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Sample records for ankeltraume hos patient

  1. What Fuzzy HOS May Mean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    HIGHER ORDER SOFTWAHE, INC, S!806 Massacysetts Avenue Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 i ’ ~ii ý4 TECHNICAL REPORT #18 • Bi 1 WHAT FUZZY HOS MAY MEAN 4...by H. Prade and L. Vatna i Nov~ 1978 OA.04i•. 81 3 0e 044 ;!. i81 ’- ----- - HIGHER ORDER SOFTWARE, INC. 806 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge...reliability is then dealt with I. INTRODUCTION Higher Order Software (HOS) has been developed by Magaret Hamilton and Saydean Zeldin [43 as a

  2. The Application of HOS to PLRS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    HIGHER ORDER SOFTWARE, INC, ( - 0843 Massachusetts Avenue 0Cambridge, MA 02139 LEVE& TECHNICAL REPORT #12 THE APPLICATION OF ( HOS TO PLRS November...Technical Report #12 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(si Higher Order Software, Inc. DAAB07- 77-C-3349,,. 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND...ADDO ESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Higher Order Software, Inc /(as of 12/9/77, AREA&WORKUNITNUMBERS 843 Massachusetts Avenue 806

  3. Data Base Query within HOS Systems Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    C?’, HIGHER ORDER SOFTWARE, INC.3 FINAL REPORT CONTRACT NO. N00014-U2-C.@I37 JULY 1962 DATA BASE QUERY HOS SYSTEMS METHODOLOGY PREPARED FOR OFFICE Of...NAVAL RESEARCH j ~ DEPARTMENT oF THE NAVY Ca 600 NORTH QUINCY STREET ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22217 0802 NOTICES Copyright 0 1982 by Higher Order Software...permission from Higher Order Software, Inc. DISCLAIMERS The findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Navy position

  4. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, G; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Dhatchana Moorthy, Nachiappan; Gopalaswamy, Radha; Narayanan, Shridhar

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush) infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of  HOS2 (High Osmolarity  Sensitive) , a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from  C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This  in  vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity. PMID:25110576

  5. The Human Operator Simulator. Volume IX. HOS Study Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    SPECIFYING A GRASP LOCATION O UNEXECUTABLE ACTIONS CAUSE SUSPENSION OF PROCEDURE 69 CONTROL MANIPULATION - DISCRETE CONTROLS -TIME TO MANIPULATE IS A...between the current location and the desired location, whether or not the crewstation geometry would actually permit such a movement. All movements are...Goldbeck and Charlet (1974), and MacPherson and Siegel (1967). 251 An explicit formula for the operation of continuous rotary con- trols is included in HOS

  6. Genetic heterogeneity in the cysA-fus region of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome: identification of the hos gene.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, S; Kobayashi, Y

    1985-01-01

    We identified a new gene, hos, which exerts different sporulation phenotypes in Bacillus subtilis strains with different genetic backgrounds. The hos+ gene showed normal sporulation in the genetic background of JH642 but showed temperature-sensitive sporulation in that of the Tano-oka W. The hos gene was mapped between cysA and rpoB. PMID:3922952

  7. A lysine deacetylase Hos3 is targeted to the bud neck and involved in the spindle position checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengqiao; Collins, Ruth N

    2014-09-15

    An increasing number of cellular activities can be regulated by reversible lysine acetylation. Targeting the enzymes responsible for such posttranslational modifications is instrumental in defining their substrates and functions in vivo. Here we show that a Saccharomyces cerevisiae lysine deacetylase, Hos3, is asymmetrically targeted to the daughter side of the bud neck and to the daughter spindle pole body (SPB). The morphogenesis checkpoint member Hsl7 recruits Hos3 to the neck region. Cells with a defect in spindle orientation trigger Hos3 to load onto both SPBs. When associated symmetrically with both SPBs, Hos3 functions as a spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) component to inhibit mitotic exit. Neck localization of Hos3 is essential for its symmetric association with SPBs in cells with misaligned spindles. Our data suggest that Hos3 facilitates cross-talk between the morphogenesis checkpoint and the SPOC as a component of the intricate monitoring of spindle orientation after mitotic entry and before commitment to mitotic exit.

  8. The E3 ubiquitin ligase HOS1 regulates low ambient temperature-responsive flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Soo Hyun; Cho, Hyun Jung; Kim, Joonki; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2012-10-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis regulates multiple aspects of plant growth and development, but little is known about its role in ambient temperature-responsive flowering. In addition to being regulated by daylength, the onset of flowering in many plants can also be delayed by low ambient temperatures. Here, we show that HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES 1 (HOS1), which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase, controls flowering time in response to ambient temperatures (16 and 23°C) and intermittent cold. hos1 mutants flowered early, and were insensitive to ambient temperature, but responded normally to vernalization and gibberellic acid. Genetic analyses suggested that this ambient temperature-insensitive flowering was independent of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Also, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) expression was up-regulated in hos1 mutants at both temperatures. The ft tsf mutation almost completely suppressed the early flowering of hos1 mutants at different temperatures, suggesting that FT and TSF are downstream of HOS1 in the ambient temperature response. A lesion in CONSTANS (CO) did not affect the ambient temperature-insensitive flowering phenotype of hos1-3 mutants. In silico analysis showed that FVE was spatiotemporally co-expressed with HOS1. A HOS1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion co-localized with FVE-GFP in the nucleus at both 16 and 23°C. HOS1 physically interacted with FVE and FLK in yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, hos1 mutants were insensitive to intermittent cold. Collectively, our results suggest that HOS1 acts as a common regulator in the signaling pathways that control flowering time in response to low ambient temperature.

  9. Computer-aided diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction using ultrasound images with DWT, GLCM and HOS methods: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Vidya, K Sudarshan; Ng, E Y K; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chou, Siaw Meng; Tan, Ru San; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial Infarction (MI) or acute MI (AMI) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Precise and timely identification of MI and extent of muscle damage helps in early treatment and reduction in the time taken for further tests. MI diagnosis using 2D echocardiography is prone to inter-/intra-observer variability in the assessment. Therefore, a computerised scheme based on image processing and artificial intelligent techniques can reduce the workload of clinicians and improve the diagnosis accuracy. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) of infarcted and normal ultrasound images will be useful for clinicians. In this study, the performance of CAD approach using Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), second order statistics calculated from Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and Higher-Order Spectra (HOS) texture descriptors are compared. The proposed system is validated using 400 MI and 400 normal ultrasound images, obtained from 80 patients with MI and 80 normal subjects. The extracted features are ranked based on t-value and fed to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to obtain the best performance using minimum number of features. The features extracted from DWT coefficients obtained an accuracy of 99.5%, sensitivity of 99.75% and specificity of 99.25%; GLCM have achieved an accuracy of 85.75%, sensitivity of 90.25% and specificity of 81.25%; and HOS obtained an accuracy of 93.0%, sensitivity of 94.75% and specificity of 91.25%. Among the three techniques presented DWT yielded the highest classification accuracy. Thus, the proposed CAD approach may be used as a complementary tool to assist cardiologists in making a more accurate diagnosis for the presence of MI.

  10. The Arabidopsis E3 Ubiquitin Ligase HOS1 Negatively Regulates CONSTANS Abundance in the Photoperiodic Control of Flowering[W

    PubMed Central

    Lazaro, Ana; Valverde, Federico; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana early in short days6 (esd6) mutant was isolated in a screen for mutations that accelerate flowering time. Among other developmental alterations, esd6 displays early flowering in both long- and short-day conditions. Fine mapping of the mutation showed that the esd6 phenotype is caused by a lesion in the HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 (HOS1) locus, which encodes a RING finger–containing E3 ubiquitin ligase. The esd6/hos1 mutation causes decreased FLOWERING LOCUS C expression and requires CONSTANS (CO) protein for its early flowering phenotype under long days. Moreover, CO and HOS1 physically interact in vitro and in planta, and HOS1 regulates CO abundance, particularly during the daylight period. Accordingly, hos1 causes a shift in the regular long-day pattern of expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcript, starting to rise 4 h after dawn in the mutant. In addition, HOS1 interacts synergistically with CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1, another regulator of CO protein stability, in the regulation of flowering time. Taken together, these results indicate that HOS1 is involved in the control of CO abundance, ensuring that CO activation of FT occurs only when the light period reaches a certain length and preventing precocious flowering in Arabidopsis. PMID:22408073

  11. Computer-aided diagnosis of psoriasis skin images with HOS, texture and color features: A first comparative study of its kind.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Vimal K; Londhe, Narendra D; Sonawane, Rajendra S; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease with red and scaly plaques on skin and affecting about 125 million people worldwide. Currently, dermatologist use visual and haptic methods for diagnosis the disease severity. This does not help them in stratification and risk assessment of the lesion stage and grade. Further, current methods add complexity during monitoring and follow-up phase. The current diagnostic tools lead to subjectivity in decision making and are unreliable and laborious. This paper presents a first comparative performance study of its kind using principal component analysis (PCA) based CADx system for psoriasis risk stratification and image classification utilizing: (i) 11 higher order spectra (HOS) features, (ii) 60 texture features, and (iii) 86 color feature sets and their seven combinations. Aggregate 540 image samples (270 healthy and 270 diseased) from 30 psoriasis patients of Indian ethnic origin are used in our database. Machine learning using PCA is used for dominant feature selection which is then fed to support vector machine classifier (SVM) to obtain optimized performance. Three different protocols are implemented using three kinds of feature sets. Reliability index of the CADx is computed. Among all feature combinations, the CADx system shows optimal performance of 100% accuracy, 100% sensitivity and specificity, when all three sets of feature are combined. Further, our experimental result with increasing data size shows that all feature combinations yield high reliability index throughout the PCA-cutoffs except color feature set and combination of color and texture feature sets. HOS features are powerful in psoriasis disease classification and stratification. Even though, independently, all three set of features HOS, texture, and color perform competitively, but when combined, the machine learning system performs the best. The system is fully automated, reliable and accurate.

  12. 76 FR 37876 - Hours of Service (HOS) of Drivers; Renewal of American Pyrotechnics Association (APA) Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... hours. These drivers will continue to be subject to the 14-hour cumulative on-duty limit, the 11-hour driving time limit, and the 60- and 70-hour weekly on-duty limits. The FMCSA believes that with the terms... of the HOS rules. Therefore, in the event of a crash or unintentional release or detonation...

  13. The E3 ubiquitin ligase HOS1 is involved in ethylene regulation of leaf expansion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyounghee; Seo, Pil Joon

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene regulates a variety of physiological processes, such as flowering, senescence, abscission, and fruit ripening. In particular, leaf expansion is also controlled by ethylene in Arabidopsis. Exogenous treatment with ethylene inhibits leaf expansion, and consistently, ethylene insensitive mutants show increased leaf area. Here, we report that the RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES 1 (HOS1) regulates leaf expansion in an ethylene signaling pathway. The HOS1-deficient mutant showed reduced leaf area and was insensitive to ethylene perception inhibitor, silver thiosulfate (STS). Accordingly, genes encoding ethylene signaling components were significantly up-regulated in hos1-3. This study demonstrates that the HOS1 protein is involved in ethylene signal transduction for the proper regulation of leaf expansion possibly under environmentally stressful conditions.

  14. Reversal of the relative stability of the isomeric radicals HSO and HOS upon hydration and their reactions with ozone.

    PubMed

    Steudel, Ralf; Steudel, Yana

    2010-04-01

    The radical HSO is an oxidation product of pollutants such as H(2)S and CH(3)SH in Earth's atmosphere. For the first time, the interaction of HSO and its tautomer HOS with single water molecules to yield the hydrates HSO.nH(2)O and HOS.nH(2)O was studied for n = 1-3, applying the high-level G3X(MP2) theory. A large number of structures corresponding to local minima on the potential energy surfaces has been identified. While gaseous HSO is more stable than HOS, the enthalpy diffference between HSO.nH(2)O and HOS.nH(2)O decreases with increasing degree of hydration and becomes practically zero for n = 3. Thus, in aqueous solution as well as in fog and rain droplets, HOS is expected to compete with HSO. The barrier for the tautomerization of HSO to HOS is dramatically lowered by the presence of water molecules since a cyclic transition state allows a concerted proton shift within the system of neighboring hydrogen bonds. The corresponding activation enthalpy of only 73.5 kJ mol(-1) predicted for the transformation of HSO.2H(2)O into HOS.2H(2)O may be compared to the 202 kJ mol(-1) reported for the tautomerization of the unhydrated gaseous HSO/HOS molecules. The impact of water of hydration on the fundamental vibrational modes of HSO and HOS has also been studied. Furthermore, HOS is predicted to dimerize at low temperatures to give two van der Waals molecules with singlet (symmetry C(2)) or triplet configuration (symmetry C(2h)), the latter being more stable than the singlet isomer. The disproportionation of 2HSO to H(2)S and SO(2) is predicted to be exothermic by -263.5 kJ mol(-1). The reaction of HSO with ozone to HSO(2) and O(2) is also strongly exothermic by -274.0 kJ mol(-1) and seems to proceed without any barrier. HOS forms a 1:1 van der Waals complex with O(3); the redox reaction of its two components is calculated as exothermic by -410.9 kJ mol(-1) and results in a rather stable adduct between HOSO and O(2) with the structure of a peroxo isomer of HOSO(3

  15. Atypical Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in a Holt Oram Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mace, James; Reddy, Srikanth; Mohil, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    We present a case report of a patient diagnosed with Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) presenting with clinical and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome. Pre-operative Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an abnormal course of the median nerve; as such an atypical incision and approach were carried out to decompress the nerve to excellent post operative clinical effect. To our knowledge this is the first description of abnormal nervous course in a patient with HOS leading to peripheral entrapment. A literature surrounding the important aspects of HOS to the orthopaedic surgeon is presented concomitantly. PMID:25621081

  16. A lysine deacetylase Hos3 is targeted to the bud neck and involved in the spindle position checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengqiao; Collins, Ruth N.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of cellular activities can be regulated by reversible lysine acetylation. Targeting the enzymes responsible for such posttranslational modifications is instrumental in defining their substrates and functions in vivo. Here we show that a Saccharomyces cerevisiae lysine deacetylase, Hos3, is asymmetrically targeted to the daughter side of the bud neck and to the daughter spindle pole body (SPB). The morphogenesis checkpoint member Hsl7 recruits Hos3 to the neck region. Cells with a defect in spindle orientation trigger Hos3 to load onto both SPBs. When associated symmetrically with both SPBs, Hos3 functions as a spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) component to inhibit mitotic exit. Neck localization of Hos3 is essential for its symmetric association with SPBs in cells with misaligned spindles. Our data suggest that Hos3 facilitates cross-talk between the morphogenesis checkpoint and the SPOC as a component of the intricate monitoring of spindle orientation after mitotic entry and before commitment to mitotic exit. PMID:25057019

  17. HOS cell adhesion on Ti6Al4V surfaces texturized by laser engraving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Amador, A.; Carreño Garcia, H.; Escobar Rivero, P.; Peña Ballesteros, D. Y.; Estupiñán Duran, H. A.

    2016-02-01

    The cell adhesion of the implant is determinate by the chemical composition, topography, wettability, surface energy and biocompatibility of the biomaterial. In this work the interaction between human osteosarcoma HOS cells and textured Ti6Al4V surfaces were evaluated. Ti6Al4V surfaces were textured using a CO2 laser in order to obtain circular spots on the surfaces. Test surfaces were uncoated (C1) used as a control surface, and surfaces with points obtained by laser engraving, with 1mm spacing (C2) and 0.5mm (C3). The HOS cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotics. No cells toxicity after one month incubation time occurred. The increased cell adhesion and cell spreading was observed after 1, 3 and 5 days without significant differences between the sample surfaces (C2 and C3) and control (uncoated) at the end of the experiment.

  18. A theoretical investigation of HSO/HOS and their positive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, P.L.M. Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO )

    1990-06-01

    The formation and eventual fate of sulfur-containing aerosols play a central role in global pollution. An understanding of the oxidation paths for sulfur species and of the formation and stability of radical and ionic intermediates is required for optimum control of acid deposition. To gain insight into these processes {ital ab} {ital initio} calculations were performed for ground and first excited electronic states of the isomers HSO/HOS and for the ground and first two excited states for their positive ions, HSO{sup +}/HOS{sup +}. A variety of basis sets were used for calculations at the self-consistent field (SCF) level. (Full details available in supplementary material for this article.) These calculations included full optimization of the geometry and examination of the potential surface for transition states. Post Hartree--Fock calculations were performed and included Moller--Plesset calculations through fourth order with quadruple excitations as well as configuration interaction including all double excitations. The effect of geometry optimization at the MP4 level and the effect of freezing the core orbitals in the calculations were examined. Five transition states for the isomerization of HSO to HOS were located for the ground and excited electronic states of the neutral and ion systems. For all transition states in both systems, the geometry resembles an isosceles triangle. The barriers to rearrangement are quite high, ranging from {similar to}20 to {similar to}60 kcal/mol depending on the state. Two of the barriers were approximately symmetric while three were asymmetric with a lower barrier for HSO to HOS isomerization.

  19. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis. PMID:26317403

  20. Butyl benzyl phthalate suppresses the ATP-induced cell proliferation in human osteosarcoma HOS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.-S.; Chen, C.-Y.

    2010-05-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), an endocrine disruptor present in the environment, exerts its genomic effects via intracellular steroid receptors and elicits non-genomic effects by interfering with membrane ion-channel receptors. We previously found that BBP blocks the calcium signaling coupled with P2X receptors in PC12 cells (Liu and Chen, 2006). Osteoblast P2X receptors were recently reported to play a role in cell proliferation and bone remodeling. In this present study, the effects of BBP on ATP-induced responses were investigated in human osteosarcoma HOS cells. These receptors mRNA had been detected, named P2X4, P2X7, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y5, P2Y9, and P2Y11, in human osteosarcoma HOS cells by RT-PCR. The enhancement of cell proliferation and the decrease of cytoviability had both been shown to be coupled to stimulation via different concentrations of ATP. BBP suppressed the ATP-induced calcium influx (mainly coupled with P2X) and cell proliferation but not the ATP-induced intracellular calcium release (mainly coupled with P2Y) and cytotoxicity in human osteosarcoma HOS cells. Suramin, a common P2 receptor's antagonist, blocked the ATP-induced calcium signaling, cell proliferation, and cytotoxicity. We suggest that P2X is mainly responsible for cell proliferation, and P2Y might be partially responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. BBP suppressed the calcium signaling coupled with P2X, suppressing cell proliferation. Since the importance of P2X receptors during bone metastasis has recently become apparent, the possible toxic risk of environmental BBP during bone remodeling is a public problem of concern.

  1. The negative regulator of plant cold responses, HOS1, is a RING E3 ligase that mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of ICE1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Agarwal, Manu; Zhang, Yiyue; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2006-01-01

    Plant responses to cold stress are mediated by a transcriptional cascade, in which the transcription factor ICE1 and possibly related proteins activate the expression of C-repeat (CRT)-binding factors (CBFs), leading to the transcription of downstream effector genes. The variant RING finger protein high expression of osmotically responsive gene (HOS)1 was identified genetically as a negative regulator of cold responses. We present evidence here that HOS1 is an E3 ligase required for the ubiquitination of ICE1. HOS1 physically interacts with ICE1 and mediates the ubiquitination of ICE1 both in vitro and in vivo. We found that cold induces the degradation of ICE1 in plants, and this degradation requires HOS1. Consistent with enhanced cold-responsive gene expression in loss-of-function hos1 mutant plants, overexpression of HOS1 represses the expression of CBFs and their downstream genes and confers increased sensitivity to freezing stress. Our results indicate that cold stress responses in Arabidopsis are attenuated by a ubiquitination/proteasome pathway in which HOS1 mediates the degradation of the ICE1 protein. PMID:16702557

  2. HosA, a MarR Family Transcriptional Regulator, Represses Nonoxidative Hydroxyarylic Acid Decarboxylase Operon and Is Modulated by 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ajit; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-02-23

    Members of the Multiple antibiotic resistance Regulator (MarR) family of DNA binding proteins regulate transcription of a wide array of genes required for virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria. The present study reports the molecular characterization of HosA (Homologue of SlyA), a MarR protein, with respect to its target gene, DNA recognition motif, and nature of its ligand. Through a comparative genomics approach, we demonstrate that hosA is in synteny with nonoxidative hydroxyarylic acid decarboxylase (HAD) operon and is present exclusively within the mutS-rpoS polymorphic region in nine different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. Using molecular biology and biochemical approach, we demonstrate that HosA binds to a palindromic sequence downstream to the transcription start site of divergently transcribed nonoxidative HAD operon and represses its expression. Furthermore, in silico analysis showed that the recognition motif for HosA is highly conserved in the upstream region of divergently transcribed operon in different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. A systematic chemical search for the physiological ligand revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) interacts with HosA and derepresses HosA mediated repression of the nonoxidative HAD operon. Based on our study, we propose a model for molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of nonoxidative HAD operon by HosA in Enterobacteriaceae family.

  3. 78 FR 26690 - Hours of Service (HOS) of Drivers; Application for Renewal and Expansion of American Pyrotechnics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... Expansion of American Pyrotechnics Association (APA) Exemption From the 14-Hour Rule During Independence Day... the 2013 and 2014 Independence Day periods because compliance with the current 14- hour rule in 49 CFR... Association Exemption From the 14-Hour HOS Rule During 2013 and 2014 Independence Day Celebrations for...

  4. 76 FR 16852 - Hours of Service (HOS) of Drivers; Assessing the Safety Impact of the Exemption From the 14-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Pyrotechnics Association (APA) an exemption from the current HOS prohibition against driving a commercial motor... 381.300(b)). APA's Independence Day Operations and the Exemption from 49 CFR 395.3(a)(2) APA is a... fireworks-related services for many years. The CMV drivers employed by APA members transport fireworks over...

  5. Red Light-Mediated Degradation of CONSTANS by the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase HOS1 Regulates Photoperiodic Flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lazaro, Ana; Mouriz, Alfonso; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of CONSTANS (CO) gene expression is crucial to accurately measure changes in daylength, which influences flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana. CO expression is under both transcriptional and posttranslational control mechanisms. We previously showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 (HOS1) physically interacts with CO in Arabidopsis. This interaction is required to precisely modulate the timing of CO accumulation and, consequently, to maintain low levels of FLOWERING LOCUS T expression during the first part of the day. The data presented here demonstrate that HOS1 is involved in the red light-mediated degradation of CO that takes place in the early stages of the daylight period. Our results show that phytochrome B (phyB) is able to regulate flowering time, acting in the phloem companion cells, as previously described for CO and HOS1. Moreover, we reveal that phyB physically interacts with HOS1 and CO, indicating that the three proteins may be present in a complex in planta that is required to coordinate a correct photoperiodic response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26373454

  6. Red Light-Mediated Degradation of CONSTANS by the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase HOS1 Regulates Photoperiodic Flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, Ana; Mouriz, Alfonso; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A

    2015-09-01

    The regulation of CONSTANS (CO) gene expression is crucial to accurately measure changes in daylength, which influences flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana. CO expression is under both transcriptional and posttranslational control mechanisms. We previously showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 (HOS1) physically interacts with CO in Arabidopsis. This interaction is required to precisely modulate the timing of CO accumulation and, consequently, to maintain low levels of FLOWERING LOCUS T expression during the first part of the day. The data presented here demonstrate that HOS1 is involved in the red light-mediated degradation of CO that takes place in the early stages of the daylight period. Our results show that phytochrome B (phyB) is able to regulate flowering time, acting in the phloem companion cells, as previously described for CO and HOS1. Moreover, we reveal that phyB physically interacts with HOS1 and CO, indicating that the three proteins may be present in a complex in planta that is required to coordinate a correct photoperiodic response in Arabidopsis. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression, Functional Characterization and X-ray Analysis of HosA, A Member of MarR Family of Transcription Regulator from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ajit; Reddi, Ravikumar; Sawhney, Bhavik; Ghosh, Debasish Kumar; Addlagatta, Anthony; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-08-01

    Regulators belonging to multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family are widespread in prokaryotes and are involved in regulation of genes that are responsible for virulence and pathogenicity in most of the clinically important pathogens. Here we report the transcriptional, biophysical, and X-ray analyses of homologue of SlyA (HosA), a member of MarR family that is predominantly present in the pathogenic strains of Enterobacteriaceae family. The initiation of hosA transcription was observed to occur at two independent start sites and subsequent binding study has revealed that the purified HosA interacts with its upstream region suggesting a probable autoregulation. The secondary structure analysis through circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that HosA is predominantly composed of the alpha helix with higher thermal stability. To further understand the three-dimensional structure, HosA was crystallized and the crystals were diffracted to maximum of 2.9 Ǻ on exposure to X-rays. Analysis of the X-ray crystallographic data suggested a primitive space group (P 6 ? 2 2), with unit cell parameters a = b = 64.19 Å and c = 244.25 Å. The solvent content and Matthews coefficient were 41 % and 2.11 Å(3) Da(-1), respectively, which indicated the existence of two molecules of HosA in the asymmetric unit of crystal.

  8. Patient-Reported Outcome questionnaires for hip arthroscopy: a systematic review of the psychometric evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hip arthroscopies are often used in the treatment of intra-articular hip injuries. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are an important parameter in evaluating treatment. It is unclear which PRO questionnaires are specifically available for hip arthroscopy patients. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate which PRO questionnaires are valid and reliable in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Methods A search was conducted in Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Pedro, EMBASE and Web of Science from 1931 to October 2010. Studies assessing the quality of PRO questionnaires in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy were included. The quality of the questionnaires was evaluated by the psychometric properties of the outcome measures. The quality of the articles investigating the questionnaires was assessed by the COSMIN list. Results Five articles identified three questionnaires; the Modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS), the Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS) and the Hip Outcome Score (HOS). The NAHS scored best on the content validity, whereas the HOS scored best on agreement, internal consistency, reliability and responsiveness. The quality of the articles describing the HOS scored highest. The NAHS is the best quality questionnaire. The articles describing the HOS are the best quality articles. Conclusions This systematic review shows that there is no conclusive evidence for the use of a single patient-reported outcome questionnaire in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Based on available psychometric evidence we recommend using a combination of the NAHS and the HOS for patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. PMID:21619610

  9. Development and Validation of Written Exam Items for the Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Orders (AgHOs) Certification Training Program.

    PubMed

    Mann, A J; Field, W E; Tormoehlen, R; French, B F

    2016-04-01

    Research was conducted to develop and validate a pool of exam items that can be used to test the readiness of youth, ages 14-15 years, to be certified under the current federally mandated Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Orders (AgHOs). The AgHOs require training prior to employment in agricultural workplaces that the Secretary of Labor has determined are especially hazardous for youth within the prescribed age range. Under the current provisions of the AgHOs certification process, non-exempt youth seeking employment in agriculture are required to pass a written exam concentrating on safe work practices as partial satisfaction to receive certification of eligibility for employment to perform certain tasks. However, the regulations provide little guidance concerning the format of the exam, subject matter to be covered, degree of difficulty, or minimum passing score. As part of the USDA-sponsored Hazardous Occupations Safety Training in Agriculture (HOSTA) initiative, efforts have been made to develop consistent and evidence-based testing methods for disseminating the test protocols to instructors. The goal was to expand, enhance, and maintain the reliability of the exam item pool for the AgHOs certification process. Item development was based on the HOSTA-supported Gearing Up for Safety: Production Agriculture Safety Training for Youth curriculum. To ensure adequate item availability, the current item pool was expanded to include a minimum of two test items for each of the 157 cognitive-based core competencies developed as part of the Gearing Up curriculum design process. Administering 70-item exams that were generated from the item pool to 568 youth, ages 13-18 years, provided evidence of item validity. The result was a pool of 367 validated exam items.

  10. On the Detectability of the X 2A" HSS, HSO, and HOS Radicals in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2017-02-01

    {\\tilde{X}}2A\\prime\\prime HSS has yet to be observed in the gas phase in the interstellar medium (ISM). HSS has been observed in cometary material and in high abundance. However, its agglomeration to such bodies or dispersal from them has not been observed. Similarly, HSO and HOS have not been observed in the ISM, either, even though models support their formation from reactions of known sulfur monoxide and hydrogen molecules, among other pathways. Consequently, this work provides high-level, quantum chemical rovibrational spectroscopic constants and vibrational frequencies in order to assist in interstellar searches for these radical molecules. Furthermore, the HSO‑HOS isomerization energy is determined to be 3.63 kcal mol‑1, in line with previous work, and the dipole moment of HOS is 36% larger at 3.87 D than HSO, making the less stable isomer more rotationally intense. Finally, the S‑S bond strength in HSS is shown to be relatively weak at 30% of the typical disulfide bond energy. Consequently, HSS may degrade into SH and sulfur atoms, making any ISM abundance of HSS likely fairly low, as recent interstellar surveys have observed.

  11. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase HOS1 Regulates Arabidopsis Flowering by Mediating CONSTANS Degradation Under Cold Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2012-01-01

    The timing of flowering is coordinated by a web of gene regulatory networks that integrates developmental and environmental cues in plants. Light and temperature are two major environmental determinants that regulate flowering time. Although prolonged treatment with low nonfreezing temperatures accelerates flowering by stable repression of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), repeated brief cold treatments delay flowering. Here, we report that intermittent cold treatments trigger the degradation of CONSTANS (CO), a central activator of photoperiodic flowering; daily treatments caused suppression of the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and delayed flowering. Cold-induced CO degradation is mediated via a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway that involves the E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE 1 (HOS1). HOS1-mediated CO degradation occurs independently of the well established cold response pathways. It is also independent of the light signaling repressor CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) E3 ligase and light wavelengths. CO has been shown to play a key role in photoperiodic flowering. Here, we demonstrated that CO served as a molecular hub, integrating photoperiodic and cold stress signals into the flowering genetic pathways. We propose that the HOS1-CO module contributes to the fine-tuning of photoperiodic flowering under short term temperature fluctuations, which often occur during local weather disturbances. PMID:23135282

  12. Isolation and characterization of rice (Oryza sativa L.) E3-ubiquitin ligase OsHOS1 gene in the modulation of cold stress response.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Tiago; Sapeta, Helena; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Rodrigues, Mafalda; Cordeiro, André; Abreu, Isabel A; Saibo, Nelson J M; Oliveira, M Margarida

    2013-11-01

    Plants can cope with adverse environmental conditions through the activation of stress response signalling pathways, in which the proteasome seems to play an important role. However, the mechanisms underlying the proteasome-mediated stress response in rice are still not fully understood. To address this issue, we have identified a rice E3-ubiquitin ligase, OsHOS1, and characterized its role in the modulation of the cold stress response. Using a RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic approach we found that, under cold conditions, the RNAi::OsHOS1 plants showed a higher expression level of OsDREB1A. This was correlated with an increased amount of OsICE1, a master transcription factor of the cold stress signalling. However, the up-regulation of OsDREB1A was transient and the transgenic plants did not show increased cold tolerance. Nevertheless, we could confirm the interaction of OsHOS1 with OsICE1 by Yeast-Two hybrid and bi-molecular fluorescence complementation in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Moreover, we could also determine through an in vitro degradation assay that the higher amount of OsICE1 in the transgenic plants was correlated with a lower amount of OsHOS1. Hence, we could confirm the involvement of the proteasome in this response mechanism. Taken together our results confirm the importance of OsHOS1, and thus of the proteasome, in the modulation of the cold stress signalling in rice.

  13. HOS cell adhesion on TiO2 nanotubes texturized by laser engraving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Amador, A.; Montañez Supelano, N. D.; Arias, A. M. Vera; Escobar Rivero, P.; Peña Ballesteros, D. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Due to its outstanding properties, the titanium and its alloys have been widely used in the dental and orthopaedic fields as biomaterials. The TiO2 nanotubes surface and the texturized process by laser engraving enables significantly accelerated osteoblast adhesion on the biomaterial. For this reason in this paper, the HOS cell responses on TiO2 nanotubes fabricated on Ti6Al4V alloy and texturized by laser engraving were evaluated. The test surfaces were carried out on smooth Ti6Al4V as control, TiO2 nanotubes (NT) and surfaces with micropoints obtained by laser engraving, with 1mm spacing (NTP1) and 0.5mm (NTP2). The results show that the texturized process enables decreases the contact angle thus improving wettability of the TiO2 nanotubes surface. The NTP1 and NTP2 surfaces show excellent cell adhesion and spreading on the surface, which is evident in epifluorescence microscopy images. Furthermore, the NTP1 and NTP2 surfaces improved the cell proliferation at 18% and 16% respectively in relation with NT surface, showing that the laser texturing improves cell response of TiO2 nanotubes.

  14. Patient reported outcomes for patients who returned to sport compared with those who did not after hip arthroscopy: minimum 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Domb, Benjamin G.; Dunne, Kevin F.; Martin, Timothy J.; Gui, Chengcheng; Finch, Nathan A.; Vemula, S. Pavan; Redmond, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies assessed elite athletes’ return to sport (RTS) after hip arthroscopy, but few investigated a cohort including athletes from all levels of sport. This study compared athletes who returned to sport to those who did not, based on four patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores, including the Hip Outcome Score—Sports Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS). Between September 2008 and April 2012, hip arthroscopies were performed on 157 patients (168 hips) who reported playing a sport preoperatively and indicated their level of sports activity post-operatively. Two-year follow-up was available for 148 (94%) amateur and professional athletes with a total of 158 hips. Of these 60 cases (65 hips) did not return to sports (NRTS) and were in the NRTS group. The remaining 88 cases (93 hips) constituted the RTS group. The modified Harris Hip Score, Non-Arthric Hip Score, Hip Outcome-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL), and HOS-SSS were used to assess outcomes. The HOS-SSS was used to assess specific sport-related movement. Both groups demonstrated significant improvement at 2 years post-operatively in visual analog score and four PRO scores (P < 0.001). There was no significant preoperative differences in HOS-SSS scores between groups; however, the RTS group had significantly higher HOS-SSS scores at 1 and 2 years post-surgery. Post-operatively, the RTS group had significantly better ability to jump, land from a jump, stop quickly and perform cutting/lateral movements (P < 0.05). In summary, patients who indicated RTSs demonstrated significantly higher PRO scores and abilities to perform several sport-related movements, compared with patients who did not. PMID:27583148

  15. fau and its ubiquitin-like domain (FUBI) transforms human osteogenic sarcoma (HOS) cells to anchorage-independence.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Toby G; Visalli, Melissa A; Komissarova, Elena V

    2003-03-27

    Arsenite is the most likely carcinogenic form of arsenic in the environment. Previously, expression cloning for cDNAs whose overexpression confers arsenite-resistance in Chinese hamster V79 cells identified two genes: fau and a novel gene, asr2. The fau gene encodes a ubiquitin-like protein (here called FUBI) fused to the ribosomal S30 protein. Since the expression of the fox sequence (antisense to fau) increased the tumorigenicity of a mouse sarcoma virus, it was proposed that fau might be a tumor suppressor gene. We intended to test its ability to block arsenite-induced transformation of human osteogenic sarcoma (HOS) cells to anchorage-independence. Instead, we found that overexpressing fau itself was able to transform HOS cells. When the two domains were expressed separately, only FUBI was transforming and only the S30 domain conferred arsenite resistance. An incidental finding was the transforming activity of the selectable marker, hyg. FUBI belongs to the ubiquitin-like protein group that is capable of forming conjugates to other proteins, although none have so far been identified. Alternatively, FUBI may act as a substitute or inhibitor of ubiquitin, to which it is most closely related, or to close ubiquitin-like relatives UCRP, FAT10, and/or Nedd8.

  16. The Patient Acceptable Symptomatic State for the Modified Harris Hip Score and Hip Outcome Score Among Patients Undergoing Surgical Treatment for Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Jaskarndip; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S; Mather, Richard C; Lee, Simon; Song, Sang Hoon; Davis, Aileen M; Salata, Michael; Nho, Shane J

    2015-08-01

    There is minimal information available on the threshold at which patients consider themselves to be well for patient-reported outcome measures used in patients treated with hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). To determine the patient acceptable symptomatic state (PASS) for the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) in patients with FAI treated with arthroscopic hip surgery. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. A consecutive series of patients at a single institution with FAI who were treated with arthroscopic labral surgery, acetabular rim trimming, and femoral osteochondroplasty were eligible. The mHHS (score range, 0-100) and the HOS (score range, 0-100) were administered at baseline and at 12 months postoperatively. An external anchor question at 1 year postoperatively was utilized to determine PASS values: "Taking into account all the activities you have during your daily life, your level of pain, and also your functional impairment, do you consider that your current state is satisfactory?" There were 130 patients (mean ± SD age, 35.6 ± 11.7 years), and 42.3% were male. Based on a receiver operator curve analysis, the PASS values-at which patients considered their status to be satisfactory-at 1 year after surgery were 74 (mHHS), 87 (HOS-activities of daily living subscale), and 75 (HOS-sports subscale). The PASS threshold was not affected by baseline scores across different instruments. However, patients with higher baseline scores were more likely to achieve the PASS (odds ratios: 3.36 [mHHS], 3.83 [HOS-activities of daily living], 3.38 [HOS-sports]). Age and sex were not significantly related to the odds of achieving the PASS for the mHHS or the HOS. This is the first study to determine the PASS for 2 commonly used hip joint patient-reported outcome measures in patients undergoing surgery for FAI. The study findings can allow researchers to determine if interventions related to FAI are meaningful to

  17. Correlation Between Changes in Visual Analog Scale and Patient-Reported Outcome Scores and Patient Satisfaction After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Gui, Chengcheng; Walsh, John P; Lodhia, Parth; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Domb, Benjamin G

    2017-09-01

    Improvements in pain, function, and patient satisfaction are used to evaluate the outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery. To identify correlations between the visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain and patient satisfaction with 4 commonly used patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores to determine to what extent changes in these 2 parameters are reflected in each of the PRO scores. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery between February 2008 and February 2013 were assessed prospectively before surgery, at 3 months, and annually thereafter with the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Score-sports-specific subscale (HOS-SSS), and Hip Outcome Score-activities of daily living (HOS-ADL). Patients were also assessed using a 10-point VAS for pain and queried for satisfaction at the same time points ("0" indicated no pain, and "10" indicated complete satisfaction with surgery). The VAS score and patient satisfaction were correlated with changes in the 4 PRO scores. During the study period, 1417 patients underwent hip arthroscopic surgery, of whom 1137 patients had 2-year postoperative PRO scores after primary surgery. There was a significant improvement in all PRO scores at 2-year follow-up. The mean improvements in mHHS, NAHS, HOS-ADL, and HOS-SSS scores were 16.7, 21.6, 19.7, and 22.7 points, respectively. The mean improvement in the VAS score was 2.9 points. Mean patient satisfaction at 2-year follow-up was 7.74 (of 10). There was a statistically significant correlation between the VAS and patient satisfaction scores and changes in each of the 4 PRO scores. The strength of the correlation was moderate. This study demonstrated a moderate correlation between the VAS and patient satisfaction outcomes and changes in 4 commonly used PRO scores in hip arthroscopic surgery (mHHS, HOS-ADL, HOS-SSS, and NAHS). In addition to several PRO instruments, a VAS for pain and patient satisfaction

  18. Recycling of Volatiles in Subduction Zones: Evidence from H-O-S Isotopic Signatures of Indonesian Arc Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Hoog, J. C.; Taylor, B. E.; van Bergen, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Subaerial lavas from eight volcanoes, situated in different sectors of the Indonesian arc system, have been analyzed for hydrogen, oxygen and sulfur isotopic compositions. The lavas are mostly basaltic and cover a range from low-K tholeiitic to high-K calc-alkaline affinities. The following whole-rock compositions were observed: δ D = -109 to -57‰ V-SMOW (avg = -89‰ ), δ 18O = +5.3 to +6.7‰ V-SMOW (avg = +5.9‰ ), δ 34S = +2.0 to +7.8‰ V-CDT (avg = +4.7‰ ). All samples are strongly degassed, as average water contents are ~0.15 wt.% and average sulfur concentrations are ~14 ppm. Because degassing-induced shifts in sulfur isotopes are limited at magmatic temperatures and oxidation states typical of basalts, the data suggest that, in all cases, the magma source in the sub-arc mantle is significantly enriched in 34S compared to MORB-source mantle. Hydrogen isotopes fractionate strongly, and our data are most consistent with multi-stage degassing of magmatic water. Based on primary H-O-S isotopic signatures inferred for the Indonesian arc basalts and on assumed compositions of the pre-subduction mantle, we performed mass-balance calculations to estimate volatile concentrations in the slab component. The results indicate that addition of about 1-1.5 wt.% aqueous fluid containing 1.5% sulfur will produce the H-O-S isotopic compositions of primary basaltic melts of the volcanoes studied. Alternatively, the slab-derived material may consist of a mix of melts and fluids, in which melts can be more voluminous, but fluids dominate the budgets of sulfur, hydrogen, and other hydrophile elements. Irrespective of the preferred model, S and H2O contents must have increased considerably in the sub-arc mantle (to ~350 ppm and ~1.3 wt.%, respectively). The S value is consistent with estimates based on primary sulfur contents in arc basalts ( ~2000 ppm), but the H2O concentration is higher than the mantle can accommodate, as it will induce melting. We argue, however, that

  19. Overexpression of an Orchid (Dendrobium nobile) SOC1/TM3-Like Ortholog, DnAGL19, in Arabidopsis Regulates HOS1-FT Expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ru; Pan, Ting; Liang, Wei-Qi; Gao, Lan; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Hong-Qing; Liang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Flowering in the appropriate season is critical for successful reproduction in angiosperms. The orchid species, Dendrobium nobile, requires vernalization to achieve flowering in the spring, but the underlying regulatory network has not been identified to date. The MADS-box transcription factor DnAGL19 was previously identified in a study of low-temperature treated D. nobile buds and was suggested to regulate vernalization-induced flowering. In this study, phylogenetic analysis of DnAGL9 and the MADS-box containing proteins showed that DnAGL19 is phylogenetically closely related to the SOC1-like protein from orchid Dendrobium Chao Parya Smile, DOSOC1. The orchid clade closed to but is not included into the SOC1-1/TM3 clades associated with either eudicots or monocots, suggesting that DnAGL19 is an SOC1-1/TM3-like ortholog. DnAGL19 was found to be highly expressed in pseudobulbs, leaves, roots, and axillary buds but rarely in flowers, and to be substantially upregulated in axillary buds by prolonged low-temperature treatments. Overexpression of DnAGL19 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a small but significantly reduced time to bolting, suggesting that flowering time was slightly accelerated under normal growth conditions. Consistent with this, the A. thaliana APETELA1 (AP1) gene was expressed at an earlier stage in transgenic lines than in wild type plants, while the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene was suppressed, suggesting that altered regulations on these transcription factors caused the weak promotion of flowering. HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE 1 (HOS1) was slightly activated under the same conditions, suggesting that the HOS1-FT module may be involved in the DnAGL19-related network. Under vernalization conditions, FT expression was significantly upregulated, whereas HOS1 expression in the transgenic A. thaliana has a level similar to that in wild type. Taken together, these results suggest that DnAGL19 controls the action of the HOS1-FT module

  20. A correlation between selenium and carnitine levels with hypo-osmotic swelling test for sperm membrane in low-grade varicocele patients

    PubMed Central

    PAJOVIC, B.; DIMITROVSKI, A.; RADOJEVIC, N.; VUKOVIC, M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) test predicts membrane integrity by determining the ability of the sperm membrane to maintain equilibrium between the sperm cell and its environment. The aim of our study was to determine the correlation between selenium and carnitine levels in the seminal fluid with HOS test for sperm membrane in low-grade varicocele patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS Study numbered 64 examinees who suffered from low-grade varicocele and were divided into two groups, according to fertility potential and HOS test outcome. The study also included a control group of 64 healthy subjects, with no varicocele. RESULTS From the Shapiro-Wilk’s test, it is clear that carnitine distribution differs significantly from normal (0.938, p = 0.03). In distribution of selenium, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test clearly shows statistically significant deviation from the normal curve (z = 0.225, p < 0.000), likewise Shapiro-Wilk’s statistic (0.787, p < 0.000). According to the results, the second group had significantly higher levels of carnitine and selenium than the first group of examinees (p < 0.05); therefore, when we compared epididymal markers with HOS tests outcomes, we found significant differences between the two groups. There were no significant differences between second group and healthy subjects (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS HOS test outcome in varicocele patients is directly proportional to the carnitine and selenium levels, which could play a major role in both determining fertility parameters and in the treatment of its impairment. This result is important for sub-clinical varicocele in infertile patients with normal semen analysis, since there is no evidence of benefit from any treatment so far. PMID:26957259

  1. CO Substitution in HOs3(CO)10(l-SC6H4Me-4) by the Diphosphine 4,5-Bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopentadiene-1,3-dione (bpcd): Structural and DFT Evaluation of the Isomeric Clusters HOs3(CO)8(bpcd)(mu-SC6H4Me-4)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Nesterov, Vladimir; Wang, Xiaoping; Richmond, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of the cluster HOs{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}({mu}-SC{sub 6}H{sub 4}Me-4) (1) with the diphosphine 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopentadiene-1,3-dione (bpcd) has been investigated. 1 reacts with bpcd at room temperature in the presence of Me{sub 3}NO to give the isomeric clusters 1,2-HOs{sub 3}(CO)8(bpcd)({mu}-SC{sub 6}H{sub 4}Me-4) (2a) and 1,1-HOs{sub 3}(CO)8(bpcd)({mu}-SC{sub 6}H{sub 4}Me-4) (2b). Clusters 2a and 2b have been isolated, and the molecular structure of each compound has been established by X-ray crystallography. The X-ray structure of 2a confirms the coordination of one of the non-hydride-bridged Os-Os vectors by the bpcd ligand, while the structure of 2b exhibits a chelating bpcd ligand that is bound to one of the osmium centers ligated by the thiolate and hydrido ligands. 2a and 2b are stable in refluxing toluene and show no evidence for bridge-to-chelate isomerization of the ancillary bpcd ligand. DFT calculations on 2a and 2b indicate that the former cluster is the thermodynamically more stable isomer. Near-UV irradiation of 2b leads to CO loss and ortho metalation of the thiolate moiety, yielding the dihydride cluster H{sub 2}Os{sub 3}(CO)7(bpcd)({mu},{sigma}-SC{sub 6}H{sub 3}Me-4) (3). The conversion of 2b to 3 and free CO is computed to be endothermic by 14.1 kcal/mol and the reaction is driven by the entropic release of CO. The photochemically promoted ortho-metalation reaction is isomer dependent since cluster 2a is inert under identical conditions.

  2. A unique TBX5 microdeletion with microinsertion detected in patient with Holt-Oram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morine, Mikio; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Inagaki, Hidehito; Watanabe, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Imoto, Issei

    2015-12-01

    Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by upper limb and congenital heart defects and caused by numerous germline mutations of TBX5 producing preterminal stop codons. Here, we report on a novel and unusual heterozygous TBX5 microdeletion with microinsertion (microindel) mutation (c.627delinsGTGACTCAGGAAACGCTTTCCTGA), which is predicted to synthesize a truncated TBX5 protein, detected in a sporadic patient with clinical features of HOS prenatally diagnosed by ultrasonography. This uncommon and relatively large inserted sequence contains sequences derived from nearby but not adjacent templates on both sense and antisense strands, suggesting two possible models, which require no repeat sequences, causing this complex microindel through the bypass of large DNA adducts via an error-prone DNA polymerase-mediated translesion synthesis.

  3. HO1 mRNA and Protein do not Change in Parallel in Bronchial Biopsies of Patients After Long Term Exposure to Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani, Samaneh; Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Ebrahimi, Majid; Halabian, Raheleh; Mirbagheri, Leila; Ghanei, Mostafa; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), is an alkylating agent and has been emerged as a chemical weapon in various battlefields. More recently, SM was employed in the Iraq conflict against Iranian military forces and civilians. Nowadays there are more than 40,000 people suffering from pulmonary lesions special chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to mustard gas in Iran. SM causes the endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Heme oxygenases (HOs) are the rate-limiting enzyme for heme metabolism. Numerous studies have confirmed that HOs are concerned in diverse biological processes such as anti-oxidation. The present study was undertaken to consider the regulation of HO-1 and HO-2 n the human airway wall, and to suggest a probable role that HOs may play in cellular defense against oxidative stress due to SM. In this research ten unexposed SM individuals and twenty SM exposed patients were included. Evaluation of HO-1& HO -2 expressions in unexposed and SM exposed patients samples was performed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, real-time RT-PCR and Immunohistochemistry analysis. While unexposed SM samples expressed same levels of HOs, expression level of HO-1 was upregulated about 3.58 ± 1.93 folds in SM exposed patients in comparison with unexposed ones, we could not find any difference in expression of HO-2 n two groups. In contrast, Immunohistochemistry results showed negative HO-1 protein expression in SM injured patients. Our results revealed that HO1 may plays an important role in cellular protection against oxidative stress due to mustard gas toxicity in airway wall of SM exposed patients at mRNA level, but translational modifications might cause decrease in the amount of HO1 protein. PMID:20981135

  4. Extensive Functional Redundancy in the Regulation of Candida albicans Drug Resistance and Morphogenesis by Lysine Deacetylases Hos2, Hda1, Rpd3, and Rpd31

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinliu; Robbins, Nicole; O’Meara, Teresa R.; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Current treatment efforts for fungal infections are hampered by the limited availability of antifungal drugs and by the emergence of drug resistance. A powerful strategy to enhance the efficacy of antifungal drugs is to inhibit the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Hsp90 governs drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence in a leading fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans. Our previous work with Saccharomyces cerevisiae established acetylation as a novel mechanism of posttranslational control of Hsp90 function in fungi. We implicated lysine deacetylases (KDACs) as key regulators of resistance to the most widely deployed class of antifungals, the azoles, in both S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. Here, we demonstrate high levels of functional redundancy among the KDACs that are important for regulating Hsp90 function. We identify Hos2, Hda1, Rpd3, and Rpd31 as the KDACs mediating azole resistance and morphogenesis in C. albicans. Furthermore, we identify lysine 30 and 271 as critical acetylation sites on C. albicans Hsp90, and substitutions at these residues compromised Hsp90 function. Finally, we show that pharmacological inhibition of KDACs phenocopies pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 and abrogates Hsp90-dependent azole resistance in numerous Candida species. This work illuminates new facets to the impact of KDACs on fungal drug resistance and morphogenesis, provides important insights into the divergence of the C. albicans Hsp90 regulatory network, and reveals new targets for development of antifungal drugs. PMID:27868254

  5. TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappa B in human osteoblastic HOS-TE85 cells is repressed in vector-averaged gravity using clinostat rotation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Kambe, F; Kurokouchi, K; Sakai, T; Ishiguro, N; Iwata, H; Koga, K; Gruener, R; Seo, H

    2000-12-09

    Effects of vector-averaged gravity on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-dependent activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) in human osteoblastic HOS-TE85 cells were investigated by culturing the cells using clinostat rotation (clinorotation). Cell cultures were rotated for 72 h at 40 rpm in a clinostat. At the end of clinorotation, the cells were treated with TNF-alpha for 30 min under stationary conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappa B was markedly reduced in the clinorotated cells when compared with the cells in control stationary cultures or after horizontal rotation (motional controls). The NF-kappa B-dependent transactivation was also impaired in the clinorotated cells, as evidenced by a transient transfection assay with a reporter plasmid containing multimerized NF-kappa B sites. Consistent with these findings, the TNF-alpha-dependent induction of endogenous NF-kappa B-responsive genes p105, I kappa B-alpha, and IL-8, was significantly attenuate in clinorotated cells. These results demonstrate that vector-averaged gravity inhibits the responsiveness of osteoblasts to TNF-alpha by repressing NF-kappa B activation. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. The effect of Me2SO overexposure during cryopreservation on HOS TE85 and hMSC viability, growth and quality.

