finding is in excellent agreement with recent experimental results. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation NRF-NRFF2012-01.

  13. Giant magnetoresistance in the variable-range hopping regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, L. B.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2013-09-15

    We predict the universal power-law dependence of the localization length on the magnetic field in the strongly localized regime. This effect is due to the orbital quantum interference. Physically, this dependence shows up in an anomalously large negative magnetoresistance in the hopping regime. The reason for the universality is that the problem of the electron tunneling in a random media belongs to the same universality class as the directed polymer problem even in the case of wave functions of random sign. We present numerical simulations that prove this conjecture. We discuss the existing experiments that show anomalously large magnetoresistance. We also discuss the role of localized spins in real materials and the spin polarizing effect of the magnetic field.

  14. Wheatstone bridge giant-magnetoresistance based cell counter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiun-Peng; Lai, Mei-Feng; Huang, Hao-Ting; Lin, Chi-Wen; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2014-07-15

    A Wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor was proposed here for the detection and counting of magnetic cells. The biosensor was made of a top-pinned spin-valve layer structure, and it was integrated with a microchannel possessing the function of hydrodynamic focusing that allowed the cells to flow in series one by one and ensured the accuracy of detection. Through measuring the magnetoresistance variation caused by the stray field of the magnetic cells that flowed through the microchannel above the GMR biosensor, we can not only detect and count the cells but we can also recognize cells with different magnetic moments. In addition, a magnetic field gradient was applied for the separation of different cells into different channels. PMID:24534580

  15. Enhancing magnetoresistance in tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate modified iron oxide nanoparticle assemblies.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhong-Peng; Luan, Zhong-Zhi; Cai, Pei-Yu; Wang, Tao; Li, Cheng-Hui; Wu, Di; Zuo, Jing-Lin; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-06-16

    We report a facile approach to stabilize Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) by using tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate (TTF-COO(-)) and to control electron transport with an enhanced magnetoresistance (MR) effect in TTF-COO-Fe3O4 NP assemblies. This TTF-COO-coating is advantageous over other conventional organic coatings, making it possible to develop stable Fe3O4 NP arrays for sensitive spintronics applications. PMID:27271347

  16. Epitaxial Ni{sub 3}FeN thin films: A candidate for spintronic devices and magnetic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Loloee, Reza

    2012-07-15

    A new type of epitaxial ferromagnetic nitride (Ni{sub 3} Fe N = permalloy nitride = 'PyN') compound films were grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(1120) substrates using reactive triode magnetron sputtering. The results of electron back-scattering diffraction and x-ray diffraction techniques indicate a high quality epitaxial crystalline structure with growth normal of (100). Magnetization measurements of epitaxial PyN films revealed several unique results. (1) A textbook square hysteresis loop that suggest existence of single magnetic domain in these films. (2) A coercive field is tunable from a few mOe up to a few Oe by changing the film thickness. (3) A magnetization that switches (rotate) over a very small field range of {delta}H{sub C} {<=} 0.05 Oe, independent of the film thickness. This small {delta}H indicates a very large resistive sensitivity ({delta}R/{delta}H) of the epitaxial PyN. (4) The epitaxial PyN thermal cycling through several cycles between '2 and 800 K' (-271 Degree-Sign C to +527 Degree-Sign C) shows much less degradation only about 2-5% compared to 40% degradation of a simple Py film. Four-probe transport measurements give an anisotropic magnetoresistance of Almost-Equal-To 6%, sufficiently higher than other known ferromagnetic materials. These interesting properties are ideal for a variety of spintronic devices and magnetic sensors.

  17. Giant intrinsic tunnel magnetoresistance in manganite thin films etched with antidot arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Li, Lin; Li, Long; Liang, Haixing; Cheng, Long; Zhai, Xiaofang; Zeng, Changgan

    2014-02-24

    Huge intrinsic tunnel magnetoresistance effects at low field are demonstrated in macroscopic La{sub 0.33}Pr{sub 0.34}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} thin films etched with periodic antidot arrays, and a highest magnetoresistance ratio (about 1600%) is achieved at 58 K. Such giant tunnel magnetoresistance effect might originate from delicate phase separation and coherent transport under the applied periodic spatial confinement. Strong transport fluctuation is also revealed in such systems due to phase competition. Our findings pave a way to realize tunnel magnetoresistance devices based on electronically phase separated materials with spatial modulations.

  18. Large linear magnetoresistance in topological crystalline insulator Pb0.6Sn0.4Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Subhajit; Ghara, Somnath; Guin, Satya N.; Sundaresan, A.; Biswas, Kanishka

    2016-01-01

    Classical magnetoresistance generally follows the quadratic dependence of the magnetic field at lower field and finally saturates when field is larger. Here, we report the large positive non-saturating linear magnetoresistance in topological crystalline insulator, Pb0.6Sn0.4Te, at different temperatures between 3 K and 300 K in magnetic field up to 9 T. Magnetoresistance value as high as ∼200% was achieved at 3 K at magnetic field of 9 T. Linear magnetoresistance observed in Pb0.6Sn0.4Te is mainly governed by the spatial fluctuation carrier mobility due to distortions in the current paths in inhomogeneous conductor.

  19. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 1017 cm−3 at 300 K to 2.2 × 1016 cm−3 below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed. PMID:26744088

  20. Magnetoresistance in organic spintronic devices: the role of nonlinear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilin, A. V.; Kabanov, V. V.; Dediu, V. A.

    2015-02-01

    We derive kinetic equations describing injection and transport of spin-polarized carriers in organic semiconductors with hopping conductivity via an impurity level. The model predicts a strongly voltage dependent magnetoresistance, defined as resistance variation between devices with parallel and antiparallel electrode magnetizations (spin-valve effect). The voltage dependence of the magnetoresistance splits into three distinct regimes. The first regime matches well-known inorganic spintronic regimes, corresponding to barrier-controlled spin injection or the well-known conductivity mismatch case. The second regime at intermediate voltages corresponds to strongly suppressed magnetoresistance. The third regime develops at higher voltages and accounts for a novel paradigm. It is promoted by the strong nonlinearity in the charge transport whose strength is characterized by the dimensionless parameter eU/kBT. This nonlinearity, depending on device conditions, can lead to both significant enhancement or to exponential suppression of the spin-valve effect in organic devices. We believe that these predictions are valid beyond the case of organic semiconductors and should be considered for any material characterized by strongly nonlinear charge transport.

  1. Anisotropic Ripple Deformation in Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  2. Anisotropic microturbulence near the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, William A.; Grall, R. R.; Spangler, S. R.; Sakurai, T.; Harmon, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation observations which sample the spatial spectrum of electron density at scales between 10 and 100 km show power-law spectra which are flatter than the Kolmogorov spectra observed at larger scales by spacecraft and also, indirectly, by phase scintillation of coherent radio signals. Furthermore, angular broadening observations of compact radio sources have shown that the microscale density fluctuations are field-aligned and become more anisotropic as R decreases inside 10 solar radius. We present angular broadening observations taken in October of 1992 which were recorded nearly simultaneously on the VLA and VLBA arrays. The VLA samples structure at scales between 3 and 30 km, whereas the VLBA samples scales between 200 and 4000 km. The small scale VLA measurements of the south polar source 1246-075 showed lower turbulence than those of the equatorial source 1256-057, consistent with previous work showing that the density delta N(exp 2)(sub e) is a factor of 10-15 lower in coronal holes. The VLA observations inside of 10 solar radius were anisotropic, as expected. We were not able to measure the equatorial source with the VLBA inside of 10 solar radius because the scattering was too strong, however we did observe the polar source just inside this distance with both the VLA and the VLBA. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scales were essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microturbulence is distinct from the larger scale isotropic turbulence.

  3. Large low-field positive magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic half-Heusler ScPtBi single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhipeng; Wang, Yue; Liu, Enke; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng

    2015-11-01

    High-quality nonmagnetic half-Heusler ScPtBi single crystals were synthesized by a Bi self-flux method. This compound was revealed to be a hole-dominated semimetal with a large low-field magnetoresistance up to 240% at 2 K in a magnetic field of 1 T. Magneto-transport measurements demonstrated that the large low-field magnetoresistance effect resulted from the coexistence of field-induced metal-semiconductor transition and weak-antilocalization effect. Moreover, Hall measurements indicated that ScPtBi single crystal showed a high mobility over a wide temperature region even up to room temperature (4050 cm2V-1s-1 at 2 K-2016 cm2V-1s-1 at 300 K). These findings not only suggest the nonmagnetic ScPtBi semimetal a potential material candidate for applications in high-sensitivity magnetic sensors but also are of great significance to comprehensively understand the rare-earth based half-Heusler compounds.

  4. A.C. Susceptometry Utilizing GMR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Daniel; Shivaram, Bellave

    2001-11-01

    Superconducting quantum interference (SQUID) magnetometers remain as the most sensitive instruments to measure magnetic properties. However, the ready availability and rapid improvements in the sensitivity of magnetic field sensors based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect combined with their low cost and ability to operate at room temperature opens up opportunities to exploit these new devices where the utmost sensitivity of SQUID based detection is not needed. In this article we present one such application of GMR sensors and demonstrate how they can enhance the signals obtained in a simple a.c. magnetic susceptibility apparatus.

  5. Molecular dynamic simulation methods for anisotropic liquids.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Keiko M; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-03-22

    Methods of molecular dynamics simulations for anisotropic molecules are presented. The new methods, with an anisotropic factor in the cell dynamics, dramatically reduce the artifacts related to cell shapes and overcome the difficulties of simulating anisotropic molecules under constant hydrostatic pressure or constant volume. The methods are especially effective for anisotropic liquids, such as smectic liquid crystals and membranes, of which the stacks of layers are compressible (elastic in direction perpendicular to the layers) while the layer itself is liquid and only elastic under uniform compressive force. The methods can also be used for crystals and isotropic liquids as well.

  6. Remarks on inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Recently a new no-global-recollapse argument was given for some inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies that utilizes surface deformation by the mean curvature flow. In this paper we discuss important properties of the mean curvature flow of spacelike surfaces in Lorentzian manifolds. We show that singularities may form during cosmic evolution, and the theorems forbidding the global recollapse lose their validity. The time evolution of the spatial scalar curvature that may kinematically prevent the recollapse is determined in normal coordinates, which shows the impact of inhomogeneities explicitly. Our analysis indicates a caveat in numerical solutions that give rise to inflation.

  7. Spin precession in anisotropic cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Teryaev, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the precession of a Dirac particle spin in some anisotropic Bianchi universes. This effect is present already in the Bianchi-I universe. We discuss in some detail the geodesics and the spin precession for both the Kasner and the Heckmann-Schucking solutions. In the Bianchi-IX universe the spin precession acquires the chaotic character due to the stochasticity of the oscillatory approach to the cosmological singularity. The related helicity flip of fermions in the very early universe may produce the sterile particles contributing to dark matter.

  8. New charged anisotropic compact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  9. Anisotropic inflation from vector impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Kimura, Masashi; Soda, Jiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: mkimura@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2008-08-15

    We study an inflationary scenario with a vector impurity. We show that the universe undergoes anisotropic inflationary expansion due to a preferred direction determined by the vector. Using the slow roll approximation, we find a formula for determining the anisotropy of the inflationary universe. We discuss possible observable predictions of this scenario. In particular, it is stressed that primordial gravitational waves can be induced from curvature perturbations. Hence, even in low scale inflation, a sizable amount of primordial gravitational waves may be produced during inflation.

  10. Granular Segregation with Anisotropic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Tim

    2005-11-01

    The results from experimental investigations of horizontally vibrated mixtures of anisotropic poppy seeds and long chains of linked spheres will be presented. A critical packing fraction was observed to be required to initiate a transition to segregation. The average size of the resulting patterns was measured and the concentration ratio of the mixtures was varied by changing the number of chains present in the mixtures. A change in the order of the transition, from second to first order with associated hysteresis, was observed as the chain number was reduced. This gave rise to three distinct regions of behaviour: segregated, mixed and a bi-stable state.

