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Sample records for anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor

  1. Highly Sensitive Flexible Magnetic Sensor Based on Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguang; Wang, Xinjun; Li, Menghui; Gao, Yuan; Hu, Zhongqiang; Nan, Tianxiang; Liang, Xianfeng; Chen, Huaihao; Yang, Jia; Cash, Syd; Sun, Nian-Xiang

    2016-11-01

    A highly sensitive flexible magnetic sensor based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect is fabricated. A limit of detection of 150 nT is observed and excellent deformation stability is achieved after wrapping of the flexible sensor, with bending radii down to 5 mm. The flexible AMR sensor is used to read a magnetic pattern with a thickness of 10 μm that is formed by ferrite magnetic inks.

  2. Space magnetometer based on an anisotropic magnetoresistive hybrid sensor.

    PubMed

    Brown, P; Whiteside, B J; Beek, T J; Fox, P; Horbury, T S; Oddy, T M; Archer, M O; Eastwood, J P; Sanz-Hernández, D; Sample, J G; Cupido, E; O'Brien, H; Carr, C M

    2014-12-01

    We report on the design and development of a low resource, dual sensor vector magnetometer for space science applications on very small spacecraft. It is based on a hybrid device combining an orthogonal triad of commercial anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors with a totem pole H-Bridge drive on a ceramic substrate. The drive enables AMR operation in the more sensitive flipped mode and this is achieved without the need for current spike transmission down a sensor harness. The magnetometer has sensitivity of better than 3 nT in a 0-10 Hz band and a total mass of 104 g. Three instruments have been launched as part of the TRIO-CINEMA space weather mission, inter-calibration against the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model makes it possible to extract physical signals such as field-aligned current deflections of 20-60 nT within an approximately 45,000 nT ambient field.

  3. Space magnetometer based on an anisotropic magnetoresistive hybrid sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.; Whiteside, B. J.; Beek, T. J.; Fox, P.; Horbury, T. S.; Oddy, T. M.; Archer, M. O.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sanz-Hernández, D.; Sample, J. G.; Cupido, E.; O'Brien, H.; Carr, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the design and development of a low resource, dual sensor vector magnetometer for space science applications on very small spacecraft. It is based on a hybrid device combining an orthogonal triad of commercial anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors with a totem pole H-Bridge drive on a ceramic substrate. The drive enables AMR operation in the more sensitive flipped mode and this is achieved without the need for current spike transmission down a sensor harness. The magnetometer has sensitivity of better than 3 nT in a 0-10 Hz band and a total mass of 104 g. Three instruments have been launched as part of the TRIO-CINEMA space weather mission, inter-calibration against the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model makes it possible to extract physical signals such as field-aligned current deflections of 20-60 nT within an approximately 45 000 nT ambient field.

  4. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  5. DNA-magnetic bead detection using disposable cards and the anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, L. T.; Quynh, L. K.; Huyen, V. T.; Tu, B. D.; Hien, N. T.; Phuong, D. M.; Nhung, P. H.; Giang, D. T. H.; Duc, N. H.

    2016-12-01

    A disposable card incorporating specific DNA probes targeting the 16 S rRNA gene of Streptococcus suis was developed for magnetically labeled target DNA detection. A single-stranded target DNA was hybridized with the DNA probe on the SPA/APTES/PDMS/Si as-prepared card, which was subsequently magnetically labeled with superparamagnetic beads for detection using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. An almost linear response between the output signal of the AMR sensor and amount of single-stranded target DNA varied from 4.5 to 18 pmol was identified. From the sensor output signal response towards the mass of magnetic beads which were directly immobilized on the disposable card surface, the limit of detection was estimated about 312 ng ferrites, which corresponds to 3.8 μemu. In comparison with DNA detection by conventional biosensor based on magnetic bead labeling, disposable cards are featured with higher efficiency and performances, ease of use and less running cost with respects to consumables for biosensor in biomedical analysis systems operating with immobilized bioreceptor.

  6. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  7. Magnetoresistive sensors for string instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenssen, K.-M. H.; Somers, G. H. J.; van Zon, J. B. A. D.

    2002-05-01

    Pickup elements for string instruments, in particular for electric guitars, represent a new application area for magnetoresistive sensors. Recently we developed a sensor configuration with permanent magnets for this purpose. For the first experiments we used commercial anisotropic magnetoresistance sensors (Philips KMZ10) mounted on small ferrite bias magnets. Recently we equipped an electric guitar with prototypes comprising giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors. These prototype MR pickup elements showed several clear advantages compared to the presently commonly used inductive pickup units. They are much less sensitive to disturbing electromagnetic fields (>1000×at 5 kHz), mainly because their active sensor area is several orders of magnitude smaller (a few mm2 instead of cm2). Also the larger freedom in the choice of the permanent magnets (due to the larger sensitivity of the GMR elements) is advantageous: employing smaller magnets reduces the damping and thus significantly improves the sustain, the magnets can be less expensive and more stable magnet materials can be chosen so that aging effects are eliminated.

  8. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling). PMID:26569263

  9. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-11-12

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling).

  10. Magnetoresistive Sensors in Biological Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondra, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic beads or nanoparticles can be used as ``labels'' in biochemical assays by attaching the beads to the biospecies of interest using a bio-specific attachment. Once the labels are attached, they can be used to manipulate, capture, and detect the species to be analyzed. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors may be used to detect and count these labels, and thus make an inference about the concentration of the species of interest. MR technology is especially promising for biosensor applications where making the detector small and integrated with related sample handling tools to form a ``lab-on-a-chip'' miniaturized system. The function of the MR sensors is to detect stray magnetic fields from the beads while they are exposed to a magnetic excitation field. Generally, the stray fields from beads and clusters of beads are complicated functions of geometry, so some care is required to relate the detected magnetic signal to the number and location of the bead labels. This presentation will begin with a broad overview of results from many groups working in this area. For convenience, the applications are divided into three categories, detection of: flowing magnetic beads, immobilized beads, and scanned samples. Next will be some discussion of how the choice of spintronic sensor technology might affect detection capabilities (AMR, GMR, TMR, Hall effect, etc). Then, challenges relating to integration of MR sensors into microfluidic products will be discussed. This is the focus of the presenter's current day-to-day work on developing and producing MR-based biosensors. And finally, a description of possible future avenues of study and development will be presented.

  11. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; López-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.-W.; Park, B.-G.; Balcells, Ll.; Martí, X.; Jungwirth, T.; Martínez, B.

    2016-10-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature.

  12. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    PubMed Central

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; López-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.-W.; Park, B.-G.; Balcells, Ll.; Martí, X.; Jungwirth, T.; Martínez, B.

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature. PMID:27762278

  13. Anomalously large anisotropic magnetoresistance in a perovskite manganite.

    PubMed

    Li, Run-Wei; Wang, Huabing; Wang, Xuewen; Yu, X Z; Matsui, Y; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Bao-Gen; Plummer, E Ward; Zhang, Jiandi

    2009-08-25

    The signature of correlated electron materials (CEMs) is the coupling between spin, charge, orbital and lattice resulting in exotic functionality. This complexity is directly responsible for their tunability. We demonstrate here that the broken symmetry, through cubic to orthorhombic distortion in the lattice structure in a prototype manganite single crystal, La(0.69)Ca(0.31)MnO(3), leads to an anisotropic magneto-elastic response to an external field, and consequently to remarkable magneto-transport behavior. An anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect occurs close to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the system, showing a direct correlation with the anisotropic field-tuned MIT in the system and can be understood by means of a simple phenomenological model. A small crystalline anisotropy stimulates a "colossal" AMR near the MIT phase boundary of the system, thus revealing the intimate interplay between magneto- and electronic-crystalline couplings.

  14. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal = Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  15. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-01

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  16. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Steven S.-L. Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-07

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  17. Gamma irradiation of magnetoresistive sensors for planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ruy; Fernández, Ana B; Dominguez, Jose A; Martín, Boris; Michelena, Marina D

    2012-01-01

    A limited number of Anisotropic Magnetoresistive (AMR) commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) magnetic sensors of the HMC series by Honeywell, with and without integrated front-end electronics, were irradiated with gamma rays up to a total irradiation dose of 200 krad (Si), following the ESCC Basic Specification No. 22900. Due to the magnetic cleanliness required for these tests a special set-up was designed and successfully employed. Several parameters of the sensors were monitored during testing and the results are reported in this paper. The authors conclude that AMR sensors without front-end electronics seem to be robust against radiation doses of up to 200 krad (Si) with a dose rate of 5 krad (Si)/hour and up to a resolution of tens of nT, but sensors with an integrated front-end seem to be more vulnerable to radiation.

  18. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors for DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Yu, Heng; Han, Shu-Jen; Osterfeld, Sebastian; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are developed for a DNA microarray. Compared with the conventional fluorescent sensors, GMR sensors are cheaper, more sensitive, can generate fully electronic signals, and can be easily integrated with electronics and microfluidics. The GMR sensor used in this work has a bottom spin valve structure with an MR ratio of 12%. The single-strand target DNA detected has a length of 20 bases. Assays with DNA concentrations down to 10 pM were performed, with a dynamic range of 3 logs. A double modulation technique was used in signal detection to reduce the 1/f noise in the sensor while circumventing electromagnetic interference. The logarithmic relationship between the magnetic signal and the target DNA concentration can be described by the Temkin isotherm. Furthermore, GMR sensors integrated with microfluidics has great potential of improving the sensitivity to 1 pM or below, and the total assay time can be reduced to less than 1 hour. PMID:20824116

  19. Linearization strategies for high sensitivity magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana V.; Leitao, Diana C.; Valadeiro, João; Amaral, José; Freitas, Paulo P.; Cardoso, Susana

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors envisaged for applications on biomedical imaging require the detection of low-intensity and low-frequency signals. Therefore linear magnetic sensors with enhanced sensitivity low noise levels and improved field detection at low operating frequencies are necessary. Suitable devices can be designed using magnetoresistive sensors, with room temperature operation, adjustable detected field range, CMOS compatibility and cost-effective production. The advent of spintronics set the path to the technological revolution boosted by the storage industry, in particular by the development of read heads using magnetoresistive devices. New multilayered structures were engineered to yield devices with linear output. We present a detailed study of the key factors influencing MR sensor performance (materials, geometries and layout strategies) with focus on different linearization strategies available. Furthermore strategies to improve sensor detection levels are also addressed with best reported values of ˜40 pT/√Hz at 30 Hz, representing a step forward the low field detection at room temperature.

  20. Gilbert damping and anisotropic magnetoresistance in iron-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.

    2016-07-01

    We use the two-current model of Campbell and Fert to understand the compositional dependence of the Gilbert damping parameter in certain iron alloys. In that model, spin-up and spin-down carriers have different resistivities ρ↑ and ρ↓. We emphasize the part of the Gilbert parameter, called Gsf, generated by spin-flip interband processes. Both Gsf and the anisotropic magnetoresistance Δρ are proportional to the square of the spin-orbit parameter, and also proportional to ρ↑. In bcc alloys of iron with V, Cr, Mo, etc. solutes on the left of iron in the periodic table, ρ↑ is increased by a scattering resonance (Gomes and Campbell, 1966, 1968). Then ρ↑, Δρ, and Gsf all exhibit a peak at the same moderate concentration of the solute. We find the best fit between this theory and existing experimental data of Gilbert damping for Fe-V epitaxial films at room temperature (Cheng, 2006; Scheck et al., 2007). At room temperature, the predicted Gsf peak is masked by a background arising from non-flip intraband processes. At elevated temperatures, the peak is expected to become more prominent, and less hidden in the background.

  1. Giant anisotropic magnetoresistance in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Abhinav; Richardella, Anthony; Kempinger, Susan; Liu, Chao-Xing; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-07-01

    When a three-dimensional ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film is magnetized out-of-plane, conduction ideally occurs through dissipationless, one-dimensional (1D) chiral states that are characterized by a quantized, zero-field Hall conductance. The recent realization of this phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, provides a conceptually new platform for studies of 1D transport, distinct from the traditionally studied quantum Hall effects that arise from Landau level formation. An important question arises in this context: how do these 1D edge states evolve as the magnetization is changed from out-of-plane to in-plane? We examine this question by studying the field-tilt-driven crossover from predominantly edge-state transport to diffusive transport in Crx(Bi,Sb)2-xTe3 thin films. This crossover manifests itself in a giant, electrically tunable anisotropic magnetoresistance that we explain by employing a Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our methodology provides a powerful means of quantifying dissipative effects in temperature and chemical potential regimes far from perfect quantization.

  2. Giant anisotropic magnetoresistance in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator.

    PubMed

    Kandala, Abhinav; Richardella, Anthony; Kempinger, Susan; Liu, Chao-Xing; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-07-07

    When a three-dimensional ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film is magnetized out-of-plane, conduction ideally occurs through dissipationless, one-dimensional (1D) chiral states that are characterized by a quantized, zero-field Hall conductance. The recent realization of this phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, provides a conceptually new platform for studies of 1D transport, distinct from the traditionally studied quantum Hall effects that arise from Landau level formation. An important question arises in this context: how do these 1D edge states evolve as the magnetization is changed from out-of-plane to in-plane? We examine this question by studying the field-tilt-driven crossover from predominantly edge-state transport to diffusive transport in Crx(Bi,Sb)(2-x)Te3 thin films. This crossover manifests itself in a giant, electrically tunable anisotropic magnetoresistance that we explain by employing a Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our methodology provides a powerful means of quantifying dissipative effects in temperature and chemical potential regimes far from perfect quantization.

  3. Magnetocardiography with sensors based on giant magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Parkkonen, L.; Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Polovy, H.; Fermon, C.; Fowley, C.

    2011-04-01

    Biomagnetic signals, mostly due to the electrical activity in the body, are very weak and they can only be detected by the most sensitive magnetometers, such as Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). We report here biomagnetic recordings with hybrid sensors based on Giant MagnetoResistance (GMR). We recorded magnetic signatures of the electric activity of the human heart (magnetocardiography) in healthy volunteers. The P-wave and QRS complex, known from the corresponding electric recordings, are clearly visible in the recordings after an averaging time of about 1 min. Multiple recordings at different locations over the chest yielded a dipolar magnetic field map and allowed localizing the underlying current sources. The sensitivity of the GMR-based sensors is now approaching that of SQUIDs and paves way for spin electronics devices for functional imaging of the body.

  4. Lateral flow immunoassay using magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taton, Kristin; Johnson, Diane; Guire, Patrick; Lange, Erik; Tondra, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic particles have been adapted for use as labels in biochemical lateral flow strip tests. Standard gold particle lateral flow assays are generally qualitative; however, with magnetic particles, quantitative results can be obtained by using electronic detection systems with giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. As described here, these small integrated sensor chips can detect the presence of magnetic labels in capture spots whose volume is approximately 150 μm×150 μm×150 μm. The range of linear detection is better than two orders of magnitude; the total range is up to four orders of magnitude. The system was demonstrated with both indirect and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for protein detection of rabbit IgG and interferon-γ, respectively, achieving detection of 12 pg/ml protein. Ultimately, the goal is for the detector to be fully integrated into the lateral flow strip backing to form a single consumable item that is interrogated by a handheld electronic reader.

  5. The MAGIC of CINEMA: first in-flight science results from a miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, M. O.; Horbury, T. S.; Brown, P.; Eastwood, J. P.; Oddy, T. M.; Whiteside, B. J.; Sample, J. G.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first in-flight results from a novel miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive space magnetometer, MAGIC (MAGnetometer from Imperial College), aboard the first CINEMA (CubeSat for Ions, Neutrals, Electrons and MAgnetic fields) spacecraft in low Earth orbit. An attitude-independent calibration technique is detailed using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), which is temperature dependent in the case of the outboard sensor. We show that the sensors accurately measure the expected absolute field to within 2% in attitude mode and 1% in science mode. Using a simple method we are able to estimate the spacecraft's attitude using the magnetometer only, thus characterising CINEMA's spin, precession and nutation. Finally, we show that the outboard sensor is capable of detecting transient physical signals with amplitudes of ~ 20-60 nT. These include field-aligned currents at the auroral oval, qualitatively similar to previous observations, which agree in location with measurements from the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) and POES (Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites) spacecraft. Thus, we demonstrate and discuss the potential science capabilities of the MAGIC instrument onboard a CubeSat platform.

  6. Analog isolated electronic dynamometer based on a magnetoresistive current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcos Carrasco, C.; Ramírez Muñoz, D.; Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Sánchez Moreno, J.; Maset Sancho, E.; Garrigós Sirvent, A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, an electronic system is presented to measure the force applied by a solenoid. The originality of the work is focused on the use of a magnetoresistive current sensor to provide the isolation barrier needed in the actual industrial plant where the solenoids are working. The design of the electronic system is presented as well as experimental measurements as a result of a calibration process showing a negligible hysteresis with that specific sensor. The magnetoresistive current sensor is used to develop transmission functions rather than playing its usual sensing roles.

  7. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  8. Tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance in CoFeB|MgO|Ta junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hatanaka, S.; Miwa, S. Matsuda, K.; Nawaoka, K.; Tanaka, K.; Morishita, H.; Goto, M.; Mizuochi, N.; Shinjo, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-08-24

    We found that CoFeB|MgO|Ta tunnel junctions exhibit tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) at room temperature. The tunnel junctions exhibit positive magnetoresistance with the application of a magnetic field normal to the film plane. The dependencies on the applied magnetic field angle and MgO thickness reveal that the magnetoresistance originates from the TAMR, caused by the spin polarization and the spin-orbit interaction at the CoFeB|MgO interface. We also found that the TAMR can be used to detect ferromagnetic resonance in the CoFeB. This detection method could be useful for the characterization of nanomagnets that are free from the spin-transfer effect and the stray field of a reference layer, unlike conventional magnetic tunnel junctions.

  9. Tunnel Magnetoresistance Sensors with Magnetostrictive Electrodes: Strain Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meier, Tobias; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Reiss, Günter; Meyners, Dirk

    2016-11-11

    Magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors pose a bright perspective in micro- and nano-scale strain sensing technology. The behavior of TMR sensors under mechanical stress as well as their sensitivity to the applied stress depends on the magnetization configuration of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ)s with respect to the stress axis. Here, we propose a configuration resulting in an inverse effect on the tunnel resistance by tensile and compressive stresses. Numerical simulations, based on a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) model, are performed in order to understand the magnetization reversal of the sense layer and to find out the optimum bias magnetic field required for high strain sensitivity. At a bias field of -3.2 kA/m under a 0.2 × 10 - 3 strain, gauge factors of 2294 and -311 are calculated under tensile and compressive stresses, respectively. Modeling results are investigated experimentally on a round junction with a diameter of 30 ± 0.2 μ m using a four-point bending apparatus. The measured field and strain loops exhibit nearly the same trends as the calculated ones. Also, the gauge factors are in the same range. The junction exhibits gauge factors of 2150 ± 30 and -260 for tensile and compressive stresses, respectively, under a -3.2 kA/m bias magnetic field. The agreement of the experimental and modeling results approves the proposed configuration for high sensitivity and ability to detect both tensile and compressive stresses by a single TMR sensor.

  10. Measurement and simulation of anisotropic magnetoresistance in single GaAs/MnAs core/shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Wang, J.; Paul, A.; Cooley, B. J.; Rench, D. W.; Dellas, N. S.; Mohney, S. E.; Engel-Herbert, R.; Samarth, N.

    2012-04-01

    We report four probe measurements of the low field magnetoresistance (MR) in single core/shell GaAs/MnAs nanowires (NWs) synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy, demonstrating clear signatures of anisotropic magnetoresistance that track the field-dependent magnetization. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations reveals that the principal characteristics of the magnetoresistance data can be unambiguously attributed to the nanowire segments with a zinc blende GaAs core. The direct correlation between magnetoresistance, magnetization, and crystal structure provides a powerful means of characterizing individual hybrid ferromagnet/semiconductor nanostructures.

  11. Tunnel Magnetoresistance Sensors with Magnetostrictive Electrodes: Strain Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meier, Tobias; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Reiss, Günter; Meyners, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors pose a bright perspective in micro- and nano-scale strain sensing technology. The behavior of TMR sensors under mechanical stress as well as their sensitivity to the applied stress depends on the magnetization configuration of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ)s with respect to the stress axis. Here, we propose a configuration resulting in an inverse effect on the tunnel resistance by tensile and compressive stresses. Numerical simulations, based on a modified Stoner–Wohlfarth (SW) model, are performed in order to understand the magnetization reversal of the sense layer and to find out the optimum bias magnetic field required for high strain sensitivity. At a bias field of −3.2 kA/m under a 0.2×10-3 strain, gauge factors of 2294 and −311 are calculated under tensile and compressive stresses, respectively. Modeling results are investigated experimentally on a round junction with a diameter of 30±0.2μm using a four-point bending apparatus. The measured field and strain loops exhibit nearly the same trends as the calculated ones. Also, the gauge factors are in the same range. The junction exhibits gauge factors of 2150±30 and −260 for tensile and compressive stresses, respectively, under a −3.2 kA/m bias magnetic field. The agreement of the experimental and modeling results approves the proposed configuration for high sensitivity and ability to detect both tensile and compressive stresses by a single TMR sensor. PMID:27845708

  12. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhel, Ahmed; Khan, Mohammed Asadullah; Cardoso, Susana; Leitao, Diana; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature. PMID:27164113

  13. Development of eddy current probes based on magnetoresistive sensors arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Decitre, J.-M.; Fermon, C.; Pelkner, M.; Reimund, V.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2014-02-01

    Eddy Current Technique is a powerful method for detection of surface notches and of buried flaws during inspection of metallic parts. Recent EC array probes have demonstrated a fast and efficient control of large surfaces. Nevertheless, when the size of flaws decreases or the defect is rather deep, traditional winding coil probes turn out to be useless. Magnetoresistive sensors present the advantages of flat frequency response and micron size. These sensors are hence very attractive for the detection of buried defects that require low frequencies because of skin depth effect. An optimization of the probe with magnetoresistive sensors as receivers has been made by simulations using CIVA software and finite elements methods with OPERA. EC probes for buried flaw detection have been designed. Experimental results have been compared with simulations.

  14. Anisotropic magnetotransport and exotic longitudinal linear magnetoresistance in WTe2 crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Yanfei; Liu, Haiwen; Yan, Jiaqiang; ...

    2015-07-06

    Recently, the WTe2 semimetal, as a typical layered transition-metal dichalcogenide, attracted much attention due to an extremely large, non-saturating parabolic magnetoresistance in the perpendicular field. Here, we report a systematic study of the angular dependence of the magnetoresistance in a WTe2 single crystal. The significant anisotropic magnetotransport behavior in different magnetic field directions and violation of the Kohler's rule are observed. Unexpectedly, when the applied field and excitation current are both parallel to the tungsten chains of WTe2, an exotic large longitudinal linear magnetoresistance as high as 1200% at 15T and 2K is identified. These results imply that the WTe2more » semimetal, due to its balanced hole and electron populations, seems to be the first material for which a large longitudinal linear magnetoresistance appears when the external magnetic field is parallel to the applied current. Finally, our work may stimulate studies of double-carrier correlated materials and the corresponding quantum physics.« less

  15. Anisotropic magnetotransport and exotic longitudinal linear magnetoresistance in WTe2 crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yanfei; Liu, Haiwen; Yan, Jiaqiang; An, Wei; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Huichao; Liu, Yi; Jiang, Hua; Li, Qing; Wang, Yong; Li, Xin-Zheng; Mandrus, David; Xie, X. C.; Pan, Minghu; Wang, Jian

    2015-07-06

    Recently, the WTe2 semimetal, as a typical layered transition-metal dichalcogenide, attracted much attention due to an extremely large, non-saturating parabolic magnetoresistance in the perpendicular field. Here, we report a systematic study of the angular dependence of the magnetoresistance in a WTe2 single crystal. The significant anisotropic magnetotransport behavior in different magnetic field directions and violation of the Kohler's rule are observed. Unexpectedly, when the applied field and excitation current are both parallel to the tungsten chains of WTe2, an exotic large longitudinal linear magnetoresistance as high as 1200% at 15T and 2K is identified. These results imply that the WTe2 semimetal, due to its balanced hole and electron populations, seems to be the first material for which a large longitudinal linear magnetoresistance appears when the external magnetic field is parallel to the applied current. Finally, our work may stimulate studies of double-carrier correlated materials and the corresponding quantum physics.

  16. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance in epitaxial NiMnSb-based multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, B.; Sakuraba, Y.; Sukegawa, H.; Li, S.; Qu, G.; Furubayashi, T.; Hono, K.

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated (001)-oriented C1b-NiMnSb epitaxial films on MgO substrate by a magnetron sputtering system and systematically investigated the structure, magnetic property, and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect. NiMnSb film was deposited using a stoichiometric NiMnSb target which has Mn-deficient (Mn ˜ 28.7 at. %) off-stoichiometric composition ratio. We have investigated bulk spin-polarization in NiMnSb films by measuring AMR on the basis of recent study for half-metallic L21-Heusler compounds. Although the negative sign of AMR ratio, which is indicative of half-metallic nature, was observed in the single layer NiMnSb films, the magnitude of AMR ratio (-0.10% at RT) was about half of the largest value reported for half-metallic L21-Heusler compounds. The current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) giant magnetoresistance (GMR) devices of NiMnSb/Ag/NiMnSb show MR ratio of 13.2% at 10 K and 4.2% at 300 K, which is higher than the previous result for NiMnSb/Cu/NiMnSb CPP-GMR devices [Caballero et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 198-199, 55 (1999)], but much less than the CPP-GMR using L21-Heusler electrodes. The reduction of intrinsic bulk spin-polarization originating from the Mn-deficiency in NiMnSb layer is expected to be the main reason for small MR values.

  17. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance in epitaxial NiMnSb-based multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.; Sakuraba, Y. Sukegawa, H.; Li, S.; Furubayashi, T.; Qu, G.; Hono, K.

    2016-01-14

    We fabricated (001)-oriented C1{sub b}-NiMnSb epitaxial films on MgO substrate by a magnetron sputtering system and systematically investigated the structure, magnetic property, and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect. NiMnSb film was deposited using a stoichiometric NiMnSb target which has Mn-deficient (Mn ∼ 28.7 at. %) off-stoichiometric composition ratio. We have investigated bulk spin-polarization in NiMnSb films by measuring AMR on the basis of recent study for half-metallic L2{sub 1}-Heusler compounds. Although the negative sign of AMR ratio, which is indicative of half-metallic nature, was observed in the single layer NiMnSb films, the magnitude of AMR ratio (−0.10% at RT) was about half of the largest value reported for half-metallic L2{sub 1}-Heusler compounds. The current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) giant magnetoresistance (GMR) devices of NiMnSb/Ag/NiMnSb show MR ratio of 13.2% at 10 K and 4.2% at 300 K, which is higher than the previous result for NiMnSb/Cu/NiMnSb CPP-GMR devices [Caballero et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 198–199, 55 (1999)], but much less than the CPP-GMR using L2{sub 1}-Heusler electrodes. The reduction of intrinsic bulk spin-polarization originating from the Mn-deficiency in NiMnSb layer is expected to be the main reason for small MR values.

  18. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and piezoelectric effect in GaAs Hall samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftja, Orion

    2017-02-01

    Application of a strong magnetic field perpendicular to a two-dimensional electron system leads to a variety of quantum phases ranging from incompressible quantum Hall liquid to Wigner solid, charge density wave, and exotic non-Abelian states. A few quantum phases seen in past experiments on GaAs Hall samples of electrons show pronounced anisotropic magnetoresistance values at certain weak magnetic fields. We argue that this might be due to the piezoelectric effect that is inherent in a semiconductor host such as GaAs. Such an effect has the potential to create a sufficient in-plane internal strain that will be felt by electrons and will determine the direction of high and low resistance. When Wigner solid, charge density wave, and isotropic liquid phases are very close in energy, the overall stability of the system is very sensitive to local order and, thus, can be strongly influenced even by a weak perturbation such as the piezoelectric-induced effective electron-electron interaction, which is anisotropic. In this work, we argue that an anisotropic interaction potential may stabilize anisotropic liquid phases of electrons even in a strong magnetic field regime where normally one expects to see only isotropic quantum Hall or isotropic Fermi liquid states. We use this approach to support a theoretical framework that envisions the possibility of an anisotropic liquid crystalline state of electrons in the lowest Landau level. In particular, we argue that an anisotropic liquid state of electrons may stabilize in the lowest Landau level close to the liquid-solid transition region at filling factor ν =1 /6 for a given anisotropic Coulomb interaction potential. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations for a liquid crystalline state with broken rotational symmetry indicate stability of liquid crystalline order consistent with the existence of an anisotropic liquid state of electrons stabilized by anisotropy at filling factor ν =1 /6 of the lowest Landau level.

  19. Ballistic anisotropic magnetoresistance in core-shell nanowires and rolled-up nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Hao; Ortix, Carmine

    2017-01-01

    In ferromagnetic nanostructures, the ballistic anisotropic magnetoresistance (BAMR) is a change in the ballistic conductance with the direction of magnetization due to spin-orbit interaction. Very recently, a directional dependent ballistic conductance has been predicted to occur in a number of newly synthesized nonmagnetic semiconducting nanostructures subject to externally applied magnetic fields, without necessitating spin-orbit coupling. In this paper, we review past works on the prediction of this BAMR effect in core-shell nanowires (CSN) and rolled-up nanotubes (RUNTs). This is complemented by new results, we establish for the transport properties of tubular nanosystems subject to external magnetic fields.

  20. Disentangling interface and bulk contributions to the anisotropic magnetoresistance in Pt/Co/Pt sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobs, André; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report on interfacial contributions to the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in Co layers sandwiched between Pt. Utilizing the Fuchs-Sondheimer formalism interface contributions can be separated from bulklike AMR. We demonstrate that for all-metal systems interfacial AMR is also present when varying the magnetization within the film plane. This interfacial in-plane AMR is two times smaller than the contribution that arises when the magnetization is varied within the plane perpendicular to the current direction. This finding is in contrast to the spin Hall MR found for ferromagnetic insulator/Pt bilayers revealing the existence of different MR effects at the interfaces of Pt with conducting and insulating ferromagnets.

  1. Asymmetric anisotropic magnetoresistance in epitaxial Fe3O4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. L.; Ding, Z.; Ma, D. H.; Li, J. X.; Xiao, X.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to study the effect of current orientation on the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and the planar Hall effect (PHE) in a single-crystalline Fe3O4 (001) thin film at room temperature. AMR exhibits an unusual asymmetric behavior with respect to the current direction when the current does not flow along the high symmetry crystal axes, such as the <100> or <110> directions. AMR and PHE strongly depend upon the current direction angle, θJ, with an in-plane fourfold symmetry. The amplitude and phase shift of AMR and PHE can be understood quantitatively by a phenomenological description of the anisotropic resistivity tensor in a single-crystalline system. These results prove that the current direction can be used to modify the AMR effect.

  2. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M.; Cao, G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  3. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance effect of single adatoms on a noncollinear magnetic surface.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Nuala M; Schröder, Silke; Ferriani, Paolo; Heinze, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) effect demonstrates the sensitivity of spin-polarized electron transport to the orientation of the magnetization with respect to the crystallographic axes. As the TAMR effect requires only a single magnetic electrode, in contrast to the tunneling magnetoresistance effect, it offers an attractive route to alternative spintronic applications. In this work we consider the TAMR effect at the single-atom limit by investigating the anisotropy of the local density of states (LDOS) in the vacuum above transition-metal adatoms adsorbed on a noncollinear magnetic surface, the monolayer of Mn on W(1 1 0). This surface presents a cycloidal spin spiral ground state with an angle of 173° between neighboring spins and thus allows a quasi-continuous exploration of the angular dependence of the TAMR of adsorbed adatoms using scanning tunneling microscopy. Using first-principle calculations, we investigate the TAMR of Co, Rh and Ir adatoms on Mn/W(1 1 0) and relate our results to the magnetization-direction-dependent changes in the LDOS. The anisotropic effect is found to be enhanced dramatically on the adsorption of heavy transition-metal atoms, with values of up to 50% predicted from our calculations. This effect will be measurable even with a non-magnetic STM tip.

  4. Magnetoresistive performance and comparison of supermagnetic nanoparticles on giant magnetoresistive sensor-based detection system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Feng, Yinglong; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-07-21

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for ultrasensitive, multiplexed, real-time electrical readout, and rapid biological/chemical detection while combining with magnetic particles. Finding appropriate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and its influences on the detection signal is a vital aspect to the GMR bio-sensing technology. Here, we report a GMR sensor based detection system capable of stable and convenient connection, and real-time measurement. Five different types of MNPs with sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm were investigated for GMR biosensing. The experiments were accomplished with the aid of DNA hybridization and detection architecture on GMR sensor surface. We found that different MNPs markedly affected the final detection signal, depending on their characteristics of magnetic moment, size, and surface-based binding ability, etc. This work may provide a useful guidance in selecting or preparing MNPs to enhance the sensitivity of GMR biosensors, and eventually lead to a versatile and portable device for molecular diagnostics.

  5. Magnetoresistive performance and comparison of supermagnetic nanoparticles on giant magnetoresistive sensor-based detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Feng, Yinglong; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for ultrasensitive, multiplexed, real-time electrical readout, and rapid biological/chemical detection while combining with magnetic particles. Finding appropriate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and its influences on the detection signal is a vital aspect to the GMR bio-sensing technology. Here, we report a GMR sensor based detection system capable of stable and convenient connection, and real-time measurement. Five different types of MNPs with sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm were investigated for GMR biosensing. The experiments were accomplished with the aid of DNA hybridization and detection architecture on GMR sensor surface. We found that different MNPs markedly affected the final detection signal, depending on their characteristics of magnetic moment, size, and surface-based binding ability, etc. This work may provide a useful guidance in selecting or preparing MNPs to enhance the sensitivity of GMR biosensors, and eventually lead to a versatile and portable device for molecular diagnostics.

  6. Temperature dependence of in-plane magnetic anisotropy and anisotropic magnetoresistance in (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakozawa, Shohei; Chen, Lin; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the temperature dependence of in-plane magnetic anisotropy and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li by magnetotransport measurements. We find that the signs of in-plane uniaxial anisotropy and AMR change at the same temperature of ˜75 K, and that the sign of planar Hall effect does not depend on temperature.

  7. Determination of magnetic anisotropy constants in Fe ultrathin film on vicinal Si(111) by anisotropic magnetoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; He, Wei; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Hao-Liang; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Chen, Zi-Yu; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of ultrathin Fe film on Si(111) surface provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the contribution of magnetic anisotropy to magnetic behavior. Here, we present the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect of Fe single crystal film on vicinal Si(111) substrate with atomically flat ultrathin p(2 × 2) iron silicide as buffer layer. Owing to the tiny misorientation from Fe(111) plane, the symmetry of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy changes from the six-fold to a superposition of six-fold, four-fold and a weakly uniaxial contribution. Furthermore, the magnitudes of various magnetic anisotropy constants were derived from torque curves on the basis of AMR results. Our work suggests that AMR measurements can be employed to figure out precisely the contributions of various magnetic anisotropy constants. PMID:23828508

  8. Four-fold symmetric anisotropic magnetoresistance of single-crystalline Ni(001) film

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2015-11-28

    Temperature, current-direction, and film-thickness dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements were performed on single-crystalline face-centered-cubic nickel films. An additional four-fold symmetry was confirmed besides the typical two-fold term even at room temperature. The angular-dependent longitudinal resistivity resolves into a two-fold term, which varies as a function of current direction, and a four-fold term, which is isotropically independent of current direction. The experimental results are interpreted well using an expression based on the phenomenological model. Both the two- and four-fold terms vary inversely proportional to film thickness, indicating that interfacial scattering can significantly influence the spin-dependent transport properties.

  9. Stability of standing spin wave in permalloy thin film studied by anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, K.; Yokotani, Y.; Cui, X.; Yakata, S.; Kimura, T.

    2015-12-21

    We have investigated the stability for the resonant spin precession under the strong microwave magnetic field by a specially developed detection method using the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. The electrically separated excitation and detection circuits enable us to investigate the influence of the heating effect and the nonuniform spin dynamics independently. The large detecting current is found to induce the field shift of the resonant spectra because of the Joule heating. From the microwave power dependence, we found that the linear response regime for the standing spin wave is larger than that for the ferromagnetic resonance. This robust characteristic of the standing spin wave is an important advantage for the high power operation of the spin-wave device.

  10. Pressure-induced topological phase transitions and strongly anisotropic magnetoresistance in bulk black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Hong; Long, Yu-Jia; Zhao, Ling-Xiao; Shan, Lei; Ren, Zhi-An; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Weng, Hong-Ming; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Ren, Cong; Chen, Gen-Fu

    2017-03-01

    We report the anisotropic magnetotransport measurement on a noncompound band semiconductor black phosphorus (BP) with magnetic field B up to 16 Tesla applied in both perpendicular and parallel to electric current I under hydrostatic pressures. The BP undergoes a topological Lifshitz transition from band semiconductor to a zero-gap Dirac semimetal state at a critical pressure Pc, characterized by a weak localization-weak antilocalization transition at low magnetic fields and the emergence of a nontrivial Berry phase of π detected by SdH magneto-oscillations in magnetoresistance curves. In the transition region, we observe a pressure-dependent negative MR only in the B ∥I configuration. This negative longitudinal MR is attributed to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly (topological E .B term) in the presence of weak antilocalization corrections.

  11. Temperature-dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance inversion behaviors in Fe3O4 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kap Soo; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2017-02-01

    We address the abnormal anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) reversal feature of half-metallic polycrystalline Fe3O4 films occurring at a specific temperature. Experimental results revealed a positive to negative MR transition in the Fe3O4 films at 264 K, which reflect the influence of additional domain wall scattering. These features was described by a correlation between domain wall resistance and inversion behavior of AMR with additional domain wall scattering factors. We further describe a possible model based on systematic structural and electrical measurements that employs a temperature-dependent domain wall width and spin diffusion length of the conducting electrons. This model allows for spin-flipping scattering of spin polarized electrons inside a proper domain width.

  12. Long phase coherence length and anisotropic magnetoresistance in MgZnO thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Meng; Xu, Yonggang; Yu, Guolin Lin, Tie; Hu, Gujin; Chu, Junhao; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Huahan; Dai, Ning

    2015-04-21

    We comprehensively investigate magnetotransport properties of MgZnO thin film grown on ZnO substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy. We measure the weak localization effect and extract the electron phase coherence length by fitting to a three-dimensional weak localization theory and by analyzing the different changing rate of the magnetoresistance, results of which are in good agreement with each other. The phase coherence length ranges from 38.4±1    nm at 50 K to 99.8±3.6 nm at 1.4  K, almost the same as that of ZnO nanoplates and In-doped ZnO nanowires, and its temperature dependence is found to scale as T{sup −3/4}. Meanwhile, we study the anisotropic magnetoresistance resulting from the geometric effect as well as the Lorentz force induced path-length effect, which will be enhanced in higher magnetic fields.

  13. Large and Anisotropic Linear Magnetoresistance in Single Crystals of Black Phosphorus Arising From Mobility Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zhipeng; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Ding, Bei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Enke; Xi, Xuekui; Wu, Guangheng; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Black Phosphorus (BP) is presently attracting immense research interest on the global level due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential application in optoelectronics and flexible devices. It was theoretically predicted that BP has a large direction-dependent electrical and magnetotransport anisotropy. Investigations on magnetotransport of BP may therefore provide a new platform for studying the nature of electron transport in layered materials. However, to the best of our knowledge, magnetotransport studies, especially the anisotropic magnetoresistance (MR) effect in layered BP, are rarely reported. Here, we report a large linear MR up to 510% at a magnetic field of 7 Tesla in single crystals of BP. Analysis of the temperature and angle dependence of MR revealed that the large linear MR in our sample originates from mobility fluctuations. Furthermore, we reveal that the large linear MR of layered BP in fact follows a three-dimensional behavior rather than a two-dimensional one. Our results have implications to both the fundamental understanding and magnetoresistive device applications of BP. PMID:27030141

  14. A Magnetoresistance Measuring Probe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The in line four point probe, commonly used for measuring the sheet resistance in a conductor, cannot measure the anisotropic ferromagnetic magnetoresistance. However, the addition of two contact points that are not collinear with the current contacts give the probe the ability to non-destructively measure the anistropic magnetoresistance. Keywords: Magnetoresistance; Anisotropic; Thin-Film; Permalloy; Four Point Probe; Anisotropic Resistance.

  15. A novel CMOS transducer for giant magnetoresistance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Van Su; Lu, Chih-Cheng; Yang, Jing-Wen; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2017-02-01

    In this work, an ASIC (application specific integrated circuits) transducer circuit for field modulated giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors was designed and fabricated using a 0.18-μ m CMOS process. The transducer circuits consist of a frequency divider, a digital phase shifter, an instrument amplifier, and an analog mixer. These comprise a mix of analog and digital circuit techniques. The compact chip size of 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm for both analog and digital parts was achieved using the TSMC18 1P6M (1-polysilicon 6-metal) process design kit, and the characteristics of the system were simulated using an HSpice simulator. The output of the transducer circuit is the result of the first harmonic detection, which resolves the modulated field using a phase sensitive detection (PSD) technique and is proportional to the measured magnetic field. When the dual-bridge GMR sensor is driven by the transducer circuit with a current of 10 mA at 10 kHz, the observed sensitivity of the field sensor is 10.2 mV/V/Oe and the nonlinearity error was 3% in the linear range of ±1 Oe. The performance of the system was also verified by rotating the sensor system horizontally in earth's magnetic field and recording the sinusoidal output with respect to the azimuth angle, which exhibits an error of less than ±0.04 Oe. These results prove that the ASIC transducer is suitable for driving the AC field modulated GMR sensors applied to geomagnetic measurement.

  16. A novel CMOS transducer for giant magnetoresistance sensors.

    PubMed

    Luong, Van Su; Lu, Chih-Cheng; Yang, Jing-Wen; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2017-02-01

    In this work, an ASIC (application specific integrated circuits) transducer circuit for field modulated giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors was designed and fabricated using a 0.18-μm CMOS process. The transducer circuits consist of a frequency divider, a digital phase shifter, an instrument amplifier, and an analog mixer. These comprise a mix of analog and digital circuit techniques. The compact chip size of 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm for both analog and digital parts was achieved using the TSMC18 1P6M (1-polysilicon 6-metal) process design kit, and the characteristics of the system were simulated using an HSpice simulator. The output of the transducer circuit is the result of the first harmonic detection, which resolves the modulated field using a phase sensitive detection (PSD) technique and is proportional to the measured magnetic field. When the dual-bridge GMR sensor is driven by the transducer circuit with a current of 10 mA at 10 kHz, the observed sensitivity of the field sensor is 10.2 mV/V/Oe and the nonlinearity error was 3% in the linear range of ±1 Oe. The performance of the system was also verified by rotating the sensor system horizontally in earth's magnetic field and recording the sinusoidal output with respect to the azimuth angle, which exhibits an error of less than ±0.04 Oe. These results prove that the ASIC transducer is suitable for driving the AC field modulated GMR sensors applied to geomagnetic measurement.

  17. Electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance in ferromagnet/n-GaAs heterostructures by tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Boyko, Y.; Geppert, C. C.; Christie, K. D.; Stecklein, G.; Crowell, P. A.; Patel, S. J.; Palmstrøm, C. J.

    2014-11-24

    We observe a dc voltage peak at ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in samples consisting of a single ferromagnetic (FM) layer grown epitaxially on the n-GaAs (001) surface. The FMR peak is detected as an interfacial voltage with a symmetric line shape and is present in samples based on various FM/n-GaAs heterostructures, including Co{sub 2}MnSi/n-GaAs, Co{sub 2}FeSi/n-GaAs, and Fe/n-GaAs. We show that the interface bias voltage dependence of the FMR signal is identical to that of the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) over most of the bias range. Furthermore, we show how the precessing magnetization yields a dc FMR signal through the TAMR effect and how the TAMR phenomenon can be used to predict the angular dependence of the FMR signal. This TAMR-induced FMR peak can be observed under conditions where no spin accumulation is present and no spin-polarized current flows in the semiconductor.

  18. Multiple-stable anisotropic magnetoresistance memory in antiferromagnetic MnTe

    PubMed Central

    Kriegner, D.; Výborný, K.; Olejník, K.; Reichlová, H.; Novák, V.; Marti, X.; Gazquez, J.; Saidl, V.; Němec, P.; Volobuev, V. V.; Springholz, G.; Holý, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial magnetic memories rely on the bistability of ordered spins in ferromagnetic materials. Recently, experimental bistable memories have been realized using fully compensated antiferromagnetic metals. Here we demonstrate a multiple-stable memory device in epitaxial MnTe, an antiferromagnetic counterpart of common II–VI semiconductors. Favourable micromagnetic characteristics of MnTe allow us to demonstrate a smoothly varying zero-field antiferromagnetic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with a harmonic angular dependence on the writing magnetic field angle, analogous to ferromagnets. The continuously varying AMR provides means for the electrical read-out of multiple-stable antiferromagnetic memory states, which we set by heat-assisted magneto-recording and by changing the writing field direction. The multiple stability in our memory is ascribed to different distributions of domains with the Néel vector aligned along one of the three magnetic easy axes. The robustness against strong magnetic field perturbations combined with the multiple stability of the magnetic memory states are unique properties of antiferromagnets. PMID:27279433

  19. Electrical detection of magnetic domain wall in Fe4N nanostrip by negative anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushi, Toshiki; Ito, Keita; Higashikozono, Soma; Takata, Fumiya; Oosato, Hirotaka; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Toko, Kaoru; Honda, Syuta; Suemasu, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic structure of the domain wall (DW) of a 30-nm-thick Fe4N epitaxial film with a negative spin polarization of the electrical conductivity is observed by magnetic force microscopy and is well explained by micromagnetic simulation. The Fe4N film is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a SrTiO3(001) substrate and processed into arc-shaped ferromagnetic nanostrips 0.3 μm wide by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching with Cl2 and BCl3 plasma. Two electrodes mounted approximately 12 μm apart on the nanostrip register an electrical resistance at 8 K. By changing the direction of an external magnetic field (0.2 T), the presence or absence of a DW positioned in the nanostrip between the two electrodes can be controlled. The resistance is increased by approximately 0.5 Ω when the DW is located between the electrodes, which signifies the negative anisotropic magnetoresistance effect of Fe4N. The electrical detection of the resistance change is an important step toward the electrical detection of current-induced DW motion in Fe4N.

  20. Twofold and Fourfold Symmetric Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect in a Model with Crystal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically study the twofold and fourfold symmetric anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effects of ferromagnets. We here use the two-current model for a system consisting of a conduction state and localized d states. The localized d states are obtained from a Hamiltonian with a spin-orbit interaction, an exchange field, and a crystal field. From the model, we first derive general expressions for the coefficient of the twofold symmetric term (C2) and that of the fourfold symmetric term (C4) in the AMR ratio. In the case of a strong ferromagnet, the dominant term in C2 is proportional to the difference in the partial densities of states (PDOSs) at the Fermi energy (EF) between the dɛ and dγ states, and that in C4 is proportional to the difference in the PDOSs at EF among the dɛ states. Using the dominant terms, we next analyze the experimental results for Fe4N, in which |C2| and |C4| increase with decreasing temperature. The experimental results can be reproduced by assuming that the tetragonal distortion increases with decreasing temperature.

  1. Transverse anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in pseudo-single-crystal γ'-Fe4N thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Kokado, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    Transverse anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effects, for which magnetization is rotated in an orthogonal plane to the current direction, were investigated at various temperatures, in order to clarify the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry in a pseudo-single-crystal Fe4N film, which is predicted from the usual in-plane AMR measurements by the theory taking into account the spin-orbit interaction and crystal field splitting of 3d bands. According to a phenomenological theory of AMR, which derives only from the crystal symmetry, a cos 2θ component ( C2 tr ) exists in transverse AMR curves for a tetragonal system but does not for a cubic system. In the Fe4N film, the C2 tr shows a positive small value (0.12%) from 300 K to 50 K. However, the C2 t r increases to negative value below 50 K and reaches to -2% at 5 K. The drastic increasing of the C2 tr demonstrates the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry below 50 K in the Fe4N film. In addition, the out-of-plane and in-plane lattice constants (c and a) were precisely determined with X-ray diffraction at room temperature using the Nelson-Riely function. As a result, the positive small C2 t r above 50 K is attributed to a slightly distorted Fe4N lattice (c/a = 1.002).

  2. Effects of Magnetic Domain Walls on the Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in NiFe Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2015-10-01

    We show that a type of magnetic domain walls (DWs) can be monitored by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) measurements due to a specific DW volume depending on the DW type in NiFe magnetic wires. A circular DW injection pad is used to generate DWs at a low magnetic field, resulting in reliable DW introduction into magnetic wires. DW pinning is induced by a change of DW energy at an asymmetric single notch. The injection of DW from the circular pad and its pinning at the notch is observed by using AMR and magnetic force microscope (MFM) measurements. A four-point probe AMR measurement allows us to distinguish the DW type in the switching process because DWs are pinned at the single notch, where voltage probes are closely placed around the notch. Two types of AMR behavior are observed in the AMR measurements, which is owing to a change of DW structures. MFM images and micromagnetic simulations are consistent with the AMR results.