    PubMed

    Morris, Timothy J; Picken, Andrew; Sharp, Duncan M C; Slater, Nigel K H; Hewitt, Christopher J; Coopman, Karen

    2016-12-01

    With the cell therapy industry continuing to grow, the ability to preserve clinical grade cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), whilst retaining cell viability and function remains critical for the generation of off-the-shelf therapies. Cryopreservation of MSCs, using slow freezing, is an established process at lab scale. However, the cytotoxicity of cryoprotectants, like Me2SO, raises questions about the impact of prolonged cell exposure to cryoprotectant at temperatures >0 °C during processing of large cell batches for allogenic therapies prior to rapid cooling in a controlled rate freezer or in the clinic prior to administration. Here we show that exposure of human bone marrow derived MSCs to Me2SO for ≥1 h before freezing, or after thawing, degrades membrane integrity, short-term cell attachment efficiency and alters cell immunophenotype. After 2 h's exposure to Me2SO at 37 °C post-thaw, membrane integrity dropped to ∼70% and only ∼50% of cells retained the ability to adhere to tissue culture plastic. Furthermore, only 70% of the recovered MSCs retained an immunophenotype consistent with the ISCT minimal criteria after exposure. We also saw a similar loss of membrane integrity and attachment efficiency after exposing osteoblast (HOS TE85) cells to Me2SO before, and after, cryopreservation. Overall, these results show that freezing medium exposure is a critical determinant of product quality as process scale increases. Defining and reporting cell sensitivity to freezing medium exposure, both before and after cryopreservation, enables a fair judgement of how scalable a particular cryopreservation process can be, and consequently whether the therapy has commercial feasibility.

  7. Expression and function of the ACE2/angiotensin(1-7)/Mas axis in osteosarcoma cell lines U-2 OS and MNNG-HOS.

    PubMed

    Ender, Stephan Albrecht; Dallmer, Andrea; Lässig, Florian; Lendeckel, Uwe; Wolke, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin-system (RAS), via its classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II/angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R)-axis, is associated with proliferation and metastasis of numerous types of solid tumor. AT1R blockers reduce tumor volume and decrease liver and lung metastasis in murine models of osteosarcoma. Expression and function of the alternative ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis in osteosarcoma is yet to be studied. In the present study, the basic and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated expression of components of this alternative RAS axis were analyzed and the impact of Mas on proliferation and/or migration of U-2 OS and MNNG-HOS osteosarcoma cells was studied. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that the two cell lines expressed the Ang(1‑7)-generating peptidases ACE2, neutral endopeptidase 24.11 and prolyl-endopeptidase together with the putative receptor for Ang(1-7), Mas. IL-1β provoked an induction of Mas mRNA and protein expression which was associated with a reduction of proliferation and migration. By contrast, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Mas expression led to increased cell proliferation. In conclusion, osteosarcoma cells express a functional active alternative ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis. The induction and reinforcement of this axis may be beneficial for the treatment of osteosarcoma by reducing growth and preventing cancer metastasis. These effects may be achieved directly by the administration of Mas agonists or, indirectly, via blocking the classical AngII RAS axis via ACE inhibitors or AT1R antagonists.

  8. Low seminal zinc bound to high molecular weight proteins in asthenozoospermic patients: evidence of increased sperm zinc content in oligoasthenozoospermic patients.

    PubMed

    Carpino, A; Siciliano, L; Petroni, M F; De Stefano, C; Aquila, S; Andó, S; Petrone, M F

    1998-01-01

    Total seminal zinc concentration, seminal zinc fraction bound to high molecular weight proteins (HMW-Zn%) and zinc content in spermatozoa were assayed in the ejaculates of 90 asthenozoospermic patients subdivided into two study groups: normoasthenozoospermics (group I: n = 50) and oligoasthenozoospermics (group II: n = 40). The zinc concentrations of patients were compared with those of a control group of donors showing normal semen parameters. All samples were also investigated for their sperm membrane functional integrity by the hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOS). The results showed normal total zinc concentrations but very low HMW-Zn% values (P < 0.001) in seminal plasma of the two groups of asthenozoospermic patients compared to the controls. Furthermore higher zinc amounts (P < 0.001) were measured in spermatozoa of oligoasthenozoospermic patients compared to group I and to the control group. Oligoasthenozoospermics also displayed a lower HOS score (P < 0.001) compared to the other two groups. These data suggest that the increased unbound seminal zinc could contribute to the decrease of sperm motility in normoasthenozoospermic and oligoasthenozoospermic patients. A further impairment in sperm motility could occur in the oligoasthenozoospermic patients where the increase of seminal free zinc was followed by a major zinc uptake by spermatozoa. The higher intrasperm zinc content in these patients could be a reflection of their low sperm membrane functionality.

  9. Are Short-term Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopy in Patients 55 Years and Older Inferior to Those in Younger Patients?

    PubMed

    Bryan, Andrew J; Krych, Aaron J; Pareek, Ayoosh; Reardon, Patrick J; Berardelli, Rebecca; Levy, Bruce A

    2016-10-01

    Hip arthroscopy for young patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been successful, but the efficacy of hip arthroscopy in older patients is not clearly defined. To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients 55 years and older who are undergoing hip arthroscopy and to compare outcomes with those of patients younger than 55 years. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 201 (63 male, 138 female) patients undergoing primary hip arthroscopy for FAI without radiographic arthritis (Tönnis grade <3) were isolated from a prospective database and stratified by age to <55-year and ≥55-year groups. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and 1 and 2 years postoperatively using the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and Hip Outcome Score (HOS: functional scores, as well as Activities of Daily Living [ADL] and Sport subscales). A Wilcoxon signed rank sum test was used to evaluate the differences in outcome scores between the cohorts at each interval. The <55-year group included 174 patients (mean age, 37 ± 12 years), and the ≥55-year group included 27 patients (mean age, 61 ± 5 years). The minimum follow-up time was 2 years in each group. Preoperative Tönnis grades and mHHS scores (59 vs 59; P = .75) were similar between groups. The ≥55-year cohort underwent labral debridement more frequently (78% vs 36%; P =.02) and were more likely to have full-thickness cartilage defects (22% vs 4%; P = .04). Despite this, the mHHS in both groups improved significantly from baseline, without significant differences at 1 year (86 [≥55 years] vs 81 [<55 years]; P = .53) or 2 years (73.88 [≥55 years] vs 79.54 [<55 years]; P = .06). However, at a minimum 2-year follow-up, patients <55 years had significant improvements over patients ≥55 years in the HOS subscales for ADL score (85.6 vs 75.2; P = .03), ADL rating (80.1 vs 70.0; P = .004), Sport score (70.2 vs 55.6; P = .04), and Sport rating (70.2 vs 58.0; P = .04). Although younger patients had superior HOS

  10. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bianca; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse; Giugliani, Roberto; Wraith, James Edmond; Guffon, Nathalie; Eich, Elke; Beck, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS). The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years) and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years). Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle). Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required. PMID:21808707

  11. Etude structurale des sulfotellurures de terres rares ( LS) 2Te 1+ x ( L = Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm et Y). I. Sous-structure de la phase ordonnée de (HoS) 2Te 1,34. Structure de la phase desordonnée de (TbS) 2Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghémard, G.; Etienne, J.; Flahaut, J.

    1982-11-01

    The lanthanide sulfotellurides ( LS) 2Te 1+ x (0 ≤ x < 0.50) show order-disorder phenomena. Above 450°C, they crystallize in a partially disordered structure, orthorhombic with cell parameters a, b, and c close to 4.1, 5.2, and 13.6 Å, respectively. This structure is determined from diffractometer data on a (HoS) 2Te 1.34 crystal ( R = 0.061). It is built up along the c axis from ( L4S) tetrahedra layers, separated by Te planes. Disorder and nonstoichiometry are related to the two vacant Te sites.

  12. Physical activity in chronic home-living and sub-acute hospitalized stroke patients using objective and self-reported measures.

    PubMed

    Vanroy, Christel; Vissers, Dirk; Vanlandewijck, Yves; Feys, Hilde; Truijen, Steven; Michielsen, Marc; Cras, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Despite confirmed reduced physical activity (PA) after stroke in various stages of recovery, the type of activities stroke patients executed and the time spent at different activity levels have not been sufficiently verified with stroke-validated assessment tools. Observational study. To determine PA of sub-acute stroke patients hospitalized in a rehabilitation centre (HOS) compared to chronic home-living stroke patients (HOM) using objective and self-reported measures during 2 weekdays and 1 weekend day. Fifteen HOS and 15 HOM patients wore a Sense Wear Pro 2 accelerometer (METs*minutes/24 h) and a knee-worn pedometer Yamax Digi Walker SW 200 (steps) and filled in a coded activity diary (kcal/24 h; METs*minutes/24 h) during three consecutive days. In HOM significantly more steps (stepstotal HOM = 18722.6 ± 10063.6; stepstotal HOS = 7097.8 ± 5850.5) and higher energy expenditure (EE) levels (EEtotal HOM = 7759.34 ± 2243.04; EEtotal HOS = 5860.15 ± 1412.78) were measured. In this group less moderate activity (≥3-6 ≤ METs) was performed on a weekday (pday1 = 0.006; pday2 = 0.027) and in total (p = 0.037). Few therapy hours (physical, occupational and speech therapy, and psychological support) were provided in HOM compared to HOS (p < 0.001). Vigorous activities were only seen in HOM. In both groups few patients executed sport activities. In HOM significantly more steps were performed and higher EE values were measured. However, participation in moderate activities and time spent on therapy were less in HOM. Evaluating PA with quantitative measures is feasible in both chronic home-living and sub-acute hospitalized patients with stroke.

  13. Do Patients With Borderline Dysplasia Have Inferior Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement Compared With Patients With Normal Acetabular Coverage?

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Levy, David M; Weber, Alexander E; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Mather, Richard C; Salata, Michael J; Nho, Shane J

    2017-07-01

    The literature contains conflicting reports regarding whether outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery for patients with borderline dysplasia are inferior to outcomes in patients with normal acetabular coverage. To assess differences in the outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in groups of patients with borderline dysplasia and normal coverage. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A registry of consecutive patients who had undergone primary hip arthroscopic surgery with capsular plication for FAI between January 2012 and January 2014 were divided based on the preoperative lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) into 2 distinct groups: (1) borderline dysplasia (LCEA 18°-25°) and (2) normal acetabular coverage (LCEA 25.1°-40°). There were 36 patients in the borderline dysplastic group and 312 patients in the normal coverage group. The primary outcome measure was the Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included the HOS-Sports and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS). The mean preoperative LCEA differed significantly between groups (23.4° ± 1.5° for borderline dysplastic, 32.5° ± 3.8° for normal coverage; P < .001). The borderline dysplastic group had a higher percentage of female patients than the normal coverage group (27/36 [75%] vs 177/312 [57%], respectively; P = .048). There were no differences in other preoperative demographics and radiographic parameters. At a minimum 2 years after hip arthroscopic surgery (mean follow-up, 2.6 ± 0.6 years), both groups demonstrated significant improvements in all patient-reported outcome scores ( P < .001 in all cases). There were no significant differences between the borderline dysplastic and normal coverage groups in final outcome scores, score improvements, or percentage of patients experiencing clinically significant improvements. One patient in the borderline dysplastic group (3%) underwent revision hip

  14. Patient-reported outcome instruments for femoroacetabular impingement and hip labral pathology: a systematic review of the clinimetric evidence.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, Parth; Slobogean, Gerard P; Noonan, Vanessa K; Gilbart, Michael K

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to systematically review the content and clinimetric evidence (rigor of rating scales and indexes for the description of clinical phenomena) of published patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments used to assess femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and labral hip pathology. We used Medical Subject Heading terms related to FAI and labrum/labral tears to search the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for studies of FAI and labral hip pathology. Studies with hip-related PRO instruments, with any operative intervention except total hip arthroplasty, were included. We excluded studies with a skeletally immature population, revision surgeries in more than 10% of cases, or a primary diagnosis of hip osteoarthritis. We conducted a second review using the same databases for studies reporting clinimetric properties of at least 1 of the PRO instruments identified previously. Articles were selected in an independent, stepwise manner by 2 reviewers. Selected articles were evaluated to determine the presence and quality of measurement properties of the outcome instruments. We found 5 articles assessing 3 PRO instruments: the Hip Outcome Score (HOS), the Non-Arthritic Hip Score, and the 12-item modified Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. The HOS had the highest positive rating for internal consistency, construct validity, agreement, responsiveness, lack of floor/ceiling effect, and interpretability. The Non-Arthritic Hip Score showed evidence for validity and lack of floor/ceiling effect. The modified Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was only strong for internal consistency and was indeterminate for construct validity. Only 3 PRO instruments have shown clinimetric evidence to support their use to measure outcomes in FAI and labral pathology patients. The HOS has the greatest amount of clinimetric evidence and is the most proven instrument for use in this population. This review shows that

  15. Isomerization of the diphosphine ligand 3,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)-5-methoxy-2(5H)-furanone (bmf) at a triosmium cluster and P C bond cleavage in the unsaturated cluster 1,1-Os3(CO)9(bmf): Synthesis and X-ray diffraction structures of the isomeric Os3(CO)10(bmf) clusters and HOs3(CO)8( -C6H4)[ -PhPCC(Ph2P)CH(OMe)OC(O)

    SciTech Connect

    Kandala, Srikanth; Yang, Li; Campana, Charles F.; Nesterov, Vladimir; Richmond, Michael G.

    2010-07-01

    The labile cluster 1,2-Os3(CO)10(MeCN)2 (1) reacts with the chiral diphosphine ligand 3,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)-5-methoxy-2(5H)-furanone (bmf) to furnish 1,2-Os3(CO)10(bmf) (2a) in high yield. Heating cluster 2a over the temperature range 358 383 K under CO leads to isomerization of the bmf ligand and formation of the diphosphine-chelated cluster 1,1-Os3(CO)10(bmf) (2b) and an equilibrium mixture consisting of 2a and 2b in a 15:85 ratio. Extended thermolysis of an equilibrium mixture of Os3(CO)10(bmf) is accompanied by CO loss and ortho-metalation of an aryl ring to afford an inseparable mixture of three diastereomeric hydride clusters HOs3(CO)9(C29H23O3P2) (3a c). Thermolysis of HOs3(CO)9(C29H23O3P2) (3a c) in refluxing toluene leads to P C bond cleavage and formation of the benzyne-substituted clusters HOs3(CO)8( -C6H4)( -C23H19O3P2) (4a,b) as a 4:1 mixture of diastereomers. The unequivocal identity of the major benzyne-substituted cluster has been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis, where the activation of one of the phenyl groups situated to the furanone carbonyl group in the bmf ligand has been established. The isomerization and activation of the bmf ligand are contrasted with other Os3(CO)10(diphosphine) derivatives prepared by our groups.

  16. Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopic Surgery in Patients With Tönnis Grade 1 Osteoarthritis With a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up: Evaluation Using a Matched-Pair Analysis With a Control Group With Tönnis Grade 0.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Gui, Chengcheng; Darwish, Nader; Lodhia, Parth; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Domb, Benjamin G

    2016-07-01

    There are limited studies on the effect of mild osteoarthritis (OA) on outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery. To conduct a matched-pair analysis with a minimum 2-year follow-up to evaluate outcomes after hip arthroscopic surgery in patients with Tönnis grade 1 OA. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were prospectively collected on patients who underwent hip arthroscopic surgery between April 2008 and December 2012. Patients were excluded if they had previous hip conditions. The remaining patients were divided into either Tönnis 0 or 1 grade OA groups and were matched in a 1-to-1 ratio according to age within 5 years, sex, body mass index category, labral treatment, and capsular treatment. Four patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores, as well as the visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain, patient satisfaction, and rates of revision arthroscopic surgery and conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA), were recorded. A total of 1412 hip arthroscopic procedures were performed during the study period, of which 1036 met the inclusion criteria and 892 (86.1%) had 2-year follow-up. There were 738 and 154 patients with Tönnis grade 0 and 1, respectively; 93 patients were matched in each group. The Tönnis grade 0 group had a mean follow up of 28.7 months (range, 23.5-67.9 months), and the Tönnis grade 1 group had a mean follow up of 31.5 months (range, 23.6-63.5 months). Both groups demonstrated a significant improvement in all PROs and the VAS at a minimum 2-year follow-up. For the Tönnis grade 0 group, the improvements (in points) in the PROs were as follows: modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), 15.51; Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS), 20.65; Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL), 16.83; and Hip Outcome Score-Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), 20.91. The VAS score for the Tönnis grade 0 group decreased by 2.82 points. For the Tönnis grade 1 group, the improvements (in points) in the PROs were as follows: mHHS, 19.52; NAHS, 20.96; HOS-ADL, 18.20; and

  17. A liquid biopsy-based method for the detection and quantification of circulating tumor cells in surgical osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Gao, Peng; Xiao, Xin; Heger, Michal; Geng, Lei; Fan, Bo; Yuan, Yulin; Huang, Chen; Chen, Guojing; Liu, Yao; Hu, Yongchen; Yu, Xiuchun; Wu, Sujia; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhen

    2017-03-08

    A method for the enumeration and quantification of osteosarcoma (OS) circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is currently not available. A correlation between the number of CTCs and progression-free survival (PFS) has been established for other cancers, but not for OS CTCs. A method was therefore developed for CTC quantification in OS and validated in a prospective cohort of surgical patients with primary and recurrent/metastatic OS (N=23). Human OS cells, acting as CTCs, were enumerated from spiked human peripheral blood (PB) following erythrocyte and leukocyte depletion. The OS cells were quantified microscopically based on aneuploidy and a CK18-/CD45- phenotype. Aneuploidy was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using fluorescence-labeled alpha-satellite probes for the centromeres of chromosome (CEP 8). CK18 and CD45 phenotyping was performed with immunocytochemistry. HOS cells in spiked PB could be effectively retrieved with the FISH-based enumeration method, which was subsequently employed in an OS patient cohort. PB of recurrent/metastatic OS patients contained more CTCs than the PB of primary OS patients. OS patients with ≥2 CTCs per 7.5 ml of PB had worse PFS than patients whose PB contained <2 CTCs. In 2 cases, CTCs were present in PB of OS patients with negative X-ray and chest CT scans. In conclusion, our method was able to quantitate CTCs in liquid biopsies of OS patients. The number of CTCs has diagnostic and prognostic value.

  18. A liquid biopsy-based method for the detection and quantification of circulating tumor cells in surgical osteosarcoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Gao, Peng; Xiao, Xin; Heger, Michal; Geng, Lei; Fan, Bo; Yuan, Yulin; Huang, Chen; Chen, Guojing; Liu, Yao; Hu, Yongchen; Yu, Xiuchun; Wu, Sujia; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    A method for the enumeration and quantification of osteosarcoma (OS) circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is currently not available. A correlation between the number of CTCs and progression-free survival (PFS) has been established for other cancers, but not for OS CTCs. A method was therefore developed for CTC quantification in OS and validated in a prospective cohort of surgical patients with primary and recurrent/metastatic OS (N=23). Human OS cells, acting as CTCs, were enumerated from spiked human peripheral blood (PB) following erythrocyte and leukocyte depletion. The OS cells were quantified microscopically based on aneuploidy and a CK18−/CD45− phenotype. Aneuploidy was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using fluorescence-labeled alpha-satellite probes for the centromeres of chromosome (CEP 8). CK18 and CD45 phenotyping was performed with immunocytochemistry. HOS cells in spiked PB could be effectively retrieved with the FISH-based enumeration method, which was subsequently employed in an OS patient cohort. PB of recurrent/metastatic OS patients contained more CTCs than the PB of primary OS patients. OS patients with ≥2 CTCs per 7.5 ml of PB had worse PFS than patients whose PB contained <2 CTCs. In 2 cases, CTCs were present in PB of OS patients with negative X-ray and chest CT scans. In conclusion, our method was able to quantitate CTCs in liquid biopsies of OS patients. The number of CTCs has diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:28350107

  19. Tumor and circulating biomarkers in patients with second-line hepatocellular carcinoma from the randomized phase II study with tivantinib

    PubMed Central

    Rimassa, Lorenza; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Personeni, Nicola; Porta, Camillo; Borbath, Ivan; Daniele, Bruno; Salvagni, Stefania; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Trojan, Jörg; De Toni, Enrico N.; Weiss, Alan; Miles, Steven; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Lencioni, Monica; Lamar, Maria E.; Wang, Yunxia; Shuster, Dale; Schwartz, Brian E.; Santoro, Armando

    2016-01-01

    ARQ 197-215 was a randomized placebo-controlled phase II study testing the MET inhibitor tivantinib in second-line hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. It identified tumor MET as a key biomarker in HCC. Aim of this research was to study the prognostic and predictive value of tumor (MET, the receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by the homonymous MNNG-HOS transforming gene) and circulating (MET, hepatocyte growth factor [HGF], alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) biomarkers in second-line HCC. Tumor MET-High status was centrally assessed by immunohistochemistry. Circulating biomarkers were centrally analyzed on serum samples collected at baseline and every 4-8 weeks, using medians as cut-off to determine High/Low status. Tumor MET, tested in 77 patients, was more frequently High after (82%) versus before (40%) sorafenib. A significant interaction (p = 0.04) between tivantinib and baseline tumor MET in terms of survival was observed. Baseline circulating MET and HGF (102 patients) High status correlated with shorter survival (HR 0.61, p = 0.03, and HR 0.60, p = 0.02, respectively), while the association between AFP (104 patients) or VEGF (103 patients) status and survival was non-significant. Conclusions: Tumor MET levels were higher in patients treated with sorafenib. Circulating biomarkers such as MET and HGF may be prognostic in second-line HCC. These results need to be confirmed in larger randomized clinical trials. PMID:27579536

  20. New osmium cluster compounds containing the heterocyclic ligand 2,3-bis-(diphenylphosphino)quinoxaline (dppq): Ligand isomerization and crystal structures of dppq, the isomeric clusters Os3(CO)10(dppq), and HOs3(CO)9[ -2,3-PhP(h1-C6H4)(Ph2P)quinoxaline

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Sean W; Yang, Li; Wang, Xiaoping; Richmond, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of the labile cluster 1,2-Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(MeCN){sub 2} (1) with the diphosphine ligand 2,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)quinoxaline (dppq) at room temperature affords 1,2-Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppq) (2b) as the kinetic product of ligand substitution in 84% yield. 2b isomerizes to the thermodynamically more stable dppq-chelated cluster 1,1-Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppq) (2c) as the sole observable product under CO at temperatures below 358 K. The kinetics for the conversion of 2b {yields} 2c have been investigated by NMR spectroscopy in CDCl{sub 3} over the temperature range 323-353 K, and the reaction was found to exhibit a rate law that is first order in 2b. The calculated activation parameters [{Delta}H{sup {ne}} = 25.4(4) kcal/mol; {Delta}S{sup {ne}} = -3(1) eu] support an intramolecular isomerization scenario, one that involves the migration of phosphine and CO groups about the cluster polyhedron. The disposition of the dppq ligand in the isomeric Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppq) clusters has been established by X-ray crystallography and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. Photolysis of 2c at 366 nm leads to CO loss and ortho metalation of one of the aryl groups on the Ph{sub 2}P moiety to furnish the hydride cluster HOs{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}[{mu}-PhP({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4})(Ph{sub 2}P)quinoxaline] (3). The isomerization behavior exhibited by 2b follows that of related diphosphine-substituted Os{sub 3} clusters prepared by us.

  1. Disproportionate growth between the spine and pelvis in patients with thoracic adolescent scoliosis: a new look into the pattern's growth.

    PubMed

    Bao, H; Liu, Z; Yan, P; Qiu, Y; Zhu, F

    2015-12-01

    A self-control ratio, the spine-pelvis index (SPI), was proposed for the assessment of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in this study. The aim was to evaluate the disproportionate growth between the spine and pelvis in these patients using SPI. A total of 64 female patients with thoracic AIS were randomly enrolled between December 2010 and October 2012 (mean age 13 years, standard deviation (sd) 2.17; 9 to 18) and a further 73 healthy female patients with a mean age of 12.4 years (mean age 12.4 years, sd 2.24; 9 to 18), were randomly selected from a normal control database at our centre. The radiographic parameters measured included length of spine (LOS), height of spine (HOS), length of thoracic vertebrae (LOT), height of thoracic vertebrae (HOT), width of pelvis (WOP), height of pelvis (HOP) and width of thorax (WOT). SPI was defined as the ratio LOS/HOP. The SPI and LOT/HOP in patients with AIS showed a significant increase when compared with normal girls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively), implying an abnormal pattern of growth of the spine relative to the pelvis in patients with AIS. No significant difference in SPI was found in different age groups in the control group, making the SPI an age-independent parameter with a mean value of 2.219 (2.164 to 2.239). We also found that the SPI was not related to maturity in the control group. This study, for the first time, used a self-control ratio to confirm the disproportionate patterns of growth of the spine and pelvis in patients with thoracic AIS, highlighting that the SPI is not affected by age or maturity.

  2. Impact of physician assistants on the outcomes of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia receiving chemotherapy in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Glotzbecker, Brett E; Yolin-Raley, Deborah S; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Soiffer, Robert J; Alyea, Edwin P

    2013-09-01

    Inpatient academic medical center care historically has been delivered by faculty physicians in conjunction with physicians in training (house officers [HOs]). Alternative staffing models have emerged secondary to American Counsel for Graduate Medical Education work-hour restrictions. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) care provided by a physician assistant (PA) service compared with a traditional model. Data were retrospectively collected on patients admitted with AML for reinduction chemotherapy from 2008 to 2012. Primary outcome measures were inpatient mortality and length of stay (LOS). Secondary measures included readmissions, intensive care unit (ICU) transfers, consults requested, and radiologic studies ordered. Ninety-five patients with AML were reviewed. Forty-seven patients (49.5%) were admitted to the HO service, and 48 patients (50.5%) were admitted to the PA service. Demographic data were similar between services. LOS was significantly different between the services, with a mean of 36.8 days with the HO model compared with 30.9 days with the PA service (P=.03). The 14-day readmission rate also differed significantly; it was 10.6% (five of 47 patients) and zero for the HO and PA models, respectively (P=.03). The mean number of consults with the HO model was 2.11 (range, zero to five) versus 1.47 (range, zero to four) with the PA service (P=.03). Mortality and ICU transfers were not significantly different. The data demonstrate equivalent mortality and ICU transfers, with a decrease in LOS, readmission rates, and consults for patients cared for in the PA service. This suggests that the PA service is associated with increased operational efficiency and decreased health service use without compromising health care outcomes.

  3. [Diagnostic approach and therapeutic strategy in 133 infertile patients with astheno-necrozoospermia].

    PubMed

    Vicari, E

    1999-02-01

    One-hundred thirty-three patients (aged 22 to 48, median 27 years) found affected by repetitive severe astheno-necrozoospermia (ASNE) (forward sperm motility < 10%; viable forms < 25%) in their ejaculates detected by both conventional viability tests (eosin Y exclusion and HOS tests) associated with oligo (51.1%), poly (3.7%), terato- (82.7%), -zoospermia, hyperdesfoliation of seminal spermatids (36.8%), hypospermia (11.3%), a comprehensive (history analysis; physical examination; lab: hormonal, microbiological, hemato-chemical blood screening, ultrasound scans at didymo-epididymal and prostato-vesicular glands, genital venous doppler) work-up allowed to recognize the following possible causes of ASNE: infectious (24.1%), spermiotoxyc (16.5%), hormonal (15.0%), iatrogenic (12.8%), chronic extratesticular diseases (CETD) (10.9%), varicocele (6.8%), idiopathic (14.3%). Overall population, except CETD patients gave their written informed consent about trial options for a three month period: a. rational, evidence-based treatment, group-standardised for doses and lenght (treated patients = subgroups T: total number = 71); b. short-term treatment/no treatment, (matched-control = subgroups Co: total number = 47). Follow-up semen data performed after completion of the assigned trial, together detected a conventionally normal percentage (> 25%) of viable sperm (necrozoospermic-responders (NR) in 37 (52.1%) out of subgroup-T patients. All subgroups-T patient, excepted subgroup-T patient affected by idiophathic ASNE (NR = 0%), exhibited NR rate (range 50-69.2%) values always significantly higher than subgroups-Co (NR = 0%, in all subgroups). Moreover, in each subgroup-T patients the percentages of viable and forward motile sperms values were significantly higher than matched-controls. The results of this study indicate that in patients affected by ASNE an andrological comprehensive work-up is mandatory because ASNE has a heterogeneous pathogenesis and a favourable prognosis

  4. Patient Power!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crowdsourcing & Rare Diseases Patient Power! Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Social ... Porzecanski couldn't be happier that such "patient power" efforts will help SCLS patients who otherwise would ...

  5. Systematic review of cross-cultural adaptations of hip-specific patient-reported outcome measures in Spanish.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Valero, Sara; García-Pérez, Fernando; Flórez-García, Mariano Tomás; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2017-03-16

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the quality of the transcultural adaptation procedure and the clinimetric properties of the self-administered hip-disability functional assessment questionnaires adapted for the Spanish population. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Web of Science databases (from inception until June 2016) to locate all the scales adapted to Spanish and to analyze the different phases of the adaptation process and its psychometric properties. Eight scales were identified, and were grouped into three sections, according to the type of diseases in which they can be used: a) lower limb: Lower Limb Functional Index (LLFI), Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) and Arthrosis of Membres Inférieurs et Qualité de vie (AMICAL); b) knee and/or hip: Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index, Osteoarthritis Knee and Hip Quality of Life (OAKHQOL) and Hip and Knee Questionnaire (HKQ); and c) specific for hip: Hip Outcome Score (HOS) and International Hip Outcome Tool-33 (iHOT-33). The transcultural adaptation procedure was satisfactory in all cases, albeit somewhat less rigorous for the HKQ and LLFI than for the remaining questionnaires. No study evaluated all the psychometric properties. We currently have 8 hip-disability functional assessment questionnaires adapted to Spanish with satisfactory psychometric properties. We can measure the patient's perceived impact of his or her hip disease by selecting, among the different options, those alternatives that best fit our clinical or research objectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Frequency of TPR-MET rearrangement in patients with gastric carcinoma and in first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Miehlke, S; Ebert, M P; Hoffmann, J; Breidert, M; Alpen, B; Starzynska, T; Stolte Prof, M; Malfertheiner, P; Bayerdörffer, E

    2000-04-15

    The activation of the c-met protooncogene through a rearrangement has been detected previously in gastric carcinoma tissue and precancerous lesions. In the current study the authors analyzed the rearrangement of TPR-MET in gastric carcinoma patients and in first-degree relatives to evaluate the potential role and timepoint of this genetic alteration in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its potential value in identifying those individuals with an increased risk of developing gastric carcinoma. The presence of TPR-MET mRNA was determined in gastric tissue from 19 patients with gastric carcinoma and in the gastric mucosa of 18 first-degree relatives without gastric carcinoma and in the gastric mucosa of 18 first-degree relatives without gastric carcinoma using a nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Southern blot analysis. A 205-base pair (bp) cDNA fragment and a 70-bp cDNA fragment spanning the breakpoint were amplified by nested PCR. Amplification products were hybridized with an oligonucleotide labeled at the 3'-end with DIG-11-dUTP spanning the breakpoint using Southern blot analysis. The MNNG-HOS cell line served as a positive control. TPR-MET mRNA was detected in nine gastric carcinoma patients (47%). Among these patients, TPR-MET mRNA was present in the both tumor and tumor free tissues in 5 patients (26%), in the tumor tissue only in 2 patients (11%), and in the tumor free gastric mucosa only in 2 patients (11%). It is interesting to note that TPR-MET rearrangement also was detected in the gastric corpus mucosa of 1 first-degree relative (6%), but in none of the control subjects. The data from the current study indicate that TPR-MET activation may be an early event in gastric carcinogenesis and may be useful for the identification of individuals with an increased risk of developing gastric carcinoma. Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.

  7. Minimal Clinically Important Difference of Patient Reported Outcome Measures of Lower Extremity Injuries in Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Derya; Çoban, Özge; Kılıçoğlu, Önder

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: MCID scores for outcome measures are frequently used evidence-based guides to gage meaningful changes. To conduct a systematic review of the quality and content of the the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) relating to 16 patient-rated outcome measures (PROM) used in lower extremity. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review on articles reporting MCID in lower extremity outcome measures and orthopedics from January 1, 1980, to May 10, 2016. We evaluated MCID of the 16 patient reported outcome measures (PROM) which were Harris Hip Score (HHS), Oxford Hip Score (OHS), Hip Outcome Score (HOS), Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), The International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC), The Lysholm Scale, The Western Ontario Meniscal Evaluation Tool (WOMET), The Anterior Cruciate Ligament Quality of Life Questionnaire (ACL-QOL), The Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), The Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Knee İnjury And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment Patellar Tendinosis (Jumper’s Knee) (VİSA-P), Tegner Activity Rating Scale, Marx Activity Rating Scale, Foot And Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), The Foot Function Index (FFI), Foot And Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), The Foot And Ankle Disability Index Score and Sports Module, Achill Tendon Total Rupture Score(ATRS), The Victorian İnstitute Of Sports Assesment Achilles Questionnaire(VİSA-A), American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). A search of the PubMed/MEDLINE, PEDro and Cochrane Cen¬tral Register of Controlled Trials and Web of Science databases from the date of inception to May 1, 2016 was conducted. The terms “minimal clinically important difference,” “minimal clinically important change”, “minimal clinically important improvement” “were combined with one of the PROM as mentioned above

  8. Frontal regional homogeneity increased and temporal regional homogeneity decreased after remission of first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder with panic disorder patients under duloxetine therapy for 6 weeks.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te

    2012-02-01

    We designed this study to investigate the changes of regional homogeneity (ReHo) after a 6-week duloxetine therapy in first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder with panic disorder (FEMDDPD) patients. 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning and ReHo functional MRI analysis were performed on 15 patients (male: 5; female: 10; age: 35.87±9.59 years old) at baseline and remitted status (sixth week) compared with 15 healthy control subjects (male: 4; female: 11; age: 34.30±9.87 years old) which were scanned twice within 6 weeks. The ReHo was analyzed by the REST toolbox (resting-state functional MRI data analysis toolbox). The ReHos of different time-points were compared by using paired t test function of REST. ReHo increased in right superior frontal cortex, right medial frontal cortex and decreased in right superior temporal cortex (uncorrected p<0.00005, cluster threshold>20, surface connected theory) after remission of symptoms in these FEMDDPD patients within 6 weeks (improvements of clinician rating and self rating scale scores; post-hoc corrected p<0.001). No significant changes of ReHo were observed in the controls within 6 weeks (uncorrected p<0.1, no cluster threshold setting, surface connected theory). The changes of ReHo value were mildly correlated with improvements of clinical rating scales with age, gender, depression and anxiety severity as covariates. Our study suggested that differential modulations inside the default mode network probably were associated with remission of FEMDDPD symptoms after duloxetine therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient Rights

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a patient bill of rights. An important patient right is informed consent. This means that if you need a treatment, your health care provider must give you the information you need to make a decision. Many hospitals have patient advocates who can help you if you have ...

  10. PATIENT NAVIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Kristen J.; Battaglia, Tracy A.; Dudley, Donald J.; Garcia, Roland; Greene, Amanda; Calhoun, Elizabeth; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.; Paskett, Electra D.; Raich, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Background First implemented in 1990, patient navigation interventions are emerging as an approach to reduce cancer disparities. However, there is lack of consensus about how patient navigation is defined, what patient navigators do, and what their qualifications should be. Little is known about the efficacy and cost effectiveness of patient navigation. Methods We conducted a qualitative synthesis of published literature on cancer patient navigation. Using the keywords “navigator” or “navigation” and “cancer,” we identified 45 articles from Pubmed and reference searches that were published or in press through October 2007. 16 provided data on efficacy of navigation in improving timeliness and receipt of cancer screening, diagnostic follow-up care, and treatment. Patient navigation services are defined and differentiated from other outreach services. Results Overall there is evidence for some degree of efficacy for patient navigation in increasing participation in cancer screening and adherence to diagnostic follow-up care following an abnormality, with increases in screening ranging from 10.8% to 17.1% and increases in adherence to diagnostic follow-up care ranging from 21% to 29.2%, when compared to control patients. There is less evidence regarding efficacy of patient navigation in reducing either late stage cancer diagnosis or delays in initiation of cancer treatment or improving outcomes during cancer survivorship. There were methodological limitations in most studies, such as lack of control groups, small sample sizes, and contamination with other interventions. Conclusions Although cancer-related patient navigation interventions are being increasingly adopted across the U.S. and Canada, further research is necessary to evaluate their efficacy and cost-effectiveness in improving cancer care. PMID:18780320

  11. Holt-Oram syndrome and diaphragmatic hernia associate with paracentric inversion of chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Eswara, M.S.; Batanian, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) consists of congenital heart disease, usually atrial septal defect, along with thumb anomalies and occasionally more extensive limb defects. Inheritance is autosomal dominant. Previous reports have associated HOS with cytogenetic abnormalities on chromosomes 4, 14 and 20. Recently a linkage study has suggested a HOS locus on chromosome 12. We describe another case of HOS with a de novo cytogenetic abnormality. On prenatal ultrasound, IUGR, oligohydramnios and left diaphragmatic hernia were noted. Following delivery, patient was placed on extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation because of severe lung hypoplasia; diaphragmatic hernia was repaired with mesh graft. He expired on day 17 of life. On exam, he had subtle dysmorphic features with hypotelorism and abnormal folding of the ear lobes. He had bilateral radial aplasia, aplasia of thumbs, index and middle fingers, along with the metacarpals. On autopsy he was found to have atrial septal defect of the ostium secundum type, right side aortic arch with vascular ring formation, bicuspid pulmonic valve and severe lung hypoplasia worse on the left. Cytogenetic analysis on blood and skin showed 48,XX,inv(8)(q24.2q13). Chromosome fragility study was negative. Parental chromosomes were normal. Our observation of inv(8)q with HOS and diaphragmatic hernia may indicate genetic heterogeneity with this condition. Regulation of morphogenesis is likely under the control of a hierarchy of genes; multiple loci for conditions such as HOS would not be surprising.

  12. Patient management.

    PubMed

    Guptill, Lynn

    2015-03-01

    Hospital-associated infections, including those caused by zoonotic agents, represent an increasing concern in veterinary practice. Veterinarians and hospital staff are obligated and expected to provide education about and protection from transmission of pathogens among animal patients and between animal patients and human beings (eg, veterinary staff, volunteers, owners) who come into contact with infected animals. Patient management involves assessing risks of pathogen transmission, identification of animals either suspected of or proved to be infected with a transmissible infectious disease agent, and the implementation of measures that minimize the likelihood of transmission of the infectious agent.

  13. Patient Empowerment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chat Social Home FAQ Start Here Learn About Kidney Cancer Guidelines for Patients Statistics and Survival Data (NIH) Cancer Term Dictionary (NCI) Surgery for Kidney Cancer Print Surgery Information Therapies for Advanced Kidney Cancer ...

  14. Patient passport.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    This article outlines the development, testing and evaluation of a patient passport designed specifically for people with severe asthma, who often prefer to self-manage rather than attend emergency services, and thereby put their lives at risk.

  15. Patient Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In photo above, the electrocardiogram of a hospitalized patient is being transmitted by telemetry. Widely employed in space operations, telemetry is a process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where the signals are reconverted to usable information. In this instance, heart readings are picked up by the electrode attached to the patient's body and delivered by wire to the small box shown, which is a telemetry transmitter. The signals are relayed wirelessly to the console in the background, which converts them to EKG data. The data is displayed visually and recorded on a printout; at the same time, it is transmitted to a central control station (upper photo) where a nurse can monitor the condition of several patients simultaneously. The Patient Monitoring System was developed by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, in conjunction with Abbott Medical Electronics, Houston, Texas. In developing the system, SCI drew upon its extensive experience as a NASA contractor. The company applied telemetry technology developed for the Saturn launch vehicle and the Apollo spacecraft; instrumentation technology developed for heart, blood pressure and sleep monitoring of astronauts aboard NASA's Skylab long duration space station; and communications technology developed for the Space Shuttle.

  16. The U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command 2008 in Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    HOS Bluewater, MV HOS Silverstar and MV HOS Gemstone provided deep submergence rescue and submarine escort support services for the Navy’s submarine...Submarine and Special Warfare Support Ships - 7 MV C-Champion MV C-Commando MV Dolores Chouest MV HOS Bluewater MV HOS Gemstone MV HOS Greystone MV

  17. Patient lifts.

    PubMed

    1990-03-01

    In this issue, we evaluate conventional patient lifts that operate by hand cranking, hand pumping, or battery-powered motors and are intended for use in the home or in institutions. We did not evaluate lifts that are designed to be used solely in bathrooms or vehicles or those that permanently affix to walls, floors or ceilings. Some of the evaluated lifts are intended primarily for use in specific environments (e.g., one can be easily disassembled into small components for automobile transport). We evaluated 15 patient lifts from eight manufacturers, basing our ratings on performance, safety, and human factors design. Because different designs make lifts preferable for different environments, we rated the lifts for both home and institutional use based on their size, ruggedness, ease of storage, maneuverability, and cost. Seven units-the Arjo 218150; the Handi-Move 1200; the Hoyer C-CBL; the Invacare 9901, 9916 and 9917; and the Porto-Lift PL-1 are rated Acceptable for both home and institutional use. The Trans-Aid S1-600 and the Versa Lift are rated Acceptable for institutional use and Acceptable-Not Recommended for home use because of their size and cost. The Arjo B and the Hoyer Travel Lift are rated Acceptable for home use and Acceptable-Not Recommended for institutional use because they will not comfortably accommodate patients of all sizes; the Arjo B has additional limitations. The Hoyer C-HLA, the Invacare 9902, and the Trans-Aid LAT-2 are rated Conditionally Acceptable for home use on the condition that they are not used to transfer patients who weigh more than 200 lb; all three units are rated Conditionally Acceptable-Not Recommended for institutional use since there is no reliable way to ensure that they will not be used on heavier patients. The Century C-3 lift is rated Conditionally Acceptable for institutional use on the condition that it is used with the base fully extended; because the fully extended base makes the unit awkward to maneuver in

  18. [Patient advice].

    PubMed

    Lucio-Villegas Menéndez, M Eulalia; González, Laura López; Gutiérrez Pérez, M Isabel; Lluch, Natalia Aresté; Morató Agustí, M Luisa; Cachafeiro, Santiago Pérez

    2014-05-01

    In wound care, knowing what to do is as important as knowing what not to do. The first step is to evaluate the severity of the lesion and to know whether it is necessary to attend a health center or not. If the wound is simple, the recommended course of action is cleansing with serum or water after washing one's hands, followed by wound disinfection with the most appropriate antiseptic. Antiseptics not should be used for wound cleansing (physiological serum or tap water should be used) or for wound healing with granulation tissue. Equally, antiseptics should not be used in the ear or near the eyes; if there is accidental application, the eye should be washed in abundant water. Povidone iodine should not be used in pregnant women, nor should iodine preparations be used in neonates, in patients with thyroid alterations or in those allergic to iodine. Currently, merbromine/mercurochrome is not used because of its mercury content. Before an antiseptic is applied, all inorganic residues (foreign bodies) and dead tissue should be removed; detritus, slough, purulent exudate, scabs… This will aid healing and the action of antiseptics, since they become inactive in the presence of organic material.

  19. An algorithm for space-time block code classification using higher-order statistics (HOS).

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenjun; Zhang, Limin; Ling, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel algorithm for space-time block code classification, when a single antenna is employed at the receiver. The algorithm exploits the discriminating features provided by the higher-order cumulants of the received signal. It does not require estimation of channel and information of the noise. Computer simulations are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm. The results show the performance of the algorithm is good.

  20. 76 FR 30232 - Hours of Service (HOS) of Drivers; Application of American Pyrotechnics Association (APA) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... exemption from FMCSA's regulation that drivers of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) may not drive after the.... These drivers would not be allowed to drive after accumulating a total of 14 hours of on- duty time, following 10 consecutive hours off duty, and would continue to be subject to the 11-hour driving time limit...

  1. HOS network-based classification of power quality events via regression algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares Salas, José Carlos; González de la Rosa, Juan José; Sierra Fernández, José María; Pérez, Agustín Agüera

    2015-12-01

    This work compares seven regression algorithms implemented in artificial neural networks (ANNs) supported by 14 power-quality features, which are based in higher-order statistics. Combining time and frequency domain estimators to deal with non-stationary measurement sequences, the final goal of the system is the implementation in the future smart grid to guarantee compatibility between all equipment connected. The principal results are based in spectral kurtosis measurements, which easily adapt to the impulsive nature of the power quality events. These results verify that the proposed technique is capable of offering interesting results for power quality (PQ) disturbance classification. The best results are obtained using radial basis networks, generalized regression, and multilayer perceptron, mainly due to the non-linear nature of data.

  2. Materials Data on HoS2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. 77 FR 38378 - Hours of Service (HOS) of Drivers; Revision of Exemption; American Pyrotechnics Association (APA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... 029329 34. Pyro Spectaculars North, Inc.... 5301 Lang Avenue McClellan, CA 95652......... 1671438 35... Mile Azle Rd...... Fort Worth, TX 76135........ 0116910 6. B.J. Alan Company 555 Martin Luther King, Jr...... 4300 Logan Lancaster Rd..... Lancaster, OH 395079 22. Hi-Tech FX, LLC 1135 Ave. I Fort Madison,...

  4. 76 FR 37880 - Hours of Service (HOS) of Drivers; Granting of Exemption; American Pyrotechnics Association (APA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    .... Pyro Spectaculars North, Inc.. 5301 Lang Avenue, 1671438 McClellan, CA 95652. 8. Pyrotechnic Display... Extravaganza........ 58 Maple Lane, 2064141 Otisville, NY 10963. 5. Hi-Tech FX, LLC 1135 Ave. I, Fort...

  5. Materials Data on HOs6C18S2O19 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-06-01

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on HOs3C10ClO10 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Signal transduction and downregulation of C-MET in HGF stimulated low and highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Knut; Ducommun, Pascal; Sabile, Adam A; Pedersen, Else-Marie; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-09-04

    The poor outcome of osteosarcoma (OS), particularly in patients with metastatic disease and a five-year survival rate of only 20%, asks for more effective therapeutic strategies targeting malignancy-promoting mechanisms. Dysregulation of C-MET, its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the fusion oncogene product TPR-MET, first identified in human MNNG-HOS OS cells, have been described as cancer-causing factors in human cancers. Here, the expression of these molecules at the mRNA and the protein level and of HGF-stimulated signaling and downregulation of C-MET was compared in the parental low metastatic HOS and MG63 cell lines and the respective highly metastatic MNNG-HOS and 143B and the MG63-M6 and MG63-M8 sublines. Interestingly, expression of TPR-MET was only observed in MNNG-HOS cells. HGF stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 in all cell lines investigated, but phospho-Stat3 remained at basal levels. Downregulation of HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation was much faster in the HGF expressing MG63-M8 cells than in HOS cells. Degradation of HGF-activated C-MET occurred predominantly through the proteasomal and to a lesser extent the lysosomal pathway in the cell lines investigated. Thus, HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 signaling as well as proteasomal degradation of HGF activated C-MET are potential therapeutic targets in OS.

  8. Validation of the Spanish version of the Hip Outcome Score: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Seijas, Roberto; Sallent, Andrea; Ruiz-Ibán, Miguel Angel; Ares, Oscar; Marín-Peña, Oliver; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Muriel, Alfonso

    2014-05-13

    The Hip Outcome Score (HOS) is a self-reported questionnaire evaluating the outcomes of treatment interventions for hip pathologies, divided in 19 items of activities of daily life (ADL) and 9 sports' items. The aim of the present study is to translate and validate HOS into Spanish. A prospective and multicenter study with 100 patients undergoing hip arthroscopy was performed between June 2012 and January 2013. Crosscultural adaptation was used to translate HOS into Spanish. Patients completed the questionnaire before and after surgery. Feasibility, reliability, internal consistency, construct validity (correlation with Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index), ceiling and floor effects and sensitivity to change were assessed for the present study. Mean age was 45.05 years old. 36 women and 64 men were included. Feasibility: 13% had at least one missing item within the ADL subscale and 17% within the sport subscale. Reliability: the translated version of HOS was highly reproducible with intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95 for ADL and 0.94 for the sports subscale. Internal consistency was confirmed with Cronbach's alpha >0.90 in both subscales. Construct validity showed statistically significant correlation with WOMAC. Ceiling effect was observed in 6% and 12% for ADL and sports subscale, respectively. Floor effect was found in 3% and 37% ADL and sports subscale, respectively. Large sensitivity to change was shown in both subscales. The translated version of HOS into Spanish has shown to be feasible, reliable and sensible to changes for patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. This validated translation of HOS allows for comparisons between studies involving either Spanish- or English-speaking patients. Prognostic study, Level I.