  11. Large magnetoresistance in highly textured Mn44.7Ni43.5Sn11.8 melt spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fenghua; Huang, Qingxue; Jiang, Zhengyi; Xuan, Haicheng; Zhang, Mingang; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Jingwei

    2016-05-01

    Highly textured Heusler alloy Mn44.7Ni43.5Sn11.8 ribbons were prepared by melt spinning. The magnetoresistance (MR) properties were evaluated by the magnetic field perpendicular to the ribbon surface with the field up to 30 kOe. A large MR (about 25%) with a lower magnetic field (10 kOe) was obtained at 276 K. Due to the rapid solidification. The ribbons with a specific texture can get a large MR twice than polycrystalline alloys at the same magnetic field. The highly textured Mn-Ni-Sn melt spun ribbons may be broadly applied in magnetic memory and as temperature and magnetic sensors as well.

  12. Superconductivity emerging from a suppressed large magnetoresistant state in tungsten ditelluride

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Defen; Zhou, Yazhou; Yi, Wei; Yang, Chongli; Guo, Jing; Shi, Youguo; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Sheng; Li, Aiguo; Yang, Ke; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Guangming; Sun, Liling; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in tungsten ditelluride provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure. Here we report the suppression of the large magnetoresistance and emergence of superconductivity in pressurized tungsten ditelluride via high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges. No structural phase transition is observed under the pressure investigated. In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones. Significantly, at the critical pressure, a sign change of the Hall coefficient is observed. PMID:26203807

  13. Superconductivity emerging from a suppressed large magnetoresistant state in tungsten ditelluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Defen; Zhou, Yazhou; Yi, Wei; Yang, Chongli; Guo, Jing; Shi, Youguo; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Sheng; Li, Aiguo; Yang, Ke; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Guangming; Sun, Liling; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2015-07-01

    The recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in tungsten ditelluride provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure. Here we report the suppression of the large magnetoresistance and emergence of superconductivity in pressurized tungsten ditelluride via high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges. No structural phase transition is observed under the pressure investigated. In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones. Significantly, at the critical pressure, a sign change of the Hall coefficient is observed.

  14. Giant magnetoresistance effects in 5f-materials

    SciTech Connect

    Havela, L.; Sechovsky, V.; Prokes, K. |

    1995-09-01

    Very large magnetoresistance effects related to reorientation of magnetic moments were observed in a number of U-intermetallics. The resemblance to magnetic multilayers is a basis of discussion of possible mechanisms of these phenomena, in background of which is probably the strong hybridization of 5f- and conduction-electron states. A clear cut evidence of relative contributions of varied scattering rate on one side and carrier concentration on the other side can be presumably obtained from experiments on samples with controlled disorder.

  15. Negative magnetoresistance in a low-k dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, B. T.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We observed negative magnetoresistance in amorphous SiCOH, a low-k dielectric, applying modest magnetic fields (<150 Gauss) at room temperature. The conductivity increases with increasing magnetic field. The change in conductivity due to the applied magnetic field increases with electric field and has little or no temperature dependence over the range studied. The magnitude of the effect is independent of the orientation of magnetic field relative to the direction of current flow. The effect is attributed to spin constraints associated with double occupancy of a trap site under the assumption that trap sites which have double occupancy have lower hopping frequencies than traps that have single occupancy.

  16. Negative magnetoresistance in a low-k dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, B. T.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2014-12-22

    We observed negative magnetoresistance in amorphous SiCOH, a low-k dielectric, applying modest magnetic fields (<150 Gauss) at room temperature. The conductivity increases with increasing magnetic field. The change in conductivity due to the applied magnetic field increases with electric field and has little or no temperature dependence over the range studied. The magnitude of the effect is independent of the orientation of magnetic field relative to the direction of current flow. The effect is attributed to spin constraints associated with double occupancy of a trap site under the assumption that trap sites which have double occupancy have lower hopping frequencies than traps that have single occupancy.

  17. Percolation Blocking as the Origin of Organic Magneto-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Qing; Sun, Ling-Ling; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    In order to identify the elementary mechanisms governing the organic magneto-resistance (OMAR) phenomenon, we demonstrated how the applied magnetic field acts on the variable hopping mobility. Based on a percolation model of hopping between localized states, we introduced an analytic expression for magneto-mobility and thus the OMAR, and discussed the influence of inter-site electronic interaction, operating bias, film thickness, temperature, and material parameters on the OMAR. The double occupied states and the spin selection rules play a major role in the mechanism.

  18. Angular dependence of the magnetoresistance in nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, V.; Guslienko, K. Y.

    2013-10-01

    The interplay between the ferromagnetism and the charging effects strongly affects the electron transport through nanoparticle arrays when they are placed between two ferromagnetic electrodes with collinear magnetizations. There are oscillations in the current for the parallel orientation of magnetizations, and large values of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). We analyze the transport properties in nanoparticle arrays for the case of noncollinear magnetizations. We show that the I-V and TMR curves strongly depend on the angle θ between the magnetization orientations of both electrodes. Large values of TMR are obtained for several values of θ.

  19. Magnetoresistance of polycrystalline gadolinium with varying grain size

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we report a study of evolution of low field magnetoresistance (MR) of Gadolinium as the grain size in the sample is changed from few microns (∼4 μm) to the nanoscopic regime (∼35 nm). The low field MR has a clear effect on varying grain size. In large grain sample (few μm), the magnetic domains are controlled by local anisotropy field determined mainly by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The low field MR clearly reflects the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. For decreasing gain size, the contribution of spin disorder at the grain boundary increases and enhances the local anisotropy field.

  20. Anisotropic Non-Fermi Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Shouvik; Lee, Sung-Sik

    We study non-Fermi liquids that arise at quantum critical points associated with spin (SDW) and charge density wave (CDW) transitions in metals with twofold rotational symmetry. We use the `codimensional' regularization scheme, where a one-dimensional Fermi surface is embedded in 3 - ɛ dimensional momentum space. In three dimensions, quasilocal marginal Fermi liquids arise at the SDW and CDW critical points. Below three dimensions, a perturbative anisotropic non-Fermi liquid state is realized at the SDW critical point, where not only time but also different spatial coordinates develop distinct anomalous dimensions. The stable non-Fermi liquid exhibits an emergent algebraic nesting as the patches of the Fermi surface are deformed into a universal power-law shape near the hot spots. Due to the anisotropic scaling, the energy of spin fluctuations disperse with different power laws in different momentum directions. In contrast, at the CDW critical point, the perturbative expansion breaks down immediately below three dimensions as the interaction renormalizes the speed of charge fluctuations to zero within a finite renormalization group scale.

  1. Postbuckling of laminated anisotropic panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffrey, Glenda L.

    1987-01-01

    A two-part study of the buckling and postbuckling of laminated anisotropic plates with bending-extensional coupling is presented. The first part involves the development and application of a modified Rayleigh-Ritz analysis technique. Modifications made to the classical technique can be grouped into three areas. First, known symmetries of anisotropic panels are exploited in the selection of approximation functions. Second, a reduced basis technique based on these same symmetries is applied in the linear range. Finally, geometric boundary conditions are enforced via an exterior penalty function approach, rather than relying on choice of approximation functions to satisfy these boundary conditions. Numerical results are presented for both the linear and nonlinear range, with additional studies made to determine the effect of variation in penalty parameter and number of basis vectors. In the second part, six panels possessing anisotropy and bending-extensional coupling are tested. Detailed comparisons are made between experiment and finite element results in order to gain insight into the postbuckling and failure characteristics of such panels. The panels are constructed using two different lamination sequences, and panels with three different aspect ratios were constructed for each lamination sequence.

  2. Cryogenic microwave anisotropic artificial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, Frank

    This thesis addresses analysis and design of a cryogenic microwave anisotropic wave guiding structure that isolates an antenna from external incident fields from specific directions. The focus of this research is to design and optimize the radome's constituent material parameters for maximizing the isolation between an interior receiver antenna and an exterior transmitter without significantly disturbing the transmitter antenna far field characteristics. The design, characterization, and optimization of high-temperature superconducting metamaterials constitutive parameters are developed in this work at X-band frequencies. A calibrated characterization method for testing arrays of split-ring resonators at cryogenic temperature inside a TE10 waveguide was developed and used to back-out anisotropic equivalent material parameters. The artificial material elements (YBCO split-ring resonators on MgO substrate) are optimized to improve the narrowband performance of the metamaterial radome with respect to maximizing isolation and minimizing shadowing, defined as a reduction of the transmitted power external to the radome. The optimized radome is fabricated and characterized in a parallel plate waveguide in a cryogenic environment to demonstrate the degree of isolation and shadowing resulting from its presence. At 11.12 GHz, measurements show that the HTS metamaterial radome achieved an isolation of 10.5 dB and the external power at 100 mm behind the radome is reduced by 1.9 dB. This work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating a structure that provides good isolation between two antennas and low disturbance of the transmitter's fields.

  3. Enhanced High-Frequency Magnetoresistance Responses of Melt-Extracted Co-Rich Soft Ferromagnetic Microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, D. S.; Devkota, J.; Huong, N. T.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2016-05-01

    We present the relationships between the structure, magnetic properties and high-frequency magnetoresistance (MR) effect in melt-extracted Co68.2Fe4.3B15Si12.5 microwires subject to thermal annealing. In order to release residual stresses to improve the magnetic softness while retaining the good mechanical property of an amorphous material, microwire samples were annealed at different temperatures of 100°C, 200°C, 350°C, 400°C, and 450°C for 15 min. We have shown that relative to an as-cast amorphous microwire, annealing microwires at T a = 100°C, 200°C, and 350°C improved both the magnetic softness and the MR effect, while an opposite trend was observed for the microwires annealed at T a = 400°C and 450°C. We have observed a distinct difference in the frequency dependence of MR response ( ξ) for dc applied magnetic fields below and above the effective anisotropy field of the microwires. While the microwire annealed at 200°C shows the largest MR ratio (~580%) at 100 MHz, the highest value of ξ (~34%/Oe) has been achieved at 400 MHz for the microwire annealed at 350°C. These results indicate that the optimally annealed Co68.2Fe4.3B15Si12.5 microwires are attractive candidates for high-frequency sensor applications.

  4. Effects of repetitive bending on the magnetoresistance of a flexible spin-valve

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.-H.; Kwak, W.-Y.; Cho, B. K.; Choi, H. Y.; Kim, G. H.

    2015-05-07

    A positive magnetostrictive single layer (CoFe) and top-pinned spin-valve structure with positive magnetostrictive free (NiFe) and pinned (CoFe) layers were deposited on flexible polyethylene terephthalate film to investigate the changes in the magnetic properties in flexible environments, especially with a repetitive bending process. It was found that the stress, applied by repetitive bending, changes significantly the magnetic anisotropy of both layers in a single and spin-valve structure depending on the direction of applied stress. The changes in magnetic anisotropy were understood in terms of the inverse magnetostriction effect (the Villari effect) and the elastic recovery force from the flexibility of the polymer substrate. Repetitive bending with tensile stress transverse (or parallel) to the magnetic easy axis was found to enhance (or reduce) the magnetic anisotropy and, consequently, the magnetoresistance ratio of a spin-valve. The observed effects of bending stress in this study should be considered for the practical applications of electro-magnetic devices, especially magneto-striction sensor.

  5. Effects of repetitive bending on the magnetoresistance of a flexible spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-H.; Kwak, W.-Y.; Choi, H. Y.; Kim, G. H.; Cho, B. K.

    2015-05-01

    A positive magnetostrictive single layer (CoFe) and top-pinned spin-valve structure with positive magnetostrictive free (NiFe) and pinned (CoFe) layers were deposited on flexible polyethylene terephthalate film to investigate the changes in the magnetic properties in flexible environments, especially with a repetitive bending process. It was found that the stress, applied by repetitive bending, changes significantly the magnetic anisotropy of both layers in a single and spin-valve structure depending on the direction of applied stress. The changes in magnetic anisotropy were understood in terms of the inverse magnetostriction effect (the Villari effect) and the elastic recovery force from the flexibility of the polymer substrate. Repetitive bending with tensile stress transverse (or parallel) to the magnetic easy axis was found to enhance (or reduce) the magnetic anisotropy and, consequently, the magnetoresistance ratio of a spin-valve. The observed effects of bending stress in this study should be considered for the practical applications of electro-magnetic devices, especially magneto-striction sensor.

  6. Effects of anisotropic dynamics on cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2011-08-01

    The dynamics of cosmic strings is considered in anisotropic backgrounds. In particular, the behaviour of infinitely long straight cosmic strings and of cosmic string loops is determined. Small perturbations of a straight cosmic string are calculated. The relevance of these results is discussed with respect to the possible observational imprints of an anisotropic phase on the behaviour of a cosmic string network.