  3. On the importance of sensor height variation for detection of magnetic labels by magnetoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Wang, Shan Xiang; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-07-21

    Magnetoresistive sensors are widely used for biosensing by detecting the signal from magnetic labels bound to a functionalized area that usually covers the entire sensor structure. Magnetic labels magnetized by a homogeneous applied magnetic field weaken and strengthen the applied field when they are over and outside the sensor area, respectively, and the detailed origin of the sensor signal in experimental studies has not been clarified. We systematically analyze the signal from both a single sensor stripe and an array of sensor stripes as function of the geometrical parameters of the sensor stripes as well as the distribution of magnetic labels over the stripes. We show that the signal from sensor stripes with a uniform protective coating, contrary to conventional wisdom in the field, is usually dominated by the contribution from magnetic labels between the sensor stripes rather than by the labels on top of the sensor stripes because these are at a lower height. We therefore propose a shift of paradigm to maximize the signal due to magnetic labels between sensor stripes. Guidelines for this optimization are provided and illustrated for an experimental case from the literature.

  4. Signature of surface state coupling in thin films of the topological Kondo insulator SmB6 from anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaviv Petrushevsky, M.; Rout, P. K.; Levi, G.; Kohn, A.; Dagan, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The temperature and thickness dependencies of the in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of SmB6 thin films are reported. We find that the AMR changes sign from negative (ρ||<ρ⊥ ) at high temperatures to positive (ρ||>ρ⊥ ) at low temperatures. The temperature, Ts, at which this sign change occurs, decreases with increasing film thickness t and Ts vanishes for t > 30 nm. We interpret our results in the framework of a competition between two components: a negative bulk contribution and a positive surface AMR.

  5. Spin polarization ratios of resistivity and density of states estimated from anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio for nearly half-metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Yuya; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2016-10-01

    We derive a simple relational expression between the spin polarization ratio of resistivity, Pρ, and the anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio Δρ/ρ, and that between the spin polarization ratio of the density of states at the Fermi energy, PDOS, and Δρ/ρ for nearly half-metallic ferromagnets. We find that Pρ and PDOS increase with increasing |Δρ/ρ| from 0 to a maximum value. In addition, we roughly estimate Pρ and PDOS for a Co2FeGa0.5Ge0.5 Heusler alloy by substituting its experimentally observed Δρ/ρ into the respective expressions.

  6. GMR sensors: magnetoresistive behaviour optimization for biological detection by means of superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manteca, A; Mujika, M; Arana, S

    2011-04-15

    An immunomagnetic method for the selective and quantitative detection of biological species by means of a magnetoresistive biosensor and superparamagnetic particles has been optimized. In order to achieve this, a giant magnetoresistive [Co (5.10nm)/Cu (2.47 nm)](20) multilayer structure has been chosen as the sensitive material, showing a magnetoresistance of 3.60% at 215 Oe and a sensitivity up to 0.19 Ω/Oe between 145 Oe and 350 Oe. The outward gold surface of the sensor is biofunctionalized with a Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM). In addition, three different types of magnetic labels have been tested. 2 μm diameter magnetic carriers (7.68 pg ferrite/particle) have shown the best response and they have induced a shift in the magnetoresistive hysteresis loops up to 9% at 175 Oe.

  7. Magnetic anisotropy and anisotropic magnetoresistance in strongly phase separated manganite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandpal, Lalit M.; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Siwach, P. K.; Gupta, Anurag; Awana, V. P. S.; Singh, H. K.

    2016-06-01

    The present study reports the impact of magnetic anisotropy (MA) on magnetotransport properties such as the magnetic transitions, magnetic liquid behavior, glass transition and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in epitaxial film (thickness 42 nm) of strongly phase separated manganite La5/8-yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y≈0.4). Angle dependent magnetization measurement confirms the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axes aligned in the plane of the film and the magnetic hard axis along the normal to the film plane. The more prominent divergence between the zero filed cooled (ZFC) and field cooled warming (FCW) and the stronger hysteresis between the field cooled cooling (FCC) and FCW magnetization for H ∥ shows the weakening of the magnetic liquid along the magnetic hard axis. The peak at Tp≈42 K in FCW magnetization, which characterizes the onset of spin freezing shifts down to Tp≈18 K as the field direction is switched from the easy axes (H ∥) to the hard axis (H ⊥). The glass transition, which appears at Tg≈28 K for H ∥ disappears for H ⊥. The easy axis magnetization (M∣∣) appears to saturate around H~20 kOe, but the hard axis counterpart (M⊥) does not show such tendency even up to H=50 kOe. MA appears well above the ferromagnetic (FM) transition at T≈170 K, which is nearly the same as the Neel temperature (TN) of M⊥ - T . The temperature dependent resistivity measured at H=10 kOe applied along the easy axis (ρ|| - T) and the hard axis (ρ⊥ - T) shows insulator metal transition (IMT) at ≈106 K and ≈99 K in the cooling cycle, respectively. The large difference between ρ⊥ - T and ρ|| - T during the cooling cycle and in the vicinity of IMT results in huge AMR of ≈-142% and -115%. The observed properties have been explained in terms of the MA induced variation in the relative fraction of the coexisting magnetic phases.

  8. Magnetoresistive Current Sensors for High Accuracy, High Bandwidth Current Measurement in Spacecraft Power Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatter, Rolf; Goffin, Benoit

    2014-08-01

    The usage of magnetoresistive (MR) current sensors is increasing steadily in the field of power electronics. Current sensors must not only be accurate and dynamic, but must also be compact and robust. The MR effect is the basis for current sensors with a unique combination of precision and bandwidth in a compact package. A space-qualifiable magnetoresistive current sensor with high accuracy and high bandwidth is being jointly developed by the sensor manufacturer Sensitec and the spacecraft power electronics supplier Thales Alenia Space (T AS) Belgium. Test results for breadboards incorporating commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) sensors are presented as well as an application example in the electronic control and power unit for the thrust vector actuators of the Ariane5-ME launcher.

  9. Detection of current-driven magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowire by tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Mitsunobu; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Saito, Nobuo; Hayashi, Naoto; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2015-05-01

    Current-driven magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires have attracted a great deal of interest in terms of both physical studies and engineering applications. The anomalous Hall effect measurement is widely used for detecting the magnetization direction of current-driven magnetic domains in a magnetic nanowire. However, the problem with this measurement is that the detection point for current-driven domain wall motion is fixed at only the installed sensing wire across the specimen nanowire. A potential solution is the magnetic domain scope method, whereby the distribution of the magnetic flux leaking from the specimen can be analyzed directly by contact-scanning a tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor on a sample. In this study, we fabricated specimen nanowires consisting of [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]21/Ta(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on Si substrates. A tunneling magnetoresistive sensor was placed on the nanowire surface and a predetermined current pulse was applied. Real-time detection of the current-driven magnetic domain motion was successful in that the resistance of the tunneling magnetoresistive sensor was changed with the magnetization direction beneath the sensor. This demonstrates that magnetic domain detection using a tunneling magnetoresistive sensor is effective for the direct analysis of micro magnetic domain motion.

  10. Optimization of magnetoresistive sensor current for on-chip magnetic bead detection using the sensor self-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the self-heating of magnetoresistive sensors used for measurements on magnetic beads in magnetic biosensors. The signal from magnetic beads magnetized by the field due to the sensor bias current is proportional to the bias current squared. Therefore, we aim to maximize the bias current while limiting the sensor self-heating. We systematically characterize and model the Joule heating of magnetoresistive sensors with different sensor geometries and stack compositions. The sensor heating is determined using the increase of the sensor resistance as function of the bias current. The measured temperature increase is in good agreement with a finite element model and a simple analytical thermal model. The heat conductance of our system is limited by the 1 μm thick electrically insulating silicon dioxide layer between the sensor stack and the underlying silicon wafer, thus the heat conductance is proportional to the sensor area and inversely proportional to the oxide thickness. This simple heat conductance determines the relationship between bias current and sensor temperature, and we show that 25 μm wide sensor on a 1 μm oxide can sustain a bias current of 30 mA for an allowed temperature increase of 5 °C. The method and models used are generally applicable for thin film sensor systems. Further, the consequences for biosensor applications of the present sensor designs and the impact on future sensor designs are discussed.

  11. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-04-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP.

  12. Weak magnetic field superconductor resistive sensors in comparison with semiconductor and magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichkitidze, L. P.

    2007-09-01

    Weak magnetic field superconductor resistive sensors are fabricated and compared with various known types of the magnetoresistive and semiconductor sensors. The magnetically sensitive characteristics of the sensors are analyzed at room temperature and liquid-nitrogen temperature. Their resolution by the magnetic field δ B and by the magnetic flux δ ϕ are unsatisfactory, namely, δ B ⩾ 3 nT and δ ϕ ⩾ 10 ϕ0. Thick films of the ceramic HTS material of the composition Bi-2223 were fabricated, for which the magnetic sensitivity S ∼ 44 V/T, δ B ∼ 2 nT, and δ ϕ ∼ 3 ϕ0 are realized. It is shown that the value of S of the film increases significantly due to the size effect. This effect is taken into account, and the expected characteristics are presented, namely, S ⩾ 1000 V/T, δ B ⩽ 0.01 nT, δ ϕ ⩽ 0.002 ϕ0, and the dynamic measurement range ⩾150 dB.

  13. Giant anisotropic magneto-resistance in the magnetic topological insulator Cry(Bi1-xSbx)2-yTe3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Abhinav; Richardella, Anthony; Liu, Chaoxing; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate magnetization control of edge state transport and report the observation of a gate-tunable giant anisotropic magneto-resistance (GAMR) effect in the magnetic topological insulator Cry(Bi1-xSbx)2-yTe3 as an external field (and the magnetization M) is rotated from out-of-plane (polar angle θ =0°) to in-plane (θ =90°). The angular dependence of the GAMR deviates from the standard cos2 ϕ form (where ϕ is the angle between M and the current density J), and is instead explained by a Landauer-Buttiker formalism that accounts for bulk-edge mixing. However, the rotation of the magnetization in-plane produces a weak, conventional AMR. These results serve as evidence for a field tilt-tuned crossover between an ``imperfect'' quantum anomalous Hall insulator (QAH) and a gapless, ferromagnetic topological insulator. We expect the GAMR to become stronger in the ideal QAH regime where edge state conduction dominates over bulk conduction, thus providing a route toward proof-of-concept ferromagnetic topological insulator transistors and magnetic field sensors. Funded by DARPA.

  14. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors and Magnetic Labels for Chip-Scale Detection of Immunosorbent Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Millen, Rachel Lora

    2005-01-01

    The combination of giant magnetoresistive sensors, magnetic labeling strategies, and biomolecule detection is just beginning to be explored. New readout methods and assay formats are necessary for biomolecules detection to flourish. The work presented in this dissertation describes steps toward the creation of a novel detection method for bioassays utilizing giant magnetoresistive sensors as the readout method. The introduction section contains a brief review of some of the current methods of bioassay readout. The theoretical underpinnings of the giant magnetoresistive effect are also discussed. Finally, the more prominent types of giant magnetoresistive sensors are described, as well as their complicated fabrication. Four data chapters follow the introduction; each chapter is presented as a separate manuscript, either already published or soon to be submitted. Chapter 1 presents research efforts toward the production of a bioassay on the surface of a gold-modified GMR sensor. The testing of this methodology involved the capture of goat a-mouse-coated magnetic nanoparticles on the mouse IgG-modified gold surface. The second, third and fourth chapters describe the utilization of a self-referenced sample stick for scanning across the GMR sensor. The sample stick consisted of alternating magnetic reference and bioactive gold addresses. Chapter 2 is concerned with the characterization of both the scanning readout method and the binding and detection of streptavidin-coated magnetic particles to a biotinylated surface. Chapter 3 advances the sample stick readout with the use of the system for detection of a sandwich immunoassay with rabbit IgG proteins. Finally, simultaneous detection of three IgG proteins is demonstrated in Chapter 4. The dissertation is concluded with a brief summary of the research presented and a discussion of the possible future applications and direction of this work.

  15. Configurational Statistics of Magnetic Bead Detection with Magnetoresistive Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect magnetic beads that, mediated by a target, have bound to a functionalized area. This area is often larger than the area of the sensor. Both the sign and magnitude of the average magnetic field experienced by the sensor from a magnetic bead depends on the location of the bead relative to the sensor. Consequently, the signal from multiple beads also depends on their locations. Thus, a given coverage of the functionalized area with magnetic beads does not result in a given detector response, except on the average, over many realizations of the same coverage. We present a systematic theoretical analysis of how this location-dependence affects the sensor response. The analysis is done for beads magnetized by a homogeneous in-plane magnetic field. We determine the expected value and standard deviation of the sensor response for a given coverage, as well as the accuracy and precision with which the coverage can be determined from a single sensor measurement. We show that statistical fluctuations between samples may reduce the sensitivity and dynamic range of a sensor significantly when the functionalized area is larger than the sensor area. Hence, the statistics of sampling is essential to sensor design. For illustration, we analyze three important published cases for which statistical fluctuations are dominant, significant, and insignificant, respectively. PMID:26496495

  16. Configurational Statistics of Magnetic Bead Detection with Magnetoresistive Sensors.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect magnetic beads that, mediated by a target, have bound to a functionalized area. This area is often larger than the area of the sensor. Both the sign and magnitude of the average magnetic field experienced by the sensor from a magnetic bead depends on the location of the bead relative to the sensor. Consequently, the signal from multiple beads also depends on their locations. Thus, a given coverage of the functionalized area with magnetic beads does not result in a given detector response, except on the average, over many realizations of the same coverage. We present a systematic theoretical analysis of how this location-dependence affects the sensor response. The analysis is done for beads magnetized by a homogeneous in-plane magnetic field. We determine the expected value and standard deviation of the sensor response for a given coverage, as well as the accuracy and precision with which the coverage can be determined from a single sensor measurement. We show that statistical fluctuations between samples may reduce the sensitivity and dynamic range of a sensor significantly when the functionalized area is larger than the sensor area. Hence, the statistics of sampling is essential to sensor design. For illustration, we analyze three important published cases for which statistical fluctuations are dominant, significant, and insignificant, respectively.

  17. Bead magnetorelaxometry with an on-chip magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Donolato, Marco; Strømme, Maria; Strömberg, Mattias; Svedlindh, Peter; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2011-01-21

    Magnetorelaxometry measurements on suspensions of magnetic beads are demonstrated using a planar Hall effect sensor chip embedded in a microfluidic system. The alternating magnetic field used for magnetizing the beads is provided by the sensor bias current and the complex magnetic susceptibility spectra are recorded as the 2nd harmonic of the sensor response. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal appears when a magnetic bead suspension is injected, it scales with the bead concentration, and it follows the Cole-Cole expression for Brownian relaxation. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal resembles that from conventional magnetorelaxometry done on the same samples apart from an offset in Brownian relaxation frequency. The time dependence of the signal can be rationalized as originating from sedimented beads.

  18. Sign of the spin-polarization in cobalt-iron nitride films determined by the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Keita; Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Sanai, Tatsunori; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi; Imai, Yoji

    2014-08-07

    We present the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) properties in Fe{sub 4}N, Co{sub 3}FeN and Co{sub 4}N epitaxial thin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. A negative AMR effect was observed in the Fe{sub 4}N and Co{sub 3}FeN films below 300 K. This behavior was attributed to the negative spin-polarizations of both the electrical conductivity and density of states at the Fermi level. The sign of the AMR ratio changed at ∼140 K in the Co{sub 4}N film and was negative below 140 K. Diffraction lines corresponding to the (100) plane were clearly observed in the ϕ-2θ{sub χ} (in-plane) x-ray diffraction patterns for the Fe{sub 4}N and Co{sub 3}FeN films but not for the Co{sub 4}N film. This indicated that nitrogen atoms were present at the body center of each unit cell in the Fe{sub 4}N and Co{sub 3}FeN films, whereas they were lacking in the Co{sub 4}N film. This assumption is discussed with energetic calculations using a spin density-functional theory.

  19. Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) Technology: Applications in Electrical Current Sensing.

    PubMed

    Reig, Candid; Cubells-Beltran, María-Dolores; Muñoz, Diego Ramírez

    2009-01-01

    The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics can be understood as a global recognition to the rapid development of the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR), from both the physics and engineering points of view. Behind the utilization of GMR structures as read heads for massive storage magnetic hard disks, important applications as solid state magnetic sensors have emerged. Low cost, compatibility with standard CMOS technologies and high sensitivity are common advantages of these sensors. This way, they have been successfully applied in a lot different environments. In this work, we are trying to collect the Spanish contributions to the progress of the research related to the GMR based sensors covering, among other subjects, the applications, the sensor design, the modelling and the electronic interfaces, focusing on electrical current sensing applications.

  20. Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) Technology: Applications in Electrical Current Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reig, Candid; Cubells-Beltran, María-Dolores; Muñoz, Diego Ramírez

    2009-01-01

    The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics can be understood as a global recognition to the rapid development of the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR), from both the physics and engineering points of view. Behind the utilization of GMR structures as read heads for massive storage magnetic hard disks, important applications as solid state magnetic sensors have emerged. Low cost, compatibility with standard CMOS technologies and high sensitivity are common advantages of these sensors. This way, they have been successfully applied in a lot different environments. In this work, we are trying to collect the Spanish contributions to the progress of the research related to the GMR based sensors covering, among other subjects, the applications, the sensor design, the modelling and the electronic interfaces, focusing on electrical current sensing applications. PMID:22408486

  1. Development of a Magneto-Resistive Angular Position Sensor for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Robert; Schmidt, Tilo; Seifart, Klaus; Olberts, Bastian; Romera, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic microsystems in the form of magneto-resistive (MR) sensors are firmly established in automobiles and industrial applications. They are used to measure travel, angle, electrical current, or magnetic fields. MR technology opens up new sensor possibilities in space applications and can be an enabling technology for optimal performance, high robustness and long lifetime at reasonable costs. In some science missions, the technology is already applied, however, the designs are proprietary and case specific, for instance in case of the angular sensors used for JPL/NASA's Mars rover Curiosity [1]. Since 2013 HTS GmbH and Sensitec GmbH have teamed up to develop and qualify a standardized yet flexible to use MR angular sensor for space mechanisms. Starting with a first assessment study and market survey performed under ESA contract, a very strong industry interest in novel, contactless position measurement means was found. Currently a detailed and comprehensive development program is being performed by HTS and Sensitec. The objective of this program is to advance the sensor design up to Engineering Qualification Model level and to perform qualification testing for a representative space application. The paper briefly reviews the basics of magneto-resistive effects and possible sensor applications and describes the key benefits of MR angular sensors with reference to currently operational industrial and space applications. The key applications and specification are presented and the preliminary baseline mechanical and electrical design will be discussed. An outlook on the upcoming development and test stages as well as the qualification program will be provided.

  2. Exchange Bias Tuning for Magnetoresistive Sensors by Inclusion of Non-Magnetic Impurities

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Albisetti, Edoardo; Monticelli, Marco; Bertacco, Riccardo; Petti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The fine control of the exchange coupling strength and blocking temperature ofexchange bias systems is an important requirement for the development of magnetoresistive sensors with two pinned electrodes. In this paper, we successfully tune these parameters in top- and bottom-pinned systems, comprising 5 nm thick Co40Fe40B20 and 6.5 nm thick Ir22Mn78 films. By inserting Ru impurities at different concentrations in the Ir22Mn78 layer, blocking temperatures ranging from 220 °C to 100 °C and exchange bias fields from 200 Oe to 60 Oe are obtained. This method is then applied to the fabrication of sensors based on magnetic tunneling junctions consisting of a pinned synthetic antiferromagnet reference layer and a top-pinned sensing layer. This work paves the way towards the development of new sensors with finely tuned magnetic anisotropies. PMID:27384565

  3. Exchange Bias Tuning for Magnetoresistive Sensors by Inclusion of Non-Magnetic Impurities.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Albisetti, Edoardo; Monticelli, Marco; Bertacco, Riccardo; Petti, Daniela

    2016-07-04

    The fine control of the exchange coupling strength and blocking temperature ofexchange bias systems is an important requirement for the development of magnetoresistive sensors with two pinned electrodes. In this paper, we successfully tune these parameters in top- and bottom-pinned systems, comprising 5 nm thick Co40Fe40B20 and 6.5 nm thick Ir22Mn78 films. By inserting Ru impurities at different concentrations in the Ir22Mn78 layer, blocking temperatures ranging from 220 °C to 100 °C and exchange bias fields from 200 Oe to 60 Oe are obtained. This method is then applied to the fabrication of sensors based on magnetic tunneling junctions consisting of a pinned synthetic antiferromagnet reference layer and a top-pinned sensing layer. This work paves the way towards the development of new sensors with finely tuned magnetic anisotropies.

  4. Report on demonstration project: imaging detection of unexploded ordinance using giant magnetoresistive sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiken, A., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate the feasibility of the detection of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. 3x3 and 5x5 arrays of off-the-shelf GMR sensors were purchased from Nonvolatile Electronics (NVE) and were interfaced with a data acquisition card and a personal computer. Magnetic images were obtained from a number of ferrous objects, such as threadstock, bolts, and rebar. These images can be interpreted in terms of the remanent magnetic state of the objects. The ability of the GMR sensor approach to discriminate among magnetic objects is assessed and the design of a more realistic UXO detection system is discussed.

  5. Anisotropic magnetoresistance of epitaxial Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} film

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X. G.; Yang, Y. B.; Wang, C. S.; Liu, S. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Han, J. Z.; Yang, Y. C.; Yang, J. B.

    2014-01-28

    The magnetic field and temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of the epitaxial grown Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} thin films was investigated. It was found that the magnetoresistance exhibited the characteristics of magnetic polaron hopping. A two-fold symmetric AMR occurred in the ferromagnetic region (∼220 K < T < ∼150 K), while a four-fold symmetric AMR appeared under a high magnetic field in the antiferromagnetic orbital ordered region (T < ∼150 K). The angular dependence of the resistance showed a hysteresis effect under magnetic field at low temperature. It is believed that these phenomena are attributed to the spin canting effect, which originates from the melting of orbital ordering under the external magnetic field in the antiferromagnetic region.

  6. Apparatus and method for imaging metallic objects using an array of giant magnetoresistive sensors

    DOEpatents

    Chaiken, Alison

    2000-01-01

    A portable, low-power, metallic object detector and method for providing an image of a detected metallic object. In one embodiment, the present portable low-power metallic object detector an array of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. The array of GMR sensors is adapted for detecting the presence of and compiling image data of a metallic object. In the embodiment, the array of GMR sensors is arranged in a checkerboard configuration such that axes of sensitivity of alternate GMR sensors are orthogonally oriented. An electronics portion is coupled to the array of GMR sensors. The electronics portion is adapted to receive and process the image data of the metallic object compiled by the array of GMR sensors. The embodiment also includes a display unit which is coupled to the electronics portion. The display unit is adapted to display a graphical representation of the metallic object detected by the array of GMR sensors. In so doing, a graphical representation of the detected metallic object is provided.

  7. Fabrication and local laser heating of freestanding Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} bridges with Pt contacts displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, F.; Grundler, D.

    2014-04-28

    In spin caloritronics, ferromagnetic samples subject to relatively large in-plane temperature gradients ∇T have turned out to be extremely interesting. We report on a preparation technique that allows us to create freely suspended permalloy/Pt hybrid structures where a scanning laser induces ∇T on the order of a few K/μm. We observe both the anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature and the magnetic field dependent anomalous Nernst effect under laser heating. The technique is promising for the realization of device concepts considered in spin caloritronics based on suspended ferromagnetic nanostructures with electrical contacts.

  8. Conditions for efficient on-chip magnetic bead detection via magnetoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, E; Petti, D; Cantoni, M; Damin, F; Torti, A; Chiari, M; Bertacco, R

    2013-09-15

    A commonly used figure of merit of magnetoresistive sensors employed to detect magnetic beads labeling biomolecules in lab-on-chip applications is the sensor sensitivity (S0) to external magnetic fields in the linear region of the sensor. In this paper we show that, in case of lock-in detection and bead excitation by a small AC magnetic field, S0 is not the good figure of merit to optimize. Indeed, the highest sensitivity to the magnetic beads is achieved biasing the sensor in the region of its characteristics where the product between the DC bias field and the second derivative of the resistance with respect to the magnetic field is maximum. The validity of this criterion, derived from a phenomenological model of bead detection, is proved in case of magnetic tunneling junction sensors detecting magnetic beads with 250nm diameter. This work paves the way to the development of a new generation of sensors properly designed to maximize the bead sensitivity.

  9. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-02-26

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper.

  10. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  11. Sensitivity and 3 dB Bandwidth in Single and Series-Connected Tunneling Magnetoresistive Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dąbek, Michał; Wiśniowski, Piotr; Stobiecki, Tomasz; Wrona, Jerzy; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P.

    2016-01-01

    As single tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) sensor performance in modern high-speed applications is limited by breakdown voltage and saturation of the sensitivity, for higher voltage applications (i.e., compatible to 1.8 V, 3.3 V or 5 V standards) practically only a series connection can be applied. Thus, in this study we focused on sensitivity, 3 dB bandwidth and sensitivity-bandwidth product (SBP) dependence on the DC bias voltage in single and series-connected TMR sensors. We show that, below breakdown voltage, the strong bias influence on sensitivity and the 3 dB frequency of a single sensor results in higher SBP than in a series connection. However, the sensitivity saturation limits the single sensor SBP which, under 1 V, reaches the same level of 2000 MHz∙V/T as in a series connection. Above the single sensor breakdown voltage, linear sensitivity dependence on the bias and the constant 3 dB bandwidth of the series connection enable increasing its SBP up to nearly 10,000 MHz∙V/T under 5 V. Thus, although by tuning bias voltage it is possible to control the sensitivity-bandwidth product, the choice between the single TMR sensor and the series connection is crucial for the optimal performance in the high frequency range. PMID:27809223

  12. Sensitivity and 3 dB Bandwidth in Single and Series-Connected Tunneling Magnetoresistive Sensors.

    PubMed

    Dąbek, Michał; Wiśniowski, Piotr; Stobiecki, Tomasz; Wrona, Jerzy; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P

    2016-10-31

    As single tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) sensor performance in modern high-speed applications is limited by breakdown voltage and saturation of the sensitivity, for higher voltage applications (i.e., compatible to 1.8 V, 3.3 V or 5 V standards) practically only a series connection can be applied. Thus, in this study we focused on sensitivity, 3 dB bandwidth and sensitivity-bandwidth product (SBP) dependence on the DC bias voltage in single and series-connected TMR sensors. We show that, below breakdown voltage, the strong bias influence on sensitivity and the 3 dB frequency of a single sensor results in higher SBP than in a series connection. However, the sensitivity saturation limits the single sensor SBP which, under 1 V, reaches the same level of 2000 MHz∙V/T as in a series connection. Above the single sensor breakdown voltage, linear sensitivity dependence on the bias and the constant 3 dB bandwidth of the series connection enable increasing its SBP up to nearly 10,000 MHz∙V/T under 5 V. Thus, although by tuning bias voltage it is possible to control the sensitivity-bandwidth product, the choice between the single TMR sensor and the series connection is crucial for the optimal performance in the high frequency range.

  13. An efficient biosensor made of an electromagnetic trap and a magneto-resistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuquan; Kosel, Jürgen

    2014-09-15

    Magneto-resistive biosensors have been found to be useful because of their high sensitivity, low cost, small size, and direct electrical output. They use super-paramagnetic beads to label a biological target and detect it via sensing the stray field. In this paper, we report a new setup for magnetic biosensors, replacing the conventional "sandwich" concept with an electromagnetic trap. We demonstrate the capability of the biosensor in the detection of E. coli. The trap is formed by a current-carrying microwire that attracts the magnetic beads into a sensing space on top of a tunnel magneto-resistive sensor. The sensor signal depends on the number of beads in the sensing space, which depends on the size of the beads. This enables the detection of biological targets, because such targets increase the volume of the beads. Experiments were carried out with a 6 µm wide microwire, which attracted the magnetic beads from a distance of 60 μm, when a current of 30 mA was applied. A sensing space of 30 µm in length and 6 µm in width was defined by the magnetic sensor. The results showed that individual E. coli bacterium inside the sensing space could be detected using super-paramagnetic beads that are 2.8 µm in diameter. The electromagnetic trap setup greatly simplifies the device and reduces the detection process to two steps: (i) mixing the bacteria with magnetic beads and (ii) applying the sample solution to the sensor for measurement, which can be accomplished within about 30 min with a sample volume in the µl range. This setup also ensures that the biosensor can be cleaned easily and re-used immediately. The presented setup is readily integrated on chips via standard microfabrication techniques.

  14. Current dependence of colossal anisotropic magnetoresistance in La 0.3 Pr 0.4 Ca 0.3 MnO 3 microbridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, J.; Jung, J.; Chow, K. H.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the bias current on the in-plane colossal anisotropic magnetoresistance (C-AMR) is investigated in spatially confined La 0.3 Pr 0.4 Ca 0.3 MnO 3 microbridges. Dramatic increases of the C-AMR are found when the bias current is reduced. For example, in one of the samples, the C-AMR changed from ˜900% to over ˜24 000% as the current is decreased from 1 μA to 10 nA. The results indicate that the bias current can be used to manipulate the C-AMR in spatially confined manganite thin films via changes to the nature of the anisotropic percolation within the samples.

  15. A current sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect: design and potential smart grid applications.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X

    2012-11-09

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A(-1), linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C(-1) with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids.

  16. A Current Sensor Based on the Giant Magnetoresistance Effect: Design and Potential Smart Grid Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A−1, linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C−1 with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids. PMID:23202221

  17. Magnetoresistive sensors for measurements of DNA hybridization kinetics – effect of TINA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, G.; Dufva, M.; Hansen, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the use of magnetoresistive sensors integrated in a microfluidic system for real-time studies of the hybridization kinetics of DNA labeled with magnetic nanoparticles to an array of surface-tethered probes. The nanoparticles were magnetized by the magnetic field from the sensor current. A local negative reference ensured that only the specific binding signal was measured. Analysis of the real-time hybridization using a two-compartment model yielded both the association and dissociation constants kon, and koff. The effect of probe modifications with ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA) was studied. Such modifications have been demonstrated to increase the melting temperature of DNA hybrids in solution and are also relevant for surface-based DNA sensing. Kinetic data for DNA probes with no TINA modification or with TINA modifications at the 5′ end (1 × TINA) or at both the 5′ and 3′ ends (2 × TINA) were compared. TINA modifications were found to provide a relative decrease of koff by a factor of 6-20 at temperatures from 57.5 °C to 60 °C. The values of kon were generally in the range between 0.5-2 × 105 M−1s−1 and showed lower values for the unmodified probe than for the TINA modified probes. The observations correlated well with measured melting temperatures of the DNA hybrids. PMID:28167835

  18. Magnetoresistance sensitivity mapping of the localized response of contiguous and lead-overlaid sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Sandra

    2003-06-01

    Magnetoresistance sensitivity mapping (MSM) was used to investigate the local response of magnetic recording sensors without convolution of the writer, magnetic media and data channel. From a 2D map of the local sensor response, the intrinsic pulse shape and magnetic track profile are readily obtained. Pulse-width is a concern for high data rate since if pulse-width is too broad, individual transitions become difficult to distinguish. Track profiles are important because due to the small difference between magnetic write-width and magnetic read-width, side reading will lead to an increase in noise. Three experiments are discussed: the dependence of the pulse-width (PW50) of the standard contiguous junction (CJ) design on shield-to-shield spacing; a comparison of the pulse shape of lead-overlaid (LOL) and CJ designs; and a comparison of the magnetic track profile (including track-width and skirt ratio) of LOL and CJ designs. The LOL design offers an increased sensitivity; however, as seen from MSM, the penalties are broadening of the track and pulse profiles. These are a direct result of the finite current in the lead overlay region and an increased shield-to-shield spacing in that region. The MSM image shows a curvature, which is associated with the topography of the top shield due to the lead overlay.

  19. A high-resolution tunneling magneto-resistance sensor interface circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangyu; Yin, Liang; Chen, Weiping; Gao, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xiaowei

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a chopper instrumentation amplifier and a high-precision and low-noise CMOS band gap reference in a standard 0.5 μm CMOS technology for a tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) sensor is presented. The noise characteristic of TMR sensor is an important factor in determining the performance of the sensor. In order to obtain a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR), the analog front-end chip ASIC weak signal readout circuit of the sensor includes the chopper instrumentation amplifier; the high-precision and low-noise CMOS band gap reference. In order to achieve the low noise, the chopping technique is applied in the first stage amplifier. The low-frequency flicker noise is modulated to high-frequency by chopping switch, so that the modulator has a better noise suppression performance at the low frequency. The test results of interface circuit are shown as below: At a single 5 V supply, the power dissipation is 40 mW; the equivalent offset voltage is less than 10 uV; the equivalent input noise spectral density 30 nV/Hz1/2(@10 Hz), the equivalent input noise density of magnetic is 0.03 nTHz1/2(@10 Hz); the scale factor temperature coefficient is less than 10 ppm/∘C, the equivalent input offset temperature coefficient is less than 70 nV/∘C; the gain error is less than 0.05%, the common mode rejection ratio is greater than 120 dB, the power supply rejection ratio is greater than 115 dB; the nonlinear is 0.1% FS.

  20. Magnetic properties and anisotropic magnetoresistance of antiperovskite nitride Mn{sub 3}GaN/Co{sub 3}FeN exchange-coupled bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, H. Ando, H.; Kuroki, Y.; Kawai, S.; Ueda, K.; Asano, H.

    2015-05-07

    Epitaxial bilayers of antiferromagnetic Mn{sub 3}GaN/ferromagnetic Co{sub 3}FeN with an antiperovskite structure were grown by reactive magnetron sputtering, and their structural, magnetic, and electrical properties were investigated. Exchange coupling with an exchange field H{sub ex} of 0.4 kOe at 4 K was observed for Mn{sub 3}GaN (20 nm)/Co{sub 3}FeN (5 nm) bilayers. Negative anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect in Co{sub 3}FeN was observed and utilized to detect magnetization reversal in exchange-coupled Mn{sub 3}GaN/Co{sub 3}FeN bilayers. The AMR results showed evidence for current-induced spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic Mn{sub 3}GaN.

  1. A non-invasive thermal drift compensation technique applied to a spin-valve magnetoresistive current sensor.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Moreno, Jaime; Ramírez Muñoz, Diego; Cardoso, Susana; Casans Berga, Silvia; Navarro Antón, Asunción Edith; Peixeiro de Freitas, Paulo Jorge

    2011-01-01

    A compensation method for the sensitivity drift of a magnetoresistive (MR) Wheatstone bridge current sensor is proposed. The technique was carried out by placing a ruthenium temperature sensor and the MR sensor to be compensated inside a generalized impedance converter circuit (GIC). No internal modification of the sensor bridge arms is required so that the circuit is capable of compensating practical industrial sensors. The method is based on the temperature modulation of the current supplied to the bridge, which improves previous solutions based on constant current compensation. Experimental results are shown using a microfabricated spin-valve MR current sensor. The temperature compensation has been solved in the interval from 0 °C to 70 °C measuring currents from -10 A to +10 A.

  2. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall effect in La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 thin films with misfit strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, S. G.; Zhang, Y.; Cui, L. M.; Jin, Y. R.; Deng, H.; Zheng, D. N.; Zimmers, A.; Aubin, H.; Lang, P. L.

    2013-02-01

    In our previous study anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and planar Hall effect (PHE) of epitaxial La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (LCMO) thin films grown on SrTiO3(001) (STO) substrates were studied, and a phenomenological model in the high field limit was developed based on the 4/mmm point group. The derived longitudinal resistivity includes a four-fold as well as a two-fold symmetry term of the in-plane field angle, which can fit the experimental results well. In this study, to highlight the effects of misfit strain, AMR and PHE of LCMO thin films epitaxially grown on LaAlO3(001) substrates were studied, along either the [110] or the [100] direction. Both values are around a few percent, comparable to those measured in films on STO. Nevertheless, only tiny four-fold oscillations appear below the metal-insulator transition temperature Tp along the [110] direction, in contrast to the case of STO, where the four-fold term is prominent. The relationship between this four-fold symmetry and the misfit strain is then discussed in terms of the partial recovery of orbital magnetic moment. The mechanism for AMR and PHE in manganites then can be understood as an anisotropic percolation at metal-insulator transition resulting in the peak, and the spin-orbital coupling effect that accounts for the remnant far below Tp.

  3. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trong-Hieu; Chao, Paul Chang-Po; Chien, Ping-Chieh

    2016-09-02

    This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR) linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an "MR reader" stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs) and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB) over the input range of 0.5-2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm², while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL) is -0.79-0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL) is -0.68-0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB) of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement measurement error is within

  4. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Trong-Hieu; Chao, Paul Chang-Po; Chien, Ping-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR) linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an “MR reader” stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs) and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB) over the input range of 0.5–2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm2, while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL) is −0.79–0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL) is −0.68–0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB) of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement measurement

  5. Slow Oscillations of In-plane Magnetoresistance in Strongly Anisotropic Quasi-Two-Dimensional Rare-Earth Tritellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinchenko, A. A.; Grigoriev, P. D.; Monceau, P.; Lejay, P.; Zverev, V. N.

    2016-12-01

    The slow oscillations of intralayer magnetoresistance in the quasi-2D metallic compounds TbTe_3 and GdTe_3 have been observed for the first time. These oscillations do not originate from small Fermi-surface pockets, as revealed usually by Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, but from the entanglement of close frequencies due to a finite interlayer transfer integral t_z, either between the two Te planes forming a bilayer or between two adjacent bilayers, which allows to estimate its values. For TbTe_3 and GdTe_3, we obtain the estimate t_ z≈ 1 meV.

  6. Giant magnetoresistive sensor array for sensitive and specific multiplexed food allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-06-15

    Current common allergen detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and dip-stick methods, do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity and specificity for at-risk allergic patients. A method for performing highly sensitive and specific detection of multiple food allergens is thus imperative as food allergies are becoming increasingly recognized as a major healthcare concern, affecting an estimated 4% of the total population. We demonstrate first instance of sensitive and specific multiplexed detection of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and wheat allergen Gliadin using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. Commercialized ELISA kits for Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 report limits of detection (LODs) at 31.5 ng/mL and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the 96-well-based ELISA developed in-house for Gliadin was found to have a LOD of 40 ng/mL. Our multiplexed GMR-based assay demonstrates the ability to perform all three assays on the same chip specifically and with sensitivities at LODs about an order of magnitude lower than those of 96-well-based ELISAs. LODs of GMR-based assays developed for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Gliadin were 7.0 ng/mL, 0.2 ng/mL, and 1.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little to no cross-reactivity. These LODs are clinically important as some patients could react strongly against such low allergen levels. Given the limitations of current industrial detection technology, multiplexed GMR-based assays provide a method for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of any combination of food-product allergens, thus protecting allergic patients from life-threatening events, including anaphylaxis, by unintentional consumption.

  7. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.; Brouckaert, J.-F.

    2016-10-01

    A simultaneous blade tip timing (BTT) and blade tip clearance (BTC) measurement system enables the determination of turbomachinery blade vibrations and ensures the monitoring of the existing running gaps between the blade tip and the casing. This contactless instrumentation presents several advantages compared to the well-known telemetry system with strain gauges, at the cost of a more complex data processing procedure. The probes used can be optical, capacitive, eddy current as well as microwaves, everyone with its dedicated electronics and many existing different signal processing algorithms. Every company working in this field has developed its own processing method and sensor technology. Hence, repeating the same test with different instrumentations, the answer is often different. Moreover, rarely it is possible to achieve reliability for in-service measurements. Developments are focused on innovative instrumentations and a common standard. This paper focuses on the results achieved using a novel magnetoresistive sensor for simultaneous tip timing and tip clearance measurements. The sensor measurement principle is described. The sensitivity to gap variation is investigated. In terms of measurement of vibrations, experimental investigations were performed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (ITWL, Warsaw, Poland) in a real aeroengine and in the von Karman Institute (VKI) R2 compressor rig. The advantages and limitations of the magnetoresistive probe for turbomachinery testing are highlighted.

  8. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Tomassini, R; Rossi, G; Brouckaert, J-F

    2016-10-01

    A simultaneous blade tip timing (BTT) and blade tip clearance (BTC) measurement system enables the determination of turbomachinery blade vibrations and ensures the monitoring of the existing running gaps between the blade tip and the casing. This contactless instrumentation presents several advantages compared to the well-known telemetry system with strain gauges, at the cost of a more complex data processing procedure. The probes used can be optical, capacitive, eddy current as well as microwaves, everyone with its dedicated electronics and many existing different signal processing algorithms. Every company working in this field has developed its own processing method and sensor technology. Hence, repeating the same test with different instrumentations, the answer is often different. Moreover, rarely it is possible to achieve reliability for in-service measurements. Developments are focused on innovative instrumentations and a common standard. This paper focuses on the results achieved using a novel magnetoresistive sensor for simultaneous tip timing and tip clearance measurements. The sensor measurement principle is described. The sensitivity to gap variation is investigated. In terms of measurement of vibrations, experimental investigations were performed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (ITWL, Warsaw, Poland) in a real aeroengine and in the von Karman Institute (VKI) R2 compressor rig. The advantages and limitations of the magnetoresistive probe for turbomachinery testing are highlighted.

  9. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.; Brouckaert, J.-F.

    2014-05-01

    The accurate control of the gap between static and rotating components is vital to preserve the mechanical integrity and ensure a correct functioning of any rotating machinery. Moreover, tip leakage above the airfoil tip results in relevant aerodynamic losses. One way to measure and to monitor blade tip gaps is by the so-called Blade Tip Clearance (BTC) technique. Another fundamental phenomenon to control in the turbomachines is the vibration of the blades. For more than half a century, this has been performed by installing strain gauges on the blades and using telemetry to transmit the signals. The Blade Tip Timing (BTT) technique, (i.e. measuring the blade time of arrival from the casing at different angular locations with proximity sensors) is currently being adopted by all manufacturers as a replacement for the classical strain gauge technique because of its non-intrusive character. This paper presents a novel magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance systems, which offers high temporal and high spatial resolution simultaneously. The sensing element adopted is a Wheatstone bridge of Permalloy elements. The principle of the sensor is based on the variation of magnetic field at the passage of ferromagnetic objects. Two different configurations have been realized, a digital and an analogue sensor. Measurements of tip clearance have been performed in an high speed compressor and the calibration curve is reported. Measurements of blade vibration have been carried out in a dedicated calibration bench; results are presented and discussed. The magnetoresistive sensor is characterized by high repeatability, low manufacturing costs and measurement accuracy in line with the main probes used in turbomachinery testing. The novel sensor has great potential and is capable of fulfilling the requirements for a simultaneous BTC and BTT measurement system.

  10. Ultra-Sensitive Magnetoresistive Displacement Sensing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, John D. (Inventor); Lairson, Bruce M. (Inventor); Ramesham, Rajeshuni (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasensitive displacement sensing device for use in accelerometers, pressure gauges, temperature transducers, and the like, comprises a sputter deposited, multilayer, magnetoresistive field sensor with a variable electrical resistance based on an imposed magnetic field. The device detects displacement by sensing changes in the local magnetic field about the magnetoresistive field sensor caused by the displacement of a hard magnetic film on a movable microstructure. The microstructure, which may be a cantilever, membrane, bridge, or other microelement, moves under the influence of an acceleration a known displacement predicted by the configuration and materials selected, and the resulting change in the electrical resistance of the MR sensor can be used to calculate the displacement. Using a micromachining approach, very thin silicon and silicon nitride membranes are fabricated in one preferred embodiment by means of anisotropic etching of silicon wafers. Other approaches include reactive ion etching of silicon on insulator (SOI), or Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of silicon nitride films over silicon substrates. The device is found to be improved with the use of giant magnetoresistive elements to detect changes in the local magnetic field.

  11. Determination of magnetic anisotropy constants and domain wall pinning energy of Fe/MgO(001) ultrathin film by anisotropic magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; He, Wei; Ye, Jun; Tang, Jin; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Ahmad, Syed Sheraz; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2015-09-15

    It is challenging to determine domain wall pinning energy and magnetic anisotropy since both coherent rotation and domain wall displacement coexist during magnetization switching process. Here, angular dependence anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) measurements at different magnetic fields were employed to determine magnetic anisotropy constants and domain wall pinning energy of Fe/MgO(001) ultrathin film. The AMR curves at magnetic fields which are high enough to ensure the coherent rotation of magnetization indicate a smooth behavior without hysteresis between clockwise (CW) and counter-clockwise (CCW) rotations. By analyzing magnetic torque, the magnetic anisotropy constants can be obtained. On the other hand, the AMR curves at low fields show abrupt transitions with hysteresis between CW and CCW rotations, suggesting the presence of multi-domain structures. The domain wall pinning energy can be obtained by analyzing different behaviors of AMR. Our work suggests that AMR measurements can be employed to figure out precisely the contributions of magnetic anisotropy and domain wall pinning energy, which is still a critical issue for spintronics.

  12. Angle dependence on the anisotropic magnetoresistance amplitude of a single-contacted Ni nanowire subjected to a thermo-mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melilli, G.; Madon, B.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Clochard, M.-C.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of thermoelastic and piezoelectric strain of an active track-etched β-PVDF polymer matrix on an electrodeposited single-contacted Ni nanowire (NW) are investigated at the nanoscale by measuring the change of magnetization (i.e. using the inverse magnetostriction effect). The magnetization state is measured locally by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The ferromagnetic NW plays thus the role of a mechanical probe that allows the effects of mechanical strain to be characterized and described qualitatively and quantitatively. The inverse magnetostriction was found to be responsible for a quasi-disappearance of the AMR signal for a variation of the order of ΔT ≈ 10 K. In other terms, the variation of the magnetization due to the stress compensates the effect of external magnetic field applied on the NW resistance. The induced stress field in a single Ni NW was found 1000 time higher than the bulk stress field (due to thermal expansion measured on the PVDF). This amplification could be attributed to three nanoscopic effects: (1) a stress mismatch between the Ni NW and the membrane, (2) a non-negligible role of the surface tension on Ni NW Young modulus, and (3) the possibility of non-linear stress-strain law. We investigate here the role of these different contributions using track-etched polymer membranes irradiated at various angles (αirrad) leading to, after electrodeposition, embedded Ni NWs of different orientations.

  13. Anisotropic magneto-resistance of 2D holes in GaAs/Al_xGa_1-xAs heterostructure under in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, H.; Tsui, D. C.; Shayegan, M.; Yoon, Jongsoo

    2000-03-01

    We report on measurements of anisotropic in-plane magneto-resistance of the 2D hole system (2DHS) in a GaAs/AlGaAs (311)A heterostructure, which exhibits both zero-field and in-plane field induced metal-insulator transitions. For high hole densities, when the direction of B field is changed relative to the current(I), which is always kept in the high mobility direction, the resistivity with B allel I is larger at low field, while the resistivity with B ⊥ I becomes larger at high field. This behavior is consistent with recent measurements(S. J. Papadakis et al.), cond-mat/9911239. on a quantum well system. That the resistivity at high field is larger for B ⊥ I than for B allel I is also consistent with a recent theoretical argument(S. Das Sarma and E. H. Hwang, cond-mat/9909452.), though the difference is smaller than that from the theory. As the density is lowered, the resistivity with B allel I gets larger at high field, and it eventually becomes greater than that with B ⊥ I at all field ranges measured. This change in anisotropy has not been seen in previous measurements. The critical field B_c, beyond which the metallic phase becomes insulating, is also different for two different directions of B, while the change in I-V characteristics across Bc remains the same.

  14. A phenomenological approach to the anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall effect in tetragonal La(2/3)Ca(1/3)MnO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Li, S L; Wu, Z W; Li, S; Chu, H F; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Tian, H Y; Zheng, D N

    2010-04-14

    A La(2/3)Ca(1/3)MnO(3) Hall bar with its long dimension roughly along the hard axis [110] was fabricated on a single-crystal-like tensilely strained film on SrTiO(3)(001). The anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and planar Hall effect (PHE) have been studied at various external magnetic fields and temperatures. A phenomenological model in the high field limit is developed, and the galvanomagnetic tensor based on a tetragonal symmetry 4/mmm (D(4h)), applicable to epitaxial films on a substrate, has been obtained by expanding the tensor to the sixth order. The derived in-plane transverse resistance R(xy) shows a sin2φ(M) angular dependence, while the longitudinal R(xx) is constituted by not only a two-fold cos2φ(M) term, but also a four-fold cos4φ(M) term due to the square symmetry of the lattice. The model is in good agreement with the experimental results in high fields, while deviations are observed near the {100} easy axis with the decreasing field. Close inspection of the fitting parameters reveals the evolution of these term weights with temperature and magnetic field, which is distinct from conventional ferromagnetic metals and cannot be explained by the phenomenological model. An alternative mechanism for AMR, stemming from the magnetization-induced local orbit deformation through spin-orbit interaction, as previously proposed by O'Donnell et al, may be prevalent in manganites and other systems of complicated crystal structure.