  9. Validation of the Spanish version of the hip outcome score: a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Hip Outcome Score (HOS) is a self-reported questionnaire evaluating the outcomes of treatment interventions for hip pathologies, divided in 19 items of activities of daily life (ADL) and 9 sports’ items. The aim of the present study is to translate and validate HOS into Spanish. Methods A prospective and multicenter study with 100 patients undergoing hip arthroscopy was performed between June 2012 and January 2013. Crosscultural adaptation was used to translate HOS into Spanish. Patients completed the questionnaire before and after surgery. Feasibility, reliability, internal consistency, construct validity (correlation with Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index), ceiling and floor effects and sensitivity to change were assessed for the present study. Results Mean age was 45.05 years old. 36 women and 64 men were included. Feasibility: 13% had at least one missing item within the ADL subscale and 17% within the sport subscale. Reliability: the translated version of HOS was highly reproducible with intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95 for ADL and 0.94 for the sports subscale. Internal consistency was confirmed with Cronbach’s alpha >0.90 in both subscales. Construct validity showed statistically significant correlation with WOMAC. Ceiling effect was observed in 6% and 12% for ADL and sports subscale, respectively. Floor effect was found in 3% and 37% ADL and sports subscale, respectively. Large sensitivity to change was shown in both subscales. Conclusion The translated version of HOS into Spanish has shown to be feasible, reliable and sensible to changes for patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. This validated translation of HOS allows for comparisons between studies involving either Spanish- or English-speaking patients. Level of evidence Prognostic study, Level I PMID:24884511

  10. Psychometric Evaluation of the Lower Extremity Computerized Adaptive Test, the Modified Harris Hip Score, and the Hip Outcome Score

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Man; Hon, Shirley D.; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D.; Aoki, Stephen K.; Anderson, Mike B.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Peters, Christopher L.; Pelt, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The applicability and validity of many patient-reported outcome measures in the high-functioning population are not well understood. Purpose: To compare the psychometric properties of the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), the Hip Outcome Score activities of daily living subscale (HOS-ADL) and sports (HOS-sports), and the Lower Extremity Computerized Adaptive Test (LE CAT). The hypotheses was that all instruments would perform well but that the LE CAT would show superiority psychometrically because a combination of CAT and a large item bank allows for a high degree of measurement precision. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Data were collected from 472 advanced-age, active participants from the Huntsman World Senior Games in 2012. Validity evidences were examined through item fit, dimensionality, monotonicity, local independence, differential item functioning, person raw score to measure correlation, and instrument coverage (ie, ceiling and floor effects), and reliability evidences were examined through Cronbach alpha and person separation index. Results: All instruments demonstrated good item fit, unidimensionality, monotonicity, local independence, and person raw score to measure correlations. The HOS-ADL had high ceiling effects of 36.02%, and the mHHS had ceiling effects of 27.54%. The LE CAT had ceiling effects of 8.47%, and the HOS-sports had no ceiling effects. None of the instruments had any floor effects. The mHHS had a very low Cronbach alpha of 0.41 and an extremely low person separation index of 0.08. Reliabilities for the LE CAT were excellent and for the HOS-ADL and HOS-sports were good. Conclusion: The LE CAT showed better psychometric properties overall than the HOS-ADL, HOS-sports, and mHHS for the senior population. The mHHS demonstrated pronounced ceiling effects and poor reliabilities that should be of concern. The high ceiling effects for the HOS-ADL were also of concern. The LE CAT was superior

  11. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    PubMed

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  12. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction.

  13. Pharmacist-Patient Interaction and Patient Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSimone, Edward M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The nature of the professional interaction between the pharmacist and the patient was explored, with data collected from 3,743 questions asked of 16 pharmacists during an 8-week period. Factors that might affect the nature of the pharmacist-patient interaction are identified along with a cognitive-based profile of patient wants. (LBH)

  14. Counseling the Coronary Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmler, Caryl; Semmler, Maynard

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses counseling sessions designed to a) help the coronary patient adjust to cardiovascular disease, b) diminish patient anxieties and fears, and c) educate the patient and family members on controlling risk factors to deter another coronary attack. (JS)

  15. Counseling the Coronary Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmler, Caryl; Semmler, Maynard

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses counseling sessions designed to a) help the coronary patient adjust to cardiovascular disease, b) diminish patient anxieties and fears, and c) educate the patient and family members on controlling risk factors to deter another coronary attack. (JS)

  16. Physician accountability, patient safety and patient compensation.

    PubMed

    Gray, John E

    2006-01-01

    In Canada, the response to adverse medical events follows one or more of three main paths: patient safety, physician accountability and patient compensation. While their goals differ, each of these responses serves a valuable function. There are however competing imperatives inherent in each response, particularly in terms of information disclosure: Effective patient safety depends on the full and protected disclosure of all information relevant to an adverse event and requires a "no blame" environment. While natural justice demands that a physician be held accountable for his actions, the doctor should be accorded the right of due process and be judged against an established standard of care. This is necessarily a fault-finding activity. Patient compensation meets both accountability demands and the social justice imperatives of supporting a patient injured through physician negligence. The most effective approach is one that achieves balance between competing imperatives. With clear information disclosure rules, patient safety, physician accountability and patient compensation can operate synergistically.

  17. [Patient education in France].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Dominique

    2011-10-01

    Patient education is an increasingly important component of therapeutic strategies, especially for chronic illnesses, which currently affect about 12% of the French population and will undoubtedly increase in coming years. Patient education aims to enhance patients' personal responsibility and participation in their therapeutic management and quality of life. Article 84 of French health legislation passed in 2009 inscribes patient education in the Public Health Code for the first time. It distinguishes personalized therapeutic education, patient accompaniment, and learning programs. Direct links between patients and drug companies are prohibited. However, the notion of patient accompaniment remains to be defined, along with the evaluation of patient education, funding sources and practical modalities.

  18. 'Patient satisfaction' in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skarstein, Jon; Dahl, Alv A; Laading, Jacob; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-01-01

    Predictors of 'patient satisfaction' with hospitalization at a specialized cancer hospital in Norway are examined in this study. Two weeks after their last hospitalization, 2021 consecutive cancer patients were invited to rate their satisfaction with hospitalization, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Compliance rate was 72% (n = 1453). Cut-off levels separating dissatisfied from satisfied patients were defined. It was found that 92% of the patients were satisfied with their stay in hospital, independent of cancer type and number of previous admissions. Performance of nurses and physicians, level of information perceived, outcome of health status, reception at the hospital and anxiety independently predicted 'patient satisfaction'. The model explained 35% of the variance with an area under the curve of 0.76 of the Receiver Operator Curve. Cancer patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay was high, and predicted by four independently predictive variables related to the performance of caregivers. These suggest areas for further improvement in the healthcare service.

  19. Patient hand hygiene practices in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ardizzone, Laura L; Smolowitz, Janice; Kline, Nancy; Thom, Bridgette; Larson, Elaine L

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the hand hygiene practices of surgical patients. Most of the research has been directed at the health care worker, and this may discount the role that hand hygiene of the surgical patient might play in surgical site infections. A quasiexperimental, pretest/post-test study was conducted in which patients (n = 72) and nurses (n = 42) were interviewed to examine perceptions and knowledge about patient hand hygiene. Concurrently, observations were conducted to determine whether surgical patients were offered assistance by the nursing staff. Following an initial observation period, nursing staff received an educational session regarding general hand hygiene information and observation results. One month after the education session, patient/nurse dyads were observed for an additional 6 weeks to determine the impact of the educational intervention. Eighty observations, 72 patient interviews, and 42 nurse interviews were completed preintervention, and 83 observations were completed postintervention. In response to the survey, more than half of patients (n = 41, 55%) reported that they were not offered the opportunity to clean their hands, but a majority of the nursing staff reported (n = 25, 60%) that they offered patients the opportunity to clean their hands. Prior to the educational intervention, nursing staff assisted patients in 14 of 81 hand hygiene opportunities. Following the intervention, nursing staff assisted patients 37 out of 83 opportunities (17.3% vs 44.6%, respectively, [χ(2)1 = 13.008, P = .0003]). This study suggests that efforts to increase hand hygiene should be directed toward patients as well as health care workers. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of centre-edge angle on clinical and quality of life outcomes after arthroscopic acetabular labral debridement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziying; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Yunxia; Li, Hong; Chen, Jiwu

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical and quality of life outcomes following arthroscopic acetabular labral debridement between patients with different centre-edge (CE) angle. A total of 79 patients who underwent hip labral debridement were enrolled in this study. Radiographic measurements of CE angle were collected, and patients were assigned into a normal group (25° < CE angle <40°, n = 68) and dysplasia group (CE angle <20°, n = 11). Clinical outcomes were evaluated by modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score (HOS) for activities of daily living (ADL) and sports and Short Form 12 (SF-12). At the final follow-up, the normal group showed significant improvements in mHHS, HOS (ADL and sports) and SF-12 (P < 0.05). However, the dysplasia group revealed significant improvements in mHHS, HOS (ADL) and SF-12 physical component summary (PCS) (P < 0.05) and no significant changes in HOS sports and SF-12 mental component summary (MCS) (P > 0.05). Additionally, there was a greater improvement in clinical scores post-operatively in the normal group compared with the dysplasia group (P < 0.05). Arthroscopic acetabular labral debridement resulted in significantly greater clinical and quality of life outcomes in patients with CE angle >25° compared with patients with CE angle < 20°.

  1. Helping patients stop smoking.

    PubMed

    Ferentz, K S; Valente, C M

    1994-01-01

    As more patients seek treatment for nicotine addiction, physicians must become adept at counseling patients on how to quit. Several simple behavioral modification techniques are available to help patients stop smoking, and these techniques can be incorporated into any busy practice. Any patient encounter can be used to inform patients of the dangers of smoking and to tell them to quit. Patients can be offered nicotine replacement therapy, although the long-term benefit is still unknown. Helping patients to quit is a rewarding process.

  2. Signal transduction and downregulation of C-MET in HGF stimulated low and highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Husmann, Knut; Ducommun, Pascal; Sabile, Adam A.; Pedersen, Else-Marie; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-09-04

    The poor outcome of osteosarcoma (OS), particularly in patients with metastatic disease and a five-year survival rate of only 20%, asks for more effective therapeutic strategies targeting malignancy-promoting mechanisms. Dysregulation of C-MET, its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the fusion oncogene product TPR-MET, first identified in human MNNG-HOS OS cells, have been described as cancer-causing factors in human cancers. Here, the expression of these molecules at the mRNA and the protein level and of HGF-stimulated signaling and downregulation of C-MET was compared in the parental low metastatic HOS and MG63 cell lines and the respective highly metastatic MNNG-HOS and 143B and the MG63-M6 and MG63-M8 sublines. Interestingly, expression of TPR-MET was only observed in MNNG-HOS cells. HGF stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 in all cell lines investigated, but phospho-Stat3 remained at basal levels. Downregulation of HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation was much faster in the HGF expressing MG63-M8 cells than in HOS cells. Degradation of HGF-activated C-MET occurred predominantly through the proteasomal and to a lesser extent the lysosomal pathway in the cell lines investigated. Thus, HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 signaling as well as proteasomal degradation of HGF activated C-MET are potential therapeutic targets in OS. - Highlights: • Expression of TPR-MET was only observed in MNNG-HOS cells. • HGF stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 but not of Stat3 in osteosarcoma cell lines. • Degradation of HGF-activated C-MET occurred predominantly through the proteasomal pathway.

  3. The U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command 2009 in Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    MV HOS Gemstone provided submarine escort support services for the Navy’s submarine forces. MV HOS Black Powder and MV HOSWestwind were substituted...Chouest MV HOS Gemstone MV HOS Silverstar MV HOS Westwind Oceanographic Survey Ships - 7 USNS Bowditch (T-AGS 62) USNS Bruce C. Heezen (T-AGS 64) USNS

  4. Mucormycosis in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cocanour, C S; Miller-Crotchett, P; Reed, R L; Johnson, P C; Fischer, R P

    1992-01-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare but often fatal infection in trauma patients. We retrospectively reviewed a 9-year experience with mucormycosis among injured patients. Eleven patients had biopsy- or culture-proven mucormycosis. Nine patients were victims of blunt trauma, two patients had burns measuring greater than 50% TBSA. No patient was at increased risk because of underlying disease or immunosuppression prior to injury. All 11 patients had open wounds on admission. Four patients died of mucormycosis. All nonsurvivors had phycomycotic gangrenous cellulitis of the head, the trunk, or both. In contrast, survivors had involvement of only the extremities. Because of underlying disease, contaminating wounds, antibiotic use, or immunocompromise secondary to shock and sepsis, trauma patients are at risk of developing mucormycosis. To successfully treat mucormycosis, diagnosis must be prompt and accompanied by aggressive debridement and parenteral administration of amphotericin B.

  5. Patient Satisfaction by Design.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Karen

    2016-11-01

    The concept of the patient experience as it relates to patient satisfaction is a complex dynamic. It is a dynamic that is becoming increasingly more important as patients are faced with multiple choices for their hearing and balance care. As reimbursement and performance policies have become more normative within health care, patient satisfaction has become a metric to measure quality. Patient satisfaction is no longer contained to just the interaction with the audiologist. It extends to the entire experience-the staff, the service, the product, and other factors. Many practices fail to capitalize on one of the primary components of the patient experience-office design. This article discusses the role of evidence-based design in facility planning as it relates to patient satisfaction. It will illustrate how design principles and ideal attributes may be used to send conscious and subconscious cues that will motivate staff, facilitate patient-centered care, and ultimately increase patient satisfaction.

  6. The Angry Dying Patient.

    PubMed

    Houston, Robert E.

    1999-02-01

    Over 25 years ago, Kubler-Ross identified anger as a predictable part of the dying process. When the dying patient becomes angry in the clinical setting, all types of communication become strained. Physicians can help the angry dying patient through this difficult time by using 10 rules of engagement. When physicians engage and empathize with these patients, they improve the patient's response to pain and they reduce patient suffering. When physicians educate patients on their normal responses to dying and enlist them in the process of family reconciliation, they can impact the end-of-life experience in a positive way.

  7. Managing patient expectations.

    PubMed

    Gladfelter, Joanne P

    2006-01-01

    Nurses and physicians are the leading advocates of patient education and patient safety. They believe that the more knowledge and understanding patients have about the procedures they are about to undertake, the better their expectations and recovery will be. Even though efforts are taken to ensure that patients have been adequately informed about risks, complications, and expectations, evaluation of patient comprehension and understanding remains difficult. Verbal information re-enforced by repetition, written text, and a signed consent do not ensure an accurate or adequate means of truly evaluating patient knowledge, understanding, or expectations.

  8. Cirrhosis: A Patient's Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... ZIP code here Cirrhosis: A Patient's Guide for Health Care Providers Cirrhosis: A Patient's Guide March 2007 Contents ... how best to treat it. What will your health care provider do about cirrhosis? People with cirrhosis need ...

  9. Repositioning the Patient:

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Summary This article explores how and why the patient came to be repositioned as a political actor within British health care during the 1960s and 1970s. Focusing on the role played by patient organizations, it is suggested that the repositioning of the patient needs to be seen in the light of growing demands for greater patient autonomy and the application of consumerist principles to health. Examining the activities of two patient groups—the National Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (NAWCH) and the Patients Association (PA)—indicates that while such groups undoubtedly placed more emphasis on individual autonomy, collective concerns did not entirely fall away. The voices of patients, as well as the patient, continued to matter within British health care. PMID:23811711

  10. Managing patients with encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Matata, Claire; Easton, Ava; Michael, Benedict; Evans, Becky; Ward, Deborah; Solomon, Tom; Kneen, Rachel

    2015-11-11

    This article provides an overview of encephalitis and addresses its diagnosis, some of the common presenting signs and symptoms, and the different aspects of nursing care required for these patients. In particular, it addresses how to explain encephalitis to the patient's relatives, the rehabilitation needs of these patients, and important aspects of discharge planning. Tests that are necessary for diagnosis in patients with suspected encephalitis and the importance of these are explained.

  11. Can "patient keeper" help in-patients?

    PubMed

    Al-Hinnawi, M F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present our "Patient Keeper" application, which is a client-server medical application. "Patient Keeper" is designed to run on a mobile phone for the client application and on a PC for the server application using J2ME and JAVA2, respectively. This application can help doctors during visits to their patients in hospitals. The client application allows doctors to store on their mobile phones the results of their diagnoses and findings such as temperature, blood pressure, medications, analysis, etc., and send this information to the server via short message service (SMS) for storage in a database. The server can also respond to any request from the client and send the result via Bluetooth, infrared, or over the air. Experimental results showed a significant improvement of the healthcare delivery and reduction for in-patient stay.

  12. Resocializing Aged Mental Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Stewart; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A special project for aged, hospitalized mental patients, drawing on home economics skills in a team approach to rehabilitation, provides skills training leading to patients' increased capacity for self-care, helps patients transfer from the hospital to some form of community life, and provides follow-up services. (Author/AJ)

  13. Does patient satisfaction affect patient loyalty?

    PubMed

    Kessler, Daniel P; Mylod, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate how patient satisfaction affects propensity to return, i.e. loyalty. Data from 678 hospitals were matched using three sources. Patient satisfaction data were obtained from Press Ganey Associates, a leading survey firm; process-based quality measures and hospital characteristics (such as ownership and teaching status) and geographic areas were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The frequency with which end-of-life patients return to seek treatment at the same hospital was obtained from the Dartmouth Atlas. The study uses regression analysis to estimate satisfaction's effects on patient loyalty, while holding process-based quality measures and hospital and market characteristics constant. There is a statistically significant link between satisfaction and loyalty. Although satisfaction's effect overall is relatively small, contentment with certain hospitalization experience may be important. The link between satisfaction and loyalty is weaker for high-satisfaction hospitals, consistent with other studies in the marketing literature. RESEARCH LIMITATION/IMPLICATIONS: The US hospitals analyzed are not a random sample; the results are most applicable to large, non-profit teaching hospitals in competitive markets. Satisfaction ratings have business implications for healthcare providers and may be useful as a management tool for private and public purchasers. The paper is the first to show that patient satisfaction affects actual hospital choices in a large sample. Because patient satisfaction ratings are also correlated with other quality measures, the findings suggest a pathway through which individuals naturally gravitate toward higher-quality care.

  14. Patient blood management equals patient safety.

    PubMed

    Zacharowski, Kai; Spahn, Donat R

    2016-06-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) can be defined in many ways and may consist of hundreds of single measures to improve patient safety. Traditionally, PBM is based on three pillars and defined as (i) optimization of the endogenous red blood cell (RBC) mass through the targeted stimulation of erythropoiesis and the treatment of modifiable underlying disorders; (ii) minimization of diagnostic, interventional, and surgical blood loss to preserve the patient's RBC mass; and (iii) optimization of the patient-specific tolerance to anemia through strict adherence to physiological transfusion thresholds [1-4]. However, for this review, we have chosen the following three peri-interventional parts: (1) diagnosis and therapy of anemia, (2) optimal hemotherapy, and (3) minimization of hospital-acquired anemia. PBM is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary preventive, and therapeutic approach focusing each patient. The PBM concept involves the use of safe and effective medical and surgical methods and techniques designed to prevent peri-interventional anemia, rationalize use of blood products, and set good blood management measures in an effort to improve patient safety and outcome.

  15. Patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Salama-Hanna, Joseph; Chen, Grace

    2013-11-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic pain is important because it may lead to multidisciplinary preoperative treatment of patients' pain and a multimodal analgesia plan for effective pain control. Preoperative multidisciplinary management of chronic pain and comorbid conditions, such as depression, anxiety, deconditioning, and opioid tolerance, can improve patient satisfaction and surgical recovery. Multimodal analgesia using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies shifts the burden of analgesia away from simply increasing opioid dosing. In more complicated chronic pain patients, multidisciplinary treatment, including pain psychology, physical therapy, judicious medication management, and minimally invasive interventions by pain specialists, can improve patients' satisfaction and surgical outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Amputation in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurjit; Chawla, S

    2006-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their complications are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes. The present study examines the amputation risk criterion and the long term outcome in terms of amputations and mortality in patients with diabetic foot. 27 patients with diabetic foot lesions were studied. There were 15 patients with early lesions and 10 with advanced lesions. 15 patients were managed conservatively including local amputations and 12 with lower extremity amputations. 80% patients were males in 45-59 years of age group and all patients had more than 6 years of poorly controlled diabetes. Precipitating factors included walking barefoot, history of minor trauma, infection, callosities or burns in 86% of patients. Major lower limb amputations were common in irregularly treated, poorly controlled diabetics due to infection in a limb devitalized by angiopathy and desensitised by neuropathy. Diabetic foot ulcers are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Mortality was higher in ischaemic ulcers than neuropathic ulcers.

  17. Patient-centered Care.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1).

  18. Patient-centered Communication

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Sara L; Buell, Stephanie; Zettler, Patti; White, Martha; Ruston, Delaney C; Lo, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate patient preferences for a patient-centered or a biomedical communication style. DESIGN Randomized study. SETTING Urgent care and ambulatory medicine clinics in an academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS We recruited 250 English-speaking adult patients, excluding patients whose medical illnesses prevented evaluation of the study intervention. INTERVENTION Participants watched one of three videotaped scenarios of simulated patient-physician discussions of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Each participant watched two versions of the scenario (biomedical vs. patient-centered communication style) and completed written and oral questionnaires to assess outcome measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Main outcome measures were 1) preferences for a patient-centered versus a biomedical communication style; and 2) predictors of communication style preference. Participants who preferred the patient-centered style (69%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 63 to 75) tended to be younger (82%[51/62] for age < 30; 68%[100/148] for ages 30–59; 55%[21/38] for age > 59; P < .03), more educated (76%[54/71] for postcollege education; 73%[94/128] for some college; 49%[23/47] for high school only; P = .003), use CAM (75%[140/188] vs. 55%[33/60] for nonusers; P = .006), and have a patient-centered physician (88%[74/84] vs. 30%[16/54] for those with a biomedical physician; P < .0001). On multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with preferring the patient-centered style included younger age, use of herbal CAM, having a patient-centered physician, and rating a “doctor's interest in you as a person” as “very important.” CONCLUSIONS Given that a significant proportion of patients prefer a biomedical communication style, practicing physicians and medical educators should strive for flexible approaches to physician-patient communication. PMID:15566435

  19. Patient-doctor communication.

    PubMed

    Teutsch, Carol

    2003-09-01

    Communication is an important component of patient care. Traditionally, communication in medical school curricula was incorporated informally as part of rounds and faculty feedback, but without a specific or intense focus on skills of communicating per se. The reliability and consistency of this teaching method left gaps, which are currently getting increased attention from medical schools and accreditation organizations. There is also increased interest in researching patient-doctor communication and recognizing the need to teach and measure this specific clinical skill. In 1999, the Accreditation of Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented a requirement for accreditation for residency programs that focuses on "interpersonal and communications skills that result in effective information exchange and teaming with patients, their families, and other health professionals." The National Board of Medical Examiners, Federation of State Medical Boards. and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates have proposed an examination between the. third and fourth year of medical school that "requires students to demonstrate they can gather information from patients, perform a physical examination, and communicate their findings to patients and colleagues" using standardized patients. One's efficiency and effectiveness in communication can be improved through training, but it is unlikely that any future advances will negate the need and value of compassionate and empathetic two-way communication between clinician and patient. The published literature also expresses belief in the essential role of communication. "It has long been recognized that difficulties in the effective delivery of health care can arise from problems in communication between patient and provider rather than from any failing in the technical aspects of medical care. Improvements in provider-patient communication can have beneficial effects on health outcomes". A systematic review of

  20. Why measure patient satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Riskind, Patty; Fossey, Leslie; Brill, Kari

    2011-01-01

    A practice that consistently and continuously measures patient perceptions will be more efficient and effective in its daily operations. With pay-for-performance requirements on the horizon and consumer rating sites already publicizing impressions from physician encounters, a practice needs to know how it is performing through the eyes of the patients. Azalea Orthopedics has used patient feedback to coach its physicians on better patient communication. The Orthopaedic Institute has used patient satisfaction results to reduce wait times and measure the return on investment from its marketing efforts. Patient survey results that are put to work can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of practice operations as well as position the practice for increased profitability.

  1. Multicenter Patient Records Research

    PubMed Central

    Behlen, Fred M.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    The expanding health information infrastructure offers the promise of new medical knowledge drawn from patient records. Such promise will never be fulfilled, however, unless researchers first address policy issues regarding the rights and interests of both the patients and the institutions who hold their records. In this article, the authors analyze the interests of patients and institutions in light of public policy and institutional needs. They conclude that the multicenter study, with Institutional Review Board approval of each study at each site, protects the interests of both. “Anonymity” is no panacea, since patient records are so rich in information that they can never be truly anonymous. Researchers must earn and respect the trust of the public, as responsible stewards of facts about patients' lives. The authors find that computer security tools are needed to administer multicenter patient records studies and describe simple approaches that can be implemented using commercial database products. PMID:10579601

  2. UAVs and Patient Movement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    determining factor and is often the deciding element between life and death. An examination of the evolution of patient movement to make the case...AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY UAVs and PATIENT MOVEMENT by Brian R Blanchard, Major, USAF Doctor...depth look at the evolution of patient movement and the utilization of advanced technologies from to ultimately decrease the time to care. Future

  3. The Anxious Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Werner M.

    1965-01-01

    Anxiety appears in many disguises and mimics most other afflictions. Once the anxious patient has been recognized as such and a proper diagnosis is made, management of him is easily carried out within the framework of the medical transaction. Lack of awareness of underlying anxiety in a patient who presents with somatic complaints can lead to poor results for the patient and frustration for the physician. It is not the physician's role to remove all anxiety. Rather, it is his mission to manage the anxious patient so as to mediate the anxiety allowing for integrated adaptive function. PMID:14254966

  4. Histoplasmosis in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, C A; Israel, K S; Smith, J W; White, A C; Schwarz, J; Brooks, G F

    1978-06-01

    Infection with Histoplasma capsulatum in 58 patients whose immune responses were suppressed (Immunosuppressed patients) (16 from the present series and 42 described previously) was analyzed. The most common underlying diseases were Hodgkin's disease (29 per cent), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (19 per cent) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (17 per cent). Sixty-three per cent of the patients had received cytotoxic drugs, and 57 per cent had taken corticosteroids. Widely disseminated infection occurred in 88 per cent of the patients, with predominant involvement of lungs and organs of the reticuloendothelial system. Localized pulmonary infection was present in the remaining patients. The most useful diagnostic method was bone marrow biopsy with microscopic examination for the intracellular yeast form of H. capsulatum. Biopsy of oral lesions, lung, liver and lymph node also proved diagnostically helpful. Growth of H. capsulatum in culture was frequently too slow to be beneficial in diagnosing histoplasmosis in ill patients. Serologic methods were of little diagnostic help in this population of immunosuppressed patients. The response to amphotericin B therapy was excellent (6.7 per cent mortality rate) in those patients in whom the diagnosis was established early and in whom a full course of antifungal therapy could be given. In contrast, the mortality rate in patients who received no antifungal therapy or less than 1 g of amphotericin B was 100 per cent.

  5. [Therapeutic patient education revisited].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Juan

    2014-06-04

    The therapeutic patient education is an absolute necessity in the management of chronic diseases including diabetes. This discipline promotes personal autonomy to live optimally, to achieve personal and professional projects, despite the constraints of the disease and treatments. The DAWN2 study demonstrates the systemic effects of this disease that goes beyond simple glycemic control. The biopsychosocial dimension needs to be better explored. Other assessment tools should be used to better manage these patients. Exploring the health literacy and numeracy are other tools that can explore the problems for socially disadvantaged patients. The main goal is development of patient capabilities and his environment for the development of the human person.

  6. [Single-patient rooms].

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elisabeth Brøgger

    2009-05-18

    The Danish government has allocated funding to achieve the goal of replacing 50% of all existing hospital buildings by new facilities. Facing such a building boom, the debate for and against single-patient rooms is in progress. A review of the literature shows that single-patient rooms have a direct impact on patient safety. Patient Safety Leadership Walkrounds and failure modes and effects analysis can be used for identifying risks before designing single rooms in future hospitals. The acuity adaptability model needs to be revised.

  7. [Impressibility of schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    Bazhin, E F; Korneva, T V; Lomachenkov, A S

    1978-01-01

    The authors studied the abilities to identify emotional states according to the acustico-phonetical symptoms of speech in 160 schizophrenic patients and 80 normals. These studies were performed with the aid of a specially elaborated tape recorder test. It was established that difficulties in accomplishing these tasks were found in schizophrenic patients with paranoid symptomatology. Patients with other clinical states, including sufficiently expressed specific disturbances in the emotional sphere, extremely subtly differentiated the emotional state of the announcers. These data are considered as proof of preserved impressive abilities in the majority of schizophrenic patients. The significance of these factors for the organization of psychosocial influences are discussed.

  8. The tourist as patient.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, M

    1975-08-02

    A review is presented of patients, mainly Australians and New Zealanders, who came to Fiji as tourists. One hundred and seven patients were seen in a six-month period in a general practice near Nadi International Airport, and 39 patients were admitted to the medical unit of the nearby Divisional Hospital over a two-year period. Attention is drawn to the need for informed advice to be given to patients about to embark on holidays abroad, and some of the common problems are discussed.

  9. Patient Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Jeannette

    Topics included in this annotated bibliography on patient education are (1) background on development of patient education programs, (2) patient education interventions, (3) references for health professionals, and (4) research and evaluation in patient education. (TA)

  10. Time for patient payment strategies.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Elizabeth M; Madison, Richard D; DeMarco, Tina

    2005-10-01

    A patient payment strategy should have four objectives: Establish equitable and consistent policies and communicate them clearly to patients. Facilitate appropriate payment, regardless of the payer. Increase patients' awareness of their payment options and responsibilities. Enhance patient relations.

  11. The critically ill immunosuppressed patient

    SciTech Connect

    Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H. )

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on the diagnosis and management of immunosuppressed patient. Some of the topics are: life-threatening organ failure in immunosuppressed patients; diagnosis and therapy of respiratory disease in the immunosuppressed patient; CNS complication of immunosuppression; infections; antineoplastic therapy of immunosuppressed patient; radiation therapy-issues in critically ill patient; AIDS; and management of bone marrow transplant patients.

  12. Patient Education Thesaurus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lynn

    This thesaurus was compiled to make the materials in the Patient Education Room of the Donald J. Vincent Medical Library at Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, more accessible to patients. Subjects are grouped in fairly broad categories (e.g., Aging & Problems of Aging; Alcohol & Alcohol Abuse; Careers in the Medical Field; Childhood and…

  13. [Syndrome of recommended patient].

    PubMed

    Sanz Rubiales, A; del Valle Rivero, M L; Flores Pérez, L A; Hernansanz de la Calle, S; García Recio, C; López-Lara Martín, F

    2002-08-01

    "Syndrome of recommended patient" is manifested as the presence of numerous unexpected and unusual complications in patients that the treating physician is trying to give a better assistance. Even assuming that a few complications may appear by chance, there are several factors from daily clinical practice that facilitate the presence of such a syndrome, and some of them can be corrected in order to reduce its incidence. All of them come from the change on daily clinical practice on these patients, as if they do not fit for the attention provided for other people. These factors favouring the presence of this syndrome come from: patients' attitude, inefficient use of health resources, absence of an adequate register of clinical data and change in usual clinical practice on interpretation of diagnostic tests as well as in the indication of treatment of these patients. The best way to prevent this "syndrome of recommended patient" is to maintain, even within these patients, an attitude based on solid clinical knowledge and to follow up the same clinical rules accepted for other patients.

  14. Patient perspectives on quality.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Gillam, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The patient perspective is central to quality improvement. This article describes how health services are involving individuals and the public in improving healthcare. It describes the importance and different methods of accessing patient and carer feedback on satisfaction, experience and outcomes, and explores current thinking on individual involvement, engagement in commissioning, and the role of the public in redesigning health services.

  15. Patient Telmonitoring at Home

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Fraga , M. Lama and J. Vila. “Intelligent telemonitoring of critical care patients,” IEEE Eng. Med. & Biol. Mag., vol. 18, pp. 80-88, July/August...1999. [6] J. Presedo, D. Castro, J. Vila, M. Fernández-Delgado, S. Fraga , M. Lama and S. Barro. “Wireless interface for monitored patients in Coronary

  16. The Patient as Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisser, Roland J.; Medio, Franklin J.

    1985-01-01

    A program of seminars designed to explore student perceptions of the emotional and psychological aspects of physician-patient interactions, part of a clinical diagnosis course, used graduate medical students to act as patients in videotaped interviews, interview evaluations, and lectures and demonstrations on interpersonal communication skills.…

  17. Orthopaedic patient education practice.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sini; Katajisto, Jouko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore orthopaedic nurses' perceptions of patient education practice; the educational skills of a nurse, the content, structure and educational approaches to patient education and its changes during nine years at a university hospital in Finland. The subjects of this survey were orthopaedic nurses at one university hospital - 56 nurses in 2001 and 51 nurses in 2010. On the whole, no statistically significant change had taken place in the nurses' patient education skills in the two periods compared. In 2001, the nurses discussed more often the learning objectives with patients compared to 2010. In both years, individual education sessions and written material were often used. In both years, the bio-physiological area of patient education was found to be dealt with most adequately, while the social area received less attention in 2010 than in 2001. According to our results, no change in a positive direction in nurses' patient education skills and the implementation of patient education can be seen over the past decade. The results of the study indicate clear development needs in patient education practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Patient Assessment Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Dorothy; Rosenaur, Janet Allan

    1974-01-01

    Use of a nursing assessment/patient history tool developed by project faculty at the school of nursing, University of California, San Francisco and used in a primary care clinic assisted nursing students in collecting patient information, making home visits, functioning as team members, recording data, and in defining their nursing role. (EA)

  19. [Malnutrition in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Antoun, Sami; Merad, Mansouriah; Raynard, Bruno; Ruffié, Pierre

    2006-11-30

    Malnutrition is common in cancer patients. Many factors contribute to weight loss: some of them can be related to diminished dietary intake, while others are more associated with metabolic changes induced by systemic inflammatory responses. This is why at a specific phase during the course of development, some cancers will benefit from nutritional support, while in theory, and others will benefit from anti-inflammatory treatment. Parenteral nutrition is indicated for severe malnourished surgical patients and for allogenic stem cell transplant patients. Tube feeding (enteral nutrition) should be considered for patients with a functional gut who are unable to ingest sufficient nutrients orally, for example head and neck cancer patients. The value of dietary counselling and oral nutritional support has not been proven in patients undergoing chemotherapy, which is why it is so difficult to propose recommendations. Some arguments seem to favour parenteral nutrition for patients with bowel obstruction suffering from advanced-stage incurable cancer. As the results of studies following omega-3 fatty acid-enriched oral nutritional support in palliative care patients are inconsistent, these products cannot be recommended.

  20. The right patient.

    PubMed

    Howrigon, Ron

    2012-01-01

    This article offers professional opinions and advice on how physicians should prepare in order to protect themselves and their practices during this turbulent time in healthcare reform. This article presents real-life scenarios to help physicians understand what they may face and what actions they should take in anticipation of the future in healthcare. The article focuses on the concept of "the right patient," defining the characteristics of patients that benefit the financial aspect of a practice and those who do not. Its purpose is not to encourage physicians to deny care to patients who are poorly insured or uninsured, but to guide in the establishment of a smart and safe balance between the two. Strategies are discussed on how to attract the right patient and what these patients mean to the practice. The importance of practice marketing is also highlighted, along with an emphasis on the necessity of change in order to survive in the future healthcare environment.

  1. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  2. Doctor-patient relationship

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    The doctor-patient relationship is an intricate concept in which patients voluntarily approach a doctor and become part of a contract by which they tend to abide by doctor’s instructions. Over recent decades, this relationship has changed dramatically due to privatization and commercialization of the health sector. A review of the relevant literature in the database of MEDLINE published in English between 1966 and August 2015 was performed with the following keywords: doctor-patient relationship, physician-patient relationship, ethics, and Islam. The Muslim doctor should be familiar with the Islamic teachings on the daily issues faced in his/her practice and the relationship with his/her patients. PMID:26837392

  3. Patients living with disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lofters, Aisha; Guilcher, Sara; Maulkhan, Niraj; Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the potential risk factors for lower-quality primary care, the potential markers of unmet needs in primary care, and the willingness to participate in future research among primary care patients with versus without physical disabilities. Design A waiting room survey using a convenience sample. Setting A family health team (FHT) in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont, with a designated Mobility Clinic. Participants A total of 40 patients seen at the FHT Mobility Clinic and 80 patients from the general patient population of the same FHT. Main outcome measures Socioeconomic status and social capital, number of self-reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations in the preceding year, and willingness of the patients in the 2 groups to participate in future research studies. Results Patients from the Mobility Clinic were more than twice as likely to be receiving benefits or social assistance (75.0% vs 32.1%, P < .001), were twice as likely to report an annual household income of less than $40000 (58.6% vs 29.2%, P = .006), and were more likely to report their health status to be fair or poor (42.5% vs 16.2%, P = .002). Half of Mobility Clinic patients had visited the emergency department at least once in the preceding year, compared with 29.7% in the general patient population (P = .027). When asked if they would be willing to provide their health card number in the future so that it could be linked to health care data for research, 82.5% of Mobility Clinic patients agreed versus 55.0% of those in the general patient population (P = .004). Conclusion In this study, patients with disabilities were at a social disadvantage compared with their peers without disabilities and were more likely to use the emergency department, suggesting that they had unmet health needs. Future research should continue to explore this patient population and to investigate if an interprofessional primary health care team approach focused on patients with disabilities can

  4. Nutrition in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sen, D; Prakash, J

    2000-07-01

    Malnutrition is a common clinical problem in dialysis patients, which is multifactorial in origin. It is most often found in a patient of chronic renal failure (CRF) during the period when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 10 ml/min, but dialysis is yet to be started. The loss of proteins, aminoacids and other essential nutrients during the procedure of dialysis may further aggravate the malnutrition. Poor nutrition in dialysis patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the form of delayed wound healing, malaise, fatigue, increased susceptibility to infection and poor rehabilitation. In view of the above consequences, all patients on dialysis must undergo nutritional assessment. It is very vital to maintain good nutritional status in-patients on dialysis by adequate protein and calories intake, appropriate supplementation of iron, calcium, minerals and water-soluble vitamins and, of course, the supplementation should be individualised. Nutritional needs are enhanced in presence of stresses like infection or surgery to limit excessive tissue catabolism and therefore, these are the situations, which demand intensive nutrition therapy. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) may be required for patients on dialysis in intensive care unit, using a central venous catheter. However, enteral route is always preferred to parenteral ones, whenever possible. Even after adequate dialysis has been given, dietary counselling is often required for both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients to ensure that they ingest the recommended amount of protein, calories and essential micronutrients.

  5. Patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Amar, Jacques

    2007-06-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in the majority of treated patients, especially those with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. This was demonstrated by a French study that showed that 70% of treated hypertensive patients are not controlled to the target level of 140/90 mmHg. This proportion reached 84% in hypertensive patients with diabetes (target level 130/85 mmHg). What are the reasons for this disappointing situation? Observational studies have shown that only a minority of patients with uncontrolled hypertension receive triple therapy including a diuretic. In this respect, self-measurement of blood pressure should improve the situation by allowing clinicians to base their decision to intensify hypertension treatment on more solid evidence than consultation blood pressure measurements alone. Patient-related factors may also contribute to this situation. Treated patients with uncontrolled hypertension often have multiple risk factors. This is associated with or is a source of poor treatment observance linked to patient psychological factors or a result of the increased consumption of medication. Finally, risk factors themselves may be responsible for problems with blood pressure control as a result of their detrimental effects on large arteries as well as the microvascular network. The early correction of such vascular anomalies is vital for medium and long-term blood pressure control.

  6. Bacteremia in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Horita, Shoko; Seki, George; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a common complication and is the second leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients. The risk of bacteremia in hemodialysis patients is 26-fold higher than in the general population, and 1/2-3/4 of the causative organisms of bacteremia in hemodialysis patients are Gram-positive bacteria. The ratio of resistant bacteria in hemodialysis patients compared to the general population is unclear. Several reports have indicated that hemodialysis patients have a higher risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The most common site of infection causing bacteremia is internal prostheses; the use of a hemodialysis catheter is the most important risk factor for bacteremia. Although antibiotic lock of hemodialysis catheters and topical antibiotic ointment can reduce catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI), their use should be limited to necessary cases because of the emergence of resistant organisms. Systemic antibiotic administration and catheter removal is recommended for treating CRBSI, although a study indicated the advantages of antibiotic lock and guidewire exchange of catheters over systemic antibiotic therapy. An infection control bundle recommended by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention succeeded in reducing bacteremia in hemodialysis patients with either a catheter or arteriovenous fistula. Appropriate infection control can reduce bacteremia in hemodialysis patients. PMID:27872830

  7. Nutrition of burned patients.

    PubMed

    Gudaviciene, Daiva; Rimdeika, Rytis; Adamonis, Kestutis

    2004-01-01

    Burns form 5-12% of all traumas. About 2,200 of patients are annually hospitalized in Lithuania. In most cases people of the employable age get burned. The treatment is often long-lasting, and afterwards recovered patients often have invalidity from burn sequels. The mortality of hospitalized burned patients is about 10%. The most common causes of death are pulmonary edema, pneumonia, sepsis and multiorgan failure. All these complications are related with insufficient nutrition. These complications are extremely frequent and dangerous for patients with more than 20% of body burned. The nutritional support of burned patient gives a possibility to increase the survival probability, to decrease complication rate and hospitalization time. Currently in Lithuania there are no standards for burned patient nutrition. More attention is given to strategy of surgical strategy and techniques, as well as antibiotic therapy. This article is the review of the different aspects of artificial nutrition of burned patient: indications, modes of nutrition, mixtures and terms of nutritional support.

  8. [Patient oriented healthcare planning].

    PubMed

    Fülöp, Gerhard

    2017-08-01

    Patient orientation has already been taken into account in healthcare planning approaches in Austria by using constantly improved routine health data, though primarily falling in the category of an indirect influence on or improvement of the individual patient-provider interaction. Data bases available in "Österreichische Gesundheitsinformationssystem (ÖGIS)" at Gesundheit Österreich GmbH (GÖG) have been used for years to both intensify the patient orientation within the needs-based planning framework (designed as "integrated regional healthcare planning", bearing the interactions between the sectors in mind) and to define and monitor the ten "Health Goals Austria". For the next few years, we can expect a further advancement and completion of the database in favour of healthcare planning to support the necessary adaptation and reorganization of the regional healthcare systems, the intensification of healthcare research and subsequently an improved patient orientation in Austria. In general, efforts are being made in Austria to improve the integration of the patient's perspective in the area of health care planning (e.g. by involving patients 'attorneys' or self-help groups). However, these efforts have not yet reached the stage of full implementation (inter alia also because the organizational potential for improvement or the quality of results from the patient's perception could not yet be adequately taken into account). Accordingly, further efforts to this end will be necessary in the upcoming years. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Anesthesiologist: the patient's perception.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carolina Sobrinho; Mourão, Joana Irene de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia is still a major concern for patients, although the anesthetic complications have decreased significantly. Additionally, the role assigned to the anesthesiologist remains inaccurate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concerns with anesthesia and assess the patient's knowledge about the anesthesiologist's duties. Prospective study conducted over three months with patients in the preoperative anesthetic visit in a university hospital. Demographic information about the level of education and prior anesthesia was obtained. The knowledge of patients regarding the anesthesiologists' education was evaluated. Patients' concerns and anesthesiologist and surgeon responsibilities were classified with a 5-point scale. The analysis was performed with SPSS 21, and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. We included 204 patients, and 135 (66.2%) recognized the anesthesiologist as a specialist physician. Not waking up after surgery and postoperative infection were the main concerns compared to all others (p<0.05). Women expressed more concern than men about not waking up after surgery, nausea and postoperative vomiting, medical problems, and waking up during surgery (p<0.05). Ensure that patients do not wake up during surgery was the anesthesiologist task most recognized, compared to all other (p<0.05). The surgeon was more recognized (p<0.05) than the anesthesiologist in post-operative, antibiotics administration, and blood transfusions pain management. Patients need to be informed about the current safety of anesthesia and the anesthesiologist's functions. The patient involvement will demystify some fears and reassure the confidence in the health system. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. [Anesthesiologist: the patient's perception].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carolina Sobrinho; Mourão, Joana Irene de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia is still a major concern for patients, although the anesthetic complications have decreased significantly. Additionally, the role assigned to the anesthesiologist remains inaccurate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concerns with anesthesia and assess the patient's knowledge about the anesthesiologist's duties. Prospective study conducted over three months with patients in the preoperative anesthetic visit in a university hospital. Demographic information about the level of education and prior anesthesia was obtained. The knowledge of patients regarding the anesthesiologists' education was evaluated. Patients' concerns and anesthesiologist and surgeon responsibilities were classified with a 5-point scale. The analysis was performed with SPSS 21, and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. We included 204 patients, and 135 (66.2%) recognized the anesthesiologist as a specialist physician. Not waking up after surgery and postoperative infection were the main concerns compared to all others (p<0.05). Women expressed more concern than men about not waking up after surgery, nausea and postoperative vomiting, medical problems, and waking up during surgery (p<0.05). Ensure that patients do not wake up during surgery was the anesthesiologist task most recognized, compared to all other (p<0.05). The surgeon was more recognized (p<0.05) than the anesthesiologist in post-operative, antibiotics administration, and blood transfusions pain management. Patients need to be informed about the current safety of anesthesia and the anesthesiologist's functions. The patient involvement will demystify some fears and reassure the confidence in the health system. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Constructions of the patient in healthcare communications: six patient figures.

    PubMed

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how strategic, patient-centred communication plays a part in the discursive management of expectations posed to patients and healthcare organizations. The paper provides an analysis of four documents collected as part of an ethnographic case study regarding "The Perspective of the Patient" - a Danish Hospital's patient-centred communication programme. Mapping methods inspired by Grounded Theory are used to qualify the analysis. The paper shows that strategic patient-centred communication addresses both a care-oriented approach to the patient and deploys market perceptions of patients. Market and care is seen as co-existing organizing modes that entail expectations to the patient. In the communication programme the patient is constructed in six information-seeking patient figures: affective patient; target group patient; citizen with rights; patient as a competent resource; user as active partner; and consumer. As a result, the patient-centred communication programme renders the patient as a flexible figure able to fit organizational demands of both care orientation and market concerns. This study contributes to qualitative research in organizational health communication by combining two subfields - patient-centredness and health communication - in an empirical study of how market and care are intertwined in a patient-centred communication programme. The argument goes beyond the prevalent prescriptive approaches to patient-centredness and healthcare communication, instead providing a critical analytical perspective on strategic communication and patient-centredness and showing how expectations are posed to both patient and organization.

  12. Evaluation of Patient Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Piedmont, Eugene B.; Dornblaser, Bright M.

    1970-01-01

    A multifaceted attempt is made to measure patients' well-being quantitatively in a complex interdisciplinary research and experimental construction project. Parallel studies were conducted in adjoining traditionally shaped and spoke-design hospital buildings. Major innovations were made, in both plants, in the organization of nursing staffs and in communications and logistical support. Smaller nursing staffs achieved significant increases in time spent in direct patient (“bedside”) care, without negative effects on patient welfare, in both buildings; but these effects were maximized in the spoke-design building. PMID:5494267

  13. Respecting patient confidentiality.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2015-02-03

    Nurses face a particular challenge in respecting the confidentiality of patients in a world where information is quickly shared and where information about illness can be sensitive. We have a duty of care towards patients. That duty includes maintaining privacy (protecting them from undue intrusion), and confidentiality (by the discreet management of information about themselves that they share with us). Legislation on confidentiality comes from different sources and should be interpreted in the clinical setting. This article summarises the principal requirements set out in the legislation and directs readers to questions and tools designed to help them explore the extent to which patient confidentiality is respected where they work.

  14. [Contraception in cardiac patients].

    PubMed

    Barrat, J; Nivet, M

    1976-01-01

    Contraception using IUDs and oral contraception, and sterilization in heart disease are discussed. IUDs are contraindicated in heart patients in whom bacterial infection might present special dangers (heart valve disease and certain congential heart defects), and in patients receiving long-term anticoagulant therapy, because of the increased risk of hemorrhage. Oral contraceptives are contraindicated because of the frequently observed water retention and weight gain, their effects on arterial blood pressure, and their contribution to thromboembolic desease. During sterilization procedures, particular attention should be given to anesthesia and to position. Contraindications are relative, depending on the patients' status and many other factors.

  15. [Fever in Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Cornely, Oliver Andreas; Mellinghoff, Sibylle Christiane

    2017-07-01

    Fever in cancer patients is a medical emergency until a severe infection has been ruled out. In case of neutropenia prompt diagnostic work-up should be paralleled by empiric antibiotic treatment. Underlying malignancy as well as treatments may impair immune response and thus pave the way for less virulent pathogens. So the spectrum of infections comprises both pathogens that cause disease in immunocompetent patients and a variety of rarer organisms. After collecting two pairs of blood cultures, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should commence within one to two hours. Depending on the individual patient's risk antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. The patient with ataxia.

    PubMed

    Maggs, F G

    2014-01-01

    In this article we look at the causes of ataxia, and how the patient presenting with ataxia should be managed. One of the difficulties in managing the patient with ataxia is that acute ataxia has many causes, but usually these can be teased out by means of a careful history and examination. Investigations can then be targeted at confirming or disproving the differential diagnosis. Some patients with ataxia need to be managed in hospital, but many can be investigated, and receive therapy, as an outpatient.