  7. Enhancement of perpendicular and parallel giant magnetoresistance with the number of bilayers in Fe/Cr superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrille, M. C.; Kim, S.; Gomez, M. E.; Santamaria, J.; Krishnan, Kannan M.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2000-08-01

    We have correlated a detailed quantitative structural analysis by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and high spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy imaging, with the magnetization and anisotropic magnetotransport properties in sputtered Fe/Cr superlattices. To accomplish this, we developed a technique for magnetotransport measurements in metallic superlattices with the current perpendicular to the plane of the layers (CPP). Using microfabrication techniques, we have fabricated microstructured Fe/Cr pillars embedded in SiO{sub 2} and interconnected with Nb electrodes. Because of the uniform current distribution in the Nb electrodes and the minimization of the superlattice-electrode contact resistance, the method allows a simple and independent measurement of the superlattice resistance and giant magnetoresistance (GMR). Structural and magnetic characterization of [Fe (3 nm)/Cr (1.2 nm)]{sub N} superlattices (where N is the number of repetitions) indicate that the roughness is correlated and increases cumulatively through the superlattice stack with no significant change in the antiferromagnetic coupling. Both the current in-plane and CPP GMR increase with N as the roughness increases. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  8. Radiation test of AMR sensors for MetNet Mars Precursor Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, R.; Fernandez, A. B.; Dominguez, J. A.; Martin, B.; Díaz-Michelena, M.

    2012-04-01

    The MetNet Mars Precursor Mission (MMPM) to Mars is supposed to be the first penetrator-based on ground meteorological station of a net over the Martian surface. MMPM will have very limited communications, power, and mass and lander and instrumentation will have to stand a huge mechanical shock, extremely low temperatures with huge temperature excursions and a radiation envelope of 15 krad. One of the instruments on board the MMPM is vector magnetometer, which main goal is to register the thermomangetic curves of the crustal magnetic minerals [1]. The instrument is based on Anisotropic MagnetoResistive (AMR) Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) sensors due to the miniaturization objective and the successful previous experience in geomagnetic surveys [2, 3], achieving a whole mass of 65 g with a good trade off of magnetic performance (resolution levels in the order of the nT). This work reports on the magnetic sensor and the systematic gamma radiation tests performed on the AMR COTS chips. The objective is to study the damage and degradation of these sensors with the total irradiated dose (TID). The sensors were irradiated with gamma rays up to a total irradiation dose of 200 krad following ESCC Basic Specification No. 22900, with limited number of tested sensors. All tests were performed assuring low disturbances of variable magnetic fields, keeping those variations under the error threshold by means of magnetic shielding and registration of magnetic field variations with pT resolution. Parameters like linear response and saturation field, offset and set/reset strips deviations, and power consumption have been monitored for the four different types of sensors during the irradiation. The sensors chosen for the test have been of the HMC series by Honeywell: HMC 1021 S, HMC 1043, HMC 6042 and HMC 6052. HMC 1043 has been chosen for the AOCS of OPTOS picosatellite of INTA and as the magnetic sensor payload for MetNet precursor mission. HMC 1021 S sensors presented low

  9. The anisotropic propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in composite materials and implications for practical applications.

    PubMed

    Putkis, O; Dalton, R P; Croxford, A J

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave propagation in anisotropic attenuative materials like CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymer) is much more complicated than in isotropic materials. Propagation phenomena need to be understood and quantified before reliable NDE (Non-destructive Evaluation)/SHM (Structural Health Monitoring) inspection systems can be realized. The propagation characteristics: energy velocity, dispersion, mode coupling, energy focusing factor and attenuation are considered in this paper. Concepts of minimum resolvable distance and sensitivity maps are extended to anisotropic attenuative materials in order to provide the means for comparison of different guided wave modes in composite materials. The paper is intended to serve as a framework for evaluating and comparing different modes and choosing the optimum operating conditions (frequency, sensor layout) for possible NDE/SHM applications on composite materials. Fundamental guided wave modes in the low frequency regime for highly anisotropic CFRP plates are investigated experimentally and theoretically and the implications for NDE/SHM are discussed. PMID:25497002

  10. The anisotropic propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in composite materials and implications for practical applications.

    PubMed

    Putkis, O; Dalton, R P; Croxford, A J

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave propagation in anisotropic attenuative materials like CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymer) is much more complicated than in isotropic materials. Propagation phenomena need to be understood and quantified before reliable NDE (Non-destructive Evaluation)/SHM (Structural Health Monitoring) inspection systems can be realized. The propagation characteristics: energy velocity, dispersion, mode coupling, energy focusing factor and attenuation are considered in this paper. Concepts of minimum resolvable distance and sensitivity maps are extended to anisotropic attenuative materials in order to provide the means for comparison of different guided wave modes in composite materials. The paper is intended to serve as a framework for evaluating and comparing different modes and choosing the optimum operating conditions (frequency, sensor layout) for possible NDE/SHM applications on composite materials. Fundamental guided wave modes in the low frequency regime for highly anisotropic CFRP plates are investigated experimentally and theoretically and the implications for NDE/SHM are discussed.

  11. Electrochemical synthesis of one-dimensional nanostructures for sensor and spintronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangarter, Carlos Maldonado

    enhanced sensitivity to ammonia vapors, and PEDOT nanowire devices exhibited strong responses to volatile organic compounds. The gas sensing performances of these single nanowire devices were tuned by dopant type and synthesis conditions. Alternatively, single PEDOT nanowire devices were also completely coated in ferromagnetic material by implementing non-selective electrodeposition. The magnetoresistance (MR) of these devices displayed anomalous behavior, drastically deviating from typical anisotropic magnetoresistance responses. Additionally, multi-segmented noble/oxidizable nanowires were electrodeposited and subjected to galvanic displacement to create nanopeapod devices with Au peas and Te pods.

  12. High-K MISFET channel mobility from magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, R. T.

    2005-03-01

    Carrier trapping in the gate insulator or at the interface with the silicon can depress the effective channel mobility of high-K MISFETs below the drift mobility. This reduction in effective mobility can be distinguished from true mobility reduction due to carrier scattering by using the Hall effect to measure the channel carrier density [1]. However, channel Hall measurements have traditionally required nonstandard multidrain devices, which must be included in the test chip design. We propose measuring the reduction in drain current of conventional transistors by a magnetic field to determine the Hall coefficient. This method, which requires no multidrain devices, could become a routine diagnostic procedure. It is based on a theorem concerning the magnetoresistance of a rectangular plate with perfectly conducting end contacts [2], which has apparently not been tested experimentally, at least on MOSFET's. The validity of the method can be determined by comparison with channel carrier density determined in other ways, including split capacitance on MOSFETS, conventional Hall effect, and Corbino magnetoresistance on MISFETs. Progress toward these goals is described. [1] N.S Saks and A.K Agarwal, Appl. Phys. Letters 77 (20), 3281 -- 3283 (2000); R. T. Bate and W. P. Kirk, Bull. Am. Phys, Soc. March, 2004, Abstract S6.011 [2] H. H. Jenson and H. Smith, J. Phys. C: Solid State, 5, 2867-2880, (1972)

  13. Large Magnetoresistance in Nanostructured Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suchun; Son, Young-Woo; Quek, Su Ying

    2014-03-01

    The prospect of all-carbon nanoelectronics has motivated significant interest in the transport of electrons through graphene and graphene nanoribbon (GNR) based junctions.... The weak intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in graphene also makes graphene an attractive candidate for replacing conventional materials in spintronics applications. Several interesting spin transport properties, such as giant magnetoresistance and half-metallicity, have been predicted. Most of these predictions have centered on GNRs with zigzag atomic edges (ZGNRs). On the other hand, significant progress has been made in the controlled atomic-scale synthesis of GNRs with armchair edges (AGNRs), all with specific widths.... Yet, to date, little is known about the potential of such well-defined AGNRs in electronics or spintronics. In this work, we use first principles transport calculations to predict the electron and spin transport properties of nanostructured AGNR junctions. We predict a large magnetoresistance of ~ 900%, related to resonant transmission channels close to the Fermi energy. We gratefully acknowledge helpful discussions with YP Feng and CK Gan, funding from Singapore NRF and A*STAR, Korea MEST NRF, and HJ Choi for use of the SCARLET code (PRB 76, 155420, 2007).

  14. Linear magnetoresistance in Ag2+δSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kreutzbruck, M.; Lembke, G.; Mogwitz, B.; Korte, C.; Janek, J.

    2009-01-01

    In the nonstoichiometric low-temperature phase of silver selenide a very small silver excess within the semiconducting silver selenide matrix in the order of 0.01% is sufficient to generate a linear magnetoresistance (LMR) of more than 300% at 5 T, which does not saturate at fields up to 60 T. Different theoretical models have been proposed to explain this unusual magnetoresistance (MR) behavior, among them a random resistor network consisting of four-terminal resistor units. According to this model the LMR and the crossover field from linear to quadratic behavior are primarily controlled by both the spatial distribution of the charge-carrier mobility and its average value, being essentially functions of the local and average compositions. Here we report measurements on silver-rich thin AgxSe films with a thickness between 20 nm and 2μm , which show an increasing average mobility in conjunction with an enhanced MR for increasing film thickness. We found a linear scaling between the size of the transverse LMR and the crossover field, as predicted by the theory. For films thinner than about 100 nm the MR with field directed in the sample plane shows a breakdown of the LMR, revealing the physical length scale of the inhomegeneities in thin AgxSe devices.

  15. Large magnetoresistance in the antiferromagnetic semimetal NdSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeham, N.; Bauer, E. D.; Neupane, M.; Ronning, F.

    2016-05-01

    There has been considerable interest in topological semimetals that exhibit extreme magnetoresistance (XMR). These have included materials lacking inversion symmetry such as TaAs, as well Dirac semimetals such as Cd3As2 . However, it was reported recently that LaSb and LaBi also exhibit XMR, even though the rocksalt structure of these materials has inversion symmetry, and the band-structure calculations do not show a Dirac dispersion in the bulk. Here, we present magnetoresistance and specific-heat measurements on NdSb, which is isostructural with LaSb. NdSb has an antiferromagnetic ground state and, in analogy with the lanthanum monopnictides, is expected to be a topologically nontrivial semimetal. We show that NdSb has an XMR of ˜104% , even within the antiferromagnetic state, illustrating that XMR can occur independently of the absence of time-reversal symmetry breaking in zero magnetic field. The persistence of XMR in a magnetic system offers the promise of new functionality when combining topological matter with electronic correlations. We also find that in an applied magnetic field below the Néel temperature there is a first-order transition, consistent with evidence from previous neutron scattering work.

  16. Negative longitudinal magnetoresistance in Dirac and Weyl metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    It has recently been found that Dirac and Weyl metals are characterized by an unusual weak-field longitudinal magnetoresistance: large, negative, and quadratic in the magnetic field. This has been shown to arise from the chiral anomaly, i.e., nonconservation of the chiral charge in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields, oriented collinearly. In this paper we report on a theory of this effect in both Dirac and Weyl metals. We demonstrate that this phenomenon contains two important ingredients. One is the magnetic-field-induced coupling between the chiral and the total (or vector, in relativistic field theory terminology) charge densities. This arises from the Berry curvature and is present in principle whenever the Berry curvature is nonzero, i.e., is nonspecific to Dirac and Weyl metals. This coupling, however, leads to a large negative quadratic magnetoresistance only when the second ingredient is present, namely when the chiral charge density is a nearly conserved quantity with a long relaxation time. This property is specific to Dirac and Weyl metals and is realized only when the Fermi energy is close to Dirac or Weyl nodes, expressing an important low-energy property of these materials, emergent chiral symmetry.