  15. Negative anisotropic magnetoresistance resulting from minority spin transport in NixFe4-xN (x = 1 and 3) epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Fumiya; Kabara, Kazuki; Ito, Keita; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Suemasu, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    We grew 50 nm-thick NixFe4-xN (x = 1 and 3) epitaxial films on a SrTiO3(001) single-crystal substrate by molecular beam epitaxy and measured their anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) ratios rAMR in the temperature range of 5-300 K with current directions set along either NixFe4-xN [100] or [110]. A negative rAMR was obtained up to 200 K or higher. Their magnitude | rAMR | increased with decreasing temperature. From the negative AMR effect and the negative spin-polarization of density of states for NixFe4-xN at the Fermi level, it can be stated that the minority spin transport is dominant in NixFe4-xN, similar to Fe4N and Co3FeN. The rAMR depends on the current direction that arises from the current direction dependence of s-d scattering. In the case of Ni3FeN, the rAMR decreased to nearly zero at 260 K. This temperature agreed well with the Curie temperature determined from the temperature dependence of magnetization. The AMR curves were reproduced well by using both cos2ϕ and cos4ϕ components below 100 K, whereas a cos2ϕ component was enough to fit those obtained above 100 K. It is assumed that the tetragonal crystal field was enhanced at low temperatures (<100 K) similar to Fe4N (<50 K).

  16. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-06-16

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment.

  17. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  18. Quantitative analysis of anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co{sub 2}MnZ and Co{sub 2}FeZ epitaxial thin films: A facile way to investigate spin-polarization in half-metallic Heusler compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuraba, Y. Hirayama, Y.; Furubayashi, T.; Sukegawa, H.; Li, S.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Hono, K.; Kokado, S.

    2014-04-28

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect has been systematically investigated in various Heusler compounds Co{sub 2}MnZ and Co{sub 2}FeZ (Z = Al, Si, Ge, and Ga) epitaxial films and quantitatively summarized against the total valence electron number N{sub V}. It was found that the sign of AMR ratio is negative when N{sub V} is between 28.2 and 30.3, and turns positive when N{sub V} becomes below 28.2 and above 30.3, indicating that the Fermi level (E{sub F}) overlaps with the valence or conduction band edges of half-metallic gap at N{sub V} ∼ 28.2 or 30.3, respectively. We also find out that the magnitude of negative AMR ratio gradually increases with shifting of E{sub F} away from the gap edges, and there is a clear positive correlation between the magnitude of negative AMR ratio and magnetoresistive output of the giant magnetoresistive devices using the Heusler compounds. This indicates that AMR can be used as a facile way to optimize a composition of half-metallic Heusler compounds having a high spin-polarization at room temperature.

  19. Contactless Measurement of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Lateral Flow Strips Using Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR) Sensors in Differential Configuration.

    PubMed

    Lei, Huaming; Wang, Kan; Ji, Xiaojun; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-12-14

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are commonly used in biomedical detection due to their capability to bind with some specific antibodies. Quantification of biological entities could be realized by measuring the magnetic response of MNPs after the binding process. This paper presents a contactless scanning prototype based on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors for quantification of MNPs present in lateral flow strips (LFSs). The sensing unit of the prototype composes of two active TMR elements, which are parallel and closely arranged to form a differential sensing configuration in a perpendicular magnetic field. Geometrical parameters of the configuration are optimized according to theoretical analysis of the stray magnetic field produced by the test line (T-line) while strips being scanned. A brief description of our prototype and the sample preparation is presented. Experimental results show that the prototype exhibits the performance of high sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability. Meanwhile, the detection speed has been improved compared with existing similar techniques. The proposed prototype demonstrates a good sensitivity for detecting samples containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at a concentration of 25 mIU/mL. The T-line produced by the sample with low concentration is almost beyond the visual limit and produces a maximum stray magnetic field some 0.247 mOe at the sensor in the x direction.

  20. Contactless Measurement of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Lateral Flow Strips Using Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR) Sensors in Differential Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Huaming; Wang, Kan; Ji, Xiaojun; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are commonly used in biomedical detection due to their capability to bind with some specific antibodies. Quantification of biological entities could be realized by measuring the magnetic response of MNPs after the binding process. This paper presents a contactless scanning prototype based on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors for quantification of MNPs present in lateral flow strips (LFSs). The sensing unit of the prototype composes of two active TMR elements, which are parallel and closely arranged to form a differential sensing configuration in a perpendicular magnetic field. Geometrical parameters of the configuration are optimized according to theoretical analysis of the stray magnetic field produced by the test line (T-line) while strips being scanned. A brief description of our prototype and the sample preparation is presented. Experimental results show that the prototype exhibits the performance of high sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability. Meanwhile, the detection speed has been improved compared with existing similar techniques. The proposed prototype demonstrates a good sensitivity for detecting samples containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at a concentration of 25 mIU/mL. The T-line produced by the sample with low concentration is almost beyond the visual limit and produces a maximum stray magnetic field some 0.247 mOe at the sensor in the x direction. PMID:27983659

  1. Significant manipulation of output performance of a bridge-structured spin valve magnetoresistance sensor via an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Baiqian; Ou-Yang, Jun; Zhu, Benpeng; Chen, Shi; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xianghao

    2016-01-28

    Through principles of spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) effect and its application in magnetic sensors, we have investigated electric-field control of the output performance of a bridge-structured Co/Cu/NiFe/IrMn SV-GMR sensor on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate using the micro-magnetic simulation. We centered on the influence of the variation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K) of Co on the output of the bridge, and K was manipulated via the stress of Co, which is generated from the strain of a piezoelectric substrate under an electric field. The results indicate that when K varies between 2 × 10{sup 4 }J/m{sup 3} and 10 × 10{sup 4 }J/m{sup 3}, the output performance can be significantly manipulated: The linear range alters from between −330 Oe and 330 Oe to between −650 Oe and 650 Oe, and the sensitivity is tuned by almost 7 times, making it possible to measure magnetic fields with very different ranges. According to the converse piezoelectric effect, we have found that this variation of K can be realized by applying an electric field with the magnitude of about 2–20 kV/cm on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate, which is realistic in application. This result means that electric-control of SV-GMR effect has potential application in developing SV-GMR sensors with improved performance.

  2. Soft Nanocomposite Based Multi-point, Multi-directional Strain Mapping Sensor Using Anisotropic Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyosang; Kwon, Donguk; Cho, Haedo; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Jung

    2017-01-25

    The practical utilization of soft nanocomposites as a strain mapping sensor in tactile sensors and artificial skins requires robustness for various contact conditions as well as low-cost fabrication process for large three dimensional surfaces. In this work, we propose a multi-point and multi-directional strain mapping sensor based on multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-silicone elastomer nanocomposites and anisotropic electrical impedance tomography (aEIT). Based on the anisotropic resistivity of the sensor, aEIT technique can reconstruct anisotropic resistivity distributions using electrodes around the sensor boundary. This strain mapping sensor successfully estimated stretch displacements (error of 0.54 ± 0.53 mm), surface normal forces (error of 0.61 ± 0.62 N), and multi-point contact locations (error of 1.88 ± 0.95 mm in 30 mm × 30 mm area for a planar shaped sensor and error of 4.80 ± 3.05 mm in 40 mm × 110 mm area for a three dimensional contoured sensor). In addition, the direction of lateral stretch was also identified by reconstructing anisotropic distributions of electrical resistivity. Finally, a soft human-machine interface device was demonstrated as a practical application of the developed sensor.

  3. Soft Nanocomposite Based Multi-point, Multi-directional Strain Mapping Sensor Using Anisotropic Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyosang; Kwon, Donguk; Cho, Haedo; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Jung

    2017-01-01

    The practical utilization of soft nanocomposites as a strain mapping sensor in tactile sensors and artificial skins requires robustness for various contact conditions as well as low-cost fabrication process for large three dimensional surfaces. In this work, we propose a multi-point and multi-directional strain mapping sensor based on multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-silicone elastomer nanocomposites and anisotropic electrical impedance tomography (aEIT). Based on the anisotropic resistivity of the sensor, aEIT technique can reconstruct anisotropic resistivity distributions using electrodes around the sensor boundary. This strain mapping sensor successfully estimated stretch displacements (error of 0.54 ± 0.53 mm), surface normal forces (error of 0.61 ± 0.62 N), and multi-point contact locations (error of 1.88 ± 0.95 mm in 30 mm × 30 mm area for a planar shaped sensor and error of 4.80 ± 3.05 mm in 40 mm × 110 mm area for a three dimensional contoured sensor). In addition, the direction of lateral stretch was also identified by reconstructing anisotropic distributions of electrical resistivity. Finally, a soft human-machine interface device was demonstrated as a practical application of the developed sensor. PMID:28120886

  4. Soft Nanocomposite Based Multi-point, Multi-directional Strain Mapping Sensor Using Anisotropic Electrical Impedance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyosang; Kwon, Donguk; Cho, Haedo; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Jung

    2017-01-01

    The practical utilization of soft nanocomposites as a strain mapping sensor in tactile sensors and artificial skins requires robustness for various contact conditions as well as low-cost fabrication process for large three dimensional surfaces. In this work, we propose a multi-point and multi-directional strain mapping sensor based on multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-silicone elastomer nanocomposites and anisotropic electrical impedance tomography (aEIT). Based on the anisotropic resistivity of the sensor, aEIT technique can reconstruct anisotropic resistivity distributions using electrodes around the sensor boundary. This strain mapping sensor successfully estimated stretch displacements (error of 0.54 ± 0.53 mm), surface normal forces (error of 0.61 ± 0.62 N), and multi-point contact locations (error of 1.88 ± 0.95 mm in 30 mm × 30 mm area for a planar shaped sensor and error of 4.80 ± 3.05 mm in 40 mm × 110 mm area for a three dimensional contoured sensor). In addition, the direction of lateral stretch was also identified by reconstructing anisotropic distributions of electrical resistivity. Finally, a soft human-machine interface device was demonstrated as a practical application of the developed sensor.

  5. Solution Concentration and Flow Rate of Fe3+-modified Porphyrin (Red Blood Model) on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) Sensor Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminudin, A.; Tjahyono, D. H.; Suprijadi; Djamal, M.; Zaen, R.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2017-03-01

    Red blood has been of great interest for scientists since it relates to human’ and living creature’s life sustainability. One of the important compounds in red blood is porphyrin. Here, the purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting porphyrin concentration using the assistance of giant magnetoresistance. In short of the method, we added Fe3+ solution to the porphyrin, and the mixed solution was introduced to the magnetic field. Next, the magnetized solution was introduced to the magnetic sensor to indicate the existence of porphyrin in the solution. To confirm the effectiveness of our method in detecting porphyrin, we varied the flow rate and concentration of Fe3+-modified porphyrin solution. The result showed that the more concentration and the slower flow rate affected the higher sensitivity gained. Since this developed method is simple but effective for detecting porphyrin concentration, we believe that further development of this method will be benefit for many applications, specifically relating to the medical uses.

  6. The Detection and Discrimination of Small Munitions using Giant Magnetoresistive (OMR) Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    sensors along the three principal axes. GMR gradiometer sensors are also available. The cost of a single GMR chip is less than $10, and the cost per...150 2K SIOC8 AAH004-00 1.5 7.5 3.2 4.8 4 15 150 2K MSOP8 AAL002-02 1.5 10.5 3.0 4.2 2 2 150 5.5K SIOC8 Gradiometers Linear Range

  7. Enhanced response and sensitivity of self-corrugated graphene sensors with anisotropic charge distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yol Jeong, Seung; Jeong, Sooyeon; Won Lee, Sang; Tae Kim, Sung; Kim, Daeho; Jin Jeong, Hee; Tark Han, Joong; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Seok Jeong, Mun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a high-performance molecular sensor using self-corrugated chemically modified graphene as a three dimensional (3D) structure that indicates anisotropic charge distribution. This is capable of room-temperature operation, and, in particular, exhibiting high sensitivity and reversible fast response with equilibrium region. The morphology consists of periodic, “cratered” arrays that can be formed by condensation and evaporation of graphene oxide (GO) solution on interdigitated electrodes. Subsequent hydrazine reduction, the corrugated edge area of the graphene layers have a high electric potential compared with flat graphene films. This local accumulation of electrons interacts with a large number of gas molecules. The sensitivity of 3D-graphene sensors significantly increases in the atmosphere of NO2 gas. The intriguing structures have several advantages for straightforward fabrication on patterned substrates, high-performance graphene sensors without post-annealing process. PMID:26053892

  8. A nanoliter volume nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system using tunneling magneto-resistive (TMR) sensors to recognize biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Pablo

    The need to incorporate advanced engineering tools in biology, biochemistry and medicine is in great demand. Many of the existing instruments and tools are usually expensive and require special facilities. With the advent of nanotechnology in the past decade, new approaches to develop devices and tools have been generated by academia and industry. One such technology, NMR spectroscopy, has been used by biochemists for more than 2 decades to study the molecular structure of chemical compounds. However, NMR spectrometers are very expensive and require special laboratory rooms for their proper operation. High magnetic fields with strengths in the order of several Tesla make these instruments unaffordable to most research groups. This doctoral research proposes a new technology to develop NMR spectrometers that can operate at field strengths of less than 0.5 Tesla using an inexpensive permanent magnet and spin dependent nanoscale magnetic devices. This portable NMR system is intended to analyze samples as small as a few nanoliters. The main problem to resolve when downscaling the variables is to obtain an NMR signal with high Signal-To-Noise-Ratio (SNR). A special Tunneling Magneto-Resistive (TMR) sensor design was developed to achieve this goal. The minimum specifications for each component of the proposed NMR system were established. A complete NMR system was designed based on these minimum requirements. The goat was always to find cost effective realistic components. The novel design of the NMR system uses technologies such as Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS), Digital Signal Processing (DSP) and a special Backpropagation Neural Network that finds the best match of the NMR spectrum. The system was designed, calculated and simulated with excellent results. In addition, a general method to design TMR Sensors was developed. The technique was automated and a computer program was written to help the designer perform this task interactively.

  9. Large tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/pentacene/Cu structures prepared on SrTiO3 (110) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Takeshi; Miyahara, Chihiro; Tada, Hirokazu

    2017-01-01

    We investigated tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) at the interface between pentacene and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) thin films prepared on SrTiO3 (STO) (110) substrates. The dependence of the TAMR ratio on the magnetic field strength was approximately ten times larger than that of the magnetic field angle at a high magnetic field. This large difference in the TAMR ratio is explained by the interface magnetic anisotropy of strain-induced LSMO thin films on a STO (110) substrate, which has an easy axis with an out-of-plane component. We also note that the TAMR owing to out-of-plane magnetization was positive at each angle of the in-plane magnetic field. This result implies that active control of the interface magnetic anisotropy between organic materials and ferromagnetic metals should realize nonvolatile and high-efficiency TAMR devices.

  10. Magnetoresistive phenomena in nanoscale magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, John D.

    Nanomagnetic materials are playing an increasingly important role in modern technologies. A particular area of interest involves the interplay between magnetism and electric transport, i.e. magnetoresistive properties. Future generations of field sensors and memory elements will have to be on a length scale of a few nanometers or smaller. Magnetoresistive properties of such nanoscale objects exhibit novel features due to reduced dimensionality, complex surfaces and interfaces, and quantum effects. In this dissertation theoretical aspects of three such nanoscale magnetoresistive phenomena are discussed. Very narrow magnetic domain walls can strongly scatter electrons leading to an increased resistance. Specifically, this dissertation will cover the newly predicted effect of magnetic moment softening in magnetic nanocontacts or nanowires. Atomically thin domain walls in Ni exhibit a reduction, or softening, of the local magnetic moments due to the noncollinearity of the magnetization. This effect leads to a strong enhancement of the resistance of a domain wall. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consist of two ferromagnetic electrodes separated by a thin layer of insulating material through which current can be carried by electron tunneling. The resistance of an MTJ depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the two ferromagnetic layers, an effect known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). A first-principles analysis of CoFeB|MgO|CoFeB MTJs will be presented. Calculations reveal that it is energetically favorable for interstitial boron atoms to reside at the interface between the electrode and MgO tunneling barrier, which can be detrimental to the TMR effect. Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) is the change in resistance of a ferromagnetic system as the orientation of the magnetization is altered. In this dissertation, the focus will be on AMR in the tunneling regime. Specifically we will present new theoretical results on tunneling AMR (TAMR) in two

  11. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Mitsunobu Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  12. Magnetic and Magnetoresistive Properties of 3D Interconnected NiCo Nanowire Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Câmara Santa Clara Gomes, Tristan; De La Torre Medina, Joaquín; Lemaitre, Matthieu; Piraux, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Track-etched polymer membranes with crossed nanochannels have been revealed to be most suitable as templates to produce large surface area and mechanically stable 3D interconnected nanowire (NW) networks by electrodeposition. Geometrically controlled NW superstructures made of NiCo ferromagnetic alloys exhibit appealing magnetoresistive properties. The combination of exact alloy compositions with the spatial arrangement of NWs in the 3D network is decisive to obtain specific magnetic and magneto-transport behavior. A proposed simple model based on topological aspects of the 3D NW networks is used to accurately determine the anisotropic magnetoresistance ratios. Despite of their complex topology, the microstructure of Co-rich NiCo NW networks display mixed fcc-hcp phases with the c-axis of the hcp phase oriented perpendicular to their axis. These interconnected NW networks have high potential as reliable and stable magnetic field sensors.

  13. Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    In recent years a broad range of magnetoresistance phenomena have been reported for organic-based semiconductors, conductors and magnets. Organic systems illustrating magnetoresistance, include molecular- and polymer-based nonmagnetic semiconductors[1], organic-based spin polarized magnetic semiconductors,[2] nonmagnetic conducting polymers, and ferromagnet/organic semiconductor/ferromagnet heterojunctions. Examples of each of these organic-based systems will be presented together with a discussion of the roles of magnetotransport mechanisms including interconversion of singlets and triplets, compression of the electronic wavefunction in presence of a magnetic field, quantum interference phenomena, effects of a ``Coulomb gap'' in π* subbands of organic magnetic semiconductors with resulting near complete spin polarization in conduction and valence bands of magnetic organic semiconductors.[2,3] Opportunities for magnetotransport in Ferromagnet/Organic Semiconductor/Ferromagnet heterojunctions will be discussed.[4] [4pt] [1] V.N. Prigodin et al., Synth. Met. 156, 757 (2006); J.D. Bergeson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 067201 (2008) [0pt] [2] V.N. Prigodin et al., Adv. Mater. 14, 1230 (2002. [0pt] [3] J.B. Kortright et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 257204 (2008). [0pt] [4] J.D. Bergeson, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 172505 (2008).

  14. Monte Carlo calculations of the magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayer structures with giant magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskiy, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo study of trilayer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects is carried out. The anisotropic Heisenberg model is used for description of magnetic properties of ultrathin ferromagnetic films forming these structures. The temperature and magnetic field dependences of magnetic characteristics are considered for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these multilayer structures. The methodology for determination of the magnetoresistance by the Monte Carlo method is introduced; this permits us to calculate the magnetoresistance of multilayer structures for different thicknesses of the ferromagnetic films. The calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance agrees very well with the experimental results measured for the Fe(0 0 1)-Cr(0 0 1) multilayer structure and CFAS-Ag-CFAS-IrMn spin-valve structure based on the half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5.

  15. Extraordinary magnetoresistance: sensing the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Thomas; Kusmartsev, Feodor

    2012-06-01

    Simulations utilising the finite element method (FEM) have been produced in order to investigate aspects of circular extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices. The effect of three specific features on the resultant magnetoresistance were investigated: the ratio of the metallic to semiconducting conductivities (σ M/σ S); the semiconductor mobility; and the introduction of an intermediate region at the semiconductormetal interface in order to simulate a contact resistance. In order to obtain a large EMR effect the conductivity ratio (σ M/σ S) is required to be larger than two orders of magnitude; below this critical value the resultant magnetoresistance effect is dramatically reduced. Large mobility semiconductors exhibit larger EMR values for a given field (below saturation) and reduce the magnetic field required to produce saturation of the magnetoresistance. This is due to a larger Hall angle produced at a given magnetic field and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. Since practical magnetic field sensors are required to operate at low magnetic fields, high mobility semiconductors are required in the production of more sensitive EMR sensors. The formation of a Schottky barrier at the semiconductor-metal interface has been modelled with the introduction of a contact resistance at the semiconductor-metal interface. Increasing values of contact resistance are found to reduce the EMR effect with it disappearing altogether for large values. This has been shown explicitly by looking at the current flow in the system and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. The interface resistance was used to fit the simulated model to existing experimental data. The best fit occurred with an interface with resistivity of 1.55×10-4 m (overestimate). The EMR effect holds great potential with regard to its future application to magnetic field sensors. The design of any such devices should incorporate high mobility materials (such as graphene) along

  16. Extraordinary magnetoresistance: sensing the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Thomas H.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2012-06-01

    Simulations utilising the finite element method (FEM) have been produced in order to investigate aspects of circular extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices. The effect of three specific features on the resultant magnetoresistance were investigated: the ratio of the metallic to semiconducting conductivities ( σ M / σ S ); the semiconductor mobility; and the introduction of an intermediate region at the semiconductormetal interface in order to simulate a contact resistance. In order to obtain a large EMR effect the conductivity ratio ( σ M / σ S ) is required to be larger than two orders of magnitude; below this critical value the resultant magnetoresistance effect is dramatically reduced. Large mobility semiconductors exhibit larger EMR values for a given field (below saturation) and reduce the magnetic field required to produce saturation of the magnetoresistance. This is due to a larger Hall angle produced at a given magnetic field and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. Since practical magnetic field sensors are required to operate at low magnetic fields, high mobility semiconductors are required in the production of more sensitive EMR sensors. The formation of a Schottky barrier at the semiconductor-metal interface has been modelled with the introduction of a contact resistance at the semiconductor-metal interface. Increasing values of contact resistance are found to reduce the EMR effect with it disappearing altogether for large values. This has been shown explicitly by looking at the current flow in the system and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. The interface resistance was used to fit the simulated model to existing experimental data. The best fit occurred with an interface with resistivity of 1.55×10-4 m (overestimate). The EMR effect holds great potential with regard to its future application to magnetic field sensors. The design of any such devices should incorporate high mobility materials (such as graphene

  17. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kodzius, Rimantas; Li, Fuquan; Foulds, Ian G.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads® demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead® SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads® travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device. PMID:27571084

  18. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Kodzius, Rimantas; Li, Fuquan; Foulds, Ian G; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-08-26

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads(®) demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead(®) SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads(®) travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device.

  19. Strong spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman spin splitting in angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Rik Pramanik, Tanmoy; Roy, Anupam; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Movva, Hema C. P.; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Colombo, Luigi

    2014-06-02

    We have studied angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film with field up to 9 T over 2–20 K temperatures. The perpendicular field magnetoresistance has been explained by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory alone in a system with strong spin-orbit coupling, from which we have estimated the mean free path, the phase coherence length, and the spin-orbit relaxation time. We have obtained the out-of-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be small and the in-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be comparable to the momentum relaxation time. The estimation of these charge and spin transport parameters are useful for spintronics applications. For parallel field magnetoresistance, we have confirmed the presence of Zeeman effect which is otherwise suppressed in perpendicular field magnetoresistance due to strong spin-orbit coupling. The parallel field data have been explained using both the contributions from the Maekawa-Fukuyama localization theory for non-interacting electrons and Lee-Ramakrishnan theory of electron-electron interactions. The estimated Zeeman g-factor and the strength of Coulomb screening parameter agree well with the theory. Finally, the anisotropy in magnetoresistance with respect to angle has been described by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory. This anisotropy can be used in anisotropic magnetic sensor applications.

  20. Colossal Magnetoresistive Manganite Based Fast Bolometric X-ray Sensors for Total Energy Measurements of Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, G J; Kolagani, R M; Adhikari, S; Mundle, R M; Cox, D W; Davidson III, A L; Liang, Y; Drury, O B; Hau-Riege, S P; Gardner, C; Ables, E; Bionta, R M; Friedrich, S

    2008-12-17

    Bolometric detectors based on epitaxial thin films of rare earth perovskite manganites have been proposed as total energy monitors for X-ray pulses at the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. We demonstrate such a detector scheme based on epitaxial thin films of the perovskite manganese oxide material Nd{sub 0.67}Sr{sub x0.33}MnO{sub 3}, grown by pulsed laser deposition on buffered silicon substrates. The substrate and sensor materials are chosen to meet the conflicting requirements of radiation hardness, sensitivity, speed and linearity over a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude. The key challenge in the material development is the integration of the sensor material with Si. Si is required to withstand the free electron laser pulse impact and to achieve a readout speed three orders of magnitude faster than conventional cryoradiometers for compatibility with the Linac Coherent Light Source pulse rate. We discuss sensor material development and the photoresponse of prototype devices. This Linac Coherent Light Source total energy monitor represents the first practical application of manganite materials as bolometric sensors.

  1. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fujian; Rybicki, James; Lin, Ran; Hutchinson, Kent; Hou, Jia; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices show a large enough magnetoresistive response (typically 10%) for potential applications as magnetic field sensors. However, applications often require sensing high frequency magnetic fields, and the examination of the frequency-dependent magnetoresistive response is therefore required. Analysis of time constants that limit the frequency response may also shed light on the mechanism behind the OMAR effect, because different OMAR mechanisms occur at different time scales In our experiments, the AC magnetic field is supplied by a coil with a ferrite core which is driven by a function generator The AC magnet shows a frequency response that is almost flat up to 1MHz. We found that the OMAR frequency limit is about 10 kHz for a typical organic semiconductor device and at least 100 kHz for devices made from a doped polymer film. We also performed capacitance and conductance vs. frequency measurements to understand the origin of the observed limit frequencies. This work was supported by Army MURI under GrantNo. W911NF-08-1-0317 and NSF under Grant No. ECS 0725280.

  2. Magnetoresistance in nanostructured Tb/Ti and Tb/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Svalov, A. V.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Vas'kovskiy, V. O.; Sorokin, A. N.; Diercks, D.

    2011-01-15

    Magnetic, magnetoresistive and structural properties were studied for [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers which were prepared by rf-sputtering. The thickness of the Tb layers varied from 1.5 to 12 nm. The thickness of 2 nm nonmagnetic spacers of Ti or Si was kept constant. Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetoresistance was observed in [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers. A decrease in the thickness of the terbium layers led to a decrease in the anisotropic contribution to the total magnetoresistance. The negative isotropic magnetoresistanse in [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers can be attributed to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and/or high field isotropic magnetoresistance. The structure of the samples of both types enabled the existence of the GMR effect.

  3. An in-depth noise model for giant magnetoresistance current sensors for circuit design and complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor integration

    SciTech Connect

    Roldán, A. Roldán, J. B.; Reig, C.; Cardoso, S.; Cardoso, F.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P. P.

    2014-05-07

    Full instrumentation bridges based on spin valve of giant magnetoresistance and magnetic tunnel junction devices have been microfabricated and experimentally characterized from the DC and noise viewpoint. A more realistic model of these devices was obtained in this work, an electrical and thermal model previously developed have been improved in such a way that noise effects are also included. We have implemented the model in a circuit simulator and reproduced the experimental measurements accurately. This provides a more realistic and complete tool for circuit design where magnetoresistive elements are combined with well-known complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor modules.

  4. Theory of organic magnetoresistance in disordered organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas J.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of spin transport in organics has been challenged by the discovery of large magnetic field effects on properties such as conductivity and electroluminescence in a wide array of organic systems. To explain the large organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) phenomenon, we present and solve a model for magnetoresistance in positionally disordered organic materials using percolation theory. The model describes the effects of singlettriplet spin transitions on hopping transport by considering the role of spin dynamics on an effective density of hopping sites. Faster spin transitions open up `spin-blocked' pathways to become viable conduction channels and hence produce magnetoresistance. We concentrate on spin transitions under the effects of the hyperfine (isotropic and anisotropic), exchange, and dipolar interactions. The magnetoresistance can be found analytically in several regimes and explains several experimental observations

  5. A detection system based on giant magnetoresistive sensors and high-moment magnetic nanoparticles demonstrates zeptomole sensitivity: potential for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Li, Yuanpeng; Jing, Ying; Xu, YunHao; Yao, Xiaofeng; Xing, Chengguo; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Zeptomole detector: A highly sensitive giant-magnetoresistive chip and FeCo nanoparticles can be used to linearly detect 600-4500 copies of streptavidin. Under unoptimized conditions, this system also detects human IL-6 with a sensitivity 13-times higher than that of standard ELISA techniques.

  6. Low frequency noise of anisotropic magnetoresistors in DC and AC-excited metal detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnanek, J.; Janosek, M.; Ripka, P.

    2013-06-01

    Magnetoresistors can replace induction sensors in applications like non-destructive testing and metal detection, where high spatial resolution or low frequency response is required. Using an AC excitation field the magnetic response of eddy currents is detected. Although giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors have higher measuring range and sensitivity compared to anisotropic magnetoresistors (AMR), they show also higher hysteresis and noise especially at low frequencies. Therefore AMR sensors are chosen to be evaluated in low noise measurements with combined processing of DC and AC excitation field with respect to the arrangement of processing electronics. Circuit with a commercial AMR sensor HMC1001 and AD8429 preamplifier using flipping technique exhibited 1-Hz noise as low as 125 pT/. Without flipping, the 1-Hz noise increased to 246 pT/.

  7. Technology Trend of Sputtering System for Magnetoresistive Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunekawa, Koji

    Magnetoresistive films used for read-heads of hard disc drives, magnetic random access memory devices, and magnetic sensors are fabricated by magnetron sputtering method. Since giant magnetoresistive and tunnel magnetoresistive films are composed of multilayered films, in which the thickness of each layer is in the nanometer range, high accuracy in thickness control and thickness uniformity is required for the sputtering systems. Film properties are also influenced by the quality of the vacuum during the fabrication process. This article addresses such issues on the deposition of magnetoresistive films, and introduces mass-production sputtering technologies capable of fabricating high quality multilayers. Furthermore, fabrication methods of the tunnel barrier in tunnel magnetoresistive devices are also described.

  8. Magnetoresistive waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, F. S.; Hunter, R. O., Jr.; Pereira, N. R.; Tajima, T.

    1982-10-01

    The self-generated magnetic field of a current diffusing into a plasma between conductors can magnetically insulate the plasma. Propagation of magnetoresistive waves in plasmas is analyzed. Applications to plasma opening switches are discussed.

  9. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors. PMID:27322277

  10. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  11. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  12. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2

    DOE PAGES

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; ...

    2014-11-19

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. As a result, a change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior ofmore » the magnetoresistance in WTe₂ was identified.« less

  13. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  14. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; ...

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] withoutmore » Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.« less

  15. Enhanced magnetoresistance and pinning–depinning processes of vortex domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soledade, P. R.; Brandão, J.; Mello, A.; Sampaio, L. C.

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the pinning–depinning processes of vortex domain walls (VDW) in Permalloy nanowires with asymmetric triangular notches by means of magnetoresistance measurements and micromagnetic simulations. Through a model based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and the magnetization structure obtained from simulations, the magnetoresistance when the VDW passes stretched through the notch was calculated. Besides the depinning field, as it is known, also the magnetoresistance drop depends on the domain wall chirality. Measurements show that the resistance drop for clockwise (CW) chirality is  ≈180 m Ω (38%) larger than for the counterclockwise (CCW) chirality. From the VDW resistance calculations it becomes clear which domain wall parameters, like domain wall structure, chirality and wall width, play a role on the magnetoresistance. These results offer an additional route to better controlling the VDW motion, which can be beneficial to applications.

  16. Systematic Angular Study of Magnetoresistance in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungsik; Le, Brian; Watts, Justin; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ices are nanostructured two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic elements, where frustrated interactions lead to unusual collective magnetic behavior. Here we report a room-temperature magnetoresistance study of connected permalloy (Ni81Fe19) kagome artificial spin ice networks, wherein the direction of the applied in-plane magnetic field is systematically varied. We measure both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance in these structures, and we find certain transport geometries of the network show strong angular sensitivity - even small variations in the applied field angle lead to dramatic changes of the magnetoresistance response. We also investigate the magnetization reversal of the networks using magnetic force microscopy (MFM), demonstrating avalanche behavior in the magnetization reversal. The magnetoresistance features are analyzed using an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) model. Supported by the US Department of Energy. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by Seagate Technology, NSF MRSEC, and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme.

  17. Magnetoresistance of heavy and light metal/ferromagnet bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, Can Onur; Garello, Kevin; Mendil, Johannes; Ghosh, Abhijit; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gabureac, Mihai; Trassin, Morgan; Fiebig, Manfred; Gambardella, Pietro

    2015-11-09

    We studied the magnetoresistance of normal metal (NM)/ferromagnet (FM) bilayers in the linear and nonlinear (current-dependent) regimes and compared it with the amplitude of the spin-orbit torques and thermally induced electric fields. Our experiments reveal that the magnetoresistance of the heavy NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ta, W, and Pt) is phenomenologically similar to the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) of YIG/Pt, but has a much larger anisotropy of the order of 0.5%, which increases with the atomic number of the NM. This SMR-like behavior is absent in light NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ti and Cu), which present the standard anisotropic magnetoresistance expected from polycrystalline FM layers. In the Ta, W, and Pt/Co bilayers, we find an additional magnetoresistance directly proportional to the current and to the transverse component of the magnetization. This so-called unidirectional SMR, of the order of 0.005%, is largest in W and correlates with the amplitude of the antidamping spin-orbit torque. The unidirectional SMR is below the accuracy of our measurements in YIG/Pt.

  18. Advanced giant magnetoresistance technology for measurement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Roland; Mattheis, Roland; Reiss, Günter

    2013-08-01

    Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors are considered one of the first real applications of nanotechnology. They consist of nm-thick layered structures where ferromagnetic metals are sandwiched by nonmagnetic metals. Such multilayered films produce a large change in resistance (typically 10 to 20%) when subjected to a magnetic field, compared with a maximum change of a few per cent for other types of magnetic sensors. This technology has been intensively used in read heads for hard disk drives and now increasingly finds applications due to the high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally these sensors are compatible with miniaturization and thus offer a high spatial resolution combined with a frequency range up to the 100 MHz regime and simple electronic conditioning. In this review, we first discuss the basics of the underlying magnetoresistance effects in layered structures and then present three prominent examples for future applications: in the field of current sensing the new GMR sensors offer high bandwidth and good accuracy in a space-saving open loop measurement configuration. In rotating systems they can be used for multiturn angle measurements, and in biotechnology the detection of magnetic particles enables the quantitative measurement of biomolecule concentrations.

  19. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; ...

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  20. Negative magnetoresistivity in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya-Wen; Yang, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Negative magnetoresistivity is a special magnetotransport property associated with chiral anomaly in four dimensional chiral anomalous systems, which refers to the transport behavior that the DC longitudinal magnetoresistivity decreases with increasing magnetic field. We calculate the longitudinal magnetoconductivity in the presence of back-reactions of the magnetic field to gravity in holographic zero charge and axial charge density systems with and without axial charge dissipation. In the absence of axial charge dissipation, we find that the quantum critical conductivity grows with increasing magnetic field when the backreaction strength is larger than a critical value, in contrast to the monotonically decreasing behavior of quantum critical conductivity in the probe limit. With axial charge dissipation, we find the negative magnetoresistivity behavior. The DC longitudinal magnetoconductivity scales as B in the large magnetic field limit, which deviates from the exact B 2 scaling of the probe limit result. In both cases, the small frequency longitudinal magnetoconductivity still agrees with the formula obtained from the hydrodynamic linear response theory, even in the large magnetic field limit.

  1. Planar Hall magnetoresistive aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Sinha, B; Ramulu, T S; Kim, K W; Venu, R; Lee, J J; Kim, C G

    2014-09-15

    The use of aptamer-based assays is an emerging and attractive approach in disease research and clinical diagnostics. A sensitive aptamer-based sandwich-type sensor is presented to detect human thrombin using a planar Hall magnetoresistive (PHR) sensor in cooperation with superparamagnetic labels. A PHR sensor has the great advantages of a high signal-to-noise ratio, a small offset voltage and linear response in the low-field region, allowing it to act as a high-resolution biosensor. In the system presented here, the sensor has an active area of 50 µm × 50 µm with a 10-nm gold layer deposited onto the sensor surface prior to the binding of thiolated DNA primary aptamer. A polydimethylsiloxane well of 600-µm radius and 1-mm height was prepared around the sensor surface to maintain the same specific area and volume for each sensor. The sensor response was traced in real time upon the addition of streptavidin-functionalized magnetic labels on the sensor. A linear response to the thrombin concentration in the range of 86 pM-8.6 µM and a lower detection limit down to 86 pM was achieved by the proposed present method with a sample volume consumption of 2 µl. The proposed aptasensor has a strong potential for application in clinical diagnosis.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of multilayer magnetic structures and calculation of the magnetoresistance coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    The Monte Carlo study of three-layer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects has been performed with the application of the Heisenberg anisotropic model to the description of the magnetic properties of thin ferromagnetic films. The dependences of the magnetic characteristics on the temperature and external magnetic field have been obtained for the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these structures. A Monte Carlo method for determining the magnetoresistance coefficient has been developed. The magnetoresistance coefficient has been calculated for three-layer and spin-valve magnetic structures at various thicknesses of ferromagnetic films. It has been shown that the calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance coefficient is in good agreement with experimental data obtained for the Fe(001)/Cr(001) multilayer structure and the CFAS/Ag/CFAS/IrMn spin valve based on the Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 (CFAS) Heusler alloy.

  3. Theory of magnetoresistance due to lattice dislocations in face-centred cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical model to describe the low temperature magneto-resistivity of high purity copper single and polycrystals containing different density and distribution of dislocations has been developed. In the model, magnetoresistivity tensor is evaluated numerically using the effective medium approximation. The anisotropy of dislocation-induced relaxation time is considered by incorporating two independent energy bands with different relaxation times and the spherical and cylindrical Fermi surfaces representing open, extended and closed electron orbits. The effect of dislocation microstructure is introduced by means of two adjustable parameters corresponding to the length and direction of electron orbits in the momentum space, which permits prediction of magnetoresistance of FCC metals containing different density and distribution of dislocations. The results reveal that dislocation microstructure influences the character of the field-dependent magnetoresistivity. In the orientation of the open orbits, the quadratic variation in magnetoresistivity changes to quasi-linear as the density of dislocations increases. In the closed orbit orientation, dislocations delay the onset of magnetoresistivity saturation. The results indicate that in the open orbit orientations of the crystals, the anisotropic relaxation time due to small-angle dislocation scattering induces the upward deviation from Kohler's rule. In the closed orbit orientations Kohler's rule holds, independent of the density of dislocations. The results obtained with the model show good agreement with the experimental measurements of transverse magnetoresistivity in deformed single and polycrystal samples of copper at 2 K.

  4. Noncontact vibration measurements using magnetoresistive sensing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.

    2016-06-01

    Contactless instrumentations is more and more used in turbomachinery testing thanks to the non-intrusive character and the possibility to monitor all the components of the machine at the same time. Performances of blade tip timing (BTT) measurement systems, used for noncontact turbine blade vibration measurements, in terms of uncertainty and resolution are strongly affected by sensor characteristics and processing methods. The sensors used for BTT generate pulses, used for precise measurements of turbine blades time of arrival. Nowadays proximity sensors used in this application are based on optical, capacitive, eddy current and microwave measuring principle. Pressure sensors has been also tried. This paper summarizes the results achieved using a novel instrumentation based on the magnetoresistive sensing elements. The characterization of the novel probe has been already published. The measurement system was validated in test benches and in a real jet-engine comparing different sensor technologies. The whole instrumentation was improved. The work presented in this paper focuses on the current developments. In particular, attention is given to the data processing software and new sensor configurations.

  5. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L. Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2014-12-14

    Classical magnetoresistance (MR) in nonmagnetic metals are conventionally understood in terms of the Kohler rule, with violation usually viewed as anomalous electron transport, in particular, as evidence of non-Fermi liquid behavior. Measurement of the MR of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms. Consequently, the Kohler rule should not be used to distinguish normal and anomalous electron transport in solids.

  6. Tunnel magnetoresistance of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-10-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of diamondoids has been predicted by first principles density functional theory. Diamantane was used as a basic molecular proxy for diamondoids because hydrogen atoms in the apical position are easily substituted for a thiol group. The pristine diamantane exhibited a low TMR ratio of 7%, and boron-substitution considerably decreased the TMR ratio. Conversely, nitrogen-substitution enhanced the TMR ratio by up to 20%. Heteroatom-substitution changes the tunneling probabilities by varying the molecular bond lengths. Furthermore, when the spins of the electrodes are parallel, the heteroatoms resulted in transmittance probabilities at an energy range near the Fermi level. Consequently, heteroatom-substitution can control the TMR ratios of diamondoids very well.

  7. Anomalous magnetoresistance in Fibonacci multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L. D.; Bezerra, C. G.; Correa, M. A.; Chesman, C.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigated magnetoresistance curves in quasiperiodic magnetic multilayers for two different growth directions, namely, [110] and [100]. We considered identical ferromagnetic layers separated by nonmagnetic layers with two different thicknesses chosen based on the Fibonacci sequence. Using parameters for Fe/Cr multilayers, four terms were included in our description of the magnetic energy: Zeeman, cubic anisotropy, bilinear coupling, and biquadratic coupling. The minimum energy was determined by the gradient method and the equilibrium magnetization directions found were used to calculate magnetoresistance curves. By choosing spacers with a thickness such that biquadratic coupling is stronger than bilinear coupling, unusual behaviors for the magnetoresistance were observed: (i) for the [110] case, there is a different behavior for structures based on even and odd Fibonacci generations, and, more interesting, (ii) for the [100] case, we found magnetic field ranges for which the magnetoresistance increases with magnetic field.

  8. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  9. Magnetoresistive smart fluid (marsonpol) and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reji, John; Suresh, G.; Narayanadas, D. J.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetorheological fluid, Electrorheological fluid and ferro fluids are the smart fluids known today. These fluids are either electrically conductive or non conductive. They do not exhibit variable electrical resistance or switching behavior. Of recent interest to researchers has been the development of new types of magnetoresistive materials. Such materials can be of large practical importance, as they will change their electrical resistance in the presence of a magnetic field. However, most materials only exhibit appreciable magnetoresistance under extreme conditions, such as high magnetic fields or low temperatures. A smart fluid whose electrical resistance can be varied by several orders of magnitude under nominal level of magnetic field is reported in this paper (designated MARSONPOL). In the absence of a magnetic field the fluid is an insulator having electrical resistance in the order of 108 ohm-meter and in the presence of a magnetic field the resistance of the material reduces to less than 1 ohm-meter, at room temperature of 30°C. The sharp and reversible change in resistivity makes the material transform from an insulator to conductor, rendering properties characteristic of either state, within a fraction of a second. Fluids with such characteristics are not reported in the literature making this development a breakthrough and opening up potentials for the development of several smart devices. One such device is the magnetic field sensor probe currently under development at NPOL. A capsule of MARSONPOL forms the basic sensor element. Depending on the strength of the Magnetic field, the electrical resistivity of the capsule undergoes changes. The present paper will discuss details of the smart fluid as well as features of the magnetic field sensor.

  10. Anomalous magnetoresistance in the spinel superconductor LiTi2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K.; He, G.; Zhang, X.; Maruyama, S.; Yasui, S.; Suchoski, R.; Shin, J.; Jiang, Y.; Yu, H. S.; Yuan, J.; Shan, L.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Greene, R. L.; Takeuchi, I.

    2015-05-01

    LiTi2O4 is a unique compound in that it is the only known spinel oxide superconductor. The lack of high quality single crystals has thus far prevented systematic investigations of its transport properties. Here we report a careful study of transport and tunnelling spectroscopy in epitaxial LiTi2O4 thin films. An unusual magnetoresistance is observed which changes from nearly isotropic negative to prominently anisotropic positive as the temperature is decreased. We present evidence that shows that the negative magnetoresistance likely stems from the suppression of local spin fluctuations or spin-orbit scattering centres. The positive magnetoresistance suggests the presence of an orbital-related state, also supported by the fact that the superconducting energy gap decreases as a quadratic function of magnetic field. These observations indicate that the spin-orbital fluctuations play an important role in LiTi2O4 in a manner similar to high-temperature superconductors.

  11. Anomalous magnetoresistance in the spinel superconductor LiTi2O4.

    PubMed

    Jin, K; He, G; Zhang, X; Maruyama, S; Yasui, S; Suchoski, R; Shin, J; Jiang, Y; Yu, H S; Yuan, J; Shan, L; Kusmartsev, F V; Greene, R L; Takeuchi, I

    2015-05-20

    LiTi2O4 is a unique compound in that it is the only known spinel oxide superconductor. The lack of high quality single crystals has thus far prevented systematic investigations of its transport properties. Here we report a careful study of transport and tunnelling spectroscopy in epitaxial LiTi2O4 thin films. An unusual magnetoresistance is observed which changes from nearly isotropic negative to prominently anisotropic positive as the temperature is decreased. We present evidence that shows that the negative magnetoresistance likely stems from the suppression of local spin fluctuations or spin-orbit scattering centres. The positive magnetoresistance suggests the presence of an orbital-related state, also supported by the fact that the superconducting energy gap decreases as a quadratic function of magnetic field. These observations indicate that the spin-orbital fluctuations play an important role in LiTi2O4 in a manner similar to high-temperature superconductors.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic multilayered structures with giant magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskiy, D. E.

    2016-02-01

    Description of giant magnetoresistance effects in magnetic multilayered structures with the use of the anisotropic Heisenberg model for determination of magnetic properties of thin ferromagnetic films forming these structures is given. Monte Carlo simulations of magnetic properties for structures, which are constructed from two ferromagnetic films divided by nonmagnetic film, are carried out. The temperature and magnetic field dependencies are considered for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these structures. The calculation of the magnetoresistance is carried out for different thicknesses of the ferromagnetic films. It was shown, that the obtained temperature dependence for the magnetoresistance is agreed very well with experimental results, measured for the magnetic multilayered structures similar to structures, which are considered in our investigations.

  13. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  14. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, E.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green’s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  15. Origin of nonsaturating linear magnetoresistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Ferdinand; Ott, Christian; Weber, Heiko B.

    2017-01-01

    The observation of nonsaturating classical linear magnetoresistivity has been an enigmatic phenomenon in solid-state physics. We present a study of a two-dimensional ohmic conductor, including local Hall effect and a self-consistent consideration of the environment. An equivalent-circuit scheme delivers a simple and convincing argument why the magnetoresistivity is linear in strong magnetic field, provided that current and biasing electric field are misaligned by a nonlocal mechanism. A finite-element model of a two-dimensional conductor is suited to display the situations that create such deviating currents. Besides edge effects next to electrodes, charge carrier density fluctuations are efficiently generating this effect. However, mobility fluctuations that have frequently been related to linear magnetoresistivity are barely relevant. Despite its rare observation, linear magnetoresitivity is rather the rule than the exception in a regime of low charge carrier densities, misaligned current pathways and strong magnetic field.

  16. Using granular C0-AI2O3 spacer for optimization of functional parameters of the FeMn/Fe20Ni80 magnetoresistive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkovenko, A. N.; Lepalovskij, V. N.; Adanakova, O. A.; Vas'kovskiy, V. O.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we studied the possibility of tailoring the functional properties of the multilayer magnetoresistive medium with unidirectional anisotropy and the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect (AMR). Objects of the research were composite Co-Al2O3 films and Ta/Fe20Ni80/Fe50Mn50/Fe20Ni80/Co-Al2O3/Fe20Ni80/Ta multilayers structures obtained by magnetron sputtering and selectively subjected vacuum annealing. Structure, magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of the films in the temperature range 77÷440 K were investigated.

  17. Magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Kang, N.; Kong, W. J.; Hu, J. S.; Pan, Z. W.; Xie, S. S.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes bundles. At temperatures above 15 K, the magnetoresistance was found to follow exactly a scaling law as predicted by the theory of two-dimensional (2D) weak localization. Below 15 K, the 2D weak localization behavior is modified due to the formation of a Coulomb gap. This modification does not fit to those theories which treat electron-electron interaction as a perturbation. Altshular-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) resistance oscillation was observed in milli-Kelvin temperature range. The results will be discussed in terms of the interplay between electron-electron interaction and disorder scattering in multiwall carbon nanotube.