  17. Why Do Patients Bleed?

    PubMed Central

    Curnow, Jennifer; Pasalic, Leonardo; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing surgical procedures can bleed for a variety of reasons. Assuming that the surgical procedure has progressed well and that the surgeon can exclude surgical reasons for the unexpected bleeding, then the bleeding may be due to structural (anatomical) anomalies or disorders, recent drug intake, or disorders of hemostasis, which may be acquired or congenital. The current review aims to provide an overview of reasons that patients bleed in the perioperative setting, and it also provides guidance on how to screen for these conditions, through consideration of appropriate patient history and examination prior to surgical intervention, as well as guidance on investigating and managing the cause of unexpected bleeding. PMID:28824979

  18. Educating the glaucoma patient.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, A. R.; Zimmerman, J. F.; Tanner, J.

    1983-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with open-angle glaucoma and 32 controls were studied at each of 2 medical centres, one in California and one in England. A 12-point questionnaire was answered before, immediately after, and 6 months after viewing a 6 minute video film about glaucoma. The English glaucoma patients and controls showed lower initial knowledge than their American counterparts. Immediately after the film all groups had substantially improved their knowledge by answering 78-88% of the questions correctly. Recall study showed that both American groups had retained more than their British counterparts and that glaucoma patients retained more knowledge of their disease than did controls. The use of an educational video film in an outpatient setting is a simple and economical method of patient education applicable to both American and British subjects with open-angle glaucoma. PMID:6671096

  19. Patient satisfaction constructs.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Muhammad Sabbir; Osmangani, Aahad M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the five-factor structure of patients' satisfaction constructs toward private healthcare service providers. This research is a cross-sectional study. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted with previous and current Bangladeshi patients. Exploratory factor analysis was employed to extract the underlying constructs. Five underlying dimensions that play a significant role in structuring the satisfaction perceived by Bangladeshi private healthcare patients are identified in this study. Practical implications - The main contribution of this study is identifying the dimensions of satisfaction perceived by Bangladeshi patients regarding private healthcare service providers. Healthcare managers adopt the five identified underlying construct items in their business practices to improve their respective healthcare efficiency while ensuring overall customer satisfaction.

  20. Leadership for patient care.

    PubMed

    Nackel, J G; Shelley, S R

    1991-01-01

    In an era of change in health-care delivery and, particularly, change in patient care, leadership is the cornerstone of change management. The environment of the 1990s will challenge even the most sophisticated and capable health-care executives. This paper discusses key aspects of leadership and models them to the patient-care setting. Leadership will be the differentiating factor as organizations seek competitive advantage.

  1. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  2. [Patient safety: Glossary].

    PubMed

    Sabio Paz, Verónica; Panattieri, Néstor D; Cristina Godio, Farmacéutica; Ratto, María E; Arpí, Lucrecia; Dackiewicz, Nora

    2015-10-01

    Patient safety and quality of care has become a challenge for health systems. Health care is an increasingly complex and risky activity, as it represents a combination of human, technological and organizational processes. It is necessary, therefore, to take effective actions to reduce the adverse events and mitigate its impact. This glossary is a local adaptation of key terms and concepts from the international bibliographic sources. The aim is providing a common language for assessing patient safety processes and compare them.

  3. Tuberculosis in HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Bidhan Nidhi; Paudel, Punya; Paudel, Luna; Dhungana, Govinda; Amatya, Gyanendra Lal; Aryal, Choodamani; Kandel, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Strict monitoring ofanti tuberculosis therapy and antiretroviral therapyis crucial for proper management of TB/HIV co-infected patients. Between December 2006 and December 2008 a prospective observational study was conducted among 135 TB/HIV co-infected patients visiting antiretroviral therapy in Seti Zonal Hospital, Dhangadi. The diagnosed TB patients were subjected to ATT through directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) and its response was evaluated as per WHO guidelines. Among 135 studied subjects, 97 (71.9%) were males and over 119 (88 %) of the patients were in the age group 21 to 50. Of the total TB cases 92 (68.1%) presented pulmonary TB and 37.20% of the Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis cases were lymph node TB. 72 (53.33%) of them had completed ATT, 11 (8.2%) transfer out and 17 (12.6%) were default. Majority of the patients presented PTB, and lymph node TB was found to be the most common EPTB. Comparatively, high efficacy of ATT was found in HIV patients visiting this resource poor setting.

  4. Chronically Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Sara L.; Daly, Barbara J.; Kelley, Carol Genet; O’Toole, Elizabeth; Montenegro, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronically critically ill patients often have high costs of care and poor outcomes and thus might benefit from a disease management program. Objectives To evaluate how adding a disease management program to the usual care system affects outcomes after discharge from the hospital (mortality, health-related quality of life, resource use) in chronically critically ill patients. Methods In a prospective experimental design, 335 intensive care patients who received more than 3 days of mechanical ventilation at a university medical center were recruited. For 8 weeks after discharge, advanced practice nurses provided an intervention that focused on case management and interdisciplinary communication to patients in the experimental group. Results A total of 74.0% of the patients survived and completed the study. Significant predictors of death were age (P = .001), duration of mechanical ventilation (P = .001), and history of diabetes (P = .04). The disease management program did not have a significant impact on health-related quality of life; however, a greater percentage of patients in the experimental group than in the control group had “improved” physical health-related quality of life at the end of the intervention period (P = .02). The only significant effect of the intervention was a reduction in the number of days of hospital readmission and thus a reduction in charges associated with readmission. Conclusion The intervention was not associated with significant changes in any outcomes other than duration of readmission, but the supportive care coordination program could be provided without increasing overall charges. PMID:17724242

  5. Patient loyalty model.

    PubMed

    Sumaedi, Sik; Bakti, I Gede Mahatma Yuda; Rakhmawati, Tri; Astrini, Nidya Judhi; Yarmen, Medi; Widianti, Tri

    2015-07-06

    This study aims to investigate the simultaneous effect of subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and trust on patient loyalty. The empirical data were collected through survey. The respondents of the survey are 157 patients of a health-care service institution in Bogor, Indonesia. Multiple regressions analysis was performed to test the conceptual model and the proposed hypotheses. The findings showed that subjective norm and trust influence patient loyalty positively. However, this research also found that perceived behavioral control does not influence patient loyalty significantly. The survey was only conducted at one health-care service institution in Bogor, Indonesia. In addition, convenience sampling method was used. These conditions may cause that the research results can not be generalized to the other contexts. Therefore, replication research is needed to test the stability of the findings in the other contexts. Health-care service institutions need to pay attention to trust and subjective norm to establish patient loyalty. This study is believed to be the first to develop and test patient loyalty model that includes subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and trust.

  6. [Suicidal patient identification].

    PubMed

    Manzanedo Sagredo, María Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, María Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    The daily evidence, in the course of professional practice shows the important role of nurses in detecting suicidal patient because the staff is in better accessibility unlimited dedication in front of a voluntary consultation and creation of an environment trust. The main objective of this plan is to identify patients at risk of suicidal behavior in psychiatric hospital settings. The basic procedures for achieving these goals are to use methods such as clinical interviews, observation and application of scales that tell us that a patient may be contemplating suicide. This assessment will take into account several variables: physical, psychological, behavioral, verbal, social, familial, demographic, etc. The aim is, likewise, discard myths about suicide which may mask important information and help to identify patients at risk. It should be noted that only a small number of suicides happen without warning. Most suicide give clear warnings of their intentions. These patients do not want to stop living, what they really want is to stop suffering, but his mental condition prevents them from thinking about other solutions while his thoughts focused on the negative aspects of his life without being able to take into account the positive. The result that the aim this plan of care is to prevent the suicide of patients in the hospital. For although not all suicides can be prevented, most do.

  7. [Urosepsis in Geriatric Patients].

    PubMed

    Heppner, H J; Yapan, F; Wiedemann, A

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demographic shift, increasing numbers of geriatric patients are admitted to acute care hospitals of all levels of care. This means that special challenges must be met in the medical care and management of these patients.Immunosenescence and multimorbidity make elderly patients vulnerable to infectious diseases. Urinary tract infections range from "simple" cystitis to pyelonephritis and urosepsis and, at 25%, are the second most common form of infection in geriatric patients. It is often difficult to make a diagnosis because typical symptoms do not always occur. Urosepsis, a hyperactive and uncontrolled immune response of the organism due to exogenous damage, is based on bacterial infection of the urogenital tract. Urinary retention, immunosuppressive medication, malignancy, diabetes mellitus and renal or prostatic processes promote the risk for urosepsis. Complicated urosepsis additionally comprises a structural or functional abnormality, including ureteral obstruction. Risk factors for urosepsis are urinary incontinence, an indwelling urinary catheter, hydronephrosis or ureteral calculi. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus are also at a higher risk for urosepsis. When diagnosing elderly patients, one has to consider that the classic symptoms can be masked by multimorbidity, or septic encephalopathy and acute confusion (delirium) may be the only symptoms. Body temperature is lower in elderly patients and does not necessarily rise to 38°C or more in the acute phase. In patients older than 75 years who are suspicious for sepsis, temperatures as low as 37.4°C should be rated as fever. Treatment of urosepsis basically includes clearing the focus, antimicrobial treatment, stabilisation of circulation and replacement of failed organ functions. Initial empiric antibiotic treatment, depending on local resistance, should be done with acylaminopenicilline and beta-lactamase inhibitors (e. g. piperacillin/combactam or tazobactam or group 3 cephalosporins

  8. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and Survivors Flu Publications Stay Informed Cancer Home Information for Patients and Caregivers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cancer patients ...

  9. Cytomegalovirus Colitis in Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Qulsoom; Shafique, Khurram; Tasleem, Syed H; Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus colitis is common in immunocompromised patients, but rare in immunocompetent patients. The present study not only represents the colonoscopy and pathological findings, but also applies the method of diagnosing and treating cytomegalovirus colitis in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27980888

  10. Choosing effective patient education materials

    MedlinePlus

    Your patient's preferences can guide your choice of education materials and methods. Find out how your patient ... aware that you may need to adjust your education plan based on the patient's health status and ...

  11. Mastocytosis among elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Rouet, Audrey; Aouba, Achille; Damaj, Gandhi; Soucié, Erinn; Hanssens, Katia; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Livideanu, Cristina Bulai; Dutertre, Marine; Durieu, Isabelle; Grandpeix-Guyodo, Catherine; Barète, Stéphane; Bachmeyer, Claude; Soria, Angèle; Frenzel, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Grosbois, Bernard; de Gennes, Christian; Hamidou, Mohamed; Arlet, Jean-Benoit; Launay, David; Lavigne, Christian; Arock, Michel; Lortholary, Olivier; Dubreuil, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases with a young median age at diagnosis. Usually indolent and self-limited in childhood, the disease can exhibit aggressive progression in mid-adulthood. Our objectives were to describe the characteristics of the disease when diagnosed among elderly patients, for which rare data are available. The French Reference Center conducted a retrospective multicenter study on 53 patients with mastocytosis >69 years of age, to describe their clinical, biological, and genetic features. The median age of our cohort of patients was 75 years. Mastocytosis variants included were cutaneous (n = 1), indolent systemic (n = 5), aggressive systemic (n = 11), associated with a hematological non-mast cell disease (n = 34), and mast cell leukemia (n = 2). Clinical manifestations were predominantly mast cell activation symptoms (75.5%), poor performance status (50.9%), hepatosplenomegaly (50.9%), skin involvement (49.1%), osteoporosis (47.2%), and portal hypertension and ascites (26.4%). The main biological features were anemia (79.2%), thrombocytopenia (50.9%), leucopenia (20.8%), and liver enzyme abnormalities (32.1%). Of the 40 patients tested, 34 (85%), 2 (5%), and 4 (10%) exhibited the KIT D816V mutant, other KIT mutations and the wild-type form of the KIT gene, respectively. Additional sequencing detected significant genetic defects in 17 of 26 (65.3%) of the patients with associated hematological non-mast cell disease, including TET2, SRSF2, IDH2, and ASLX1 mutations. Death occurred in 19 (35.8%) patients, within a median delay of 9 months, despite the different treatment options available. Mastocytosis among elderly patients has a challenging early detection, rare skin involvement, and/or limited skin disease; it is heterogeneous and has often an aggressive presentation with nonfortuitous associated myeloid lineage malignant clones, and thus a poor overall prognosis. PMID:27310990

  12. Patients' positive identification systems.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Turdo, Rosalia; Capuzzo, Enrico

    2009-10-01

    Blood safety must be maintained throughout the whole transfusion chain to prevent the transfusion of incorrect blood components. The estimated risk of an incorrect transfusion is in the order of 1 per 10,000 units of blood. Although several kinds of errors contribute to "wrong blood" events, 70% of errors occur in clinical areas with the most common being due to failure of the pre-transfusion bedside checking procedure. Several methods are available to reduce such errors. The I-TRAC Plus system by Immucor consists of an identification bracelet which is a bar-coded wristband and a handheld portable computer that identifies patients and blood bags by a scanner and prints the information through a portable printer. The labels attached on the blood order forms and on the sample tubes are read and recorded in the blood bank's informatics system (EmoNet INSIEL). Labels showing the bar-code of the assigned number, which includes the ID number of the patient, the ID number of the unit and a code identifying the kind of product and use (allogeneic or autologous), are generated and applied to the blood components. The transfusions are administered after checking the unit and the patient's wristband using the scanner of a portable PC. In 5 years a total of 71,400 units of blood components were transfused to 15,430 patients using the I-TRAC Plus system. The system prevented 12 cases of mis-identification of patients (5 in 2003, 0 in 2004, 1 in 2005, 1 in 2006 and 5 in 2007). In 2003 we introduced the use of a bar-code matching system between a patient's wristband and the blood bag to avoid mistakes at the bedside. In 5 years the system provided benefits by avoiding errors in the identification of patients, thus preventing "wrong blood" transfusions.

  13. 77 FR 40142 - Applications for Exemption: Commercial Driver's License (CDL) and Hours-of-Service (HOS) of Drivers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... carrier operations without the exemption [49 CFR 381.305(b)]. The application must include a written assessment of the safety impacts the exemption may have. It must also describe how the applicant would ensure... application, the safety assessment, and all other information relevant to the application. The Agency...

  14. Stabilitet i uppfostringsattityder hos daghemspersonal (Stability of Attitudes of Child-Rearing by Personnel at Day-Care Centers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekholm, Bodil; And Others

    All day care personnel (about 900) in a Swedish commune answered a questionnaire concerning attitudes toward child rearing. The questionnaire consisted of 10 short descriptions of daily day care situations representing a child rearing dilemma which could be solved in different ways. Respondents indicated their views of typical and preferred ways…

  15. Patient safety culture: finding meaning in patient experiences.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Andrea C; Cregan, Brianna R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine what patient and family stories can tell us about patient safety culture within health care organizations and how patients experience patient safety culture. A total of 11 patient and family stories of adverse event experiences were examined in September 2013 using publicly available videos on the Canadian Patient Safety Insitute web site. Videos were transcribed verbatim and collated as one complete data set. Thematic analysis was used to perform qualitative inquiry. All qualitative analysis was done using NVivo 10 software. A total of three themes were identified: first, Being Passed Around; second, Not Having the Conversation; and third, the Person Behind the Patient. Results from this research also suggest that while health care organizations and providers might expect patients to play a larger role in managing their health, there may be underlying reasons as to why patients are not doing so. The findings indicate that patient experiences and narratives are useful sources of information to better understand organizational safety culture and patient experiences of safety while hospitalized. Greater inclusion and analysis of patient safety narratives is important in understanding the needs of patients and how patient safety culture interventions can be improved to ensure translation of patient safety strategies at the frontlines of care. Greater acknowledgement of the patient and family experience provides organizations with an integral perspective to assist in defining and addressing deficiencies within their patient safety culture and to identify opportunities for improvement.

  16. The "Permanent" Patient Problem.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Courtenay R; Majumder, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    Patients who enter the health care system for acute care may become "permanent" patients of the hospital when a lack of resources precludes discharge to the next level of post-acute care. Legal, professional, and ethical norms prohibit physician and acute care hospital "dumping" of these patients. However, limitless use of hospital resources for indefinite stays is untenable. In the absence of hospital policy addressing this specific issue, the availability of financial support will be determined by health care professionals' willingness to advocate for the patient and negotiate with hospital administrators and the ability and willingness of administrators to authorize the use of hospital resources. We propose five mid-level ethical principles to guide advocacy and administrative decision-making about provision of financial support for post-acute care for those patients who cannot afford it. We use two actual, de-identified cases to illustrate how these principles can be used to make reasoned, consistent decisions about the provision of post-acute financial support. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  17. Thromboprophylaxis in nonsurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Streiff, Michael B; Lau, Brandyn D

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in medically ill patients. Randomized controlled trials indicate that pharmacologic prophylaxis reduces deep venous thrombosis (relative risk [RR] = 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36-0.59) and pulmonary embolism (RR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.33-0.72) with a nonsignificant trend toward more bleeding (RR = 1.36; 95% CI, 0.80-2.33]. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin are equally efficacious in preventing deep venous thrombosis (RR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69-1.06) and pulmonary embolism (RR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.47-2.38), but LMWH is associated with significantly less major bleeding (RR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.85). LMWH is favored for VTE prophylaxis in critically ill patients. New VTE and bleeding risk stratification tools offer the potential to improve the risk-benefit ratio for VTE prophylaxis in medically ill patients. Intermittent pneumatic compression devices should be used for VTE prophylaxis in patients with contraindications to pharmacologic prophylaxis. Graduated compression stockings should be used with caution. VTE prevention in medically ill patients using extended-duration VTE prophylaxis and new oral anticoagulants warrant further investigation. VTE prophylaxis prescription and administration rates are suboptimal and warrant multidisciplinary performance improvement strategies.

  18. Online patient information.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Amanda

    2002-09-01

    Information appropriate for patients with skin diseases is readily available on the Internet. Patients primarily seek disease-related information, but may also search for a dermatologist, shop for skin care products, or look to a consumer organization for support. Authoritative educational material is supplied by academic dermatologic associations and institutions and distributed by independent websites, large health portals, and search directories. Interactive opportunities include bulletin boards, ask-an-expert forums, and live chat. Although it is easy to find excellent dermatological information, the Internet is dynamic and unmoderated and patients can be misled or exploited by inaccurate or fraudulent websites. Health on the Net and other organizations have developed ethical principles to aid consumers in evaluating the quality of health-related information.

  19. Handedness in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, J J; Dalton, R; Standage, K F

    1977-11-01

    Eight hundred psychiatric patients and eight hundred controls completed a handedness preference questionnaire. There was no significant difference in handedness between the two samples, but, contrary to some previous reports, excess of sinistrality was not associated with male sex. The distribution of handedness was similar in neurotics and controls, but among psychotics in general there was a higher proportion of fully right-handed subjects. Among schizophrenics there was a significantly higher proportion of left-handed writers among males than females. There were relatively few left-handed writers of either sex among patients with affective psychosis. Female patients with personality disorders had a significantly higher proportion of mixed handedness than controls. The findings are considered in relation to suggestions that functional psychoses may be associated with asymmetrical cerebral dysfunction, and that poorly lateralized function may be related to anomalous psychological development.

  20. [Toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised patients].

    PubMed

    Machala, L; Kodym, P; Malý, M; Geleneky, M; Beran, O; Jilich, D

    2015-06-01

    In humans, toxoplasmosis mostly occurs as a latent infection, but in immunocompromised individuals, the agent may reactivate and cause severe to life-threatening disease. HIV positive individuals and transplant recipients, in particular hematopoietic stem cell transplant and heart transplant recipients, are at highest risk. The disease most often affects the central nervous system but can involve any organ. Because of the alteration of the immune response in these patients, the serodiagnosis is not reliable and direct detection of the causative agent is needed--namely by microscopy and DNA PCR. If inadequately treated or left untreated, toxoplasmosis generally has a fatal prognosis in immunocompromised patients and therefore, the treatment must be started as early and energetically as possible. The gold standard both in the treatment of reactivation and secondary prophylaxis is the pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine combination while co-trimoxazole can be used in the primary prophylaxis for high-risk patients.

  1. Creating virtual ARDS patients.

    PubMed

    Das, Anup; Haque, Mainul; Chikhani, Marc; Wenfei Wang; Hardman, Jonathan G; Bates, Declan G

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the methodology used in patient-specific calibration of a novel highly integrated model of the cardiovascular and pulmonary pathophysiology associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). We focus on data from previously published clinical trials on the static and dynamic cardio-pulmonary responses of three ARDS patients to changes in ventilator settings. From this data, the parameters of the integrated model were identified using an optimization-based methodology in multiple stages. Computational simulations confirm that the resulting model outputs accurately reproduce the available clinical data. Our results open up the possibility of creating in silico a biobank of virtual ARDS patients that could be used to evaluate current, and investigate novel, therapeutic strategies.

  2. Hypertension in aging patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension, especially isolated systolic hypertension, is commonly found in older (60-79 years of age) and elderly (≥80 years of age) people. Antihypertensive drug therapy should be considered in all aging hypertensive patients, as treatment greatly reduces cardiovascular events. Most classes of antihypertensive medications may be used as first-line treatment with the possible exception of α- and β-blockers. An initial blood pressure treatment goal is less than 140/90 mmHg in all older patients and less than 150/80 mmHg in the nonfrail elderly. The current paradigm of delaying therapeutic interventions until people are at moderate or high cardiovascular risk, a universal feature of hypertensive patients over 60 years of age, leads to vascular injury or disease that is only partially reversible with treatment. Future management will likely focus on intervening earlier to prevent accelerated vascular aging and irreversible arterial damage.

  3. Patients' preferences for information

    PubMed Central

    Kindelan, K.; Kent, G.

    1986-01-01

    In a study of patients' views of the type of information they would like to receive from the doctor 265 patients from four general practices were given a list of five areas of information — diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, aetiology and social effects of their illness — and asked to rank these in order of importance for that visit. In general, information on diagnosis and prognosis was the most highly valued, while the ways the illness would affect daily activities was the least preferred. Although information on treatment was rarely selected as the first preference it was often the second or third preference. Conversely, diagnosis was the first choice of the largest proportion of patients and the least valued information for 26%. PMID:3440990

  4. [Respecting patient intimacy].

    PubMed

    2014-04-01

    Transparency as a general rule for all our professional acts casts doubts about the statement of the Hippocratic Oath that says "Whatever I see or hear in the lives of my patients, I will keep secret, as considering all such things to be private". Medical secrecy protects the intimacy of patients, who reveal to their physicians their most hidden secrets aiming to recover their health. Therefore, physicians should receive those secrets with reverence and care, as servers and not as their owners. The values associated with the respect for personal intimacy are the anthropological basis of medical confidentiality. A medical act is performed by definition between two equally honorable individuals. Therefore, the professional honors the trust of his patient, maintaining strict confidence of what is revealed. Therefore, medical secrecy must be strengthened rather than weakened, pursuing common wealth and dignity.

  5. The moderators of patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jessie L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which Department of Defense (DOD) active duty patient sociodemographic, health status, geographic location, and utilization factors, predict overall patient satisfaction with health care in military facilities. A theoretical framework developed from patient satisfaction and social identity theories and from previous empirical findings was used to develop a model to predict patient satisfaction and delineate moderating variables. The major finding indicated in this study was the significance of patients' characteristics in moderating their satisfaction. Principal components factor analysis and hierarchical linear regression revealed that patient specific factors predicted patients' satisfaction after controlling for factors depicting patients' evaluations of health system characteristics. Patient specific factors provided added, although very minimal, explanatory value to the determination of patients' satisfaction. The study findings can aid in the development of targeted, objectively prioritized programs of improvement and marketing by ranking variables using patients' passively derived importance schema.

  6. [Anesthesia for ambulatory patients].

    PubMed

    Landauer, B

    1975-11-13

    The specific problems of outpatient anesthesia are discussed with respect to the patient's condition, the anesthesist's qualification and pharmacological properties of anesthetics used. Methohexitone seems to be the best choice for induction. Problems may arise from the use of Propanidid, Ketamin and Diazepam. Nitrousoxide and Enflurane are a suitable completion. Endotracheal intubation, if needed, is facilitated by Suxamethonium, which is rapidly eliminated. Practical aspects of timing, premedication, induction, maintenance and ending of anesthesia are pointed out. After 1-2 hours the patient can be allowed to leave the hospital accompanied by a responsible person. Driving a car is not recommended before 24 hours have elapsed since anesthesia.

  7. [Healthcare patient loyalty].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    If the "old economy" preached standardization of products/services in order to reduce costs, the "new economy" is based on the recognition of the needs and the management of information. It is aimed at providing better and more usable services. One scenario is a national health service with regional management but based on competition between hospitals/companies.This led to a different handling of the user/patient, which has become the center of the health system: marketing seeks to retain the patient, trying to push a client-patient to not change their healthcare service provider. In costs terms, it is more economical to retain a customer rather than acquire a new one: a satisfied customer is also the best sounding board for each company. Customer equity is the management of relations with patients which can result in a greater customer value: it is possible to recognize an equity of the value, of the brand and of the report. Loyalty uses various marketing activities (basic, responsive, responsible, proactive and collaborative): each hospital/company chooses different actions depending on how many resources it plans to invest in loyalty.

  8. The Adolescent Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, William A., Jr.

    Written to orient the physician and paramedical personnel to the adolescent patient, the book provides information concerning the changes of adolescence, and age-related problems and illnesses. Part 1 discusses the essence of adolescence by describing physical, mental, and emotional growth and development. Part 2, the major section, consists of 21…

  9. Thromboprophylaxis for trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Luis Manuel Barrera; Perel, Pablo; Ker, Katharine; Cirocchi, Roberto; Farinella, Eriberto; Morales, Carlos Hernando

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of thromboprophylaxis in trauma patients on mortality and incidence of DVT and PE. To compare the effects of different thromboprophylaxis interventions and their relative effects according to the type of trauma. PMID:25267908

  10. A Patient's Best Friend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Ann

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the development of a pet therapy program at a rehabilitation unit of a hospital. She discusses documentation of the success of pet therapy programs, picking out the right pets, responsibilities of caring for the pet, training the pet, patient response, and program policies. (CT)

  11. The Adolescent Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, William A., Jr.

    Written to orient the physician and paramedical personnel to the adolescent patient, the book provides information concerning the changes of adolescence, and age-related problems and illnesses. Part 1 discusses the essence of adolescence by describing physical, mental, and emotional growth and development. Part 2, the major section, consists of 21…

  12. [Autonomy and patient prisoners].

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, J; Bellver-Capella, V; Blanco-Sueiro, R; Galán-Cortés, J C; Mínguez-Gallego, C; Serrat-Moré, D

    2007-10-01

    The authors study a recent Spanish High Court decision declaring liability on the Administration's part for the death of an inmate in a prison hospital. We analyse the Court's decision using legal, ethical, medical and social perspectives. The conclusions are that: 1. the Administration has no legitimate right to force a prisoner to take medical treatment, except in circumstances in which there is a grave and definite risk to the patient's life, or when the patient lacks capacity or when there is the risk of harm to the health of third parties; 2. That in the case of health decision making that might affect a patient, the Court has mounted a frontal attack on the autonomy of patients in prison; 3. That from a medical point of view the decision is discriminatory since it does not apply the same standards of measurement to all chronic illnesses that might be found in the prison context; 4. That it is inapplicable in daily practice due to the fact that its strictness of application would seriously affect the already highly fragile ordered coexistence that exists in a prison.

  13. A Patient's Best Friend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Ann

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the development of a pet therapy program at a rehabilitation unit of a hospital. She discusses documentation of the success of pet therapy programs, picking out the right pets, responsibilities of caring for the pet, training the pet, patient response, and program policies. (CT)

  14. Facial esthetics and patient selection.

    PubMed

    Habbema, Loek

    2004-01-01

    Preventing patient dissatisfaction is a primary goal when performing botulinum toxin-A injections. By taking the correct approach with careful patient selection, ensuring safety and minimizing the risk of complications and side effects, the practitioner can largely eliminate patient dissatisfaction with this therapy. Basic understanding of facial esthetics and concepts of beauty are helpful to optimize patient satisfaction.

  15. Patient-Clinician Communication

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Laura M.; Reinke, Lynn F.; Ganzini, Linda; Udris, Edmunds M.; Moss, Brianna R.; Bryson, Chris L.; Curtis, J. Randall; Au, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: High quality patient-clinician communication is widely advocated, but little is known about which health outcomes are associated with communication for patients with COPD. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study of 342 veterans enrolled in a randomized controlled trial, we evaluated the association of communication, measured with the quality of communication (QOC) instrument, with subject-reported quality of clinician care, breathing problem confidence, and general self-rated health. We measured these associations using general estimating equations and adjusted odds ratios (OR) of patient-reported outcomes associated with one-point changes in QOC scores. Results: Nearly one-half of the subjects reported receiving the best imaginable care (47%), whereas fewer reported being confident with their breathing problems all the time (29%) or in very good or excellent health (15%). General communication was associated with best-imagined quality of care (OR, 4.29; 95% CI, 2.84-6.48; P < .001) and confidence in dealing with breathing problems all the time (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.34-2.25; P < .001) but not general self-rated health (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.92-1.55; P = .19). Specific clinician behaviors with larger associations with higher quality care included listening, caring, and attentiveness. The associations between general communication and quality care increased over time (P for interaction .03). Conclusions: Communication between patients and clinicians is associated with quality of care and confidence in dealing with breathing problems, and this association may change over time. Attention to specific communication strategies may lead to improvements in the care of patients with COPD. PMID:20299633

  16. Improving patient education for patients with low literacy skills.

    PubMed

    Mayeaux, E J; Murphy, P W; Arnold, C; Davis, T C; Jackson, R H; Sentell, T

    1996-01-01

    Patients who misunderstand their diagnosis and treatment plans usually exhibit poor compliance. The 90 million adult Americans with low literacy skills struggle to understand such essential health information as discharge instructions, consent forms, oral instructions and drug labels. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organizations (JCAHO) now requires that instructions be given on a level understandable to the patient. Most physicians tend to give too much information on too high a level for many patients to understand. Physicians who speak in simpler language, repeat their instructions and demonstrate key points, while avoiding too many directives, enhance their patients' understanding. Combining easy-to-read written patient education materials with oral instructions has been shown to greatly enhance patient understanding. To be effective with patients whose literacy skills are low, patient education materials should be short and simple, contain culturally sensitive graphics and encourage desired behavior. Compliance with therapy also may be improved by including family members in the patient education process.

  17. Activities Patients and Nurses Undertake to Promote Patient Participation.

    PubMed

    Tobiano, Georgia; Marshall, Andrea; Bucknall, Tracey; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    To describe and understand activities patients and nurses undertake to enact patient participation in nursing care. This observational study was conducted on two medical units at a public hospital in Australia. Twenty-eight nurse-patient dyads were observed for at least 4 hr. Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014. Field notes were collected and were analyzed both inductively and deductively. Nurse-patient interactions promoted patient participation through dialogue and knowledge sharing. Less evident was patient involvement in planning or self-care. Nurses exerted control over patient care, which influenced the extent of patient participation. Patient participation appears to be difficult to enact. Nurses' controlling approach, influenced by organizational issues, was in conflict with a patient-centered approach to care. Nurse-patient communication is one aspect of patient-centered care enacted more frequently. Nurses may benefit from strategies at the individual and organizational level to enhance their patient-centered practices. Fostering nurses' communication may enhance patient-centered practices in hospitals. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Communicating with Latino patients.

    PubMed

    de Pheils, Pilar Bernal; Saul, Naledi Marie

    2009-09-01

    This article describes the efforts of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing to develop the Spanish language and cultural competency skills of advanced practice nursing students by establishing an elective course, Communicating with the Latino Patient. The need for this training is reflected in the literature, which has shown that language barriers decrease patient satisfaction and quality of care and increase the likelihood of medical error. Fifty-seven first-year master's students participated in this course. The effectiveness of the training was monitored during and after each course by self-assessment surveys of the participants' language acquisition. The data suggest that the most successful outcomes result from limiting class size, emphasizing high interactivity, and incorporating clinical experiences in the instruction, as well as focusing exclusively on intermediate-level speakers when resources are limited. Training can be time consuming and costly, yet graduates agreed that the training was imperative and valuable.

  19. Visualising patient flow.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Andrew; Boyle, Justin; Khanna, Sankalp

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development of a method to distil routinely collected clinical data into patient flow information to aid hospital bed management. Using data from state-wide emergency department and inpatient clinical information systems, a user-friendly interface was developed to visualise patient flow conditions for a particular hospital. The historical snapshots employ a variable time scale, allowing flow to be visualised across a day, week, month or year. Flow information includes occupancy, arrival and departure rates, length-of-stay and access block observations, which can be filtered by age, departure status, diagnosis, elective status, triage category, and admission unit. The tool may be helpful in supporting hospital bed managers in their daily decision making.

  20. Mucormycosis in immunochallenged patients.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jane; Tucci, Veronica T; Vincent, Albert L; Sandin, Ramon L; Greene, John N

    2008-07-01

    Mucorales species are deadly opportunistic fungi with a rapidly invasive nature. A rare disease, mucormycosis is most commonly reported in patients with diabetes mellitus, because the favorable carbohydrate-rich environment allows the Mucorales fungi to flourish, especially in the setting of ketoacidosis. However, case reports over the past 20 years show that a growing number of cases of mucormycosis are occurring during treatment following bone marrow transplants (BMT) and hematological malignancies (HM) such as leukemia and lymphoma. This is due to the prolonged treatment of these patients with steroids and immunosuppressive agents. Liposomal amphotericin B treatment and posaconazole are two pharmacologic agents that seem to be effective against mucormycosis, but the inherently rapid onset and course of the disease, in conjunction with the difficulty in correctly identifying it, hinder prompt institution of appropriate antifungal therapy. This review of the literature discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of mucormycosis among the BMT and HM populations.

  1. Management of headache patients.

    PubMed

    Sances, Grazia; Catarci, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Headache is a very common complaint, in both primary care and in specialist settings. Headache patients account for around 20% of all outpatients seen in neurological practices and their management, particularly when they present with intractable headache, or are suspected of having secondary headaches, can be a challenge for the clinician. All the guidelines agree that the diagnosis of headache is merely clinical and that testing is not recommended if the individual is not significantly more likely than anyone else in the general population to have a significant abnormality. A full history of the temporal profile of the headache should be gathered first: when it first started, the circumstances of its onset, whether it has remained the same over time, and, if not, in what way it has changed. The patient should be questioned carefully about the specific characteristics of the attacks (frequency, duration, severity of the pain, efficacy of the treatments). It is also necessary to establish whether there is a history of other diseases and to investigate gynecological and psychological history, and family history. History alone allows a diagnosis of probable primary headache. Signs of a possible secondary headache must be carefully sought in all patients, even in apparently clear-cut cases. The guidelines recommend careful investigation of new headaches or those whose features have recently changed in order to exclude secondary headache. Once a secondary headache has been reasonably ruled out, it can help the patient to investigate possible comorbid pathologies and suggest appropriate lifestyle changes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient Safety in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Makary, Martin A.; Sexton, J Bryan; Freischlag, Julie A.; Millman, E Anne; Pryor, David; Holzmueller, Christine; Pronovost, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Improving patient safety is an increasing priority for surgeons and hospitals since sentinel events can be catastrophic for patients, caregivers, and institutions. Patient safety initiatives aimed at creating a safe operating room (OR) culture are increasingly being adopted, but a reliable means of measuring their impact on front-line providers does not exist. Methods: We developed a surgery-specific safety questionnaire (SAQ) and administered it to 2769 eligible caregivers at 60 hospitals. Survey questions included the appropriateness of handling medical errors, knowledge of reporting systems, and perceptions of safety in the operating room. MANOVA and ANOVA were performed to compare safety results by hospital and by an individual's position in the OR using a composite score. Multilevel confirmatory factor analysis was performed to validate the structure of the scale at the operating room level of analysis. Results: The overall response rate was 77.1% (2135 of 2769), with a range of 57% to 100%. Factor analysis of the survey items demonstrated high face validity and internal consistency (α = 0.76). The safety climate scale was robust and internally consistent overall and across positions. Scores varied widely by hospital [MANOVA omnibus F (59, 1910) = 3.85, P < 0.001], but not position [ANOVA F (4, 1910) = 1.64, P = 0.16], surgeon (mean = 73.91), technician (mean = 70.26), anesthesiologist (mean = 71.57), CRNA (mean = 71.03), and nurse (mean = 70.40). The percent of respondents reporting good safety climate in each hospital ranged from 16.3% to 100%. Conclusions: Safety climate in surgical departments can be validly measured and varies widely among hospitals, providing the opportunity to benchmark performance. Scores on the SAQ can serve to evaluate interventions to improve patient safety. PMID:16632997

  3. [What is patient autonomy?

    PubMed

    Durand, Guillaume

    What does patient autonomy mean? If an autonomous choice is defined as an objective and rational choice, is the doctor's prescription not always the best route? Our contemporary democracies are marked by moral and religious pluralism which obliges society to respect a multiplicity of choices of existence. Three levels are important in terms of autonomy: a range of intellectual capacities, freedom with regard to constraints (external and internal), the capacity to be in control of one's existence.

  4. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  5. Patient (customer) expectations in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Sedat; Acuner, Taner; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2007-06-01

    The expectations of patient are one of the determining factors of healthcare service. The purpose of this study is to measure the Patients' Expectations, based on Patient's Rights. This study was done with Likert-Survey in Trabzon population. The analyses showed that the level of the expectations of the patient was high on the factor of receiving information and at an acceptable level on the other factors. Statistical meaningfulness was determined between age, sex, education, health insurance, and the income of the family and the expectations of the patients (p<0.05). According to this study, the current legal regulations have higher standards than the expectations of the patients. The reason that the satisfaction of the patients high level is interpreted due to the fact that the level of the expectation is low. It is suggested that the educational and public awareness studies on the patients' rights must be done in order to increase the expectations of the patients.

  6. "The impatient patient".

    PubMed

    Bos, Lodewijk; Carroll, Denis; Marsh, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Modern Healthcare Systems that have embraced ICT and Internet technologies (referred to as Health 1.0) are evolving towards self management but from a clinical knowledge perspective. In contrast, from a user experience perspective, and using the latest web 2.0 technologies, the developing healthcare social networking communities (referred to as Health 2.0) are evolving towards becoming online medical portals. The growing Grand Challenge for healthcare is therefore: how will health care services (Health 1.0) work together with user-generated health care (Health 2.0) in a consumer market place delivering self management services for a healthier lifestyle and medical compliance. What is foreseen is that the self care information tool of the future will be a combination between the patient's observation record and the Internet, with the doctor and the patient positioned together at the intersection but not having to pay attention to the technology. This article deals with various aspects related to this Grand Challenge like the paradigm shift towards a needs-led and consumer-oriented healthcare, the role, supply and quality of information and the changing doctor-patient relationship.

  7. The visually impaired patient.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Eric A; Sperazza, Laura C

    2008-05-15

    Blindness or low vision affects more than 3 million Americans 40 years and older, and this number is projected to reach 5.5 million by 2020. In addition to treating a patient's vision loss and comorbid medical issues, physicians must be aware of the physical limitations and social issues associated with vision loss to optimize health and independent living for the visually impaired patient. In the United States, the four most prevalent etiologies of vision loss in persons 40 years and older are age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. Exudative macular degeneration is treated with laser therapy, and progression of nonexudative macular degeneration in its advanced stages may be slowed with high-dose antioxidant and zinc regimens. The value of screening for glaucoma is uncertain; management of this condition relies on topical ocular medications. Cataract symptoms include decreased visual acuity, decreased color perception, decreased contrast sensitivity, and glare disability. Lifestyle and environmental interventions can improve function in patients with cataracts, but surgery is commonly performed if the condition worsens. Diabetic retinopathy responds to tight glucose control, and severe cases marked by macular edema are treated with laser photocoagulation. Vision-enhancing devices can help magnify objects, and nonoptical interventions include special filters and enhanced lighting.

  8. Diabetic patients: Psychological aspects.

    PubMed

    Adili, Fatemeh; Larijani, Bagher; Haghighatpanah, Mohammadreza

    2006-11-01

    This study was undertaken to consider the psychological aspect of diabetes with regard to improving clinical outcomes. The review was limited to literature reports on the causes, solutions, and treatments of some common psychological problems known to complicate diabetes management. A literature search was undertaken using Pub-Med, CINAHL, Proquest, Elsevier, Blackwell Synergy, Ovid, Ebsco, Rose net, and Google websites, including studies published in English journals between 1995 and 2006. Therefore about 88 articles were selected based on the inclusion criteria. In earlier studies, relatively little empirical research was found to substantiate the effect of psychological counseling in complicated diabetes. The greatest deficits were seen in areas of mental health, self-esteem parent impact, and family cohesion. There were some different factors, which influence the psychological aspect of diabetic patients, such as age, gender, place of living, familial and social support, motivation, energy, life satisfaction, and lifestyle. There are various types of solutions for coping with the psychological problems in diabetic clients. The most essential solution lies in educating the patients and healthcare providers on the subject. Before initiating each educational intervention, a thorough assessment would be crucial. Treatment plans may benefit from cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), behavior family therapy, improving family communication, problem-solving skills, and providing motivation for diabetic patients. Moreover, it seems that the close collaboration between diabetologists and psychologists would be fruitful.

  9. Pain in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  10. Gastric Cancer in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhobi, Manzoor A.; Wani, Khursheed Alam; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Wani, Rouf A.; Peer, G. Q.; Abdullah, Safiya; Wani, Imtiyaz A.; Wani, Muneer A.; Shah, Mubashir A.; Thakur, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to see the clinical, pathological, and demographic profile of young patients with stomach carcinoma besides association with p53. Patients and Methods. Prospective study of young patients with stomach carcinoma from January 2005 to December 2009. A total of 50 patients with age less than 40 years were studied. Results. Male female ratio was 1 : 1.08 in young patients and 2.5 : 1 in older patients. A positive family history of stomach cancer in the first degree relatives was present in 10% of young patients. Resection was possible only in 50% young patients. 26% young patients underwent only palliative gastrojejunostomy. The most common operation was lower partial gastrectomy in 68%. Amongst the intraoperative findings peritoneal metastasis was seen in 17.4% in young patients. 50% young patients presented in stage IV as per AJCC classification (P value .004; sig.). None of the patients presented as stage 1 disease in young group. Conclusion. Early detection of stomach carcinoma is very important in all patients but in young patients it is of paramount importance. PMID:24381753

  11. Defining patient centricity with patients for patients and caregivers: a collaborative endeavour

    PubMed Central

    Yeoman, Guy; Furlong, Patricia; Seres, Michael; Binder, Helena; Chung, Helena; Garzya, Vincenzo; Jones, Rachel RM

    2017-01-01

    Background Patient engagement is an essential aspect in the research/development of biopharmaceutical products and disease management. Improving the lives of patients requires a deep understanding of their medical conditions, experiences, needs and priorities. However, a consistent definition of patient centricity is lacking. A series of initiatives was conducted to define patient centricity and its important principles impacting the biopharmaceutical industry. Methods Interviews, questionnaires and literature reviews were conducted involving key stakeholders to initially identify issues of importance to patients, healthcare providers and payers. Subsequently, two identical workshops which included 22 patients/carers created a definition of patient centricity and the healthcare values important to patients/caregivers. Outputs were tested in a validation exercise involving patients in predominantly US (n=470) and European (n=703) patient forums. Results Initial research provided deeper understanding of patient needs and key topics of interest that were used to cocreate a definition of patient centricity and 10 associated principles of importance to the biopharmaceutical industry. Wider testing of these outputs among predominantly US/European patient communities confirmed their validity. Patient centricity should be defined as ‘Putting the patient first in an open and sustained engagement of the patient to respectfully and compassionately achieve the best experience and outcome for that person and their family’. Important principles for patients focused on education/information, cocreation, access and transparency. Conclusions The development of a consistent definition of patient centricity and its associated principles provides an opportunity for biopharmaceutical companies to adopt and use these as a reference point for consistent patient engagement throughout the product life cycle. PMID:28890797

  12. Defining patient centricity with patients for patients and caregivers: a collaborative endeavour.

    PubMed

    Yeoman, Guy; Furlong, Patricia; Seres, Michael; Binder, Helena; Chung, Helena; Garzya, Vincenzo; Jones, Rachel Rm

    2017-04-01

    Patient engagement is an essential aspect in the research/development of biopharmaceutical products and disease management. Improving the lives of patients requires a deep understanding of their medical conditions, experiences, needs and priorities. However, a consistent definition of patient centricity is lacking. A series of initiatives was conducted to define patient centricity and its important principles impacting the biopharmaceutical industry. Interviews, questionnaires and literature reviews were conducted involving key stakeholders to initially identify issues of importance to patients, healthcare providers and payers. Subsequently, two identical workshops which included 22 patients/carers created a definition of patient centricity and the healthcare values important to patients/caregivers. Outputs were tested in a validation exercise involving patients in predominantly US (n=470) and European (n=703) patient forums. Initial research provided deeper understanding of patient needs and key topics of interest that were used to cocreate a definition of patient centricity and 10 associated principles of importance to the biopharmaceutical industry. Wider testing of these outputs among predominantly US/European patient communities confirmed their validity. Patient centricity should be defined as 'Putting the patient first in an open and sustained engagement of the patient to respectfully and compassionately achieve the best experience and outcome for that person and their family'. Important principles for patients focused on education/information, cocreation, access and transparency. The development of a consistent definition of patient centricity and its associated principles provides an opportunity for biopharmaceutical companies to adopt and use these as a reference point for consistent patient engagement throughout the product life cycle.

  13. Physician-Patient Communication and Patient Compliance: A Theoretical Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clampitt, Phillip G.; Williams, M. Lee

    This paper synthesizes much of the literature concerning physician/patient communication as it relates to patient compliance. Using the theoretical perspective that deals with belief, attitude, intention, and behavior (a perspective generated by Martin Fishbein and Icek Ajzen), a new theoretical orientation for predicting patient compliance is…

  14. Heartburn in patients with achalasia.

    PubMed Central

    Spechler, S J; Souza, R F; Rosenberg, S J; Ruben, R A; Goyal, R K

    1995-01-01

    Heartburn, the main symptom of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD), might be expected to occur infrequently in achalasia, a disorder characterised by a hypertensive lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) that fails to relax. Nevertheless, it is often described by patients with achalasia. The medical records of 32 patients with untreated achalasia who complained of heartburn, and of 35 similar patients who denied the symptom, were reviewed to explore the implications of heartburn in this condition. Data on endoscopic and manometric findings, and on the onset and duration of oesophageal symptoms were collected. Three patterns of heartburn were observed: (1) in 8 patients (25%) the onset of heartburn followed the onset of dysphagia, (2) in 15 patients (47%) heartburn preceded the onset of dysphagia and persisted as dysphagia progressed, and (3) in 9 patients (28%), heartburn preceded the onset of dysphagia and stopped as dysphagia progressed. The mean (SD) basal LOS pressure in the patients with heartburn (38 (16) mm Hg) was significantly lower than that in patients without the symptom (52 (26) mm Hg); the lowest LOS pressure (29 (11) mm Hg) was observed in the subset of patients whose heartburn preceded the onset of dysphagia and then stopped. It is concluded that patients who have achalasia with heartburn have lower basal LOS pressures than patients who have achalasia without this symptom. In some patients with achalasia, the appearance of dysphagia is heralded by the disappearance of longstanding heartburn. For these patients, it is speculated that achalasia develops in the setting of underlying GORD. PMID:7590421

  15. The challenge of patient adherence

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Leslie R; Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; DiMatteo, M Robin

    2005-01-01

    Quality healthcare outcomes depend upon patients' adherence to recommended treatment regimens. Patient nonadherence can be a pervasive threat to health and wellbeing and carry an appreciable economic burden as well. In some disease conditions, more than 40% of patients sustain significant risks by misunderstanding, forgetting, or ignoring healthcare advice. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research studies agree that successful attempts to improve patient adherence depend upon a set of key factors. These include realistic assessment of patients' knowledge and understanding of the regimen, clear and effective communication between health professionals and their patients, and the nurturance of trust in the therapeutic relationship. Patients must be given the opportunity to tell the story of their unique illness experiences. Knowing the patient as a person allows the health professional to understand elements that are crucial to the patient's adherence: beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, cultural context, social supports, and emotional health challenges, particularly depression. Physician–patient partnerships are essential when choosing amongst various therapeutic options to maximize adherence. Mutual collaboration fosters greater patient satisfaction, reduces the risks of nonadherence, and improves patients' healthcare outcomes. PMID:18360559

  16. Angle closure in younger patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Brian M; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Angle-closure glaucoma is rare in children and young adults. Only scattered cases associated with specific clinical entities have been reported. We evaluated the findings in patients in our database aged 40 or younger with angle closure. METHODS: Our database was searched for patients with angle closure who were 40 years old or younger. Data recorded included age at initial consultation; age at the time of diagnosis; gender; results of slit-lamp examination, gonioscopy, and ultrasound biomicroscopy (from 1993 onward); clinical diagnosis; and therapy. Patients with previous incisional surgery were excluded, as were patients with anterior chamber proliferative mechanisms leading to angle closure. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients (49 females, 18 males) met entry criteria. Mean age (+/- SD) at the time of consultation was 34.4 +/- 9.4 years (range, 3-68 years). Diagnoses included plateau iris syndrome (35 patients), iridociliary cysts (8 patients), retinopathy of prematurity (7 patients), uveitis (5 patients), isolated nanophthalmos (3 patients), relative pupillary block (2 patients), Weill-Marchesani syndrome (3 patients), and 1 patient each with Marfan syndrome, miotic-induced angle closure, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, and idiopathic lens subluxation. CONCLUSION: The etiology of angle closure in young persons is different from that in the older population and is typically associated with structural or developmental ocular anomalies rather than relative pupillary block. Following laser iridotomy, these eyes should be monitored for recurrent angle closure and the need for additional laser or incisional surgical intervention. PMID:12545694

  17. Patient Safety: Do Your Homework

    MedlinePlus

    American Society of Plastic Surgeons Home Cosmetic Reconstructive Before & After Photos Find A Surgeon Patient Safety News Patients of Courage About ASPS Menu More Call for a nearby plastic surgeon you can trust | 1-800-514-5058 ...