  17. A Wireless Magnetoresistive Sensing System for an Intraoral Tongue-Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hangue; Kiani, Mehdi; Lee, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jeonghee; Block, Jacob; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, and wireless assistive technology (AT) that infers users’ intentions by detecting their voluntary tongue motion and translating them into user-defined commands. Here we present the new intraoral version of the TDS (iTDS), which has been implemented in the form of a dental retainer. The iTDS system-on-a-chip (SoC) features a configurable analog front-end (AFE) that reads the magnetic field variations inside the mouth from four 3-axial magnetoresistive sensors located at four corners of the iTDS printed circuit board (PCB). A dual-band transmitter (Tx) on the same chip operates at 27 and 432 MHz in the Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) band to allow users to switch in the presence of external interference. The Tx streams the digitized samples to a custom-designed TDS universal interface, built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, which delivers the iTDS data to other devices such as smartphones, personal computers (PC), and powered wheelchairs (PWC). Another key block on the iTDS SoC is the power management integrated circuit (PMIC), which provides individually regulated and duty-cycled 1.8 V supplies for sensors, AFE, Tx, and digital control blocks. The PMIC also charges a 50 mAh Li-ion battery with constant current up to 4.2 V, and recovers data and clock to update its configuration register through a 13.56 MHz inductive link. The iTDS SoC has been implemented in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 3.7 mW on average. PMID:23853258

  18. Gravitational baryogenesis after anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational baryogensis may not generate a sufficient baryon asymmetry in the standard thermal history of the Universe when we take into account the gravitino problem. Hence, it has been suggested that anisotropy of the Universe can enhance the generation of the baryon asymmetry through the increase of the time change of the Ricci scalar curvature. We study the gravitational baryogenesis in the presence of anisotropy, which is produced at the end of an anisotropic inflation. Although we confirm that the generated baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared with the original isotropic cosmological model, taking into account the constraint on the anisotropy by the recent CMB observations, we find that it is still difficult to obtain the observed baryon asymmetry only through the gravitational baryogenesis without suffering from the gravitino problem.

  19. Anisotropic scaling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Horbury, Timothy S; Forman, Miriam; Oughton, Sean

    2008-10-24

    We present a quantitative estimate of the anisotropic power and scaling of magnetic field fluctuations in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, using a novel wavelet technique applied to spacecraft measurements in the solar wind. We show for the first time that, when the local magnetic field direction is parallel to the flow, the spacecraft-frame spectrum has a spectral index near 2. This can be interpreted as the signature of a population of fluctuations in field-parallel wave numbers with a k(-2)_(||) spectrum but is also consistent with the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulent cascade. We also find, in common with previous studies, that most of the power is contained in wave vectors at large angles to the local magnetic field and that this component of the turbulence has a spectral index of 5/3.

  20. Anisotropic invariance in minisuperspace models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Sabido, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce invariance under anisotropic transformations to cosmology. This invariance is one of the key ingredients of the theory of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point put forward by Hořava. We find that this new symmetry in the minisuperspace introduces characteristics to the model that can be relevant in the ultraviolet regime. For example, by canonical quantization we find a Schrödinger-type equation which avoids the problem of frozen time in quantum cosmology. For simple cases we obtain solutions to this quantum equation in a Kantowski–Sachs (KS) minisuperspace. At the classical level, we study KS and Friedmann–Robertson–Walker cosmologies, obtaining modifications to the solutions of general relativity that can be relevant in the early Universe.

  1. Anisotropic charged core envelope star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafa Takisa, P.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study a charged compact object with anisotropic pressures in a core envelope setting. The equation of state is quadratic in the core and linear in the envelope. There is smooth matching between the three regions: the core, envelope and the Reissner-Nordström exterior. We show that the presence of the electric field affects the masses, radii and compactification factors of stellar objects with values which are in agreement with previous studies. We investigate in particular the effect of electric field on the physical features of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 in the core envelope model. The gravitational potentials and the matter variables are well behaved within the stellar object. We demonstrate that the radius of the core and the envelope can vary by changing the parameters in the speed of sound.

  2. Anisotropic invariance in minisuperspace models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Sabido, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce invariance under anisotropic transformations to cosmology. This invariance is one of the key ingredients of the theory of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point put forward by Hořava. We find that this new symmetry in the minisuperspace introduces characteristics to the model that can be relevant in the ultraviolet regime. For example, by canonical quantization we find a Schrödinger-type equation which avoids the problem of frozen time in quantum cosmology. For simple cases we obtain solutions to this quantum equation in a Kantowski-Sachs (KS) minisuperspace. At the classical level, we study KS and Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies, obtaining modifications to the solutions of general relativity that can be relevant in the early Universe.

  3. Modeling of Anisotropic Inelastic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D.J.; Nath, D.S.; Brown, A.A.; Casey, J.

    2000-02-25

    An experimental capability, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is being used to study the yield behavior of elastic-plastic materials. The objective of our research is to develop better constitutive equations for polycrystalline metals. We are experimentally determining the multidimensional yield surface of the material, both in its initial state and as it evolves during large inelastic deformations. These experiments provide a more complete picture of material behavior than can be obtained from traditional uniaxial tests. Experimental results show that actual material response can differ significantly from that predicted by simple idealized models. These results are being used to develop improved constitutive models of anisotropic plasticity for use in continuum computer codes.

  4. Enhancement of tunnel magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2014-01-27

    Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junction improved by a superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The forbidden band of the superlattice is used to predict the low transmission range in the superlattice barrier. By forbidding electron transport in the anti-parallel configuration, the tunnel magnetoresistance is enhanced in the superlattice junction. The results show that the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio for a superlattice magnetic tunnel junction is greater than that for traditional single or double barrier junctions.

  5. Large Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Ferromagnet/Topological Insulator Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sarmita; Guchhait, Samaresh; Dey, Rik; Register, Leonard Franklin; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-07-01

    We report magnetoresistance for current flow through iron/topological insulator (Fe/TI) and Fe/evaporated-oxide/TI contacts when a magnetic field is used to initially orient the magnetic alignment of the incorporated ferromagnetic Fe bar, at temperatures ranging from 100 K to room temperature. This magnetoresistance is associated with the relative orientation of the Fe bar magnetization and spin-polarization of electrons moving on the surface of the TI with helical spin-momentum locking. The magnitude of the observed magnetoresistance is relatively large compared to that observed in prior work.

  6. Anisotropic Superfluidity in a Dipolar Bose Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ticknor, Christopher; Wilson, Ryan M.; Bohn, John L.

    2011-02-11

    We study the superfluid character of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate (DBEC) in a quasi-two dimensional geometry. We consider the dipole polarization to have some nonzero projection into the plane of the condensate so that the effective interaction is anisotropic in this plane, yielding an anisotropic dispersion relation. By performing direct numerical simulations of a probe moving through the DBEC, we observe the sudden onset of drag or creation of vortex-antivortex pairs at critical velocities that depend strongly on the direction of the probe's motion. This anisotropy emerges because of the anisotropic manifestation of a rotonlike mode in the system.

  7. Anisotropic optical film embedded with cellulose nanowhisker.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dah Hee; Song, Young Seok

    2015-10-01

    We investigated anisotropic optical behaviors of composite films embedded with CNWs. To control the orientation of CNWs, elongation was applied to the composite film. Morphological and mechanical analyses of the specimens were carried out to examine the influence of the applied extension. The CNWs were found to be aligned in the elongated direction, yielding remarkable anisotropic microstructure and optical properties. As the applied elongation and CNW loading increased, the resulting degree of polarization and birefringence increased due to increased interactions between the embedded particles. This study suggests a way to prepare an anisotropic optical component with nanoparticles of which the microstructures, such as orientation and filler content, can be controlled. PMID:26076646

  8. Anisotropic inflation in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Sayantani

    2016-09-01

    We study anisotropic inflation with Gauss-Bonnet correction in presence of a massless vector field. In this scenario, exact anisotropic power-law inflation is realized when the inflaton potential, gauge coupling function and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling are exponential functions. We show that anisotropy becomes proportional to two slow-roll parameters of the theory and hence gets enhanced in presence of quadratic curvature corrections. The stability analysis reveals that anisotropic power-law solutions remain stable over a substantially large parameter region.

  9. Magnetoresistance and magnetodynamics in thin-film magnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Sarah Cunegunda

    Current information technology relies heavily on magnetism. Gaining a deeper understanding of magnetism, and in particular spin dynamics, is important to today's quickly evolving technology. In this thesis, two separate studies have been conducted to help aid in the study of spin dynamics. The first project explores giant magnetoresistive (GMR) devices. These devices are presumed to be made of materials that are radiation hard with respect to both photons and particles, potentially increasing their utility for nuclear energy and space based applications. However, to date there are few detailed studies of magnetism and GMR devices in hard radiation environments. This project utilizes the facilities at The Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory to study the effects of gamma ray and neutron irradiation on GMR samples. The structure used in this experiment is a standard GMR trilayer consisting of a thin, non-magnetic layer placed between thin ferromagnetic layers, with one of the two magnetic layers in contact with an exchange biased antiferromagnet (Py/Cu/Py/FeMn/Ge). To study the effects of radiation three types of magnetic measurements, vibrating sample magnetometery (VSM), magnetoresistance (MR), and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE), are taken and correlated pre and post gamma radiation. We present characterization of the devices pre and post gamma irradiation for multiple device geometries and radiation doses up to 50 Mrad for gamma rays and a minimum fast flux (En>0.5MeV) of 4.2E12 nv for neutrons, both of which are well above the failure threshold for semiconducting devices. The second study that was done in this thesis uses current-induced magnetodynamics in giant magnetoresistive (GMR) trilayers. These devices promise a novel platform for microwave electronics. One of the keys to developing this potential has been the development of nanoscale fabrication techniques, typically resulting in either nanopillar or point-contact geometries. As a result

  10. A Magnetoresistive Heat Switch for the Continuous ADR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavan, E. R.; Dipirro, M. J.; Jackson, M.; Panek, J.; Shirron, P. J.; Tuttle, J. G.; Krebs, C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In compensated elemental metals at low temperature, a several Tesla field can suppress electronic heat conduction so thoroughly that heat is effectively carried by phonons alone. In approximately one mm diameter single crystal samples with impurity concentrations low enough that electron conduction is limited by surface scattering, the ratio of zerofield to high-field thermal conductivity can exceed ten thousand. We have used this phenomenon to build a compact, solid-state heat switch with no moving parts and no enclosed fluids. The time scale for switching states is limited by time scale for charging the magnet that supplies the controlling field. Our design and fabrication techniques overcome the difficulties associated with manufacturing and assembling parts from single crystal tungsten. A clear disadvantage of the magnetoresistive switch is the mass and complexity of the magnet system for the controlling field. We have discovered a technique of minimizing this mass and complexity, applicable to the continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  11. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1999-03-16

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  12. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1998-10-20

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  13. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1998-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  14. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1999-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  15. Micromagnetic modeling of overlaid exchange-biased giant magnetoresistance head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuankai; You, Dan; Wu, Yihong

    2002-05-01

    Overlaid exchange-biased structures for giant magnetoresistance head have been proposed and investigated. A home-developed three-dimensional micromagnetic modeling tool has been used to simulate synthetic antiferromagnetic spin valves of this type of biased structure with dimensions of 100 nm in width and 80 nm in height. Simulation results showed that, with a properly chosen antiferromagnetic material and structure, the exchange-biasing field could be made sufficient to suppress the noise without severely reducing the sensitivity. The sensitivity of overlaid exchange-biased spin valves is 1.73 times that of the abutted hard biased ones. Microtrack profiles showed that side reading effect could be suppressed effectively with an effective exchange-biasing field over 600 Oe.

  16. Theory of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Ting; Takahashi, Saburo; Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Althammer, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T B; Saitoh, Eiji; Bauer, Gerrit E W

    2016-03-16

    We review the so-called spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in bilayers of a magnetic insulator and a metal, in which spin currents are generated in the normal metal by the spin Hall effect. The associated angular momentum transfer to the ferromagnetic layer and thereby the electrical resistance is modulated by the angle between the applied current and the magnetization direction. The SMR provides a convenient tool to non-invasively measure the magnetization direction and spin-transfer torque to an insulator. We introduce the minimal theoretical instruments to calculate the SMR, i.e. spin diffusion theory and quantum mechanical boundary conditions. This leads to a small set of parameters that can be fitted to experiments. We discuss the limitations of the theory as well as alternative mechanisms such as the ferromagnetic proximity effect and Rashba spin-orbit torques, and point out new developments.

  17. Magnetoresistance in permalloy/GaMnAs circular microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Justin Michael

    When two ferromagnetic materials are deposited directly on top of one another, their magnetic moments lock together and will no longer switch independently. This effect is known as exchange spring coupling. Reports in literature indicate that a bilayer composed of GaMnAs and permalloy may be a rare exception. Such a bilayer would allow for independent switching and, as a result, giant magnetoresistance. For this thesis, we verified the independent switching of continuous films of GaMnAs and expanded on existing literature. We also investigated GMR in bilayers. Samples were fabricated and measured using novel techniques and software developed specifically for this project. Transport measurements of GaMnAs/Py bilayers revealed a minimal to non-existent GMR effect; instead, the main discernible effect was due to AMR of the bulk substrate of the samples. This thesis also details the construction process of an inexpensive, temporary cleanroom environment.