  18. Pure spin-Hall magnetoresistance in Rh/Y3Fe5O12 hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Shang, T.; Zhan, Q. F.; Ma, L.; Yang, H. L.; Zuo, Z. H.; Xie, Y. L.; Li, H. H.; Liu, L. P.; Wang, B. M.; Wu, Y. H.; Zhang, S.; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report an investigation of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and anomalous Hall resistance (AHR) of Rh and Pt thin films sputtered on epitaxial Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) ferromagnetic insulator films. For the Pt/YIG hybrid, large spin-Hall magne toresistance (SMR) along with a sizable conventional anisotropic magnetoresistance (CAMR) and a nontrivial temperature dependence of AHR were observed in the temperature range of 5–300 K. In contrast, a reduced SMR with negligible CAMR and AHR was found in Rh/YIG hybrid. Since CAMR and AHR are characteristics for all ferromagnetic metals, our results suggest that the Pt is likely magnetized by YIG due to the magnetic proximity effect (MPE) while Rh remains free of MPE. Thus the Rh/YIG hybrid could be an ideal model system to explore physics and devices associated with pure spin current. PMID:26639108

  19. Mobility controlled linear magnetoresistance with 3D anisotropy in a layered graphene pallet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Peng; He, Xin; Li, Jun; Wen, Yan; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-ming; Yang, Yang; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.; Zhang, Xixiang

    2016-10-01

    A bulk sample of pressed graphene sheets was prepared under hydraulic pressure (~150 MPa). The cross-section of the sample demonstrates a layered structure, which leads to 3D electrical transport properties with anisotropic mobility. The electrical transport properties of the sample were measured over a wide temperature (2-400 K) and magnetic field (-140 ~\\text{kOe}≤slant H≤slant 140 ~\\text{kOe} ) range. The magnetoresistance measured at a fixed temperature can be described by R≤ft(H,θ \\right)=R≤ft({{\\varepsilon}θ}H,0\\right) with {{\\varepsilon}θ}={≤ft({{\\cos}2}θ +{{γ-2}{{\\sin}2}θ \\right)}1/2} , where γ is the mobility anisotropy constant and θ is the angle between the normal of the sample plane and the magnetic field. The large linear magnetoresistance (up to 36.9% at 400 K and 140 kOe) observed at high fields is ascribed to a classical magnetoresistance caused by mobility fluctuation ( Δ μ ). The magnetoresistance value at 140 kOe was related to the average mobility ≤ft(< μ > \\right) because of the condition Δ μ << μ > . The carrier concentration remained constant and the temperature-dependent resistivity was proportional to the average mobility, as verified by Kohler’s rule. Anisotropic dephasing length was deduced from weak localization observed at low temperatures.

  20. Giant room-temperature magnetoresistance in single-crystal Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Shinji; Nagahama, Taro; Fukushima, Akio; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Ando, Koji

    2004-12-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is the key to developing magnetoresistive random-access-memory (MRAM), magnetic sensors and novel programmable logic devices. Conventional MTJs with an amorphous aluminium oxide tunnel barrier, which have been extensively studied for device applications, exhibit a magnetoresistance ratio up to 70% at room temperature. This low magnetoresistance seriously limits the feasibility of spintronics devices. Here, we report a giant MR ratio up to 180% at room temperature in single-crystal Fe/MgO/Fe MTJs. The origin of this enormous TMR effect is coherent spin-polarized tunnelling, where the symmetry of electron wave functions plays an important role. Moreover, we observed that their tunnel magnetoresistance oscillates as a function of tunnel barrier thickness, indicating that coherency of wave functions is conserved across the tunnel barrier. The coherent TMR effect is a key to making spintronic devices with novel quantum-mechanical functions, and to developing gigabit-scale MRAM.

  1. CPP magnetoresistance of magnetic multilayers: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jack

    2016-06-01

    review is designed to provide a history of how knowledge of CPP-MR parameters grew, to give credit for discoveries, to explain how combining theory and experiment has enabled extraction of quantitative information about these parameters, but also to make clear that progress was not always direct and to point out where disagreements still exist. To limit its length, the review considers only collinear orientations of the moments of adjacent F-layers. To aid readers looking for specific information, we have provided an extensive table of contents and a detailed summary. Together, these should help locate over 100 figures plus 17 tables that collect values of individual parameters. In 1997, CIP-MR replaced anisotropic MR (AMR) as the sensor in read heads of computer hard drives. In principle, the usually larger CPP-MR was a contender for the next generation read head sensor. But in 2003, CIP-MR was replaced by the even larger Tunneling MR (TMR), which has remained the read-head sensor ever since. However, as memory bits shrink to where the relatively large specific resistance AR of TMR gives too much noise and too large an R to impedance match as a read-head sensor, the door is again opened for CPP-MR. We will review progress in finding techniques and F-alloys and F/N pairs to enhance the CPP-MR, and will describe its present capabilities.

  2. Geometrically enhanced extraordinary magnetoresistance in semiconductor-metal hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, T. H.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2010-12-01

    Extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) arises in hybrid systems consisting of semiconducting material with an embedded metallic inclusion. We have investigated such systems with the use of finite-element modeling, with our results showing good agreement to existing experimental data. We show that this effect can be dramatically enhanced by over four orders of magnitude as a result of altering the geometry of the conducting region. The significance of this result lies in its potential application to EMR magnetic field sensors utilizing more familiar semiconducting materials with nonoptimum material parameters, such as silicon. Our model has been extended further with a geometry based on the microstructure of the silver chalcogenides, consisting of a randomly sized and positioned metallic network with interspersed droplets. This model has shown a large and quasilinear magnetoresistance analogous to experimental findings.

  3. Anisotropic universe with anisotropic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra; Thakur, Snigdha E-mail: sukanta@iiserb.ac.in E-mail: snigdha@iiserb.ac.in

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the state space of a Bianchi-I universe with anisotropic sources. Here we consider an extended state space which includes null geodesics in this background. The evolution equations for all the state observables are derived. Dynamical systems approach is used to study the evolution of these equations. The asymptotic stable fixed points for all the evolution equations are found. We also check our analytic results with numerical analysis of these dynamical equations. The evolution of the state observables are studied both in cosmic time and using a dimensionless time variable. Then we repeat the same analysis with a more realistic scenario, adding the isotropic (dust like dark) matter and a cosmological constant (dark energy) to our anisotropic sources, to study their co-evolution. The universe now approaches a de Sitter space asymptotically dominated by the cosmological constant. The cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps due to shear are also generated in this scenario, assuming that the universe contains anisotropic matter along with the usual (dark) matter and vacuum (dark) energy since decoupling. We find that they contribute dominantly to the CMB quadrupole. We also constrain the current level of anisotropy and also search for any cosmic preferred axis present in the data. We use the Union 2 Supernovae data to this extent. An anisotropy axis close to the mirror symmetry axis seen in the cosmic microwave background data from Planck probe is found.

  4. Optimization of magneto-resistive response of ion-irradiated exchange biased films through zigzag arrangement of magnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; McCord, Jeffrey; Langer, Manuel; Fassbender, Jürgen; Mönch, Ingolf; Mattheis, Roland

    2014-03-14

    Exchange coupled ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}/Ir{sub 23}Mn{sub 77} films with a zigzag alignment of magnetization are prepared by local ion irradiation. The anisotropic magneto-resistive behavior of the magnetic thin film structures is correlated to the magnetic structure and modeled. A unique uniaxial field sensitivity along the net magnetization alignment is obtained through the orthogonally modulated and magnetic domain wall stabilized magnetic ground state. Controlling local thin film magnetization distributions and, thus, the overall magnetization response opens unique ways to tailor the magneto-resistive sensitivity of functional magnetic thin film devices.

  5. Anisotropic magnetotransport in Dirac-Weyl magnetic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ominato, Yuya; Kobayashi, Koji; Nomura, Kentaro

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically study the anisotropic magnetotransport in Dirac-Weyl magnetic junctions where a doped ferromagnetic Weyl semimetal is sandwiched between doped Dirac semimetals. We calculate the conductance using the Landauer formula and find that the system exhibits extraordinarily large anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The AMR depends on the ratio of the Fermi energy to the strength of the exchange interaction. The origin of the AMR is the shift of the Fermi surface in the Weyl semimetal, and the mechanism is completely different from the conventional AMR originating from the spin dependent scattering and the spin-orbit interaction.

  6. Giant magnetoresistance materials for magnetic recording technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.; Adams, C.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work focused on a class of transition-metal-oxide (TMO) materials (LaMnO{sub 3} doped with Ca, Ba, or Sr) that exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition near a ferromagnetic phase transition temperature. This yields a very large magnetoresistance; thus these materials may have important uses as magnetic sensors in a variety of applications, ranging from automobiles to read heads for magnetic storage. In addition, the transport current in the ferromagnetic state is likely to be very highly polarized, which means that additional device applications using the phenomena of spin-polarized tunneling can be envisioned. Use of these materials as magnetic sensors depends upon learning to control the synthesis parameters (principally temperature, pressure and composition) to achieve a specific carrier concentration and/or mobility. A second challenge is the high magnetic fields ({ge}1 Tesla) currently required to achieve a large change in resistance. The authors began an investigation of two novel approaches to this field-sensitivity problem, involving the development of multilayer structures of the TMO materials. Finally, they began to explore the use of epitaxial strain as a means of changing the transport properties in thin-film multilayers.

  7. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  8. Magic angle effects and angular magnetoresistance oscillations as dimensional crossovers.

    PubMed

    Lebed, A G; Bagmet, N N; Naughton, M J

    2004-10-08

    Interference effects between velocity and density of states, which occur as electrons move along open orbits in the extended Brillouin zone in anisotropic conductors, result in a change of wave functions' dimensionality at magic angle (MA) directions of a magnetic field. In particular, these 1D-->2D dimensional crossovers result in the appearance of sharp minima in a resistivity component rho perpendicular (H,alpha), perpendicular to conducting layers. This explains the main qualitative features of MA and angular magnetoresistance oscillations' phenomena observed due to the existence of quasi-one-dimensional sheets of Fermi surface in (TMTSF)2X, (DMET-TSeF)2X, and kappa-(ET)2Cu(NCS)(2) conductors.

  9. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobaut, B.; Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Rafaqat, H.; Roddaro, S.; Rossi, G.; Panaccione, G.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.; Torelli, P.

    2015-12-01

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe1-xGax) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude.

  10. Giant Magnetoresistive Biochips for Biomarker Detection and Genotyping: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shan X.

    2008-06-01

    Giant magnetoresistive biochips based on spin valve sensor arrays and magnetic nanoparticle labels have been successfully applied to the detection of biological events in the form of both protein and DNA assays with great speed, sensitivity, selectivity and economy. The technology is highly scalable to deep multiplex detection of biomarkers in a complex disease, and amenable to integration of microfluidics and CMOS electronics for portable applications. The results suggest that a magneto-nano biochip holds great promises in biomedicine, particularly for point of care molecular diagnostics of cancer, infectious diseases, radiation injury, cardiac and other diseases.

  11. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films: dependence on Pt thickness and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiufeng; Dai, Zhiwen; Huang, Lin; Lu, Guangduo; Liu, Min; Piao, Hongguang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Yu, Seong-cho; Pan, Liqing

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the temperature and the Pt layer thickness dependence of the magnetoresistances (MRs) in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films. Based on the field dependent measurements, it can be seen that the spin-current-induced spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) plays the dominant role in the MRs in the Co2FeSi/Pt bilayers in the whole temperature range. Meanwhile, a quite small part of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) existed in the MRs. It proved to be originated from magnetic proximity effect (MPE) by measuring the Pt thickness and temperature dependence of the AMR. Moreover, the Co2FeSi layer thickness has much weaker effect on the SMR and AMR compared to the Pt layer thickness. These results indicate that the Co2FeSi/Pt interface is beneficial to be used in the spin-current-induced physical phenomena.

  12. Quantum criticality and DBI magneto-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiritsis, Elias; Li, Li

    2017-03-01

    We use the DBI action from string theory and holography to study the magneto-resistance at quantum criticality with hyperscaling violation. We find and analyze a rich class of scaling behaviors for the magneto-resistance. A special case describes the scaling results found in pnictides by Hayers et al in 2014 (arXiv:1412.6484).

  13. Static Magnetic Properties of Films Measured by Means of Angular Perturbative Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Alexandre; Melo, Abner; da Costa, Ricardo; Chesman, Carlos

    In this work we introduced a new technique to measure magnetic anisotropies and magnetoelectrical properties, such as Anisotropic Magnetoresistance (AMR) and Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) amplitudes. The Perturbative Magnetoresistance (PMR) consist of a regular collinear four probe magnetoresistance set up with an AC magnetic field (hac) applied perpendicular to the DC (Hdc) one. hac amplitude is about 1.0 Oe and oscillate at 270 Hz. We successfully interpreted the signal response from the voltage measured by lock-in amplifier and proposed a model based on energy minimization to extract magnetic anisotropies, AMR and GMR amplitudes. Measuring the in-plane angular dependency of PMR signal we were able to identify the usual magnetic anisotropy, such as uniaxial, unidirectional and cubic. Taking into account the perturbative nature of this technique (small hac amplitude and low frequency), we argue that angular PMR can be used to investigate some dynamic magnetic effects where static technique can not provide such information. A distinct feature of angular PMR is the capability to be used in saturated and non-saturated regime, so revealing magnetic properties dependency on applied field strength. We addressed the Rotatable Anisotropy as an example in this work.

  14. Enhanced Magnetoresistance in Molecular Junctions by Geometrical Optimization of Spin-Selective Orbital Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rakhmilevitch, David; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Bitton, Ora; Kronik, Leeor; Tal, Oren

    2016-03-09

    Molecular junctions based on ferromagnetic electrodes allow the study of electronic spin transport near the limit of spintronics miniaturization. However, these junctions reveal moderate magnetoresistance that is sensitive to the orbital structure at their ferromagnet-molecule interfaces. The key structural parameters that should be controlled in order to gain high magnetoresistance have not been established, despite their importance for efficient manipulation of spin transport at the nanoscale. Here, we show that single-molecule junctions based on nickel electrodes and benzene molecules can yield a significant anisotropic magnetoresistance of up to ∼200% near the conductance quantum G0. The measured magnetoresistance is mechanically tuned by changing the distance between the electrodes, revealing a nonmonotonic response to junction elongation. These findings are ascribed with the aid of first-principles calculations to variations in the metal-molecule orientation that can be adjusted to obtain highly spin-selective orbital hybridization. Our results demonstrate the important role of geometrical considerations in determining the spin transport properties of metal-molecule interfaces.

  15. Rashba-Edelstein Magnetoresistance in Metallic Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Kanno, Yusuke; An, Hongyu; Tashiro, Takaharu; Haku, Satoshi; Nomura, Akiyo; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of magnetoresistance originating from Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in a metallic heterostructure: the Rashba-Edelstein (RE) magnetoresistance. We show that the simultaneous action of the direct and inverse RE effects in a Bi /Ag /CoFeB trilayer couples current-induced spin accumulation to the electric resistance. The electric resistance changes with the magnetic-field angle, reminiscent of the spin Hall magnetoresistance, despite the fact that bulk SOC is not responsible for the magnetoresistance. We further found that, even when the magnetization is saturated, the resistance increases with increasing the magnetic-field strength, which is attributed to the Hanle magnetoresistance in this system.

  16. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Janssen, P.; van der Heijden, E. H. M.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2010-09-01

    To identify the microscopic mechanisms of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), the dependency on the frequency of the applied magnetic field is explored, which consists of a dc and ac component. The measured magnetoconductance decreases when the frequency is increased. The decrease is stronger for lower voltages, which is shown to be linked to the presence of a negative capacitance, as measured with admittance spectroscopy. The negative capacitance disappears when the frequency becomes comparable to the inverse transit time of the minority carriers. These results are in agreement with recent interpretations that magnetic field effects on minority carrier mobility dominate OMAR.

  17. Large linear magnetoresistance in a transition-metal stannide β-RhSn4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, X. Z.; Xu, C. Q.; Zhou, N.; Li, B.; Zhang, Jinglei; Shi, Z. X.; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Materials exhibiting large magnetoresistance may not only be of fundamental research interest, but also can lead to wide-ranging applications in magnetic sensors and switches. Here we demonstrate a large linear-in-field magnetoresistance, Δρ/ρ reaching as high as ˜600% at 2 K under a 9 T field, in the tetragonal phase of a transition-metal stannide β-RhSn4. Detailed analyses show that its magnetic responses are overall inconsistent with the classical model based on the multiple electron scattering by mobility fluctuations in an inhomogenous conductor, but rather in line with the quantum effects due to the presence of Dirac-like dispersions in the electronic structure. Our results may help guiding the future quest for quantum magnetoresistive materials into the family of stannides, similar to the role played by PtSn4 with topological node arcs.

  18. Room temperature giant and linear magnetoresistance in topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-29

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi(2)Te(3) topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  19. Room Temperature Giant and Linear Magnetoresistance in Topological Insulator Bi2Te3 Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi2Te3 topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  20. Magnetotransport in metal/insulating-ferromagnet heterostructures: Spin Hall magnetoresistance or magnetic proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Ma, L.; Shi, Z.; Fan, W. J.; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Evans, R. F. L.; Zhou, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the anomalous Hall-like effect (AHLE) and the effective anisotropic magnetoresistance (EAMR) in antiferromagnetic γ -IrMn3/Y3Fe5O12(YIG ) and Pt/YIG heterostructures. For γ -IrMn3/YIG , the EAMR and the AHLE resistivity change sign with temperature due to the competition between the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and the magnetic proximity effect (MPE) induced by the interfacial antiferromagnetic uncompensated magnetic moment. In contrast, for Pt/YIG, the AHLE resistivity changes sign with temperature whereas no sign change is observed in the EAMR. This is because the MPE and the SMR play a dominant role in the AHLE and the EAMR, respectively. As different types of galvanomagnetic properties, the AHLE and the EAMR have proved vital in disentangling the MPE and the SMR in metal/insulating-ferromagnet heterostructures.

  1. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Polymer and the Correlated Anomalous Magnetoresistance Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinsong; Yang, Bin; Shield, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) has been observed in organic semiconductor devices where resistance can change in a relatively small external magnetic field at room temperature. Since a weak magnetic field is involved, the hyperfine interaction (HFI) is employed to explain OMAR in the reported literatures. None of these issues consider the magnetic properties of the organic semiconductors themselves. However, the we recently discovered that polymer semiconductors, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT, can have room temperature (RT) ferromagnetic properties in their crystalline phase and when mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Here, we will report the possible correlation between the ferromagnetic property of the P3HT:PCBM and anomalous OMAR phenomenon including the anisotropic and hysteretic OMAR behavior. The magnetic property of the polymer including the anisotropic and photo induced change of magnetism will be also discussed to explore the possible mechanism of the room temperature ferromagnetism.~ This work is partially supported by the NSF MRSEC program at University.

  2. Viscous magnetoresistance of correlated electron liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, Alex; Xie, Hong-Yi; Andreev, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    We develop a theory of magnetoresistance of two-dimensional electron systems in a smooth disorder potential in the hydrodynamic regime. Our theory applies to two-dimensional semiconductor structures with strongly correlated carriers when the mean free path due to electron-electron collisions is sufficiently short. The dominant contribution to magnetoresistance arises from the modification of the flow pattern by the Lorentz force, rather than the magnetic field dependence of the kinetic coefficients of the electron liquid. The resulting magnetoresistance is positive and quadratic at weak fields. Although the resistivity is governed by both the viscosity and thermal conductivity of the electron fluid, the magnetoresistance is controlled by the viscosity only. This enables the extraction of viscosity of the electron liquid from magnetotransport measurements.

  3. Magnetoresistance in inhomogeneous graphene/metal hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moktadir, Zakaria; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We investigate extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) of inhomogeneous graphene-metal hybrids using finite element modelling. Inhomogeneous graphene is a binary system made of electron and hole puddles. Two geometries of the embedded metallic structure were considered: circular and fishbone geometries. We found that the breaking of graphene into charge puddles weakens the magnetoresistance of the hybrid system compared to a homogeneous graphene-metal system. For a fixed value of the magnetic field, the magnetoresistance increases with decreasing area fraction occupied by electrons puddles. Fishbone geometry showed an enhanced magnetoresistance compared to circular geometry. The EMR is also investigated as a function of the contact resistance for the fishbone geometry where it was found that a minimal contact resistance is essential to obtain enhanced EMR in graphene-metal hybrid devices.

  4. Competing Mechanisms in Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Bert

    2013-03-01

    A surprisingly large ``organic magnetoresistance'' (OMAR) has been found in both polymers and small molecule organic semiconductors at relatively small applied magnetic fields (~ 5 mT) and at room temperature. Unlike spin-injection devices, where the occurrence of a finite spin polarization of the current is essential for measuring a finite magnetoresistance, OMAR is generally considered to be due to spin correlations between spin carrying particles in the organic material. Although the microscopic mechanisms of hyperfine field induced spin mixing are relatively well understood, it is still intensively debated which particles are involved and how they can affect the current in such a drastic manner. In this presentation recent developments and new insights as to the underlying physics are discussed. Quantitative models will be introduced, based on different pairs of particles and mechanisms, and giving rise to effects at a variety of field scales. It will be discussed how specific device physics causes a non-trivial relation between microscopic spin-dependent reactions and macroscopic device behaviour. Finally, it will be shown how comprehensive studies on especially engineered organic systems, including polymer-fullerene blends and molecular doping, can be used to pinpoint the relevance of different mechanisms in the complementary regimes. The experimentally observed linewidth, sign and amplitude of both ``high-field'' (>100 mT) and ``low-field'' (~ 5 mT) effects, as well as their bias voltage dependence display very pronounced features as a function of fullerene doping. They provide unique fingerprints for which mechanism is of relevance. After careful analysis, this allows for identification of three earlier proposed mechanisms, involving exciton-charge, electron-hole and bipolaron (polarons of like charge) reactions. Present activities are aiming at using this insight for tailoring OMAR response by design.

  5. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  6. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-tao; Tian, Yu-feng; Yan, Shi-shen; Lin, Zhao-jun; Kang, Shi-shou; Chen, Yan-xue; Liu, Guo-lei; Mei, Liang-mo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices. PMID:26387967

  7. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  8. Organic magnetoresistance based on hopping theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fu-Jiang; Xie, Shi-Jie

    2014-09-01

    For the organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect, we suggest a spin-related hopping of carriers (polarons) based on Marcus theory. The mobility of polarons is calculated with the master equation (ME) and then the magnetoresistance (MR) is obtained. The theoretical results are consistent with the experimental observation. Especially, the sign inversion of the MR under different driving bias voltages found in the experiment is predicted. Besides, the effects of molecule disorder, hyperfine interaction (HFI), polaron localization, and temperature on the MR are investigated.

  9. Giant magnetoresistance through a single molecule.

    PubMed

    Schmaus, Stefan; Bagrets, Alexei; Nahas, Yasmine; Yamada, Toyo K; Bork, Annika; Bowen, Martin; Beaurepaire, Eric; Evers, Ferdinand; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2011-03-01

    Magnetoresistance is a change in the resistance of a material system caused by an applied magnetic field. Giant magnetoresistance occurs in structures containing ferromagnetic contacts separated by a metallic non-magnetic spacer, and is now the basis of read heads for hard drives and for new forms of random access memory. Using an insulator (for example, a molecular thin film) rather than a metal as the spacer gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance, which typically produces a larger change in resistance for a given magnetic field strength, but also yields higher resistances, which are a disadvantage for real device operation. Here, we demonstrate giant magnetoresistance across a single, non-magnetic hydrogen phthalocyanine molecule contacted by the ferromagnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We measure the magnetoresistance to be 60% and the conductance to be 0.26G(0), where G(0) is the quantum of conductance. Theoretical analysis identifies spin-dependent hybridization of molecular and electrode orbitals as the cause of the large magnetoresistance.

  10. Frequency dependence of magnetoresistance in MEH-PPV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdem Djidjou, Thaddee; Nguyen, Tho; Valy Vardeny, Z.; Rogachev, Andrey

    2012-02-01

    The organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) made of MEH-PPV was investigated by means of DC transport and the admittance spectroscopy in the range of 1 Hz to 10 MHz at room temperature. The measurements were carried out on unipolar and bipolar OLEDs made of pristine MEH-PPV as well as MEH-PPV with traps introduced by the UV light irradiation. We found that in bipolar, UV-exposed OLEDs, the magnitude of magnetoresistance effect in real part of admittance increases with DC bias, reaches very high value of 35 % (in the field 30mT) at bias 4.8 V and decreases at higher bias voltages. Also, we observed that the cutoff frequency of OMAR effect monotonically increases with DC bias voltage. The cutoff has extrinsic origin and is likely caused by a dissipative process related to the reorientation of permanent dipoles. At the highest tested bias voltage 6.7 V, we were able to detect the OMAR at the highest frequency of our system, 10 MHz. We have found that imaginary part of the admittance is also affected by magnetic field. The effect of magnetic field on dynamical capacitance of the device at low frequencies is very strong and opens up a possibility of using these devices as magnetic field sensors.

  11. Magnetoresistance Behavior of Conducting Filaments in Resistive-Switching NiO with Different Resistance States.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Diyang; Qiao, Shuang; Luo, Yuxiang; Chen, Aitian; Zhang, Pengfei; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Zhong; Guo, Minghua; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Wu, Jian; Luo, Jianlin; Li, Jianqi; Kokado, Satoshi; Wang, Yayu; Zhao, Yonggang

    2017-03-29

    The resistive switching (RS) effect in various materials has attracted much attention due to its interesting physics and potential for applications. NiO is an important system and its RS effect has been generally explained by the formation/rupture of Ni-related conducting filaments. These filaments are unique since they are formed by an electroforming process, so it is interesting to explore their magnetoresistance (MR) behavior, which can also shed light on unsolved issues such as the nature of the filaments and their evolution in the RS process, and this behavior is also important for multifunctional devices. Here, we focus on MR behavior in NiO RS films with different resistance states. Rich and interesting MR behaviors have been observed, including the normal and anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, which provide new insights into the nature of the filaments and their evolution in the RS process. First-principles calculation reveals the essential role of oxygen migration into the filaments during the RESET process and can account for the experimental results. Our work provides a new avenue for exploration of the conducting filaments in resistive switching materials and is significant for understanding the mechanism of RS effect and multifunctional devices.

  12. Tunneling magnetoresistive heads for magnetic data storage.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sining

    2007-01-01

    Spintronics is emerging to be a new form of nanotechnologies, which utilizes not only the charge but also spin degree of freedom of electrons. Spin-dependent tunneling transport is one of the many kinds of physical phenomena involving spintronics, which has already found industrial applications. In this paper, we first provide a brief review on the basic physics and materials for magnetic tunnel junctions, followed more importantly by a detailed coverage on the application of magnetic tunneling devices in magnetic data storage. The use of tunneling magnetoresistive reading heads has helped to maintain a fast growth of areal density, which is one of the key advantages of hard disk drives as compared to solid-state memories. This review is focused on the first commercial tunneling magnetoresistive heads in the industry at an areal density of 80 approximately 100 Gbit/in2 for both laptop and desktop Seagate hard disk drive products using longitudinal media. The first generation tunneling magnetoresistive products utilized a bottom stack of tunnel junctions and an abutted hard bias design. The output signal amplitude of these heads was 3 times larger than that of comparable giant magnetoresistive devices, resulting in a 0.6 decade bit error rate gain over the latter. This has enabled high component and drive yields. Due to the improved thermal dissipation of vertical geometry, the tunneling magnetoresistive head runs cooler with a better lifetime performance, and has demonstrated similar electrical-static-discharge robustness as the giant magnetoresistive devices. It has also demonstrated equivalent or better process and wafer yields compared to the latter. The tunneling magnetoresistive heads are proven to be a mature and capable reader technology. Using the same head design in conjunction with perpendicular recording media, an areal density of 274 Gbit/in2 has been demonstrated, and advanced tunneling magnetoresistive heads can reach 311 Gbit/in2. Today, the

  13. Classical and quantum routes to linear magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jingshi

    The transverse, positive magnetoresistance of suitably doped silver chalcogenides and indium antimonides changes linearly with magnetic field by thousands of percent, with no sign of saturation up to MegaGauss. A precise characterization of these unexpected observations has led to two very different, yet equally interesting magnetotransport mechanisms: the classical inhomogeneity-induced current jetting, and quantum linear magnetoresistance. The inhomogeneous distribution of excess/deficient silver atoms lies behind the anomalous magnetoresistive response of silver chalcogenides, introducing spatial conductivity fluctuations with length scales independent of the cyclotron radius. We show that a systematic investigation of the resistivity tensor in longitudinal field could be used to identify the spatial inhomogeneities and determine the associated length scale of the current distortion. By contrast, the linear magnetoresistance observed in single-crystalline InSb presents a spectacular manifestation of magnetotransport in the extreme quantum limit, when only one Landau band is partially filled. Harnessing both the classical and quantum effects opens the gate to artificial fabrication of conducting networks with micron scale unit size for enhanced magnetoresistive sensitivity.

  14. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance and quantum oscillations in high-mobility semimetal LuPtBi.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guizhou; Hou, Zhipeng; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Enke; Xi, X; Xu, Feng; Wu, Guangheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Wang, Wenhong

    2017-03-14

    The recent discovery of ultrahigh mobility and large positive magnetoresistance in topologically non-trivial Half-Heusler semimetal LuPtBi provides a unique playground for studying exotic physics and significant perspective for device applications. As an fcc-structured electron-hole-compensated semimetal, LuPtBi theoretically exhibits six symmetrically arranged anisotropic electron Fermi pockets and two nearly-spherical hole pockets, offering the opportunity to explore the physics of Fermi surface with a simple angle-related magnetotransport properties. In this work, through the angle-dependent transverse magnetoresistance measurements, in combination with high-field SdH quantum oscillations, we achieved to map out a Fermi surface with six anisotropic pockets in the high-temperature and low-field regime, and furthermore, identify a possible magnetic field driven Fermi surface change at lower temperatures. Reasons account for the Fermi surface change in LuPtBi are discussed in terms of the field-induced electron evacuation due to Landau quantization.

  15. Magnetic and magnetoresistance studies of nanometric electrodeposited Co films and Co/Cu layered structures: Influence of magnetic layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsurzsa, S.; Péter, L.; Kiss, L. F.; Bakonyi, I.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic properties and the magnetoresistance behavior were investigated for electrodeposited nanoscale Co films, Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with individual Co layer thicknesses ranging from 1 nm to 20 nm. The measured saturation magnetization values confirmed that the nominal and actual layer thicknesses are in fairly good agreement. All three types of layered structure exhibited anisotropic magnetoresistance for thick magnetic layers whereas the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with thinner magnetic layers exhibited giant magnetoresistance (GMR), the GMR magnitude being the largest for the thinnest Co layers. The decreasing values of the relative remanence and the coercive field when reducing the Co layer thickness down to below about 3 nm indicated the presence of superparamagnetic (SPM) regions in the magnetic layers which could be more firmly evidenced for these samples by a decomposition of the magnetoresistance vs. field curves into a ferromagnetic and an SPM contribution. For thicker magnetic layers, the dependence of the coercivity (Hc) on magnetic layer thickness (d) could be described for each of the layered structure types by the usual equation Hc=Hco+a/dn with an exponent around n=1. The common value of n suggests a similar mechanism for the magnetization reversal by domain wall motion in all three structure types and hints also at the absence of coupling between magnetic layers in the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers.

  16. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface.

  17. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Gobaut, B.; Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Panaccione, G.; Torelli, P.; Rafaqat, H.; Roddaro, S.; Rossi, G.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.

    2015-12-15

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude.

  18. Strong anisotropic thermal conductivity of monolayer WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinlong; Chen, Yani; Han, Zheng; Li, Wu

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) has attracted increasing attention due to its large magnetoresistance and pressure-induced superconductivity. In this work, we investigate the thermal conductivity (κ) of monolayer WTe2 by performing first-principles calculations, and find strong anisotropic κ with predicted room-temperature values of 9 and 20 W m-1 K-1 along two principal lattice directions, respectively. Such strong anisotropy suggests the importance of orientation when engineering thermal-related applications based on WTe2. The anisotropy of κ is attributed to the in-plane linear acoustic phonon branches, while the out-of-plane quadratic acoustic phonon branch is almost isotropic. The size dependence of κ shows that the size effect can persists up to 10 μm, and the anisotropy decreases with decreasing sample size due to the suppression of low-frequency anisotropic phonons by boundary scattering.

  19. Dynamic Vehicle Detection via the Use of Magnetic Field Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Markevicius, Vytautas; Navikas, Dangirutis; Zilys, Mindaugas; Andriukaitis, Darius; Valinevicius, Algimantas; Cepenas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-01

    The vehicle detection process plays the key role in determining the success of intelligent transport management system solutions. The measurement of distortions of the Earth’s magnetic field using magnetic field sensors served as the basis for designing a solution aimed at vehicle detection. In accordance with the results obtained from research into process modeling and experimentally testing all the relevant hypotheses an algorithm for vehicle detection using the state criteria was proposed. Aiming to evaluate all of the possibilities, as well as pros and cons of the use of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) sensors in the transport flow control process, we have performed a series of experiments with various vehicles (or different series) from several car manufacturers. A comparison of 12 selected methods, based on either the process of determining the peak signal values and their concurrence in time whilst calculating the delay, or by measuring the cross-correlation of these signals, was carried out. It was established that the relative error can be minimized via the Z component cross-correlation and Kz criterion cross-correlation methods. The average relative error of vehicle speed determination in the best case did not exceed 1.5% when the distance between sensors was set to 2 m. PMID:26797615

  20. Dynamic Vehicle Detection via the Use of Magnetic Field Sensors.

    PubMed

    Markevicius, Vytautas; Navikas, Dangirutis; Zilys, Mindaugas; Andriukaitis, Darius; Valinevicius, Algimantas; Cepenas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-19

    The vehicle detection process plays the key role in determining the success of intelligent transport management system solutions. The measurement of distortions of the Earth's magnetic field using magnetic field sensors served as the basis for designing a solution aimed at vehicle detection. In accordance with the results obtained from research into process modeling and experimentally testing all the relevant hypotheses an algorithm for vehicle detection using the state criteria was proposed. Aiming to evaluate all of the possibilities, as well as pros and cons of the use of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) sensors in the transport flow control process, we have performed a series of experiments with various vehicles (or different series) from several car manufacturers. A comparison of 12 selected methods, based on either the process of determining the peak signal values and their concurrence in time whilst calculating the delay, or by measuring the cross-correlation of these signals, was carried out. It was established that the relative error can be minimized via the Z component cross-correlation and Kz criterion cross-correlation methods. The average relative error of vehicle speed determination in the best case did not exceed 1.5% when the distance between sensors was set to 2 m.

  1. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  2. Giant Magnetoresistive Biochip for DNA Detection and HPV Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Yu, Heng; Akhras, Michael S.; Han, Shu-Jen; Osterfeld, Sebastian; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2008-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biochip based on spin valve sensor array and magnetic nanoparticle labels was developed for inexpensive, sensitive and reliable DNA detection. The DNA targets detected in this experiment were PCR products amplified from Human Papillomavirus (HPV) plasmids. The concentrations of the target DNA after PCR were around 10 nM in most cases, but concentrations of 10 pM were also detectable, which is demonstrated by experiments with artificial DNA samples. A mild but highly specific surface chemistry was used for probe oligonucleotide immobilization. Double modulation technique was used for signal detection in order to reduce the 1/f noise in the sensor. Twelve assays were performed with an accuracy of approximately 90%. Magnetic signals were consistent with particle coverage data measured with Scanning Electron Microscopy. More recent research on microfluidics showed the potential of reducing the assay time below one hour. This is the first demonstration of magnetic DNA detection using plasmid-derived samples. This study provides a direct proof that GMR sensors can be used for biomedical applications. PMID:18457945

  3. Electromotive force and huge magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam Hai; Ohya, Shinobu; Tanaka, Masaaki; Barnes, Stewart E; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2009-03-26

    The electromotive force (e.m.f.) predicted by Faraday's law reflects the forces acting on the charge, -e, of an electron moving through a device or circuit, and is proportional to the time derivative of the magnetic field. This conventional e.m.f. is usually absent for stationary circuits and static magnetic fields. There are also forces that act on the spin of an electron; it has been recently predicted that, for circuits that are in part composed of ferromagnetic materials, there arises an e.m.f. of spin origin even for a static magnetic field. This e.m.f. can be attributed to a time-varying magnetization of the host material, such as the motion of magnetic domains in a static magnetic field, and reflects the conversion of magnetic to electrical energy. Here we show that such an e.m.f. can indeed be induced by a static magnetic field in magnetic tunnel junctions containing zinc-blende-structured MnAs quantum nanomagnets. The observed e.m.f. operates on a timescale of approximately 10(2)-10(3) seconds and results from the conversion of the magnetic energy of the superparamagnetic MnAs nanomagnets into electrical energy when these magnets undergo magnetic quantum tunnelling. As a consequence, a huge magnetoresistance of up to 100,000 per cent is observed for certain bias voltages. Our results strongly support the contention that, in magnetic nanostructures, Faraday's law of induction must be generalized to account for forces of purely spin origin. The huge magnetoresistance and e.m.f. may find potential applications in high sensitivity magnetic sensors, as well as in new active devices such as 'spin batteries'.

  4. Angular dependence of the magnetoresistance below T c of epitaxial Bi 2Sr 2CuO y thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifi, H.; Li, Z. Z.; Megtert, S.; Raffy, H.; Laborde, O.; Monceau, P.

    1994-12-01

    Magnetoresistance of high quality epitaxial Bi 2Sr 2CuO y thin films has been measured for temperatures below T c (1.5Kanisotropic Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O y phase. The behavior with the magnetic field perpendicular to the CuO 2 planes is briefly discussed.

  5. Anisotropic Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarfoth, Ryan Gordon

    Anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces are a group of planar materials that can be modeled by the tensor impedance boundary condition. This boundary condition relates the electric and magnetic field components on a surface using a 2x2 tensor. The advantage of using the tensor impedance boundary condition, and by extension anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces, is that the method allows large and complex structures to be modeled quickly and accurately using a planar boundary condition. This thesis presents the theory of anisotropic impedance surfaces and multiple applications. Anisotropic impedance surfaces are a generalization of scalar impedance surfaces. Unlike the scalar version, anisotropic impedance surfaces have material properties that are dependent on the polarization and wave vector of electromagnetic radiation that interacts with the surface. This allows anisotropic impedance surfaces to be used for applications that scalar surfaces cannot achieve. Three of these applications are presented in this thesis. The first is an anisotropic surface wave waveguide which allows propagation in one direction, but passes radiation in the orthogonal direction without reflection. The second application is a surface wave beam shifter which splits a surface wave beam in two directions and reduces the scattering from an object placed on the surface. The third application is a patterned surface which can alter the scattered radiation pattern of a rectangular shape. For each application, anisotropic impedance surfaces are constructed using periodic unit cells. These unit cells are designed to give the desired surface impedance characteristics by modifying a patterned metallic patch on a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple unit cell geometries are analyzed in order to find the setup with the best performance in terms of impedance characteristics and frequency bandwidth.

  6. Magnetoresistive system with concentric ferromagnetic asymmetric nanorings

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, J. I. Tumelero, M. A.; Pasa, A. A.; Viegas, A. D. C.

    2015-03-14

    A structure consisting of two concentric asymmetric nanorings, each displaying vortex remanent states, is studied with micromagnetic calculations. By orienting in suitable directions, both the asymmetry of the rings and a uniform magnetic field, the vortices chiralities can be switched from parallel to antiparallel, obtaining in this way the analogue of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations found in bar magnets pairs. Conditions on the thickness of single rings to obtain vortex states, as well as formulas for their remanent magnetization are given. The concentric ring structure enables the creation of magnetoresistive systems comprising the qualities of magnetic nanorings, such as low stray fields and high stability. A possible application is as contacts in spin injection in semiconductors, and estimations obtained here of magnetoresistance change for a cylindrical spin injection based device show significant variations comparable to linear geometries.

  7. Dirac State in Giant Magnetoresistive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Jo, N. H.; Ochi, M.; Huang, L.; Mou, D.; Kong, T.; Mun, E.; Wang, L.; Lee, Y.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Trivedi, N.; Arito, R.; Kaminski, A.

    We use ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the electronic properties of materials that recently were discovered to display titanic magnetoresistance. We find that that several of these materials have Dirac-like features in their band structure. In some materials those features are ``ordinary'' Dirac cones, while in others the linear Dirac dispersion of two crossing bands forms a linear object in 3D momentum space. Our observation poses an important question about the role of Dirac dispersion in the unusually high, non-saturating magnetoresistance of these materials. Research was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358; Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation EPiQS Initiative (Grant No. GBMF4411); CEM, a NSF MRSEC, under Grant No. DMR-1420451.

  8. Anisotropic Nanoparticles and Anisotropic Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Nathan D; Vartanian, Ariane M; Abadeer, Nardine S; Grzincic, Elissa M; Jacob, Lisa M; Lin, Wayne; Li, Ji; Dennison, Jordan M; Hinman, Joshua G; Murphy, Catherine J

    2016-02-18

    Anisotropic nanoparticles are powerful building blocks for materials engineering. Unusual properties emerge with added anisotropy-often to an extraordinary degree-enabling countless new applications. For bottom-up assembly, anisotropy is crucial for programmability; isotropic particles lack directional interactions and can self-assemble only by basic packing rules. Anisotropic particles have long fascinated scientists, and their properties and assembly behavior have been the subjects of many theoretical studies over the years. However, only recently has experiment caught up with theory. We have begun to witness tremendous diversity in the synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled anisotropy. In this Perspective, we highlight the synthetic achievements that have galvanized the field, presenting a comprehensive discussion of the mechanisms and products of both seed-mediated and alternative growth methods. We also address recent breakthroughs and challenges in regiospecific functionalization, which is the next frontier in exploiting nanoparticle anisotropy.

  9. Anisotropic ray trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  10. Linear magnetoresistance in n-type silicon due to doping density fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Nicholas A.; Marrows, Christopher H.

    2012-01-01

    We report the observation of a large linear magnetoresistance in the ohmic regime in commonplace commercial n-type silicon wafer with a P dopant density of (1.4±0.1) ×1015 cm–3, and report measurements of it in the temperature range 30–200 K. It arises from the deformation of current paths, which causes a part of the Hall field to be detected at the voltage probes. In short, wide samples we found linear magnetoresistance as large as 4707% in an 8 tesla field at 35 K. Sample geometry effects like these are commonplace in commercial Hall sensors. However, we found that the effect persisted in long, thin samples where the macroscopic current flow should be uniform between the voltage probes: we observed a magnetoresistance of 445% under the same conditions as above. We interpret this result as arising due to spatial fluctuations in the donor density, in the spirit of the Herring model. PMID:22876340

  11. Fe/Bi2Te3/Fe Tunneling Magneto-Resistance with topological insulator barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Vallery; Seifu, Dereje

    2014-03-01

    Thin film tri-layer structure Fe/Bi2Te3/Fe was synthesized using magnetron DC / RF sputtering. This sample was synthesized at a substrate temperature of 100 °C. It was studied using in-house built magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) instrument. The operating principles of MOKE consist of measuring changes in polarization of light reflected from a magnetic sample. The bulk magnetization was measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and torque magneto meter (TMM). Topographic structure and magnetic domains were studied using atomic force microscope (AFM) and magnetic force microscope (MFM). Tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) effect occurs in a structure that is composed of two conductors separated by a thin insulator of the order of few nanometers, the insulator barrier in this case is a well known topological insulator, Bi2Te3. In this structure, electrons tunnel from one of the conductors to the other through the insulating barrier. This is a forbidden process in classical physics, tunnel magneto-resistance is a purely quantum mechanical effect which is key in developing magneto-resistive random access memory (MRAM), magnetic sensors, and novel logic devices. We would like to acknowledge the support by ARL #W911NF-12-2-0041 and by NSF #MRI -DMR-1337339.

  12. Study of the magnetic microstructure of Ni/NiO nanogranular samples above the electric percolation threshold by magnetoresistance measurements.

    PubMed

    Del Bianco, L; Spizzo, F; Tamisari, M; Calbucci, M; Allia, P

    2012-08-01

    Magnetoresistance measurements have been exploited to gain information on the magnetic microstructure of two Ni/NiO nanogranular materials consisting of Ni nanocrystallites (mean size of the order of 10 nm) embedded in a NiO matrix and differing in the amount of metallic Ni, ~33 and ~61 vol%. The overall conductance of both samples is metallic in character, indicating that the Ni content is above the percolation threshold for electric conductivity; the electric resistivity is two orders of magnitude smaller in the sample with higher Ni fraction (10(-5) Ωm against 10(-3) Ωm). An isotropic, spin-dependent magnetoresistance has been measured in the sample with lower Ni content, whereas both isotropic and anisotropic magnetoresistance phenomena coexist in the other material. This study, associated with magnetization loop measurements and the comparison with the exchange bias effect, allows one to conclude that in the sample with lower Ni content neither the physical percolation of the Ni nanocrystallites nor the magnetic percolation (i.e., formation of a homogeneous ferromagnetic network) are achieved; in the other sample physical percolation is reached while magnetic percolation is still absent. In both behaviors, a key role is played by the NiO matrix, which brings about a magnetic nanocrystallite/matrix interface exchange energy term and rules both the direct exchange interaction among Ni nanocrystallites and the magnetotransport properties of these nanogranular materials.

  13. Polarization dependent asymmetric magneto-resistance features in nanocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-08-18

    Polar angle-dependence of magneto-resistance (AMR) in heavily nitrogen-incorporated ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films is recorded by applying high magnetic fields, which shows strong anisotropic features at low temperatures. The temperature-dependence of MR and AMR can reveal transport in the weak-localization regime, which is explained by using a superlattice model for arbitrary values of disorder and angles. While a propagative Fermi surface model explains the negative MR features for low degree of disorder the azimuthal angle-dependent MR shows field dependent anisotropy due to the aligned conducting channels on the layers normal to film growth direction. The analysis of MR and AMR can extract the temperature dependence of dephasing time with respect to the elastic scattering time which not only establishes quasi-two dimensional features in this system but also suggests a potential application in monitoring the performance of UNCD based quantum devices.

  14. Distortion of Magnetic Domain Wall Measured by Magneto-Resistance Changes in a Co Nanoring.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2015-01-01

    The electrical anisotropic magneto-resistance (AMR) measurements were performed to see the formation of a 360 degree magnetic domain wall (360 DW) and distortion of the magnetic moments in a Co nanoring structure. Since the 360 DW is consisted of two 180 degree DWs, a decrease of the resistance was found in the switching process from the vortex to reverse onion state by the AMR effects, which is consistent with micromagnetic simulations. In addition, a decrease of the resistance in the switching process from the onion to vortex state was observed by the distortion of the local magnetic moments due to an applied magnetic field. The stochastic behavior in the switching process is caused by thermally induced magnetic moments changes.

  15. Tuning quantum corrections and magnetoresistance in ZnO nanowires by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y J; Pereira, L M C; Menghini, M; Temst, K; Vantomme, A; Locquet, J-P; Van Haesendonck, C

    2012-02-08

    Using ion implantation, the electrical as well as the magnetotransport properties of individual ZnO nanowires (NWs) can be tuned. The virgin NWs are configured as field-effect transistors which are in the enhancement mode. Al-implanted NWs reveal a three-dimensional metallic-like behavior, for which the magnetoresistance is well described by a semiempirical model that takes into account the presence of doping induced local magnetic moments and of two conduction bands. On the other hand, one-dimensional electron transport is observed in Co-implanted NWs. At low magnetic fields, the anisotropic magnetoresistance can be described in the framework of weak electron localization in the presence of strong spin-orbit scattering. From the weak localization, a large phase coherence length is inferred that reaches up to 800 nm at 2.5 K. The temperature-dependent dephasing is shown to result from a one-dimensional Nyquist noise-related mechanism. At the lowest temperatures, the phase coherence length becomes limited by magnetic scattering.

  16. Towards sub-200 nm nano-structuring of linear giant magneto-resistive spin valves by a direct focused ion beam milling process

    SciTech Connect

    Riedmüller, Benjamin; Huber, Felix; Herr, Ulrich

    2014-02-14

    In this work, we present a detailed investigation of a focused ion beam (FIB) assisted nano-structuring process for giant magneto-resistive (GMR) spin valve sensors. We have performed a quantitative study of the dependence of the GMR ratio as well as the sensor resistance on the ion dose, which is implanted in the active region of our sensors. These findings are correlated with the decrease of magneto-resistive properties after micro- and nano-structuring by the FIB and reveal the importance of ion damage which limits the applicability of FIB milling to GMR devices in the low μm range. Deposition of a protective layer (50 nm SiO{sub 2}) on top of the sensor structure before milling leads to a preservation of the magneto-resistive properties after the milling procedure down to sensor dimensions of ∼300 nm. The reduction of the sensor dimensions to the nanometer regime is accompanied by a shift of the GMR curves, and a modification of the saturation behavior. Both effects can be explained by a micromagnetic model including the magnetic interaction of free and pinned layer as well as the effect of the demagnetizing field of the free layer on the sensor behavior. The results demonstrate that the FIB technology can be successfully used to prepare spintronic nanostructures.

  17. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical ( GMO ) or Faraday...Squids are those based upon the giant magneto-optical ( GMO ) effect in ferrimagnetic materials or YIG garnets and the giant magneto-resistance (GMR...effect in manganese based compounds. The development of the GMO material was mostly motivated by the need for compact, in-line fiber optical

  18. Low-Profile UHF Antenna Design Based on an Anisotropic Transverse Resonance Condition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Low-Profile UHF Antenna Design Based on an Anisotropic Transverse Resonance Condition by Gregory Mitchell and Wasyl Wasylkiwskyj ARL-TR...2014 Low-Profile UHF Antenna Design Based on an Anisotropic Transverse Resonance Condition Gregory Mitchell and Wasyl Wasylkiwskyj Sensors...DATES COVERED (From - To) 01/2014–06/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low-Profile UHF Antenna Design Based on an Anisotropic Transverse Resonance

  19. Superficial magnetic imaging by an xy-scanner of three magnetoresistive channels.

    PubMed

    Cano, M E; Pacheco, A H; Cordova, T; Mazon, E E; Barrera, A

    2012-03-01

    A scanning system developed for planar magnetic surfaces composed of a moving line of three magnetoresistive ultrasensitive transducers, complemented by a signal conditioning circuit is presented. After the calibration of the sensors, it was used to determine magnetized surface images with different shapes to evaluate the sensitivity of the device, and the images are represented in gray levels on a scale from 0 to 255 intensities, to get a visual representation of the magnetic field strength. The device is shown to be sensitive enough to detect gradients homogeneities and discontinuities in the magnetic field maps and images of magnetic susceptibility.