  18. Leptospirosis in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gancheva, Galya Ivanova

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a re-emerging zoonosis with broad clinical spectrum and high mortality in severe forms. The aim of this study was to analyze clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, epidemiological data, and management in elderly patients with leptospirosis. Toward that end, we performed a descriptive analysis of 15 leptospirosis elderly cases (age 60-78 years) treated at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of University Hospital - Pleven (1976-2012). Patients were serologically confirmed by microscopic agglutination test. Twelve cases (80%) presented with the severe form of leptospirosis. Co-morbidity (hypertonic diseases, chronic pulmonary diseases, chronic alcohol abuse, and diabetes) was registered in 13 cases. All cases had fever, oliguria, conjunctival suffusions, hepatosplenomegaly. Jaundice (14/93%), hemorrhagic diathesis (13/87%), vomiting (11/73%), abdominal pain (10/67%), myalgia (7/47%) and hypotension (7/47%) also were observed. Renal dysfunction was expressed by increased blood urea nitrogen (mean 38.1±24.1mmol/L) and serum creatinine (mean 347.6±179.8μmol/L). Hepatic dysfunction was expressed by increased total serum bilirubin level (mean 274.6±210.7μmol/L) and slightly elevated aminotransferases (ASAT mean 125.8±61.6IU/L; ALAT mean 131.3±126.5IU/L). Five cases (33%) had a lethal outcome. In conclusion, leptospirosis in elderly patients is associated with severe course and higher risk for death, and requires prompt intensive treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Podcasting: contemporary patient education.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Daniel V; Tamura, Thomas K; Sipp, J Andrew; Keamy, Donald G; Eavey, Roland D

    2008-04-01

    Portable video technology is a widely available new tool with potential to be used by pediatric otolaryngology practices for patient and family education. Podcasts are media broadcasts that employ this new technology. They can be accessed via the Internet and viewed either on a personal computer or on a handheld device, such as an iPod or an MP3 player. We wished to examine the feasibility of establishing a podcast-hosting Web site. We digitally recorded pediatric otologic procedures in the operating room and saved the digital files to DVDs. We then edited the DVDs at home with video-editing software on a personal computer. Next, spoken narrative was recorded with audio-recording software and combined with the edited video clips. The final products were converted into the M4V file format, and the final versions were uploaded onto our hospital's Web site. We then downloaded the podcasts onto a high-quality portable media player so that we could evaluate their quality. All of the podcasts are now on the hospital Web site, where they can be downloaded by patients and families at no cost. The site includes instructions on how to download the appropriate free software for viewing the podcasts on a portable media player or on a computer. Using this technology for patient education expands the audience and permits portability of information. We conclude that a home computer can be used to inexpensively create informative surgery demonstrations that can be accessed via a Web site and transferred to portable viewing devices with excellent quality.

  20. Carctol: Profit before Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Edzard

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Carctol is a herbal remedy that recently was widely reported to offer a cure for a range of cancers. This article is aimed at evaluating the evidence that supports this claim. Methods In addition to numerous websites, we conducted systematic searches in six electronic databases. Any factual information relating to Carctol was considered. Results The websites provided the composition of the herbal mixture and numerous claims as to its effectiveness. However, not a single scientific study of any style was found. Conclusions The claim that Carctol is of any benefit to cancer patients is not supported by scientific evidence. PMID:20877681

  1. Rehabilitation of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pandey, M; Thomas, B C

    2001-01-01

    With the developments in cancer treatment, more and more patients are surviving their disease. However, very little emphasis is being placed to rehabilitate these cancer survivors. Ignorance, social structure, stigma attached in seeking psychological help, and poor communication skills of oncology staff all contribute to poor rehabilitative efforts. The priority of governmental agencies and health efforts to fight rampant communicable diseases, malnutrition, maternal health, and the frequent natural calamities, puts rehabilitation movements in the back seat. Treatment and prevention of disability and its rehabilitation requires comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. There is an urgent need to promote physical and psychological rehabilitation.

  2. The patient-friendly practice.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Sharon Kay

    2006-01-01

    In today's medical marketplace, patients see themselves as consumers of healthcare with certain customer-service expectations. The medical practice that is indifferent or resistant to these changes is at risk. Having a good understanding of patient-friendly changes can help a practice survive in a changing environment. A patient-friendly office will continue to meet the needs of the patient by adopting this new practice style.

  3. Patient-centered healthcare design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2011-12-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient's and family's experience in the hospital, and the design of the healthcare environment should support the patient-centered care concept. The purpose of this facility design department is to expand nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enable them to take leadership roles in design efforts. This article focuses on healthcare design guiding principles and features to support organizational cultural initiatives such as patient- and family-centered care and Planetree.

  4. Patient safety--who cares?

    PubMed

    Schwappach, David L B; Conen, Dieter

    2012-07-16

    Medical errors and adverse events are a serious threat to patients worldwide. In recent years methodologically sound studies have demonstrated that interventions exist, can be implemented and can have sustainable, measurable positive effects on patient safety. Nonetheless, system-wide progress and adoption of safety practices is slow and evidence of improvements on the organisational and systems level is scarce and ambiguous. This paper reports on the Swiss Patient Safety Conference in 2011 and addresses emerging issues for patient safety and future challenges.

  5. Profile of Your Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Mark F.; Slade, Debra

    1990-01-01

    The family doctor cares for many geriatric patients. Many of these patients enter the family practice for the first time, having either recently moved to the area or to a nearby long-term care facility. Obtaining a meaningful patient profile is essential to the physicians' care, allowing future medical decisions to be made in the best interest of that person. Patients' beliefs motivate their functioning in a system. Any system has its own history, structure, and function. PMID:21234029

  6. Systems Thinking and Patient Safety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    1 Prologue Systems Thinking and Patient Safety Paul M. Schyve Patient safety is a prominent theme in health care delivery today. This should...been “unenlightened,” to say the least; we would not have been able to apply systems thinking to patient safety. Even today, preventable patient...in the minds of many, to be met with blame and punishment. But systems thinking is now ubiquitous in health care—due, in large measure, to its

  7. Nutritional screening in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J S; Burrough, C A; Green, J L; Brown, G L

    1984-03-01

    Routine nutritional screening of patients admitted to the surgical services confirms a substantial prevalence of malnutrition. Identification of the malnourished patient and the patient who is likely to become malnourished should be done as early as possible in the hospital stay and usually requires only simple, readily available parameters. Nutritional screening is only the first step in the optimal nutritional management of surgical patients. This information should be used to determine the need for further nutritional assessment, the appropriate consultation, and nutritional therapy.

  8. [Glaucoma in the melanoderm patient].

    PubMed

    Denis, P

    2004-06-01

    Much less marginal in France than believed, glaucoma in the melanoderm patient comes early in life, with a more aggressive progression leading to blindness twice as often as in the Caucasian patient. Generally open-angle glaucoma, it may be related to anatomical ocular characteristics of the Black population. Its management is not very different from that of glaucoma in the Caucasian patient.

  9. Professional Preparation in Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigg, R. Morgan, Jr.

    Information on Indiana University's course in patient education is presented, along with sources of additional information on patient education and a summary of a national survey on professional preparation in patient education. An outline of the following course topics is presented: past and current developments, health care delivery, patient…

  10. Dental problems in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Zioło, Anna; Mielnik-Błaszczak, Maria

    2004-01-01

    On the grounds of literature and own clinical experience, pathological changes in epilepitic patients have been described. Dental management procedures in these patients have also been presented. The unquestionable importance of prophylaxis, which may markedly minimize the impact of epilepsy on the incidence of mouth diseases, has been emphasised. It has also been stated that epileptic patients should receive specialised and integrated dental treatment.

  11. Malnutrition in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gyan, Emmanuel; Raynard, Bruno; Durand, Jean-Philippe; Lacau Saint Guily, Jean; Gouy, Sébastien; Movschin, Marie Lespiau; Khemissa, Faiza; Flori, Nicolas; Oziel-Taieb, Sandrine; Bannier Braticevic, Cécile; Zeanandin, Gilbert; Hebert, Christophe; Savinelli, Francesco; Goldwasser, François; Hébuterne, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a critical predictor of toxicity and outcome in patients with cancer and may be perceived differently by patients, relatives, and physicians. To assess the prevalence of malnutrition in oncology departments and to compare it with the perceptions of nutrition status by patients themselves, their closest relatives, and attending physicians. A 1-day multicentric cross-sectional survey on the prevalence of malnutrition was conducted in different oncology departments using patient-, relative-, and physician-specific questionnaires. Malnutrition was defined by a weight loss ≥5% within 1 month or ≥10% within 6 months, a body mass index ≤18.5 kg/m(2) in patients aged <70 years or ≤21 kg/m(2) in patients aged ≥70 years, and/or albuminemia <35 g/L. Questionnaires for assessing medical condition, knowledge of nutrition status, and perceptions of the impact of malnutrition on daily life were distributed to consenting patients, attending physicians, and closest relatives. A total of 2197 patients were included, and 2071 and 976 questionnaires were collected from patients and relatives, respectively. Prevalence of malnutrition was 39%. Physicians overestimated malnutrition (44%), whereas patients and relatives underestimated it (22% and 23%, respectively, P < .001). Conversely, malnutrition-associated symptoms were underestimated by physicians compared with patients and relatives. We found a prevalence of malnutrition of 39%: it was underestimated by patients and relatives and overestimated by physicians.

  12. Managing the chronically late patient.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Every practice has patients who are chronically late. This wrecks havoc with your schedule and makes you less productive. Patients can be trained to respect your time and arrive in the office on time. This article discusses several approaches to managing the chronically late patient.

  13. Patient perception of wound photography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheila C; Anderson, John Ae; Jones, Duncan Vb; Evans, Robyn

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide an assessment of photographic documentation of the wound from the patients' perspective and to evaluate whether this could improve patients' understanding of and involvement in their wound care. Our results revealed that most patients visiting the wound care clinic have difficult-to-see wounds (86%). Only 20% of patients monitor their wounds and instead rely on clinic or nurse visits to track the healing progress. There was a significant association between patients' ability to see their wound and their subsequent memory of the wound's appearance. This was especially true for patients who had recently begun visiting the wound care clinic. This relationship was not present in patients who had visited the clinic for 3  or more years. Patients reported that the inability to see their wounds resulted in feeling a loss of autonomy. The majority of patients reported that photographing their wounds would help them to track the wound progress (81%) and would afford them more involvement in their own care (58%). This study provides a current representation of wound photography from the patients' perspective and reveals that it can motivate patients to become more involved in the management of their wounds - particularly for patients with difficult-to-see wounds. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Patient involvement in clinical teaching.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, V J

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal study of patient refusals (as reported by graduating medical students) to take part in the teaching function of public hospitals. Results from a smaller study of non-patients' attitudes are also reported. Findings are discussed in terms of patients' rights, issues of personal privacy, medical education, and the public good. PMID:7861431

  15. Use of patient-controlled psychiatric hospital admissions: patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Trine; Bliksted, Vibeke; Lomborg, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Mimi

    2017-07-01

    By patient-controlled admission (PCA), psychiatric patients with a PCA contract can initiate a brief admission without a health professional gatekeeper. However, research regarding use of PCA is scarce. In this Danish multi-centre study, motives for and satisfaction with PCA were explored. During a 1-year period, patients from 11 Danish mental health units evaluated PCA using a questionnaire developed for the purpose. In total, 190 patients evaluated 462 admissions. The majority had concluded a PCA contract to receive early help. PCA was mostly initiated because of mental health conditions, but also because of social and everyday problems. The purpose was mainly to be at peace and prevent symptom increase. Patients from units with a quarantine period felt more ready for discharge than the others. Patients were in general satisfied with PCA (61.7%), but patients who hoped for improved medication or wished to obtain more care were less satisfied. Patients can use PCA as a means to receive timely help. Motives for patients seeking help are not limited to mental conditions. Expectations that cannot be met within the organizational structure of the PCA programme are associated with less satisfaction. However, regional differences in structures were associated with satisfaction. Patients who had access to shorter PCAs were more satisfied, and a quarantine period may even help patients become more ready for discharge. A brief admission period does not cause dissatisfaction at discharge and can be used in the clinical setting.

  16. [Patient education in pre-dialysis -- patient-led forums].

    PubMed

    Heatley, S A

    2006-01-01

    In order for patients to make an informed choice about renal replacement therapies, it is important that they are given sufficient and appropriate information, which must include explanations about their condition and likely outcomes with or without treatment. Furthermore information regarding the reality of living with dialysis, its strict regimes and patient's commitment to self care are imperative to enable patients to adapt to a life changing, ongoing, often relentless treatment. Encouraging patients to take control of their chronic illness through the provision of education support and choice is fundamental to the successful outcomes of the patient's journey through the pre-dialysis phase of their illness. This paper describes the implementation of Patient-led Forums designed to offer an education programme for pre-dialysis patients and the benefits gained by those who have attended.

  17. Writing to patients: 'putting the patient in the picture'.

    PubMed

    Reilly, M O; Cahill, M; Perry, I J

    2005-02-01

    We have explored consultant, general practitioner and patient attitudes toward the proposal that following an outpatient consultation, consultants should consider communicating directly with patients in the form of a summary letter, with a copy to the referring general practitioner or other professionals as appropriate. We conducted in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 20 consultants, 16 patients and 12 general practitioners. The consultants and general practitioners were both involved in the care of participating patients. Patients highlighted the likely value of summary letters including, increased knowledge, improvement recall of the clinical encounter, and reassurance. Clinicians were concerned that patients would not understand letters from consultants. Additional concerns included the impact of letter on consultant-general practitioner relationship and medico-legal issues. These findings reflect fundamental differences in expectations about the nature and quality of communications between doctors and their patients.

  18. Patient population controls.

    PubMed

    Carey, R Neill

    2013-03-01

    Quality control (QC) procedures incorporating patient means, or average of normals (AoN) algorithms, have been used in hematology laboratories and large reference laboratories for decades to monitor analytical processes during the periods between the testing of reference sample QC materials. With the advent of middleware that includes AoN capability, these QC procedures are now available to many more laboratories, including medium-sized hospital laboratories. AoN procedures can improve the control of tests that have low "sigma-metrics," such as electrolytes, where relatively low numbers of patient results can be averaged to provide a high probability of detecting medically significant errors. QC of nearly one-third of the tests whose AoN capabilities have been studied would possibly benefit from AoN procedures in medium-sized laboratories. To obtain satisfactory performance, laboratories must tailor the applications of AoN procedures to their particular volumes and test characteristics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Caring for Latino patients.

    PubMed

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients.

  20. The Patient Who Falls

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Mary E.; Kumar, Chandrika

    2013-01-01

    Falls are common health events that cause discomfort and disability for older adults and stress for caregivers. Using the case of an older man who has experienced multiple falls and a hip fracture, this article, which focuses on community-living older adults, addresses the consequences and etiology of falls; summarizes the evidence on predisposing factors and effective interventions; and discusses how to translate this evidence into patient care. Previous falls; strength, gait, and balance impairments; and medications are the strongest risk factors for falling. Effective single interventions include exercise and physical therapy, cataract surgery, and medication reduction. Evidence suggests that the most effective strategy for reducing the rate of falling in community-living older adults may be intervening on multiple risk factors. Vitamin D has the strongest clinical trial evidence of benefit for preventing fractures among older men at risk. Issues involved in incorporating these evidence-based fall prevention interventions into outpatient practice are discussed, as are the trade-offs inherent in managing older patients at risk of falling. While challenges and barriers exist, fall prevention strategies can be incorporated into clinical practice. PMID:20085954

  1. Patient Zero”:

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This article contextualizes the production and reception of And the Band Played On, Randy Shilts’s popular history of the initial recognition of the American AIDS epidemic. Published over twenty-five years ago, the book and its most notorious character, “Patient Zero,” are in particular need of a critical historical treatment. The article presents a more balanced consideration—a “patient’s view”—of Gaétan Dugas’s experience of the early years of AIDS. I oppose the assertion that Dugas, the so-called Patient Zero, ignored incontrovertible information about the condition and was intent on spreading his infection. Instead I argue that scientific ideas in 1982 and 1983 about AIDS and the transmissibility of a causative agent were later portrayed to be more self-evident than they were at the time. The article also traces how Shilts’s highly selective—and highly readable—characterization of Dugas rapidly became embedded in discussions about the need to criminalize the reckless transmission of HIV. PMID:24769806

  2. Depression in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Abbas Asghar-Ali, A; Braun, U K

    2009-02-01

    While the most serious of depressive illnesses in the elderly is major depressive disorder, patients' quality of life can be significantly impacted by dysthmic disorder, sub-threshold depression (minor depression), or a depressive disorder due to a general medical condition, all of which have been shown to be more prevalent than major depression in the community dwelling population of older adults. Older adults are also more likely to develop grief reaction and frequently deal with issues of bereavement. This review will discuss the diagnoses of all relevant depressive diagnoses that primary care physicians are likely to encounter. Among the many different assessment tools that screen for depression the briefest instruments are a two-question screening tool recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and, specifically developed for older adults, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is available in a short 15- Yes/No-question version. Many medical illnesses are associated with depressive symptoms. The focus in this review is on dementing illnesses/cerebrovascular disease, dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and Parkinson disease. First-line pharmacological therapy of depression includes selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Side effects of particular drugs can often be geared towards achieving additional benefits, e.g. weight gain associated with the use of some SSRISs may be helpful for patients with dementia.

  3. Increasing patient engagement: patients' responses to viewing problem lists online.

    PubMed

    Wright, A; Feblowitz, J; Maloney, F L; Henkin, S; Ramelson, H; Feltman, J; Bates, D W

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the opinions, emotions, and actions taken by patients who viewed their electronic problem list via an online personal health record (PHR). An online survey of patients who viewed their problem lists, as maintained by their healthcare provider, in a web-based PHR linked to an electronic health record for the first time. A total 3,649 patients completed the survey, yielding a response rate of 42.1%. Patient attitudes towards the problem list function were positive overall, with 90.4% rating it at least somewhat useful and 86.7% reporting they would probably or definitely use it again. Nearly half (45.6%) of patients identified at least one major or minor problem missing from their list. After viewing the list, 56.1% of patients reported taking at least one action in response, with 32.4% of patients reporting that they researched a condition on the Internet, 18.3% reported that they contacted their healthcare provider and 16.7% reported changing or planning to change a health behavior (patients could report multiple actions). 64.7% of patients reported feeling at least somewhat happy while viewing their problem list, though others reported feeling sad (30.4%), worried (35.7%) or scared (23.8%) (patients could report multiple emotions). A smaller number of patients reported feeling angry (16.6%) or ashamed (14.3%). Patients who experienced an emotional response were more likely to take action. Overall, patients found the ability to view their problem lists very useful and took action in response to the information. However, some had negative emotions. More research is needed into optimal strategies for supporting patients receiving this information.

  4. Pulmonary metastasectomy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Erginel, Basak; Gun Soysal, Feryal; Keskin, Erbug; Kebudi, Rejin; Celik, Alaaddin; Salman, Tansu

    2016-02-02

    This study aims to evaluate the outcomes of pulmonary metastasectomy resections in pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 43 children who were operated on in the Pediatric Surgery Clinic between January 1988 and 2014. Forty-three children (26 boys; 17 girls; mean age 10±4.24 years, range 6 months-18 years) who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy resection were included in the study. The patients were evaluated based on age, gender, history of disease, surgical procedures, complications, duration of hospitalization, duration of chest tube placement, and procedure outcome. Indications for pediatric resections were oncological. Metastasis was secondary to Wilms' tumor in 14 patients, osteosarcoma in 7 patients, Ewing's sarcoma in 5 patients, rhabdomyosarcoma in 5 patients, lymphoma in 3 patients, hepatoblastoma in 2 patients, and other tumors in 7 patients. A total of 59 thoracotomies were performed. Approaches utilized included unilateral posterolateral thoracotomy (n=33), bilateral posterolateral thoracotomy (n=8), and sternotomy (n=2). Wedge resection was the procedure of choice (n=44). In selected cases, 11 segmentectomies, 3 lobectomies, and 1 pneumonectomy were performed. There was no perioperative mortality. One patient suffered prolonged air leak and three patients from fever. All patients received chemotherapy. Radiotherapy was administered to 16 patients (37.2%). Of those 16 patients, 7 had Wilms' tumor, 6 had Ewing's sarcoma/PNET, and 3 were rhabdomyosarcoma patients. During a median follow-up of 3 years, the overall survival was 74.4%. Multidisciplinary treatment involving pediatric oncologists, surgeons, and radiation oncologists is necessary to obtain positive results in children who have pulmonary metastases of oncological diseases. Wedge resection is a suitable option for children because less lung tissue is resected.

  5. Financial Distress in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Jonas A.; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Novel diagnostic and therapeutic options offer hope to cancer patients with both localized and advanced disease. However, many of these treatments are often costly and even well-insured patients can face high out-of-pocket costs. Families may also be at risk of financial distress due to lost wages and other treatment-related expenses. Research is needed to measure and characterize financial distress in cancer patients and understand how it affects their quality of life. In addition, health care providers need to be trained to counsel patients and their families so they can make patient-centered treatment decisions that reflect their preferences and values. PMID:24349677

  6. Bibliotherapy in a Patients' Library *

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, David J.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes the involvement of patients in the Patients' Library at McLean Hospital, and the relationship between them and the librarian in library activities. The publication of a patients' magazine is discussed, with case histories of persons who had taken part in its production. The Patients' Librarian has a personal role in patient therapy, and accounts are given of various activities such as play-reading, poetry-reading, and the discussion of poems by established writers, with therapeutic aims in view. Actual clinical experiences are given. PMID:5146769

  7. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  8. Individual patient information to select patients for different radiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Quik, E H; Feenstra, T L; Postmus, D; Slotman, B J; Leemans, C R; Krabbe, P F M; Langendijk, J A

    2016-07-01

    Proton therapy is an emerging technique in radiotherapy which results in less dose to the normal tissues with similar target dose than photon therapy, the current standard. Patient-level simulation models support better decision making on which patients would benefit most. A simulation model was developed tracking individual patients' status regarding the primary tumour and multiple complications. As a proof of principle, the model was populated based on information from a cohort of 1013 head and neck cancer patients. Dose-volume parameters for photon and proton radiation treatment plans were then fed into the model to compare outcomes in terms of length and quality of life and select patients that would benefit most. The illustrative model could adequately replicate the outcomes of photon therapy in the cohort. Improvements from proton therapy varied considerably between patients. The model projects medium-term outcomes for specific individuals and determines the benefits of applying proton rather than photon therapy. While the model needs to be fed with more and especially recent data before being fully ready for use in clinical practice, it could already distinguish between patients with high and low potential benefits from proton therapy. Benefits are highest for patients with both good prognosis and high expected damage to adjacent organs. The model allows for selecting such patients a priori based on patient relevant outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. IMPROVEMENTS IN KNEE EXTENSION STRENGTH ARE ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVEMENTS IN SELF-REPORTED HIP FUNCTION FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPY FOR FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Thomas J.; Amesur, Ajit K.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Di Stasi, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Background Recovery of strength is critical for return to sport, and is a known predictor of functional outcomes in post-surgical orthopedic populations. Muscle weakness is a known impairment in patients with femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) but whether improvements in muscle strength after arthroscopy are associated with improved hip function is unknown. Hypothesis/Purpose To examine the relationships between changes in hip and thigh muscle strength and self-reported function in athletes undergoing arthroscopy for FAIS. Study Design Single cohort descriptive and correlational study Methods Twenty-eight athletes underwent strength testing and completed the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sports (HOS-S) subscales prior to and six months after surgery. Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength were measured using a Biodex dynamometer at 60 °/s and 300 °/s. Isometric hip abduction strength was measured using a custom dynamometer. Changes in strength, limb symmetry, and HOS scores were assessed using paired t-tests. Spearman's rank correlations were used to examine relationships between change in involved limb strength and change in HOS scores. Results Subjects were tested an average of 32 days before and 178 days after surgery. HOS-ADL and HOS-S subscales improved by a mean of 19.0 ± 21.1 and 23.8 ± 31.9, respectively, over time (p < 0.001). Hip abduction strength did not increase over time in either limb (p ≥ 0.27). Involved limb knee flexion and extension strength did not increase significantly over time (p-values: 0.10-0.48) with the exception of knee extension at 300 °/s (p = 0.04). Uninvolved limb knee extension strength at both velocities and knee flexion strength at 60 °/s improved significantly over time (p < 0.012). Increases in knee extension strength (60 °/s) of the involved limb were significantly correlated with improvements on the HOS-ADL (r = 0.431; 0 = 0

  10. [Management of splenectomized patients].

    PubMed

    Chambon, J P; Vallet, B; Caiazzo, R; Zerbib, P

    2003-09-06

    PARTIAL SPLENECTOMY: Partial resection is possible in certain indications for splenectomy. Partial splenectomy is the best way to prevent postsplenectomy infections, even though vaccination and antibiotic prophylaxis must be prescribed. This association is also necessary when the patient undergoes an autograft to reimplant splenic tissue or develops splenosis, i.e. fortuitous autotransplantation of splenic parenchyma. GUIDELINES FOR PLANNED SPLENECTOMY: Prophylactic vaccination should be performed 15 days, or 6 weeks, before surgery. Antibiotic prophylaxis includes a preoperative injection of cefazolin followed by intravenous amoxicillin, then Oracilline (Penicilline V) with resumption of oral intake. SURGICAL ASPECTS: Indications for laparoscopic surgery have broadened, laparotomy being reserved for the most difficult cases. Special care is recommended concerning complications, particularly respiratory disorders (pleural effusion, atelectasia) and acute pancreatitis.

  11. EUS in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Attila, Tan; Adler, Douglas G; Hilden, Kristen; Faigel, Douglas O

    2009-11-01

    The knowledge of EUS use in children is limited. We investigated the indications, feasibility, safety, and clinical utility of EUS in the management of pediatric GI, pancreatobiliary, and mediastinal diseases. Retrospective study. Two tertiary referral university hospitals. Consecutive children age younger than 18 years referred over a 7-year period for EUS evaluation. Forty EUS scans were performed in 38 children with a mean age of 13.5 years. The indications for pancreatobiliary endosonography were pancreatitis (n = 10), solid pancreatic mass (n = 7), cystic pancreatic mass (n = 1), cyst in the setting of chronic pancreatitis (n = 1), suspected annular pancreas (n = 1), celiac plexus block (n = 1), suspected common bile duct stone (n = 1), abdominal pain and atrophic pancreas (n = 1), ampullary adenoma (n = 1), and abnormal MRCP in a patient with jaundice (n = 1). The indications for gastric EUS were mucosal lesions (n = 2) and subepithelial lesions (n = 4). The indications for mediastinal endosonography were mediastinal masses/lymph nodes (n = 5). The remaining evaluations were performed for esophageal stricture (n = 1), unexplained abdominal pain (n = 1), unexplained abdominal pain with celiac axis block (n = 1), and perirectal fluid collection (n = 1). EUS-guided FNA (EUS-FNA) was performed in 12 (30%) cases and established the correct diagnosis in 9 (75%). EUS-guided fine-needle injections for celiac axis block were performed in 2 (5%) cases. The procedure was successful in all patients, and no complications related to sedation, EUS, or EUS-FNA were encountered. Retrospective study. EUS and EUS-FNA are feasible and safe and have a significant impact on the management of pediatric GI, pancreatobiliary, and mediastinal diseases.

  12. Prescription Opioid Analgesics: Promoting Patient Safety with Better Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Costello, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Patients expect and deserve adequate postoperative pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely used and effective in controlling postoperative pain, but their use poses risks that many patients don't understand and that all too often result in adverse outcomes. Inappropriate and often dangerous use of prescription medication has increased sharply in the past two decades in the United States. Patients and caregivers must have an adequate understanding of safe use, storage, and disposal of opioids to prevent adverse drug events in patients and others. Nurses play a key role in providing this patient education. This article provides a case study that highlights the risks and important aspects of opioid medication use in the postoperative patient.

  13. Can patient safety be measured by surveys of patient experiences?

    PubMed

    Solberg, Leif I; Asche, Stephen E; Averbeck, Beth M; Hayek, Anita M; Schmitt, Kay G; Lindquist, Tim C; Carlson, Richard R

    2008-05-01

    A study was conducted to test whether patient reports of medical errors via surveys could produce sufficiently accurate information to be used as a measure of patient safety. A survey mailed regularly by a large multispecialty medical group to recent patients to assess their satisfaction and error experiences was expanded to collect more details about the patient-perceived errors. Following an initial mailing to 3,109 patients and parents of child patients soon after they had office visits in June 2005, usable mailed or phone follow-up responses were obtained from 1,998 respondents (65.1% adjusted). Responses were reviewed through a two-stage process that included chart audits and implicit physician reviewer judgments. The analysis categorized the review results and compared patient-reported errors with satisfaction. Of the 1,998 respondents, 219 (11.0%) reported 247 separate incidents, for a rate of 12.4 errors per 100 patients. After complete review, only 5 (2.0%) of these incidents were judged to be real clinician errors. Most appeared to represent misunderstandings or behavior/communication problems, but 15.4% lacked sufficient information to categorize. Women, Hispanics, and those aged 41-60 years were most likely to report errors. Those respondents making error reports were much more likely to report visit dissatisfaction than those not reporting them (odds ratio [OR] = 13.8, p < .001). Although patient reports of perceived errors might be useful to improve the patient experience of care, they cannot be used to measure technical medical errors and patient safety reliably without added evaluation. This study's findings need to be replicated elsewhere before generalizing from one metropolitan region and a patient population that is about two-thirds members of one health plan.

  14. [Autonomy of the patient with chronic diseases: from passive patient to active patient].

    PubMed

    González Mestre, Assumpció

    2014-01-01

    Due to social, economic and cultural changes, there has been a transformation of Health Services around the world. A new figure has emerged from this: the Active Patient, more responsible, with more information and willing to change his life as a chronic patient. In order to respond to this new situation, several countries have established initiatives such as self-reliance programmes for chronic patients. The aim of this article is to underline the Expert Patient Programme Catalonia(®) and to explain its operation and the results obtained up until now. The purpose of this program is to improve the experience of chronic disease by patients, from meetings in which an expert patient provides his knowledge and experiences to a group of patients with the same disease, with the aim of promoting changes in habits and lifestyles that improve the quality of life and the coexistence of the person with his chronic process.

  15. Improving emergency department patient flow

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Paul Richard Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) face significant challenges in delivering high quality and timely patient care on an ever-present background of increasing patient numbers and limited hospital resources. A mismatch between patient demand and the ED’s capacity to deliver care often leads to poor patient flow and departmental crowding. These are associated with reduction in the quality of the care delivered and poor patient outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify evidence-based strategies to reduce the amount of time patients spend in the ED in order to improve patient flow and reduce crowding in the ED. The use of doctor triage, rapid assessment, streaming and the co-location of a primary care clinician in the ED have all been shown to improve patient flow. In addition, when used effectively point of care testing has been shown to reduce patient time in the ED. Patient flow and departmental crowding can be improved by implementing new patterns of working and introducing new technologies such as point of care testing in the ED. PMID:27752619

  16. Hallux ulceration in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    ElMakki Ahmed, Mohamed; Tamimi, Abdulhakim O; Mahadi, Seif I; Widatalla, Abubakr H; Shawer, Mohamed A

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a prospective cohort study to assess risk factors associated with hallux ulceration, and to determine the incidence of healing or amputation, in consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus who were treated over the observation period extending from September 2004 to March 2005, at the Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre, Khartoum City, Sudan. There were 122 diabetic patients in the cohort (92 males and 30 females) with an overall mean age of 58 +/- 9 years. Fifty-three percent of patients had complete healing within 8 weeks and 43% healed within 20 weeks. The overall mean time to healing was 16 +/- 8 weeks. In 32 (26.2%) patients, osteomyelitic bone was removed, leaving a healed and boneless hallux. The hallux was amputated in 17 (13.9%) patients; in 2 (1.6%) patients it was followed by forefoot amputation and in 7 (5.7%) patients by below-the-knee amputation. In 90 (73.8%) patients the initial lesion was a blister. In conclusion, hallux ulceration is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and is usually preceded by a blister. Neuropathy, foot deformity, and wearing new shoes are common causative factors; and ischemia, osteomyelitis, any form of wound infection, and the size of the ulcer are main outcome determinants. Complete healing occurred in 103 (85%) of diabetic patients with a hallux ulcer. Vascular intervention is important relative to limb salvage when ischemia is the main cause of the ulcer.

  17. Improving emergency department patient flow.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Paul Richard Edwin

    2016-06-01

    Emergency departments (ED) face significant challenges in delivering high quality and timely patient care on an ever-present background of increasing patient numbers and limited hospital resources. A mismatch between patient demand and the ED's capacity to deliver care often leads to poor patient flow and departmental crowding. These are associated with reduction in the quality of the care delivered and poor patient outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify evidence-based strategies to reduce the amount of time patients spend in the ED in order to improve patient flow and reduce crowding in the ED. The use of doctor triage, rapid assessment, streaming and the co-location of a primary care clinician in the ED have all been shown to improve patient flow. In addition, when used effectively point of care testing has been shown to reduce patient time in the ED. Patient flow and departmental crowding can be improved by implementing new patterns of working and introducing new technologies such as point of care testing in the ED.

  18. Creating the ideal patient experience.

    PubMed

    Purcărea, Th.V

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare industry continues to evolve under conditions of intense competition in approaching health prevention, protection, and promotion. Therefore, healthcare providers are challenged to always ensure better patient experience, winning patients' satisfaction, and loyalty and remain competitive on today's healthcare market. Healthcare markets bring together professionals and their patients into real collaborative relationships, which empower patients to contribute to the healthcare improvement. Within this competitive landscape, which is also characterized by digital health tools boosting patients' awareness and controlling their own health, medical providers need to be perceived as skilled and trustworthy in relying on patients' needs, expectations, and sacrifices are required in order to obtain the promised benefits. Moreover, while constantly providing a holistic assessment of the healthcare services' and experience attributes, acting on feedback and reaching healthcare service excellence, providing a better understanding of all the touch points with their patients and improving the quality and consistency of all these touch points, all these are achieved by employees, who are truly connected to the healthcare business. Today, patients are systematically becoming aware of the diversity of their choices, being increasingly involved in making better healthcare choices, and, so, more and more innovative products are introduced, targeting new patient segments. Findings from the last three years have shown that patients may achieve better outcomes due to the stakeholders' commitment to innovation within the context of the big-data revolution, by building new values.

  19. [Electroconvulsive therapy in nonconsenting patients].

    PubMed

    Besse, M; Methfessel, I; Wiltfang, J; Zilles, D

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a potent and successful method for the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. Severe depressive and psychotic disorders may lead to legal incapacity and inability to consent. In Germany, administration of ECT against the patient's will is feasible under certain constellations and is regulated under the terms of the guardianship law. This article outlines the prevalence, effectiveness and tolerability of ECT when applied in nonconsenting patients. Case report and literature review. The literature on ECT as a treatment in nonconsenting patients is relatively sparse. In 2008 the prevalence in Germany was less than 0.5 % of all patients receiving ECT. Case reports and case series suggest a good and equal level of effectiveness when compared to consenting patients. In the course of treatment the majority of patients consented to receive further ECT and retrospectively judged ECT as helpful. The use of ECT is a highly effective treatment in severe psychiatric disorders even when administered as treatment in nonconsenting patients. It can be lifesaving and lead to a rapid improvement of symptoms and relief from severe suffering also from the patients' perspective. Thus, it seems unethical not to consider ECT as a treatment against the nonautonomous will of legally incompetent patients in individual cases. Nevertheless, physicians should always seek to obtain the patients' consent as soon as possible for both legal and ethical reasons.

  20. Febrile neutropaenia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, M; Nicholson, A; Lee, M G; Wharfe, G; Frankson, M A

    2010-03-01

    Febrile neutropaenia is a common complication of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Empirical antibiotic regimes are based on the epidemiological characteristics of bacterial isolates globally and locally. This study retrospectively reviewed all cases of febrile neutropaenia in patients with confirmed cancer admitted at the University Hospital of the West Indies in the four-year period between, January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006 and who received chemotherapy. Cases were identified from blood culture records and hospital charts which were reviewed to determine the aetiological agents causing bacteraemia, their antimicrobial susceptibilities and clinicalfeatures. These cases were compared with non-neutropaenic cancer patients admitted with fever. A total of 197 febrile episodes in cancer patients were reviewed. Thirty-seven per cent had febrile neutropaenia while 62% were non-neutropaenic. Acute myeloid leukaemia was the most common haematological malignancy and the most common solid tumour was breast cancer. Twenty-six per cent of patients had a positive blood culture. In febrile neutropaenic patients, Escherichia coli was the most common organism isolated followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci while in non-neutropaenic patients, coagulase-negative staphylococci was most common. Acinetobacter infections was prominent in non-neutropaenic patients but absent in neutropaenic patients. More than one organism was cultured in 9 neutropaenic and 18 non-neutropaenic patients. Mortality was 10.8% in neutropaenic and 24.4% in non-neutropaenic patients. Gram-negative organisms are the predominant isolates in febrile neutropaenic episodes in this cohort of patients. Non-neutropaenic patients had an increased mortality with an increase in Acinetobacter infections and multiple isolates.

  1. Primary hyperparathyroidism in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kollars, Josh; Zarroug, Abdalla E; van Heerden, Jon; Lteif, Aida; Stavlo, Penny; Suarez, Luis; Moir, Christopher; Ishitani, Michael; Rodeberg, David

    2005-04-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is unusual in children. We reviewed our experience with HPT to better characterize these children. The retrospective review of patients <19 years old who underwent parathyroid resection for primary HPT from 1970 to 2000 was performed at a single institution.. Fifty-two patients were identified. Median age was 16.8 years (range: 4-18.9) with a female-to-male ratio of 3:2. Eighty-five percent had an elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) level, and 15% had an inappropriately normal PTH level during hypercalcemia. Serum calcium was elevated in all patients except for 2 with multiple endocrine neoplasma (MEN)-IIA and 1 with familial non-MEN HPT, but both had elevated PTH levels. Alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly higher in children with documented bone involvement. At presentation 41 patients (79%) were symptomatic and end-organ damage (nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, acute pancreatitis, or bone involvement) occurred in 23 patients (44%). Thirty-four patients (65%) had a single adenoma; hyperplasia was identified in 16 patients (27%), and of these cases, 57% occurred in patients diagnosed with MEN-I. Short-term complications included transient hypocalcemia in 29 patients (56%) and transient vocal cord paralysis in 2 patients (4%). Long-term complications were significant for permanent hypocalcemia in 2 patients (4%) and no recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries. No parathyroid abnormalities were identified during exploration in 4 (8%) children. Long-term follow-up was achieved in 98% of patients for a mean and median of 13 years. Resolution of hypercalcemia was achieved in 94% of cases. The diagnosis of primary HPT in pediatric patients is frequently delayed, is commonly symptomatic, and has significant morbidity. For children in whom HPT is suspected, evaluation of serum calcium and PTH levels is diagnostic in 100% of children. Parathyroid resection is effective at restoring normal serum calcium, has few complications, and is

  2. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  3. Informing patients: a guide for providing patient health information.

    PubMed

    Tang, P C; Newcomb, C

    1998-01-01

    To understand and address patients' need for information surrounding ambulatory-care visits. The authors conducted two patient focus groups regarding patient education. The first covered general information needs of patients and the second explored their reactions to a computer-generated patient handout that was developed in response to the results of the first focus group and implemented in a clinic. Participants sought information about their health--generally after the encounter with their caregiver. They wanted a permanent record of personal health data and relevant educational information. Participants recommended that the information be concise, clear, and illustrated with graphics if appropriate. Receiving health-related information from their providers favorably affected the participants' trust in, relationship with, and confidence in their physicians. When given printouts with graphic trends depicting their responses to therapy, participants reported that they were more motivated to adhere to a treatment plan and were more satisfied with their care. Based on the results of the focus groups, we developed a set of attributes (P.A.T.I.E.N.T.) to guide the development of patient and consumer health information. Patients participating in our focus groups felt that providing printed summary information to patients at the end of a clinic visit improves their understanding of their care, enhances their relationships with providers, improves their satisfaction with care, and motivates them to adhere to treatment plans. Further empirical studies are necessary to test their perceptions.

  4. [Patient education in cystic fibrosis: what skills for the patient?].

    PubMed

    David, V; Iguenane, J; Ravilly, S

    2007-01-01

    In France since 2002 two major changes have occurred in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis: systematic neonatal screening and the establishment of specialised CF centres. One of the roles of the CF centres is therapeutic education of the patients and their families. The proposed educational approach consists of 4 steps: an educational diagnosis to assess the patient; an educational contract based on the capabilities and objectives previously identified by the team; implementation of the education programme which organises the teaching of the patient and, finally, evaluation. With the goal of facilitating the establishment of patient education in the CF centres we present the learning objectives for patients suffering from cystic fibrosis, based on the capabilities that the patients need to acquire in the course of the education programme. Based on the capabilities and learning objectives of the patients the working party are developing valid tools for the instructor/carer. They present the outcomes of the meetings, the educational principles of implementation and the respective roles of the patient and the carer.

  5. Patient reported outcomes and patient empowerment in clinical genetics services.

    PubMed

    McAllister, M; Dearing, A

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of clinical genetics services (CGS), including genetic counseling and genetic testing, has been problematic. Patient mortality and morbidity are unlikely to be directly improved by interventions offered in CGS. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are not routinely measured in CGS evaluation, but this may change as patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) become a key part of how healthcare services are managed and funded across the world. However, there is no clear consensus about which PROMs are most useful for CGS evaluation. This review summarizes the published research on how PROs from CGS have been measured and how patients may benefit from using those services, with a focus on patient empowerment. Many patient benefits (PROs) identified repeatedly in the research literature can be re-interpreted within a patient empowerment framework. Other important PROs identified include family functioning, social functioning, altruism, sense of purpose, enabling development of future research and treatment/participating in research. Well-validated measures are available to capture (dimensions of) patient empowerment. Although generic measures of family functioning are available, suitable measures capturing social functioning, development of future treatments, and altruism were not identified in this review. Patient empowerment provides one useful approach to measuring PROs from CGS.

  6. Patient opinion regarding patient-centered medical home fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Randell K; King, Dana E; Andrews, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Although conceptually there is agreement on how the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) should be organized, there is little information regarding which PCMH components are the most important to patients. An anonymous, voluntary survey was administered to patients at three US academic medical centers. Questions sought opinions regarding the National Committee for Quality Assurance's key components and essential elements of the PCMH. Analysis of the survey responses was conducted using SAS version 9.1. A total of 780 surveys were returned. Patients expressed believing strongly that the ability to coordinate care, help patients to manage their own disease, and track laboratory results were the most important aspects of a PCMH office. There were no differences in response to the survey according to age, sex, race, or site. Patients listed care coordination, patient self-management, and improved access to care as the top priority attributes of a PCMH. Patients were consistent in their opinions that care coordination, access, and patient self-management were the most important elements of a PCMH.

  7. Provider and patient perception of psychiatry patient health literacy.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Opal; Vandenberg, Amy; May, Meghan E

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate health literacy in adults is a nationwide issue that is associated with worse health outcomes. There is a paucity of literacy regarding rates of inadequate health literacy in psychiatric populations. The aim of the study was to identify an existing tool that would easily identify patients who had inadequate health literacy, so that a targeted intervention could be performed. Secondarily we attempted to compare rates of inadequate health literacy with providers' perception of patients' health literacy. We assessed health literacy in a psychiatric population by administering the Brief Health Literacy Survey (BHLS). Additionally, all psychiatry residents, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and social workers were surveyed to assess their perception of patient health literacy. Differences between patient health literacy and provider expectations of patient health literacy were compared. Inadequate health literacy was identified in 31 out of 61 patients (50.8%) using 2 questions from the BHLS. Only 9 (29%) of patients who were identified as having inadequate health literacy were identified by both BHLS questions. In contrast, almost 100% of providers identified their patients, in general, as having inadequate health literacy. These results identify a higher rate of health literacy in a psychiatric inpatient population than in the general population. However, providers at this institution likely over-identify health literacy. This highlights the need for a health literacy tool that can easily target patients with inadequate health literacy for an intervention.

  8. [Anemia in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Lausević, Mirjana; Nesić, Vidosava; Jovanović, Natasa; Stojimirović, Biljana

    2006-01-01

    A normocytic normochromic anemia is one of the first signs of renal failure. Since anemia increases morbidity and mortality, its elimination is one of the essential objectives of the treatment. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has changed the therapeutical approach to anemia. The aim of the present study was to compare efficacy of anemia correction in peritoneal dialysis patients depending on treatment and dialysis modality. The study is the retrospective analysis of 64 patients who presented to our Clinic in 2003. Eighteen (28.13%) patients were treated with rHuEPO, 14 (28%) underwent continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), 2 (100%)--automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and 2 (33.3%)--intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD). Mean hemoglobin level was 98.6 +/- 17.82 g/l in patients treated with rHuEPO versus 98.81 +/- 15.14 g/l in patients without rHuEPO treatment. Erythropoietin requirements were 3392.85 +/- 1211.77 IU/week All patients received iron supplementation during rHuEPO therapy. Mean serum ferritin levels were 463.41 +/- 360 ug/l. Transferrin saturation (TSAT) was 0.35 +/- 0.16%. No difference of serum iron and TSAT levels was found between CAPD and IPD patients. The degree of anemia significantly differed between CAPD and IPD patients. A total of 17.11% of PD patients were given blood transfusions, most frequently during the first three months after the onset of dialysis. Our conclusion is that the number of patients receiving rHuEPO should be increased, as 50% of our patients should be substituted, while only 28% are being treated. As 50% of patients receiving rHuEPO failed to reach target Hgb levels, higher EPO doses should be considered. Iron stores should be continuously monitored, particularly in patients receiving rHuEPO, since iron deficiency is an important problem for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, especially during erythropoietin therapy. Oral iron supplementation is satisfactory in the majority of patients, and iron

  9. Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections With Needle Tenotomy for Gluteus Medius Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James J.; Harrison, Julian R.; Boachie-Adjei, Kwadwo; Vargas, Elizabeth; Moley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gluteal tendinopathy is a prevalent condition that can be associated with significant pain and disability. To date, no studies have prospectively assessed the efficacy of intratendinous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections as a minimally invasive treatment for gluteus medius tendinopathy. Purpose: To prospectively assess the efficacy of intratendinous PRP injections as treatment for chronic recalcitrant gluteus medius tendinopathy. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: During the study period between July 2011 and November 2015, data were collected from the Hospital for Special Surgery Center for Hip Preservation Outcomes Registry on participants who underwent ultrasound-guided intratendinous PRP injections for recalcitrant gluteus medius tendinosis and/or partial tears of the tendon associated with moderate to severe lateral hip pain for longer than 3 months. All participants were assessed pre- and postinjection with 4 outcome measures: modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score–Activities of Daily Living subscale (HOS-ADL), Hip Outcome Score–Sport-Specific subscale (HOS-Sport), and the International Hip Outcome Tool–33 (iHOT-33). Demographic data, including age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, and smoking status, were also collected. Results: A total of 21 patients were included in the study, with a mean follow-up of 19.7 months (range, 12.1-32.3 months). The mean improvements from preinjection to postinjection follow-up were 56.73 to 74.17 for mHHS, 68.93 to 84.14 for HOS-ADL, 45.54 to 66.72 for HOS-Sport, and 34.06 to 66.33 for iHOT-33. All mean outcome measure improvements were clinically and statistically significant (P < .001). Length of follow-up was positively correlated with improvements in HOS-ADL (P = .021) and HOS-Sport (P = .004) scores. No adverse events were observed during or after the procedure. Conclusion: In this registry study with prospective follow-up, we found ultrasound

  10. Prioritization strategies for patient evacuations.

    PubMed

    Childers, Ashley Kay; Mayorga, Maria E; Taaffe, Kevin M

    2014-03-01

    Evacuation from a health care facility is considered last resort, and in the event of a complete evacuation, a standard planning assumption is that all patients will be evacuated. A literature review of the suggested prioritization strategies for evacuation planning-as well as the transportation priorities used in actual facility evacuations-shows a lack of consensus about whether critical or non-critical care patients should be transferred first. In addition, it is implied that these policies are "greedy" in that one patient group is given priority, and patients from that group are chosen to be completely evacuated before any patients are evacuated from the other group. The purpose of this paper is to present a dynamic programming model for emergency patient evacuations and show that a greedy, "all-or-nothing" policy is not always optimal as well as discuss insights of the resulting optimal prioritization strategies for unit- or floor-level evacuations.

  11. Web Applications for Patient Communication.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kristopher; Reicher, Murray A

    2016-12-01

    Communication between imaging professionals and patients can help achieve many goals, including improved patient understanding of imaging-related diagnostic and treatment options, better compliance with appropriate imaging screening procedures, and improved efficiency of service. The explosive growth of out-of-pocket consumer spending on health care has heightened health care shopping, thus making patient communication an important goal of any imaging practice or health care organization. Furthermore, the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System introduced by CMS will publicly disclose physicians' quality ratings, which are in part dependent on patient engagement. The authors summarize the rationale for web communication with patients, the range of content that should be considered, and the technology options. The aim is to help imaging providers develop organized patient communication strategic and implementation plans. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutritional Alert in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Brieux, Humberto Fernán Mandirola; Kaminker, Diego; Campos, Fernando; Guillen, Sebastian; Alejandris, Javier; Luna, Daniel; Baum, Analia; de Quirós, Fernán Gonzalez Bernaldo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to assess a nutritional risk alert using an Informatics System in hospitalized patients versus the conventional methodology. We studied 400 medical patients at the Belgrano Hospital Critical Care Unit. We considered two groups of 200 patients. In the first the group (Control Group), nutritional risk was diagnosed in a traditional way. In the second group (Alarm Group), nutritional risk was diagnosed with an alert system. The alert was triggered when a patient showed low levels of, at least, two of the following variables: albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, lymphocyte or low body mass index (BMI). Nutritional risk was detected in 20.3% of the Control Group patients while, in the Alert Group, nutritional risk was detected in 34.3% of the patients; the difference between the two groups was significant (p<0.001), with a sensitivity rate of 99% and a specificity rate of 98%. Malnutrition is more easily detected when using an alert system.