  18. Theory of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Ting; Takahashi, Saburo; Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Althammer, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T B; Saitoh, Eiji; Bauer, Gerrit E W

    2016-03-16

    We review the so-called spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in bilayers of a magnetic insulator and a metal, in which spin currents are generated in the normal metal by the spin Hall effect. The associated angular momentum transfer to the ferromagnetic layer and thereby the electrical resistance is modulated by the angle between the applied current and the magnetization direction. The SMR provides a convenient tool to non-invasively measure the magnetization direction and spin-transfer torque to an insulator. We introduce the minimal theoretical instruments to calculate the SMR, i.e. spin diffusion theory and quantum mechanical boundary conditions. This leads to a small set of parameters that can be fitted to experiments. We discuss the limitations of the theory as well as alternative mechanisms such as the ferromagnetic proximity effect and Rashba spin-orbit torques, and point out new developments. PMID:26881498

  19. Theory of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and related phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Ting; Takahashi, Saburo; Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Althammer, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Saitoh, Eiji; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2016-03-01

    We review the so-called spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in bilayers of a magnetic insulator and a metal, in which spin currents are generated in the normal metal by the spin Hall effect. The associated angular momentum transfer to the ferromagnetic layer and thereby the electrical resistance is modulated by the angle between the applied current and the magnetization direction. The SMR provides a convenient tool to non-invasively measure the magnetization direction and spin-transfer torque to an insulator. We introduce the minimal theoretical instruments to calculate the SMR, i.e. spin diffusion theory and quantum mechanical boundary conditions. This leads to a small set of parameters that can be fitted to experiments. We discuss the limitations of the theory as well as alternative mechanisms such as the ferromagnetic proximity effect and Rashba spin-orbit torques, and point out new developments.

  20. Impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance under a weak magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Txoperena, Oihana; Song, Yang; Qing, Lan; Gobbi, Marco; Hueso, Luis E; Dery, Hanan; Casanova, Fèlix

    2014-10-01

    Injection of spins into semiconductors is essential for the integration of the spin functionality into conventional electronics. Insulating layers are often inserted between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors for obtaining an efficient spin injection, and it is therefore crucial to distinguish between signatures of electrical spin injection and impurity-driven effects in the tunnel barrier. Here we demonstrate an impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance effect in nonmagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic tunnel barriers. In both cases, the effect reflects on-off switching of the tunneling current through impurity channels by the external magnetic field. The reported effect is universal for any impurity-assisted tunneling process and provides an alternative interpretation to a widely used technique that employs the same ferromagnetic electrode to inject and detect spin accumulation. PMID:25325651

  1. Impurity scattering from {delta}-layers in giant magnetoresistance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marrows, C. H.; Hickey, B. J.

    2001-06-01

    The properties of the archetypal Co/Cu giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin-valve structure have been modified by the insertion of very thin (submonolayer) {delta}-layers of various elements at different points within the Co layers, and at the Co/Cu interface. Different effects are observed depending on the nature of the impurity, its position within the periodic table, and its location within the spin valve. The GMR can be strongly enhanced or suppressed for various specific combinations of these parameters, giving insight into the microscopic mechanisms giving rise to the GMR. In particular, the doping of Fe and Ni into the spin valve close to, but not at the interface, leads to an increase in GMR, as does the introduction of Cu, a nonmagnetic impurity, into the Co layers.

  2. Finite-size effects in giant magnetoresistance multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M.; Marrows, C. H.; Hickey, B. J.

    2001-06-01

    It is of interest to determine the characteristic length scale that determines giant magnetoresistance (GMR). In order to understand this behavior, GMR multilayers of Co/Ru and Co/Cu have been studied at a temperature of 4.2 K. The total thickness of Co/Ru multilayers has been varied from 96 to 1654 Aa and Co/Cu from 77 to 2712 Aa by increasing the number of bilayers (N). It has been observed that GMR increases with the number of bilayers and more than 20 bilayers for Co/Ru and 50 for Co/Cu are needed to reach the saturation value. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Magnetoresistance measurement of permalloy thin film rings with triangular fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Mei-Feng; Hsu, Chia-Jung; Liao, Chun-Neng; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2010-01-01

    Magnetization reversals in permalloy rings controlled by nucleation sites using triangular fins at the same side and diagonal with respect to the field direction are demonstrated by magnetoresistance measurement and micromagnetic simulation. In the ring with triangular fins at the same side, there exists two-step reversal from onion to flux-closure state (or vortex state) and then from flux-closure (or vortex state) to reverse onion state; in the ring with diagonal triangular fins, one-step reversal occurs directly from onion to reverse onion state. The reversal processes are repeatable and controllable in contrast to an ideal ring without triangular fins where one-step and two-step reversals occur randomly in sweep-up and sweep-down processes.

  4. The Challenges in Applying Magnetroesistive Sensors on the 'Curiosity' Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoresistive Sensors were selected for use on the motor encoders throughout the Curiosity Rover for motor position feedback devices. The Rover contains 28 acuators with a corresponding number of encoder assemblies. The environment on Mars provides opportunities for challenges to any hardware design. The encoder assemblies presented several barriers that had to be vaulted in order to say the rover was ready to fly. The environment and encoder specific design features provided challenges that had to be solved in time to fly.

  5. Resistance transition assisted geometry enhanced magnetoresistance in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Zhaochu; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2015-05-07

    Magnetoresistance (MR) reported in some non-magnetic semiconductors (particularly silicon) has triggered considerable interest owing to the large magnitude of the effect. Here, we showed that MR in lightly doped n-Si can be significantly enhanced by introducing two diodes and proper design of the carrier path [Wan, Nature 477, 304 (2011)]. We designed a geometrical enhanced magnetoresistance (GEMR) device whose room-temperature MR ratio reaching 30% at 0.065 T and 20 000% at 1.2 T, respectively, approaching the performance of commercial MR devices. The mechanism of this GEMR is: the diodes help to define a high resistive state (HRS) and a low resistive state (LRS) in device by their openness and closeness, respectively. The ratio of apparent resistance between HRS and LRS is determined by geometry of silicon wafer and electrodes. Magnetic field could induce a transition from LRS to HRS by reshaping potential and current distribution among silicon wafer, resulting in a giant enhancement of intrinsic MR. We expect that this GEMR could be also realized in other semiconductors. The combination of high sensitivity to low magnetic fields and large high-field response should make this device concept attractive to the magnetic field sensing industry. Moreover, because this MR device is based on a conventional silicon/semiconductor platform, it should be possible to integrate this MR device with existing silicon/semiconductor devices and so aid the development of silicon/semiconductor-based magnetoelectronics. Also combining MR devices and semiconducting devices in a single Si/semiconductor chip may lead to some novel devices with hybrid function, such as electric-magnetic-photonic properties. Our work demonstrates that the charge property of semiconductor can be used in the magnetic sensing industry, where the spin properties of magnetic materials play a role traditionally.

  6. Optical trapping of the anisotropic crystal nanorod.

    PubMed

    Bareil, Paul B; Sheng, Yunlong

    2015-05-18

    We observed in the optical tweezers experiment that some anisotropic nanorod was stably trapped in an orientation tiled to the beam axis. We explain this trapping with the T-matrix calculation. As the vector spherical wave functions do not individually satisfy the anisotropic vector wave equation, we expand the incident and scattered fields in the isotropic buffer in terms of E→, and the internal field in the anisotropic nanoparticle in terms of D→, and use the boundary condition for the normal components of D→ to compute the T-matrix. We found that when the optical axes of an anisotropic nanorod are not aligned to the nanorod axis, the nanorod may be trapped stably at a tilted angle, under which the lateral torque equals to zero and the derivative of the torque is negative. PMID:26074566

  7. Strongly Anisotropic Bianchi i Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hans-Jürgen

    2002-12-01

    We report on the period-doubling bifurcation recently detected for strongly anisotropic Bianchi I quantum cosmology by M. Bachmann and H.-J. Schmidt and present further arguments related to the quantum boundary.

  8. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F. Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-01-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. This work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications. PMID:27739442

  9. Oliver E. Buckley Prize Talk: Birth of tunnel magnetoresistance and its development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Terunobu

    2009-03-01

    Nowadays usually we use the word, tunnel magnetoresistance, but it required a long time to combine both words tunnel and magnetoresistance. The study of tunnel junction may originate p-n junction studied first around 1950. On the other hand, magnetoresistance effect was reported first in 1857 which was about 100 years earlier than the start of tunnel junction study. The research of tunnel magnetoresoistance has been mainly developed first for Al-oxide tunnel barrier junctions and made a big progress by the appearance of MgO barrier junctions for both basic research and applications. More recently Heusler electrode tunnel junctions exhibits a large TMR ratio up to about 750 %. In my talk I will explain first the history of the study of tunnel junction and magnetoresistance effect. Then, I will focus on the Heusler electrode junctions and also application of tunnel magnetoresoistance junctions.

  10. A simple formulation for magnetoresistance in metal-insulator granular films with increased current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boff, M. A. S.; Canto, B.; Baibich, M. N.; Pereira, L. G.

    2013-02-01

    We studied the tunnel magnetoresistance in metal/insulator granular films when the applied current is varied. The tunnel magnetoresistance shows a strong modification related to a non-Ohmic behaviour of theses materials. It was verified that spin-dependent tunnelling is the main mechanism for magnetoresistance at low applied current. However, when the current is high, another mechanism gets to be important: it is independent of the magnetization and is associated to variable range hopping between metallic grains. In this work, we propose a simple modification of Inoue and Maekawa's model for tunnelling magnetoresistance in granulars, rewriting the expression for resistance as a function of magnetic field and temperature, also taking into account the two different contributions.

  11. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. H. Bai, Lihui; Hu, C.-M.; Hemour, S.; Wu, K.; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.

    2015-03-15

    The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  12. Hanle Magnetoresistance in Thin Metal Films with Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Saül; Golovach, Vitaly N; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Isasa, Miren; Sagasta, Edurne; Abadia, Mikel; Rogero, Celia; Hueso, Luis E; Bergeret, F Sebastian; Casanova, Fèlix

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of a new type of magnetoresistance in Pt and Ta thin films. The spin accumulation created at the surfaces of the film by the spin Hall effect decreases in a magnetic field because of the Hanle effect, resulting in an increase of the electrical resistance as predicted by Dyakonov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 126601 (2007)]. The angular dependence of this magnetoresistance resembles the recently discovered spin Hall magnetoresistance in Pt/Y(3)Fe(5)O(12) bilayers, although the presence of a ferromagnetic insulator is not required. We show that this Hanle magnetoresistance is an alternative simple way to quantitatively study the coupling between charge and spin currents in metals with strong spin-orbit coupling. PMID:26799036

  13. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F. Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-10-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. This work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications.

  14. Electric field control of magnetoresistance in InP nanowires with ferromagnetic contacts.

    PubMed

    Zwanenburg, F A; van der Mast, D W; Heersche, H B; Kouwenhoven, L P; Bakkers, E P A M

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate electric field control of sign and magnitude of the magnetoresistance in InP nanowires with ferromagnetic contacts. The sign change in the magnetoresistance is directly correlated with a sign change in the transconductance. Additionally, the magnetoresistance is shown to persist at such a high bias that Coulomb blockade has been lifted. We also observe the magnetoresistance when one of the ferromagnets is replaced by a nonmagnetic metal. We conclude that it must be induced by a single ferromagnetic contact, and that spin transport can be ruled out as the origin. Our results emphasize the importance of a systematic investigation of spin-valve devices in order to discriminate between ambiguous interpretations. PMID:19537736

  15. Inflation in anisotropic scalar-tensor theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pimentel, Luis O.; Stein-Schabes, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    The existence of an inflationary phase in anisotropic Scalar-Tensor Theories is investigated by means of a conformal transformation that allows us to rewrite these theories as gravity minimally coupled to a scalar field with a nontrivial potential. The explicit form of the potential is then used and the No Hair Theorem concludes that there is an inflationary phase in all open or flat anisotropic spacetimes in these theories. Several examples are constructed where the effect becomes manifest.

  16. Phase space analysis in anisotropic optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Chumakov, Sergey M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1995-01-01

    From the minimal action principle follows the Hamilton equations of evolution for geometric optical rays in anisotropic media. As in classical mechanics of velocity-dependent potentials, the velocity and the canonical momentum are not parallel, but differ by an anisotropy vector potential, similar to that of linear electromagnetism. Descartes' well known diagram for refraction is generalized and a factorization theorem holds for interfaces between two anisotropic media.