  20. Dramatically decreased magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao; Pang, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Da-Jun; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y. B.; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Minghui; Liu, Zhongkai; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the layered semimetal WTe2 has attracted renewed interest owing to the observation of a non-saturating and giant positive magnetoresistance (~105%), which can be useful for magnetic memory and spintronic devices. However, the underlying mechanisms of the giant magnetoresistance are still under hot debate. Herein, we grew the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals to test the robustness of giant magnetoresistance. The stoichiometric WTe2 crystals have magnetoresistance as large as 3100% at 2 K and 9-Tesla magnetic field. However, only 71% and 13% magnetoresistance in the most non-stoichiometry (WTe1.80) and the highest Mo isovalent substitution samples (W0.7Mo0.3Te2) are observed, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic-field dependent magnetoresistance of non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals substantiates that both the large electron-hole concentration asymmetry and decreased carrier mobility, induced by non-stoichiometry, synergistically lead to the decreased magnetoresistance. This work sheds more light on the origin of giant magnetoresistance observed in WTe2.

  1. Hall effect and magnetoresistivity in the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Hall coefficient and magnetoresistance of sputtered films of Cu(x)Mo6S8 and PbMo6S8 have been measured, as well as the magnetoresistance in sintered samples of the same materials. Assuming a single band model, net carrier densities and mean mobilities are determined

  2. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  3. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance in Hybrid Semiconductor-Metal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, T. H.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    We show that extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) arises in systems consisting of two components; a semiconducting ring with a metallic inclusion embedded. The important aspect of this discovery is that the system must have a quasi-two-dimensional character. Using the same materials and geometries for the samples as in experiments by Solin et al.1,2, we show that such systems indeed exhibit a huge magnetoresistance. The magnetoresistance arises due to the switching of electrical current paths passing through the metallic inclusion. Diagrams illustrating the flow of the current density within the samples are utilised in discussion of the mechanism responsible for the magnetoresistance effect. Extensions are then suggested which may be applicable to the silver chalcogenides. Our theory offers an excellent description and explanation of experiments where a huge magnetoresistance has been discovered2,3.

  4. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance in Hybrid Semiconductor-Metal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, T. H.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2010-12-01

    We show that extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) arises in systems consisting of two components; a semiconducting ring with a metallic inclusion embedded. The important aspect of this discovery is that the system must have a quasi-two-dimensional character. Using the same materials and geometries for the samples as in experiments by Solin et al.1,2, we show that, such systems indeed exhibit a huge magnetoresistance. The magnetoresistance arises due to the switching of electrical current paths passing through the metallic inclusion. Diagrams illustrating the flow of the current density within the samples are utilised in discussion of the mechanism responsible for the magnetoresistance effect. Extensions are then suggested which may be applicable to the silver chalcogenides. Our theory offers an excellent description and explanation of experiments where a huge magnetoresistance has been discovered2,3.

  5. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  6. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  7. Giant magnetoresistance in organic spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Da-Li; Yin, Lifeng; Sun, Chengjun; Guo, Hangwen; Gai, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Ward, Thomas Z; Cheng, Zhaohua; Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial diffusion between magnetic electrodes and organic spacer layers is a serious problem in the organic spintronics which complicates attempts to understand the spin-dependent transport mechanism and hurts the achievement of a desirably high magnetoresistance (MR). We deposit nanodots instead of atoms onto the organic layer using buffer layer assist growth. Spin valves using this method exhibit a sharper interface and a giant MR of up to {approx}300%. Analysis of the current-voltage characteristics indicates that the spin-dependent carrier injection correlates with the observed MR.

  8. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Choi, Heonjin; Lee, Sangkwon; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kuykendal, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  9. Giant magnetoresistance in bilayer graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghadan, Rouhollah; Farekiyan, Marzieh

    2016-09-01

    Coherent spin transport through bilayer graphene (BLG) nanoflakes sandwiched between two electrodes made of single-layer zigzag graphene nanoribbon was investigated by means of Landauer-Buttiker formalism. Application of a magnetic field only on BLG structure as a channel produces a perfect spin polarization in a large energy region. Moreover, the conductance could be strongly modulated by magnetization of the zigzag edge of AB-stacked BLG, and the junction, entirely made of carbon, produces a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) up to 100%. Intestinally, GMR and spin polarization could be tuned by varying BLG width and length. Generally, MR in a AB-stacked BLG strongly increases (decreases) with length (width).

  10. Three-dimensional Anisotropy and Kohler's Rule Scaling of the Magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Lei

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) was recently discovered to have extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) at low temperatures and exhibits a transformative 'turn-on' temperature behavior: when the applied magnetic field H is above a certain value, the resistivity versus temperature ρ (T) curve shows a minimum at a field dependent temperature T* (H) . Since WTe2 is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, it is typically considered to be a two dimensional (2D) material, whereby the anisotropic magnetoresistance is attributed only to the perpendicular component of the magnetic field. Moreover, the 'turn-on' temperature behavior has been interpreted as a magnetic-field-driven metal-insulator transition or attributed to an electronic structure change. In this talk I will report on two scaling behaviors of the magnetoresistance in WTe2. The first shows that the angle dependence of the magnetoresistance follows a conventional 3D anisotropy scaling and hence reveals the electrical 3D nature of WTe2. The second demonstrates that the ρ (T , H) curves, including those with 'turn-on' temperature behavior, can be scaled with Kohler's rule. The observed Kohler's rule scaling excludes the possible existence of a magnetic-field-driven metal-insulator transition or significant contribution of an electronic structure change to the low-temperature XMR in WTe2. It indicates that both the XMR and the 'turn-on' behavior originate from the high mobilities of the charge carriers, which are strongly temperature dependent in WTe2. We also derived quantitative expressions for the magnetic field dependence of the 'turn-on' temperature T* (H) and for the temperature dependence of the resistivity ρ (T* , H) at the onset of the XMR behavior. In collaboration with L. R. Thoutam, Z. L. Xiao, J. Hu, S. Das, Z. Q. Mao, J. Wei, R. Divan, A. Luican-Mayer, G. W. Crabtree, and W. K. Kwok This work was supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, BES

  11. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  12. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Peres, M. L. Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF{sub 2} exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30 T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ΔR/ΔB is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF{sub 2} doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  13. Nonlocal Magnetoresistance Mediated by Spin Superfluidity.

    PubMed

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-10-09

    The electrical response of two diffusive metals is studied when they are linked by a magnetic insulator hosting a topologically stable (superfluid) spin current. We discuss how charge currents in the metals induce a spin supercurrent state, which in turn generates a magnetoresistance that depends on the topology of the electrical circuit. This magnetoresistance relies on phase coherence over the entire magnet and gives direct evidence for spin superfluidity. We show that driving the magnet with an ac current allows coherent spin transport even in the presence of U(1)-breaking magnetic anisotropy that can preclude dc superfluid transport. Spin transmission in the ac regime shows a series of resonance peaks as a function of frequency. The peak locations, heights, and widths can be used to extract static interfacial properties, e.g., the spin-mixing conductance and effective spin Hall angle, and to probe dynamic properties such as the spin-wave dispersion. Thus, ac transport may provide a simpler route to realizing nonequilbrium coherent spin transport and a useful way to characterize the magnetic system, serving as a precursor to the realization of dc superfluid spin transport.

  14. High-performance magnetic sensorics for printable and flexible electronics.

    PubMed

    Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Stöber, Max; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy D; Baunack, Stefan; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2015-02-04

    High-performance giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensorics are realized, which are printed at predefined locations on flexible circuitry. Remarkably, the printed magnetosensors remain fully operational over the complete consumer temperature range and reveal a giant magnetoresistance up to 37% and a sensitivity of 0.93 T(-1) at 130 mT. With these specifications, printed magnetoelectronics can be controlled using flexible active electronics for the realization of smart packaging and energy-efficient switches.

  15. Direct visualization of lead corona and its nanomolar colorimetric detection using anisotropic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Charu; Chaudhary, Abhishek; Gupta, Abhishek; Nandi, Chayan K

    2015-03-11

    The study presents dithiothreitol (DTT) functionalized anisotropic gold nanoparticles (GNP) based colorimetric sensor for detection of toxic lead ions in water. Our results demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the developed sensor over various heavy metal ions with detection limit of ∼9 nM. The mechanism of sensing is explained on the basis of unique corona formation around the DTT functionalized anisotropic GNP.

  16. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Althammer, Matthias

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  17. Anisotropic resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwanger, J. V.; Pain, C. C.; Binley, A.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Worthington, M. H.

    2004-08-01

    Geophysical tomographic techniques have the potential to remotely detect and characterize geological features, such as fractures and spatially varying lithologies, by their response to signals passed through these features. Anisotropic behaviour in many geological materials necessitates the generalization of tomographic methods to include anisotropic material properties in order to attain high-quality images of the subsurface. In this paper, we present a finite element (FE) based direct-current electrical inversion method to reconstruct the conductivity tensor at each node point of a FE mesh from electrical resistance measurements. The inverse problem is formulated as a functional optimization and the non-uniqueness of the electrical inverse problem is overcome by adding penalty terms for structure and anisotropy. We use a modified Levenberg-Marquardt method for the functional optimization and the resulting set of linear equation is solved using pre-conditioned conjugate gradients. The method is tested using both synthetic and field experiments in cross-well geometry. The acquisition geometry for both experiments uses a cross-well experiment at a hard-rock test site in Cornwall, southwest England. Two wells, spaced at 25.7 m, were equipped with electrodes at a 1 m spacing at depths from 21-108 m and data were gathered in pole-pole geometry. The test synthetic model consists of a strongly anisotropic and conductive body underlain by an isotropic resistive formation. Beneath the resistive formation, the model comprises a moderately anisotropic and moderately conductive half-space, intersected by an isotropic conductive layer. This model geometry was derived from the interpretation of a seismic tomogram and available geological logs and the conductivity values are based on observed conductivities. We use the test model to confirm the ability of the inversion scheme to recover the (known) true model. We find that all key features of the model are recovered. However

  18. Magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity of semimetal WTe2 ultrathin flakes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Fang, Chi; Wan, Caihua; Cai, Jialin; Liu, Yong; Han, Xiufeng; Lu, Zhihong; Shi, Wenhua; Xiong, Rui; Zeng, Zhongming

    2017-04-07

    This article reports the characterization of WTe2 thin flake magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity. We found it does not exhibit magnetoresistance saturation when subject to high fields, in a manner similar to their bulk characteristics. The linearity of Hall resistivity in our devices confirms the compensation of electrons and holes. By relating experimental results to a classic two-band model, the lower magnetoresistance values in our samples is demonstrated to be caused by decreased carrier mobility. The dependence of mobility on temperature indicates the main role of optical phonon scattering at high temperatures. Our results provide more detailed information on carrier behavior and scattering mechanisms in WTe2 thin films.

  19. Magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity of semimetal WTe2 ultrathin flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Fang, Chi; Wan, Caihua; Cai, Jialin; Liu, Yong; Han, Xiufeng; Lu, Zhihong; Shi, Wenhua; Xiong, Rui; Zeng, Zhongming

    2017-04-01

    This article reports the characterization of WTe2 thin flake magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity. We found it does not exhibit magnetoresistance saturation when subject to high fields, in a manner similar to their bulk characteristics. The linearity of Hall resistivity in our devices confirms the compensation of electrons and holes. By relating experimental results to a classic two-band model, the lower magnetoresistance values in our samples is demonstrated to be caused by decreased carrier mobility. The dependence of mobility on temperature indicates the main role of optical phonon scattering at high temperatures. Our results provide more detailed information on carrier behavior and scattering mechanisms in WTe2 thin films.

  20. Large magnetoresistance of insulating silicon films with superconducting nanoprecipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.; Fiedler, J.; Skorupa, W.

    2016-10-01

    We report on large negative and positive magnetoresistance in inhomogeneous, insulating Si:Ga films below a critical temperature of about 7 K. The magnetoresistance effect exceeds 300 % at temperatures below 3 K and fields of 8 T. The comparison of the transport properties of superconducting samples with that of insulating ones reveals that the large magnetoresistance is associated with the appearance of local superconductivity. A simple phenomenological model based on localized Cooper pairs and hopping quasiparticles is able to describe the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the sheet resistance of such films.

  1. Spin-transfer torque in ferromagnetic bilayers generated by anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Grollier, Julie; Stiles, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to determine the spin-transfer torque efficiency excited by the spin-orbit interaction in ferromagnetic bilayers from the measurement of the longitudinal magnetoresistace. Solving a diffusive spin-transport theory with appropriate boundary conditions gives an analytical formula of the longitudinal charge current density. The longitudinal charge current has a term that is proportional to the square of the spin-transfer torque efficiency and that also depends on the ratio of the film thickness to the spin diffusion length of the ferromagnet. Extracting this contribution from measurements of the longitudinal resistivity as a function of the thickness can give the spin-transfer torque efficiency. PMID:28057977

  2. Spin-transfer torque in ferromagnetic bilayers generated by anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Grollier, Julie; Stiles, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to determine the spin-transfer torque efficiency excited by the spin-orbit interaction in ferromagnetic bilayers from the measurement of the longitudinal magnetoresistace. Solving a diffusive spin-transport theory with appropriate boundary conditions gives an analytical formula of the longitudinal charge current density. The longitudinal charge current has a term that is proportional to the square of the spin-transfer torque efficiency and that also depends on the ratio of the film thickness to the spin diffusion length of the ferromagnet. Extracting this contribution from measurements of the longitudinal resistivity as a function of the thickness can give the spin-transfer torque efficiency.

  3. Spin-transfer torque in ferromagnetic bilayers generated by anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Grollier, Julie; Stiles, M D

    2016-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to determine the spin-transfer torque efficiency excited by the spin-orbit interaction in ferromagnetic bilayers from the measurement of the longitudinal magnetoresistace. Solving a diffusive spin-transport theory with appropriate boundary conditions gives an analytical formula of the longitudinal charge current density. The longitudinal charge current has a term that is proportional to the square of the spin-transfer torque efficiency and that also depends on the ratio of the film thickness to the spin diffusion length of the ferromagnet. Extracting this contribution from measurements of the longitudinal resistivity as a function of the thickness can give the spin-transfer torque efficiency.

  4. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  5. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the precise transduction mechanism in giant magnetoresistive biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Sato, Noriyuki; Bechstein, Daniel J. B.; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Wang, Junyi; Gani, Adi Wijaya; Hall, Drew A.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors consisting of many rectangular stripes are being developed for high sensitivity medical diagnostics of diseases at early stages, but many aspects of the sensing mechanism remain to be clarified. Using e-beam patterned masks on the sensors, we showed that the magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm located between the stripes predominantly determine the sensor signals over those located on the sensor stripes. Based on computational analysis, it was confirmed that the particles in the trench, particularly those near the edges of the stripes, mainly affect the sensor signals due to additional field from the stripe under an applied field. We also demonstrated that the direction of the average magnetic field from the particles that contributes to the signal is indeed the same as that of the applied field, indicating that the particles in the trench are pivotal to produce sensor signal. Importantly, the same detection principle was validated with a duplex protein assay. Also, 8 different types of sensor stripes were fabricated and design parameters were explored. According to the detection principle uncovered, GMR biosensors can be further optimized to improve their sensitivity, which is highly desirable for early diagnosis of diseases. PMID:26728870

  7. Passive wireless strain measurement based upon the Villari effect and giant magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windl, Roman; Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Huber, Thomas; Oezelt, Harald; Suess, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    A passive wireless radio frequency-identification (RFID) stress/strain sensor is presented. Stress is transformed into a change of magnetic field by utilizing an amorphous metal ribbon. This magnetic field change is measured by a giant magnetoresistance magnetic field sensor and converted into a digital value with a RFID chip for wireless access. Standard metal foil strain gauges have a gauge factor GF from around 2 to 5 and suffer from the disadvantage of a physically connected power supply and measurement equipment. For the presented sensor, a strain range of -10 μm/m to 190 μm/m results in a linear sensor response, a gauge factor of GF ≈ 245, and a detectivity of 4.10 nm/m 1/√{Hz } . The detectivity of the presented sensor is similar to the detectivity of a reference metal foil strain gauge. Due to low power consumption and easy signal analysis, this sensor is well suited for long term strain measurement inside closed spaces. RFID adds features like multiple tag detection, wireless passive operation and a user data storage.

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the precise transduction mechanism in giant magnetoresistive biosensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Sato, Noriyuki; Bechstein, Daniel J B; Osterfeld, Sebastian J; Wang, Junyi; Gani, Adi Wijaya; Hall, Drew A; Wang, Shan X

    2016-01-05

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors consisting of many rectangular stripes are being developed for high sensitivity medical diagnostics of diseases at early stages, but many aspects of the sensing mechanism remain to be clarified. Using e-beam patterned masks on the sensors, we showed that the magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm located between the stripes predominantly determine the sensor signals over those located on the sensor stripes. Based on computational analysis, it was confirmed that the particles in the trench, particularly those near the edges of the stripes, mainly affect the sensor signals due to additional field from the stripe under an applied field. We also demonstrated that the direction of the average magnetic field from the particles that contributes to the signal is indeed the same as that of the applied field, indicating that the particles in the trench are pivotal to produce sensor signal. Importantly, the same detection principle was validated with a duplex protein assay. Also, 8 different types of sensor stripes were fabricated and design parameters were explored. According to the detection principle uncovered, GMR biosensors can be further optimized to improve their sensitivity, which is highly desirable for early diagnosis of diseases.

  9. A 256 pixel magnetoresistive biosensor microarray in 0.18μm CMOS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Drew A.; Gaster, Richard S.; Makinwa, Kofi; Wang, Shan X.; Murmann, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanotechnologies have shown significant potential in several areas of nanomedicine such as imaging, therapeutics, and early disease detection. Giant magnetoresistive spin-valve (GMR SV) sensors coupled with magnetic nanotags (MNTs) possess great promise as ultra-sensitive biosensors for diagnostics. We report an integrated sensor interface for an array of 256 GMR SV biosensors designed in 0.18 μm CMOS. Arranged like an imager, each of the 16 column level readout channels contains an analog front- end and a compact ΣΔ modulator (0.054 mm2) with 84 dB of dynamic range and an input referred noise of 49 nT/√Hz. Performance is demonstrated through detection of an ovarian cancer biomarker, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), spiked at concentrations as low as 10 fM. This system is designed as a replacement for optical protein microarrays while also providing real-time kinetics monitoring. PMID:24761029

  10. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastiao, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 {mu}V amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  11. Toward a system to measure action potential on mice brain slices with local magnetoresistive probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Sebastião, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    This work combines an electrophysiological system with a magnetoresistive chip to measure the magnetic field created by the synaptic/action potential currents. The chip, with 15 spin valve sensors, was designed to be integrated in a recording chamber for submerged mice brain slices used for synaptic potential measurements. Under stimulation (rectangular pulses of 0.1 ms every 10 s) through a concentric electrode placed near the CA3/CA1 border of the hippocampus, the spin valve sensor readout signals with 20 μV amplitude and a pulse length of 20 to 30 ms were recorded only in the pyramidal cell bodies region and can be interpreted as being derived from action potentials/currents.

  12. Giant magnetoresistive biosensors for molecular diagnosis: surface chemistry and assay development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Heng; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Xu, Liang; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2008-08-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biochips using magnetic nanoparticle as labels were developed for molecular diagnosis. The sensor arrays consist of GMR sensing strips of 1.5 μm or 0.75 μm in width. GMR sensors are exquisitely sensitive yet very delicate, requiring ultrathin corrosion-resistive passivation and efficient surface chemistry for oligonucleotide probe immobilization. A mild and stable surface chemistry was first developed that is especially suitable for modifying delicate electronic device surfaces, and a practical application of our GMR biosensors was then demonstrated for detecting four most common human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes in plasmids. We also showed that the DNA hybridization time could potentially be reduced from overnight to about ten minutes using microfluidics.

  13. A 256 pixel magnetoresistive biosensor microarray in 0.18μm CMOS.

    PubMed

    Hall, Drew A; Gaster, Richard S; Makinwa, Kofi; Wang, Shan X; Murmann, Boris

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic nanotechnologies have shown significant potential in several areas of nanomedicine such as imaging, therapeutics, and early disease detection. Giant magnetoresistive spin-valve (GMR SV) sensors coupled with magnetic nanotags (MNTs) possess great promise as ultra-sensitive biosensors for diagnostics. We report an integrated sensor interface for an array of 256 GMR SV biosensors designed in 0.18 μm CMOS. Arranged like an imager, each of the 16 column level readout channels contains an analog front- end and a compact ΣΔ modulator (0.054 mm(2)) with 84 dB of dynamic range and an input referred noise of 49 nT/√Hz. Performance is demonstrated through detection of an ovarian cancer biomarker, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), spiked at concentrations as low as 10 fM. This system is designed as a replacement for optical protein microarrays while also providing real-time kinetics monitoring.

  14. Anisotropic Total Variation Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Grasmair, Markus; Lenzen, Frank

    2010-12-15

    Total variation regularization and anisotropic filtering have been established as standard methods for image denoising because of their ability to detect and keep prominent edges in the data. Both methods, however, introduce artifacts: In the case of anisotropic filtering, the preservation of edges comes at the cost of the creation of additional structures out of noise; total variation regularization, on the other hand, suffers from the stair-casing effect, which leads to gradual contrast changes in homogeneous objects, especially near curved edges and corners. In order to circumvent these drawbacks, we propose to combine the two regularization techniques. To that end we replace the isotropic TV semi-norm by an anisotropic term that mirrors the directional structure of either the noisy original data or the smoothed image. We provide a detailed existence theory for our regularization method by using the concept of relaxation. The numerical examples concluding the paper show that the proposed introduction of an anisotropy to TV regularization indeed leads to improved denoising: the stair-casing effect is reduced while at the same time the creation of artifacts is suppressed.

  15. Sensors for noncontact vibration diagnostics in rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with electromagnetic sensors for noncontact vibration diagnostics in rotating machinery. The sensors were designed for operational measurements in turbomachinery by means of the tip-timing method. The main properties of eddy-current, Hall effect, induction and magnetoresistive sensors are described and compared. Possible arrangements of the experimental systems for static and dynamic calibration of the sensors are suggested and discussed.

  16. A new class of magnetoresistive compounds ^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, R.; Husmann, A.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Enderby, J. E.; Price, D. L.

    1997-03-01

    We have measured a significant magnetoresistance (MR) in some silver selenide and silver telluride compounds from 4.5 K up to room termperature; the composition is such that these compounds are narrow gap self-doped degenerate n-type semiconductors. Our results show no evidence of saturation up to at least 5.5 T for transverse MR and the field dependences are rather linear ^2. A comparison is being made with that of other traditional and novel materials. Studies are under way to determine the origin of this phenomenom and the physical factors which may further enhance the MR. Supported by NSF-MRSEC at Chicago and by U.S.DOE contrac W-31-109-ENG-38 at ANL. R. Xu, A. Husmann, T.F. Rosenbaum, M.-L. Saboungi, D.L. Price, J.E. Enderby, in preparation.

  17. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-11-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions.

  18. Low field magnetoresistance of gadolinium nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2014-02-07

    We report low field (μ{sub 0}H < 0.2 T) magnetoresistance (MR) studies on a single Gd nanowire patterned from a nano-structured film (average grain size ∼ 35 nm) by focused ion beam. For comparison, we did similar MR measurements on a polycrystalline sample with large crystallographic grains (∼4 μm). It is observed that in the low field region where the MR is due to motion of magnetic domains, the MR in the large grained sample shows a close relation to the characteristic temperature dependent magnetocrystalline anisotropy including a sharp rise in MR at the spin reorientation transition at 235 K. In stark contrast, in the nanowire, the MR shows complete suppression of the above behaviours and it shows predominance of the grain boundary and spin disorder controlling the domain response.

  19. Magnetic mesocrystal-assisted magnetoresistance in manganite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jan-Chi; He, Qing; Zhu, Yuan-Min; Lin, Jheng-Cyuan; Liu, Heng-Jui; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Wu, Ping-Chun; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lee, Shang-Fan; Chin, Yi-Ying; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, Chien-Te; Zhan, Qian; Arenholz, Elke; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2014-11-12

    Mesocrystal, a new class of crystals as compared to conventional and well-known single crystals and polycrystalline systems, has captured significant attention in the past decade. Recent studies have been focused on the advance of synthesis mechanisms as well as the potential on device applications. In order to create further opportunities upon functional mesocrystals, we fabricated a self-assembled nanocomposite composed of magnetic CoFe2O4 mesocrystal in Sr-doped manganites. This combination exhibits intriguing structural and magnetic tunabilities. Furthermore, the antiferromagnetic coupling of the mesocrystal and matrix has induced an additional magnetic perturbation to spin-polarized electrons, resulting in a significantly enhanced magnetoresistance in the nanocomposite. Our work demonstrates a new thought toward the enhancement of intrinsic functionalities assisted by mesocrystals and advanced design of novel mesocrystal-embedded nanocomposites.

  20. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions. PMID:27876859

  1. Hyperfine interaction and magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Nguyen, T. D.; Veeraraghavan, G.; Mermer, Ö.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Qiu, S.; Scherf, U.

    2006-07-01

    We explore the possibility that hyperfine interaction causes the recently discovered organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect. We deduce a simple fitting formula from the hyperfine Hamiltonian that relates the saturation field of the OMAR traces to the hyperfine coupling constant. We compare the fitting results to literature values for this parameter. Furthermore, we apply an excitonic pair mechanism model based on hyperfine interaction, previously suggested by others to explain various magnetic-field effects in organics, to the OMAR data. Whereas this model can explain a few key aspects of the experimental data, we uncover several fundamental contradictions as well. By varying the injection efficiency for minority carriers in the devices, we show experimentally that OMAR is only weakly dependent on the ratio between excitons formed and carriers injected, likely excluding any excitonic effect as the origin of OMAR.

  2. Molecular hyperfine fields in organic magnetoresistance devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giro, Ronaldo; Rosselli, Flávia P.; dos Santos Carvalho, Rafael; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Cremona, Marco; Achete, Carlos A.

    2013-03-01

    We calculate molecular hyperfine fields in organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) devices using ab initio calculations. To do so, we establish a protocol for the accurate determination of the average hyperfine field Bhf and apply it to selected molecular ions: NPB, TPD, and Alq3. Then, we make devices with precisely the same molecules and perform measurements of the OMAR effect, in order to address the role of hole-transport layer in the characteristic magnetic field B0 of OMAR. Contrary to common belief, we find that molecular hyperfine fields are not only caused by hydrogen nuclei. We also find that dipolar contributions to the hyperfine fields can be comparable to the Fermi contact contributions. However, such contributions are restricted to nuclei located in the same molecular ion as the charge carrier (intramolecular), as extramolecular contributions are negligible.

  3. Evaluation of Magnetoresistive RAM for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidecker, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is a non-volatile memory that exploits electronic spin, rather than charge, to store data. Instead of moving charge on and off a floating gate to alter the threshold voltage of a CMOS transistor (creating different bit states), MRAM uses magnetic fields to flip the polarization of a ferromagnetic material thus switching its resistance and bit state. These polarized states are immune to radiation-induced upset, thus making MRAM very attractive for space application. These magnetic memory elements also have infinite data retention and erase/program endurance. Presented here are results of reliability testing of two space-qualified MRAM products from Aeroflex and Honeywell.

  4. Anomalous magnetoresistance in magnetized topological insulator cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-05-07

    The close coupling between the spin and momentum degrees of freedom in topological insulators (TIs) presents the opportunity for the control of one to manipulate the other. The momentum can, for example, be confined on a curved surface and the spin influenced by applying a magnetic field. In this work, we study the surface states of a cylindrical TI magnetized in the x direction perpendicular to the cylindrical axis lying along the z direction. We show that a large magnetization leads to an upwards bending of the energy bands at small |k{sub z}|. The bending leads to an anomalous magnetoresistance where the transmission between two cylinders magnetized in opposite directions is higher than when the cylinders are magnetized at intermediate angles with respect to each other.

  5. High speed magneto-resistive random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high speed read MRAM memory element is configured from a sandwich of magnetizable, ferromagnetic film surrounding a magneto-resistive film which may be ferromagnetic or not. One outer ferromagnetic film has a higher coercive force than the other and therefore remains magnetized in one sense while the other may be switched in sense by a switching magnetic field. The magneto-resistive film is therefore sensitive to the amplitude of the resultant field between the outer ferromagnetic films and may be constructed of a high resistivity, high magneto-resistive material capable of higher sensing currents. This permits higher read voltages and therefore faster read operations. Alternate embodiments with perpendicular anisotropy, and in-plane anisotropy are shown, including an embodiment which uses high permeability guides to direct the closing flux path through the magneto-resistive material. High density, high speed, radiation hard, memory matrices may be constructed from these memory elements.

  6. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-22

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y3Fe5O12) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  7. Linear magnetoresistance in a topological insulator Ru2Sn3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Y.; Saitoh, E.

    2017-03-01

    We have studied magnetotransport properties of a topological insulator material Ru2Sn3. Bulk single crystals of Ru2Sn3 were grown by a Bi flux method. The resistivity is semiconducting at high temperatures above 160 K, while it becomes metallic below 160 K. Nonlinear field dependence of Hall resistivity in the metallic region shows conduction of multiple carriers at low temperatures. In the high-temperature semiconducting region, magnetoresistance exhibits a conventional quadratic magnetic-field dependence. In the low-temperature metallic region, however, high-field magnetoresistance is clearly linear with magnetic fields, signaling a linear dispersion in the low-temperature electronic structure. Small changes in the magnetoresistance magnitude with respect to the magnetic field angle indicate that bulk electron carriers are responsible mainly for the observed linear magnetoresistance.

  8. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y3Fe5O12) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  9. Graphene magnetoresistance device in van der Pauw geometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianming; Zhang, Haijing; Shi, Wu; Wang, Zhe; Zheng, Yuan; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Ning; Tang, Zikang; Sheng, Ping

    2011-07-13

    We have fabricated extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device, comprising a monolayer graphene with an embedded metallic disk, that exhibits large room temperature magnetoresistance (MR) enhancement of up to 55,000% at 9 T. Finite element simulations yield predictions in excellent agreement with the experiment and show possibility for even better performance. Simplicity, ease of implementation and high sensitivity of this device imply great potential for practical applications.

  10. A two-site bipolaron model for organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Bloom, F. L.; Bobbert, P. A.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2008-04-01

    The recently proposed bipolaron model for large "organic magnetoresistance" (OMAR) at room temperature is extended to an analytically solvable two-site scheme. It is shown that even this extremely simplified approach reproduces some of the key features of OMAR, viz., the possibility to have both positive and negative magnetoresistance, as well as its universal line shapes. Specific behavior and limiting cases are discussed. Extensions of the model, to guide future experiments and numerical Monte Carlo studies, are suggested.

  11. On the relativistic anisotropic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojai, F.; Kohandel, M.; Stepanian, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study anisotropic spherical polytropes within the framework of general relativity. Using the anisotropic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations, we explore the relativistic anisotropic Lane-Emden equations. We find how the anisotropic pressure affects the boundary conditions of these equations. Also we argue that the behavior of physical quantities near the center of star changes in the presence of anisotropy. For constant density, a class of exact solution is derived with the aid of a new ansatz and its physical properties are discussed.

  12. High anisotropic pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Dickakian, G. B.

    1985-11-05

    An improved process for preparing an optically anisotropic pitch which comprises heating a pitch feed material at a temperature within the range of about 350/sup 0/ C. to 450/sup 0/ C. while passing an inert gas therethrough at a rate of at least 2.5 SCFH/lb of pitch feed material and agitating said pitch feed material at a stirrer rate of from about 500 to 600 rpm to obtain an essentially 100% mesophase pitch product suitable for carbon production.

  13. Anisotropic spinfoam cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennert, Julian; Sloan, David

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of a homogeneous, anisotropic universe are investigated within the context of spinfoam cosmology. Transition amplitudes are calculated for a graph consisting of a single node and three links—the ‘Daisy graph’—probing the behaviour a classical Bianchi I spacetime. It is shown further how the use of such single node graphs gives rise to a simplification of states such that all orders in the spin expansion can be calculated, indicating that it is the vertex expansion that contains information about quantum dynamics.

  14. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-12

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with “flat” (including toroidal) and “open” (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are “flat” or “open”. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with “flat” or “open” topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  15. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with ``flat'' (including toroidal) and ``open'' (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are ``flat'' or ``open''. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with ``flat'' or ``open'' topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  16. Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg A.; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic particles are common in many industrial and natural turbulent flows. When these particles are small and neutrally buoyant, they follow Lagrangian trajectories while exhibiting rich orientational dynamics from the coupling of their rotation to the velocity gradients of the turbulence field. This system has proven to be a fascinating application of the fundamental properties of velocity gradients in turbulence. When particles are not neutrally buoyant, they experience preferential concentration and very different preferential alignment than neutrally buoyant tracer particles. A vast proportion of the parameter range of anisotropic particles in turbulence is still unexplored, with most existing research focusing on the simple foundational cases of axisymmetric ellipsoids at low concentrations in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulent channel flow. Numerical simulations and experiments have recently developed a fairly comprehensive picture of alignment and rotation in these cases, and they provide an essential foundation for addressing more complex problems of practical importance. Macroscopic effects of nonspherical particle dynamics include preferential concentration in coherent structures and drag reduction by fiber suspensions. We review the models used to describe nonspherical particle motion, along with numerical and experimental methods for measuring particle dynamics.

  17. Resistivity dependence of magnetoresistance in Co/ZnO films.

    PubMed

    Quan, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Li; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-06

    We report the dependence of magnetoresistance effect on resistivity (ρ) in Co/ZnO films deposited by magnetron sputtering at different sputtering pressures with different ZnO contents. The magnitude of the resistivity reflects different carrier transport regimes ranging from metallic to hopping behaviors. Large room-temperature magnetoresistance greater than 8% is obtained in the resistivity range from 0.08 to 0.5 Ω · cm. The magnetoresistance value decreases markedly when the resistivity of the films is less than 0.08 Ω · cm or greater than 0.5 Ω · cm. When 0.08 Ω · cm < ρ < 0.5 Ω · cm, the conduction contains two channels: the spin-dependent tunneling channel and the spin-independent second-order hopping (N = 2). The former gives rise to a high room-temperature magnetoresistance effect. When ρ > 0.5 Ω · cm, the spin-independent higher-order hopping (N > 2) comes into play and decreases the tunneling magnetoresistance value. For the samples with ρ < 0.08 Ω · cm, reduced magnetoresistance is mainly ascribed to the formation of percolation paths through interconnected elongated metallic Co particles. This observation is significant for the improvement of room-temperature magnetoresistance value for future spintronic devices.

  18. Tunneling magnetoresistance tuned by a vertical electric field in an AA-stacked graphene bilayer with double magnetic barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dali; Jin, Guojun

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effect of a vertical electric field on the electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in an AA-stacked graphene bilayer modulated by the double magnetic barriers with parallel or antiparallel configuration. The results show that the electronic transmission properties in the system are sensitive to the magnetic-barrier configuration and the bias voltage between the graphene layers. In particular, it is found that for the antiparallel configuration, within the low energy region, the blocking effect is more obvious compared with the case for the parallel configuration, and even there may exist a transmission spectrum gap which can be arbitrarily tuned by the field-induced interlayer bias voltage. We also demonstrate that the significant discrepancy between the conductance for both parallel and antiparallel configurations would result in a giant tunneling magnetoresistance ratio, and further the maximal magnetoresistance ratio can be strongly modified by the interlayer bias voltage. This leads to the possible realization of high-quality magnetic sensors controlled by a vertical electric field in the AA-stacked graphene bilayer.

  19. Anisotropic power-law inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro; Watanabe, Masa-aki E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2010-12-01

    We study an inflationary scenario in supergravity model with a gauge kinetic function. We find exact anisotropic power-law inflationary solutions when both the potential function for an inflaton and the gauge kinetic function are exponential type. The dynamical system analysis tells us that the anisotropic power-law inflation is an attractor for a large parameter region.

  20. Unusual magnetoresistance in cubic B20 Fe0.85Co0.15Si chiral magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, S. X.; Chen, Fei; Kang, Jian; ...

    2016-06-24

    The B20 chiral magnets with broken inversion symmetry and C4 rotation symmetry have attracted much attention. The broken inversion symmetry leads to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya that gives rise to the helical and Skyrmion states.Wereport the unusual magnetoresistance (MR) of B20 chiral magnet Fe0.85Co0.15Si that directly reveals the broken C4 rotation symmetry and shows the anisotropic scattering by Skyrmions with respect to the current directions. The intimacy between unusual MR and broken symmetry is well confirmed by theoretically studying an effective Hamiltonian with spin–orbit coupling. In conclusion, the unusual MR serves as a transport signature for the Skyrmion phase.

  1. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.

    2014-11-03

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%.

  2. Anomalous Magnetoresistance Phenomena in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, Jeremy D.; Lincoln, Derek M.; Shima Edelstein, Ruth; Prigodin, Vladimir N.; Epstein, Arthur J.

    2006-03-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena with temperature and bias dependence in organic semiconductor thin films with either nonmagnetic or magnetic contacts through high field reaching 9T. For nonmagnetic organic thin films such as Alq3 we find a low field MR up to 15%. A similar magnetic field effect has been reported earlier^1 but, as noted, the mechanism remains unclear. We propose a model of the anomalous MR where charge transport is space-charge limited. The current is determined by the e-h recombination rate. The recombination rate is field dependent, analogous to the chemical yield for radical pairs^2. Using an organic- based magnetic semiconductor^3, V[TCNE]x, and Co as magnetic contacts, with a nonmagnetic organic semiconductor (α-6T) leads to an order-of-magnitude broader zero-centered MR peak superimposed on a spin-valve effect. Possible origins of this broader MR will be discussed. 1. Francis, et al., New J. Phys. 6 185 (2004); Frankevich, et al., Phys. Rev. B 53 4498 (1996) 2. Steiner and Ulrich, Chem. Rev. 89 51 (1989) 3. Pokhodnya, et al., Adv. Mater. 12 410 (2000); Prigodin, et al., Adv. Mater. 14 1230 (2002); Shima Edelstein, et al., Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 871E I7.3 (2005)

  3. Hopping magnetoresistance in ion irradiated monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlimak, I.; Zion, E.; Butenko, A. V.; Wolfson, L.; Richter, V.; Kaganovskii, Yu.; Sharoni, A.; Haran, A.; Naveh, D.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) of ion irradiated monolayer graphene samples with a variable-range hopping (VRH) mechanism of conductivity was measured at temperatures down to T=1.8 K in magnetic fields up to B=8 T. It was observed that in perpendicular magnetic fields, hopping resistivity R decreases, which corresponds to negative MR (NMR), while parallel magnetic field results in positive MR (PMR) at low temperatures. NMR is explained on the basis of the "orbital" model in which perpendicular magnetic field suppresses the destructive interference of many paths through the intermediate sites in the total probability of the long-distance tunneling in the VRH regime. At low fields, a quadratic dependence (| ΔR / R | ∼ B2) of NMR is observed, while at B > B*, the quadratic dependence is replaced by the linear one. It was found that all NMR curves for different samples and different temperatures could be merged into common dependence when plotted as a function of B/B*. It is shown that B* ∼ T1/2 in agreement with predictions of the "orbital" model. The obtained values of B* also allowed us to estimate the localization radius ξ of charge carriers for samples with a different degree of disorder. PMR in parallel magnetic fields is explained by suppression of hopping transitions via double occupied states due to alignment of electron spins.

  4. Giant magnetoresistance of copper/permalloy multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holody, P.; Chiang, W. C.; Loloee, R.; Bass, J.; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Schroeder, P. A.

    1998-11-01

    Current perpendicular (CPP) and current in-plane (CIP) magnetoresistances (MR) have been measured on sputtered Cu/Py (Py=Permalloy) multilayers at 4.2 K. The CPP-MR is several times larger than the CIP-MR. For fixed Py layer thickness, tPy=1.5 nm, both the CPP and CIP MR's show oscillations with increasing tCu with a period similar to that previously reported for the CIP-MR. The CPP data for Cu thicknesses large enough that exchange interactions between Py layers are small are analyzed using the two spin-current model for both infinite and finite spin-diffusion length in Py. The very low coercive field of Py leads to a larger than usual uncertainty in the derived parameters, because of the uncertainty in the degree of antiparallel alignment required for the analysis. Three alternative analyses give bulk and interface spin-dependent anisotropy parameters, β, and γ, of comparable size, so that both must be considered in determining the CPP-MR. Our preferred values, based upon an assumed IPysf=5.5+/-1 nm, are β=0.65+/-0.1 and γ=0.76+/-0.1. These values produce good fits to the CPP-MR's of Co/Cu/Py/Cu multilayers.

  5. Controlling organic magnetoresistance via interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, C. A.; Jang, H.-J.; Pookpanratana, S. J.; Basham, J. I.; Hacker, C. A.; Kirillov, O. A.; Kline, R. J.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Gundlach, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of experiments in which we manipulate organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in devices based on Alq3 (tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum) and TPD (N,N '-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N '-diphenylbenzidine) by adding a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The results of OMAR measurements on this OLED-like architecture are correlated with impedance spectroscopy results to elucidate charge carrier transport and accumulation. We observe competing OMAR mechanisms in these devices, the relative strength of which can be tuned by adding SAMs at electrode interfaces. To determine how the interfacial and structural properties of these organic devices effect the OMAR, we obtained a complete picture of the interfacial, topological, and crystalline properties of these devices by performing UPS (Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy), XPS (X-ray PS), XRD (X-ray diffraction), and AFM (atomic force microscopy). To verify our understanding of how interfacial changes affect OMAR, we characterized simple Alq3-only devices: one with a SAM and one without it. Despite having the same current density at room temperature, the latter shows a negative MR while the former displays a positive MR.

  6. Organic magnetoresistance under resonant ac drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Raikh, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment, we develop a theory of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in the presence of a resonant ac drive. To this end, we perform a thorough analysis of the dynamics of ac-driven electron-hole polaron pair in magnetic field, which is a sum of external and random hyperfine fields. Resonant ac drive affects the OMAR by modifying the singlet content of the eigenmodes. This, in turn, leads to the change of recombination rate, and ultimately, to the change of the spin-blocking that controls the current. Our analysis demonstrates that, upon increasing the drive amplitude, the blocking eigenmodes of the triplet type acquire a singlet admixture and become unblocking. Most surprisingly, the opposite process goes in parallel: new blocking modes emerge from nonblocking precursors as the drive increases. These emergent blocking modes are similar to subradiant modes in the Dicke effect. A nontrivial evolution of eigenmodes translates into a nontrivial behavior of OMAR with the amplitude of the ac drive: it is initially linear, then passes through a maximum, drops, and finally saturates.

  7. Nodal Quasiparticle in Pseudogapped Colossal Magnetoresistive Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Mannella, N.

    2010-06-02

    A characteristic feature of the copper oxide high-temperature superconductors is the dichotomy between the electronic excitations along the nodal (diagonal) and antinodal (parallel to the Cu-O bonds) directions in momentum space, generally assumed to be linked to the d-wave symmetry of the superconducting state. Angle-resolved photoemission measurements in the superconducting state have revealed a quasiparticle spectrum with a d-wave gap structure that exhibits a maximum along the antinodal direction and vanishes along the nodal direction. Subsequent measurements have shown that, at low doping levels, this gap structure persists even in the high-temperature metallic state, although the nodal points of the superconducting state spread out in finite Fermi arcs. This is the so-called pseudogap phase, and it has been assumed that it is closely linked to the superconducting state, either by assigning it to fluctuating superconductivity or by invoking orders which are natural competitors of d-wave superconductors. Here we report experimental evidence that a very similar pseudogap state with a nodal-antinodal dichotomous character exists in a system that is markedly different from a superconductor: the ferromagnetic metallic groundstate of the colossal magnetoresistive bilayer manganite La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Our findings therefore cast doubt on the assumption that the pseudogap state in the copper oxides and the nodal-antinodal dichotomy are hallmarks of the superconductivity state.

  8. Linear unsaturating magnetoresistance in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ying Tong; Lara, Silvia; Love, Cameron; Ramakrishnan, Navneeth; Adam, Shaffique

    Theoretical works have shown that disordered systems exhibit classical magnetoresistance (MR). In this talk, we examine a variety of experimental systems that observe linear MR at high magnetic fields, including silver chalcogenides, graphene, graphite and Weyl semimetals. We show that a careful analysis of the magnitude of the MR, as well as the field strength at which the MR changes from quadratic to linear, reveal important properties of the system, such as the ratio of the root-mean-square fluctuations in the carrier density and the average carrier density. By looking at other properties such as the zero-field mobility, we show that this carrier density inhomogeneity is consistent with what is known about the microscopic impurities in these experiments. The application of this disorder-induced MR to a variety of different experimental scenarios underline the universality of these theoretical models. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01) and the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College through Grant Number R-607-265-01312.

  9. Magnetoresistance in paramagnetic heavy fermion metals.

    PubMed

    Parihari, D; Vidhyadhiraja, N S

    2009-10-07

    A theoretical study of magnetic field (h) effects on single-particle spectra and the transport quantities of heavy fermion metals in the paramagnetic phase is carried out. We have employed a non-perturbative local moment approach (LMA) to the asymmetric periodic Anderson model within the dynamical mean field framework. The lattice coherence scale ω(L), which is proportional within the LMA to the spin-flip energy scale, and has been shown in earlier studies to be the energy scale at which crossover to single-impurity physics occurs, increases monotonically with increasing magnetic field. The many body Kondo resonance in the density of states at the Fermi level splits into two, with the splitting being proportional to the field itself. For h≥0, we demonstrate adiabatic continuity from the strongly interacting case to a corresponding non-interacting limit, thus establishing Fermi liquid behaviour for heavy fermion metals in the presence of a magnetic field. In the Kondo lattice regime, the theoretically computed magnetoresistance is found to be negative in the entire temperature range. We argue that such a result could be understood at [Formula: see text] by field-induced suppression of spin-flip scattering and at [Formula: see text] through lattice coherence. The coherence peak in the heavy fermion resistivity diminishes and moves to higher temperatures with increasing field. Direct comparison of the theoretical results to the field dependent resistivity measurements in CeB(6) yields good agreement.

  10. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers.

    PubMed

    Stamopoulos, D; Aristomenopoulou, E

    2015-08-26

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent 'on' and 'off', thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis.

  11. The Effects of Fringe Fields on Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Macià, Ferran; Wang, Fujian; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Kent, Andrew; Flatté, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The importance of random hyperfine fields is now widely acknowledged as a vital ingredient for the phenomena of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR). Recent experiments (Phys. Rev. X 2 021013 (2012)) have shown that another type of random field - fringe fields due to a nearby ferromagnet - can also dramatically affect magnetoconductivity. A theoretical analysis of the fringe field OMAR is challenging due to the different properties of the fringe fields when compared to the hyperfine fields. For instance, the range of fringe field strengths is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the hyperfine couplings. The correlation length between fringe fields is also larger by the same degree. We use a recent theory of OMAR that is well-suited to numerically calculate the magnetoresistance with both hyperfine and fringe fields present. We find agreement with key features of experimental fringe-field magnetoresistance dependences on applied magnetic field, including the field values of extrema of the magnetoresistance, the region of large magnetoresistance effects from the fringe fields, and the sign of the effect. This work was supported by an ARO MURI.

  12. Anisotropic Kepler and anisotropic two fixed centres problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Przybylska, Maria; Szumiński, Wojciech

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we show that the anisotropic Kepler problem is dynamically equivalent to a system of two point masses which move in perpendicular lines (or planes) and interact according to Newton's law of universal gravitation. Moreover, we prove that generalised version of anisotropic Kepler problem as well as anisotropic two centres problem are non-integrable. This was achieved thanks to investigation of differential Galois groups of variational equations along certain particular solutions. Properties of these groups yield very strong necessary integrability conditions.

  13. Thermodynamics of anisotropic branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, Daniel; Fernández, Daniel; Patiño, Leonardo; Trancanelli, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We study the thermodynamics of flavor D7-branes embedded in an anisotropic black brane solution of type IIB supergravity. The flavor branes undergo a phase transition between a `Minkowski embedding', in which they lie outside of the horizon, and a `black hole embedding', in which they fall into the horizon. This transition depends on the black hole temperature, its degree of anisotropy, and the mass of the flavor degrees of freedom. It happens either at a critical temperature or at a critical anisotropy. A general lesson we learn from this analysis is that the anisotropy, in this particular realization, induces similar effects as the temperature. In particular, increasing the anisotropy bends the branes more and more into the horizon. Moreover, we observe that the transition becomes smoother for higher anisotropies.

  14. Read/write head having a GMR sensor biased by permanent magnets located between the GMR and the pole shields

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Samuel W.; Rottmayer, Robert Earl; Carey, Matthew J.