  13. Oral lesions in haemopathic patients.

    PubMed

    Grande, M; Milano, V; Desiate, A; Martinelli, A; Iaffaldano, B

    1990-03-01

    This paper deals with the oral manifestations observed in patients with haemolymphopathies and oral complications associated with systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. We report the percentage of oral manifestations observed in 30 patients treated with cytotoxic drugs for malignant haemolymphopathies or other tumors after 2-4 cycles of systemic combinations chemotherapy. No sex or age differences were recorded except for abnormalities of taste present only in 13% treated patients older than 50. Stomatitis was more frequent in patients with malignant haemolymphopathies than in patient with other neoplastic diseases, probably due to the fact that in the former group neutropenia and thrombocytopenia induced by bone marrow infiltration or by more aggressive combination chemotherapy are most frequent. An oral care protocol for these patients is suggested.

  14. Trading patients. Lessons from Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Botten, Grete; Grepperud, Sverre; Nerland, Sölve Mikal

    2004-09-01

    The next few decades will bring about more trade in services, among them health care. This paper describes a recent project on cross-border trading of patients initiated by the Norwegian parliament (The Patient Bridge). This health policy reform met some resistance among hospital physicians. However, patients were willing to participate if being properly informed and supported by local health care workers. The Patient Bridge turned out to be a relatively expensive project partly because of the transaction costs involved (transportation and escort) and partly because of high treatment costs. Excessive treatment costs were a result of insufficient cost-consciousness in the purchasing organization. The Patient Bridge revealed large price differentials not only between Norwegian and foreign hospitals, but also between hospitals abroad, even within the same country. This finding points to the possibilities of reaching mutual gains from trading patients across borders.

  15. Nurses' perceptions of patient rounding.

    PubMed

    Neville, Kathleen; Lake, Kristen; LeMunyon, Danielle; Paul, Darilyn; Whitmore, Karen

    2012-02-01

    This descriptive pilot study explored hospital staff nurses' perceptions toward the practice of patient rounding. Rounding has re-emerged as a standard practice initiative among nurses in hospitals and has been associated with a decrease in call lights and falls, increased patient satisfaction and safety, and quieter nursing units. Regardless of these outcomes, controversy exists among nurses regarding rounding. The Nurses' Perception of Patient Rounding Scale (K. Neville, unpublished manuscript, 2010) was developed to gain an understanding of nurses' perceptions of rounding. Nurses identified rounding as valuable and perceived hourly rounding to be beneficial to patients and families but significantly less beneficial to their own professional practice. Challenges to rounding as a practice include issues of documentation, patient ratios, and skill mix. Findings support the need for further research to address the challenges of patient rounding for nursing.

  16. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the sole cause of the pneumonia in two patients and a contributing cause, along with aerobic gram-negative bacteria, in another five, four of whom also had a fungal infection. Two patients, both of whom survived, had nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. PMID:6342741

  17. [Nursing approaches toward postoperative pain in patients: patients' opinions].

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Meryem; Gürler, Hesna

    2011-04-01

    We aimed in this defining study to determine patients' opinions about nursing practices with respect to their postoperative pain and their satisfaction with these practices. Data were collected by two questionnaires that were prepared by the researchers. The collected data were evaluated with chi-square and number, frequency tests. Of the 360 patients participating in this study, 61.4% were women, 83% were over 40 years old and 88% had low educational level. 60.4% had no previous surgery experience. It was determined that 30.6% of patients had undergone heart-lung (cardiovascular system, CVS) and 25.5% gastrointestinal system (GIS) surgery. It was found that 96.4% of patients experienced pain while coughing and 81.9% while getting out of bed. 96.4% of patients reported difficulty in coughing, 78.3% difficulty in mobilization and 46.7% difficulty in breathing because of postoperative pain. It was determined that patients who underwent CVS, TAH+BSO and GIS operations experienced more pain while coughing and trying to get out of bed, while patients who underwent discectomy experienced more pain while walking. There was a significant difference between types of operation and pain (p<0.05) and between activities in which patients experienced difficulty and types of operation (p<0.05). The patients stated that nurses did not use a pain scale, provide information about how pain could be relieved, demonstrate what they needed to do during the activities that caused pain, assist the patients to reposition to relieve the pain, or use any non-pharmacological interventions. Nevertheless, all of the patients were satisfied with the analgesics that were administered by nurses for pain relief.

  18. Implementing national patient safety alerts.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sally; Taylor, Natalie; Lawton, Rebecca; Slater, Beverley

    National patient safety alerts are sometimes difficult to implement in an effective way. All trusts have to declare compliance with alerts as part of a three-step process to improve patient safety. This article discusses an alternative way of implementing national patient safety alerts and describes how behaviour-change methods can be used to successfully implement lasting changes in practice at ward or departmental level.

  19. [Team Care and Patient Safety].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of patient safety management is to nurture an environment which provides optimal care for each patient through the cooperation of each healthcare staff member based on the idea of team care. This is based on the safety culture of an organization that places value on sharing information. Laboratory medicine is expected to become more important in the areas of staff, patient, and community education.

  20. [Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-07-01

    Dyspnea occurs in most cancer patients and is often associated with severe pain. Pulmonary rehabilitation has become increasingly important to improve ADL and QOL and to relieve pain that results from dyspnea. Although pulmonary rehabilitation is now provided mainly during the perioperative period, it has been recognized as an effective procedure for patients before, during, or after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It is also useful for patients with advanced or terminal cancer. However, an evidence-based cancer rehabilitation procedure has to be established.

  1. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    cornea’s defense mechanisms and subsequent events that may lead to cornea opacification and the need for cornea transplant . Currently these patients...cornea’s defense mechanisms and subsequent events that may lead to cornea opacification and the need for cornea transplant . Currently these patients...resistant crosslinked amniotic membranes for treating cornea of burn patients that were produced in Years 1 and 2. Major findings: Identified

  2. [Sophrology for patients in oncology].

    PubMed

    Barré, Chantal; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Mosseri, Véronique; Carrié, Sylvie; Dolbeault, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    It is important to support patients with cancer during their care pathway and even beyond. They undergo long and difficult treatments, all anxiety-causing situations and sources of stress. Sophrological techniques help patients to find calm, lessen their fears and offer them the opportunity to work on themselves through simple easily reproducible exercises. This observation has been verified by a study carried out at the Institut Curie with patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  3. Scripting patienthood with patient clothing.

    PubMed

    Topo, Päivi; Iltanen-Tähkävuori, Sonja

    2010-06-01

    The potential of care environments to promote patient healing has gained increasing attention over the last decade, with evidence-based designs used to explore developments in this field. Medical textiles, such as clothes provided to patients, are part of the care environment in many countries. Our study focuses on patients' experiences of such clothing. The goal of this research is to understand how patienthood is constructed in relation to patient clothing and the practices around their use. The study is based on four group interviews involving a total of 12 people with experience of being patients in a hospital or of visiting residential care environments. We employed an active interview format, and the medical textiles currently used in Finnish hospitals and residential care facilities were available for scrutiny during the interviews. Content analyses were carried out on the interview transcripts. Patient clothing was critically evaluated by the participants; they experienced giving up their own clothes as akin to a rite of passage into their new role as a patient. The low status of a patient in a hospital environment was symbolised by the outworn appearance of patient clothing and the problems in protecting privacy. Patient clothing was also felt to provide limited possibilities for being active and in some cases was found to be annoying or even harmful and upsetting. For patients, being dressed in patient clothing may be symbolic of lower status and narrowed agency in everyday life. We can conclude that artefacts such as clothing worn in care environments need to be given attention when considering possibilities for improving care.

  4. Expert patients: learning from HIV.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Molly

    2011-04-01

    The outbreak of HIV in the early 1980s saw widespread activism among patients and community supporters. The author, a young physician in San Francisco at the time, describes how coming of age as a clinician in the midst of this activism affected her concept of the patient-physician relationship. The insistence of a particular patient, Robert, on specifying his treatment goals illustrates that even people with substantial cognitive challenges can participate in their own care in an egalitarian and active manner.

  5. Patient or customer?

    PubMed

    Parker, J M

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates caring in practice within the context of the global imperative of increasing rationalisation of care based on an economic ethic. The notion of the global marketplace has spread to the domain of health services, so that 'health' has come to be seen as a commodity, with the body as its site, and the 'patient' a customer; clinicians work to construct standard pathways through the healthcare supermarket. The challenge for nurses is to work within but also to challenge and resist the reductionist impetus of economically based and commercially driven approaches to health care. They must retain the sense of the value of the wholeness of the person, the deeply personal and profoundly significant professional-recipient relationship, and find ways of demonstrating their capacity to deliver high-quality care in a cost-effective way. Proper and appropriate accountability is a key strategy to maintaining quality nursing as a significant aspect of care. The expansion of the role of the advanced practice nurse is very useful in providing holistic and cost-effective care, though there are currently limitations to scope of practice that need to be removed. The metaphor of the marketplace, underpinned by powerful global economic forces, can draw us into unthinking compliance with its imperatives--but other metaphors are available. Metaphor and creativity are linked, and we need to consider how the creative use of language can facilitate the emergence of new ways of understanding in health care.

  6. Psychological distress and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Greenley, J R; Young, T B; Schoenherr, R A

    1982-04-01

    Psychologically distressed patients and clients of health care and social service organizations are found to report somewhat more dissatisfaction with services than do the nondistressed. Four explanations for this relationship are examined: 1) the psychologically distressed are generally dissatisfied; 2) service providers react negatively to the psychologically distressed; 3) psychologically distressed patients are dissatisfied when service providers do not respond to their psychological needs; and 4) patients who deny their psychological distress tend to be dissatisfied. The results show that the psychologically distressed report more dissatisfaction because of the very high levels of dissatisfaction found among patients who deny having personal problems.

  7. Violent psychiatric patients: a study.

    PubMed

    Kermani, E J

    1981-04-01

    In a study of fifty-three violent psychiatric patients in a psychiatric hospital setting, it was found that there are two distinct major groups of violent patients--one of patients with a long history of antisocial behavior who are often chronically homicidal and suicidal, and another of patients who neither have a history of destructive behavior nor exhibit homicidal or suicidal tendencies. The latter become acutely assaultive only during the course of psychiatric illness. The personality traits and background associated with these two groups offer additional contrasts. Each group presents different problems and, of major importance to the psychiatric practioner, each group requires different management.

  8. Patients' responsibilities in medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Draper, Heather; Sorell, Tom

    2002-08-01

    Patients have not been entirely ignored in medical ethics. There has been a shift from the general presumption that 'doctor knows best' to a heightened respect for patient autonomy. Medical ethics remains one-sided, however. It tends (incorrectly) to interpret patient autonomy as mere participation in decisions, rather than a willingness to take the consequences. In this respect, medical ethics remains largely paternalistic, requiring doctors to protect patients from the consequences of their decisions. This is reflected in a one-sided account of duties in medical ethics. Duties fall mainly on doctors and only exceptionally on patients. Medical ethics may exempt patient from obligations because they are the weaker or more vulnerable party in the doctor-patient relationship. We argue that vulnerability does not exclude obligation. We also look at other ways in which patient responsibilities flow from general ethics: for instance, from responsibilities to others and to the self, from duties of citizens, and from the responsibilities of those who solicit advice. Finally, we argue that certain duties of patients counterbalance an otherwise unfair capacity of doctors as helpers.

  9. Patient bill of rights 2001.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, G C

    2001-01-01

    Breaking gridlock on managed care reform, a bipartisan coalition in Congress introduced the newest version of a patient bill of rights. Unlike last year's ill-fated Norwood-Dingell bill, the Bipartisan Patient Protection Act of 2001 has strong bipartisan support; concern remains, however, on the provisions that allow patients to sue their managed care plan. The debate now focuses on the type of liability reform that Congress and the White House can agree on. If they are able to agree, a patient bill of rights may soon become law.

  10. Government influence on patient organizations.

    PubMed

    Van de Bovenkamp, Hester M; Trappenburg, Margo J

    2011-12-01

    Patient organizations increasingly play an important role in health care decision-making in Western countries. The Netherlands is one of the countries where this trend has gone furthest. In the literature some problems are identified, such as instrumental use of patient organizations by care providers, health insurers and the pharmaceutical industry. To strengthen the position of patient organizations government funding is often recommended as a solution. In this paper we analyze the ties between Dutch government and Dutch patient organizations to learn more about the effects of such a relationship between government and this part of civil society. Our study is based on official government documents and existing empirical research on patient organizations. We found that government influence on patient organizations has become quite substantial with government influencing the organizational structure of patient organizations, the activities these organizations perform and even their ideology. Financing patient organizations offers the government an important means to hold them accountable. Although the ties between patient organizations and the government enable the former to play a role that can be valued as positive by both parties, we argue that they raise problems as well which warrant a discussion on how much government influence on civil society is acceptable.

  11. Strategies for improving patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Strand, J

    1994-01-01

    Achieving patient compliance in taking prescribed medications is a formidable challenge for all clinicians. As PAs, we have daily opportunities to communicate with patients and improve their compliance. An office-based compliance program, combining patient education and behavior-modification components, can be beneficial in this regard. Strategies for improving compliance include giving clear, concise, and logical instructions in familiar language, adapting drug regimens to daily routines, eliciting patient participation through self-monitoring, and providing educational materials that promote overall good health in connection with medical treatment.

  12. Patient Transport via Commercial Airlines

    PubMed Central

    Macnab, Andrew John

    1992-01-01

    Because the frequency of patient transport from one hospital to another is increasing and the popularity of air travel continues to rise, physicians should be aware of the procedures for patient transport by commercial airlines. Major airlines in Canada have experienced personnel and established procedures that facilitate the transportation of patients with special medical needs. By working with the airline medical health officers and using up-to-date equipment, physicians can achieve safe, cost-effective transport of appropriate patients via commercial aircraft. PMID:21221401

  13. Nutritional assessment of surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, C S; Stegman, M R

    1988-10-01

    In order to test the sensitivity and specificity of the East Orange Nutritional Screening Form (EONSF), nutritional assessments were performed on a random sample of 10% of general medical/surgical admissions at a large midwestern veteran's administration hospital. Patients were followed until discharge to determine if they met the standard criteria of additional nutritional support. The tool correctly identified patients at nutritional risk (sensitivity) 95% of the time and patients not at nutritional risk (specificity) 89% of the time. It proved to be an effective, low-cost tool for identifying patients at risk and for planning appropriate nutritional strategies.

  14. Engaging patients through your website.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kimberlee; Ornes, Lynne L; Paulson, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Legislation requires the healthcare industry to directly engage patients through technology. This paper proposes a model that can be used to review hospital websites for features that engage patients in their healthcare. The model describes four levels of patient engagement in website design. The sample consisted of 130 hospital websites from hospitals listed on 2010 and 2011 Most Wired Hospitals. Hospital websites were analyzed for features that encouraged patient interaction with their healthcare according to the levels in the model. Of the four levels identified in the model, websites ranged from "informing" to "collaborative" in website design. There was great variation of features offered on hospital websites with few being engaging and interactive.

  15. Effective writing that attracts patients.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Doctors today not only must communicate verbally, they must also realize that the written word is important to their ability to connect with the patients that they already have and also to attract new patients. Doctors will be expected to write blogs, to create content for their Web sites, to write articles for local publications, and even to learn to express themselves in 140 characters or less (i.e., Twitter). This article presents 10 rules for selecting the right words to enhance your communication with existing patients and potentially to attract new patients to your practice.

  16. What can Crohn's patients eat?

    PubMed

    McDonald, P J; Fazio, V W

    1988-08-01

    Seventy-one patients with Crohn's disease were interviewed about their diet. All had undergone surgery for the condition. Thirty-seven patients had an ileostomy and 34 patients did not. Information about the effect of 32 foodstuffs and drinks, what advice had been given, who had given it, and the patients' attitude to food, was obtained. Twenty-seven fit health workers acted as a control group. Corn, nuts, fizzy drinks, raw fruits, shellfish and pickles in the ileostomy patients and nuts, raw fruit and tomatoes in the non-ileostomy patients gave rise to problems. These differences were statistically significant (P less than 0.01) when compared to the control group. Chicken, white bread, rice, potatoes and lamb were the foods least likely to provoke symptoms in all the groups. "Eat what you can" was the commonest dietary advice given and physicians were the most important source of that advice. More than half of the patients thought their diet was adequate but more Crohn's patients than controls took regular vitamin supplements. Although only two patients considered that diet might be responsible for their disease, most thought dietary factors important in controlling symptoms or aiding recovery.

  17. Disclosing adverse events to patients.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Michael D; Barach, Paul; Derse, Arthur; Maklan, Claire W; Wlody, Ginger Schafer; Fox, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    The rationale for, and recommended approaches to, disclosing adverse events to patients are examined on the basis of the experience of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The VHA's National Ethics Committee endorses a general policy requiring the routine disclosure of adverse events to patients and offers practical recommendations for implementation. Disclosure is required when the adverse event (1) has a perceptible effect on the patient that was not discussed in advance as a known risk; (2) necessitates a change in the patient's care; (3) potentially poses an important risk to the patient's future health, even if that risk is extremely small; (4) involves providing a treatment or procedure without the patient's consent. From an ethical perspective, disclosure is required and should not be limited to cases in which the injury is obvious or severe. Disclosure of near misses is also discretionary but is advisable at times. In general, disclosure by a clinician involved in the patient's care is appropriate. Although a variety of psychological and cultural factors may make clinicians and organizations reluctant to disclose adverse events to patients, the arguments favoring routine disclosure are compelling. Organizations should develop clear policies supporting disclosure and should create supportive environments that enable clinicians to meet their ethical obligations to disclose adverse events to patients and families.

  18. Orthodontic treatment in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Łoboda, Magdalena; Marcinkowska-Mituś, Agata; Durka-Zajac, Magdalena; Pawłowska, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The progress in oncological treatment has led to the current increase of childhood cancer survival rate to 80%. That is why orthodontists more and more frequently consult patients who had completed a successful anti-cancer therapy in childhood. Oncological treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy or supportive immunosuppressive therapy cause numerous side effects in growing patients, connected i.a. with growth, the development of teeth or the viscerocranium. This is a special group of patients that needs an optimised plan of orthodontic treatment and often has to accept a compromise result. The purpose of the current work is to discuss the results of orthodontic treatment in patients after an anti-cancer therapy. Time of treatment was 12,5 months. In 6 patients (from 40 undergoing orthodontic therapy) we haven't reached a normocclusion, in 9 patients we should have stopped the therapy because of the recurrence. In 11 patients we found mucosa inflammation and in 1 patient the therapy stopped before the end because of very low oral hygiene level. Bearing in mind the limited number of original works on the above topic in Polish medical literature, the study has been carried out in order to make Polish orthodontists more acquainted with the topic and the standards of dealing with an oncological patient.

  19. Patient Symptomatology in Anal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Wick, Elizabeth C; Leeds, Ira L; Efron, Jonathan E; Gearhart, Susan L; Safar, Bashar; Fang, Sandy H

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) is becoming increasingly advocated as a method of screening for anal dysplasia in high-risk patients. To describe, through HRA findings, the association between patient symptomatology and anal dysplasia among patients at high risk for anal dysplasia. Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted of data from a prospectively maintained HRA database on all patients undergoing HRA with biopsy from November 1, 2011, to March 13, 2014, at a tertiary care HRA clinic. Data included demographics, medical history and comorbidities, HIV status and related measures (CD4 cell counts, HIV viral load, and use of highly active antiretroviral therapy), sexual orientation (when available), patient symptoms at initial presentation, physical examination findings, anal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear findings. High-resolution anoscopy diagnosis of high- vs low-grade dysplasia or no dysplasia. One hundred sixty-one HRA biopsy specimens (mean [SEM], 1.77 [0.11] biopsy specimens per patient) were obtained from 91 patients (mean [SEM] age, 45.7 [1.2] years; 61 men [67%]; 47 black patients [52%]; and 70 human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients [77%]). Twenty-seven patients (30%) had high-grade dysplasia, 26 had low-grade dysplasia (29%), and 38 had no dysplasia (42%). The majority of patients (63 [69%]) were asymptomatic (anal pain, 11 [12%]; bleeding, 14 [15%]; and pruritus, 10 [11%]). Forty-one patients (45%) presented with anal pain (odds ratio, 5.25; 95% CI, 1.44-21.82; P = .02), and patients with either high- or low-grade dysplasia were more likely to present with anal lesions on physical examination compared with patients without dysplasia (odds ratio, 4.34; 95% CI, 1.78-11.20; P = .002). Multivariable analysis suggested that anal pain was independently associated with high-grade dysplasia (odds ratio, 6.42; 95% CI, 1.18-43.3; P = .03). Anal dysplasia is a silent disease that is frequently asymptomatic. However, patients with anal

  20. Nurse Burnout and Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Vahey, Doris C.; Aiken, Linda H.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Clarke, Sean P.; Vargas, Delfino

    2010-01-01

    Background Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. Objectives This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. Research Design/Subjects We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N = 820) and patients (N = 621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Measures Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Results Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Conclusions Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care. PMID:14734943

  1. Nurse burnout and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Vahey, Doris C; Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas M; Clarke, Sean P; Vargas, Delfino

    2004-02-01

    Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. RESEARCH DESIGN/SUBJECTS: We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N=820) and patients (N=621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care.

  2. [Eyelash alterations in anophthalmic patients].

    PubMed

    Narikawa, Silvia; Schellini, Silvana Artioli; Padovani, Carlos Roberto Pereira; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the eyelash alterations in anophthalmic cavity patients. An observational study was done looking for eyelash alterations in anophthalmic cavity patients at "Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu". Eyelash alterations were observed in 70.7% of the anophthalmic patients. The most frequently observed eyelash alterations were eyelash ptosis (24.4%), reduction in the quantity (19.5%), trichomegaly (19.5%), trichiasis (14.6%) and entropium (17.0%). The anophthalmic cavity patients have eyelash alteration and ptosis, reduction in quantity, trichomegaly, trichiasis are the most common observed situations. Further studies are needed to know more about it.

  3. [Patient information in radiooncology Information seeking behaviour and patient characteristics].

    PubMed

    Pour-Haring, Herta Farassati; Volleritsch, Christa; Roth, Roswith

    2009-01-01

    Provision of relevant and accurate information is an important factor for patient-satisfaction. This study investigated the self-assessed level of information, information needs and sources of information of patients undergoing radiotherapy in correlation between socio-demographic, medical and psychological variables. A self-ministered questionnaire designed to measure the self-assessed level of information and information needs was distributed to 133 cancer patients before (t(1)) and 14 days after the first medical consultation (t(2)). "Anxiety" and "Social desirability" were assessed at t(1) and four groups of coping methods (repressive, sensitive, anxious, non-defensive/non-anxious) were derived. Sources of information were elicited at t(2). The self-assessed level of information increased, while the demand for information declined. Female patients felt better informed than males. Older patients had a lower self-assessed level of information than younger patients. Among the four groups using different methods of coping, the repressive group wanted the least information. Generally medical consultations were preferred and other sources of information rarely were used. Where there are a large number of older patients with a low educational background, the use of computers is not appropriate at the moment. It can, however, be assumed that the next generation of patients will have a more practical knowledge of computers, and will thus make better use of this method of communication.

  4. The Patient-Centered Medical Home and Patient Experience

    PubMed Central

    Martsolf, Grant R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shi, Yunfeng; Casalino, Lawrence P; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Scanlon, Dennis P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between practices' reported use of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) processes and patients' perceptions of their care experience. Data Source Primary survey data from 393 physician practices and 1,304 patients receiving care in those practices. Study Design This is an observational, cross-sectional study. Using standard ordinary least-squares and a sample selection model, we estimated the association between patients' care experience and the use of PCMH processes in the practices where they receive care. Data Collection We linked data from a nationally representative survey of individuals with chronic disease and two nationally representative surveys of physician practices. Principal Findings We found that practices' use of PCMH processes was not associated with patient experience after controlling for sample selection as well as practice and patient characteristics. Conclusions In our study, which was large, but somewhat limited in its measures of the PCMH and of patient experience, we found no association between PCMH processes and patient experience. The continued accumulation of evidence related to the possibilities of the PCMH, how PCMH is measured, and how the impact of PCMH is gauged provides important information for health care decision makers. PMID:22670806

  5. Patient Education Leads to Better Care for Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Stanley G.

    The staff of a heart and circulatory disease program of a State department of health conducted a special project at a city hospital which showed that a well-organized treatment and education program for patients with congestive heart failure increased the patient's knowledge of his disease, medication, and diet as well as his adherence to a…

  6. Tbx5 Buffers Inherent Left/Right Asymmetry Ensuring Symmetric Forelimb Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Satoko; Kucharska, Anna; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Logan, Malcolm P. O.

    2016-01-01

    The forelimbs and hindlimbs of vertebrates are bilaterally symmetric. The mechanisms that ensure symmetric limb formation are unknown but they can be disrupted in disease. In Holt-Oram Syndrome (HOS), caused by mutations in TBX5, affected individuals have left-biased upper/forelimb defects. We demonstrate a role for the transcription factor Tbx5 in ensuring the symmetric formation of the left and right forelimb. In our mouse model, bilateral hypomorphic levels of Tbx5 produces asymmetric forelimb defects that are consistently more severe in the left limb than the right, phenocopying the left-biased limb defects seen in HOS patients. In Tbx hypomorphic mutants maintained on an INV mutant background, with situs inversus, the laterality of defects is reversed. Our data demonstrate an early, inherent asymmetry in the left and right limb-forming regions and that threshold levels of Tbx5 are required to overcome this asymmetry to ensure symmetric forelimb formation. PMID:27992425

  7. Current status of patient-controlled analgesia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, C; Bruera, E

    1997-03-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a relatively new technique in which patients are able to self-administer small doses of opioid analgesics when needed. Many different devices are available for opioid infusion, including a syringe pump, disposable plastic cylinder, and battery-operated computer-driven pump. These devices allow patients to choose an intermittent (demand) bolus, continuous infusion, or both modes of administration. Parameters, such as route, drug concentration dose, frequency, and maximum daily or hourly dose, are programmed by the physician. The patient decides whether or not to take a dose. Devices can be used to deliver the drug into a running intravenous infusion, the epidural space, or subcutaneously. Controlled trials indicate that PCA is probably superior to regular opioid administration in postoperative pain. Reported advantages include greater patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, and reduced nursing time and hospitalization. Preliminary experience suggests that PCA is also useful and safe for cancer pain, but further research is greatly needed.

  8. Pain management: association with patient satisfaction among emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Hemangini C; Marco, Catherine A

    2014-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with emergency care is associated with timeliness of care, empathy, technical competence, and information delivery. Previous studies have demonstrated inconsistent findings regarding the association between pain management and patient satisfaction. This study was undertaken to determine the association between pain management and patient satisfaction among Emergency Department (ED) patients presenting with acute painful conditions. In this survey study, a standardized interview was conducted at the Emergency Department at the University of Toledo Medical Center in May-July 2011. Participants were asked to answer 18 questions pertaining to patient satisfaction. Additional data collected included demographic information, pain scores, and clinical management. Among 328 eligible participants, 289 (88%) participated. The mean triage pain score on the verbal numeric rating scale was 8.2 and the mean discharge score was 6.0. The majority of patients (52%) experienced a reduction in pain of 2 or more points. Participants received one pain medication dose (44%), two medication doses (14%), three medication doses (5%), or four medication doses (2%). Reduction in pain scores of 2 or more points was associated with a higher number of medications administered. Reduction in pain scores was associated with higher satisfaction as scored on questions of patient perceptions of adequate assessment and response to pain, and treatment of pain. There was a significant association between patient satisfaction and a reduction in pain of 2 or more points and number of medications administered. Effective pain management is associated with improved patient satisfaction among ED patients with painful conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Patients as partners, patients as problem-solvers.

    PubMed

    Young, Amanda; Flower, Linda

    2002-01-01

    This article reports our ongoing work in developing a model of health care communication called collaborative interpretation, which we define as a rhetorical practice that generates building blocks for a more complete and coherent diagnostic story and for a collaborative treatment plan. It does this by situating patients as problem-solvers. Our study begins with an analysis of provider-patient interactions in a specific setting-the emergency department (ED) of an urban trauma-level hospital- where we observed patients and providers miscommunicating in at least 3 distinct areas: over the meaning of key terms, in the framing of the immediate problem, and over the perceived role of the ED in serving the individual and the community. From our observations, we argue that all of these miscommunications and missed opportunities are rooted in mismatched expectations on the part of both provider and patient and the lack of explicit comparison and negotiation of expectations-in other words, a failure to see the patient-provider interaction as a rhetorical, knowledge-building event. In the process of observing interactions, conversing with patients and providers, and working with a team of providers and patients, we have developed an operational model of communication that could narrow the gap between the lay public and the medical profession-a gap that is especially critical in intercultural settings like the one we have studied. This model of collaborative interpretation (CI) provides strategies to help patients to represent their medical problems in the context of their life experiences and to share the logic behind their health care decisions. In addition, CI helps both patient and provider identify their goals and expectations in treatment, the obstacles that each party perceives, and the available options. It is adaptableto various settings, including short, structured conversations in the emergency room, extended dialogue between a health educator and a patient in a

  10. Patient safety culture among nurses.

    PubMed

    Ammouri, A A; Tailakh, A K; Muliira, J K; Geethakrishnan, R; Al Kindi, S N

    2015-03-01

    Patient safety is considered to be crucial to healthcare quality and is one of the major parameters monitored by all healthcare organizations around the world. Nurses play a vital role in maintaining and promoting patient safety due to the nature of their work. The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' perceptions about patient safety culture and to identify the factors that need to be emphasized in order to develop and maintain the culture of safety among nurses in Oman. A descriptive and cross-sectional design was used. Patient safety culture was assessed by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture among 414 registered nurses working in four major governmental hospitals in Oman. Descriptive statistics and general linear regression were employed to assess the association between patient safety culture and demographic variables. Nurses who perceived more supervisor or manager expectations, feedback and communications about errors, teamwork across hospital units, and hospital handoffs and transitions had more overall perception of patient safety. Nurses who perceived more teamwork within units and more feedback and communications about errors had more frequency of events reported. Furthermore, nurses who had more years of experience and were working in teaching hospitals had more perception of patient safety culture. Learning and continuous improvement, hospital management support, supervisor/manager expectations, feedback and communications about error, teamwork, hospital handoffs and transitions were found to be major patient safety culture predictors. Investing in practices and systems that focus on improving these aspects is likely to enhance the culture of patient safety in Omani hospitals and others like them. Strategies to nurture patient safety culture in Omani hospitals should focus upon building leadership capacity that support open communication, blame free, team work and continuous organizational learning. © 2014 International

  11. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  12. Anaesthetic management of neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Himmelseher, S; Pfenninger, E

    2001-10-01

    Anaesthetic care of neurosurgical patients increasingly involves management issues that apply not only to 'asleep patients', but also to 'awake and waking-up patients' during and after intracranial operations. On one hand, awake brain surgery poses unique anaesthetic challenges for the provision of awake brain mapping, which requires that a part of the procedure is performed under conscious patient sedation. Recent case reports suggest that local infiltration anaesthesia combined with sedative regimens using short-acting drugs and improved monitoring devices have assumed increasing importance. These techniques may optimize rapid adjustments of the narcotic depth, providing analgesia and patient immobility yet permitting a swift return to cooperative patient alertness for functional brain tests. Regional anaesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks were used to prevent uncontrolled movements in special cases of intractable seizures. However, few of these strategies have been evaluated in controlled trials. Awake craniotomy for tumour removal is performed as early discharge surgery. Meticulous consideration of postoperative patient safety is therefore strongly advised. On the other hand, waking-up patients or the emergence from general anaesthesia after brain surgery is still an area with considerable variation in clinical practice. Developments indicate that fast-acting anaesthetic agents and prophylactic strategies to prevent postoperative complications minimize the adverse effects of anaesthesia on the recovery process. Recent data do not advocate a delay in extubating patients when neurological impairment is the only reason for prolonged intubation. An appropriate choice of sedatives and analgesics during mechanical ventilation of neurosurgical patients allows for a narrower range of wake-up time, and weaning protocols incorporating respiratory and neurological measures may improve outcome. In conclusion, despite a lack of key evidence to request 'fast

  13. Patient Perspectives on Biosimilar Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Alasdair R.; Venkat, Manu V.; Brown, Adam S.; Dong, Jessica P.; Ran, Nina A.; Hirsch, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Given that a new wave of biosimilar insulins will likely enter the market in coming years, it is important to understand patient perspectives on these biosimilars. A survey (N = 3214) conducted by the market research company dQ&A, which maintains a 10 000-patient panel of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in roughly equal measure, investigated these perspectives. The survey asked whether patients would switch to a hypothetical less expensive biosimilar insulin that was approved by their provider. Approximately 66% of respondents reported that they would “definitely” or “likely” use a biosimilar insulin, while 17% reported that they were “unlikely” to use or would “definitely not use” such a product. Type 2 diabetes patients demonstrated slightly more willingness to use biosimilars than type 1 diabetes patients. Common patient concerns included whether biosimilars would be as effective as reference products (~650 respondents), whether side effect profiles would deviate from those of reference products (~220 respondents), and the design of the delivery device (~50 respondents). While cost savings associated with biosimilar insulins could increase patient uptake, especially among patients without health insurance (some recent estimates suggest that biosimilars will come at a substantial discount), patients may still need assurance that a cheaper price tag is not necessarily associated with substandard quality. Overall, the dQ&A survey indicates that the majority of patients are willing to consider biosimilar insulins, but manufacturers will need to work proactively to address and assuage patient concerns regarding efficacy, safety, drug administration, and other factors. PMID:24876533

  14. [Psychotherapy institutions and their patients].

    PubMed

    Rudolf, G; von Essen, C; Porsch, U; Grande, T

    1988-01-01

    This article investigates a number of institutions and private practices involved in the Berlin psychotherapy study from the point of view of their patients and their offerings in the area of therapy. Certain similarities have been found to exist between the institutions in the sex and age structure of the patients as well as in terms of the high level of previous experience with psychotherapy and psychoanalysis and previous medical measures. None of the institutions or practices saw primarily socially privileged patients, as is sometimes maintained. To a considerable degree the people they see live in a destabilized situation or one that is not yet stabilized and enjoy little social certainty (ca. 50%). The rate of the indication for psychotherapy and its actual initiation varies considerably from one institution to another. It runs the spectrum from the municipal counseling services, whose little motivated patients are only open to psychotherapy at all at a rate of 50% (actual therapy 22%) to patients in private psychotherapeutic practices who have gone through a long motivational process and who begin therapy at a rate of 70%. Study of the relationship between the location of the institution and the area in which the patients live shows on the one hand a tendency toward regionalism insofar as institutions are preferred by the patients who live near by. On the other hand, these special institutions are also sought out by patients from more distant locations and from differently structured areas; these patients are represented to the same degree as patients from the immediate area. Although psychotherapeutic institutions are often situated in the "better" residential areas, their patients are by no means only from such privileged areas but from all regions, including those that are socially weak.

  15. Elderly patients also have rights

    PubMed Central

    Pérez‐Cárceles, M D; Lorenzo, M D; Luna, A; Osuna, E

    2007-01-01

    Background Sharing information with relatives of elderly patients in primary care and in hospital has to fit into the complex set of obligations, justifications and pressures concerning the provision of information, and the results of some studies point to the need for further empirical studies exploring issues of patient autonomy, privacy and informed consent in the day‐to‐day care of older people. Objectives To know the frequency with which “capable” patients over 65 years of age receive information when admitted to hospital, the information offered to the families concerned, the person who gives consent for medical intervention, and the degree of satisfaction with the information received and the healthcare provided. Method A descriptive questionnaire given to 200 patients and 200 relatives during the patients' stay in hospital. Results Only 5% of patients confirmed that they had been asked whether information could be given to their relatives. A significantly higher proportion of relatives received information on the successive stages of the care offered than did patients themselves. As the age of the patients increased, so the number who were given information, understood the information and were asked for their consent for complementary tests decreased. The degree of satisfaction with the information offered was high for both patients and relatives (86.5% and 84%, respectively), despite the irregularities observed. Conclusions The capacity of elderly patients to participate in the decision‐making process is frequently doubted simply because they have reached a certain age and it is thought that relatives should act as their representatives. In Spain, the opinion of the family and doctors appears to play a larger role in making decisions than does the concept of patient autonomy. PMID:18055902

  16. Patient preference: a comparison of electronic patient-completed questionnaires with paper among cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Brown, M C; Espin-Garcia, O; Cuffe, S; Pringle, D; Mahler, M; Villeneuve, J; Niu, C; Charow, R; Lam, C; Shani, R M; Hon, H; Otsuka, M; Xu, W; Alibhai, S; Jenkinson, J; Liu, G

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we compared cancer patients preference for computerised (tablet/web-based) surveys versus paper. We also assessed whether the understanding of a cancer-related topic, pharmacogenomics is affected by the survey format, and examined differences in demographic and medical characteristics which may affect patient preference and understanding. Three hundred and four cancer patients completed a tablet-administered survey and another 153 patients completed a paper-based survey. Patients who participated in the tablet survey were questioned regarding their preference for survey format administration (paper, tablet and web-based). Understanding was assessed with a 'direct' method, by asking patients to assess their understanding of genetic testing, and with a 'composite' score. Patients preferred administration with tablet (71%) compared with web-based (12%) and paper (17%). Patients <65 years old, non-Caucasians and white-collar professionals significantly preferred the computerised format following multivariate analysis. There was no significant difference in understanding between the paper and tablet survey with direct questioning or composite score. Age (<65 years) and white-collar professionals were associated with increased understanding (both P = 0.03). There was no significant difference in understanding between the tablet and print survey in a multivariate analysis. Patients overwhelmingly preferred computerised surveys and understanding of pharmacogenomics was not affected by survey format. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Patient Disclosure of Medical Misdeeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Clara; Stivers, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Modern patients walk a tightrope between respecting medical authority and acting as knowledgeable advocates regarding health issues, with the agency and responsibilities that come with this. This article uses conversation analysis to explore this balance in relation to patient disclosures of medical misdeeds in video-recorded primary care medical…

  18. Idiom Comprehension in Aphasic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papagno, Costanza; Tabossi, Patrizia; Colombo, Maria Rosa; Zampetti, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    Idiom comprehension was assessed in 10 aphasic patients with semantic deficits by means of a string-to-picture matching task. Patients were also submitted to an oral explanation of the same idioms, and to a word comprehension task. The stimuli of this last task were the words following the verb in the idioms. Idiom comprehension was severely…

  19. Virtual Patients in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Jabbur-Lopes, Monique O.; Mesquita, Alessandra R.; Silva, Leila M. A.; De Almeida Neto, Abilio

    2012-01-01

    A review of the literature relating to the use of virtual patients in teaching pharmaceutical care to pharmacy students was conducted. Only 7 articles met the inclusion criteria for the review and 4 of the studies were conducted in North America. Few articles identified by the review used virtual patient technology that was true-to-life and/or validated. PMID:22761533

  20. Patient Perspectives of Medical Confidentiality

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Pamela; Mora, Susan; Merz, Jon F; Jones, Nora L

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To lay the groundwork for a better understanding of patient views on medical confidentiality. DESIGN Studies were found by searching medline, bioethicsline, and selected bibliographies. Articles concerning physician perspectives or implications of legal and administrative regulations were excluded. Only peer-reviewed journal articles reporting original research on patients' confidentiality views and conduct were included. MAIN RESULTS Many patients are unaware of or misunderstand their legal or ethical right to medical confidentiality protections, which leads them to both over- and underestimate confidentiality protections. The possibility that medical information might be revealed, intentionally or not, to acquaintances in a clinic or other social community troubles patients as much as information release to insurers or employers. A significant minority of patients distrust confidentiality protections, leading some to report that they delay or forgo medical care. If doubtful that confidentiality will be upheld, patients will act independently to protect information. CONCLUSIONS Our review found a wider variety of understandings and beliefs about medical confidentiality among patients than are often indicated in the writings of practitioners or legal experts. As medical confidentiality regulations evolve, these differences need to be recognized and accounted for in interactions between practitioners and patients. PMID:12911650

  1. Rhinoplasty in Middle Eastern Patients.

    PubMed

    Sajjadian, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Rhinoplasty in patients of Middle Eastern origin requires complete understanding of nasal morphology and an individualized approach to create a racially congruent and aesthetically pleasing outcome. In this article, common anatomic features and characteristics and detailed steps, surgical techniques, and operative maneuvers that can lead to predictable outcome in rhinoplasty of Middle Eastern patients are discussed.

  2. Patient safety: honoring advanced directives.

    PubMed

    Tice, Martha A

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare providers typically think of patient safety in the context of preventing iatrogenic injury. Prevention of falls and medication or treatment errors is the typical focus of adverse event analyses. If healthcare providers are committed to honoring the wishes of patients, then perhaps failures to honor advanced directives should be viewed as reportable medical errors.

  3. Burns in Morbidly Obese Patients,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    tract infection and one episode C obesity. The clinical records of these patients were reviewed in of sinusitis. Two patients had documented bacteremias...veloped pneumonia and two developed tracheobronchitis. 0 Research, seven of whom clearly fulfilled the criteria for morbid There were one urinary

  4. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    cornea transplant . Currently these patients receive frequent application of topical lubricants and anti-inflammatory medications, an imperfect solution...of the degradation-resistant crosslinked amniotic membranes for treating cornea of burn patients that were produced in Years 1 and 2. Major findings...Identified membrane stiffness as a critical parameter for a successful cornea -protective membrane and quantitatively assessed this parameter

  5. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    cornea transplant . Currently these patients receive frequent application of topical lubricants and anti-inflammatory medications, an imperfect... cornea as is done in amniotic membrane transplantation . However we proposed and, have now tested, an alternative method for securing the... cornea of burn patients that were produced in Year 1. Major findings: Established that 2 and 3 layer crosslinked amniotic membrane composites are more

  6. Patient Disclosure of Medical Misdeeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Clara; Stivers, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Modern patients walk a tightrope between respecting medical authority and acting as knowledgeable advocates regarding health issues, with the agency and responsibilities that come with this. This article uses conversation analysis to explore this balance in relation to patient disclosures of medical misdeeds in video-recorded primary care medical…

  7. The Coronary Patient in Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, B.

    1971-01-01

    The coronary patient, as he pertains to industry particularly NASA, is discussed. Concepts of precoronary care, acute attacks which may develop while on the job, and the return of the cardiac patient to work are covered. Major emphasis was on the prevention of sudden death due to coronary disease.

  8. Scurvy in hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Raynaud-Simon, A; Cohen-Bittan, J; Gouronnec, A; Pautas, E; Senet, P; Verny, M; Boddaert, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically screen hospitalized elderly patients for clinical symptoms of scurvy and to confirm the diagnosis with biological measures. Geriatric acute care ward. Scurvy symptoms (one or more among perifollicular hyperkeratosis, petechiae or bruises, haemorrhagic features caused by venous puncture, severe gingivitis). We compared associated diseases, nutritional status, need for assistance for feeding, serum albumin, transthyretin, B9 and B12 vitamins, iron status and Serum Ascorbic Acid Level (SAAL) and outcome (in-hospital mortality) between scurvy and scurvy free patients. 18 patients with clinical symptoms of scurvy (scurvy group) were identified out of 145 consecutive patients (12%). They were compared to 23 consecutive control patients with no clinical symptoms of scurvy (scurvy-free group). SAAL was significantly lower (1.09 +/- 1.06 vs 4.87 +/- 4.2 mg x L-1, p < .001) and vitamin C deficiency more frequent (94 vs 30 %, p < .001) in the scurvy group. Moreover, in scurvy group, coronary heart disease (39 vs 9 %, p=.028), need for assistance for feeding (56 vs 13 %, p=.006) and in-hospital deaths (44 vs 9 %, p=.012) were more frequent. Ninety-four percent of patients with clinical symptoms of scurvy had vitamin C deficiency. Our results suggest that in hospitalized elderly patients, clinical symptoms allow scurvy diagnosis. Scurvy could be a frequent disease in elderly patients admitted to acute geriatric ward.

  9. Gadobutrol in Renally Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Michaely, Henrik J.; Aschauer, Manuela; Deutschmann, Hannes; Bongartz, Georg; Gutberlet, Matthias; Woitek, Ramona; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Kucharczyk, Walter; Hammerstingl, Renate; De Cobelli, Francesco; Rosenberg, Martin; Balzer, Thomas; Endrikat, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Materials and Methods We performed a prospective, international, multicenter, open-label study in 55 centers. Patients with moderate to severe renal impairment scheduled for any gadobutrol-enhanced MRI were included. All patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight. The primary target variable was the number of patients who develop NSF within a 2-year follow-up period. Results A total of 908 patients were enrolled, including 586 with moderate and 284 with severe renal impairment who are at highest risk for developing NSF. The mean time since renal disease diagnosis was 1.83 and 5.49 years in the moderate and severe renal impairment cohort, respectively. Overall, 184 patients (20.3%) underwent further contrast-enhanced MRI with other gadolinium-based contrast agents within the 2-year follow-up. No patient developed symptoms conclusive of NSF. Conclusions No safety concerns with gadobutrol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment were identified. There were no NSF cases. PMID:27529464

  10. The Coronary Patient in Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, B.

    1971-01-01

    The coronary patient, as he pertains to industry particularly NASA, is discussed. Concepts of precoronary care, acute attacks which may develop while on the job, and the return of the cardiac patient to work are covered. Major emphasis was on the prevention of sudden death due to coronary disease.

  11. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  12. [Delirium in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Agnieszka; Kłoszewska, Iwona

    2007-01-01

    Delirium is a frequent complication of cancer. It is the cause of patients' suffering and due to worsening of communication, the impediment to clinical assessment. It lowers the quality of life of family caregivers as well. Instant diagnosis and therapy of delirium are essential in clinical practice. In this review etiology, prevalence, clinical features and management of delirium in cancer patients are described.

  13. Pharmacotherapeutics for the AIDS Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fife, Kenneth H.

    1991-01-01

    Anticipated shifts in the demographics of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic are examined, current state-of-the-art AIDS patient management is summarized, and some unique facets of drug therapy in the AIDS patient are discussed, including adverse reactions, complex drug interactions, use of investigational drugs, and…

  14. Art Therapy with Laryngectomy Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anand, Susan Ainlay; Anand, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the experiences of patients with laryngeal cancer who used art therapy. Drawing on 14 years of experience and 109 laryngeal cancer patients, describes treatment results and the case material substantiating the distinct role of art therapy. Provides an overview of the special medical and therapeutic needs of this group. (RJM)

  15. Viscoelastic cushion for patient support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauers, D. G.

    1971-01-01

    Flexible container, filled with liquid, provides supportive device which conforms to patient's anatomy. Uniform cushion pressure prevents formation of decubitus ulcers, while the porous sponge substructure damps fluid movement through cushion response so that patient is not dumped when his weight shifts.

  16. Preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Perks, Anna; Chakravarti, Sucharita; Manninen, Pirjo

    2009-04-01

    Anxiety is common in surgical patients, with an incidence of 60% to 92%. There is little information on the incidence and severity of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for neurosurgery. The aim of this study was to measure the level of preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients and to assess any influencing factors. After the Institutional Review Board approval and informed written consent, 100 patients booked for neurosurgery were interviewed preoperatively. Each patient was asked to grade their preoperative anxiety level on a verbal analog scale, Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale, and a set of specific anxiety-related questions. The anxiety scores and the responses to the questions were compared between the sex, age, weight, diagnosis, and history of previous surgery. The mean age (+/-SD) was 50+/-13 years. The preoperative diagnosis was tumor (n=64), aneurysm (n=14), and other (n=22). Overall verbal analog scale was 5.2+/-2.7; the score was higher for female (5.8+/-2.8) than male patients (4.6+/-2.5) (P<0.05). Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale anxiety and knowledge scores were greater for surgery than for anesthesia. Questionnaire results showed that the most common anxieties were waiting for surgery, physical/mental harm, and results of the operation. In conclusion, our study showed that neurosurgical patients have high levels of anxiety, with a higher incidence in females. There was a moderately high need for information, particularly in patients with a high level of preoperative anxiety.

  17. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  18. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  19. Oocyte cryopreservation in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Eleonora; Fabbri, Raffaella; Damiano, Giuseppe; Fratto, Rosita; Giunchi, Susanna; Venturoli, Stefano

    2004-04-05

    The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in oncological patients may reduce their reproductive potential. Sperm cryopreservation has been already used in men affected by neoplastic disease. Oocyte cryopreservation might be an important solution for these patients at risk of losing ovarian function. A program of oocyte cryopreservation for oncological patients is also present in our center. From June 1996 to January 2000, 18 patients awaiting chemotherapy and radiotherapy for neoplastic disease were included in our oocyte cryopreservation program. Our experience documents that oocyte storage may be a concrete and pragmatic alternative for oncological patients. The duration of oocyte storage does not seem to interfere with oocyte survival as pregnancies occurred even after several years of gamete cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen.

  20. Patient discomfort following periapical surgery.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, René; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Hørsted-Bindslev, Preben; Wenzel, Ann

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patient discomfort following periapical surgery. Forty-two patients with apical periodontitis were allocated to apicectomy with either smoothening of the gutta-percha root filling or a retrograde root filling with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Pooling all patients, VAS score for pain peaked 3 hours postoperatively (mean VAS = 29). The VAS score for swelling peaked 1 day postoperatively (mean VAS = 41). Patients' overall perception of postoperative discomfort was induced by (questions asked at the day for suture removal): Oral awareness (36 yes, 6 no); swelling (30 yes, 12 no); compromised chewing ability (18 yes, 24 no); pain (15 yes, 27 no). There was no correlation between the operating time and VAS scores for pain and swelling (r < or = .25, P > .11). Patients experienced little pain and moderate swelling after periapical surgery. Oral awareness was the most reported reason for postoperative discomfort. The operating time was not a decisive factor in relation to postoperative discomfort.