  17. Overview of anisotropic flow measurements from ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic flow is an important observable to study the properties of the hot and dense matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), created in heavy-ion collisions. Measurements of anisotropic flow for inclusive and identified charged hadrons are reported in Pb-Pb, p-Pb and pp collisions with the ALICE detector. The comparison of experimental measurements to various theoretical calculations are also presented in these proceedings.

  18. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  19. Soft particles with anisotropic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurtenberger, Peter

    Responsive colloids such as thermo- or pH-sensitive microgels are ideal model systems to investigate the relationship between the nature of interparticle interactions and the plethora of self-assembled structures that can form in colloidal suspensions. They allow for a variation of the form, strength and range of the interaction potential almost at will. While microgels have extensively been used as model systems to investigate various condensed matter problems such as glass formation, jamming or crystallization, they can also be used to study systems with anisotropic interactions. Here we show results from a systematic investigation of the influence of softness and anisotropy on the structural and dynamic properties of strongly interacting suspensions. We focus first on ionic microgels. Due to their large number of internal counterions they possess very large polarisabilities, and we can thus use external electrical ac fields to generate large dipolar contributions to the interparticle interaction potential. This leads to a number of new crystal phases, and we can trigger crystal-crystal phase transitions through the appropriate choice of the field strength. We then show that this approach can be extended to more complex particle shapes in an attempt to copy nature's well documented success in fabricating complex nanostructures such as virus shells via self assembly. European Research Council (ERC-339678-COMPASS).

  20. Anisotropic diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Popescu, M N; Hentschel, H G E; Family, F

    2004-06-01

    Using stochastic conformal mappings, we study the effects of anisotropic perturbations on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions. The harmonic measure of the growth probability for DLA can be conformally mapped onto a constant measure on a unit circle. Here we map m preferred directions for growth to a distribution on the unit circle, which is a periodic function with m peaks in [-pi,pi) such that the angular width sigma of the peak defines the "strength" of anisotropy kappa= sigma(-1) along any of the m chosen directions. The two parameters (m,kappa) map out a parameter space of perturbations that allows a continuous transition from DLA (for small enough kappa ) to m needlelike fingers as kappa--> infinity. We show that at fixed m the effective fractal dimension of the clusters D(m,kappa) obtained from mass-radius scaling decreases with increasing kappa from D(DLA) approximately 1.71 to a value bounded from below by D(min) = 3 / 2. Scaling arguments suggest a specific form for the dependence of the fractal dimension D(m,kappa) on kappa for large kappa which compares favorably with numerical results. PMID:15244564

  1. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  2. Modeling of anisotropic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, C.; Javierre, E.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Menzel, A.

    2015-06-01

    Biological soft tissues exhibit non-linear complex properties, the quantification of which presents a challenge. Nevertheless, these properties, such as skin anisotropy, highly influence different processes that occur in soft tissues, for instance wound healing, and thus its correct identification and quantification is crucial to understand them. Experimental and computational works are required in order to find the most precise model to replicate the tissues' properties. In this work, we present a wound healing model focused on the proliferative stage that includes angiogenesis and wound contraction in three dimensions and which relies on the accurate representation of the mechanical behavior of the skin. Thus, an anisotropic hyperelastic model has been considered to analyze the effect of collagen fibers on the healing evolution of an ellipsoidal wound. The implemented model accounts for the contribution of the ground matrix and two mechanically equivalent families of fibers. Simulation results show the evolution of the cellular and chemical species in the wound and the wound volume evolution. Moreover, the local strain directions depend on the relative wound orientation with respect to the fibers.

  3. Photothermal method for absorption measurements in anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubenvoll, M.; Schäfer, B.; Mann, K.; Novak, O.

    2016-02-01

    A measurement system for quantitative determination of both surface and bulk contributions to the photo-thermal absorption has been extended to anisotropic optical media. It bases upon a highly sensitive Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, accomplishing precise on-line monitoring of wavefront deformations of a collimated test beam transmitted perpendicularly through the laser-irradiated side of a cuboid sample. Caused by the temperature dependence of the refractive index as well as thermal expansion, the initially plane wavefront of the test beam is distorted. Sign and magnitude depend on index change and expansion. By comparison with thermal theory, a calibration of the measurement is possible, yielding a quantitative absolute measure of bulk and surface absorption losses from the transient wavefront distortion. Results for KTP and BBO single crystals are presented.

  4. Ultrahigh-Q modes in anisotropic 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouleghlimat, Oussama; Hocini, Abdesselam

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we design a two-dimensional photonic crystal cavity made with a substrate of an anisotropic material. We consider triangular lattice photonic crystal made from air holes in tellurium. The cavity itself is then created by three missing holes in the centre. Using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation and optimization of the geometrical parameters and the symmetric displacement of the edge air holes on the quality factor, the cavity’s structural parameters yield an ultrahigh-Q mode cavity with quality factor Q = 2.95 × 1011 for a filling factor r/a = 0.45 and lateral displacement of 10 nm. This shows great enhancement compared with previous studies in which silicon material has been used. The designed structure can be helpful in a number of applications associated with photonic crystal cavities, including quantum information processing, filters, and nanoscale sensors.

  5. Large magnetoresistance induced by crystallographic defects in FexTaS2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Morosan, Emilia; Morosan's Group Team

    The search for the materials that show large magnetoresistance and the mechanisms that induce it remains challenging in both experimental and theoretical aspects. The giant magnetoresistance in one class of materials, ferromagnetic conductors, is generally attributed to the misalignments of magnetic moments, which cause spin disorder scattering. Recently, very large magnetoresistance (>60 %) was discovered in the ferromagnetic Fe-intercalated transition metal dichalcogenide, Fe0.28TaS2 [Phys. Rev. B 91, 054426(2015)]. The mechanism that led to this large magnetoresistance was suggested to be due to the deviation of Fe concentration from commensurate values (1/4 or 1/3), which caused magnetic moments' misalignments. Here we report a study of FexTaS2 crystals with x close to the commensurate values. Our results qualitatively demonstrate that crystallographic defects significantly affect magnetoresistance in FexTaS2. This provides a way to search for large magnetoresistance in more intercalated transition metal dichalcogenides. This work is supported by the Department of Defense PECASE.

  6. Quantum and classical contributions to linear magnetoresistance in topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sourabh; Gopal, R. K.; Sarkar, Jit; Mitra, Chiranjib

    2016-05-01

    Three dimensional topological insulators possess backscattering immune relativistic Dirac fermions on their surface due to nontrivial topology of the bulk band structure. Both metallic and bulk insulating topological insulators exhibit weak-antilocalization in the low magnetic field and linear like magnetoresistance in higher fields. We explore the linear magnetoresistance in bulk insulating topological insulator Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition technique. Thin films of Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey were found to be insulating in nature, which conclusively establishes the origin of linear magnetoresistance from surface Dirac states. The films were thoroughly characterized for their crystallinity and composition and then subjected to transport measurements. We present a careful analysis taking into considerations all the existing models of linear magnetoresistance. We comprehend that the competition between classical and quantum contributions to magnetoresistance results in linear magnetoresistance in high fields. We observe that the cross-over field decreases with increasing temperature and the physical argument for this behavior is explained.

  7. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Tobias; Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm(3) is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm(3). In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers.

  8. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    PubMed Central

    Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers. PMID:25821686

  9. Scalar field in the anisotropic universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2010-04-15

    We discuss the primordial spectrum of a massless and minimally coupled scalar field, produced during the initial anisotropic epoch before the onset of inflation. We consider two models of the anisotropic cosmology, the (planar) Kasner-de Sitter solution (Bianchi I) and the Taub-NUT-de Sitter solution (Bianchi IX), where the 3-space geometry is initially anisotropic, followed by the de Sitter phase due to the presence of a positive cosmological constant. We discuss the behavior of a quantized, massless and minimally coupled scalar field in the anisotropic stage. This scalar field is not the inflaton and hence does not contribute to the background dynamics. We focus on the quantization procedure and evolution in the preinflationary anisotropic background. Also, in this paper for simplicity the metric perturbations are not taken into account. The initial condition is set by the requirement that the scalar field is initially in an adiabatic state. Usually, in a quantum harmonic oscillator system, an adiabatic process implies the one where the potential changes slowly enough compared to its size, and the time evolution can be obtained from the zeroth order WKB approximation. In our case, such a vacuum state exists only for limited solutions of the anisotropic universe, whose spacetime structure is regular in the initial times. In this paper, we call our adiabatic vacuum state the anisotropic vacuum. In the Kasner-de Sitter model, for one branch of planar solutions there is an anisotropic vacuum unless k{sub 3{ne}}0, where k{sub 3} is the comoving momentum along the third direction, while in the other branch there is no anisotropic vacuum state. In the first branch, for the moderate modes, k{sub 3{approx}}k, where k is the total comoving momentum, the scalar power spectrum has an oscillatory behavior and its direction dependence is suppressed. For the planar modes, k{sub 3}<

  10. Magnetoresistance in the magnetic and superconducting phases of RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, J. L.; Jurelo, A. R.; Pureur, P.

    The transverse magnetoresistance of RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8 is studied as a function of the applied field in several fixed temperatures spanning the superconducting and purely magnetic phases. In low applied fields, the magnetoresistance is positive and results from suppression of superconducting fluctuations. In the high field-high temperature regimes, a spin-disorder contribution to the magnetoresistance is identified. This fact indicates that the magnetic Ru-O 2 atomic layers have a conducting character.

  11. Spin valve sensors for ultrasensitive detection of superparamagnetic nanoparticles for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanxiong; Sun, Shouheng; Wilson, Robert J; White, Robert L; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X

    2006-01-01

    We present giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin valve sensors designed for detection of superparamagnetic nanoparticles as potential biomolecular labels in magnetic biodetection technology. We discuss the sensor design and experimentally demonstrate that as few as approximately 23 monodisperse 16-nm superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles can be detected by submicron spin valve sensors at room temperature without resorting to lock-in detection. A patterned self-assembly method of nanoparticles, based on a polymer-mediated process and fine lithography, is developed for the detection. It is found that sensor signal increases linearly with the number of nanoparticles. PMID:18414592

  12. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ.

  13. Low-field magnetic sensors based on the planar Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhl, A.; Van Dau, F. Nguyen; Childress, J. R.

    1995-05-01

    Sensitive magnetic field detection devices have been fabricated based on the planar Hall effect. The active material consists of permalloy ultrathin films (6 nm thick) epitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy is induced in the film through ferromagnetic coupling with a Fe/Pd bilayer epitaxially grown on MgO(001). The active layer shows a magnetoresistive ratio ΔR/R=2%. The device gives a sensitivity of 100 V/TA and a minimum detectable field below 10 nT. The detector response is linear over at least four decades. The transverse resistivity is sensitive only to the anisotropic resistivity, and not to the isotropic resistivity term which is highly temperature sensitive. Consequently, the thermal noise at 1 Hz is reduced by four orders of magnitude compared to a similar longitudinal magnetoresistive detector.

  14. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    PubMed Central

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R.; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S.; Samal, Akshaya K.; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications. PMID:22110867

  15. Anisotropic matching principle for the hydrodynamic expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Following the recent success of anisotropic hydrodynamics, I propose here a new, general prescription for the hydrodynamic expansion around an anisotropic background. The anisotropic distribution fixes exactly the complete energy-momentum tensor, just like the effective temperature fixes the proper energy density in the ordinary expansion around local equilibrium. This means that momentum anisotropies are already included at the leading order, allowing for large pressure anisotropies without the need of a next-to-leading-order treatment. The first moment of the Boltzmann equation (local four-momentum conservation) provides the time evolution of the proper energy density and the four-velocity. Differently from previous prescriptions, the dynamic equations for the pressure corrections are not derived from the zeroth or second moment of the Boltzmann equation, but they are taken directly from the exact evolution given by the Boltzmann equation. As known in the literature, the exact evolution of the pressure corrections involves higher moments of the Boltzmann distribution, which cannot be fixed by the anisotropic distribution alone. Neglecting the next-to-leading-order contributions corresponds to an approximation, which depends on the chosen form of the anisotropic distribution. I check the the effectiveness of the leading-order expansion around the generalized Romatschke-Stricklad distribution, comparing with the exact solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Bjorken limit with the collisional kernel treated in the relaxation-time approximation, finding an unprecedented agreement.