    1999-01-01

    A compact read/write head having a biased giant magnetoresistive sensor. Permanent magnet films are placed adjacent to the giant magnetoresistive sensor operating in the current-perpendicular-to the-plane (Cpp) mode and spaced with respect to the sensor by conducting films. These permanent magnet films provide a magnetic bias. The bias field is substantial and fairly uniform across sensor height. Biasing of the giant magnetoresistive sensor provides distinguishable response to the rising and falling edges of a recorded pulse on an adjacent recording medium, improves the linearity of the response, and helps to reduce noise. This read/write head is much simpler to fabricate and pattern and provides an enhanced uniformity of the bias field throughout the sensor.

  15. Analytical theory and method for longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect of optically anisotropic magnetic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Lian, Jie; Li, Ping; Xu, XiJin; Li, MengMeng

    2017-01-01

    The Fresnel equations are solved to analyze the reflection and propagation properties of the ordinary and extraordinary light of the optically anisotropic magnetic film. Using the boundary and propagation matrix, the longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr rotation expression is derived. After that, simulations are performed on optically anisotropic and isotropic Co/SiO2 film. Results show that for Co material in the thin-film limit, the anisotropic Co can provide larger max rotations than the isotropic Co in the visible region. This is because that the refractive index discrepancy of optically anisotropic Co film reduces the Fresnel reflective coefficient rpp, which improves the Kerr rotation. This makes the optically anisotropic Co film more effective in magneto optical sensor design and device fabrication.

  16. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  17. Very low field magnetic resonance imaging with spintronic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreros, Q.; Dyvorne, H.; Campiglio, P.; Jasmin-Lebras, G.; Demonti, A.; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Fermon, C.

    2013-09-01

    A very low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) setup based on magnetoresistive-superconducting mixed sensors is presented. A flux transformer is used to achieve coupling between the sample to image and the mixed sensor. The novel detector was implemented in a spin echo MRI experiment, exposing the mixed sensor to RF pulses without use of any RF switch. The performance of the novel detector is given in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and is compared with classical tuned coils.

  18. Optical trapping of anisotropic nanocylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareil, Paul B.; Sheng, Yunlong

    2013-09-01

    The T-matrix method with the Vector Spherical Wave Function (VSWF) expansions represents some difficulties for computing optical scattering of anisotropic particles. As the divergence of the electric field is nonzero in the anisotropic medium and the VSWFs do not satisfy the anisotropic wave equations one questioned whether the VSWFs are still a suitable basis in the anisotropic medium. We made a systematic and careful review on the vector basis functions and the VSWFs. We found that a field vector in Euclidean space can be decomposed to triplet vectors {L, M, N}, which as non-coplanar. Especially, the vector L is designed to represent non-zero divergence component of the vector solution, so that the VSWF basis is sufficiently general to represent the solutions of the anisotropic wave equation. The mathematical proof can be that when the anisotropic wave equations is solved in the Fourier space, the solution is expanded in the basis of the plan waves with angular spectrum amplitude distributions. The plane waves constitute an orthogonal and complete set for the anisotropic solutions. Furthermore, the plane waves are expanded into the VSWF basis. These two-step expansions are equivalent to the one-step direct expansion of the anisotropic solution to the VSWF basis. We used direct VSWF expansion, along with the point-matching method in the T-matrix, and applied the boundary condition to the normal components displacement field in order to compute the stress and the related forces and torques and to show the mechanism of the optical trap of the anisotropic nano-cylinders.

  19. Stripe sensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Mladen; Vltava, Lvcian; Barrett, Christopher P; Emery, Teresa H; Scherer, Axel

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a general concept of tomographic imaging for the case of an imaging sensor that has a stripelike shape. We first show that there is no difference, in principle, between two-dimensional tomography using conventional electromagnetic or particle radiation and tomography where a stripe sensor is mechanically scanned over a sample at a sequence of different angles. For a single stripe detector imaging, linear motion and angular rotation are required. We experimentally demonstrate single stripe sensor imaging principle using an elongated inductive coil detector. By utilizing an array of parallel stripe sensors that can be individually addressed, two-dimensional imaging can be performed with rotation only, eliminating the requirement for linear motion, as we also experimentally demonstrate with parallel coil array. We conclude that imaging with a stripe-type sensor of particular width and thickness (where the width is much larger than the thickness) is resolution limited only by the thickness (smaller parameter) of the sensor. We give examples of multiple sensor families where this imaging technique may be beneficial such as magnetoresistive, inductive, superconducting quantum interference device, and Hall effect sensors, and, in particular, discuss the possibilities of the technique in the field of magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Huge positive magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic double perovskite metals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Viveka Nand; Majumdar, Pinaki

    2014-07-23

    Metals with large positive magnetoresistance are rare. We demonstrate that antiferromagnetic metallic states, as have been predicted for the double perovskites, are excellent candidates for huge positive magnetoresistance. An applied field suppresses long range antiferromagnetic order leading to a state with short range antiferromagnetic correlations and strong electronic scattering. The field induced resistance ratio can be more than tenfold, at moderate field, in a structurally ordered system, and continues to be almost twofold even in systems with ∼ 25% antisite disorder. Although our explicit demonstration is in the context of a two- dimensional spin-fermion model of the double perovskites, the mechanism we uncover is far more general, complementary to the colossal negative magnetoresistance process, and would operate in other local moment metals that show a field driven suppression of non-ferromagnetic order.

  1. Magnetoresistive junctions based on epitaxial graphene and h-BN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazyev, Oleg; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2009-03-01

    Using a first-principles approach, we investigate the structural, magnetic and transport properties of interfaces based on epitaxially grown monolayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) in combination with ferromagnetic transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni). Such structurally well defined interfaces based on (111) fcc or (0001) hcp transition metals can be produced using simple manufacturing processes. Our calculations predict magnetoresistance ratios over 100% for certain junction compositions. In addition, such systems feature strong antiparallel (Fe and Co) and parallel (Ni) exchange coupling across the interface combined with low junction resistance. The predicted properties position such magnetoresistive junctions as an interesting alternative to the currently used giant and tunneling magnetoresistance systems and make them suitable for practical applications.

  2. Large linear magnetoresistance in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Aamir, Mohammed Ali Goswami, Srijit Ghosh, Arindam; Baenninger, Matthias; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Tripathi, Vikram; Pepper, Michael

    2013-12-04

    We report non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterointerface in the strongly insulating regime. We achieve this by driving the gate voltage below the pinch-off point of the device and operating it in the non-equilibrium regime with high source-drain bias. Remarkably, the magnitude of MR is as large as 500% per Tesla with respect to resistance at zero magnetic field, thus dwarfing most non-magnetic materials which exhibit this linearity. Its primary advantage over most other materials is that both linearity and the enormous magnitude are retained over a broad temperature range (0.3 K to 10 K), thus making it an attractive candidate for cryogenic sensor applications.

  3. Rectification magnetoresistance device: Experimental realization and theoretical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Huang, Qikun; Yan, Yi; Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Jing; Kang, Shishou; Tian, Yufeng

    2016-11-01

    A unique technique has been proposed to realize rectification magnetoresistance (RMR) by combining a commercial diode and a magnetoresistance component in parallel. The observed RMR could be greatly tuned in a wide range by applying direct current and alternating current simultaneously to the device. Moreover, a quantitative theoretical model has been established, which well explained both the observed RMR and the electrical manipulation behavior. The highly tunable RMR and the correlated magnetoelectric functionalities provide an alternative route for developing multi-functional spintronics devices.

  4. Room temperature electrically tunable rectification magnetoresistance in Ge-based Schottky devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qi-Kun; Yan, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Kang, Shishou; Tian, Yu-Feng

    2016-11-01

    Electrical control of magnetotransport properties is crucial for device applications in the field of spintronics. In this work, as an extension of our previous observation of rectification magnetoresistance, an innovative technique for electrical control of rectification magnetoresistance has been developed by applying direct current and alternating current simultaneously to the Ge-based Schottky devices, where the rectification magnetoresistance could be remarkably tuned in a wide range. Moreover, the interface and bulk contribution to the magnetotransport properties has been effectively separated based on the rectification magnetoresistance effect. The state-of-the-art electrical manipulation technique could be adapt to other similar heterojunctions, where fascinating rectification magnetoresistance is worthy of expectation.

  5. Room temperature electrically tunable rectification magnetoresistance in Ge-based Schottky devices

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi-kun; Yan, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Kang, Shishou; Tian, Yu-feng

    2016-01-01

    Electrical control of magnetotransport properties is crucial for device applications in the field of spintronics. In this work, as an extension of our previous observation of rectification magnetoresistance, an innovative technique for electrical control of rectification magnetoresistance has been developed by applying direct current and alternating current simultaneously to the Ge-based Schottky devices, where the rectification magnetoresistance could be remarkably tuned in a wide range. Moreover, the interface and bulk contribution to the magnetotransport properties has been effectively separated based on the rectification magnetoresistance effect. The state-of-the-art electrical manipulation technique could be adapt to other similar heterojunctions, where fascinating rectification magnetoresistance is worthy of expectation. PMID:27876868

  6. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  7. Studies of current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, Khalid Fatthi

    2002-09-01

    Scientifically, measurements of Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic (F/N) metal multilayers with Current flow Perpendicular to the layer Planes (CPP-MR) are of interest because they can provide unique insights into the physical phenomena underlying GMR. Technologically, the CPP-MR is of growing interest because it may be able to provide the larger MRs needed for next generation devices. Most CPP-MR data have been reasonably well described by two simple models, the two-current series-resistor (2CSR) model, in which the only lengths are the thicknesses of the F- and N-metals, t F and tN, and the Valet-Fert extension to when spin-flipping occurs, where the characteristic lengths are the spin-flipping (or spin-diffusion) lengths lFSF and lNSF . This thesis consists of several experiments that test and/or use these models. (1) Recently, new data were claimed to be evidence that there are additional length scales in the CPP-MR, the mean-free-paths for elastic scattering, lambdaN and lambdaF (actually two lengths in the F-metal). After reproducing the reported results, we extended them in three different ways to test the claimed interpretation. We conclude that the mean-free-paths are not responsible for the behavior of the data; rather we propose spin-memory-loss at the F/N interfaces as the primary explanation. (2) The CPP-MR would be more competitive for devices if the total specific resistance, area times resistance, AR, the change in AR with magnetic field, ADeltaR, or both can be increased. We investigated three potential ways to increase them: (a) by alloying the F metal layer with an impurity expected to produce a large change in resistivity without decreasing the anisotropic scattering that is fundamental to GMR, (b) by creating additional interfaces within individual ferromagnetic layers, and (c) by inserting a source of strong spin-flipping, in hopes of reducing the contribution of contact or lead resistances to ADeltaR. (3) Ruthenium (Ru

  8. Hybrid magnetoresistance in Pt-based multilayers: Effect originated from strong interfacial spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kangkang; Xiao, Jiaxing; Wu, Yong; Miao, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Jianhua; Jiang, Yong

    2016-02-01

    The hybrid magnetoresistance (MR) behaviors in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt, Mn1.5Ga/Pt and Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt multilayers have been investigated. Both planer Hall effect (PHE) and angle-dependent MR in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt revealed the combination of spin Hall MR (SMR) and normal anisotropic MR (AMR), indicating the large contribution of strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at the interfaces. When Pt contacted with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) metal Mn1.5Ga, the strong interfacial SOC modified the effective anomalous Hall effect. The MR in Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt is not a simple combination of SMR and AMR, but ascribed to the complicated domain wall scattering and strong interfacial SOC when Pt is sandwiched by the in-plane magnetized Co90Fe10 and the PMA Mn1.5Ga.

  9. Hybrid magnetoresistance in Pt-based multilayers: Effect originated from strong interfacial spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Meng, Kangkang; Xiao, Jiaxing; Wu, Yong; Miao, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Jianhua; Jiang, Yong

    2016-02-04

    The hybrid magnetoresistance (MR) behaviors in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt, Mn1.5Ga/Pt and Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt multilayers have been investigated. Both planer Hall effect (PHE) and angle-dependent MR in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt revealed the combination of spin Hall MR (SMR) and normal anisotropic MR (AMR), indicating the large contribution of strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at the interfaces. When Pt contacted with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) metal Mn1.5Ga, the strong interfacial SOC modified the effective anomalous Hall effect. The MR in Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt is not a simple combination of SMR and AMR, but ascribed to the complicated domain wall scattering and strong interfacial SOC when Pt is sandwiched by the in-plane magnetized Co90Fe10 and the PMA Mn1.5Ga.

  10. Effect of thermal deformation on giant magnetoresistance of flexible spin valves grown on polyvinylidene fluoride membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luping, Liu; Qingfeng, Zhan; Xin, Rong; Huali, Yang; Yali, Xie; Xiaohua, Tan; Run-wei, Li

    2016-07-01

    We fabricated flexible spin valves on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes and investigated the influence of thermal deformation of substrates on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) behaviors. The large magnetostrictive Fe81Ga19 (FeGa) alloy and the low magnetostrictive Fe19Ni81 (FeNi) alloy were selected as the free and pinned ferromagnetic layers. In addition, the exchange bias (EB) of the pinned layer was set along the different thermal deformation axes α 31 or α 32 of PVDF. The GMR ratio of the reference spin valves grown on Si intrinsically increases with lowering temperature due to an enhancement of spontaneous magnetization. For flexible spin valves, when decreasing temperature, the anisotropic thermal deformation of PVDF produces a uniaxial anisotropy along the α 32 direction, which changes the distribution of magnetic domains. As a result, the GMR ratio at low temperature for spin valves with EB∥ α 32 becomes close to that on Si, but for spin valves with EB∥ α 31 is far away from that on Si. This thermal effect on GMR behaviors is more significant when using magnetostrictive FeGa as the free layer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374312, 51401230, 51522105, and 51471101) and the Ningbo Science and Technology Innovation Team, China (Grant No. 2015B11001).

  11. Hybrid magnetoresistance in Pt-based multilayers: Effect originated from strong interfacial spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Kangkang; Xiao, Jiaxing; Wu, Yong; Miao, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Jianhua; Jiang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid magnetoresistance (MR) behaviors in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt, Mn1.5Ga/Pt and Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt multilayers have been investigated. Both planer Hall effect (PHE) and angle-dependent MR in Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt revealed the combination of spin Hall MR (SMR) and normal anisotropic MR (AMR), indicating the large contribution of strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at the interfaces. When Pt contacted with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) metal Mn1.5Ga, the strong interfacial SOC modified the effective anomalous Hall effect. The MR in Mn1.5Ga/Pt/Co90Fe10/Pt is not a simple combination of SMR and AMR, but ascribed to the complicated domain wall scattering and strong interfacial SOC when Pt is sandwiched by the in-plane magnetized Co90Fe10 and the PMA Mn1.5Ga. PMID:26843035

  12. Actuation performances of anisotropic gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardinocchi, P.; Teresi, L.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the actuation performances of anisotropic gels driven by mechanical and chemical stimuli, in terms of both deformation processes and stroke-curves, and distinguished between the fast response of gels before diffusion starts and the asymptotic response attained at the steady state. We also showed as the range of forces that an anisotropic hydrogel can exert when constrained is especially wide; indeed, changing fiber orientation allows us to induce shear as well as transversely isotropic extensions.

  13. Anisotropic assembly and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.; Uminsky, David T.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of anisotropy in two classes of individual-based models for self-organization, collective behavior and self-assembly. We accomplish this via first-order dynamical systems of pairwise interacting particles that incorporate anisotropic interactions. At a continuum level, these models represent the natural anisotropic variants of the well-known aggregation equation. We leverage this framework to analyze the impact of anisotropic effects upon the self-assembly of co-dimension one equilibrium structures, such as micelles and vesicles. Our analytical results reveal the regularizing effect of anisotropy, and isolate the contexts in which anisotropic effects are necessary to achieve dynamical stability of co-dimension one structures. Our results therefore place theoretical limits on when anisotropic effects can be safely neglected. We also explore whether anisotropic effects suffice to induce pattern formation in such particle systems. We conclude with brief numerical studies that highlight various aspects of the models we introduce, elucidate their phase structure and partially validate the analysis we provide.

  14. Giant Magnetoresistance-based Biosensor for Detection of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Venkatramana D.; Wu, Kai; Perez, Andres M.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a simple and sensitive method for the detection of influenza A virus based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor. This assay employs monoclonal antibodies to viral nucleoprotein (NP) in combination with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Presence of influenza virus allows the binding of MNPs to the GMR sensor and the binding is proportional to the concentration of virus. Binding of MNPs onto the GMR sensor causes change in the resistance of sensor, which is measured in a real time electrical readout. GMR biosensor detected as low as 1.5 × 102 TCID50/mL virus and the signal intensity increased with increasing concentration of virus up to 1.0 × 105 TCID50/mL. This study showed that the GMR biosensor assay is relevant for diagnostic application since the virus concentration in nasal samples of influenza virus infected swine was reported to be in the range of 103 to 105 TCID50/mL. PMID:27065967

  15. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  16. Low temperature magnetoresistance measurements on bismuth nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ch; Weiss, G; Cornelius, T W; Toimil-Molares, M E; Neumann, R

    2009-05-20

    We present low temperature resistance R(T) and magnetoresistance measurements for Bi nanowires with diameters between 100 and 500 nm, which are close to being single-crystalline. The nanowires were fabricated by electrochemical deposition in pores of polycarbonate membranes. R(T) varies as T(2) in the low temperature range 1.5 Kmagnetoresistance. The transverse magnetoresistance of all samples shows a clear B(1.5) variation. Its size depends strongly on the diameter of the wires but only weakly on temperature. Finally, a steplike increase in the magnetoresistance of our sample with a wire diameter of 100 nm was found and this might be attributed to a transition from one-dimensional to three-dimensional localization.

  17. Tuning spin transport properties and molecular magnetoresistance through contact geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana; Delin, Anna

    2014-01-28

    Molecular spintronics seeks to unite the advantages of using organic molecules as nanoelectronic components, with the benefits of using spin as an additional degree of freedom. For technological applications, an important quantity is the molecular magnetoresistance. In this work, we show that this parameter is very sensitive to the contact geometry. To demonstrate this, we perform ab initio calculations, combining the non-equilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory, on a dithienylethene molecule placed between spin-polarized nickel leads of varying geometries. We find that, in general, the magnetoresistance is significantly higher when the contact is made to sharp tips than to flat surfaces. Interestingly, this holds true for both resonant and tunneling conduction regimes, i.e., when the molecule is in its “closed” and “open” conformations, respectively. We find that changing the lead geometry can increase the magnetoresistance by up to a factor of ∼5. We also introduce a simple model that, despite requiring minimal computational time, can recapture our ab initio results for the behavior of magnetoresistance as a function of bias voltage. This model requires as its input only the density of states on the anchoring atoms, at zero bias voltage. We also find that the non-resonant conductance in the open conformation of the molecule is significantly impacted by the lead geometry. As a result, the ratio of the current in the closed and open conformations can also be tuned by varying the geometry of the leads, and increased by ∼400%.

  18. Anisotropic artificial substrates for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahvarpour, Attieh

    The perfect electromagnetic conductor (PEMC) boundary is a novel fundamental electromagnetic concept. It is a generalized description of the electromagnetic boundary conditions including the perfect electric conductor (PEC) and the perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) and due to its fundamental properties, it has the potential of enabling several electromagnetic applications. However, the PEMC boundaries concept had remained at the theoretical level and has not been practically realized. Therefore, motivated by the importance of this electromagnetic fundamental concept and its potential applications, the first contribution of this thesis is focused on the practical implementation of the PEMC boundaries by exploiting Faraday rotation principle and ground reflection in the ferrite materials which are intrinsically anisotropic. As a result, this thesis reports the first practical approach for the realization of PEMC boundaries. A generalized scattering matrix (GSM) is used for the analysis of the grounded-ferrite PEMC boundaries structure. As an application of the PEMC boundaries, a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waveguide is experimentally demonstrated using grounded ferrite PMC (as particular case of the PEMC boundaries) side walls. Perfect electromagnetic conductor boundaries may find applications in various types of sensors, reflectors, polarization convertors and polarization-based radio frequency identifiers. Leaky-wave antennas perform as high directivity and frequency beam scanning antennas and as a result they enable applications in radar, point-to-point communications and MIMO systems. The second contribution of this thesis is introducing and analysing a novel broadband and highly directive two-dimensional leaky-wave antenna. This antenna operates differently in the lower and higher frequency ranges. Toward its lower frequencies, it allows full-space conical-beam scanning while at higher frequencies, it provides fixed-beam radiation (at a designable angle

  19. Microfluidic multiplexed partitioning enables flexible and effective utilization of magnetic sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Bechstein, Daniel J B; Ng, Elaine; Lee, Jung-Rok; Cone, Stephanie G; Gaster, Richard S; Osterfeld, Sebastian J; Hall, Drew A; Weaver, James A; Wilson, Robert J; Wang, Shan X

    2015-11-21

    We demonstrate microfluidic partitioning of a giant magnetoresistive sensor array into individually addressable compartments that enhances its effective use. Using different samples and reagents in each compartment enables measuring of cross-reactive species and wide dynamic ranges on a single chip. This compartmentalization technique motivates the employment of high density sensor arrays for highly parallelized measurements in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  20. Permanent-Magnet Free Biasing of MR Sensors with Tunable Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, Sean; Dasilva, Fabio; Pappas, David

    2007-03-01

    Exchange coupling^1 has been previously observed in a trilayer structure of ferromagnet (FM)/non-magnetic/antiferromagnet (AFM) and the exchange bias was found to be a function of the thickness of the buffer layer.^2,3,4 This unique coupling is used as a stabilizing bias for the sense layer with the additional ability to tailor the magnetic gain of the sensor for various applications. The elimination of permanent magnet bias results in the elimination of one patterning and one deposition step. Ruthenium (Ru) is used as the buffer layer and is self aligned with the FM and AFM layers and the thickness is varied to change the slope of the transfer curve in the linear region. Sensor devices are fabricated with a bipolar output, a medium sensitivity, and a wide field range. The results show that this biasing scheme is well suited for barber pole and soft adjacent layer (SAL) anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) stripes used in magnetic field sensors with a FM layer of Permalloy (NiFe) and an AFM layer of Iridium-Manganese (IrMn). Applications include a 256 channel read head used for magnetic forensics. 1N.J. Gokemeijer, T. Ambrose, C.L. Chien, N. Wang and K.K. Fung, J. Appl. Phys. 81 (8), 4999, 15 April 1997. 2W.H. Meiklejohn and C.P. Bean, Phys. Rev. 102, 1413 1956; 105, 904, 1957. 3L. Thomas, A.J. Kellock and S.S.P. Parkin, J. Appl. Phys. 87 (9), 5061, 1 May 2000. 4D. Wang, J. Daughton, C. Nordman, P. Eames and J. Fink, J. Appl. Phys. 99, 2006.

  1. Light propagation through anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Italo; Agrawal, Brij; Restaino, Sergio

    2011-03-01

    A wealth of experimental data has shown that atmospheric turbulence can be anisotropic; in this case, a Kolmogorov spectrum does not describe well the atmospheric turbulence statistics. In this paper, we show a quantitative analysis of anisotropic turbulence by using a non-Kolmogorov power spectrum with an anisotropic coefficient. The spectrum we use does not include the inner and outer scales, it is valid only inside the inertial subrange, and it has a power-law slope that can be different from a Kolmogorov one. Using this power spectrum, in the weak turbulence condition, we analyze the impact of the power-law variations α on the long-term beam spread and scintillation index for several anisotropic coefficient values ς. We consider only horizontal propagation across the turbulence cells, assuming circular symmetry is maintained on the orthogonal plane to the propagation direction. We conclude that the anisotropic coefficient influences both the long-term beam spread and the scintillation index by the factor ς(2-α).

  2. Fluctuation relations for anisotropic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio-Sanchez, R.; Harris, R. J.; Touchette, H.

    2014-02-01

    Currents of particles or energy in driven non-equilibrium steady states are known to satisfy certain symmetries, referred to as fluctuation relations, determining the ratio of the probabilities of positive fluctuations to negative ones. A generalization of these fluctuation relations has been proposed recently for extended non-equilibrium systems of dimension greater than one, assuming, crucially, that they are isotropic (Hurtado P. I., Pérez-Espigares C., del Pozo J. J. and Garrido P. L., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 7704). Here we relax this assumption and derive a fluctuation relation for d-dimensional systems having anisotropic bulk driving rates. We test the validity of this anisotropic fluctuation relation by calculating the particle current fluctuations in the 2d anisotropic zero-range process, using both exact and fluctuating hydrodynamic approaches.

  3. Coexistence of tunneling magnetoresistance and Josephson effects in SFIFS junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vávra, O.; Soni, R.; Petraru, A.; Himmel, N.; Vávra, I.; Fabian, J.; Kohlstedt, H.; Strunk, Ch.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate an integration of tunneling magnetoresistance and the Josephson effects within one tunneling junction. Several sets of Nb-Fe-Al-Al2O3-Fe-Nb wafers with varying Al and Fe layers thickness were prepared to systematically explore the competition of TMR and Josephson effects. A coexistence of the critical current IC(dFe) and the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio T M R(dFe) is observed for iron layer dFe thickness range 1.9 and 2.9 nm. Further optimization such as thinner Al2O3 layer leads to an enhancement of the critical current and thus to an extension of the coexistence regime up to dFe≃3.9 nm Fe.

  4. Giant magnetoresistance in the variable-range hopping regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, L. B.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2013-09-15

    We predict the universal power-law dependence of the localization length on the magnetic field in the strongly localized regime. This effect is due to the orbital quantum interference. Physically, this dependence shows up in an anomalously large negative magnetoresistance in the hopping regime. The reason for the universality is that the problem of the electron tunneling in a random media belongs to the same universality class as the directed polymer problem even in the case of wave functions of random sign. We present numerical simulations that prove this conjecture. We discuss the existing experiments that show anomalously large magnetoresistance. We also discuss the role of localized spins in real materials and the spin polarizing effect of the magnetic field.

  5. Separating Positive and Negative Magnetoresistance in Organic Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, F. L.; Wagemans, W.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2007-12-01

    We study the transition between positive and negative organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in tris-(8 hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), in order to identify the elementary mechanisms governing this phenomenon. We show how the sign of OMAR changes as function of the applied voltage and temperature. The transition from negative to positive magnetoresistance (MR) is found to be accompanied by an increase in slope of log⁡(I) versus log⁡(V). ac admittance measurements show this transition coincides with the onset of minority charge (hole) injection in the device. All these observations are consistent with two simultaneous contributions with opposite sign of MR, which may be assigned to holes and electrons having different magnetic field responses.

  6. Magnetoresistance in organic light-emitting diode structures under illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Shakya, P.; Kreouzis, T.; Gillin, W. P.

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated the effect of illumination on the organic magnetoresistance (OMR) in organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structures. The results show that it is possible to obtain OMR at voltages below “turn-on,” where no OMR was visible for devices operated in the dark. The photoinduced OMR has a field dependence that is identical to that obtained for OLEDs containing very thin layers, where triplet dissociation at the cathode was a major component of the OMR. At voltages around the open circuit voltage, where the current through the device is very small, very large OMRs of ˜300% can be observed. The results support our proposed model for organic magnetoresistance as being caused in part by the interaction of free carriers with triplet excitons within the device. The results suggest that the introduction of a low field magnet could provide a simple means of improving the efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells.

  7. Enhancing magnetoresistance in tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate modified iron oxide nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhong-Peng; Luan, Zhong-Zhi; Cai, Pei-Yu; Wang, Tao; Li, Cheng-Hui; Wu, Di; Zuo, Jing-Lin; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-06-01

    We report a facile approach to stabilize Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) by using tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate (TTF-COO-) and to control electron transport with an enhanced magnetoresistance (MR) effect in TTF-COO-Fe3O4 NP assemblies. This TTF-COO-coating is advantageous over other conventional organic coatings, making it possible to develop stable Fe3O4 NP arrays for sensitive spintronics applications.We report a facile approach to stabilize Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) by using tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate (TTF-COO-) and to control electron transport with an enhanced magnetoresistance (MR) effect in TTF-COO-Fe3O4 NP assemblies. This TTF-COO-coating is advantageous over other conventional organic coatings, making it possible to develop stable Fe3O4 NP arrays for sensitive spintronics applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details; supplementary figures and tables. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03311c

  8. Magnetoresistance and magnetic properties in amorphous Fe-based wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, G.; Buttino, G.; Cecchetti, A.; Poppi, M.

    2001-06-01

    The longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistances in amorphous Fe 77.5Si 7.5B 15 wires are studied at different values of the DC-bias currents in order to clarify the mechanism of the magnetization according to a 'core-shell' domain model. The role of closure domain structures in the magnetization process of the wires is analysed. Moreover, the effects of the Joule heating on the internal stresses, introduced during the rapid quenching in the sample preparation, are examined.

  9. Flat magnetic exchange springs as mechanism for additional magnetoresistance in magnetic nanoisland arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltaev, A. P.; Pudonin, F. A.; Sherstnev, I. A.; Egorov, D. A.; Kozmin, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    Process of magnetization and magnetoresistance have been studied in nanoisland bilayer systems of FeNi-Co. Hysteresis loops show characteristic features (steps) most clearly observed in certain orientations of the sample in a magnetic field. To explain these features the concept of flat magnetic exchange spring has been introduced for nanoisland bilayers. It has been proposed that additional magnetoresistance can be the result of spin-dependent scattering of electrons in the area of flat magnetic exchange spring. Magnetoresistance studies of bilayer systems has shown that additional magnetoresistance occurs at the same magnetic fields as steps on hysteresis loops.

  10. Preparation and magnetoresistance of silver and copper chalcogenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuprakov, Ilya; Watts, Steven; Wirth, Steffen; von Molnár, Stephan; Dahmen, Klaus-Hermann

    1998-03-01

    An unexpected giant positive magnetoresitance was recently discovered in non-stoichiometric crystals of Ag_2Te and Ag_2Se [1]. There, a linear magnetoresistance effect as high as 120% was observed in fields of 4 T at room temperature. Here we report on thin films of copper and silver chalcogenides prepared by a vapor phase transport method. A prefered grain orientation is found in the films after annealing. Resistance, magnetoresistance and Hall effect were measured. Typically, the resistivity is temperature independent below 70 K with a value of 1 mΩ cm. As in the crystals, there is a large positive magnetoresistance, but the field dependence is non-linear with a typical value of 50% at room temperature and 200% at temperatures below 100 K for applied fields of 6 T. Variations of the deposition techniques are explored in order to establish the relationship between the deposition conditions and transport properties. [0.25cm] [1] R. Xu, A. Husmann, T.F. Rosenbaum, M.-L. Saboungi, E.J. Enderby and P.B. Littlewood, Nature 390, 57 (1997).

  11. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 1017 cm−3 at 300 K to 2.2 × 1016 cm−3 below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed. PMID:26744088

  12. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 1017 cm-3 at 300 K to 2.2 × 1016 cm-3 below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed.

  13. Multiband superconductivity in Ta4Pd3Te16 with anisotropic gap structure.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wen-He; Liu, Yi; Li, Yu-Ke; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Bao, Jin-Ke; Feng, Chun-Mu; Li, S Y; Xu, Zhu-An; Cao, Guang-Han

    2015-08-19

    We carried out measurements of the magnetoresistance, magnetic susceptibility and specific heat on crystals of the low-dimensional transition metal telluride Ta4Pd3Te16. Our results indicate that Ta4Pd3Te16 is an anisotropic type-II superconductor in the clean limit with the extracted Ginzburg-Landau parameter KGL = 84. The upper critical field Hc2(T) shows an anomalous temperature dependence at low temperatures and the anisotropy of Hc2(T) is strongly T-dependent, both of which indicate a multiband scenario. The electronic specific heat Cel(T) can be consistently described by a two-gap (s   +   d waves) model from the base temperature T/Tc ~ 0.12 up to Tc. Our results suggest nodal and multiband superconductivity in Ta4Pd3Te16.

  14. Synthesis and anisotropic magnetic and transport properties of cubic SrCoO3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Youwen; Kaneko, Yoshio; Ishiwata, Shintaro; Taguchi, Yasujiro; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2011-03-01

    Solid state oxides containing transition metals with unusually high valence states exhibit interesting physical properties. However, due to the unstableness of these high valence states, high pressure is often needed to stabilize such high valence states. We were successful in growing a large-size SrCo O3 single crystal by using high-pressure technique. This material shows good metallic behavior with high ferromagnetic Curie temperature about 305 K, and the easy magnetization axis is 111 > direction . ThespinmomentofCo 4+ ionmeasuredat 2 Kand 7 Tisabout 2.50 μB , suggesting an spin configuration as predicted by theoretical calculations. Although SrCoO3 has a highly symmetric cubic crystal structure (Pm-3m), it exhibits significant anisotropic magnetoresistance at low temperatures.

  15. Large low-field positive magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic half-Heusler ScPtBi single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhipeng; Wang, Yue; Liu, Enke; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng

    2015-11-01

    High-quality nonmagnetic half-Heusler ScPtBi single crystals were synthesized by a Bi self-flux method. This compound was revealed to be a hole-dominated semimetal with a large low-field magnetoresistance up to 240% at 2 K in a magnetic field of 1 T. Magneto-transport measurements demonstrated that the large low-field magnetoresistance effect resulted from the coexistence of field-induced metal-semiconductor transition and weak-antilocalization effect. Moreover, Hall measurements indicated that ScPtBi single crystal showed a high mobility over a wide temperature region even up to room temperature (4050 cm2V-1s-1 at 2 K-2016 cm2V-1s-1 at 300 K). These findings not only suggest the nonmagnetic ScPtBi semimetal a potential material candidate for applications in high-sensitivity magnetic sensors but also are of great significance to comprehensively understand the rare-earth based half-Heusler compounds.

  16. Extremely large magnetoresistance in the type-II Weyl semimetal Mo Te2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Lv, H. Y.; Luo, X.; Lu, W. J.; Pei, Q. L.; Lin, G. T.; Han, Y. Y.; Zhu, X. B.; Song, W. H.; Sun, Y. P.

    2016-12-01

    We performed the angle dependent magnetoresistance (MR), Hall effect measurements, the temperature dependent magneto-thermoelectric power (TEP) S (T ) measurements, and the first-principles calculations to study the electronic properties of orthorhombic phase Mo Te2 (Td-Mo Te2) , which was proposed to be electronically two dimensional (2D). There are some interesting findings about Td-Mo Te2 . (1) A scaling approach ɛθ=(sin2θ +γ-2co s2θ ) 1 /2 is applied, where θ is the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis of the crystal and γ is the mass anisotropy. Unexpectedly, the electronically three-dimensional (3D) character with γ as low as 1.9 is observed in Td-Mo Te2 . (2) The possible Lifshitz transition and the following electronic structure change can be verified around T ˜150 K and T ˜60 K , which is supported by the evidence of the slope changing of the temperature dependence of TEP, the carrier density extracted from Hall resistivity, and the onset temperature of γ obtained from the MR measurements. The extremely large MR effect in Td-Mo Te2 could originate from the combination of the electron-hole compensation and a particular orbital texture on the electron pocket, which is supported by the calculations of electronic structure. Our results may provide a general scaling relation for the anisotropic MR and help to recognize the origins of the MR effect in other systems, such as the Weyl semimetals and the Dirac ones.

  17. Effectis of Lattice Distortion, Polaron Sonduction and Double-Exchange Interaction on the Physical Properties of Magnetoresistive Manganites and Cobaltites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.; Wei, J. Y. T.; Fu, C. C.; Beach, G.; Huynh, J.; Samoilov, A. V.; Boris, A. V.; Kovaleva, N. N.; Bazhenov, A. V.

    1997-01-01

    The relevance of lattice distortion, polaron conduction, and double-exchange interaction to the occurrence of colossal magnetoresistance (SMR) is investigated by comparing the physical properties of magnetoresistive manganites and cobaltites.

  18. Signature of enhanced spin-orbit interaction in the magnetoresistance of LaTiO3/SrTiO3 interfaces on δ doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shubhankar; Hossain, Z.; Budhani, R. C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of modulation of spin-orbit interaction (SOI) at the interface of LaTiO3/SrTiO3 by δ doping with an isostructural ferromagnetic perovskite LaCoO3. The sheet carrier density at the interface decreases exponentially with δ -doping thickness. We have explored that the spin-orbit scattering time (τs o) can be decreased by nearly three orders of magnitude, whereas the inelastic scattering time (τi) remains almost constant with δ -doping thickness. We have also observed that the τi varies almost inversely proportional to temperature and τs o remains insensitive to temperature, which suggest that the spin relaxation in these interfaces follows D'yakonov-Perel mechanism. The observed in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance is attributed to the mixing of the spin-up and spin-down states of the d band at the Fermi level due to SOI.

  19. Unusual magnetoresistance in cubic B20 Fe0.85Co0.15Si chiral magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S. X.; Chen, Fei; Kang, Jian; Zang, Jiadong; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-06-24

    The B20 chiral magnets with broken inversion symmetry and C4 rotation symmetry have attracted much attention. The broken inversion symmetry leads to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya that gives rise to the helical and Skyrmion states.Wereport the unusual magnetoresistance (MR) of B20 chiral magnet Fe0.85Co0.15Si that directly reveals the broken C4 rotation symmetry and shows the anisotropic scattering by Skyrmions with respect to the current directions. The intimacy between unusual MR and broken symmetry is well confirmed by theoretically studying an effective Hamiltonian with spin–orbit coupling. In conclusion, the unusual MR serves as a transport signature for the Skyrmion phase.

  20. Digital magnetic recording systems utilizing magnetoresistive (MR) playback technology: Theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Eric Justin

    1997-11-01

    The use of magnetoresistive playback technology in high density magnetic recording systems poses special challenges for the hard drive designer. The MR sensor is an intrinsically nonlinear device which must be biased into a region of linear response with respect to the external field. Additional magnetic structures are required to stabilize the sensor against domain formation. These structures result in complicated magnetization processes during the playback of recorded information. The spatial variation of the MR head replay voltage is complicated and has asymmetries due to the magnetic structure of the device. These issues require sophisticated modeling to properly characterize the system performance. This dissertation presents studies of several key problems involved with integrating MR heads into hard disk drives. Models of varying levels of sophistication have been developed for this work. These range from simple linear reciprocity analyses to large scale numerical energy minimization techniques. The spatial variation of the MR playback voltage is studied as a function of the system geometry using a linear theory. The response is found to depend strongly on both the head and medium parameters. Instabilities are investigated using a large scale numerical model for a particular head fabrication geometry. The interface between the stabilizing magnetic structures and the head material produces repeatable hysteretic effects in the voltage response. The saturation of MR heads is characterized using numerical modeling. This is important for estimates of the error rate in the drive. The results show that the saturation characteristics can vary significantly between different head designs and as a function of the spatial position of the device. The issues involved with the use of MR heads as positioning sensors are also addressed. The servo system stability is a strong function of the recording parameters and the head spatial symmetry. Optimization of the servo system

  1. Yield surfaces for anisotropic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. D.; Thacker, B. H.

    2000-04-01

    Aerospace systems are incorporating composite materials into their structures. The composite materials are often anisotropic in mechanical response due to their geometric layout. For many years, the failure surfaces of anisotropic materials were thought to be characterizable by a quadratic function in the stress, referred to as a Tsai-Wu yield surface, or, in a more restrictive form, a Tsai-Hill yield surface. Such a representation does not work for materials that are strong in two directions and weak in one direction, which is the case of most interest since it represents fiber/epoxy composite plates. This paper demonstrates the impossibility of modeling the failure surface with either the Tsai-Wu or Tsai-Hill failure surfaces. A yield surface is presented based on the lemniscate, which is quartic in the stress. This new yield surface addresses the case of strong in two directions and weak in one.

  2. Anisotropic ripple deformation in phosphorene

    DOE PAGES

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C.; ...

    2015-04-07

    Here, two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticitymore » theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.« less

  3. Anisotropic ripple deformation in phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C.; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-04-07

    Here, two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  4. Anisotropic Ripple Deformation in Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Smith, Sean C; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-05-07

    Two-dimensional materials tend to become crumpled according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem, and the resulting ripple deformation may significantly influence electronic properties as observed in graphene and MoS2. Here, we unveil by first-principles calculations a new, highly anisotropic ripple pattern in phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus, where compression-induced ripple deformation occurs only along the zigzag direction in the strain range up to 10%, but not the armchair direction. This direction-selective ripple deformation mode in phosphorene stems from its puckered structure with coupled hinge-like bonding configurations and the resulting anisotropic Poisson ratio. We also construct an analytical model using classical elasticity theory for ripple deformation in phosphorene under arbitrary strain. The present results offer new insights into the mechanisms governing the structural and electronic properties of phosphorene crucial to its device applications.

  5. Slotted Antenna with Anisotropic Covering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Slotted Antenna with Anisotropic Covering David A. Tonn et al Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St...NUWC 300055 Distribution A An antenna includes a tubular, conductive radiator having a longitudinal slot formed therein from a first end of the...conductive radiator to a second end of the conductive radiator. An antenna feed can be joined to the conductive radiator adjacent to and across the slot

  6. Yield Surfaces for Anisotropic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. D.; Thacker, B. H.

    1999-06-01

    Modern aerospace systems are incorporating composite materials into their structures. Often, the composite materials are anisotropic in their mechanical response due to the geometric layout of fibers. For many years, the failure surfaces of anisotropic materials were thought to be characterizable by a quadratic function in the stress, often referred to as a Tsai-Wu yield surface, or, in a more restrictive form, a Tsai-Hill yield surface. Such a representation does not work for materials that are strong in two directions and weak in one direction, which, unfortunately, is the case of most interest since it represents most composite plates. This paper demonstrates the impossibility of modeling the failure surface with both the Tsai-Wu and Tsai-Hill failure surfaces. We then present a yield surface based on the lemniscate, which is quartic in the stress. This new yield surface addresses the case of strong in two directions and weak in one. Calculations with a fragment impacting a composite plate modeled with the new yield surface are presented. Modifications of the yield surface are presented to allow, in a limited way, materials that are both anisotropic and have differing strengths in tension and compression.

  7. Viscoacoustic anisotropic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Li, Zhenchun; Huang, Jianping; Li, Jinli

    2017-01-01

    A viscoacoustic vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) quasi-differential wave equation, which takes account for both the viscosity and anisotropy of media, is proposed for wavefield simulation in this study. The finite difference method is used to solve the equations, for which the attenuation terms are solved in the wavenumber domain, and all remaining terms in the time-space domain. To stabilize the adjoint wavefield, robust regularization operators are applied to the wave equation to eliminate the high-frequency component of the numerical noise produced during the backward propagation of the viscoacoustic wavefield. Based on these strategies, we derive the corresponding gradient formula and implement a viscoacoustic VTI full waveform inversion (FWI). Numerical tests verify that our proposed viscoacoustic VTI FWI can produce accurate and stable inversion results for viscoacoustic VTI data sets. In addition, we test our method's sensitivity to velocity, Q, and anisotropic parameters. Our results show that the sensitivity to velocity is much higher than that to Q and anisotropic parameters. As such, our proposed method can produce acceptable inversion results as long as the Q and anisotropic parameters are within predefined thresholds.

  8. Superconductivity emerging from a suppressed large magnetoresistant state in tungsten ditelluride.

    PubMed

    Kang, Defen; Zhou, Yazhou; Yi, Wei; Yang, Chongli; Guo, Jing; Shi, Youguo; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Sheng; Li, Aiguo; Yang, Ke; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Guangming; Sun, Liling; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2015-07-23

    The recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in tungsten ditelluride provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure. Here we report the suppression of the large magnetoresistance and emergence of superconductivity in pressurized tungsten ditelluride via high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges. No structural phase transition is observed under the pressure investigated. In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones. Significantly, at the critical pressure, a sign change of the Hall coefficient is observed.

  9. Superconductivity emerging from a suppressed large magnetoresistant state in tungsten ditelluride

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Defen; Zhou, Yazhou; Yi, Wei; Yang, Chongli; Guo, Jing; Shi, Youguo; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Sheng; Li, Aiguo; Yang, Ke; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Guangming; Sun, Liling; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in tungsten ditelluride provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure. Here we report the suppression of the large magnetoresistance and emergence of superconductivity in pressurized tungsten ditelluride via high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges. No structural phase transition is observed under the pressure investigated. In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones. Significantly, at the critical pressure, a sign change of the Hall coefficient is observed. PMID:26203807

  10. An integrated low 1/f noise and high-sensitivity CMOS instrumentation amplifier for TMR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Luan, Bo; Zhao, Jincai; Liu, Xiaowei

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a very low 1/f noise integrated Wheatstone bridge magnetoresistive sensor ASIC based on magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) technology is presented for high sensitivity measurements. The present CMOS instrumentation amplifier employs the gain-boost folded-cascode structure based on the capacitive-feedback chopper-stabilized technique. By chopping both the input and the output of the amplifier, combined with MTJ magnetoresistive sensitive elements, a noise equivalent magnetoresistance 1 nT/Hz1/2 at 2 Hz, the equivalent input noise spectral density 17 nV/Hz1/2(@2Hz) is achieved. The chip-scale package of the TMR sensor and the instrumentation amplifier is only about 5 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm, while the whole DC current dissipates only 2 mA.

  11. Magnetoresistance of polycrystalline gadolinium with varying grain size

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we report a study of evolution of low field magnetoresistance (MR) of Gadolinium as the grain size in the sample is changed from few microns (∼4 μm) to the nanoscopic regime (∼35 nm). The low field MR has a clear effect on varying grain size. In large grain sample (few μm), the magnetic domains are controlled by local anisotropy field determined mainly by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The low field MR clearly reflects the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. For decreasing gain size, the contribution of spin disorder at the grain boundary increases and enhances the local anisotropy field.

  12. Negative magnetoresistance in a low-k dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, B. T.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2014-12-22

    We observed negative magnetoresistance in amorphous SiCOH, a low-k dielectric, applying modest magnetic fields (<150 Gauss) at room temperature. The conductivity increases with increasing magnetic field. The change in conductivity due to the applied magnetic field increases with electric field and has little or no temperature dependence over the range studied. The magnitude of the effect is independent of the orientation of magnetic field relative to the direction of current flow. The effect is attributed to spin constraints associated with double occupancy of a trap site under the assumption that trap sites which have double occupancy have lower hopping frequencies than traps that have single occupancy.

  13. Distinct electronic structure for the extreme magnetoresistance in YSb

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Zhang, Chaofan; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Liang, Tian; Jia, Chunjing; Jiang, Juan; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Sudi; He, Yu; Mo, S. -K.; Hwang, C. C.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Chen, Y. L.; Mitchell, J. F.; Shen, Z. -X.

    2016-12-23

    An extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been observed in several nonmagnetic semimetals. Increasing experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that the XMR can be driven by either topological protection or electron-hole compensation. Moreover, by investigating the electronic structure of a XMR material, YSb, we present spectroscopic evidence for a special case which lacks topological protection and perfect electron-hole compensation. Further investigations reveal that a cooperative action of a substantial difference between electron and hole mobility and a moderate carrier compensation might contribute to the XMR in YSb.

  14. Percolation Blocking as the Origin of Organic Magneto-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Qing; Sun, Ling-Ling; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    In order to identify the elementary mechanisms governing the organic magneto-resistance (OMAR) phenomenon, we demonstrated how the applied magnetic field acts on the variable hopping mobility. Based on a percolation model of hopping between localized states, we introduced an analytic expression for magneto-mobility and thus the OMAR, and discussed the influence of inter-site electronic interaction, operating bias, film thickness, temperature, and material parameters on the OMAR. The double occupied states and the spin selection rules play a major role in the mechanism.

  15. The electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of metallic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraga, Luis; Henriquez, Ricardo; Bravo, Sergio; Solis, Basilio

    2017-03-01

    Proceeding from exact solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation, we present formulas for the electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of single-crystalline cylindrical nanotubes. The effects of surface scattering are taken into account by introducing different specularity parameters at the inner and outer surfaces. For small values of the inner diameter, these formulas reduce to the respective expressions for cylindrical nanowires. It is found that the existing measurements of the resistivity of nanotubes (Venkata Kamalakar and Raychaudhuri, New J. Phys. 14, 043032 (2012)) can be accurately described by this formalism.

  16. Effects of repetitive bending on the magnetoresistance of a flexible spin-valve

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.-H.; Kwak, W.-Y.; Cho, B. K.; Choi, H. Y.; Kim, G. H.

    2015-05-07

    A positive magnetostrictive single layer (CoFe) and top-pinned spin-valve structure with positive magnetostrictive free (NiFe) and pinned (CoFe) layers were deposited on flexible polyethylene terephthalate film to investigate the changes in the magnetic properties in flexible environments, especially with a repetitive bending process. It was found that the stress, applied by repetitive bending, changes significantly the magnetic anisotropy of both layers in a single and spin-valve structure depending on the direction of applied stress. The changes in magnetic anisotropy were understood in terms of the inverse magnetostriction effect (the Villari effect) and the elastic recovery force from the flexibility of the polymer substrate. Repetitive bending with tensile stress transverse (or parallel) to the magnetic easy axis was found to enhance (or reduce) the magnetic anisotropy and, consequently, the magnetoresistance ratio of a spin-valve. The observed effects of bending stress in this study should be considered for the practical applications of electro-magnetic devices, especially magneto-striction sensor.