  1. Developing patient safety in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, M N

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety has always been important and is a source of public concern. Recent high profile scandals and subsequent reports, such as the Francis report into the failings at Mid Staffordshire, have raised those concerns even higher. Mortality and significant morbidity associated with the practice of medicine has led to many strategies to help improve patient safety, however, with its lack of associated mortality and lower associated morbidity, dentistry has been slower at systematically considering how patient safety can be improved. Recently, several organisations, researchers and clinicians have discussed the need for a patient safety culture in dentistry. Strategies are available to help improve patient safety in healthcare and deserve further consideration in dentistry.

  2. Endodontics and the ageing patient.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, M; Parashos, P

    2015-03-01

    Patients are living longer and the rate of edentulism is decreasing. Endodontic treatment is an essential part of maintaining the health and well-being of the elderly. Retention of natural teeth improves the quality of life and the overall health and longevity of ageing patients. Also, teeth that might be otherwise extracted may be strategically valuable to retain a prosthesis, and elderly patients are more likely to have medical complications that may prevent dental extractions from being safely performed. The technical goals of endodontic treatment in the elderly are the same as those for younger patients. However, the pulpo-dentinal complex undergoes calcific changes over time, which may pose challenges for the clinician. The purposes of this review are to discuss age changes in the pulp and the challenges posed by diagnosing, treatment planning and treating the elderly endodontic patient.

  3. Are rhinoplasty patients potentially mad?

    PubMed

    Slator, R; Harris, D L

    1992-01-01

    Rhinoplasty patients have long been considered to be psychologically unstable and therefore a "risky" group upon which to operate. Patients who had rhinoplastic operations more than 5 years ago were contacted by post and their psychological health assessed by the use of psychometric tests. The results show no evidence to support earlier suggestions that requests for rhinoplasty may be early symptoms of severe psychiatric disease. However, several points do emerge. Male patients show more symptoms of anxiety and depression than normal, and female patients who give no history of injury preceding their operation behave in a more extrovert and sociable manner than normal. Furthermore, patients of both sexes who give no history of injury before their operation, even though pleased with the operative results, are more self-conscious of their appearance than those who were injured prior to their rhinoplasty.

  4. Mediating consolation with suicidal patients.

    PubMed

    Gilje, Fredricka; Talseth, Anne-Grethe

    2007-07-01

    Psychiatric nurses frequently encounter suicidal patients. Caring for such patients often raises ethical questions and dilemmas. The research question for this study was: 'What understandings are revealed in texts about consolation and psychiatric nurses' responses to suicidal patients?' A Gadamerian approach guided re-interpretation of published texts. Through synthesizing four interpretive phases, a comprehensive interpretation emerged. This revealed being 'at home' with self, or an ethical way of being, as a hermeneutic understanding of a way to become ready to mediate consolation with suicidal patients. Trustworthiness was addressed by means of the qualities of auditability, credibility and confirmability. This re-interpretation adds to nursing knowledge, enhances understanding of previous research findings, provides pre-understanding for further research and reveals the value of hermeneutic inquiry in nursing. It also deepens understanding of a published model of consolation. These understandings may help to guide nurses who are struggling with suicidal patients.

  5. Prosocial capabilities in Alzheimer's patients.

    PubMed

    Bosch-Domènech, Antoni; Nagel, Rosemarie; Sánchez-Andrés, Juan V

    2010-01-01

    To examine the decision making of Alzheimer's patients in a simple, classic game focusing on their capabilities to implement social norms and common social preferences. Patients with Stage I (very mild and mild) Alzheimer's disease (AD) were asked to participate in a dictator game, a type of game in which a subject has to decide how to allocate a certain amount of money between himself and another person. When we compared the results of treatments involving AD patients (at an early stage) with those of identical treatments involving patients with mild cognitive impairment or healthy elderly controls, with similar ages and social backgrounds, we did not find statistically significant differences. This finding suggests that Stage I AD patients are as capable of making decisions involving basic social norms and preferences as other individuals of their age. Whatever brain structures are affected by the disease, they do not appear to influence, at this early stage, the neural basis for cooperation-enhancing social interactions.

  6. Computers in medicine: patients' attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented from two surveys where a 26-item questionnaire was used to measure patients' attitudes to diagnostic computers and to medical computers in general. The first group of respondents were 229 patients who had been given outpatient appointments at a hospital general medical clinic specializing in gastrointestinal problems, where some had experienced a diagnostic computer in use. The second group of respondents were 416 patients attending a group general practice where there was no computer. Patients who had experience of the diagnostic computer or a personal computer had more favourable attitudes to computers in medicine as did younger people and males. The two samples of patients showed broadly similar attitudes, and a notable finding was that over half of each group believed that, with a computer around, the personal touch of the doctor would be lost. PMID:6471021

  7. Hormone therapy for transgender patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many transgender men and women seek hormone therapy as part of the transition process. Exogenous testosterone is used in transgender men to induce virilization and suppress feminizing characteristics. In transgender women, exogenous estrogen is used to help feminize patients, and anti-androgens are used as adjuncts to help suppress masculinizing features. Guidelines exist to help providers choose appropriate candidates for hormone therapy, and act as a framework for choosing treatment regimens and managing surveillance in these patients. Cross-sex hormone therapy has been shown to have positive physical and psychological effects on the transitioning individual and is considered a mainstay treatment for many patients. Bone and cardiovascular health are important considerations in transgender patients on long-term hormones, and care should be taken to monitor certain metabolic indices while patients are on cross-sex hormone therapy. PMID:28078219

  8. Patient With Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Dorothy E.

    1989-01-01

    Every family practice includes people who are difficult to manage. Persons with a borderline personality disorder can be the most difficult of all. They will trust no one, and consequently few, if any, others will be able to tolerate their profoundly difficult interpersonal communication style. These patients will present to their family physician more and more often with a variety of somatic and emotional symptoms. They will demand, either verbally or silently, that these symptoms be relieved immediately. This increasing demand for immediate response may eventually cause the physician to reject the patient. An understanding of this condition and how it develops in infancy may enable the physician to help the patient. A family physician who can set appropriate limits to the patient's demands may slowly convince the patient that he can trust and not be hurt. PMID:21248944

  9. Do patient assessments of primary care differ by patient ethnicity?

    PubMed Central

    Taira, D A; Safran, D G; Seto, T B; Rogers, W H; Inui, T S; Montgomery, J; Tarlov, A R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if patient assessments (reports and ratings) of primary care differ by patient ethnicity. DATA SOURCES/STUDY DESIGN: A self-administered patient survey of 6,092 Massachusetts employees measured seven defining characteristics of primary care: (1) access (financial, organizational); (2) continuity (longitudinal, visit based); (3) comprehensiveness (knowledge of patient, preventive counseling); (4) integration; (5) clinical interaction (communication, thoroughness of physical examinations); (6) interpersonal treatment; and (7) trust. The study employed a cross-sectional observational design. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Asians had the lowest primary care performance assessments of any ethnic group after adjustment for socioeconomic and other factors. For example, compared to whites, Asians had lower scores for communication (69 vs. 79, p = .001) and comprehensive knowledge of patient (56 vs. 48, p = .002), African Americans and Latinos had less access to care, and African Americans had less longitudinal continuity than whites. CONCLUSIONS: We do not know what accounts for the observed differences in patient assessments of primary care. The fact that patient reports as well as the more subjective ratings of care differed by ethnicity suggests that quality differences might exist that need to be addressed. PMID:11775667

  10. Patients as educators: interprofessional learning for patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Towle, Angela; Godolphin, William

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic conditions have unique expertise that enhances interprofessional education. Although their active involvement in education is increasing, patients have minimal roles in key educational tasks. A model that brings patients and students together for patient-centred learning, with faculty playing a supportive role, has been described in theory but not yet implemented. To identify issues involved in creating an educational intervention designed and delivered by patients and document outcomes. An advisory group of community members, students and faculty guided development of the intervention (interprofessional workshops). Community educators (CEs) were recruited through community organizations with a healthcare mandate. Workshops were planned by teams of key stakeholders, delivered by CEs, and evaluated by post-workshop student questionnaires. Workshops were delivered by CEs with epilepsy, arthritis, HIV/AIDS and two groups with mental health problems. Roles and responsibilities of planning team members that facilitated control by CEs were identified. Ten workshops attended by 142 students from 15 different disciplines were all highly rated. Workshop objectives defined by CEs and student learning both closely matched dimensions of patient-centredness. Our work demonstrates feasibility and impact of an educational intervention led by patient educators facilitated but not controlled by faculty.

  11. Longitudinal deteriorations in patient reported outcomes in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Oga, Toru; Nishimura, Koichi; Tsukino, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Susumu; Hajiro, Takashi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2007-01-01

    Goals of effective management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) include relieving their symptoms and improving their health status. We examined how such patient reported outcomes would change longitudinally in comparison to physiological outcomes in COPD. One hundred thirty-seven male outpatients with stable COPD were recruited for the study. The subjects health status was evaluated using the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ). Their dyspnoea using the modified Medical Research Council (MRC) scale and their psychological status using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were assessed upon entry and every 6 months thereafter over a 5-year period. Pulmonary function and exercise capacity as evaluated by peak oxygen uptake (VO2) on progressive cycle ergometry were also followed over the same time. Using mixed effects models to estimate the slopes for the changes, scores on the SGRQ, the CRQ, the MRC and the HADS worsened in a statistically significant manner over time. However, changes only weakly correlated with changes in forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1)) and peak (VO2). We demonstrated that although changes in pulmonary function and exercise capacity are well known in patients with COPD, patient reported outcomes such as health status, dyspnoea and psychological status also deteriorated significantly over time. In addition, deteriorations in patient reported outcomes only weakly correlated to changes in physiological indices. To capture the overall deterioration of COPD from the subjective viewpoints of the patients, patient reported outcomes should be followed separately from physiological outcomes.

  12. Patient/Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Landier, Wendy; Ahern, JoAnn; Barakat, Lamia P; Bhatia, Smita; Bingen, Kristin M; Bondurant, Patricia G; Cohn, Susan L; Dobrozsi, Sarah K; Haugen, Maureen; Herring, Ruth Anne; Hooke, Mary C; Martin, Melissa; Murphy, Kathryn; Newman, Amy R; Rodgers, Cheryl C; Ruccione, Kathleen S; Sullivan, Jeneane; Weiss, Marianne; Withycombe, Janice; Yasui, Lise; Hockenberry, Marilyn

    There is a paucity of data to support evidence-based practices in the provision of patient/family education in the context of a new childhood cancer diagnosis. Since the majority of children with cancer are treated on pediatric oncology clinical trials, lack of effective patient/family education has the potential to negatively affect both patient and clinical trial outcomes. The Children's Oncology Group Nursing Discipline convened an interprofessional expert panel from within and beyond pediatric oncology to review available and emerging evidence and develop expert consensus recommendations regarding harmonization of patient/family education practices for newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients across institutions. Five broad principles, with associated recommendations, were identified by the panel, including recognition that (1) in pediatric oncology, patient/family education is family-centered; (2) a diagnosis of childhood cancer is overwhelming and the family needs time to process the diagnosis and develop a plan for managing ongoing life demands before they can successfully learn to care for the child; (3) patient/family education should be an interprofessional endeavor with 3 key areas of focus: (a) diagnosis/treatment, (b) psychosocial coping, and (c) care of the child; (4) patient/family education should occur across the continuum of care; and (5) a supportive environment is necessary to optimize learning. Dissemination and implementation of these recommendations will set the stage for future studies that aim to develop evidence to inform best practices, and ultimately to establish the standard of care for effective patient/family education in pediatric oncology.

  13. Preoperative patient assessment: Identifying patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Boehm, O; Baumgarten, G; Hoeft, A

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative mortality remains alarmingly high with a mortality rate ranging between 0.4% and 4%. A small subgroup of multimorbid and/or elderly patients undergoing different surgical procedures naturally confers the highest risk of complications and perioperative death. Therefore, preoperative assessment should identify these high-risk patients and stratify them to individualized monitoring and treatment throughout all phases of perioperative care. A "tailored" perioperative approach might help further reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. This article aims to elucidate individual morbidity-specific risks. It further suggests approaches to detect patients at the risk of perioperative complications.

  14. Patient activation and improved outcomes in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Rebecca; Beach, Mary Catherine; Saha, Somnath; Mori, Tomi; Loveless, Mark O; Hibbard, Judith H; Cohn, Jonathan A; Sharp, Victoria L; Korthuis, P Todd

    2013-05-01

    The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) assesses several important concepts in chronic care management, including self-efficacy for positive health behaviors. In HIV-infected populations, better self-efficacy for medication management is associated with improved adherence to antiretroviral medications (ARVs), which is critically important for controlling symptoms and slowing disease progression. To determine 1) characteristics associated with patient activation and 2) associations between patient activation and outcomes in HIV-infected patients. Cross-sectional survey. 433 patients receiving care in four HIV clinics. An interviewer conducted face-to-face interviews with patients following their HIV clinic visit. Survey data were supplemented with medical record abstraction to obtain most recent CD4 counts, HIV viral load and antiretroviral medications. Patient activation was measured using the 13-item PAM (possible range 0-100). Outcomes included CD4 cell count > 200 cells/mL(3), HIV-1 RNA < 400 copies/mL (viral suppression), and patient-reported adherence. Overall, patient activation was high (mean PAM = 72.3 [SD 16.5, range 34.7-100]). Activation was lower among those without vs. with a high school degree (68.0 vs. 74.0, p < .001), and greater depression (77.6 lowest, 70.2 middle, 68.1 highest tertile, p < .001). There was no association between patient activation and age, race, gender, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, or social status. In multivariable models, every 5-point increase in PAM was associated with greater odds of CD4 count > 200 cells/mL(3) (aOR 1.10 [95 % CI 1.01, 1.21]), adherence (aOR 1.18 [95 % CI 1.09, 1.29]) and viral suppression (aOR 1.08 [95 % CI 1.00, 1.17]). The association between PAM and viral suppression was mediated through adherence. Higher patient activation was associated with more favorable HIV outcomes. Interventions to improve patient activation should be developed and tested for their ability to

  15. The transition from 'informed patient' care to 'patient informed' care.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    We are in the midst of a real change in the application of information technology to support the delivery of healthcare. We are seeing a shift from the 'informed patient' which has resulted from improved access to healthcare information, primarily from the Web, to the 'participative patient' as we move into Web 2.0 territory. The last decade has seen significant strides in the application of healthcare information to support patient care including: Increased access to healthcare related information by the patient through access to healthcare information on the Web (1.0). The development of electronic patient/health records. Improved access to knowledge for care professionals has enabled the dissipation of professional clinical skills with the introduction of nurse practitioners and increased use of therapies. Improved access to patient related information across disciplines is beginning to enable the shift from acute based to community based care. The introduction of home care technologies has enabled self monitoring in supporting self care. There are also developments in the way care is provided with an increasing diversity of healthcare providers with the challenges this has presented in exchanging patient related information to support continuity of care. We are now at another major turning point that could present greater challenges for healthcare professionals, organisations and the patient or client. These developments include: The application of information sharing services commonly referred to as Web 2.0. As a result we are seeing a transition from the 'informed patient' to the 'participative patient' that will present increasing challenges for healthcare professionals and healthcare organisations in adapting care to embrace this evolution. New entrants to the ehealth market are now emerging such as Google and Microsoft who are competing to 'own' the 'healthcare consumer'. Open source solutions for EPR/EHRs are now emerging that will challenge the

  16. Clinical Outcomes Comparing Capsular Repair vs. No Repair Following Hip Arthroscopy: A Prospective, Randomized, Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Sugarman, Etan P.; Birns, Michael E.; Fishman, Matthew; Patel, Deepan N.; Goldsmith, Laura; Greene, Renee Shirley; Banffy, Michael B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: As hip arthroscopy procedures become more common there is increasing concern of iatrogenic instability from excessive capsulotomy during surgery. As a result, greater attention is being focused preserving hip capsule integrity following surgery. To date, there are no large scale prospective blinded studies that address whether capsular closure has any detrimental effect on outcomes. Our goal is to evaluate outcomes in patients undergoing interportal capsulotomy repair compared to outcomes when not repairing the capsule. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a clinical/functional difference at 1 & 2 year follow up between patients who undergo capsular repair vs no repair following hip arthroscopy. Our hypothesis is that restoration of normal capsular anatomy with interportal repair will achieve similar clinical outcomes as the “no repair” group without functional deficits from over-constraint. Methods: Adult patients were recruited from November 2013 to July 2015 who were scheduled to undergo hip arthroscopy for femoral acetabular. Subjects were randomized into either the capsular repair (CR) or no repair (NR) groups. Standard AP/Dunn view radiographs were evaluated and alpha angle (AA) /center-edge (CEA) angle measurements were performed for all patients preoperatively. All patients underwent standard hip arthroscopy with labral repair +/- CAM/pincer lesion resection. Primary clinical outcomes were measured via the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sport-Specific (HOS-SS) subscales at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Secondary outcome measures included the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), visual analog scale (VAS), the international hip outcome tool (iHOT-12), and the Veterans RAND 12 Item Health Survey (VR-12) scores. Results: A total of 56 patients were included in this study (30 male, 26 females) with a mean age of 33 years. Follow up was available for 49 patients at 6 months, 41 patients at 1 year and 26 patients at

  17. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient Empowerment: Myths and Misconceptions

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robert M.; Funnell, Martha M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to clarify the concept of empowerment and to correct common misconceptions about its use in diabetes care and education. Methods The patient empowerment approach is well suited to helping patients make self-selected changes related to weight, nutrition, and physical activity. Although the concept of patient empowerment has become an integral part of diabetes education, an accurate understanding and authentic application of empowerment has not occurred as readily. The empowerment approach is clarified and common misconceptions have been corrected. Results Embracing empowerment means making a paradigm shift that is often difficult because the traditional approach to care is embedded in the training and socialization of most health care professionals (HCP). Conclusion Unlike the traditional approach, empowerment is not something one does to patients. Rather, empowerment begins when HCPs acknowledge that patient are in control of their daily diabetes care. Empowerment occurs when the HCPs goal is to increase the capacity of patients to think critically and make autonomous, informed decisions. Empowerment also occurs when patients are actually making autonomous, informed decisions about their diabetes self-management. Practice Implications Clarity about all aspects of the empowerment approach is essential if it is to be used effectively. PMID:19682830

  19. Psychological care in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mohta, Medha; Sethi, A K; Tyagi, Asha; Mohta, Anup

    2003-01-01

    The clinician manages trauma patients in the emergency room, operation theatre, intensive care unit and trauma ward with an endeavour to provide best possible treatment for physical injuries. At the same time, it is equally important to give adequate attention to behavioural and psychological aspects associated with the event. Knowledge of the predisposing factors and their management helps the clinician to prevent or manage these psychological problems. Various causes of psychological disturbances in trauma patients have been highlighted. These include pain, the sudden and unexpected nature of events and the procedures and interventions necessary to resuscitate and stabilise the patient. The ICU and trauma ward environment, sleep and sensory deprivation, impact of injury on CNS, medications and associated pre-morbid conditions are also significant factors. Specific problems that concern the traumatised patients are helplessness, humiliation, threat to body image and mental symptoms. The patients react to these stressors by various defence mechanisms like conservation withdrawal, denial, regression, anger, anxiety and depression. Some of them develop delirium or even more severe problems like acute stress disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. Physical, pharmacological or psychological interventions can be performed to prevent or minimise these problems in trauma patients. These include adequate pain relief, prevention of sensory and sleep deprivation, providing familiar surroundings, careful explanations and reassurance to the patient, psychotherapy and pharmacological treatment whenever required.

  20. Celebrity Patients, VIPs, and Potentates

    PubMed Central

    Groves, James E.; Dunderdale, Barbara A.; Stern, Theodore A.

    2002-01-01

    Background: During the second half of the 20th century, the literature on the doctor-patient relationship mainly dealt with the management of “difficult” (personality-disordered) patients. Similar problems, however, surround other types of “special” patients. Method: An overview and analysis of the literature were conducted. As a result, such patients can be subcategorized by their main presentations; each requires a specific management strategy. Results: Three types of “special” patients stir up irrational feelings in their caregivers. Sick celebrities threaten to focus public scrutiny on the private world of medical caregivers. VIPs generate awe in caregivers, with loss of the objectivity essential to the practice of scientific medicine. Potentates unearth narcissism in the caregiver-patient relationship, which triggers a struggle between power and shame. Pride, privacy, and the staff's need to be in control are all threatened by introduction of the special patient into medicine's closed culture. Conclusion: The privacy that is owed to sick celebrities should be extended to protect overexposed staff. The awe and loss of medical objectivity that VIPs generate are counteracted by team leadership dedicated to avoiding any deviation from standard clinical procedure. Moreover, the collective ill will surrounding potentates can be neutralized by reassuring them that they are “special”—and by caregivers mending their own vulnerable self-esteem. PMID:15014712

  1. HPV Carcinomas in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reusser, Nicole M.; Downing, Christopher; Guidry, Jacqueline; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and can result in pre-malignancies or overt malignancies of the skin and mucosal surfaces. HPV-related illnesses are an important personal and public health problem causing physical, mental, sexual and financial detriments. Moreover, this set of malignancies severely affects the immunosuppressed population, particularly HIV-positive patients and organ-transplant recipients. There is growing incidence of HPV-associated anogenital malignancies as well as a decrease in the average age of affected patients, likely related to the rising number of high-risk individuals. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of HPV-related malignancy. Current treatment options for HPV infection and subsequent disease manifestations include imiquimod, retinoids, intralesional bleomycin, and cidofovir; however, primary prevention with HPV vaccination remains the most effective strategy. This review will discuss anogenital lesions in immunocompromised patients, cutaneous warts at nongenital sites, the association of HPV with skin cancer in immunocompromised patients, warts and carcinomas in organ-transplant patients, HIV-positive patients with HPV infections, and the management of cutaneous disease in the immunocompromised patient. PMID:26239127

  2. Creating the ideal patient experience

    PubMed Central

    Purcărea, Th.V

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare industry continues to evolve under conditions of intense competition in approaching health prevention, protection, and promotion. Therefore, healthcare providers are challenged to always ensure better patient experience, winning patients’ satisfaction, and loyalty and remain competitive on today’s healthcare market. Healthcare markets bring together professionals and their patients into real collaborative relationships, which empower patients to contribute to the healthcare improvement. Within this competitive landscape, which is also characterized by digital health tools boosting patients’ awareness and controlling their own health, medical providers need to be perceived as skilled and trustworthy in relying on patients’ needs, expectations, and sacrifices are required in order to obtain the promised benefits. Moreover, while constantly providing a holistic assessment of the healthcare services’ and experience attributes, acting on feedback and reaching healthcare service excellence, providing a better understanding of all the touch points with their patients and improving the quality and consistency of all these touch points, all these are achieved by employees, who are truly connected to the healthcare business. Today, patients are systematically becoming aware of the diversity of their choices, being increasingly involved in making better healthcare choices, and, so, more and more innovative products are introduced, targeting new patient segments. Findings from the last three years have shown that patients may achieve better outcomes due to the stakeholders’ commitment to innovation within the context of the big-data revolution, by building new values. PMID:27928442

  3. Confabulations in alcoholic Korsakoff patients.

    PubMed

    Borsutzky, Sabine; Fujiwara, Esther; Brand, Matthias; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2008-11-01

    Besides forgetting, memory is also prone to distortions, errors and illusions. Confabulation is one type of memory distortion that may occur in cases of brain damage. Although confabulations are described anecdotally in patients with alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome (KS), there are few systematic investigations of the presence and nature of these types of false memories in KS. Moreover, it is unclear whether KS patients' confabulations evenly affect all types of memories, or whether certain memory domains are more susceptible. Our study attempted to clarify two questions: first, whether confabulations are a critical feature of the cognitive impairment associated with long-term KS in a large sample of patients (N=42). Second, we investigated which memory domain is most likely affected by confabulations in KS. To elicit confabulations, we used a Confabulation Interview containing questions from different memory domains. We found that KS patients overall confabulated more compared to a group of healthy subjects. Furthermore, we found that patients confabulated most within the episodic/autobiographical memory domain. Our results imply that besides pronounced memory deficits typically associated with KS, confabulation can also be regarded as a clinical feature of the disease. The preponderance of episodic confabulation obtained here by using a standardized test, confirms anecdotic reports that KS patients confabulate in everyday life mainly with respect to their personal past and present. Thus, for a detailed description of the memory profile of KS patients, the screening of confabulation tendencies may be a useful supplementary clinical tool.

  4. [Peritoneal dialysis in obstetric patients].

    PubMed

    Briones-Garduño, Jesús Carlos; Díaz de León-Ponce, Manuel Antonio; Rodríguez-Roldán, Martín; Briones-Vega, Carlos Gabriel; Torres-Pérez, Juan

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of acute renal failure (ARF) in obstetric patients in our country is estimated to be between 3 and 42.8%. The most important causes are preeclampsia, especially when associated with thrombotic microangiopathy and hemolysis and less frequently to hemorrhagic shock. Early peritoneal dialysis (EPD) is the temporary treatment. For these patients, 100 % recovery in renal function was observed. When ARF is associated with multiple organ failure (MOF), the reported mortality ranges between 0 and 20 %. To describe clinical features and medical outcomes of patients treated with early peritoneal dialysis in pregnancy complicated by ARF. A case series was conducted at the Research Unit of the Instituto Materno Infantil del Estado de México. We reviewed the cases of patients admitted to the ICU matching the criteria for ARF. They were divided into two groups: those who received EPD vs. those who did not require EPD. The most important national series were included describing the association with preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathy with hemolysis. In a 5-year period, 1272 patients were admitted to the ICU; in 38 patients ARF was documented requiring peritoneal dialysis. In nine cases ARF was associated with thrombotic microangiopathy with hemolysis, two cases of stillbirth, and one case of mortality with MOF. A 100% recovery in renal function was observed in all cases, using 1.5% solution with an average of 34 dialysis treatments. The early use of peritoneal dialysis in obstetric patients with ARF has a good prognosis.

  5. [Adrenal insufficiency in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Orozco, Federico; Anders, María; Mella, José; Antinucci, Florencia; Pagano, Patricia; Esteban, Paula; Cartier, Mariano; Romero, Gustavo; Francini, Bettina; Mastai, Ricardo

    Relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with severe sepsis, and increased mortality. Its significance is unknown in stable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of RAI in stable cirrhotic patients at different stages of the disease. Also, the impact of RAI on the survival was evaluated and basal cortisol levels between plasma and saliva was correlated in control subjects and cirrhotic patients. Forty seven ambulatory patients and 16 control subjects were studied. RAI was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 9 υg/dl from baseline after the stimulation with 250 mg of synthetic ACTH. Twenty two had Child-Pugh = 8 and 25 = 9. The prevalence of RAI in patients with stable cirrhosis was 22%. A higher incidence of RAI was observed in patients with a Child-Pugh = 9 (8/32) than in those with = 8 (3/13, p < 0.05). A correlation between salivary cortisol and basal plasma cortisol (r = 0.6, p < 0.0004) was observed. Finally, survival at 1 year (97%) and 3 years (91%) was significantly higher without RAI than those who developed this complication (79% and 51%, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the prevalence of RAI is frequent in patients with stable cirrhosis and that it is related to the severity of liver diseaseand increased mortality.

  6. [The AIDS patient in anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Jalowy, A; Flesche, C W; Lorenz, C

    1997-02-01

    Treatment of a patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is very challenging, and makes great demands on the anaesthesiologist. Any of an AIDS patient's vital organ systems may be compromised, either by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) itself, opportunistic infections, by tumours, or as a result of AIDS-related drug therapies. Infections of the lungs (e.g., Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia) are prevalent, and cardiac impairment can be found in as many as 50% of AIDS patients. In addition, disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system and water and electrolyte imbalances are often seen. Perioperatively, the AIDS patient is especially prone to infections as a result of a compromised immune system. The choice of anaesthetic procedure for the AIDS patient-aside from the type of operation-depends on the severity of the illness and progression of organ impairment. All anaesthesia personnel must be careful to avoid infection, as they frequently come in contact with the blood or body fluids of their patients. However, the risk of being infected by an AIDS patient is very low, provided hygiene regulations are followed strictly. The rate of seroconversion after accidental needle-stick injury is below 1%. If exposure does occur, regular serologic controls should be continued for one year. Prophylactic treatment with azidothymidine after exposition to HIV is recommended.

  7. Communicating with the rheumatic patient.

    PubMed

    Wright, V; Hopkins, R

    1977-05-01

    To explore the meanings attached to words by patients and doctors, a multiple-choice questionnaire was given to 214 rheumatic patients, 110 non-rheumatic patients, 227 rheumatologists and 36 general practitioners. Words and phrases dealt with symptoms in descriptive terms, common disorders and parts of the body relevant to rheumatology. Poor agreement was obtained for 'back' among rheumatologists and hospital doctors, and for 'arthritis' among general practitioners. The word 'sciatica' means very different things to different doctors. Among rheumatic sufferers good agreement was only reached for 'rheumatism' and 'hereditary'. Non-rheumatic sufferers obtained better agreement than the rheumatic patients. This may have been due to more in the professional classes among the former group. The poorest agreement among rheumatic patients was for 'numbness', 'sciatica', 'slipped disc', 'vertebra', 'cervical', 'spinal cord', 'arthritis', 'deformity', 'anaemia', 'ligaments', 'osteoarthritis', 'lumbar', 'sacrum' and 'back'. Poor doctor-patient correlation between patients and rheumatologists occurred for 'numbness', 'spinal cord', 'cervical', 'sacrum', 'loin', 'slipped disc', 'arthritis', 'osteoarthritis' and 'steroids'.

  8. Informational Needs of Postmastectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilyurt, Duygu Soydaş; Fındık, Ümmü Yıldız

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine informational needs of postmastectomy patients. Materials and Methods This descriptive study was conducted in the general surgery clinics of a university health center for medical research and practice with 72 voluntary patients. For data collection, a patient identification form was used, which was prepared by the researchers in accordance with the literature. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.66±13.39 years, 87% were married, 58% had primary school education, 76% had moderate economic status, and 53% had undergone simple mastectomy. It was determined that 83% of the patients wanted to be informed about hospital and home care interventions, 82% about symptoms and prevention of post-surgical problems, 76% regarding breast cancer and treatment options, and in the range of 54–68%, patients wanted information on the effects of surgery on the body, shoulder and arm exercises, breast self-examination, the effects of breast cancer on family and work life, lymphedema and prevention interventions. Conclusion We recommend that patients with mastectomy should be informed about topics including care interventions, breast cancer and treatment options, effects of surgery, and reducing these effects.

  9. [Neurologically critical patient. Nurses' care].

    PubMed

    López Díaz, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Handling a neurologically critical patient requires some necessary knowledge and aptitudes in order to avoid risks and complications which could worsen a patient's prognosis. To that end, in this article the author deals with two important points nursing personnel need to bear in mind: the distinct methods and catheters which can be used to monitor intracranial pressure, obtaining an important parameter for evaluation purposes and therapeutic follow-up on these patients, placing special emphasis on ventricular drainage and nursing care, and the operations nurses take when dealing with patients who present a risk of intracranial hypertension, setting up a protocol based on seven necessities in the Virginia Henderson model: breathing, elimination, temperature, hygiene and skin, feeding and hydration, mobility and safety. In each of these necessities, the author studies the problems these patients present, identifying them with a series of diagnoses according to NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), and defining the care or nursing activities for each of them, which will prove essential to prevent cerebral ischemia after suffering a primary cerebral injury due to a "TCE"(Cranial Encephalic Trauma) hemorrhage, etc. Nurses' role in caring for neurologically critical patients proves to be of vital importance since these professionals must be capable of evaluating, preventing, controlling and identifying those risk situations which neurologically critical patients could present, avoiding possible complications, aiding their recuperation, and providing quality health care.

  10. Patient satisfaction: focusing on "excellent".

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichiro; Waterman, Brian; Faulkner, Kelly M; Boslaugh, Sarah; Burroughs, Thomas E; Dunagan, W Claiborne

    2009-01-01

    In an emerging competitive market such as healthcare, managers should focus on achieving excellent ratings to distinguish their organization from others. When it comes to customer loyalty, "excellent" has a different meaning. Customers who are merely satisfied often do not come back. The purpose of this study was to find out what influences adult patients to rate their overall experience as "excellent." The study used patient satisfaction data collected from one major academic hospital and four community hospitals. After conducting a multiple logistic regression analysis, certain attributes were shown to be more likely than others to influence patients to rate their experiences as excellent. The study revealed that staff care is the most influential attribute, followed by nursing care. These two attributes are distinctively stronger drivers of overall satisfaction than are the other attributes studied (i.e., physician care, admission process, room, and food). Staff care and nursing care are under the control of healthcare managers. If improvements are needed, they can be accomplished through training programs such as total quality management or continuous quality improvement, through which staff employees and nurses learn to be sensitive to patients' needs. Satisfying patients' needs is the first step toward having loyal patients, so hospitals that strive to ensure their patients are completely satisfied are more likely to prosper.

  11. Contribution of patient and hospital characteristics to adverse patient incidents.

    PubMed Central

    Elnicki, R A; Schmitt, J P

    1980-01-01

    The 1974 medical malpractice "crisis" brought about extensive legislation and insurance regulation in the United States. Hospitals in many states are now required to support risk management programs that include investigation and systematic analyses of adverse patient incidents. However, no research supports the hypothesis that systematic analysis of adverse patient incidents can identify contributory factors. In this study, a simple prediction model was used to estimate relationships between adverse incidents and selected patient and environmental characteristics in a large hospital. While some of the incident-characteristic relationships were significant, none of the estimated equations yielded results that could be logically translated into policy recommendations for the hospital. These results point to the need for further research. The benefits that positive research results would have for patients, hospitals, an the bill-paying public are obvious. Additional negative results would suggest that many legislative bodies and regulatory agencies were presumptions in requiring hospitals to conduct analyses of incidents. PMID:7461973

  12. Standardized patient care guidelines reduce infectious morbidity in appendectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Helmer, Kenneth S; Robinson, Emily K; Lally, Kevin P; Vasquez, J C; Kwong, Karen L; Liu, Terrence H; Mercer, David W

    2002-06-01

    Surgical wound infection and intra-abdominal abscess remain common infectious complications after appendectomy, especially in the setting of a perforated or gangrenous appendix. We therefore developed a clinical protocol for the management of appendicitis to decrease postoperative infectious complications. Between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 1999, 206 patients with appendicitis were treated on protocol. Retrospectively, the charts were reviewed for all protocol patients as well as for 232 patients with appendicitis treated in the year prior to protocol initiation. Data were collected on surgical wound infections and intra-abdominal abscesses. There were significantly fewer infectious complications in the protocol group than in the nonprotocol group (20 [9%] versus 8 [4%]; P <0.05). In patients with a perforated or gangrenous appendix, the infectious complication rate was reduced from 33% to 13% (P <0.05). The incidence of infectious complications after appendectomy can be significantly reduced with a standardized approach to antibiotic therapy and wound management.

  13. Shader Lamps Virtual Patients: the physical manifestation of virtual patients.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Gutierrez, Diego; Welch, Greg; Lincoln, Peter; Whitton, Mary; Cendan, Juan; Chesnutt, David A; Fuchs, Henry; Lok, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of Shader Lamps Virtual Patients (SLVP) - the combination of projector-based Shader Lamps Avatars and interactive virtual humans. This paradigm uses Shader Lamps Avatars technology to give a 3D physical presence to conversational virtual humans, improving their social interactivity and enabling them to share the physical space with the user. The paradigm scales naturally to multiple viewers, allowing for scenarios where an instructor and multiple students are involved in the training. We have developed a physical-virtual patient for medical students to conduct ophthalmic exams, in an interactive training experience. In this experience, the trainee practices multiple skills simultaneously, including using a surrogate optical instrument in front of a physical head, conversing with the patient about his fears, observing realistic head motion, and practicing patient safety. Here we present a prototype system and results from a preliminary formative evaluation of the system.

  14. Hospitalizations in elderly glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Moroney, Claire; Perry, James R; Tsang, Derek S; Bilodeau, Denise; Mueller, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Myrehaug, Sten; Sahgal, Arjun; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Tsao, May N

    2017-08-11

    Elderly glioblastoma (GB) patients are at risk of hospitalizations due to the morbidity of the disease and possible treatment toxicity. In this observational cohort study, 255 newly diagnosed GB patients age 65 years and older were included. Survival, emergency room visits and admissions to an acute care hospital were determined. Mean and median total health care costs were calculated. Risk factors for Emergency room visits and acute care hospital admissions were determined. Median overall survival was 6 months. The majority of patients (68%) had at least one visit to the emergency department and 77% had at least one admission to acute care. The mean and median total costs (hospital, ambulatory, physician billing, other health care costs) per patient were $162,479.78 (CAN) and $125,511.00 (CAN), respectively. Treatment with radiation or treatment with radio-chemotherapy was associated with a relative risk (RR) of 2.31 (95% CI: 1.44-3.7; P=0.0005) and 2.19 (95% CI: 1.28-3.74; P=0.004), respectively for emergency department visits as compared to patients who were managed with comfort measures only. Patients with a baseline ECOG 0 had a RR of 1.71 (95% CI: 1.06-2.77; P=0.0289) and patients with baseline ECOG 1 had a RR of 1.49 (0.98-2.26; P=0.0623) for hospital admission as compared to patients with ECOG 4. A large proportion of elderly GB patients (particularly those with good baseline performance status who underwent active treatment) presented to the emergency department and had at least one admission to acute care.

  15. [The patient and his family].

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Susanne; van Oorschot, Birgitt; Köhler, Norbert; Leppert, Karena; Steinbach, Kerstin; Hausmann, Christopher; Anselm, Reiner

    2005-06-01

    Medical decision-making models focus on doctor-patient relationship. The impact of the family, specifically the involvement of the relatives in the information- and decision-making process have rarely been evaluated yet. Within the project "Patient as partners - cancer patients and their involvement in medical decision making" progressive disease cancer patients, their relatives and doctors as well as Thuringian general practitioners have been interviewed with regard to their attitudes (among others) towards the medical system and information and decision making processes. From the patient's point of view, the family is highly important in decision-making (very important/important 80.3 %). 73 % of the patients, but only 58 % of the relatives feel very good/good informed about the treatment. With regard to prognosis, 30 % of the patients and 27 % of the relatives feel less/poorly informed. 83.7 % of the relatives believe they cannot influence treatment decisions. According to this, Thuringian general practitioners judge the influence of family members on treatment decisions quite low (very high/high 12.9 %, partly 37.4 %, low/not possible 49.7 %), though the relatives' wish for involvement is seen quite realistic (89 % of the GP's believe that the family wants to be involved). From the patients point of view, the family has got a high status with regard to medical decision-making. In palliative cancer patients doctors should offer an early and continuous involvement of relatives in information and decision-making processes in order to reduce misjudgements and frustration within the families.

  16. Maintaining primacy of the patient perspective in the development of patient-centered patient reported outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garver, Amanda; Ljungberg, Inger H.; Schladen, Manon M.; Groah, Suzanne L.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe and demonstrate a new model of developing patient reported outcomes (PROs) that are patient-centered, and to test the hypothesis that following this model would result in a qualitatively different PRO than if the typical PRO development model were followed. The typical process of developing PROs begins with an initial list of signs or symptoms originating from clinicians or PRO developers; patient validation of this list ensures that the list (i.e., the new PRO) is interpretable by patients, but not that patient perspectives are central or even represented. The new model begins with elicitation from clinicians and patients independently and separately. These perspectives are formally analyzed qualitatively, and the results are iteratively integrated by researchers, supporting clinical relevance and patient centeredness. We describe the application of this new model to the development of a PRO for urinary signs and symptoms in individuals with neuropathic bladder, and test the hypothesis that the two processes generate qualitatively different instruments using a national validation sample of 300 respondents. Of its 29 items, the new instrument included 13 signs/symptoms derived from existing clinical practice guidelines, with 16 others derived from the patient/focus groups. The three most-endorsed items came from the patients, and the three least-endorsed items came from clinical guidelines. Thematic qualitative analysis of the elicitation process, as well as the results from our national sample, support the conclusion that the new model yields an instrument that is clinically interpretable, but more patient-centered, than the typical model would have done in this context. PMID:28257414

  17. Emergency department team communication with the patient: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Danielle M; Ellison, Emily P; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Engel, Kirsten G; Cameron, Kenzie A; Makoul, Gregory; Adams, James G

    2013-08-01

    Effective communication is important for the delivery of quality care. The Emergency Department (ED) environment poses significant challenges to effective communication. The objective of this study was to determine patients' perceptions of their ED team's communication skills. This was a cross-sectional study in an urban, academic ED. Patients completed the Communication Assessment Tool for Teams (CAT-T) survey upon ED exit. The CAT-T was adapted from the psychometrically validated Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) to measure patient perceptions of communication with a medical team. The 14 core CAT-T items are associated with a 5-point scale (5 = excellent); results are reported as the percent of participants who responded "excellent." Responses were analyzed for differences based on age, sex, race, and operational metrics (wait time, ED daily census). There were 346 patients identified; the final sample for analysis was 226 patients (53.5% female, 48.2% Caucasian), representing a response rate of 65.3%. The scores on CAT-T items (reported as % "excellent") ranged from 50.0% to 76.1%. The highest-scoring items were "let me talk without interruptions" (76.1%), "talked in terms I could understand" (75.2%), and "treated me with respect" (74.3%). The lowest-scoring item was "encouraged me to ask questions" (50.0%). No differences were noted based on patient sex, race, age, wait time, or daily census of the ED. The patients in this study perceived that the ED teams were respectful and allowed them to talk without interruptions; however, lower ratings were given for items related to actively engaging the patient in decision-making and asking questions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving oral hygiene for patients.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Debbie; Hampson, Victoria; Queen, Kerry; Kirk, Donna; Clarkson, Jan; Young, Linda

    2015-01-13

    Systematic reviews and patient safety initiatives recommend that oral hygiene should be part of routine patient care. However, evidence suggests it is often neglected in hospitals and care homes. Research recommends encouraging beliefs that support oral hygiene, and teaching nurses appropriate skills, as necessary prerequisites to implementing best practice in hospital wards. This article describes a pilot study of an educational workshop on oral hygiene. Results from the pilot study suggest that this workshop is a feasible intervention for a service-wide trial. The literature suggests that other interventions are required to complement this approach if nurses are to make oral hygiene a priority in daily patient care.

  19. How important is patient education?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, C; Salcedo-Rocha, A L; Prieto-Parra, R E; Galvan-Villegas, F

    2000-12-01

    The prevalence and disability rate of rheumatic diseases are increasing. It seems that non-medical causes play an important role in the morbidity, disability and mortality of these patients. Efforts to reduce their impact are extremely important. Patient education is thought to be one way to limit disability in rheumatic diseases and to achieve an improvement in quality of life. In this chapter, we review the influence of non-medical causes of morbidity on disease outcome, some basic aspects of education and the evidence of the effectiveness of patient education in diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia syndrome.

  20. Patient risk from interproximal radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Computer simulation methods for determining patient dose from dental radiography have demonstrated that patient risk from a two-film interproximal examination ranges from 1.1 X 10(-8) to 3.4 X 10(-7) using 90-kVp beams, depending on film speed, projection technique, and age and sex of the patient. Further, changing from a short-cone round-beam to a long-cone technique with rectangular collimation reduces risk by a factor of 2.9, independent of other factors.

  1. The doctor-patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H H

    1983-08-01

    This essay focuses on the doctor-patient relationship as a measure of ethical behavior by the physician. The perspective is derived from commitment as a religious humanist to the Judaic heritage, and experience in hospitals. The ethical responsibility to be competent professionally is presupposed. Emphasis is placed on the need of the physician to respect the autonomy of the patient as person, thus to limit the paternalism inherent in the physician's position, and to re-enforce this with compassion. Judaic sources supporting such conduct are cited. Exception is taken to decisions by civil and rabbinic judges which disregard the intimacy of the doctor-patient relationship.

  2. Erectile dysfunction in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Turan, Onur; Ure, Iyimser; Turan, Pakize Ayse

    2016-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common problem in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to assess the presence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in COPD patients. Ninety-three outpatients who had been diagnosed as COPD and followed in Bolvadin State Hospital, Afyon, Turkey, were included in the study. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas analysis. They completed International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Medical Research Council (MRC) Dyspnea Scale, Short Form 36-item Scale (SF-36), and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) Questionnaire. The mean age of 10 (10.8%) mild, 46 (49.5%) moderate, 28 (30.1%) severe, and 9 (9.7%) very severe COPD patients was 61.4 ± 9.8 years. Varying degrees of ED were detected in 67.7% of COPD patients. All patients with hypoxemia had ED. IPAQ score and all SF-36 parameters were low in patients with ED, while MRC score was high. Forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, partial pressure of oxygen in blood, oxygen (O2) saturation, IPAQ score, and role-physical parameters were statistically low in ED patients (p = 0.04, 0.02, <0.01, <0.01, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively); MRC score was statistically higher in patients with ED (p = 0.02). Patients with moderate and severe ED had statistically lower score of mental health (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). There was a positive correlation between IIEF score and IPAQ scores (p < 0.01), MRC scores (p = 0.01), general health (p < 0.01), role-physical (p < 0.01), role-emotional (p < 0.01), physical functioning (p < 0.01), and mental health (p < 0.01) parameters in SF-36. ED is frequently seen in COPD patients. Hypoxemia, smoking, and limitation of physical activity are thought to be associated with ED in COPD as mechanisms. Quality of life and the functional capacity are negatively affected with the presence of ED. It is important for a physician to question the sexual functions in patients with COPD. The

  3. Psychotherapy of the Postdysthymic Patient

    PubMed Central

    MARKOWITZ, JOHN C.

    1993-01-01

    Many patients with dysthymia respond to antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Psychotherapy of dysthymic patients has received less study, but it may have efficacy as a primary treatment or as complement to pharmacotherapy. This preliminary report offers an impression of the value of psychotherapy for 21 dysthymic responders to antidepressant medication. Successful pharmacotherapy appeared to relieve not only depressive symptoms, but also seemingly characterological traits. Yet patients who felt better than ever before lacked social skills whose development dysthymia had retarded. Case examples illustrate the importance of psychotherapy in developing personality and fostering appropriate risk-taking. Prescription of combined pharmaco- and psychotherapy may be appropriate in dysthymia. PMID:22700139

  4. Erythropoietic protoporphyria patients in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Marko, P B; Miljković, J; Gorenjak, M; Povalej, P; Kansky, A

    2007-09-01

    There are only scarce epidemiological data on the prevalence of erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) in a given population. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of EPP within the Slovenian population. The patients were selected by routine examination of photosensitive patients and by studying hospital records. A quantitative spectrophotometric method was used to assess protoporphyrin, with values larger than 530 nm/l considered elevated. 32 EPP patients were detected, which allows us to estimate the prevalence of EPP in Slovenia at 1.75 per 100,000 inhabitants.

  5. [The magnetotherapy of hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S G; Smirnov, V V; Solov'eva, F V; Liashevskaia, S P; Selezneva, L Iu

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of the constant MKM2-1 magnets on patients suffering from essential hypertension. Continuous action of the magnetic field, created by such magnets, on the patients with stage II essential hypertension was noted to result in a decrease of arterial pressure without the occurrence of any side effects and in a simultaneous reduction of the scope of drug administration. Apart from that fact, magnetotherapy was discovered to produce a beneficial effect on the central hemodynamics and microcirculation. The use of the MKM2-1 magnets may be regarded as a feasible method of the treatment of essential hypertension patients at any medical institution.

  6. Fluid Therapy for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justine A; Cohn, Leah A

    2017-03-01

    Young puppies and kittens have unique physiologic needs in regards to fluid therapy, which must address hydration, vascular fluid volume, electrolyte disturbances, or hypoglycemia. Pediatric patients have a higher fluid requirement compared with adults and can rapidly progress from mild dehydration to hypovolemia. Simultaneously, their small size makes overhydration a real possibility. Patient size complicates fluid administration because catheters used in larger pets may be difficult to place. Routes of fluid administration used in the neonate or pediatric patient include oral, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, intraosseous, and intravenous. Clinicians should be aware of the pros and cons of each route. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Patients's with aphasia communication problems].

    PubMed

    Matuszak, Katarzyna; Bonikowska, Agata; Kuczma, Monika; Hagner, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Aphasia is a speech disorder caused by disorders of speech centre in brain cortex. Patient with aphasia compensates communication disorders by communication strategy, witch are spontaneous mechanisms, and uses individual rehabilitation methods. Compensation mechanisms are divided in to: phonetic, inflective, formative, semantic, discursive and structural. Patients with aphasia early therapy have to be individual and consists in not only articulation correction, but in establish over verbal contact or verbal, and improvement this contacts, to create patients ability of communication with society. Later therapy is oriented on improvement of cognitive functions for possibility of participation in social live and if it is possible for return to work.

  8. Diarrhea in the immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Krones, Elisabeth; Högenauer, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common problem in patients with immunocompromising conditions. The etiologic spectrum differs from patients with diarrhea who have a normal immune system. This article reviews the most important causes of diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, ranging from infectious causes to noninfectious causes of diarrhea in the setting of HIV infection as a model for other conditions of immunosuppression. It also deals with diarrhea in specific situations, eg, after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation, diarrhea induced by immunosuppressive drugs, and diarrhea in congenital immunodeficiency syndromes.

  9. Alcoholic patients with secondary depression.

    PubMed

    Schuckit, M

    1983-06-01

    This study of alcoholic patients with and without secondary depression showed that the two groups were almost identical in demographic characteristics, early-life antisocial problems, quantity and frequency of drinking, and family history of affective disorder. The depressed patients reported slightly more alcoholism in their first-degree male relatives and tended to have more alcohol-related life problems. The only significant difference between the two groups was that the depressed patients were heavier users of drugs other than alcohol. Thus severe depression in alcoholics may be related to a greater intake of drugs in addition to alcohol.