  16. Mie scattering by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Geng Youlin; Wu Xinbao; Li Lewei; Guan Boran

    2004-11-01

    The field solution to the electromagnetic scattering of a plane wave by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere is obtained in terms of a spherical vector wave function expansion form. Using the source-free Maxwell's equations for uniaxial anisotropic media and making the Fourier transform of the field quantities, the electromagnetic fields in the spectral domain in uniaxial anisotropic media are assumed to have a form similar to the plane wave expanded also in terms of the spherical vector wave functions. Applying the continuous boundary conditions of electromagnetic fields on the surface between the air region and uniaxial anisotropic sphere, the coefficients of transmitted fields and the scattered fields in uniaxial anisotropic media can be obtained analytically in the expansion form of vector wave eigenfunctions. Numerical results for some special cases are obtained and compared with those of the classical Lorenz-Mie theory and the method of moments accelerated with the conjugate-gradient fast-Fourier-transform approach. We also present some new numerical results for the more general uniaxial dielectric material media.

  17. Mie scattering by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere.

    PubMed

    Geng, You-Lin; Wu, Xin-Bao; Li, Le-Wei; Guan, Bo-Ran

    2004-11-01

    The field solution to the electromagnetic scattering of a plane wave by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere is obtained in terms of a spherical vector wave function expansion form. Using the source-free Maxwell's equations for uniaxial anisotropic media and making the Fourier transform of the field quantities, the electromagnetic fields in the spectral domain in uniaxial anisotropic media are assumed to have a form similar to the plane wave expanded also in terms of the spherical vector wave functions. Applying the continuous boundary conditions of electromagnetic fields on the surface between the air region and uniaxial anisotropic sphere, the coefficients of transmitted fields and the scattered fields in uniaxial anisotropic media can be obtained analytically in the expansion form of vector wave eigenfunctions. Numerical results for some special cases are obtained and compared with those of the classical Lorenz-Mie theory and the method of moments accelerated with the conjugate-gradient fast-Fourier-transform approach. We also present some new numerical results for the more general uniaxial dielectric material media.

  18. Self-powered magnetic sensor based on a triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Lin, Long; Zhang, Yue; Jing, Qingshen; Hou, Te-Chien; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-11-27

    Magnetic sensors are usually based on the Hall effect or a magnetoresistive sensing mechanism. Here we demonstrate that a nanogenerator can serve as a sensor for detecting the variation of the time-dependent magnetic field. The output voltage of the sensor was found to exponentially increase with increasing magnetic field. The detection sensitivities for the change and the changing rate of magnetic field are about 0.0363 ± 0.0004 ln(mV)/G and 0.0497 ± 0.0006 ln(mV)/(G/s), respectively. The response time and reset time of the sensor are about 0.13 and 0.34 s, respectively. The fabricated sensor has a detection resolution of about 3 G and can work under low frequencies (<0.4 Hz).

  19. Low-resistivity 10 nm diameter magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Maqableh, Mazin M; Huang, Xiaobo; Sung, Sang-Yeob; Reddy, K Sai Madhukar; Norby, Gregory; Victora, R H; Stadler, Bethanie J H

    2012-08-01

    Resistivities of 5.4 μΩ·cm were measured in 10-nm-diameter metallic wires. Low resistance is important for interconnections of the future to prevent heating, electromigration, high power consumption, and long RC time constants. To demonstrate application of these wires, Co/Cu/Co magnetic sensors were synthesized with 20-30 Ω and 19% magnetoresistance. Compared to conventional lithographically produced magnetic tunnel junction sensors, these structures offer facile fabrication and over 2 orders of magnitude lower resistances due to smooth sidewalls from in situ templated chemical growth.

  20. Ultra-sharp oscillatory magneto-resistance in spatially confined La{sub 0.3}Pr{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Alagoz, H. S. Jeon, J.; Boos, R.; Ahangharnejhad, R. H.; Chow, K. H. Jung, J.

    2014-10-20

    Our investigations of magneto-transport properties of La{sub 0.3}Pr{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} manganite thin films of reduced dimensions revealed dramatic changes in R(θ), the dependence of resistivity on the angle between the magnetic field direction and the current direction, and consequently in the anisotropic magneto-resistance. A regular oscillatory  sin{sup 2}θ form of R(θ) is replaced by a very sharp rectangular-shaped ones when the dimensions of the system become comparable to the size of the intrinsic electronic domains. We discuss possible mechanisms that could be responsible for these changes.

  1. Magnetization of anisotropic Type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.

    1989-04-10

    Peculiarities of magnetization of anisotropic type II superconductors are of considerable interest in view of the discovery of high-T/sub c/ superconductors characterized by strongly asymmetric layered structure. Specifics of the penetration of magnetic flux into an anisotropic type II superconductor were discussed in the literature. This analysis gave the distribution of induction in an isolated vortex, its energy, and critical magnetic field H/sub c1/. However, the magnetization curve of anisotropic superconductors was not considered. This paper deals with the magnetic moment of uniaxial London superconductor in the interval H/sub c1/ /le/ H/sub 0/ << H/sub c2/, where H/sub 0/ is the external magnetic field strength.

  2. Elastic properties of spherically anisotropic piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, En-Bo; Gu, Guo-Qing; Poon, Ying-Ming

    2010-09-01

    Effective elastic properties of spherically anisotropic piezoelectric composites, whose spherically anisotropic piezoelectric inclusions are embedded in an infinite non-piezoelectric matrix, are theoretically investigated. Analytical solutions for the elastic displacements and the electric potentials under a uniform external strain are derived exactly. Taking into account of the coupling effects of elasticity, permittivity and piezoelectricity, the formula is derived for estimating the effective elastic properties based on the average field theory in the dilute limit. An elastic response mechanism is revealed, in which the effective elastic properties increase as inclusion piezoelectric properties increase and inclusion dielectric properties decrease. Moreover, a piezoelectric response mechanism, of which the effective piezoelectric response vanishes due to the symmetry of spherically anisotropic composite, is also disclosed.

  3. Gravitational stresses in anisotropic rock masses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Savage, W.Z.; Swolfs, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained and are modelled as a homogeneous, orthotropic or transversely isotropic, linearly elastic material. The analysis, constrained by the thermodynamic requirement that strain energy be positive definite, gives the following important result: inclusion of anisotropy broadens the range of permissible values of gravity-induced horizontal stresses. In fact, for some ranges of anisotropic rock properties, it is thermodynamically admissible for gravity-induced horizontal stresses to exceed the vertical stress component; this is not possible for the classical isotropic solution. Specific examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity-induced stress field in anisotropic rocks and its dependence on the type, degree and orientation of anisotropy with respect to the horizontal ground surface. ?? 1987.

  4. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  5. Colossal anisotropic resistivity and oriented magnetic domains in strained La{sub 0.325}Pr{sub 0.3}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} films

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Tao; Yang, Shengwei; Liu, Yukuai; Zhao, Wenbo; Feng, Lei; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Haibiao; Lu, Qingyou; Hou, Yubin

    2014-05-19

    Magnetic and resistive anisotropies have been studied for the La{sub 0.325}Pr{sub 0.3}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} films with different thicknesses grown on low symmetric (011)-oriented (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(SrAl{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}){sub 0.7} substrates. In the magnetic and electronic phase separation region, a colossal anisotropic resistivity (AR) of ∼10{sup 5}% and an anomalous large anisotropic magnetoresistance can be observed for 30 nm film. However, for 120 nm film, the maximum AR decreases significantly (∼2 × 10{sup 3}%) due to strain relaxation. The colossal AR is strongly associated with the oriented formation of magnetic domains, and the features of the strain effects are believed to be useful for the design of artificial materials and devices.

  6. Magnetoresistance in p-type cadmium telluride doped with sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faisal R.

    2015-01-05

    This paper gives an account of the observations that were made during experiments in which temperature dependent van der Pauw (vdP) measurements were conducted on sodium doped single crystalline CdTe. With the aid of the vdP technique, the resistivity of the sample was measured in the presence of an external transverse magnetic field. The measurements were conducted at temperatures that ranged from 24 K all the way up to 300 K. The measurements indicated that at low temperatures, the resistivity of the sample increased significantly as the magnitude of the magnetic field perpendicular to the sample was raised from 0 T to 1.5 T. It was observed that the magnetoresistance (MR) decreased with increasing temperature. At 24 K, for an applied field of 1.5 T, the maximum MR was over 30%. Furthermore, it was also observed that the MR below 75 K exhibited a more or less linear dependence on the magnetic field. At higher temperatures, the MR as a function of the applied magnetic field exhibited a quadratic dependence. The results seem to indicate that the linear MR is most likely due to inhomogeneity in the semiconductor.

  7. Large Magnetoresistance in Single-Radical Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Ryoma; Karimi, Mohammad Amin; Wolf, Jannic; Huhn, Thomas; Zöllner, Martin Sebastian; Herrmann, Carmen; Scheer, Elke

    2016-08-10

    Organic radicals are promising building blocks for molecular spintronics. Little is known about the role of unpaired electrons for electron transport at the single-molecule level. Here, we examine the impact of magnetic fields on electron transport in single oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) (OPE)-based radical molecular junctions, which are formed with a mechanically controllable break-junction technique at a low temperature of 4.2 K. Surprisingly huge positive magnetoresistances (MRs) of 16 to 287% are visible for a magnetic field of 4 T, and the values are at least 1 order of magnitude larger than those of the analogous pristine OPE (2-4%). Rigorous analysis of the MR and of current-voltage and inelastic electron-tunneling spectroscopy measurements reveal an effective reduction of the electronic coupling between the current-carrying molecular orbital and the electrodes with increasing magnetic field. We suggest that the large MR for the single-radical molecular junctions might be ascribed to a loss of phase coherence of the charge carriers induced by the magnetic field. Although further investigations are required to reveal the mechanism underlying the strong MR, our findings provide a potential approach for tuning charge transport in metal-molecule junctions with organic radicals. PMID:27458666

  8. Energy scales and magnetoresistance at a quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaginyan, V. R.; Amusia, M. Ya.; Msezane, A. Z.; Popov, K. G.; Stephanovich, V. A.

    2009-03-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of CeCoIn 5 is notably different from that in many conventional metals. We show that a pronounced crossover from negative to positive MR at elevated temperatures and fixed magnetic fields is determined by the scaling behavior of quasiparticle effective mass. At a quantum critical point (QCP) this dependence generates kinks (crossover points from fast to slow growth) in thermodynamic characteristics (like specific heat, magnetization, etc.) at some temperatures when a strongly correlated electron system transits from the magnetic field induced Landau-Fermi liquid (LFL) regime to the non-Fermi liquid (NFL) one taking place at rising temperatures. We show that the above kink-like peculiarity separates two distinct energy scales in QCP vicinity - low temperature LFL scale and high temperature one related to NFL regime. Our comprehensive theoretical analysis of experimental data permits to reveal for the first time new MR and kinks scaling behavior as well as to identify the physical reasons for above energy scales.

  9. Energy scales and magnetoresistance at a quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, Miron; Shaginyan, Vasiliy

    2009-05-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of CeCoIn55 is notably different from that in many conventional metals. We show that a pronounced crossover from negative to positive MR at elevated temperatures and fixed magnetic fields is determined by the scaling behavior of quasiparticle effective mass. At a quantum critical point (QCP) this dependence generates kinks (crossover points from fast to slow growth) in thermodynamic characteristics (like specific heat, magnetization etc) at some temperatures when a strongly correlated electron system transits from the magnetic field induced Landau Fermi liquid (LFL) regime to the non-Fermi liquid (NFL) one taking place at rising temperatures. We show that the above kink-like peculiarity separates two distinct energy scales in QCP vicinity - low temperature LFL scale and high temperature one related to NFL regime. We show that the same behavior is observed under the application of elevated magnetic field at fixed temperature. These observations are in accord with recent facts (P. Gegenwart, et. al., Science 315, 969 (2007)). Our comprehensive theoretical analysis of experimental data permits to reveal for the first time new MR and kinks scaling behavior as well as to identify the physical reasons for above energy scales.