  17. Rapid and specific detection of cell-derived microvesicles using a magnetoresistive biochip.

    PubMed

    Cherré, Solène; Fernandes, Elisabete; Germano, José; Dias, Tomás; Cardoso, Susana; Piedade, Moisés S; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Oliveira, Marta I; Freitas, Paulo P

    2017-03-13

    Microvesicles (MVs) are a promising source of diagnostic biomarkers which have gained a wide interest in the biomedical and biosensing field. They can be interpreted as a "fingerprint" of various diseases. Nonetheless, MVs implementation into clinical settings has been hampered by the lack of technologies to accurately characterize, detect and quantify them. Here, we report the specific sensing and quantification of MVs from endothelial cells using a portable magnetoresistive (MR) biochip platform, in less than one hour and within physiologically relevant concentrations (1 × 10(8) MVs per ml). MVs were isolated from both endothelial and epithelial cells undergoing apoptosis, and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), which revealed similar MV sizes. Importantly, our results showed that the two distinct MV populations could be discriminated with the MR biochip platform, with over a 5-fold capture efficiency of endothelial MVs in comparison to the control (epithelial MVs). Also, unspecific binding of MVs to BSA was less than 1% of the specific signal. The detection strategy was based on a sandwich immunoassay, where MVs were labelled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized with Annexin V and then captured by anti-CD31 antibodies previously immobilized on the surface of the sensor. Results suggest that this approach allows the detection of specific MVs from complex samples such as serum, and highlight the potential of this technology to become a suitable tool for MVs detection as a complementary method of diagnosis.

  18. Constitutive Equation for Anisotropic Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazacu, O.

    2006-12-01

    In many rocks, due to the existence of well-defined fabric elements such as bedding, layering, foliation or lamination planes, or due to the existence of linear structures, anisotropy can be important. The symmetries most frequently encountered are: transverse isotropy and orthotropy. By adopting both theoretical and experimental approaches, many authors have investigated the effect of the presence within the rock of pronounced anisotropic feature on the mechanical behavior in the elastic regime and on strength properties. Fewer attempts however have been made to capture the anisotropy of rocks in the plastic range. In this paper an elastic/viscoplastic non-associated constitutive equation for an initially transversely isotropic material is presented. The model captures the observed dependency of the elastic moduli on the stress state. The limit of the elastic domain is given by an yield function whose expression is a priori unknown and is determined from data. The basic assumption adopted is that the type of anisotropy of the rock does not change during the deformation process. The anisotropy is thus described by a fourth order tensor invariant with respect to any transformation belonging to the symmetry group of the material. This tensor is assumed to be constant: it does not depend on time nor on deformation; A is involved in the expression of the flow rule, of the yield function, and of the failure criterion in the form of a transformed stress tensor. The components of the anisotropic tensor A are determined from the compressive strengths in conjunction with an anisotropic short- term failure The irreversibility is supposed to be due to transient creep, the irreversible stress work per unit volume being considered as hardening parameter. The adequacy of the model is demonstrated by applying it to a stratified sedimentary rock, Tournemire shale.

  19. Signature of anisotropic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2010-09-15

    Our universe may have formed via bubble nucleation in an eternally inflating background. Furthermore, the background may have a compact dimension--the modulus of which tunnels out of a metastable minimum during bubble nucleation--which subsequently grows to become one of our three large spatial dimensions. When in this scenario our bubble universe collides with other ones like it, the collision geometry is constrained by the reduced symmetry of the tunneling instanton. While the regions affected by such bubble collisions still appear (to leading order) as disks in an observer's sky, the centers of these disks all lie on a single great circle, providing a distinct signature of anisotropic bubble nucleation.

  20. Granular Segregation with Anisotropic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Tim

    2005-11-01

    The results from experimental investigations of horizontally vibrated mixtures of anisotropic poppy seeds and long chains of linked spheres will be presented. A critical packing fraction was observed to be required to initiate a transition to segregation. The average size of the resulting patterns was measured and the concentration ratio of the mixtures was varied by changing the number of chains present in the mixtures. A change in the order of the transition, from second to first order with associated hysteresis, was observed as the chain number was reduced. This gave rise to three distinct regions of behaviour: segregated, mixed and a bi-stable state.

  1. Anisotropic inflation from vector impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Kimura, Masashi; Soda, Jiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: mkimura@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2008-08-15

    We study an inflationary scenario with a vector impurity. We show that the universe undergoes anisotropic inflationary expansion due to a preferred direction determined by the vector. Using the slow roll approximation, we find a formula for determining the anisotropy of the inflationary universe. We discuss possible observable predictions of this scenario. In particular, it is stressed that primordial gravitational waves can be induced from curvature perturbations. Hence, even in low scale inflation, a sizable amount of primordial gravitational waves may be produced during inflation.

  2. Light Propagation through Anisotropic Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Kolmogorov stratospheric turbulence on star image motion,” Proc. SPIE 3126, 113–123 (1997). 5. B. E . Stribling, B. M . Welsh, and M . C. Roggemann...746407 (2009). 10. M . Chang, C. O. Font, F. Santiago, Y. Luna, E . Roura, and S. Restaino, “Marine environment optical propagation measure- ments,” Proc...Anisotropic factor as a function of alpha for several zeta values. Toselli et al. Vol. 28, No. 3 / March 2011 / J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 487 14. M . S

  3. Magnetoresistance of Tl_2Mo_6Se_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuh, Jayong; Mengistu, E. H.; McCarten, J. C.; Tessema, G. X.; Skove, M. J.; Saffar, Hugo

    1997-03-01

    We present results of high precision R vs T and magnetoresistance measurements on Tl_2Mo_6Se_6. The high precision resistance results corroborate the thermopwer and Hall results which indicate that an electronic instability of a density wave type develops in this compound around 80 K^1. This is further confirmed by the high field, up to 20T, magnetoresistance for 2K

  4. Unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/normal metal bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Can Onur; Garello, Kevin; Ghosh, Abhijit; Gabureac, Mihai; Alvarado, Santos F.; Gambardella, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Magnetoresistive effects are usually invariant on inversion of the magnetization direction. In non-centrosymmetric conductors, however, nonlinear resistive terms can give rise to a current dependence that is quadratic in the applied voltage and linear in the magnetization. Here we demonstrate that such conditions are realized in simple bilayer metal films where the spin-orbit interaction and spin-dependent scattering couple the current-induced spin accumulation to the electrical conductivity. We show that the longitudinal resistance of Ta|Co and Pt|Co bilayers changes when reversing the polarity of the current or the sign of the magnetization. This unidirectional magnetoresistance scales linearly with current density and has opposite sign in Ta and Pt, which we associate with the modification of the interface scattering potential induced by the spin Hall effect in these materials. Our results suggest a route to control the resistance and detect magnetization switching in spintronic devices using a two-terminal geometry, which applies also to heterostructures including topological insulators.

  5. Recent observations of negative longitudinal magnetoresistance in semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xi-Tong; Jia, Shuang

    2016-11-01

    The discovery of Dirac semimetal and Weyl semimetal has motivated a growing passion for investigating the unique magneto-transport properties in the topological materials. A Weyl semimetal can host Weyl fermions as its low-energy quasi-particle excitations, and therefore perform exotic features analogous to those in high-energy physics, such as the violation of the chiral charge conservation known as the chiral anomaly. One of the electrical transport signatures of the chiral anomaly is the Adler-Bell-Jackiw (ABJ) anomaly which presents as a negative magnetoresistance when the magnetic field and the current are parallel. Very recently, numerous experiments reported negative longitudinal magnetoresistance (NLMR) in topological materials, but the details of the measurement results are various. Here the materials and the corresponding experiment results are briefly reviewed. Besides the plausible explanation of the ABJ anomaly, some other origins of the NLMR are also discussed. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB921901 and 2014CB239302).

  6. Radiation test of AMR sensors for MetNet Mars Precursor Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, R.; Fernandez, A. B.; Dominguez, J. A.; Martin, B.; Díaz-Michelena, M.

    2012-04-01

    The MetNet Mars Precursor Mission (MMPM) to Mars is supposed to be the first penetrator-based on ground meteorological station of a net over the Martian surface. MMPM will have very limited communications, power, and mass and lander and instrumentation will have to stand a huge mechanical shock, extremely low temperatures with huge temperature excursions and a radiation envelope of 15 krad. One of the instruments on board the MMPM is vector magnetometer, which main goal is to register the thermomangetic curves of the crustal magnetic minerals [1]. The instrument is based on Anisotropic MagnetoResistive (AMR) Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) sensors due to the miniaturization objective and the successful previous experience in geomagnetic surveys [2, 3], achieving a whole mass of 65 g with a good trade off of magnetic performance (resolution levels in the order of the nT). This work reports on the magnetic sensor and the systematic gamma radiation tests performed on the AMR COTS chips. The objective is to study the damage and degradation of these sensors with the total irradiated dose (TID). The sensors were irradiated with gamma rays up to a total irradiation dose of 200 krad following ESCC Basic Specification No. 22900, with limited number of tested sensors. All tests were performed assuring low disturbances of variable magnetic fields, keeping those variations under the error threshold by means of magnetic shielding and registration of magnetic field variations with pT resolution. Parameters like linear response and saturation field, offset and set/reset strips deviations, and power consumption have been monitored for the four different types of sensors during the irradiation. The sensors chosen for the test have been of the HMC series by Honeywell: HMC 1021 S, HMC 1043, HMC 6042 and HMC 6052. HMC 1043 has been chosen for the AOCS of OPTOS picosatellite of INTA and as the magnetic sensor payload for MetNet precursor mission. HMC 1021 S sensors presented low

  7. A Wireless Magnetoresistive Sensing System for an Intraoral Tongue-Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hangue; Kiani, Mehdi; Lee, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jeonghee; Block, Jacob; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, and wireless assistive technology (AT) that infers users’ intentions by detecting their voluntary tongue motion and translating them into user-defined commands. Here we present the new intraoral version of the TDS (iTDS), which has been implemented in the form of a dental retainer. The iTDS system-on-a-chip (SoC) features a configurable analog front-end (AFE) that reads the magnetic field variations inside the mouth from four 3-axial magnetoresistive sensors located at four corners of the iTDS printed circuit board (PCB). A dual-band transmitter (Tx) on the same chip operates at 27 and 432 MHz in the Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) band to allow users to switch in the presence of external interference. The Tx streams the digitized samples to a custom-designed TDS universal interface, built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, which delivers the iTDS data to other devices such as smartphones, personal computers (PC), and powered wheelchairs (PWC). Another key block on the iTDS SoC is the power management integrated circuit (PMIC), which provides individually regulated and duty-cycled 1.8 V supplies for sensors, AFE, Tx, and digital control blocks. The PMIC also charges a 50 mAh Li-ion battery with constant current up to 4.2 V, and recovers data and clock to update its configuration register through a 13.56 MHz inductive link. The iTDS SoC has been implemented in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 3.7 mW on average. PMID:23853258

  8. Extremely large magnetoresistance in few-layer graphene/boron–nitride heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gopinadhan, Kalon; Shin, Young Jun; Jalil, Rashid; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Geim, Andre K.; Neto, Antonio H. Castro; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding magnetoresistance, the change in electrical resistance under an external magnetic field, at the atomic level is of great interest both fundamentally and technologically. Graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore magnetoresistance at its nascent stage of structural formation. Here we report an extremely large local magnetoresistance of∼2,000% at 400 K and a non-local magnetoresistance of >90,000% in an applied magnetic field of 9 T at 300 K in few-layer graphene/boron–nitride heterostructures. The local magnetoresistance is understood to arise from large differential transport parameters, such as the carrier mobility, across various layers of few-layer graphene upon a normal magnetic field, whereas the non-local magnetoresistance is due to the magnetic field induced Ettingshausen–Nernst effect. Non-local magnetoresistance suggests the possibility of a graphene-based gate tunable thermal switch. In addition, our results demonstrate that graphene heterostructures may be promising for magnetic field sensing applications. PMID:26388149

  9. Anisotropic non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Shouvik; Lee, Sung-Sik

    2016-11-01

    We study non-Fermi-liquid states that arise at the quantum critical points associated with the spin density wave (SDW) and charge density wave (CDW) transitions in metals with twofold rotational symmetry. We use the dimensional regularization scheme, where a one-dimensional Fermi surface is embedded in (3 -ɛ ) -dimensional momentum space. In three dimensions, quasilocal marginal Fermi liquids arise both at the SDW and CDW critical points: the speed of the collective mode along the ordering wave vector is logarithmically renormalized to zero compared to that of Fermi velocity. Below three dimensions, however, the SDW and CDW critical points exhibit drastically different behaviors. At the SDW critical point, a stable anisotropic non-Fermi-liquid state is realized for small ɛ , where not only time but also different spatial coordinates develop distinct anomalous dimensions. The non-Fermi liquid exhibits an emergent algebraic nesting as the patches of Fermi surface are deformed into a universal power-law shape near the hot spots. Due to the anisotropic scaling, the energy of incoherent spin fluctuations disperse with different power laws in different momentum directions. At the CDW critical point, on the other hand, the perturbative expansion breaks down immediately below three dimensions as the interaction renormalizes the speed of charge fluctuations to zero within a finite renormalization group scale through a two-loop effect. The difference originates from the fact that the vertex correction antiscreens the coupling at the SDW critical point whereas it screens at the CDW critical point.

  10. Discrete vortices on anisotropic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gui-Hua; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Chen, Zi-Fa

    2015-08-01

    We consider the effects of anisotropy on two types of localized states with topological charges equal to 1 in two-dimensional nonlinear lattices, using the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a paradigm model. We find that on-site-centered vortices with different propagation constants are not globally stable, and that upper and lower boundaries of the propagation constant exist. The region between these two boundaries is the domain outside of which the on-site-centered vortices are unstable. This region decreases in size as the anisotropy parameter is gradually increased. We also consider off-site-centered vortices on anisotropic lattices, which are unstable on this lattice type and either transform into stable quadrupoles or collapse. We find that the transformation of off-sitecentered vortices into quadrupoles, which occurs on anisotropic lattices, cannot occur on isotropic lattices. In the quadrupole case, a propagation-constant region also exists, outside of which the localized states cannot stably exist. The influence of anisotropy on this region is almost identical to its effects on the on-site-centered vortex case.

  11. Postbuckling of laminated anisotropic panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffrey, Glenda L.

    1987-01-01

    A two-part study of the buckling and postbuckling of laminated anisotropic plates with bending-extensional coupling is presented. The first part involves the development and application of a modified Rayleigh-Ritz analysis technique. Modifications made to the classical technique can be grouped into three areas. First, known symmetries of anisotropic panels are exploited in the selection of approximation functions. Second, a reduced basis technique based on these same symmetries is applied in the linear range. Finally, geometric boundary conditions are enforced via an exterior penalty function approach, rather than relying on choice of approximation functions to satisfy these boundary conditions. Numerical results are presented for both the linear and nonlinear range, with additional studies made to determine the effect of variation in penalty parameter and number of basis vectors. In the second part, six panels possessing anisotropy and bending-extensional coupling are tested. Detailed comparisons are made between experiment and finite element results in order to gain insight into the postbuckling and failure characteristics of such panels. The panels are constructed using two different lamination sequences, and panels with three different aspect ratios were constructed for each lamination sequence.

  12. Anisotropic water reorientation around ions.

    PubMed

    Tielrooij, K J; van der Post, S T; Hunger, J; Bonn, M; Bakker, H J

    2011-11-03

    We study the reorientation dynamics of water molecules around ions using terahertz dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The results are discussed in relation to the ion-specific Hofmeister series and the concomitant "structure-making" and "structure-breaking" effects of ions on water. We show that when a dissolved salt consists of a strongly hydrated ion with a weakly hydrated counterion the reorientation of water molecules around the strongly hydrated ion is anisotropic, in the sense that differently charged ions affect reorientation along different molecular axes: cations mainly slow the reorientation dynamics of the water dipole vectors, and anions mainly slow down the reorientation dynamics of the hydroxyl group that points toward the anion. In both cases, motion along only one molecular axis is impeded, so that the hydration shell is best described as semirigid. In this semirigid hydration picture, water molecules in the first hydration shell show anisotropic reorientation, whereas water molecules outside the first hydration shell remain unaffected. The inferred anisotropy in molecular motion explains why terahertz dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, which probes dipolar relaxation, is more sensitive to cation hydration effects while femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy, which is sensitive to reorientation of hydroxyl groups, is more sensitive to anion hydration effects. We also show that dissolution of CsI-a salt for which both cation and anion are weakly hydrated-has little effect on water reorientation dynamics, with hydration water displaying dynamics that are similar to those in bulk water.

  13. Recent progress in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The quark-gluon plasma created in a relativistic heavy-ion collisions possesses a sizable pressure anisotropy in the local rest frame at very early times after the initial nuclear impact and this anisotropy only slowly relaxes as the system evolves. In a kinetic theory picture, this translates into the existence of sizable momentum-space anisotropies in the underlying partonic distribution functions, < pL2> ≪ < pT2>. In such cases, it is better to reorganize the hydrodynamical expansion by taking into account momentum-space anisotropies at leading-order in the expansion instead of as a perturbative correction to an isotropic distribution. The resulting anisotropic hydrodynamics framework has been shown to more accurately describe the dynamics of rapidly expanding systems such as the quark-gluon plasma. In this proceedings contribution, I review the basic ideas of anisotropic hydrodynamics, recent progress, and present a few preliminary phenomenological predictions for identified particle spectra and elliptic flow.

  14. Characterization of anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Hyeong; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    In an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial, the off-diagonal components of its effective mass density tensor should be considered in order to describe the anisotropic behavior produced by arbitrarily shaped inclusions. However, few studies have been carried out to characterize anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a method that uses the non-diagonal effective mass density tensor to determine the behavior of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. Our method accurately evaluates the effective properties of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials by separately dealing with slabs made of single and multiple unit cells along the thickness direction. To determine the effective properties, the reflection and transmission coefficients of an acoustic metamaterial slab are calculated, and then the wave vectors inside of the slab are determined using these coefficients. The effective material properties are finally determined by utilizing the spatial dispersion relation of the anisotropic acoustic metamaterial. Since the dispersion relation of an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial is explicitly used, its effective properties can be easily determined by only using a limited number of normal and oblique plane wave incidences into a metamaterial slab, unlike existing approaches requiring a large number of wave incidences. The validity of the proposed method is verified by conducting wave simulations for anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs with Z-shaped elastic inclusions of tilted principal material axes.

  15. The anisotropic propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in composite materials and implications for practical applications.

    PubMed

    Putkis, O; Dalton, R P; Croxford, A J

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave propagation in anisotropic attenuative materials like CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymer) is much more complicated than in isotropic materials. Propagation phenomena need to be understood and quantified before reliable NDE (Non-destructive Evaluation)/SHM (Structural Health Monitoring) inspection systems can be realized. The propagation characteristics: energy velocity, dispersion, mode coupling, energy focusing factor and attenuation are considered in this paper. Concepts of minimum resolvable distance and sensitivity maps are extended to anisotropic attenuative materials in order to provide the means for comparison of different guided wave modes in composite materials. The paper is intended to serve as a framework for evaluating and comparing different modes and choosing the optimum operating conditions (frequency, sensor layout) for possible NDE/SHM applications on composite materials. Fundamental guided wave modes in the low frequency regime for highly anisotropic CFRP plates are investigated experimentally and theoretically and the implications for NDE/SHM are discussed.

  16. Spin-current-induced magnetoresistance in trilayer structure with nonmagnetic metallic interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Ryo; Sato, Koji; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-04-01

    We have theoretically investigated the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and Rashba–Edelstein magnetoresistance (REMR), mediated by spin currents, in a ferrimagnetic insulator/nonmagnetic metal/heavy metal system in the diffusive regime. The magnitude of both SMR and REMR decreases with increasing thickness of the interlayer because of the current shunting effect and the reduction in spin accumulation across the interlayer. The latter contribution is due to driving a spin current and persists even in the absence of spin relaxation, which is essential for understanding the magnetoresistance ratio in trilayer structures.

  17. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Magnetoresistance of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Lei-Mei; Gao, Wei; Cao, Shi-Xun; Zhang, Jin-Cang

    2008-09-01

    We measure zero-Geld resistivity and magnetoresistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube yarns (CNTYs). The CNTYs are drawn from superaligned multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays synthesized by the low-pressure chemical vapour deposition method. The zero-Geld resistivity shows a logarithmic decrease from 2K to 300 K. In the presence of a magnetic Geld applied perpendicular to the yarn axis, a pronounced negative magnetoresistance is observed. A magnetoresistance ratio of 22% is obtained. These behaviours can be explained by the weak localization effect.

  18. Anisotropic Charge Distribution and Anisotropic van der Waals Radius Leading to Intriguing Anisotropic Noncovalent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hahn; Van Dung Doan; Cho, Woo Jong; Madhav, Miriyala Vijay; Kim, Kwang S.

    2014-01-01

    Although group (IV–VII) nonmetallic elements do not favor interacting with anionic species, there are counterexamples including the halogen bond. Such binding is known to be related to the charge deficiency because of the adjacent atom's electron withdrawing effect, which creates σ/π-holes at the bond-ends. However, a completely opposite behavior is exhibited by N2 and O2, which have electrostatically positive/negative character around cylindrical-bond-surface/bond-ends. Inspired by this, here we elucidate the unusual features and origin of the anisotropic noncovalent interactions in the ground and excited states of the 2nd and 3rd row elements belonging to groups IV–VII. The anisotropy in charge distributions and van der Waals radii of atoms in such molecular systems are scrutinized. This provides an understanding of their unusual molecular configuration, binding and recognition modes involved in new types of molecular assembling and engineering. This work would lead to the design of intriguing molecular systems exploiting anisotropic noncovalent interactions. PMID:25059645

  19. Anisotropic grid adaptation in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, Siavash; Larsson, Johan

    2016-11-01

    The modeling errors depend directly on the grid (or filter) spacing in turbulence-resolving simulations (LES, DNS, DES, etc), and are typically at least as significant as the numerical errors. This makes adaptive grid-refinement complicated, since it prevents the estimation of the local error sources through numerical analysis. The present work attempts to address this difficulty with a physics-based error-source indicator that accounts for the anisotropy in the smallest resolved scales, which can thus be used to drive an anisotropic grid-adaptation process. The proposed error indicator is assessed on a sequence of problems, including turbulent channel flow and flows in more complex geometries. The formulation is geometrically general and applicable to complex geometries.

  20. Anisotropic invariance in minisuperspace models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Sabido, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce invariance under anisotropic transformations to cosmology. This invariance is one of the key ingredients of the theory of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point put forward by Hořava. We find that this new symmetry in the minisuperspace introduces characteristics to the model that can be relevant in the ultraviolet regime. For example, by canonical quantization we find a Schrödinger-type equation which avoids the problem of frozen time in quantum cosmology. For simple cases we obtain solutions to this quantum equation in a Kantowski-Sachs (KS) minisuperspace. At the classical level, we study KS and Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies, obtaining modifications to the solutions of general relativity that can be relevant in the early Universe.

  1. Modeling of Anisotropic Inelastic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D.J.; Nath, D.S.; Brown, A.A.; Casey, J.

    2000-02-25

    An experimental capability, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is being used to study the yield behavior of elastic-plastic materials. The objective of our research is to develop better constitutive equations for polycrystalline metals. We are experimentally determining the multidimensional yield surface of the material, both in its initial state and as it evolves during large inelastic deformations. These experiments provide a more complete picture of material behavior than can be obtained from traditional uniaxial tests. Experimental results show that actual material response can differ significantly from that predicted by simple idealized models. These results are being used to develop improved constitutive models of anisotropic plasticity for use in continuum computer codes.

  2. Anisotropic decomposition of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward; Bajar, Sean; Yulga, Brian; Yang Wenge; Hooks, Daniel

    2007-12-12

    Using a white x-ray synchrotron beam, we have dynamically studied radiation-induced decomposition in single crystalline PETN and TATB. By monitoring the integrated intensity of selected diffraction spots via a CCD x-ray camera as a function of time, we have found that the decomposition rate varies dramatically depending upon the orientation of the crystalline axes relative to polarized x-ray beam and for differing diffracting conditions (spots) within the same crystalline orientation. We suggest that this effect is due to Compton scattering of the polarized x-rays with electron clouds that is dependent upon their relative orientation. This novel effect may yield valuable insight regarding anisotropic detonation sensitivity in energetic materials such as PETN.

  3. A Magnetoresistive Heat Switch for the Continuous ADR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavan, E. R.; Dipirro, M. J.; Jackson, M.; Panek, J.; Shirron, P. J.; Tuttle, J. G.; Krebs, C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In compensated elemental metals at low temperature, a several Tesla field can suppress electronic heat conduction so thoroughly that heat is effectively carried by phonons alone. In approximately one mm diameter single crystal samples with impurity concentrations low enough that electron conduction is limited by surface scattering, the ratio of zerofield to high-field thermal conductivity can exceed ten thousand. We have used this phenomenon to build a compact, solid-state heat switch with no moving parts and no enclosed fluids. The time scale for switching states is limited by time scale for charging the magnet that supplies the controlling field. Our design and fabrication techniques overcome the difficulties associated with manufacturing and assembling parts from single crystal tungsten. A clear disadvantage of the magnetoresistive switch is the mass and complexity of the magnet system for the controlling field. We have discovered a technique of minimizing this mass and complexity, applicable to the continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  4. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1998-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  5. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1999-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  6. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1999-03-16

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  7. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1998-10-20

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  8. Chiral magnetoresistance in the Weyl semimetal NbP

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Anna Corinna; Gooth, Johannes; Wu, Shu-Chun; Bäßler, Svenja; Sergelius, Philip; Hühne, Ruben; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Shekhar, Chandra; Süß, Vicky; Schmidt, Marcus; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2017-01-01

    NbP is a recently realized Weyl semimetal (WSM), hosting Weyl points through which conduction and valence bands cross linearly in the bulk and exotic Fermi arcs appear. The most intriguing transport phenomenon of a WSM is the chiral anomaly-induced negative magnetoresistance (NMR) in parallel electric and magnetic fields. In intrinsic NbP the Weyl points lie far from the Fermi energy, making chiral magneto-transport elusive. Here, we use Ga-doping to relocate the Fermi energy in NbP sufficiently close to the W2 Weyl points, for which the different Fermi surfaces are verified by resultant quantum oscillations. Consequently, we observe a NMR for parallel electric and magnetic fields, which is considered as a signature of the chiral anomaly in condensed-matter physics. The NMR survives up to room temperature, making NbP a versatile material platform for the development of Weyltronic applications. PMID:28262790

  9. Chiral magnetoresistance in the Weyl semimetal NbP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, Anna Corinna; Gooth, Johannes; Wu, Shu-Chun; Bäßler, Svenja; Sergelius, Philip; Hühne, Ruben; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Shekhar, Chandra; Süß, Vicky; Schmidt, Marcus; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2017-03-01

    NbP is a recently realized Weyl semimetal (WSM), hosting Weyl points through which conduction and valence bands cross linearly in the bulk and exotic Fermi arcs appear. The most intriguing transport phenomenon of a WSM is the chiral anomaly-induced negative magnetoresistance (NMR) in parallel electric and magnetic fields. In intrinsic NbP the Weyl points lie far from the Fermi energy, making chiral magneto-transport elusive. Here, we use Ga-doping to relocate the Fermi energy in NbP sufficiently close to the W2 Weyl points, for which the different Fermi surfaces are verified by resultant quantum oscillations. Consequently, we observe a NMR for parallel electric and magnetic fields, which is considered as a signature of the chiral anomaly in condensed-matter physics. The NMR survives up to room temperature, making NbP a versatile material platform for the development of Weyltronic applications.

  10. Magnetoresistance in a strongly interacting two-dimensional metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. P.

    1992-07-01

    Using a gauge-theory formulation of the fluxless metallic phase of the t-J model in two dimensions, it is shown that the soft chiral spin fluctuations existing in this phase are suppressed by the introduction of a small transverse magnetic field, while soft charge fluctuations are enhanced. This effect results in the reduction of the predicted linear-in-temperature resistance by an amount proportional to the square of the Hall conductance in the strong-correlation limit near half filling. However, away from this limit, the magnetoresistance may be positive. A similar effect is also shown to exist for the thermal resistance and the specific heat. A comparison with available data on the oxide superconductors is made.

  11. Compensated Semimetal LaSb with Unsaturated Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, L.-K.; Lou, R.; Wu, D.-S.; Xu, Q. N.; Guo, P.-J.; Kong, L.-Y.; Zhong, Y.-G.; Ma, J.-Z.; Fu, B.-B.; Richard, P.; Wang, P.; Liu, G. T.; Lu, L.; Huang, Y.-B.; Fang, C.; Sun, S.-S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, L.; Shi, Y.-G.; Weng, H. M.; Lei, H.-C.; Liu, K.; Wang, S.-C.; Qian, T.; Luo, J.-L.; Ding, H.

    2016-09-01

    By combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and quantum oscillation measurements, we performed a comprehensive investigation on the electronic structure of LaSb, which exhibits near-quadratic extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) without any sign of saturation at magnetic fields as high as 40 T. We clearly resolve one spherical and one intersecting-ellipsoidal hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) at the Brillouin zone (BZ) center Γ and one ellipsoidal electron FS at the BZ boundary X . The hole and electron carriers calculated from the enclosed FS volumes are perfectly compensated, and the carrier compensation is unaffected by temperature. We further reveal that LaSb is topologically trivial but shares many similarities with the Weyl semimetal TaAs family in the bulk electronic structure. Based on these results, we have examined the mechanisms that have been proposed so far to explain the near-quadratic XMR in semimetals.

  12. Anisotropic microstructure near the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, W. A.; Grall, R. R.; Spangler, S. R.; Sakurai, T.; Harmon, J. K.

    1996-07-01

    Radio scattering observations provide a means of measuring a two-dimensional projection of the three-dimensional spatial spectrum of electron density, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. Earlier observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 10 Rsolar [Armstrong et al., 1990]. Earlier work has also shown that density fluctuations at scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ``background'' [Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new observations made during 1990 and 1992. These confirm the earlier work, which was restricted to one source on a few days, but they suggest that the anisotropy changes abruptly near 6 Rsolar which was not clear in the earlier data. The axial ratio measurements are shown on Figure 1 below. The new observations were made with a more uniform sampling of the spatial plane. They show that contours of constant correlation are elliptical. This is apparently inconsistent with the spatial correlation of the ISEE-3 magnetic field which shows a ``Maltese Cross'' shape [Matthaeus et al., 1990]. However this inconsistency may be only apparent: the magnetic field and density correlations need not have the same shape; the scale of the magnetic field correlations is at least 4 orders of magnitude larger; they are much further from the sun; and they are point measurements whereas ours are path-integrated. We also made two simultaneous measurements, at 10 Rsolar, of the anisotropy on scales of 200 to 4000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scale structure was essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is independent of the larger scale isotropic turbulence. It is then tempting to speculate that the damping of this anisotropic process inside of 6 Rsolar

  13. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F. Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-01-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. This work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications. PMID:27739442

  14. A simple formulation for magnetoresistance in metal-insulator granular films with increased current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boff, M. A. S.; Canto, B.; Baibich, M. N.; Pereira, L. G.

    2013-02-01

    We studied the tunnel magnetoresistance in metal/insulator granular films when the applied current is varied. The tunnel magnetoresistance shows a strong modification related to a non-Ohmic behaviour of theses materials. It was verified that spin-dependent tunnelling is the main mechanism for magnetoresistance at low applied current. However, when the current is high, another mechanism gets to be important: it is independent of the magnetization and is associated to variable range hopping between metallic grains. In this work, we propose a simple modification of Inoue and Maekawa's model for tunnelling magnetoresistance in granulars, rewriting the expression for resistance as a function of magnetic field and temperature, also taking into account the two different contributions.

  15. Theory of unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance in heavy-metal/ferromagnetic-metal bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Recent experiments have revealed nonlinear features of the magnetoresistance in metallic bilayers consisting of a heavy metal (HM) and a ferromagnetic metal (FM). A small change in the longitudinal resistance of the bilayer has been observed when reversing the direction of either the applied in-plane current or the magnetization. We attribute such nonlinear transport behavior to the spin-polarization dependence of the electron mobility in the FM layer acting in concert with the spin accumulation induced in that layer by the spin Hall current originating in the bulk of the HM layer. An explicit expression for the nonlinear magnetoresistance is derived based on a simple drift-diffusion model, which shows that the nonlinear magnetoresistance appears at the first order of the spin Hall angle, and changes sign when the current is reversed, in agreement with the experimental observations. We also discuss possible ways to control sign of the nonlinear magnetoresistance and to enhance the magnitude of the effect.

  16. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Keshab R; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-10-14

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. This work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications.

  17. Hanle Magnetoresistance in Thin Metal Films with Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, Saül; Golovach, Vitaly N.; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Isasa, Miren; Sagasta, Edurne; Abadia, Mikel; Rogero, Celia; Hueso, Luis E.; Bergeret, F. Sebastian; Casanova, Fèlix

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of a new type of magnetoresistance in Pt and Ta thin films. The spin accumulation created at the surfaces of the film by the spin Hall effect decreases in a magnetic field because of the Hanle effect, resulting in an increase of the electrical resistance as predicted by Dyakonov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 126601 (2007)]. The angular dependence of this magnetoresistance resembles the recently discovered spin Hall magnetoresistance in Pt /Y3Fe5O12 bilayers, although the presence of a ferromagnetic insulator is not required. We show that this Hanle magnetoresistance is an alternative simple way to quantitatively study the coupling between charge and spin currents in metals with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  18. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. H. Bai, Lihui; Hu, C.-M.; Hemour, S.; Wu, K.; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.

    2015-03-15

    The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  19. Magneto-Resistance Anisotropy in Uncompensated Ca:YIG Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Donglei; Wigen, Philip E.

    2000-03-01

    : A magneto-resistance (MR) in an uncompensated p-type Ca:YIG film having a bulk resistivity of 400 ohm.cm at 300K has been observed using an AC signal modulating method. For the geometry of the magnetic field (H) in the plane of the film and parallel to the current, the resistivity increases by 4 parts in 10000 where H varies from 0 to ±10G without hysteresis. The dependence of the MR as a function of the angle (theta) between the direction of the current and the applied H varies as cos2theta. At the perpendicular orientation the MR initially increases up to 6 pts in 10000 as H varies from 0 to ±300G, and then reverses sign and changes by -12 parts per 10000 at H=±2000G where the film magnetization is saturated. For higher H the resistance increases by 4 pts in 10000 at H=±4000G. The origin of the conductivity in these Ca doped garnets is due to a hopping of small polarons along various spin channels in the garnet structure [1,2]. The MR is then consistent with a hopping mechanism being more favorable when the magnetization is oriented perpendicular to the current. The temperature dependence between 240 K and 320 K will be reviewed. Any magneto-resistance present in n-type Si:YIG or Ge:YIG was too small to detect. A small variation in the amplitude and phase of the MR response with the AC frequency will be discussed. [1] G.B. Turpin, Ph.D. Thesis, The Ohio State University (1996). [2] S. Batra, Andrea Lehman-Szweykowska, and P.E. Wigen, J. Appl. Phys., 61, 3274 (1987).

  20. Resistance transition assisted geometry enhanced magnetoresistance in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Zhaochu; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2015-05-07

    Magnetoresistance (MR) reported in some non-magnetic semiconductors (particularly silicon) has triggered considerable interest owing to the large magnitude of the effect. Here, we showed that MR in lightly doped n-Si can be significantly enhanced by introducing two diodes and proper design of the carrier path [Wan, Nature 477, 304 (2011)]. We designed a geometrical enhanced magnetoresistance (GEMR) device whose room-temperature MR ratio reaching 30% at 0.065 T and 20 000% at 1.2 T, respectively, approaching the performance of commercial MR devices. The mechanism of this GEMR is: the diodes help to define a high resistive state (HRS) and a low resistive state (LRS) in device by their openness and closeness, respectively. The ratio of apparent resistance between HRS and LRS is determined by geometry of silicon wafer and electrodes. Magnetic field could induce a transition from LRS to HRS by reshaping potential and current distribution among silicon wafer, resulting in a giant enhancement of intrinsic MR. We expect that this GEMR could be also realized in other semiconductors. The combination of high sensitivity to low magnetic fields and large high-field response should make this device concept attractive to the magnetic field sensing industry. Moreover, because this MR device is based on a conventional silicon/semiconductor platform, it should be possible to integrate this MR device with existing silicon/semiconductor devices and so aid the development of silicon/semiconductor-based magnetoelectronics. Also combining MR devices and semiconducting devices in a single Si/semiconductor chip may lead to some novel devices with hybrid function, such as electric-magnetic-photonic properties. Our work demonstrates that the charge property of semiconductor can be used in the magnetic sensing industry, where the spin properties of magnetic materials play a role traditionally.

  1. Time-resolved optical studies of colossal magnetoresistance and charge-density wave materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuhang

    This thesis presents measurements of collective modes and ultrafast carrier relaxation dynamics in charge-density-wave (CDW) conductors and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) manganites. A femtosecond laser pump pulse excites a broad frequency spectrum of low-energy collective modes and electron-hole pairs thereby changing its optical properties. The low-energy collective excitations and quasiparticle relaxation and recombination processes are monitored by measuring the resulting photoinduced absorption as a function of probe pulse wavelength and time delay. A general model was developed for the photogeneration and detection mechanism of collective modes based on light absorption in two-color pump-probe experiments. A broad spectrum of collective modes (phasons and amplitudons) with frequencies down to a few GHz is excited and propagates normal to the surface into the material. The dispersion of the long-wavelength phason and amplitudon can be measured by changing the probe wavelength. The first pump-probe spectroscopy was performed from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared wavelength range to study low-frequency collective excitations, including temperature evolution, dispersion, damping, and anisotropy of amplitude mode and transverse phason in quasi-one dimensional CDW conductors, K 0.3MoO3 and K0.33MoO3 on ultrafast time scale. The transverse phason exhibits an acoustic-like dispersion relation in the frequency range from 5--40 GHz. The phason velocity is strongly anisotropic with a very weak temperature dependence. In contrast, the amplitude mode exhibits a weak (optic-like) dispersion relation with a frequency of 1.66 THz at 30 K. The studies were extended to doped perovskite manganite thin films and single crystals. A low-energy collective mode is observed and discussed in terms of the opening of a pseudogap resulting from charge/orbital ordering phases. The softening of the collective mode is necessary to explain by combining a cooperative Jahn-Teller type

  2. Negative Magnetoresistance in Silicon Doped AlAs-GaAs Short Period Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gougam, A. B.; Sicart, J.; Robert, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    We report the negative magnetoresistance effect observed in GaAs-AlAs short period superlattices doped selectively in GaAs or in AlAs or doped uniformly. This doping technique introduces deep donor states with different thermal activation energies. Consequently, the low temperature electron concentration is different in samples doped at the same silicon concentration. We find the magnetic correction to the conductivity increasing with the free carrier density. The low magnetic field data are interpreted in the framework of a weak localization model derived from the Kawabata theory in 3D anisotropic systems. The theory of effective mass in superlattices is applied and we find that the inelastic scattering time does not depend on the doping modulation. Nous présentons des résultats de magnétorésistance négative obtenus avec des superréseaux à courte période de GaAs-AlAs dopés au silicium sélectivement dans GaAs ou AlAs et uniformément dopés. Ce type de dopage permet d'introduire des niveaux donneurs d'énergie d'activation thermique différents. Ceci permet d'obtenir à basse température des concentrations d'électrons différentes à partir d'une concentration initiale de dopant identique pour tous les échantillons. Nous mettons ainsi en évidence une correction magnétique à la conductivité qui augmente avec la densité de porteurs libres. Les mesures à faible champ sont interprétées en termes de faible localisation à partir du modèle de Kawabata 3D dans lequel l'anisotropie de masse effective du superréseau est introduite. Nous trouvons que le temps de diffusion inélastique ne dépend pas de la modulation de dopage.

  3. Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior in the Magnetoresistance of (TMTSF)_2PF_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Guy M.

    1997-03-01

    Organic superconductors have proven to be a rich source of new physics in recent years. The compounds (TMTSF)_2X consist of weakly coupled, highly anisotropic planes, and they exhibit one dimensional conducting properties. Recent work has focused on mapping the Fermi Surface of these materials by rotating them in a magnetic field at low temperature. This work has provided a detailed picture of the band structure and Fermi surface for (TMTSF)_2ClO4 (G.M. Danner, and P.M. Chaikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72), 3714 (1994). , but the sister compound (TMTSF)_2PF6 has not been well understood. It has been suggested ( David G. Clarke, S.P. Strong, and P.W. Anderson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72), 3218(1994), S.P. Strong, David G. Clark, and P.W. Anderson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1007(1994), S.P. Strong and David G. Clarke, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 48, 10089 (1996). that the PF6 salt is marginally a three dimensional Fermi Liquid which can be destabilized by a small field in the conducting plane in the cyrstal b direction. This field would cause the interplane transport to be come incoherent. A comparison (G.M. Danner and P.M. Chaikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), p. 4690 (1995), E.I. Chashechkina and P.M. Chaikin, proceedings of LT21, to be published. of the measurements of the Fermi surface of ClO4 to those of PF6 shows that the three dimensional Fermi surface exists and is coherent for zero destabilizing field. These measurements also show that the Fermi surface is incoherent or non-existent for small destabilizing fields in PF_6. In this incoherent state the magnetoresistances become power laws in the field applied perpendicular to the conducting planes (ρ_allel a ∝ H_⊥^1/2 and ρ_⊥ ∝ H_⊥^3/2). These are two dimensional, non-Fermi liquid properties.

  4. The Challenges in Applying Magnetroesistive Sensors on the 'Curiosity' Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoresistive Sensors were selected for use on the motor encoders throughout the Curiosity Rover for motor position feedback devices. The Rover contains 28 acuators with a corresponding number of encoder assemblies. The environment on Mars provides opportunities for challenges to any hardware design. The encoder assemblies presented several barriers that had to be vaulted in order to say the rover was ready to fly. The environment and encoder specific design features provided challenges that had to be solved in time to fly.

  5. Synthesis of cubic SrCoO3 single crystal and its anisotropic magnetic and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Youwen; Kaneko, Yoshio; Ishiwata, Shintaro; Taguchi, Yasujiro; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2011-06-01

    A large-size single crystal of nearly stoichiometric SrCoO3 was prepared with a two-step method combining the floating-zone technique and subsequent high oxygen pressure treatment. SrCoO3 crystallizes in a cubic perovskite structure with space group Pm\\bar {3}m , and displays an itinerant ferromagnetic behavior with the Curie temperature of 305 K. The easy magnetization axis is found to be along the [111] direction, and the saturation moment is 2.5 µB/f.u., in accord with the picture of the intermediate spin state. The resistivity at low temperatures (T) is proportional to T2, indicative of the possible effect of orbital fluctuation in the intermediate spin ferromagnetic metallic state. Unusual anisotropic magnetoresistance is also observed and its possible origin is discussed.

  6. Interaction Effects and its Influence on Magnetoresistances in Two-Dimensional Hole Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Houzhi

    Magnetoresistances of two-dimensional holes in GaAs/p-AlzGal-zAs heterostructures have been investigated in the context of particle-hole (p-h) Hartree interactions. Aplication of a magnetic field is to suppress the Hartree contribution between two different heavy holes, hh+ and hh-, and leads to an orbit-related magnetoresistence with a proper functional form and a positive sign in consistence with experiments.

  7. Influence of Domain Structure on Magnetoresistance in Perovskite Manganite Grain Boundary Jnctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    Perovskite Manganite Grain Boundary Jnctions DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report...Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 674 © 2001 Materials Research Society Influence of Domain Structure on Magnetoresistance in Perovskite Manganite Grain...INTRODUCTION Since the discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) [I I in perovskite manganites these materials have attracted a lot of scientific

  8. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  9. Shaped beam scattering by an anisotropic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Huayong; Huang, Zhixiang; Wu, Xianliang

    2017-03-01

    An exact semi-analytical solution to the electromagnetic scattering from an optically anisotropic particle illuminated by an arbitrarily shaped beam is proposed. The scattered fields and fields within the anisotropic particle are expanded in terms of spherical vector wave functions. The unknown expansion coefficients are determined by using the boundary conditions and the method of moments scheme. For incidence of a Gaussian beam, zero-order Bessel beam and Hertzian electric dipole radiation, numerical results of the normalized differential scattering cross section are given to a uniaxial, gyrotropic anisotropic spheroid and circular cylinder of finite length. The scattering properties are analyzed concisely.

  10. Anisotropic inflation in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Sayantani

    2016-09-19

    We study anisotropic inflation with Gauss-Bonnet correction in presence of a massless vector field. In this scenario, exact anisotropic power-law inflation is realized when the inflaton potential, gauge coupling function and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling are exponential functions. We show that anisotropy becomes proportional to two slow-roll parameters of the theory and hence gets enhanced in presence of quadratic curvature corrections. The stability analysis reveals that anisotropic power-law solutions remain stable over a substantially large parameter region.

  11. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    PubMed Central

    Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers. PMID:25821686

  12. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Tobias; Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm(3) is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm(3). In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers.

  13. Crossover from negative to positive magnetoresistance in a Si delta-doped GaAs single quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Chen, Kuang Yao; Su, Yi-Chun; Liang, C.-T.; Chang, Y. H.; Kim, Gil-Ho; Wu, J.-Y.; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2010-07-01

    We have performed magnetoresistance measurements on a Si delta-doped GaAs single quantum well. With increasing temperature T, a crossover from negative magnetoresistance (NMR) to positive magnetoresistance (PMR) can be observed. Our experimental results suggest that such a crossover corresponds to a transition from variable range hopping regime to activated electron transport. This is also consistent with the measured non-monotonic carrier density dependence on T.

  14. Anisotropic wettability on imprinted hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengxiang; Low, Hong Yee

    2007-07-03

    A series of two-level hierarchical structures on polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were fabricated using sequential nanoimprinting lithography (NIL). The hierarchical structures consist of micrometer and sub-micrometer scale grating imprinted with varying orientations. Through water contact angle measurements, these surface hierarchical structures showed a wide range of anisotropic wettabilities on PMMA and PS, with PMMA having an anisotropic wettability from 6 degrees to 54 degrees and PS having an anisotropic wettability from 8 degrees to 32 degrees. At the same time, the water contact angle of PMMA and PS can be tuned to nearly 120 degrees without modifying the surface chemistry. A tunable anisotropic wettability is beneficial for applications where controlling the direction of liquid flow is important, such as in microfluidic devices.

  15. Anisotropic magnetostrictive metal-polymer composites for functional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseleva, T. Yu.; Zholudev, S. I.; Il'inykh, I. A.; Novakova, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    New metal-polymer composites based on mechanochemically synthesized magnetostrictive Fe-Ga phase particles with dimensions of up to 2 μm dispersed and spatially oriented in a polymer matrix have been studied. The polymer matrix for spatial anisotropic stabilization of particles was represented by modified polyurethane (PU). An increase in the magnetostrictive effect was achieved by directed orientation of particles in a magnetic field applied during polymerization of the PU matrix. The spatial anisotropy of the composite has been studied by the methods of conversion Mössbauer spectroscopy with resonant X-ray detection and scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that the mechanochemical synthesis is an effective method of obtaining particles with microstress-enhanced magnetostriction. The use of these particles for the formation of a functional elastomer composite provides a material with significant magnetostrictive effect, which can be several-fold increased due to orientation of particles in an applied magnetic field. The obtained anisotropic magnetostrictive composite is a promising material for the creation of smart functional components of positioning systems, attenuators, and sensors.

  16. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  17. Phase space analysis in anisotropic optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Chumakov, Sergey M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1995-01-01

    From the minimal action principle follows the Hamilton equations of evolution for geometric optical rays in anisotropic media. As in classical mechanics of velocity-dependent potentials, the velocity and the canonical momentum are not parallel, but differ by an anisotropy vector potential, similar to that of linear electromagnetism. Descartes' well known diagram for refraction is generalized and a factorization theorem holds for interfaces between two anisotropic media.

  18. Inflation in anisotropic scalar-tensor theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pimentel, Luis O.; Stein-Schabes, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    The existence of an inflationary phase in anisotropic Scalar-Tensor Theories is investigated by means of a conformal transformation that allows us to rewrite these theories as gravity minimally coupled to a scalar field with a nontrivial potential. The explicit form of the potential is then used and the No Hair Theorem concludes that there is an inflationary phase in all open or flat anisotropic spacetimes in these theories. Several examples are constructed where the effect becomes manifest.

  19. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ. PMID:26450679

  20. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ.

  1. Spin precession in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raes, B.; Cummings, A. W.; Bonell, F.; Costache, M. V.; Sierra, J. F.; Roche, S.; Valenzuela, S. O.

    2017-02-01

    We generalize the diffusive model for spin injection and detection in nonlocal spin structures to account for spin precession under an applied magnetic field in an anisotropic medium, for which the spin lifetime is not unique and depends on the spin orientation. We demonstrate that the spin precession (Hanle) line shape is strongly dependent on the degree of anisotropy and on the orientation of the magnetic field. In particular, we show that the anisotropy of the spin lifetime can be extracted from the measured spin signal, after dephasing in an oblique magnetic field, by using an analytical formula with a single fitting parameter. Alternatively, after identifying the fingerprints associated with the anisotropy, we propose a simple scaling of the Hanle line shapes at specific magnetic field orientations that results in a universal curve only in the isotropic case. The deviation from the universal curve can be used as a complementary means of quantifying the anisotropy by direct comparison with the solution of our generalized model. Finally, we applied our model to graphene devices and find that the spin relaxation for graphene on silicon oxide is isotropic within our experimental resolution.