  10. Magnetoresistance Phenomena in a Variety of Amorphous Semiconductors and Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutch, Michael; Westley, David; Lenahan, Patrick; Semiconductor Spectroscopy Lab at Penn State University Team

    We report on near zero-field magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena in a variety of amorphous semiconductors and insulators. We utilize electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurements at multiple fields and frequencies to complement MR measurements. EDMR, the electrically detected analog of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), provides both information about the chemical nature and energy levels of point defects involved. Semiconductors in this study include a-BC:H, a-C:H, diamond-like carbon (DLC), and a-Si:H. Insulators include a-SiN:H, a-SiOC:H, a-SiCN:H. In hydrogenated amorphous systems, near featureless EPR and EDMR spectra are often difficult to analyze. We utilize multiple field and frequency EDMR results including ultra-low field/frequency (ν = 85 MHz, B = 3 mT) EDMR measurements to provide insight into defect chemistry in these systems. We have also made EDMR and MR conditions over a wide range of metal/semiconductor heterojunction and metal/insulator/semiconductor biasing conditions. By comparing variable bias measurements with band diagrams, we gain an elementary understanding of defect energy levels. We believe our results will be of significant importance for understanding defect mediated spin-dependent transport in these systems. The authors would like to thanks Dr. Sean King of Intel Corporation for the provision of samples.

  11. Tunnel magnetoresistance in Self-Assembled Monolayers Based Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattana, Richard; Barraud, Clément; Tatay, Sergio; Galbiati, Marta; Seneor, Pierre; Bouzehouane, Karim; Jacquet, Eric; Deranlot, Cyrile; Fert, Albert; Petroff, Frédéric

    2012-02-01

    Organic/molecular spintronics is a rising research field at the frontier between spintronics and organic chemistry. Organic molecule and semiconductors were first seen as promising for spintronics devices due to their expected long spin lifetime. But an exciting challenge has also been to find opportunities arising from chemistry to develop new spintronics functionalities. It was shown that the molecular structure and the ferromagnetic metal/molecule hybridization can strongly influence interfacial spin properties going from spin polarization enhancement to its sign control in spintronics devices. In this scenario, while scarcely studied, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are expected to become perfect toy barriers to further test these tailoring properties in molecular magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Due to its very high spin polarization and air stability LSMO has positioned itself as the electrode of choice in most of the organic spintronics devices. We will present a missing building block for molecular spintronics tailoring: the grafting and film characterization of organic monofunctionalized long alkane chains over LSMO. We have obtained 35% of magnetoresistance in LSMO/SAMs/Co MTJs. We will discuss the unusual behaviour of the bias voltage dependence of the TMR.

  12. The spin-Dicke effect in OLED magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, D. P.; Joshi, G.; Kavand, M.; Limes, M. E.; Malissa, H.; Burn, P. L.; Lupton, J. M.; Boehme, C.

    2015-11-01

    Pairs of charge-carrier spins in organic semiconductors constitute four-level systems that can be driven electromagnetically. Given appropriate conditions for ultrastrong coupling--weak local hyperfine fields Bhyp, large magnetic resonant driving fields B1 and low static fields B0 that define Zeeman splitting--the spin-Dicke effect, a collective transition of spin states, has been predicted. This parameter range is challenging to probe by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy because thermal magnetic polarization is negligible. It is accessed through spin-dependent conductivity that is controlled by electron-hole pairs of singlet and triplet spin-permutation symmetry without the need of thermal spin polarization. Signatures of collective behaviour of carrier spins are revealed in the steady-state magnetoresistance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), rather than through radiative transitions. For intermediate B1, the a.c.-Zeeman effect appears. For large B1, a collective spin-ensemble state arises, inverting the current change under resonance and removing power broadening, thereby offering a unique window to ambient macroscopic quantum coherence.

  13. Viable chemical approach for patterning nanoscale magnetoresistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeseung; Kim, Younghee; Chen, Jack Kun-Chieh; Chang, Jane P.

    2015-03-15

    A reactive ion etching process with alternating Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} exposures has been shown to chemically etch CoFe film that is an integral component in magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM). Starting with systematic thermodynamic calculations assessing various chemistries and reaction pathways leading to the highest possible vapor pressure of the etch products reactions, the potential chemical combinations were verified by etch rate investigation and surface chemistry analysis in plasma treated CoFe films. An ∼20% enhancement in etch rate was observed with the alternating use of Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} plasmas, in comparison with the use of only Cl{sub 2} plasma. This chemical combination was effective in removing metal chloride layers, thus maintaining the desired magnetic properties of the CoFe films. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed visually and spectroscopically that the metal chloride layers generated by Cl{sub 2} plasma were eliminated with H{sub 2} plasma to yield a clean etch profile. This work suggests that the selected chemistries can be used to etch magnetic metal alloys with a smooth etch profile and this general strategy can be applied to design chemically based etch processes to enable the fabrication of highly integrated nanoscale MRAM devices.

  14. Quantum Fluctuations of Local Magnetoresistance in Organic Spin Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikh, Mikhail; Roundy, Robert; Nemirovsky, Demitry; Kagalovsky, Victor

    2014-03-01

    Aside from interfacial effects, the performance of organic spin valves is limited by the spin memory loss in course of electron transport between the magnetized electrodes. One of the most prominent mechanisms of this loss is the spin precession in the random hyperfine fields of nuclei. We assume that the electron transport is due to incoherent multi-step tunneling. Then the precession takes place while electron ``waits'' for the subsequent tunneling step. While the spatial coherence of electron is lost after a single step, the spin evolution remains absolutely coherent all the way between the electrodes. As a result, the amplitudes of subsequent spin rotation interfere with each other. We demonstrate that this interference leads to a wide spread in the local values of tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). Moreover, if on average the TMR is positive, the portion of the surface area where the TMR is negative is appreciable. We calculate analytically and numerically the distribution of local TMR as a function of the spin-valve thickness. Supported by the NSF through MRSEC DMR-112125 and by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation

  15. Temperature‑field phase diagram of extreme magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah Tafti, Fazel; Gibson, Quinn; Kushwaha, Satya; Krizan, Jason W.; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Cava, Robert Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The recent discovery of extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) in LaSb introduced lanthanum monopnictides as a new platform to study this effect in the absence of broken inversion symmetry or protected linear band crossing. In this work, we report XMR in LaBi. Through a comparative study of magnetotransport effects in LaBi and LaSb, we construct a temperature‑field phase diagram with triangular shape that illustrates how a magnetic field tunes the electronic behavior in these materials. We show that the triangular phase diagram can be generalized to other topological semimetals with different crystal structures and different chemical compositions. By comparing our experimental results to band structure calculations, we suggest that XMR in LaBi and LaSb originates from a combination of compensated electron‑hole pockets and a particular orbital texture on the electron pocket. Such orbital texture is likely to be a generic feature of various topological semimetals, giving rise to their small residual resistivity at zero field and subject to strong scattering induced by a magnetic field.

  16. Crystallinity and magnetoresistance in calcium doped lanthanum manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Gillman, E.S.; Dahmen, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    Thin films of calcium doped lanthanum manganites La{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) with x {approximately} 0.41 have been prepared on LaAlO{sub 3}(001) (LAO) Y-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}(001) (YSZ), and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) (SAP) substrates by liquid delivery metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (LD-MOCVD). The films on YSZ and SAP substrates have a textured, polycrystalline morphology with a preferred orientation of (110). The films on LAO show a single-crystalline morphology and a (100) orientation. Transport measurements show the polycrystalline films have a resistance peak approximately 60 K lower than the films on LAO and, in general, have a much higher overall resistance. The magnetoresistance (MR) ratio ([R(H) - R(0)]/R(H)) is sharply peaked near the maximum in resistance for the films on LAO, while the polycrystalline films show a noticeable absence of this sharply peaked behavior and a flat, rather large ({approximately} 100%) MR ratio over a large temperature range. These results will be discussed in terms of grain boundary scattering, crystallite size, and magnetization.

  17. Magnetoresistance detected spin collectivity in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malissa, Hans; Waters, David P.; Joshi, Gajadhar; Kavand, Marzieh; Limes, Mark E.; Burn, Paul L.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) typically refers to the significant change in the conductivity of thin layers of organic semiconductors at low static magnetic fields (< 10 mT). When radio frequency (rf) radiation is applied to an organic semiconductor under bipolar injection, and in the presence of small magnetic fields B, magnetic resonance can occur, which is observed as a change of the OMAR effect [Baker et al., Nat. Commun. 3, 898 (2012)]. When B and the resonant driving field are stronger than local hyperfine fields, an ultrastrong coupling regime emerges, which is marked by collective spin effects analogous to the optical Dicke effect [Roundy and Raikh, Phys. Rev. B 88, 125206 (2013)]. Experimentally, this collective behavior of spins can be probed in the steady state OMAR of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at room temperature by observation of a sign reversal of the OMAR change under rf irradiation. Furthermore, in the presence of strong driving fields, an ac Zeeman effect can be observed through OMAR [Waters et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 910 (2015)], a unique window to observe room temperature macroscopic spin quantum coherence.

  18. Decomposition of the magnetoresistance of multilayers into ferromagneticand superparamagnetic contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakonyi, I.; Péter, L.; Rolik, Z.; Kiss-Szabó, K.; Kupay, Z.; Tóth, J.; Kiss, L. F.; Pádár, J.

    2004-08-01

    An analysis of both magnetic and magnetotransport properties is presented for electrodeposited multilayers prepared intentionally under conditions to make the superparamagnetic (SPM) magnetization contribution comparable to or larger than the ferromagnetic term. Based on a model elaborated for the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) of granular metals [N. Wiser, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 159, 119 (1996); B. Hickey , Phys. Rev. B. 51, 667 (1995)], it is shown that in such multilayers both the magnetization and the GMR can be decomposed into ferromagnetric and superparamagnetic contributions where the latter term is described by a Langevin function. The size of the SPM regions estimated from the experimental data is in the nanoscale regime. It is believed that the method applied here gives a quantitative answer to the problem of the often observed nonsaturating behavior of GMR in multilayers. Electrodeposited multilayers are particularly prone to this feature although the occurrence of SPM regions is quite common in multilayers prepared by any technique. Therefore, this type of analysis should help better understanding of the factors influencing the GMR of multilayer films.

  19. Role of structurally and magnetically modified nanoclusters in colossal magnetoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jing; Niebieskikwiat, Dario; Jie, Qing; Schofield, Marvin A.; Wu, Lijun; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Yimei

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electronic and magnetic phase separation is the origin of many of exotic properties of strongly correlated electron materials, such as colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), an unusually large variation in the electrical resistivity under applied magnetic field. In the simplest picture, the two competing phases are those associated with the material state on either side of the phase transition. Those phases would be paramagnetic insulator and ferromagnetic metal for the CMR effect in doped manganites. It has been speculated that a critical component of the CMR phenomenon is nanoclusters with quite different properties than either of the terminal phases during the transition. However, the role of these nanoclusters in the CMR effect remains elusive because the physical properties of the nanoclusters are hard to measure when embedded in bulk materials. Here we show the unexpected behavior of the nanoclusters in the CMR compound La1-xCaxMnO3 (0.4 ≤ x < 0.5) by directly correlating transmission electron microscopy observations with bulk measurements. The structurally modified nanoclusters at the CMR temperature were found to be ferromagnetic and exhibit much higher electrical conductivity than previously proposed. Only at temperatures much below the CMR transition, the nanoclusters are antiferromagnetic and insulating. These findings substantially alter the current understanding of these nanoclusters on the material’s functionality and would shed light on the microscopic study on the competing spin-lattice-charge orders in strongly correlated systems. PMID:22160678

  20. Temperature-field phase diagram of extreme magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Fallah Tafti, Fazel; Gibson, Quinn; Kushwaha, Satya; Krizan, Jason W; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Cava, Robert Joseph

    2016-06-21

    The recent discovery of extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) in LaSb introduced lanthanum monopnictides as a new platform to study this effect in the absence of broken inversion symmetry or protected linear band crossing. In this work, we report XMR in LaBi. Through a comparative study of magnetotransport effects in LaBi and LaSb, we construct a temperature-field phase diagram with triangular shape that illustrates how a magnetic field tunes the electronic behavior in these materials. We show that the triangular phase diagram can be generalized to other topological semimetals with different crystal structures and different chemical compositions. By comparing our experimental results to band structure calculations, we suggest that XMR in LaBi and LaSb originates from a combination of compensated electron-hole pockets and a particular orbital texture on the electron pocket. Such orbital texture is likely to be a generic feature of various topological semimetals, giving rise to their small residual resistivity at zero field and subject to strong scattering induced by a magnetic field. PMID:27274081