  2. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  3. Low Field, Large Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, Jeremy D.

    2007-03-01

    Transport in various thin-film organic semiconductors has been shown to have an anomalously high sensitivity to low magnetic fields at room temperature (RT). Early experiments on polydiacetylene single crystals and poly(phenylenevinylene)s revealed increases in photoconductivity of a few percent at RT. Further magnetotransport studies showed larger effects in π-conjugated backbone polymers and small molecules. We report magnetoresistance (MR) for semiconducting oligomer and nonconjugated polymer materials in addition to small molecule and conjugated backbone polymer materials. For example, films of the light emitters poly(N-vinylcarbazole) and Alq3 each have an MR response greater than 5% at an unusually low magnetic field of 100 Oe (μBH ˜0.0006 meV) at an unusually high temperature of 300 K (kBT ˜26 meV). Increasing the spin-orbit coupling in Alq3 films by doping with the phosphorescent sensitizers Ir(ppy)3 or PtOEP strongly suppresses the MR signal. MR in thin films of the oligomer α-sexithiophene can be negative, similar to the behavior of other organic semiconductors, or positive depending on the temperature, layer thickness, or applied voltage. We have developed a model, termed Magnetoresistance by the Interconversion of Singlets and Triplets (MIST), accounting for this anomalous MR. At zero field, the singlet and triplet e-h pair states are degenerate and the states can readily interconvert due to hyperfine interaction. Finite magnetic fields lift triplet degeneracy which affects the hyperfine interconversion of e-h pairs between singlet and triplet states. By changing the carrier recombination the MIST mechanism gives rise to a space-charge-limited current that depends on magnetic field, producing MR. E.L. Frankevich, et al., Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst.175, 41 (1989); E.L. Frankevich, et al., Phys. Rev. B 46, 9320 (1992). O. Mermer, et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 205202 (2005). V.N. Prigodin, et al., Synth. Met.156, 757 (2006).

  4. Ultra-sharp oscillatory magneto-resistance in spatially confined La{sub 0.3}Pr{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Alagoz, H. S. Jeon, J.; Boos, R.; Ahangharnejhad, R. H.; Chow, K. H. Jung, J.

    2014-10-20

    Our investigations of magneto-transport properties of La{sub 0.3}Pr{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} manganite thin films of reduced dimensions revealed dramatic changes in R(θ), the dependence of resistivity on the angle between the magnetic field direction and the current direction, and consequently in the anisotropic magneto-resistance. A regular oscillatory  sin{sup 2}θ form of R(θ) is replaced by a very sharp rectangular-shaped ones when the dimensions of the system become comparable to the size of the intrinsic electronic domains. We discuss possible mechanisms that could be responsible for these changes.

  5. Dynamic coupling of ferromagnets via spin Hall magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2017-03-01

    The synchronized magnetization dynamics in ferromagnets on a nonmagnetic heavy metal caused by the spin Hall effect is investigated theoretically. The direct and inverse spin Hall effects near the ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic interface generate longitudinal and transverse electric currents. The phenomenon is known as the spin Hall magnetoresistance effect, whose magnitude depends on the magnetization direction in the ferromagnet due to the spin transfer effect. When another ferromagnet is placed onto the same nonmagnet, these currents are again converted to the spin current by the spin Hall effect and excite the spin torque to this additional ferromagnet, resulting in the excitation of the coupled motions of the magnetizations. The in-phase or antiphase synchronization of the magnetization oscillations, depending on the value of the Gilbert damping constant and the field-like torque strength, is found in the transverse geometry by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation numerically. On the other hand, in addition to these synchronizations, the synchronization having a phase difference of a quarter of a period is also found in the longitudinal geometry. The analytical theory clarifying the relation among the current, frequency, and phase difference is also developed, where it is shown that the phase differences observed in the numerical simulations correspond to that giving the fixed points of the energy supplied by the coupling torque.

  6. Viable chemical approach for patterning nanoscale magnetoresistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeseung; Kim, Younghee; Chen, Jack Kun-Chieh; Chang, Jane P.

    2015-03-15

    A reactive ion etching process with alternating Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} exposures has been shown to chemically etch CoFe film that is an integral component in magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM). Starting with systematic thermodynamic calculations assessing various chemistries and reaction pathways leading to the highest possible vapor pressure of the etch products reactions, the potential chemical combinations were verified by etch rate investigation and surface chemistry analysis in plasma treated CoFe films. An ∼20% enhancement in etch rate was observed with the alternating use of Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} plasmas, in comparison with the use of only Cl{sub 2} plasma. This chemical combination was effective in removing metal chloride layers, thus maintaining the desired magnetic properties of the CoFe films. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed visually and spectroscopically that the metal chloride layers generated by Cl{sub 2} plasma were eliminated with H{sub 2} plasma to yield a clean etch profile. This work suggests that the selected chemistries can be used to etch magnetic metal alloys with a smooth etch profile and this general strategy can be applied to design chemically based etch processes to enable the fabrication of highly integrated nanoscale MRAM devices.

  7. Magnetoresistance in p-type cadmium telluride doped with sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faisal R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the observations that were made during experiments in which temperature dependent van der Pauw (vdP) measurements were conducted on sodium doped single crystalline CdTe. With the aid of the vdP technique, the resistivity of the sample was measured in the presence of an external transverse magnetic field. The measurements were conducted at temperatures that ranged from 24 K all the way up to 300 K. The measurements indicated that at low temperatures, the resistivity of the sample increased significantly as the magnitude of the magnetic field perpendicular to the sample was raised from 0 T to 1.5 T. It was observed that the magnetoresistance (MR) decreased with increasing temperature. At 24 K, for an applied field of 1.5 T, the maximum MR was over 30%. Furthermore, it was also observed that the MR below 75 K exhibited a more or less linear dependence on the magnetic field. At higher temperatures, the MR as a function of the applied magnetic field exhibited a quadratic dependence. The results seem to indicate that the linear MR is most likely due to inhomogeneity in the semiconductor.

  8. Novel Majorana mode and magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic superconducting topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, H.; Khezerlou, M.; Asgarifar, S.

    2017-03-01

    Among the potential applications of topological insulators, we investigate theoretically the effect of coexistence of proximity-induced ferromagnetism and superconductivity on the surface states of 3-dimensional topological insulator, where the superconducting electron-hole excitations can be significantly affected by the magnetization of ferromagnetic order. We find that, Majorana mode energy, as a verified feature of TI F/S structure, along the interface sensitively depends on the magnitude of magnetization mzfs in FS region, while its slope in perpendicular incidence presents steep and no change. Since the superconducting gap is renormalized by a factor η (mzfs) , hence Andreev reflection is more or less suppressed, and, in particular, resulting subgap tunneling conductance is more sensitive to the magnitude of magnetizations in FS and F regions. Furthermore, an interesting scenario happens at the antiparallel configuration of magnetizations mzf and mzfs resulting in magnetoresistance in N/F/FS junction, which can be controlled and decreased by tuning the magnetization magnitude in FS region.

  9. Electric polarization control of magnetoresistance in complex oxide heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Adrian G.; Inoue, Hisashi; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2016-10-01

    Lorentzian magnetoresistance (L-MR) has been widely observed in three-terminal ferromagnet-nonmagnet (FM-NM) tunnel junctions. One possible explanation for this behavior is ensemble dephasing (Hanle effect) of a spin accumulation, potentially offering a powerful approach for characterizing the spin lifetime of emerging spintronics materials. However, discrepancies between the extracted spin parameters with known materials properties has cast doubt on this interpretation for most implementations. Here, we have developed a method to control band alignments in perovskite oxide heterostructures through the use of epitaxial interface dipoles, providing a highly effective method for manipulating the Schottky barrier height and contact resistance. Using these atomically engineered heterojunctions, we are able to tune key parameters relevant to various spin accumulation models, providing an experimental platform which can test their applicability. We find that the observed L-MR is inconsistent with an interpretation of spin accumulation in either the NM material or in interface states. Rather, we consider a mechanism analogous to Coulomb blockade in quantum dots, where spin-dependent tunneling through an ensemble of interfacial defect states is controlled by local and external magnetic fields.

  10. Magnetoresistance of rolled-up Fe3Si nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, J.; Lisunov, K. G.; Escoffier, W.; Raquet, B.; Broto, J. M.; Arushanov, E.; Mönch, I.; Makarov, D.; Deneke, C.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2012-06-01

    Magnetotransport of individual rolled-up Fe3Si nanomembranes is investigated in a broad temperature range from 4.2 K up to 300 K in pulsed magnetic fields up to 55 T. The observed magnetoresistance (MR) has the following pronounced features: (i) MR is negative in the investigated intervals of temperature and magnetic field; (ii) its magnitude increases linearly with the magnetic field in a low-field region and reveals a gradual trend to saturation when the magnetic field increases; (iii) the MR effect becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. These dependences of MR on the magnetic field and temperature are in line with predictions of the spin-disorder model of the spin-flip s-d interaction assisted with creation or annihilation of magnons, which is expected above a certain critical temperature. Comparison of the MR features in rolled-up and planar samples reveals a substantial increase of the critical temperature in the rolled-up tube, which is attributed to a new geometry and internal strain arising in the rolled-up nanomembranes, influencing the electronic and magnetic properties of the material.

  11. Magnetoresistance and magnetization anomalies in CeB{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Bogach, A.V. . E-mail: alex@lt.gpi.ru; Glushkov, V.V.; Demishev, S.V.; Samarin, N.A.; Paderno, Yu.B.; Dukhnenko, A.V.; Shitsevalova, N.Yu.; Sluchanko, N.E.

    2006-09-15

    High precision magnetoresistance (MR) {delta}{rho}/{rho}(H,T) and magnetization M(H,T) measurements have been carried out for well known and typical strongly correlated electron system-cerium hexaboride. The detailed measurements have been fulfilled on single crystalline samples of CeB{sub 6} over a wide temperature range T>=1.8K in magnetic fields up to 70kOe. It was shown that the MR anomalies in the magnetic heavy fermion compound under investigation can be consistently interpreted in the frameworks of a simple relation between resistivity and magnetization-{delta}{rho}/{rho}{approx}M{sup 2} obtained by Yosida [Phys. Rev. 107(1957)396]. A local magnetic susceptibility {chi}{sub loc}(T,H)=(1/H*(d({delta}{rho}/{rho})/dH)){sup 1/2} was deduced directly from the MR {delta}{rho}(H,T) measurements and compared with the experimental data of magnetization M(H,T). The magnetic susceptibility dependences {chi}{sub loc}(T,H) and {chi}(T,H) obtained in this study for CeB{sub 6} allow us to analyze the complicated H-T magnetic phase diagram of this so-called dense Kondo-system.

  12. Magnetoresistance detected spin collectivity in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malissa, Hans; Waters, David P.; Joshi, Gajadhar; Kavand, Marzieh; Limes, Mark E.; Burn, Paul L.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) typically refers to the significant change in the conductivity of thin layers of organic semiconductors at low static magnetic fields (< 10 mT). When radio frequency (rf) radiation is applied to an organic semiconductor under bipolar injection, and in the presence of small magnetic fields B, magnetic resonance can occur, which is observed as a change of the OMAR effect [Baker et al., Nat. Commun. 3, 898 (2012)]. When B and the resonant driving field are stronger than local hyperfine fields, an ultrastrong coupling regime emerges, which is marked by collective spin effects analogous to the optical Dicke effect [Roundy and Raikh, Phys. Rev. B 88, 125206 (2013)]. Experimentally, this collective behavior of spins can be probed in the steady state OMAR of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at room temperature by observation of a sign reversal of the OMAR change under rf irradiation. Furthermore, in the presence of strong driving fields, an ac Zeeman effect can be observed through OMAR [Waters et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 910 (2015)], a unique window to observe room temperature macroscopic spin quantum coherence.

  13. Magnetoresistance in Ultrathin Homogeneous and Granular Superconducting Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Peng

    1998-03-01

    We have performed magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on a series of ultrathin Pb and Sn wires in the superconducting transition region using a method of in situ growth and electrical measurement. The wires had a width as narrow as 200 Åand were as thin as 10 ÅThey could be of a uniform or granular morphology depending on the growth condition. In the uniform wires we observed a pronounced negative MR, which grows as the wire cross-sectional area decreases.(P. Xiong, A.V. Herzog, and R.C. Dynes, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 927 (1997). Namely, a moderate magnetic field apparently suppresses the superconducting fluctuations. The results will be discussed in the context of a model proposed by Kivelson and Spivak.(S.A. Kivelson and B.I. Spivak, Phys. Rev. B 45), 10490 (1992). In contrast, in the granular wires no negative MR was present. Instead, we observed periodic oscillations in MR,(A.V. Herzog, P. Xiong, and R.C. Dynes, unpublished.) which we attribute to the oscillation of the supercurrent in phase coherent loops in the granular network. The implications of the results on the magnetic field driven superconductor-insulator transition in granular systems will be discussed.

  14. Quantum Fluctuations of Local Magnetoresistance in Organic Spin Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikh, Mikhail; Roundy, Robert; Nemirovsky, Demitry; Kagalovsky, Victor

    2014-03-01

    Aside from interfacial effects, the performance of organic spin valves is limited by the spin memory loss in course of electron transport between the magnetized electrodes. One of the most prominent mechanisms of this loss is the spin precession in the random hyperfine fields of nuclei. We assume that the electron transport is due to incoherent multi-step tunneling. Then the precession takes place while electron ``waits'' for the subsequent tunneling step. While the spatial coherence of electron is lost after a single step, the spin evolution remains absolutely coherent all the way between the electrodes. As a result, the amplitudes of subsequent spin rotation interfere with each other. We demonstrate that this interference leads to a wide spread in the local values of tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). Moreover, if on average the TMR is positive, the portion of the surface area where the TMR is negative is appreciable. We calculate analytically and numerically the distribution of local TMR as a function of the spin-valve thickness. Supported by the NSF through MRSEC DMR-112125 and by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation

  15. Spin and orbital order separation in colossal magnetoresistive transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. A.; Burkhardt, M. H.; Weschke, E.; Schierle, E.; Golden, M. S.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.; StöHr, J.; D&üRr, H. A.

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the Colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) process in manganites is one of the grand challenges of modern physics. While the metallic ferromagnetic phase is relatively well understood, the triggering mechanism of the metal-insulator transition is not clear and it is believed that lattice strain in term of polarons play an important role in the mysterious insulating phase. Lattice strain occurs in the charge-orbitally ordered insulating phase via the Jahn-Teller type distortion and therefore, to understand the CMR it is critical to understand the interplay of ferromagnetism and orbital order during the CMR transition itself. In this letter, with high magnetic field dependent Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering measurements, we show that during the CMR process, an insulating antiferromagnetic phase, which is extremely susceptible to magnetic field and temperature, directly competes with metallic ferromagnetism while the robust CE type spin and orbitally ordered regions act as a catalyst to seed these antiferromagnetic regions. This allows us to construct a picture of the competing forces at the heart of CMR.

  16. Self-powered magnetic sensor based on a triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Lin, Long; Zhang, Yue; Jing, Qingshen; Hou, Te-Chien; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-11-27

    Magnetic sensors are usually based on the Hall effect or a magnetoresistive sensing mechanism. Here we demonstrate that a nanogenerator can serve as a sensor for detecting the variation of the time-dependent magnetic field. The output voltage of the sensor was found to exponentially increase with increasing magnetic field. The detection sensitivities for the change and the changing rate of magnetic field are about 0.0363 ± 0.0004 ln(mV)/G and 0.0497 ± 0.0006 ln(mV)/(G/s), respectively. The response time and reset time of the sensor are about 0.13 and 0.34 s, respectively. The fabricated sensor has a detection resolution of about 3 G and can work under low frequencies (<0.4 Hz).

  17. Giant magnetoresistance, three-dimensional Fermi surface and origin of resistivity plateau in YSb semimetal.

    PubMed

    Pavlosiuk, Orest; Swatek, Przemysław; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2016-12-09

    Very strong magnetoresistance and a resistivity plateau impeding low temperature divergence due to insulating bulk are hallmarks of topological insulators and are also present in topological semimetals where the plateau is induced by magnetic field, when time-reversal symmetry (protecting surface states in topological insulators) is broken. Similar features were observed in a simple rock-salt-structure LaSb, leading to a suggestion of the possible non-trivial topology of 2D states in this compound. We show that its sister compound YSb is also characterized by giant magnetoresistance exceeding one thousand percent and low-temperature plateau of resistivity. We thus performed in-depth analysis of YSb Fermi surface by band calculations, magnetoresistance, and Shubnikov-de Haas effect measurements, which reveals only three-dimensional Fermi sheets. Kohler scaling applied to magnetoresistance data accounts very well for its low-temperature upturn behavior. The field-angle-dependent magnetoresistance demonstrates a 3D-scaling yielding effective mass anisotropy perfectly agreeing with electronic structure and quantum oscillations analysis, thus providing further support for 3D-Fermi surface scenario of magnetotransport, without necessity of invoking topologically non-trivial 2D states. We discuss data implying that analogous field-induced properties of LaSb can also be well understood in the framework of 3D multiband model.

  18. Giant magnetoresistance, three-dimensional Fermi surface and origin of resistivity plateau in YSb semimetal

    PubMed Central

    Pavlosiuk, Orest; Swatek, Przemysław; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Very strong magnetoresistance and a resistivity plateau impeding low temperature divergence due to insulating bulk are hallmarks of topological insulators and are also present in topological semimetals where the plateau is induced by magnetic field, when time-reversal symmetry (protecting surface states in topological insulators) is broken. Similar features were observed in a simple rock-salt-structure LaSb, leading to a suggestion of the possible non-trivial topology of 2D states in this compound. We show that its sister compound YSb is also characterized by giant magnetoresistance exceeding one thousand percent and low-temperature plateau of resistivity. We thus performed in-depth analysis of YSb Fermi surface by band calculations, magnetoresistance, and Shubnikov–de Haas effect measurements, which reveals only three-dimensional Fermi sheets. Kohler scaling applied to magnetoresistance data accounts very well for its low-temperature upturn behavior. The field-angle-dependent magnetoresistance demonstrates a 3D-scaling yielding effective mass anisotropy perfectly agreeing with electronic structure and quantum oscillations analysis, thus providing further support for 3D-Fermi surface scenario of magnetotransport, without necessity of invoking topologically non-trivial 2D states. We discuss data implying that analogous field-induced properties of LaSb can also be well understood in the framework of 3D multiband model. PMID:27934949

  19. Giant magnetoresistance, three-dimensional Fermi surface and origin of resistivity plateau in YSb semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlosiuk, Orest; Swatek, Przemysław; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Very strong magnetoresistance and a resistivity plateau impeding low temperature divergence due to insulating bulk are hallmarks of topological insulators and are also present in topological semimetals where the plateau is induced by magnetic field, when time-reversal symmetry (protecting surface states in topological insulators) is broken. Similar features were observed in a simple rock-salt-structure LaSb, leading to a suggestion of the possible non-trivial topology of 2D states in this compound. We show that its sister compound YSb is also characterized by giant magnetoresistance exceeding one thousand percent and low-temperature plateau of resistivity. We thus performed in-depth analysis of YSb Fermi surface by band calculations, magnetoresistance, and Shubnikov–de Haas effect measurements, which reveals only three-dimensional Fermi sheets. Kohler scaling applied to magnetoresistance data accounts very well for its low-temperature upturn behavior. The field-angle-dependent magnetoresistance demonstrates a 3D-scaling yielding effective mass anisotropy perfectly agreeing with electronic structure and quantum oscillations analysis, thus providing further support for 3D-Fermi surface scenario of magnetotransport, without necessity of invoking topologically non-trivial 2D states. We discuss data implying that analogous field-induced properties of LaSb can also be well understood in the framework of 3D multiband model.

  20. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    PubMed Central

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R.; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S.; Samal, Akshaya K.; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications. PMID:22110867

  1. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions.

    PubMed

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S; Samal, Akshaya K; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  2. Matter sourced anisotropic stress for dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Baorong; Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin

    2014-11-01

    Usually a dark energy as a perfect fluid is characterized by the ratio of pressure to energy density (w =p /ρ ) and the ratio of their perturbations in its rest frame (cs2=δ p /δ ρ ). However, a dark energy would have other characteristics beyond its equation of state and the effective speed of sound. Here the extra property is the anisotropic stress sourced by matter as a simple extension to the perfect fluid model. At the background level, this anisotropic stress is zero with respect to the cosmological principle, but not at the first-order perturbation. We tested the viability of the existence of this kind of anisotropic stress by using the currently available cosmic observations through the geometrical and dynamical measurements. Using the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method, we found that the upper bounds on the anisotropic stress which enters into the summation of the Newtonian potentials should be of the order O (1 0-3)Δm . We did not find any strong evidence for the existence of this matter-sourced anisotropic stress, even in the 1 σ region.

  3. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics for central collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqahtani, Mubarak; Nopoush, Mohammad; Strickland, Michael

    2017-03-01

    We use quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics to study an azimuthally symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. In quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics, a single finite-temperature quasiparticle mass is introduced and fit to the lattice data in order to implement a realistic equation of state (EoS). We compare results obtained by using the quasiparticle method with the standard method of imposing the EoS in anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. Using these three methods, we extract the primordial particle spectra, total number of charged particles, and average transverse momentum for various values of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η /s . We find that the three methods agree well for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η /s , but differ at large η /s , with the standard anisotropic EoS method showing suppressed production at low transverse-momentum compared with the other two methods considered. Finally, we demonstrate explicitly that, when using standard viscous hydrodynamics, the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative at large pT. Such behavior is not seen in either anisotropic hydrodynamics approach, irrespective of the value of η /s .

  4. Large linear magnetoresistance in topological crystalline insulator Pb{sub 0.6}Sn{sub 0.4}Te

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, Subhajit; Ghara, Somnath; Guin, Satya N.; Sundaresan, A.; Biswas, Kanishka

    2016-01-15

    Classical magnetoresistance generally follows the quadratic dependence of the magnetic field at lower field and finally saturates when field is larger. Here, we report the large positive non-saturating linear magnetoresistance in topological crystalline insulator, Pb{sub 0.6}Sn{sub 0.4}Te, at different temperatures between 3 K and 300 K in magnetic field up to 9 T. Magnetoresistance value as high as ∼200% was achieved at 3 K at magnetic field of 9 T. Linear magnetoresistance observed in Pb{sub 0.6}Sn{sub 0.4}Te is mainly governed by the spatial fluctuation carrier mobility due to distortions in the current paths in inhomogeneous conductor. - Graphical abstract: Large non-saturating linear magnetoresistance has been evidenced in topological crystalline insulator, Pb{sub 0.6}Sn{sub 0.4}Te, at different temperatures between 3 K and 300 K in magnetic field up to 9 T. - Highlights: • Large non-saturating linear magnetoresistance was achieved in the topological crystalline insulator, Pb{sub 0.6}Sn{sub 0.4}Te. • Highest magnetoresistance value as high as ~200% was achieved at 3 K at magnetic field of 9 T. • Linear magnetoresistance in Pb{sub 0.6}Sn{sub 0.4}Te is mainly governed by the spatial fluctuation of the carrier mobility.

  5. New compensation method for bulk optical sensors with multiple birefringences.

    PubMed

    Lee, K S

    1989-06-01

    The dielectric tensor of an anisotropic crystal with multiple perturbations is presented to include the effects of multiple perturbations. To study electromagnetic wave propagation in anisotropic crystals subject to various influences the perturbed dielectric tensor is substituted into Maxwell's equation. Then, a 2 x 2 transmission matrix formalism, based on a normal-mode approach, is extended to anisotropic crystals possessing multiple birefringences to develop compensation schemes for ac optical sensors employing the crystal. It is shown that a new compensation method utilizing two analyzers can eliminate the effects of both unwanted linear birefringences and unwanted circular birefringences on the stability of the ac bulk polarimetric optical sensor. The conditions (here referred to as the quenching condition) in which the compensation method becomes important are also derived for both the voltage (or electric field) and current (or magnetic field) sensors.

  6. Negative magnetoresistance without well-defined chirality in the Weyl semimetal TaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Frank; Shekhar, Chandra; Wu, Shu-Chun; Sun, Yan; Dos Reis, Ricardo Donizeth; Kumar, Nitesh; Naumann, Marcel; Ajeesh, Mukkattu O.; Schmidt, Marcus; Grushin, Adolfo G.; Bardarson, Jens H.; Baenitz, Michael; Sokolov, Dmitry; Borrmann, Horst; Nicklas, Michael; Felser, Claudia; Hassinger, Elena; Yan, Binghai

    2016-05-01

    Weyl semimetals (WSMs) are topological quantum states wherein the electronic bands disperse linearly around pairs of nodes with fixed chirality, the Weyl points. In WSMs, nonorthogonal electric and magnetic fields induce an exotic phenomenon known as the chiral anomaly, resulting in an unconventional negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, the chiral-magnetic effect. However, it remains an open question to which extent this effect survives when chirality is not well-defined. Here, we establish the detailed Fermi-surface topology of the recently identified WSM TaP via combined angle-resolved quantum-oscillation spectra and band-structure calculations. The Fermi surface forms banana-shaped electron and hole pockets surrounding pairs of Weyl points. Although this means that chirality is ill-defined in TaP, we observe a large negative longitudinal magnetoresistance. We show that the magnetoresistance can be affected by a magnetic field-induced inhomogeneous current distribution inside the sample.

  7. Influence of the antiferromagnetic spin density wave on the magnetoresistance of Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Yeong-Ah; Kummamuru, Ravi

    2007-03-01

    We have performed magnetotransport measurements on Cr films that are 350, 56, 43 and 18 nm thick. The magnetoresistance with the field perpendicular to the film plane shows a clear increase below the Neel temperature and is accompanied by an anomalous negative magnetoresistance at the Neel temperature. The orbital magnetoresistance satisfies the Kohler's rule in the paramagnetic state but violates it in the Neel state. The Hall resistance shows temperature dependence in the paramagnetic state, which was previously suggested to be indicative of a pseudogap [1]. We explain the above phenomena by the evolution of the electronic structure due to the formation of antiferromagnetic spin density wave, the influence of antiferromagnetic domain walls, and the existence of more than one scattering time. [1] ``Quantum phase transition in a common metal'', A. Yeh, Y-A. Soh, J. Brooke, G. Aeppli, T. F. Rosenbaum, and S. M. Hayden, Nature (London) 419, 459 (2002).

  8. Electric field dependence of junction magnetoresistance in magnetite/semiconductor heterostructure at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Aireddy, H.; Bhaumik, S.; Das, A. K.

    2015-12-07

    We have fabricated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/p-Si heterojunction using pulsed laser deposition technique and explored its electro-magnetic transport properties. The heterojunction exhibits backward rectifying property at all temperatures, and appraisal of giant junction magnetoresistance (JMR) is observed at room temperature (RT). Conspicuously, the variation and sign change of JMR as a function of electric field is observed at RT. The backward rectifying behavior of the device is ascribed to the highly doped p-type (p{sup ++}) semiconducting nature of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and the origin of electric field (voltage) dependence of magnetoresistance is explained proposing electronic band diagram of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si heterojunction. This interesting result may have importance to integrate Si-based magnetoresistance sources in multifunctional spintronic devices.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of Copper/Cobalt/Copper/Iron nanostructurated films with magnetoresistive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupinǎ, Victor; Prioteasa, Iulian; Ilie, Daniela; Manu, Radu; Petrǎşescu, Lucian; Tutun, Ştefan Gabriel; Dincǎ, Paul; MustaÅ£ǎ, Ion; Lungu, Cristian Petricǎ; Jepu, IonuÅ£; Vasile, Eugeniu; Nicolescu, Virginia; Vladoiu, Rodica

    2017-02-01

    Copper/Cobalt/Copper/Iron thin films were synthesized in order to obtain nanostructured materials with special magnetoresistive properties. The multilayer films were deposited on silicon substrates. In this respect we used Thermionic Vacuum Arc Discharge Method (TVA). The benefit of this deposition technique is the ability to have a controlled range of thicknesses starting from few nanometers to hundreds of nanometers. The purity of the thin films was insured by a high vacuum pressure and a lack of any kind of buffer gas inside the coating chamber. The morphology and structure of the thin films were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Techniques and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). Magnetoresistive measurement results depict that thin films possess Giant Magneto-Resistance Effect (GMR). Magneto-Optic-Kerr Effect (MOKE) studies were performed to characterize the magnetic properties of these thin films.

  10. Distinctive uniaxial magnetic anisotropy and positive magnetoresistance in (110)-oriented Fe3O4 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dho, Joonghoe; Kim, Byeong-geon; Ki, Sanghoon

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) films were synthesized on (110)-oriented MgO, MgAl2O4, and SrTiO3 substrates for comparative studies of the substrates' effects on magnetic and magnetoresistance properties of the films. For the [-110] direction, the hysteresis loops of the Fe3O4 film on MgAl2O4 exhibited a good squareness with the largest coercivity of ˜1090 Oe, and the ratio of remanent magnetization to saturation magnetization was ˜0.995. For the [001] direction, positive magnetoresistance in weak magnetic fields was most distinct for the (110) SrTiO3 substrate with the largest lattice mismatch. Positive magnetoresistance in the (110) Fe3O4 films was presumably affected by imperfect atomic arrangements at anti-phase boundaries.

  11. Giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a molecular junction: Molecular spin-valve transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-04-21

    Amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance by gate field in a molecular junction is the most important requirement for the development of a molecular spin valve transistor. Herein, we predict a giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a single molecular spin valve junction, which consists of Ru-bis-terpyridine molecule as a spacer between two ferromagnetic nickel contacts. Based on the first-principles quantum transport approach, we show that a modest change in the gate field that is experimentally accessible can lead to a substantial amplification (320%) of tunnel magnetoresistance. The origin of such large amplification is attributed to the spin dependent modification of orbitals at the molecule-lead interface and the resultant Stark effect induced shift in channel position with respect to the Fermi energy.

  12. Negative magnetoresistance without well-defined chirality in the Weyl semimetal TaP

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Frank; Shekhar, Chandra; Wu, Shu-Chun; Sun, Yan; dos Reis, Ricardo Donizeth; Kumar, Nitesh; Naumann, Marcel; Ajeesh, Mukkattu O.; Schmidt, Marcus; Grushin, Adolfo G.; Bardarson, Jens H.; Baenitz, Michael; Sokolov, Dmitry; Borrmann, Horst; Nicklas, Michael; Felser, Claudia; Hassinger, Elena; Yan, Binghai

    2016-01-01

    Weyl semimetals (WSMs) are topological quantum states wherein the electronic bands disperse linearly around pairs of nodes with fixed chirality, the Weyl points. In WSMs, nonorthogonal electric and magnetic fields induce an exotic phenomenon known as the chiral anomaly, resulting in an unconventional negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, the chiral-magnetic effect. However, it remains an open question to which extent this effect survives when chirality is not well-defined. Here, we establish the detailed Fermi-surface topology of the recently identified WSM TaP via combined angle-resolved quantum-oscillation spectra and band-structure calculations. The Fermi surface forms banana-shaped electron and hole pockets surrounding pairs of Weyl points. Although this means that chirality is ill-defined in TaP, we observe a large negative longitudinal magnetoresistance. We show that the magnetoresistance can be affected by a magnetic field-induced inhomogeneous current distribution inside the sample. PMID:27186980

  13. Magnetism and magnetoresistance from different origins in Co/ZnO:Al granular films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Zhiyong; Liu, Xia; Song, Zhilin; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-12-01

    Co/ZnO:Al granular films were made on glass substrates by sequential magnetron sputter deposition of ultrathin Co layer and ZnO:Al layer at room temperature. The as-deposited films consist of superparamagnetic Co particles dispersed in ZnO:Al ( 2% Al) semiconductor matrix. Distinguished magnetoresistance effect at room temperature was obtained in the as-deposited films, which obviously reduced after annealing due to the growth of Co particles. The size of important magnetic particles was analyzed by Langevin function for hysteresis loops and magnetoresistance curves at room temperature. It was found that small magnetic particle contribute to magnetoresistance behavior and large particles dominate the room temperature magnetism in Co/ZnO:Al granular films.

  14. Termination layer compensated tunnelling magnetoresistance in ferrimagnetic Heusler compounds with high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaewoo; Ferrante, Yari; Faleev, Sergey V; Samant, Mahesh G; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-01-18

    Although high-tunnelling spin polarization has been observed in soft, ferromagnetic, and predicted for hard, ferrimagnetic Heusler materials, there has been no experimental observation to date of high-tunnelling magnetoresistance in the latter. Here we report the preparation of highly textured, polycrystalline Mn3Ge films on amorphous substrates, with very high magnetic anisotropy fields exceeding 7 T, making them technologically relevant. However, the small and negative tunnelling magnetoresistance that we find is attributed to predominant tunnelling from the lower moment Mn-Ge termination layers that are oppositely magnetized to the higher moment Mn-Mn layers. The net spin polarization of the current reflects the different proportions of the two distinct termination layers and their associated tunnelling matrix elements that result from inevitable atomic scale roughness. We show that by engineering the spin polarization of the two termination layers to be of the same sign, even though these layers are oppositely magnetized, high-tunnelling magnetoresistance is possible.

  15. Size effects under a strong magnetic field: transverse magnetoresistance of thin gold films deposited on mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Raúl C.; Henríquez, Ricardo; García, Juan Pablo; María Moncada, Ana; Espinosa, Andrés; Robles, Marcelo; Kremer, Germán; Moraga, Luis; Cancino, Simón; Morales, José Roberto; Ramírez, Adán; Oyarzún, Simón; Suárez, Marco Antonio; Chen, David; Zumelzu, Ernesto; Lizama, Claudio

    2006-04-01

    We report measurements of transverse magnetoresistance where the signal can be attributed to electron-surface scattering, together with measurements of the surface roughness of the films on an atomic scale. The measurements were performed with a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) on four thin gold films evaporated onto mica. The magnetoresistance exhibits a marked thickness dependence: at 4 K and 9 T is about 5% for the thinner (69 nm) film, and about 14% for the thicker (185 nm) film. Sondheimer's theory provides an accurate description of the temperature dependence of the resistivity, but predicts a magnetoresistance one order of magnitude smaller than that observed at 4 K. Calecki's theory in the limit of small roughness correlation length, predicts a resistivity two orders of magnitude larger than observed at 4 K.

  16. Impact of Tunnel-Barrier Strength on Magnetoresistance in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Caitlin; Misiorny, Maciej; Metten, Dominik; Heedt, Sebastian; Schäpers, Thomas; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola

    2016-05-01

    We investigate magnetoresistance in spin valves involving CoPd-contacted carbon nanotubes. Both the temperature and bias-voltage dependence clearly indicate tunneling magnetoresistance as the origin. We show that this effect is significantly affected by the tunnel-barrier strength, which appears to be one reason for the variation between devices previously detected in similar structures. Modeling the data by means of the scattering matrix approach, we find a nontrivial dependence of the magnetoresistance on the barrier strength. Furthermore, an analysis of the spin precession observed in a nonlocal Hanle measurement yields a spin lifetime of τs=1.1 ns , a value comparable with those found in silicon- or graphene-based spin-valve devices.

  17. Transition from positive to negative magnetoresistance induced by a constriction in semiconductor nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.; Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the magnetotransport through an indium antimonide (InSb) nanowire grown in [111] direction, with a geometric constriction and in an external magnetic field applied along the nanowire axis. We have found that the magnetoresistance is negative for the narrow constriction, nearly zero for the constriction of some intermediate radius, and takes on positive values for the constriction with the radius approaching that of the nanowire. For all magnitudes of the magnetic field, the radius of constriction at which the change of the magnetoresistance sign takes place has been found to be almost the same as long as other geometric parameters of the nanowire are fixed. The sign reversing of the magnetoresistance is explained as a combined effect of two factors: the influence of the constriction on the transverse states and the spin Zeeman effect.

  18. Universality of Effective Medium and Random Resistor Network models for disorder-induced linear unsaturating magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Silvia; Lai, Ying Tong; Love, Cameron; Ramakrishnan, Navneeth; Adam, Shaffique

    In recent years, the Effective Medium Theory (EMT) and the Random Resistor Network (RRN) have been separately used to explain disorder induced magnetoresistance that is quadratic at low fields and linear at high fields. We demonstrate that the quadratic and linear coefficients of the magnetoresistance and the transition point from the quadratic to the linear regime depend only on the inhomogeneous carrier density profile. We use this to find a mapping between the two models using dimensionless parameters that determine the magnetoresistance and show numerically that they belong to the same universality class. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01) and the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College through Grant Number R-607-265-01312.

  19. Magnetization of anisotropic Type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.

    1989-04-10

    Peculiarities of magnetization of anisotropic type II superconductors are of considerable interest in view of the discovery of high-T/sub c/ superconductors characterized by strongly asymmetric layered structure. Specifics of the penetration of magnetic flux into an anisotropic type II superconductor were discussed in the literature. This analysis gave the distribution of induction in an isolated vortex, its energy, and critical magnetic field H/sub c1/. However, the magnetization curve of anisotropic superconductors was not considered. This paper deals with the magnetic moment of uniaxial London superconductor in the interval H/sub c1/ /le/ H/sub 0/ << H/sub c2/, where H/sub 0/ is the external magnetic field strength.

  20. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2016-07-19

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  1. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2016-07-19

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numericalmore » simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.« less

  2. Anisotropic Failure Modeling for HY-100 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harstad, E. N.; Maudlin, P. J.; McKirgan, J. B.

    2004-07-01

    HY-100 steel is a material that behaves isotropically in the elastic and plastic region and acts anisotropically in failure. Since HY-100 is a ductile metal, a more gradual failure process is observed as opposed to the nearly instantaneous failure in brittle materials. We extend our elasto-plastic-damage constitutive model by including of a decohesion model to describe material behavior between the onset of failure and fracture. We also develop an anisotropic failure surface to account for directionality in material failure. Both the anisotropic failure and decohesion models have been implemented into a finite element code, where the effects of these models are studied in a uniaxial stress simulations, a plate impact simulations, and a quasistatic notched round bar tensile test simulations.

  3. Gravitational stresses in anisotropic rock masses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Savage, W.Z.; Swolfs, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained and are modelled as a homogeneous, orthotropic or transversely isotropic, linearly elastic material. The analysis, constrained by the thermodynamic requirement that strain energy be positive definite, gives the following important result: inclusion of anisotropy broadens the range of permissible values of gravity-induced horizontal stresses. In fact, for some ranges of anisotropic rock properties, it is thermodynamically admissible for gravity-induced horizontal stresses to exceed the vertical stress component; this is not possible for the classical isotropic solution. Specific examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity-induced stress field in anisotropic rocks and its dependence on the type, degree and orientation of anisotropy with respect to the horizontal ground surface. ?? 1987.

  4. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGES

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  5. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy; Kurien, Susan

    2016-11-01

    A new spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence is proposed. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  6. Anisotropic Hanle line shape via magnetothermoelectric phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, K. S.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.; Vera-Marun, I. J.

    2016-11-01

    We observe anisotropic Hanle line shape with unequal in-plane and out-of-plane nonlocal signals for spin precession measurements carried out on lateral metallic spin valves with transparent interfaces. The conventional interpretation for this anisotropy corresponds to unequal spin relaxation times for in-plane and out-of-plane spin orientations as for the case of two-dimensional materials like graphene, but it is unexpected in a polycrystalline metallic channel. Systematic measurements as a function of temperature and channel length, combined with both analytical and numerical thermoelectric transport models, demonstrate that the anisotropy in the Hanle line shape is magnetothermal in origin, caused by the anisotropic modulation of the Peltier and Seebeck coefficients of the ferromagnetic electrodes. Our results call for the consideration of such magnetothermoelectric effects in the study of anisotropic spin relaxation.

  7. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does.

  8. Method for site characterization of anisotropic diffuse illumination of photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Juan M.; Zhang, Deming; Vorndran, Shelby; Gordon, Michael; Castillo, Jose; Brooks, Adria; Lonij, Vincent; Cronin, Alex; Kostuk, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    In this paper a method to characterize the anisotropy of diffuse illumination incident on photovoltaic systems is presented. PV systems are designed based on standard conditions in which only consider direct and isotropic diffuse illumination. Anisotropic illumination can cause the PV system output to step outside of the design specifications. A baffled multi-detector sensor system is described having a discrete set of azimuthal and declination angle combinations in order to constantly sample the irradiance and the incidence angle of the diffuse illumination in all zenith directions. The sensor was deployed in the Tucson Electric Power Solar Test Yard alongside with commercially available PV systems that are independently monitored. Constant and transient sources of anisotropic diffuse illumination, such as surface reflection and cloud edge effects respectively, are measured and modeled with ray tracing software. Results of the method are described for characterizing diffuse illumination at the TEP Solar Test Yard. Understanding the anisotropic diffuse illumination can potentially allow to more accurately predict PV system or to optimize energy harvesting of systems with non-standard mounting conditions as well as building integrated photovoltaic applications.

  9. Dirac tunneling magnetoresistance in a double ferromagnetic graphene barrier structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soodchomshom, Bumned; Tang, I.-Ming; Hoonsawat, Rassmidara

    2009-06-01

    The quantum magneto-transport properties of a double ferromagnetic graphene barrier NG/FG/NG‧/FG/NG junction are investigated, where NG's are normal graphene layers, NG‧ is a normal graphene layer of thickness d and FG's are ferromagnetic graphene layers of thickness L. The FG layers with exchange energy H are in contact with the gates of potential energy U. The electrical conductance's ( G qP and G qAP) for parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) alignment of the polarization in the two FG layers, respectively, and the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) defined as ( G qP- G qAP/ G qP)×100% are derived. We find that at zero bias, the oscillatory behavior of the TMR for our multilayer junction has a maximal value of 50% which can be tuned by adjusting the gate voltage and exchange fields in the FG's. The conductance and the TMR's are found to exhibit periodic (oscillatory) depending on the thicknesses of the NG layer and on the value of the ferromagnetic barrier strengths χ U(H) defined as U( H) L/ℏ v F. It is also seen that the amplitudes of oscillation do not decrease as d, U or H increases. This is due to the relativistic nature of the mobile electrons (with the effective speed of light being the Fermi velocity v F∼10 6 m/s) in graphene. For junctions having d=0, we find that in the AP junction, the quantum conductance modulation due to the combination between spin up and spin down conductance does not appear. The conductance of the AP junction exhibits an oscillatory dependence on χ H when d≠0.

  10. An Anisotropic Multiphysics Model for Intervertebral Disk

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gu, Weiyong

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disk (IVD) is the largest avascular structure in human body, consisting of three types of charged hydrated soft tissues. Its mechanical behavior is nonlinear and anisotropic, due mainly to nonlinear interactions among different constituents within tissues. In this study, a more realistic anisotropic multiphysics model was developed based on the continuum mixture theory and employed to characterize the couplings of multiple physical fields in the IVD. Numerical simulations demonstrate that this model is capable of systematically predicting the mechanical and electrochemical signals within the disk under various loading conditions, which is essential in understanding the mechanobiology of IVD. PMID:27099402

  11. Directional wetting in anisotropic inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine R; Vogel, Nicolas; Burgess, Ian B; Perry, Carole C; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-07-01

    Porous materials display interesting transport phenomena due to restricted motion of fluids within the nano- to microscale voids. Here, we investigate how liquid wetting in highly ordered inverse opals is affected by anisotropy in pore geometry. We compare samples with different degrees of pore asphericity and find different wetting patterns depending on the pore shape. Highly anisotropic structures are infiltrated more easily than their isotropic counterparts. Further, the wetting of anisotropic inverse opals is directional, with liquids filling from the side more easily. This effect is supported by percolation simulations as well as direct observations of wetting using time-resolved optical microscopy.

  12. Optical Activity of Anisotropic Achiral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, T.; Kauranen, M.; Van Rompaey, Y.; Persoons, A. |

    1996-08-01

    Anisotropic achiral surfaces respond differently to left- and right-hand circularly polarized light. This occurs when the orientation of the surface with respect to an otherwise achiral experimental setup makes the total geometry chiral. Such optical activity is demonstrated in second-harmonic generation from an anisotropic thin molecular film. The circular-difference response reverses sign as the handedness of the geometry is reversed and vanishes when the setup possesses a mirror plane. The results are explained within the electric-dipole-allowed second-order surface nonlinearity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. On cracking of charged anisotropic polytropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, M.; Mardan, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Recently in [1], the role of electromagnetic field on the cracking of spherical polytropes has been investigated without perturbing charge parameter explicitly. In this study, we have examined the occurrence of cracking of anisotropic spherical polytropes through perturbing parameters like anisotropic pressure, energy density and charge. We consider two different types of polytropes in this study. We discuss the occurrence of cracking in two different ways (i) by perturbing polytropic constant, anisotropy and charge parameter (ii) by perturbing polytropic index, anisotropy and charge parameter for each case. We conclude that cracking appears for a wide range of parameters in both cases. Also, our results are reduced to [2] in the absence of charge.

  14. Inverse moments equilibria for helical anisotropic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Hirshman, S. P.; Depassier, M. C.

    1987-11-01

    An energy functional is devised for magnetic confinement schemes that have anisotropic plasma pressure. The minimization of this energy functional is demonstrated to reproduce components of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force balance relation in systems with helical symmetry. An iterative steepest descent procedure is applied to the Fourier moments of the inverse magnetic flux coordinates to minimize the total energy and thus generate anisotropic pressure MHD equilibria. Applications to straight ELMO Snaky Torus (NTIS Document No. DE-84002406) configurations that have a magnetic well on the outermost flux surfaces have been obtained.

  15. Raman Tensor Formalism for Optically Anisotropic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kranert, Christian; Sturm, Chris; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-03-25

    We present a formalism for calculating the Raman scattering intensity dependent on the polarization configuration for optically anisotropic crystals. It can be applied to crystals of arbitrary orientation and crystal symmetry measured in normal incidence backscattering geometry. The classical Raman tensor formalism cannot be used for optically anisotropic materials due to birefringence causing the polarization within the crystal to be depth dependent. We show that in the limit of averaging over a sufficiently large scattering depth, the observed Raman intensities converge and can be described by an effective Raman tensor given here. Full agreement with experimental results for uniaxial and biaxial crystals is demonstrated.

  16. Evolution of multidimensional flat anisotropic cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, A. ); Demianski, M. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics , Universita di Roma I, La Sapienza, Rome ); Ivanov, P.; Polnarev, A.G. )

    1993-07-15

    We study the dynamics of a flat multidimensional anisotropic cosmological model filled with an anisotropic fluidlike medium. By an appropriate choice of variables, the dynamical equations reduce to a two-dimensional dynamical system. We present a detailed analysis of the time evolution of this system and the conditions of the existence of spacetime singularities. We investigate the conditions under which violent, exponential, and power-law inflation is possible. We show that dimensional reduction cannot proceed by anti-inflation (rapid contraction of internal space). Our model indicates that it is very difficult to achieve dimensional reduction by classical means.

  17. Differential matrix formalism for depolarizing anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2011-06-15

    Azzam's differential matrix formalism [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 1756 (1978)], originally developed for longitudinally inhomogeneous anisotropic nondepolarizing media, is extended to include depolarizing media. The generalization is physically interpreted in terms of means and uncertainties of the elementary optical properties of the medium, as well as of three anisotropy absorption parameters introduced to describe the depolarization. The formalism results in a particularly simple mathematical procedure for the retrieval of the elementary properties of a generally depolarizing anisotropic medium, assumed to be globally homogeneous, from its experimental Mueller matrix. The approach is illustrated on literature data and the conditions of its validity are identified and discussed.

  18. Anisotropic quantum transport in a network of vertically aligned graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Guo, L-W; Li, Z-L; Chen, L-L; Lin, J-J; Jia, Y-P; Lu, W; Guo, Y; Chen, X-L

    2014-08-27

    Novel anisotropic quantum transport was observed in a network of vertically aligned graphene sheets (VAGSs), which can be regarded as composed of plenty of quasi-parallel, nearly intrinsic, freestanding monolayers of graphene. When a magnetic field was perpendicular to most graphene sheets, magnetoresistance (MR) curves showed a weak localization (WL) effect at low field and a maximum value at a critical field ascribed to diffusive boundary scattering. While the magnetic field was parallel to the graphene sheets, the MR maximum disappeared and exhibited a transition from WL to weak antilocalization (WAL) with increasing temperature and magnetic field. Edges as atomically sharp defects are the main elastic and inelastic intervalley scattering sources, and inelastic scattering is ascribed to electron-electron intervalley scattering in the ballistic regime. This is the first time simultaneously observing WL, WAL and diffusive boundary scattering in such a macroscopic three-dimensional graphene system. These indicate the VAGS network is a robust platform for the study of the intrinsic physical properties of graphene.

  19. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

  20. Magnetic configuration dependence of magnetoresistance in a Fe-porphyrin-like carbon nanotube spintronic device

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2014-01-20

    By using nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density functional theory, we investigate the spin-dependent transport properties in a Fe-porphyrin-like carbon nanotube spintronic device. The results show that magnetoresistance ratio is strongly dependent on the magnetic configuration of the Fe-porphyrin-like carbon nanotube. Under the application of the external magnetic field, the magnetoresistance ratio of the device can be increased from about 19% to about 1020% by tuning the magnetic configuration in the device. Our results confirm that the magnetic configuration is a key factor for obtaining a high-performance spintronic device.