  10. Simulated Patients vs. Standardized Patients in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Zubin; Gregory, Paul; Tabak, Diana

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To describe the use of patient-actors as educators in a senior-level pharmacy practice course, and to contrast the value and application of “standardized patient” and “simulated patient” educational methodologies. Design The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) of the licensing examination were utilized during and at the end of the course along with external assessment to determine the impact of this educational methodology. Interviews with a randomly selected cohort of 14 students were undertaken 3 years after graduation and licensure to evaluate long-term impact of this course. Assessment Overall, students responded positively to the shift from “standardized” patients to “simulated” patients, recognizing their value in teaching clinical and pharmaceutical care skills. Concerns were expressed regarding objectivity in assessment and individual grading. Over 98% of students successfully passed the OSCE component of the licensing examination. Long-term follow-up suggests students valued this approach to education and that it provided them with a foundation for better understanding of the psychosocial needs of patients in practice. Conclusions Simulated-patient educators can play an important role in the pharmacy curriculum, and can complement practitioner-educators in providing students with a real-world context for understanding complex patient care needs. PMID:17149448

  11. With patient satisfaction under increasing scrutiny, consider patient callbacks.

    PubMed

    2011-07-01

    Under the final rules for Medicare's value-based purchasing program, one-third of the funding that is set aside to reward quality will be based on how patients rate their hospital experience. However, some EDs are already working to maximize patient satisfaction by implementing programs or policies whereby patients who have been discharged are routinely called to make sure their recovery is going well, as well as to intervene if there is an opportunity for service recovery. There are benefits to having ED clinicians make the follow-up calls themselves, but some health care organizations are also reaping benefits by having non-clinicians collect feedback on individual clinicians as well as specific facilities. In addition to potentially boosting quality and customer service, experts say callbacks are useful in curbing malpractice litigation. To avoid pushback among staff, consider beginning a program of patient callbacks by asking clinicians to call back just two patients per shift worked, and to share their experiences with colleagues. For maximum value, experts recommend that patient callbacks be made within one to four days of discharge.

  12. Evidence-based patient education: knowledge transfer to endodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, John T; McNeil, Daniel W; Gochenour, Lori L; Jackson, C Russell

    2009-11-01

    Evidence-based treatment is emphasized in oral health care, but there has been less focus on empirically demonstrating the effects of patient education. Attempts to educate patients must be empirically demonstrated in order to provide evidence-based guidance to practitioners and educators. We conducted two studies that assessed information acquisition during five-minute audiovisual films on oral hygiene procedures, endodontic procedures, and fear about pain during root canal therapy. A fifteen-item Dental Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ), with three subscales each focusing on the content of one of the films, was developed and psychometrically evaluated. Study 1 included 268 undergraduates; study 2 involved 104 endodontic patients. Participants completed the DKQ, viewed one of the three films, and repeated the questionnaire. The effects of information on knowledge were assessed using 3 (film group) X 3 (subscale of the DKQ) X 2 (time) repeated measures ANOVAs. Scores improved in a content-specific fashion relevant to the film viewed among undergraduates, F(4, 263)=211.33, p<.001, partial eta(2)=.62 and endodontic patients, F(4, 99)=87.22, p<.001, partial eta(2)=.63. The results provide evidence for using brief informational film as an efficacious method to increase patient knowledge, at least in the short term. The DKQ is proposed as a tool to assess patient knowledge in the arenas of oral hygiene and endodontics.

  13. Patient choice modelling: how do patients choose their hospitals?

    PubMed

    Smith, Honora; Currie, Christine; Chaiwuttisak, Pornpimol; Kyprianou, Andreas

    2017-04-11

    As an aid to predicting future hospital admissions, we compare use of the Multinomial Logit and the Utility Maximising Nested Logit models to describe how patients choose their hospitals. The models are fitted to real data from Derbyshire, United Kingdom, which lists the postcodes of more than 200,000 admissions to six different local hospitals. Both elective and emergency admissions are analysed for this mixed urban/rural area. For characteristics that may affect a patient's choice of hospital, we consider the distance of the patient from the hospital, the number of beds at the hospital and the number of car parking spaces available at the hospital, as well as several statistics publicly available on National Health Service (NHS) websites: an average waiting time, the patient survey score for ward cleanliness, the patient safety score and the inpatient survey score for overall care. The Multinomial Logit model is successfully fitted to the data. Results obtained with the Utility Maximising Nested Logit model show that nesting according to city or town may be invalid for these data; in other words, the choice of hospital does not appear to be preceded by choice of city. In all of the analysis carried out, distance appears to be one of the main influences on a patient's choice of hospital rather than statistics available on the Internet.

  14. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  15. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  16. Emotion classification in Parkinson's disease by higher-order spectra and power spectrum features using EEG signals: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Omar, Mohd Iqbal; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Mohamad, Khairiyah; Palaniappan, R; Satiyan, M

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in the ability to process emotions characterize several neuropsychiatric disorders and are traits of Parkinson's disease (PD), and there is need for a method of quantifying emotion, which is currently performed by clinical diagnosis. Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, being an activity of central nervous system (CNS), can reflect the underlying true emotional state of a person. This study applied machine-learning algorithms to categorize EEG emotional states in PD patients that would classify six basic emotions (happiness and sadness, fear, anger, surprise and disgust) in comparison with healthy controls (HC). Emotional EEG data were recorded from 20 PD patients and 20 healthy age-, education level- and sex-matched controls using multimodal (audio-visual) stimuli. The use of nonlinear features motivated by the higher-order spectra (HOS) has been reported to be a promising approach to classify the emotional states. In this work, we made the comparative study of the performance of k-nearest neighbor (kNN) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers using the features derived from HOS and from the power spectrum. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that power spectrum and HOS based features were statistically significant among the six emotional states (p < 0.0001). Classification results shows that using the selected HOS based features instead of power spectrum based features provided comparatively better accuracy for all the six classes with an overall accuracy of 70.10% ± 2.83% and 77.29% ± 1.73% for PD patients and HC in beta (13-30 Hz) band using SVM classifier. Besides, PD patients achieved less accuracy in the processing of negative emotions (sadness, fear, anger and disgust) than in processing of positive emotions (happiness, surprise) compared with HC. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of applying machine learning techniques to the classification of emotional states in PD patients in a user independent manner using EEG signals. The

  17. Learning from patients: students' perceptions of patient-instructors.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2011-09-01

    Prior research on the use of patients as teachers has focused on testing the effectiveness of this practice and exploring its benefits for students. However, very little is known about the added value of patient teaching and how it relates to patient-centred learning. The aim of this study was to explore whether there is added value in using patients as instructors in health professions education and, if there is, to examine how it is constituted. Group interviews were conducted with physiotherapy and occupational therapy students who had attended a 3-hour optional class entitled 'Thoughtful joint examination and respectful patient contact'. This class was delivered by patient-instructors (PIs), who were patients with rheumatism certified to teach. A semi-structured interview guide was used. Interviews continued until data saturation occurred (seven interviews). The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using content analysis. The main finding of this study is that PI sessions facilitate a learning environment in which the content matter is complemented by the provision of realism and individual perspectives on rheumatism, the pedagogical format is characterised by authenticity and intimacy in the style of instruction and feedback, and the PI-student relationship is characterised by balanced teacher-student power relations that support the legitimacy of learning and make space for the asking of questions and the making of mistakes. This study indicates that, in terms of power relations, the PI-student relationship differs from those between faculty teachers and students, and students and patients in the clinic. The formation of a professional identity by students may clash with the fulfilment of their learning tasks in the clinical environment. The study indicates that patient-centredness can be fostered in the PI-student relationship. This is probably supported by the absence of faculty staff involvement in PI teaching sessions

  18. Developing patient-centered teams: The role of sharing stories about patients and patient care.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ariana H; Hassinger, Jane A; Martin, Lisa A; Harris, Lisa H; Gold, Marji

    2015-09-01

    Research indicates that health care teams are good for staff, patients, and organizations. The characteristics that make teams effective include shared objectives, mutual respect, clarity of roles, communication, trust, and collaboration. We were interested in examining how teams develop these positive characteristics. This paper explores the role of sharing stories about patients in developing patient-centered teams. Data for this paper came from 1 primary care clinic as part of a larger Providers Share Workshop study conducted by the University of Michigan. Each workshop included 5 facilitated group sessions in which staff met to talk about their work. This paper analyzes qualitative data from the workshops. Through an iterative process, research team members identified major themes, developed a coding scheme, and coded transcripts for qualitative data analysis. One of the most powerful ways group members connected was through sharing stories about their patients. Sharing clinical cases and stories helped participants bond around their shared mission of patient-centered care, build supportive relationships, enhance compassion for patients, communicate and resolve conflict, better understand workflows and job roles, develop trust, and increase morale. These attributes highlighted by participants correspond to those documented in the literature as important elements of teambuilding and key indicators of team effectiveness. The sharing of stories about patients seems to be a promising tool for positive team development in a primary care clinical setting and should be investigated further. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-01-01

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported. PMID:24907215

  20. CCCT - Patient Advocate Steering Committee

    Cancer.gov

    The Patient Advocate Steering Committee (PASC) works to ensure advocates involved with the Scientific Steering Committees (SSCs) are completely integrated in the development, implementation, and monitoring of clinical trials within those groups.

  1. Helping Patients To Quit Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Frederic

    1989-01-01

    Years ago, the tobacco leaf offered its users many social and ceremonial benefits. But today, throughout the world, the manufactured cigarette wreaks biological havoc. Clinically, physicians can make a small, but significant, contribution to their patients' stopping smoking. Family physicians who want to offer systematic aid to their smoking patients should assess the amount of time and energy they are willing to invest in patients' smoking and the probable rewards of such efforts. Behavioural change comprises four stages: a pre-motivational phase, a motivational phase, a behavioural-change phase, and a maintenance phase. Anyone who has ever smoked belongs to one of these phases and should be treated accordingly. Paradoxically, the physician should support consonant smoking (the patient freely choosing to smoke) except when the smoker is actively engaged in changing behaviour. PMID:21248907

  2. Patient Safety Threat - Syringe Reuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... HAIs HICPAC One & Only Campaign A Patient Safety Threat – Syringe Reuse Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... need to be aware of a very serious threat to their health – the reuse of needles or ...

  3. [Ergotherapy of severely burned patients].

    PubMed

    Nickerl, U; Resag, I

    1995-04-01

    Occupational therapy for severely burned patients includes individual exercise programmes, activities of daily living (ADL), assessment of the need for technical aids, splinting and pressure bandages, as well as psychological and social support. There are different focal points in the three stages of treatment. In the burn-care unit (first stage), if necessary, the patient is provided with splints. At this time the first contact is made. In the burn-care ward (second stage), the occupational therapy is focused on individual exercise programmes, dynamic splinting, ADL, and preparation for discharge from hospital. In the outpatient department (third stage), the aims of occupational therapy are: providing the patients with pressure bandages, checking of splints, assessment of the need for technical aids and special support if the patients have difficulties at home and work.

  4. Vaccines for Patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Dolores; Barroso, Judith; Garcia, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease characterized by chronic obstruction of lung airflow limitation. This disease is currently the fourth higher cause of death in the world, and it is predicted to be the third by the year 2020. Patients with COPD are frequently exposed to Human Rhinovirus, Respiratory Syncytial and Influenza Virus, as well as to Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. These infectious agents are responsible for exacerbations increasing morbidity and mortality in COPD patients. Prevention of infectious exacerbations by vaccination would improve quality of life and patient survival. A literature search: "vaccination of COPD patients" was performed using Medline, the Cochrane Library and other Non-Indexed Citations for this review. This article presents a brief overview of the different studies found, on the new patents, and the future strategies on the field.

  5. Patient compliance with antihypertensive medication.

    PubMed Central

    Hershey, J C; Morton, B G; Davis, J B; Reichgott, M J

    1980-01-01

    Self-reported medication taking compliance behavior of 132 high blood pressure patients was analyzed using an expanded version of the health belief model. Subjects were selected through random sampling procedures from regular hypertension program sessions at a large urban hospital. A questionnaire was constructed to measure the model components, and interviews were conducted with each patient. Bivariate analysis showed that control over health matters, dependence on providers, perceived barriers, duration of treatment, and others' nonconfirming experience were significantly related to compliance (p < .05). Log-linear multivariate analysis revealed that three of these five variables--control over health matters, perceived barriers, and duration of treatment--contributed independently to patient compliance. Self-reported medication taking was significantly related to blood pressure control (p < .02). These data provide the basis for developing interventions for providers to facilitate the medication taking behavior of clinic patients. PMID:7416325

  6. [Food habits among HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Parrilla Saldaña, Josefa; Muñoz Sánchez, Isabel; Peñalver Jiménez, Carmen; Castro Rodríguez, Encarnación; Quero Haro, Antonia; Largo García, Esperanza

    2003-01-01

    The authors analyze the eating habits of a group of 108 patients suffering from HIV. The authors elaborate a chart about the composition and distribution of foods which contains all the required food groups necessary for a complete diet. This food chart lists the variable of this study as well as the frequency of their consummation. Once this chart was drawn up, it was approved by the Nutrition and Dietetic Unit at the Virgen de Valma University Hospital. Among the results obtained, there is a relationship between the necessity these patients have regarding eating a complete diet and diverse nutrients that are easy to chew as well as an abundance of liquids. The article "Nutrition for Patients suffering from HIV" written by the same authors published in the Revista ROL de Enfermera 2002; 25(12):816-820, is recommended in order to have a more complete understanding of this topic, nutrition for patients suffering from HIV.

  7. Should Immunocompromised Patients Have Pets?

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Russell W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risks and benefits of pet ownership by immunodeficient patients, focusing primarily on organisms that colonize animals and are transmitted to humans. Those diseases that are known to be progressive or more severe in patients with altered immune function are emphasized. Methods: A review of the medical and veterinary literature pertaining to zoonoses transmitted by domestic animals was completed. Information pertaining to issues involving immunosuppressed patients including AIDS was carefully evaluated and summarized for inclusion. Results: There are significant clinical and psychosocial benefits to pet ownership. However, numerous diseases can be acquired from these animals which may be more severe in immunocompromised individuals. Conclusion: Simple guidelines for pet ownership by immunosuppressed patients can be implemented to reduce their risk of disease and allow them to safely interchange with their pets. PMID:21603465

  8. Cockroach hypersensitivity in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Pola, J; Valdivieso, R; Zapata, C; Moneo, I; Duce, F; Larrad, L; Losada, E

    1988-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to cockroach antigen has been recognized as an important cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and asthma. To assess the frequency of cockroach hypersensitivity in our country, 150 asthmatic atopic subjects were studied using skin testing and in vitro assays for cockroach-specific IgE antibodies (Oriental and German cockroaches). Twenty-two of 61 patients who had a positive history of cockroach exposure had positive skin tests, and only 3 of 89 patients who had no history of exposure had positive skin reactions. Of 25 patients with positive skin tests, 23 showed specific IgE antibodies against oriental and German cockroaches using RAST and EIA techniques. In summary, approximately 15% of asthmatic atopics in Madrid area are sensitive to cockroaches (positive skin test + specific IgE antibodies). These results indicate that cockroach hypersensitivity should be considered in every patient with perennial asthma.

  9. Connecting Patients With Specialty Products

    PubMed Central

    MCCAIN, JACK

    2012-01-01

    Previously, this series described distribution channels through which specialty drugs move to patients. This installment discusses changes and challenges that lie ahead, especially at the dispensing end. PMID:23091429

  10. Bathing a patient in bed

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will need: Large bowl of warm water Soap (regular or non-rinse soap) Two washcloths or sponges Dry towel Lotion Shaving ... skin, then gently apply a small amount of soap. Check with the patient to make sure you ...

  11. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-01-01

    Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research. PMID:21083009

  12. Fluconazole Pharmacokinetics in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Bradley A.; King, Stephen R.; Wandschneider, Heidi L.; Hickerson, William L.; Hanes, Scott D.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Canada, Todd W.; Hess, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in nine adult patients with severe (30 to 95% total body surface area) burns were studied. There was no significant difference in half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), or volume of distribution (V) over time in five patients on days 3 and 8 of the study (P > 0.05). Combined parameter estimates (means ± standard deviations) for all nine patients for the two study periods were as follows: t1/2, 24.4 ± 5.8 h; CL, 0.36 ± 0.09 ml/min/kg; and V, 0.72 ± 0.12 liters/kg. These estimates of t1/2 and CL in burn patients were approximately 13% shorter and 30% more rapid, respectively, than the most extreme estimates reported for other populations. PMID:9559811

  13. Should patients complete the course?

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Matt

    2017-08-23

    In a recent article in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), a group of experts including infectious disease specialists and microbiologists discussed whether patients should stop taking antibiotics when they feel better.

  14. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-06-06

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported.

  15. The patient with daily headaches.

    PubMed

    Maizels, Morris

    2004-12-15

    The term "chronic daily headache" (CDH) describes a variety of headache types, of which chronic migraine is the most common. Daily headaches often are disabling and may be challenging to diagnose and treat. Medication overuse, or drug rebound headache, is the most treatable cause of refractory daily headache. A pathologic underlying cause should be considered in patients with recent-onset daily headache, a change from a previous headache pattern, or associated neurologic or systemic symptoms. Treatment of CDH focuses on reduction of headache triggers and use of preventive medication, most commonly anti-depressants, antiepileptic drugs, and beta blockers. Medication overuse must be treated with discontinuation of symptomatic medicines, a transitional therapy, and long-term prophylaxis. Anxiety and depression are common in patients with CDH and should be identified and treated. Although the condition is challenging, appropriate treatment of patients with CDH can bring about significant improvement in the patient's quality-of-life.

  16. [Perioperative Management of PD Patients].

    PubMed

    Reichmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Both patients and caregivers but also treating physicians are concerned about complications along with surgical interventions. A major problem is abrupt cessation of anti-Parkinson medication, which leads to manifold disturbances, sometimes even to an akinetic crisis. There are several means to guarantee continuous dopaminergic stimulation even in patients that are not allowed to take medication orally before they undergo surgery. Amongst others rectally applied levodopa, amantadine infusions, and especially the use of a rotigotine patch are good means to overcome oral intake. Perioperative management is important due to the fact that in Germany alone each year more than 10 000 PD patients undergo surgery. Main reasons for this are fractures, but also elective interventions. Further emergency situations that cause treatment as an inpatient are psychosis, motoric disability, but also pneumonia and cardiovascular disturbances. In contrast PD patients suffer less often from cancer. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Sleep in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Numerous electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies have reported neurophysiological and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients during wakefulness. However, these findings have been inconsistently replicated across different groups of patients, thus complicating the identification of underlying neuronal defects. Sleep minimizes possible waking-related confounds, including decreased motivation and presence of active symptoms. Additionally, the two main sleep rhythms, slow waves and spindles, reflect the intrinsic activity of corticothalamic circuits and are associated with cognitive activities, including learning and memory, occurring during wakefulness. In this review I will present the most relevant sleep findings in schizophrenia, with particular emphasis on several recent studies that have consistently reported sleep spindle deficits in patients with schizophrenia. I will then elaborate on how these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia as well as to the development of novel pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to ameliorate the symptoms and cognitive impairments of schizophrenia patients. PMID:26430610

  18. 'The patient is medically cleared'.

    PubMed

    Beale, Chloe; Turner, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    It is standard practice for psychiatric nurses and junior doctors working in emergency departments to ask that patients be 'medically cleared' before psychiatric admission or even assessment. However, there is a lack of agreement over what this process should entail.

  19. Pineal Calcification Among Black Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Kuang-Jaw

    1983-01-01

    A postmortem histopathological study was done in 233 pineal glands of black patients. Among them, 70 percent showed microscopic evidence of calcification in the pineal parenchyma. The frequency of calcification increased with age. However, the severity of calcification reached the peak in the 60 to 69 year old age group and then gradually declined. As compared to males, females had slightly higher frequency and reached the peak of severity in younger age groups. When pineal calcification was compared among patients with various malignancies, a higher frequency and more severe calcification were observed in patients with carcinoma of the prostate and the pancreas. A lower frequency and less severe calcification were observed in patients with carcinoma of the breast and the cervix. The results of this study emphasize the important role of sex hormone in genesis of pineal calcification. PMID:6631985

  20. Psychotherapists' dreams about their patients.

    PubMed

    Kron, Tamar; Avny, Nadav

    2003-06-01

    This study examines therapists' dreams about their patients from the Jungian and the relational perspectives. Few clinical and empirical references to this subject are to be found in the literature. In the present study 31 dreams were collected from 22 therapists. Dreams were collected using anonymous self-report inventory. The research focused on three theoretical research questions: 1. What themes appear in the manifest content of therapists' dreams about their patients? 2. What contributions are made by Jungian interpretation of therapists' dreams about their patients? 3. To what extent are masochistic contents present in the manifest content of therapists' dreams about their patients? The first question was addressed using categorical content analysis of a) themes common to different dreams and b) pre-determined themes for all dreams. The third research question was addressed using Beck's (1967) 'Masochistic Dream' measure. Among the themes common to different dreams were: therapist-patient role reversal; therapist and/or patient attends and remains in meeting, departs/doesn't depart; cancellation of therapy session; sexuality between therapist and patient; aggression; presence vs. absence; non-verbal relationship and communication; time; driving vs. stopping. With regard to pre-determined themes it was found that in 20 of the 31 dreams, the therapist had a negative experience and was characterized as vulnerable. Likewise it was found that 26 out of 31 dreams took place in either a) a street, a road, a route, a corridor; b) en route to somewhere; c) a therapy room and/or building; d) a house. With regard to the contribution of Jungian interpretations of the dreams it was found that 17 of the dreams had diagnostic and prognostic elements, 4 of which were initial dreams, 9 of them were compensatory dreams and in 14 it was found that the patient represents the shadow of the therapist. With regard to the third question it was found that 18 of the 31 dreams met Beck

  1. Corneal temperature in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roni; Munitz, Hanan; Portuguese, Shirley; Gross-Isseroff, Ruth; Sigler, Mayanit; Bodinger, Liron; Katz, Nachum; Stryjer, Rafael; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-12-01

    Most data imply that dopaminergic transmission is essential for proper hypothalamic-mediated core temperature regulation. Altered central dopaminergic transmission is suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Thus, hypothetically, schizophrenia patients might be at increased risk of developing thermoregulatory dysregulation manifested by alterations in core temperature, as well as in peripheral tissue, the temperature of which has been shown to correlate with core temperature (e.g. cornea). Previous small pilot studies of ours showed that schizophrenia patients may exhibit corneal temperature abnormalities. Hence, we assessed corneal temperature in a controlled sample of drug-free ( n =11) and medicated ( n =28) schizophrenia patients compared to healthy comparison subjects ( n =9), using a FLIR thermal imaging camera. Drug-free schizophrenia patients exhibited significantly higher corneal temperature compared to healthy subjects, typical antipsychotic drug (APD)-treated patients ( n =16) and atypical APD-treated patients ( n =12) (37.08+/-1.46 degrees C vs. 33.37+/-2.51 degrees C, 31.08+/-1.43 degrees C and 31.67+/-0.44 degrees C respectively, p <0.0001; p <0.001 vs. each group separately). The healthy comparison subjects and the atypical APD-treated patients exhibited comparable corneal temperatures and these two groups exhibited higher corneal temperatures compared to the typical APD-treated patients ( p <0.01 and p =0.051 respectively). In conclusion, this study indicates that drug-free schizophrenia patients exhibit substantially higher corneal temperature compared to healthy comparison subjects or medicated patients, and that APDs may decrease corneal temperature either to normal (atypical APD) or to subnormal (typical APD) values. The relevance of these phenomena to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, the biological mechanism underlying drug-induced corneal temperature alterations, the possible role of temperature-lowering drugs

  2. Patient Simulators Train Emergency Caregivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Johnson Space Center teamed up with Sarasota, Florida-based METI (now CAE Healthcare) through the STTR program to ruggedize the company’s patient simulators for training astronauts in microgravity environments. The design modifications were implemented in future patient simulators that are now used to train first responders in the US military as well as fire departments and other agencies that work in disaster zones.

  3. Paradoxical emboli in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Vella, M; McNabb, R; Lewis, R; Sulke, N; Poston, R; Lugon, M

    1992-01-01

    We report two elderly patients who each had a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and were considered to have had paradoxical emboli. In one patient the PFO was detected by contrast two-dimensional echocardiography, whereas in the other it was demonstrated at post-mortem examination. This is an unusual but treatable condition, particularly difficult to diagnose in older people and probably occurring more frequently than is generally suspected.

  4. Patients' perceptions of psychotropic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Cecil G.

    1981-01-01

    This pilot study examined patients' perceptions of, and attitudes towards, psychotropic drug-taking. Fifty chronic users of benzodiazepines in two Middlesex group practices were interviewed, and data were collected on their knowledge, experience and expectations of these drugs. The data suggest that psychotropic drug-taking has become an important part of many patients' self-image and of their social relationships, and that these factors should be taken into account when dealing with psychological dependence on psychotropic drugs. PMID:7265056

  5. Delirium in hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Inouye, S K

    1998-11-01

    Delirium is a common, serious problem for hospitalized older patients. Recognition of delirium poses challenges requiring cognitive assessment and knowledge of the clinical course. Delirium often is of multiple causes and is associated with a poor long-term prognosis. Nonpharmacologic approaches for delirium management are recommended; pharmacologic management should be reserved for patients who pose a danger to themselves or others. Importantly, delirium and its complications may be preventable through a targeted risk factor approach.

  6. Emergency Department Rotational Patient Assignment.

    PubMed

    Traub, Stephen J; Stewart, Christopher F; Didehban, Roshanak; Bartley, Adam C; Saghafian, Soroush; Smith, Vernon D; Silvers, Scott M; LeCheminant, Ryan; Lipinski, Christopher A

    2016-02-01

    We compare emergency department (ED) operational metrics obtained in the first year of a rotational patient assignment system (in which patients are assigned to physicians automatically according to an algorithm) with those obtained in the last year of a traditional physician self-assignment system (in which physicians assigned themselves to patients at physician discretion). This was a pre-post retrospective study of patients at a single ED with no financial incentives for physician productivity. Metrics of interest were length of stay; arrival-to-provider time; rates of left before being seen, left subsequent to being seen, early returns (within 72 hours), and early returns with admission; and complaint ratio. We analyzed 23,514 visits in the last year of physician self-assignment and 24,112 visits in the first year of rotational patient assignment. Rotational patient assignment was associated with the following improvements (percentage change): median length of stay 232 to 207 minutes (11%), median arrival to provider time 39 to 22 minutes (44%), left before being seen 0.73% to 0.36% (51%), and complaint ratio 9.0/1,000 to 5.4/1,000 (40%). There were no changes in left subsequent to being seen, early returns, or early returns with admission. In a single facility, the transition from physician self-assignment to rotational patient assignment was associated with improvement in a broad array of ED operational metrics. Rotational patient assignment may be a useful strategy in ED front-end process redesign. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intragastric Balloon for Overweight Patients

    PubMed Central

    Martins Fernandes, Flavio Augusto; Lima, Diego L.; Rao, Prashanth; Shadduck, Phillip P.; Montandon, Isabelle D.; de Souza Barros, Juscielle; Rodrigues, Ingrid Lais Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Current treatments for overweight adults include reduced-calorie diet, exercise, behavior modification, and selective use of medications. Many achieve suboptimal results with these measures and progress to obesity. Whether the intragastric balloon (IGB), a reversible device approved for treatment of obesity, is a safe and effective option in overweight adults is less well studied. We conducted a study to prospectively analyze the safety and effectiveness of IGB in overweight adults, to compare the results to a simultaneously studied cohort of obese patients, and to share procedural tips for safe IGB placement and removal. Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients were evaluated in this prospective, nonrandomized study. Twenty-six overweight [body mass index (BMI), 26–30)] and 113 obese (BMI > 30) patients underwent outpatient, endoscopic IGB placement under intravenous sedation. The IGB was filled with a 550–900 mL (average, 640 mL) solution of saline, radiological contrast, and methylene blue, with an approximate final proportion of 65:2:1. The patients were followed up at 1–2 weeks and then monthly for 6 months. At 6 months, they underwent IGB removal via an esophageal overtube to optimize safety, and then they were observed for 6 more months. Results: IGB time was 190 ± 36 d in the overweight patients and 192 ± 43 d in the obese patients. Symptoms of IGB intolerance included nausea and pain, which were transiently present in 50–95% of patients for several days, and necessitated early IGB removal in 6% of patients. There were no procedure-related complications and no IGB-related esophagitis, erosion, perforation, or obstruction. The percentage of excess weight loss (EWL%) was 96 ± 54% in the overweight group and 41 ± 26% in the obese group (P < 0.001). Conclusion: In overweight adults failing standard treatments, IGB placement for 6 months had an acceptable safety profile and excellent weight loss. PMID:26955259

  8. [Risk management and patient safety].

    PubMed

    Lessing, C

    2009-06-01

    Risk management and patient safety are of indisputable importance for the quality of health care. At the same time they confront all professional groups in the health system with high demands. The Action Alliance for Patient Safety inc. wants to demonstrate ways in which measures for avoiding errors and improving safety can reach the healthcare practice. Interdisciplinary cooperation and the availability of mutually developed materials are the maxims of the work of the society.

  9. [Ocular changes in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Popa, M; Nicoară, S

    2000-01-01

    The study analyzes the ocular aspects in patients receiving hemodialysis, in order to define the importance of the ophthalmological exam as prognosis and follow-up parameter. The prospective study includes 84 patients with renal insufficiency who received hemodialysis between 1994-1998. The ocular aspects and their connection with the dialysis and the basic disease are described and analyzed. The most important were the retinal vascular complications: hypertensive retinopathy, anterior optic ischaemic neuropathy, central retinal artery occlusion, diabetic retinopathy.

  10. [Orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients].

    PubMed

    Krausz, E; Einy, S; Aizenbud, D; Levin, L

    2011-07-01

    Orthodontic treatment poses a significant challenge in patients suffering from periodontal disease. Providing orthodontic treatment to periodontal patients should be carefully planned and performed in a tight collaboration between the orthodontist and periodontist. Resolution and stabilization of the periodontal condition is a pre-requisite for orthodontic treatment initiation. Careful oral hygiene performance and highly frequent recall periodontal visits are also crucial. Pre- or post- orthodontic periodontal surgery might help providing better treatment outcomes.

  11. Depression and the Suicidal Patient.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Dick C; Tran, Mina; Shah, Asim A; Matorin, Anu

    2015-11-01

    Depression is the most common psychiatric illness in the general community, with 3% to 4% of depressives dying by suicide today. Studies have shown that depression has considerable morbidity and mortality. This article focuses on depressed patients and their management within the emergency department. Understanding the intricacies of the interview process and identifying which patients need immediate attention are important skills for the emergency physician.

  12. Dental management of anticoagulated patients.

    PubMed

    Carr, M M; Mason, R B

    1992-10-01

    Today's trend toward ambulatory medical care will bring more pharmacological problems into the dental office. While the dental management of patients taking oral anticoagulants is controversial, current research supports the contention that they can be safely treated on an outpatient basis. The use of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) has made better estimates of prothrombin time possible, and patients can be maintained in a narrow therapeutic range. Postoperative hemorrhage can be avoided or controlled with local hemostatic agents.

  13. Patient-empowerment interactive technologies.

    PubMed

    Bruggers, Carol S; Altizer, Roger A; Kessler, Robert R; Caldwell, Craig B; Coppersmith, Kurt; Warner, Laura; Davies, Brandon; Paterson, Wade; Wilcken, Jordan; D'Ambrosio, Troy A; German, Massiell L; Hanson, Glen R; Gershan, Lynn A; Korenberg, Julie R; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2012-09-19

    Video games capture the rapt attention of an individual player's mind and body, providing new opportunities for personalized health care. An example of therapeutic interactive technologies is an incentive-based video game that translates physical exercise into mental empowerment via motivational metaphoric visualization in order to help patients psychologically overcome cancer. Such nonpharmacological interventions may enhance patients' resilience toward various chronic disorders via neuronal mechanisms that activate positive emotions and the reward system.

  14. Nutritional Considerations for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angela

    1985-01-01

    Although weight loss is a frequent, though not invariable, component of the cancer syndrome, the associated malnutrition is a poor prognostic sign among both children and adults. This article describes the possible mechanisms of cancer cachexia; reviews the present state of nutritional support in cancer patients; identifies nutritional problems and workable approaches during the pre- and post-treatment periods; discusses the unconventional nutritional practices commonly encountered and lists resource materials for patients and families. PMID:21274086

  15. Hypnotherapy and the Suicidal Patient

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Daniel

    1973-01-01

    Three cases are presented in which a family physician treats a suicidal patient by the hypnotherapeutic method described. It is postulated that such a method may be quick, effective, and relatively safe method for a diagnostic and therapeutic approach in family practice. In the hypnotic state, the patient is hypersuggestible and can accept suggestions which meet her unconscious needs to be loved as an individual within the milieu of the ego state at the time her psychopathology occurred. PMID:20468906

  16. EPS: An Epidemiologic Patient Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James Scott

    1981-01-01

    EPS is an automated patient case simulator which presents the user (student) with a mock patient that he may interview, as in a standard medical history; examine, as in a physical examination; evaluate, through XRAY and other laboratory studies; and finally, diagnose. The foundation of the system is a mathematical description of the relevant epidemiological data for each disease simulated. This is referred to as the DISEASE MODEL.

  17. Information technologies and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Scott J; Joyner, Paul W

    2012-02-01

    Advances in health information technology provide significant opportunities for improvements in surgical patient safety. The adoption and use of electronic health records can enhance communication along the surgical spectrum of care. Bar coding and radiofrequency identification technology are strategies to prevent retained surgical sponges and for tracking the operating room supply chain. Computerized intraoperative monitoring systems can improve the performance of the operating room team. Automated data registries collect patient information to be analyzed and used for surgical quality improvement.

  18. Cultural competence and simulated patients.

    PubMed

    Paroz, Sophie; Daele, Amaury; Viret, Francine; Vadot, Sara; Bonvin, Raphaël; Bodenmann, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Cultural competence education is central in addressing the socio-cultural factors that affect health care; however, there is little agreement over the best teaching approach. Although simulated patients are widely used in medical education, little is known about their application to cultural competence education. At the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine, University of Lausanne, the content of a cultural competence education module for resident doctors was recently restructured, with a final session emphasising previous principles through a simulated patient-doctor encounter. We tested the feasibility of cultural competence training with simulated patients. We created two complementary case scenarios based on real clinical practice and focused on specific clinical skills. An interdisciplinary team trained two simulated patients, and a 90-minute pilot session took place. General satisfaction was high and the increased opportunity for interaction was greatly appreciated. According to the learners, the simulated case setting was relevant for improving self-reflection and cultural sensitivity: applying skills in the session enhanced perceived impact for 'real-world' practice. We tested the feasibility of cultural competence training with simulated patients The use of patient-centred simulated clinical practice as a teaching approach seems to be advantageous in increasing providers' self-reflection about cultural competence and intensifying the impact of cultural competence education in clinical practice, and hopefully will improve the quality of care for every patient. Case scenarios based on a diversity of socio-cultural factors and oriented towards a broad skills set would seem preferable to avoid cultural drift and to enhance the learning of cultural approaches that are adaptable to every patient. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Seeing Patients Through Genetic Lenses

    PubMed Central

    FELCONE, LINDA HULL

    2005-01-01

    Biotechnology is changing how doctors ‘see’ patients and disease processes. Optical probes and computer-assisted genetic screening tools let researchers peer into the structure and functions of cellular proteins on a molecular level. Soon, this clearer vision of individual patients will be available in the clinic, making drug and biologic treatments safer. These new lenses will push medicine toward risk prediction and away from acute intervention. PMID:23393472

  20. The Zest for Patient Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    Thawani, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Patient Empowerment (PE) can be considered as an active and self-determining role of patient than a passive recipient of health related services. It encourages the provider–patient relationship to blossom and helps in clearing patients’ doubts, confusion and fears to bring in clarity, relief and assurance. For the active involvement of the patient’s in own health management they need to be awakened, motivated, educated and enlightened to enable them to exercise their rights. Active patient involvement in the decision-making achieves favourable health outcome. In an empowerment based approach, the focus is not on defining a particular type of behaviour, but on how the behaviour is defined as a goal to be achieved by a particular individual. As a result of their empowerment process, the patients can better self-manage their illness and their lives. Thus empowerment of the patients will positively help medical uprising of the community by creating an educated, health aware, informed and health conscious mass. PMID:27504307

  1. Optimising patient outcomes in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Harousseau, Jean-Luc

    2010-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable disease, and the goal of therapy is to prolong survival. Newer therapies (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib) have contributed to the recent improvements in survival. Optimal integration of these newer therapies into standard practice may be aided by better methods of risk stratification. Supplementation of existing risk stratification methods with new prognostic information, such as cytogenetic data and gene expression profiles, may improve prognostication and help to identify appropriate treatment. The advent of newer therapies has also prompted a reassessment of traditional endpoints and goals of therapy, such as complete response. While complete response correlates with survival in some cases, the correlation is not consistent across all treatment regimens and patient groups, and is therefore not always the most appropriate goal of therapy. With the aim of prolonging survival, trials are currently evaluating newer therapies as long-term maintenance therapy or as prevention therapy for patients with smouldering myeloma. Given that these patients are often asymptomatic and free of clinically active disease, success in this setting depends highly on long-term tolerability of these agents. The available evidence suggests that their adverse event profiles are distinct, predictable, and manageable with careful monitoring and intervention as appropriate. Treatment of MM should therefore be tailored to the individual patient based on the goals of therapy, patient condition, expected adverse events, and patient preference. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Caring for visually impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Orrico, Kathleen B

    2013-01-01

    To raise pharmacist awareness about the needs and concerns of our patients with visual impairment and to review useful strategies to foster medication adherence. As patient-centered pharmacists, we need to understand the challenges faced by our patients with low vision and tailor pharmaceutical care to best fit their needs. Evidence-based best practices in labeling and written communication have been developed by the American Foundation for the Blind in partnership with the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. These recommendations include the use of specific font styles, minimum font size, and other standards known to enhance usability for those with limited vision. Recent advances in assistive technologies such as audio output and object recognition software can be used to ease the medication-taking process and effectively communicate important drug and safety information in a manner that can be understood by those with low vision. In July 2012, the Prescription Accessible Drug Labeling Promotion Act of 2012 (HR 4087) was signed into law. This new legislation is an addition to the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, which required the development and ultimate implementation by pharmacies of national best practices intended to improve the accessibility of prescription drug labeling for the visually impaired. As a patient-centered profession, we need to advocate for our patients with special needs by partnering with government and patient groups to support and enact legislation intended to enhance people's ability to adhere to drug therapy.

  3. [Fertility in testicular cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Shin, Takeshi; Miyata, Akane; Arai, Gaku; Okada, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Testicular cancer(TC)is the most common and curable cancer affecting men of reproductive age. Successful treatment approaches have resulted in longer life expectancy in TC survivors. The most frequently used treatment for TC is a combination of inguinal orchiectomy, and either radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In many TC patients, sperm quality is already abnormal and there may even be a lack of viable spermatozoa at the time of diagnosis. Therefore, the effect of cancer treatment on fertility is a potentially significant issue. Fertility preservation in these men has become essential and needs to be discussed prior to the start of cancer treatment. The only currently established fertility preservation method is the cryopreservation of sperm before therapy. For most patients seeking cryopreservation, the semen sample is collected via masturbation. If the patient is unable to ejaculate for any reason, other techniques such as vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation can be performed. In azoospermic or severely oligozoospermic patients, testicular sperm extraction at the time of the inguinal orchiectomy is a useful technique for obtaining spermatozoa before cytotoxic therapy. We herein present an overview of the current topics on fertility in TC patients, including the effects of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. We also describe the strategy for fertility preservation in these patients.

  4. Cancer patient satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, J H; Donovan, K O; Redman, S; Sanson-Fisher, R W

    1990-08-01

    A diagnosis of cancer places considerable stress on patients and requires them to make major adjustments in many areas of their lives. As a consequence, considerable demands are placed on health care providers to satisfy the complex care needs of cancer patients. Currently, there is little available information to indicate the extent to which cancer patients are satisfied with the quality of care they receive. The present study assessed the perceptions of 232 ambulatory cancer patients about the importance of and satisfaction with the following aspects of care: doctors technical competence and interpersonal and communication skills, accessibility and continuity of care, hospital and clinic care, nonmedical care, family care, and finances. The results indicate that all 60 questionnaire items used were considered to reflect important aspects of care, but that greater importance was given to the technical quality of medical care, the interpersonal and communication skills of doctors, and the accessibility of care. Most patients were satisfied with the opportunities provided to discuss their needs with doctors, the interpersonal support of doctors, and the technical competence of doctors. However, few patients were satisfied with the provision of information concerning their disease, treatment, and symptom control and the provision of care in the home and to family and friends.

  5. Establishing an active patient partnership.

    PubMed

    Herrier, R N; Boyce, R W

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacists face many changes in the coming decade, some of which threaten their professional survival. Although uncertainty may currently prevail, one of these changes, the shift in the patient-health care professional relationship from the patient taking a passive role to an active partnering role, provides pharmacists with many opportunities to realize the vision of patient-centered care that has been advocated by pharmacy innovators and leaders for almost three decades. To take advantage of these changes, pharmacists must modify their practice paradigms and use their existing strengths, such as easy patient access and high levels of patient trust, to help develop a new model of pharmaceutical care. The concern that the magnitude of these changes will prevent successful practice transformations may be exaggerated. In reality, these proposed "new" roles have been in existence for much of this century. Most pharmacists can expand and enhance their traditional roles as self-care advisors and patient educators simply by incremental improvements in interpersonal and clinical skills. Rather than a Star Trek approach to "go where no man has gone before," the profession needs only a pharmaceutical sequel to Back to the Future.

  6. [Delusion in the critical patient].

    PubMed

    Palencia-Herrejón, E; Romera, M A; Silva, J A

    2008-02-01

    Delirium, the acute confusional syndrome, is a common although infradiagnosed problem in the critically ill patient, especially the hypoactive subtype. Risk factors for delirium are previous cognitive disturbances, some comorbidities, ambiental factors and the acute organic alterations of critical illness. Delirium is associated to an increase in short and long term mortality, prolongation of mechanical ventilation, increased Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay, and cognitive impairment after hospital discharge. In the last years several tools have been developed to detect delirium in critically ill patients. The Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC) and the Confusion Assessment Method for ICU patients (CAM-ICU) have been validated and are useful even in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Some interventions on specific risk factors can decrease the incidence of delirium in hospitalized patients. Treatment of delirium is based on the identification and correction of contributing factors, the introduction of support measures, and pharmacological therapy for symptomatic control. Halloperidol is the first line therapy of delirium in the critically ill patient, while experience with atypical neuroleptics and other drugs is limited, precluding to do recommendations about its use. Neuroleptic drugs can produce severe side effects and need careful dosage and monitoring. When agitation is important, can be necessary the simultaneous use of benzodiazepines or propofol, and some times, the temporal and protocolized application of physical restraints.

  7. Spiritual care in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Hojjatollah; Abedi, Heidar Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spiritual needs are among an individual's essential needs in all places and times. With his physical and spiritual dimensions and the mutual effect of these two dimensions, human has spiritual needs as well. These needs are an intrinsic need throughout the life; therefore, they will remain as a major element of holistic nursing care. One of the greatest challenges for nurses is to satisfy the patients’ spiritual needs. METHODS: This is a qualitative study with hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Data were collected from 16 patients hospitalized in internal medicine-surgery wards and 6 nurses in the respective wards. Data were generated by open-ended interview and analyzed using Diekelmann's seven-stage method. Rigorousness of findings was confirmed by use of this method as well as team interpretation, and referring to the text and participants. RESULTS: In final interpretation of the findings, totally 10 sub-themes, three themes including formation of mutual relation with patient, encouraging the patient, and providing the necessary conditions for patient's connection with God, and one constitutive pattern, namely spiritual need of hospitalized patients. CONCLUSIONS: Spiritual needs are those needs whose satisfaction causes the person's spiritual growth and make the person a social, hopeful individual who always thanks God. They include the need for communication with others, communication with God, and being hopeful. In this study, the three obtained themes are the spiritual needs whose satisfaction is possible in nursing system. Considering these spiritual aspects accelerates patient's treatment. PMID:22039390

  8. [Orthodontics for mentally handicapped patients].

    PubMed

    Remmelink, H J

    2006-12-01

    The mentally handicapped exhibit a 3 times higher incidence of malocclusions and related functional problems than the general population. In contrast there is little available literature relating to the orthodontic treatment of handicapped patients. Based on published articles on orthodontic treatment of disabled patients the following recommendations can be given. First of all for each patient a 'problem list' should be drawn up, based on the diagnosis. In this list the orthodontic problems are formulated. Additionally, the list makes clear who is responsible for providing services related to orthodontic care, such as oral hygiene and transportation of the patient to the orthodontist. When deciding whether or not orthodontic treatment should be administered to a patient with a mental handicap the same functional and aesthetic considerations as with any other orthodontic case must be taken into account. Furthermore, the severity of the handicap and possible associated psychosocial and medical limitations as well as the extent to which it will be possible to treat the patient have to be considered. Contraindications are a severe mental handicap, inability to remain still in the dental chair, insufficient co-operation of parents/carers, open bite resulting from abnormal oral function, and a mild malocclusion. The orthodontic treatment should aim for an acceptable result, and not for orthodontic perfection.

  9. Toothbrush pressures of orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    White, L

    1983-02-01

    The intention of this study was to determine whether toothbrushing pressures varied significantly between groups of orthodontic patients who were good toothbrushers and those who were poor toothbrushers. Seventy-two patients undergoing full-banded orthodontic treatment were selected from the author's practice and were subjectively paired by him according to their habitual oral hygiene. One group of thirty-six patients who habitually displayed poor oral hygiene was compared to a group of thirty-six patients who habitually displayed good oral hygiene. A specially designed strain gauge with a force-averaging feedback mechanism was attached to each patient's manual toothbrush, and the force with which that patient brushed was averaged and recorded in pounds. The poor brushers averaged 0.20 pound, whereas the average pressure of the good brushers was 0.89 pound. The statistical evidence indicates that the difference between the two groups is highly significant and is unlikely to be due to chance alone. This study has shown that toothbrush pressures can be easily and accurately measured. The attempt to objectify a single characteristic of toothbrushing behavior in an orthodontic population is an effort to avoid the medical model explanation of behavior vis-a-vis the nonspecific and subjective word attitude. Future studies will determine whether poor toothbrushers can be changed into good toothbrushers through the progressive acquisition of greater toothbrushing forces.

  10. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  11. Peripapillary Retinoschisis in Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Serife; Cebeci, Zafer; Kabaalioglu, Melis; Ciloglu, Serife; Kir, Nur; Izgi, Belgin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate peripapillary retinoschisis and its effect on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in glaucomatous eyes. Methods. Circumpapillary RNFL (cpRNFL) B-scan images of 940 glaucoma patients (Group 1) and 801 glaucoma-suspect patients (Group 2) obtained by SD-OCT were reviewed. The structural and clinical characteristics of the retinoschisis were investigated. The RNFL thickness measurements taken at the time of retinoschisis diagnosis and at the follow-up visits were also compared. Results. Twenty-nine retinoschisis areas were found in 26 of the 940 glaucoma patients (3.1%) in Group 1 and seven areas were found in 801 patients (0.87%) in Group 2. In glaucomatous eyes, the retinoschisis was attached to the optic disc and overlapped with the RNFL defect. At the time of retinoschisis, the RNFL thickness was statistically greater in the inferior temporal quadrant when compared with the follow-up scans (p < 0.001). No macular involvement or retinal detachment was observed. Conclusion. The present study investigated 33 peripapillary retinoschisis patients. Increase in RNFL thickness measurements was observed at the time of retinoschisis. It is important to examine the cpRNFL B-scan images of glaucoma patients so that the RNFL thickness is not overestimated. PMID:27069674

  12. [GASTRIC CANCER IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    PubMed

    Quispe, Dolly; Ruiz, Eloy; Celis, Juan; Berrospi, Francisco; Payet, Eduardo

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In order to determine a the clinicopatological features in young patients with gastric cancer and compare them with aged patients.PATIENTS AND METHODS: For this study, we selected the clinical charts from the total of patients with histological proved diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma admitted at the INEN between 1980 and 1996 whose age was less than 31 year (Young group, n =92). As a comparison group (Average Group) we chose of the same universe, a random sample of 184 patients between 50 to 70 years of age. Epidemiological, clinical and histological features, operability and resecability, TNM stage, type of surgery and follow-up of both groups were analyzed.RESULTS: In the Young Group in compared with Average Group, females were more frequent (73.9% vs. 50.5% p<0.001); mucocelular type (70% vs. 31.0%, p<0.001) and undifferentiated carcinoma (75% vs. 32.6%, p>0.001). The mean survival time in the Young Group was 74.9 months and in the Average Group was 36.03 months (p=0.26), there were no significant differences in the survival between resecability and sex (p=0.10 and p=0.41).CONCLUSION: The females and undifferentiated carcinoma was the most frequent features in the young patients with gastric cancer. The survival in this group is better than the average group but this was a no significant difference because the diagnosis was made in late stages.

  13. Alpha-CaMKII plays a critical role in determining the aggressive behavior of human osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Daft, Paul G.; Yuan, Kaiyu; Warram, Jason M.; Klein, Michael J.; Siegal, Gene P.; Zayzafoon, Majd

    2013-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is among the most frequently occurring primary bone tumors, primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. Despite improvements in osteosarcoma treatment, more specific molecular targets are needed as potential therapeutic options. One target of interest is alpha-Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (α-CaMKII), a ubiquitous mediator of Ca2+-linked signaling, which has been shown to regulate tumor cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, we investigate the role of α-CaMKII in the growth and tumorigenicity of human osteosarcoma. We show that α-CaMKII is highly expressed in primary osteosarcoma tissue derived from 114 patients and is expressed in varying levels in different human osteosarcoma cell lines (HOS, MG-63, MNNG/HOS and 143B). To examine whether α-CaMKII regulates osteosarcoma tumorigenic properties, we genetically inhibited α-CaMKII in two osteosarcoma cell lines using two different α-CaMKII shRNAs delivered by lentiviral vectors and overexpressed α-CaMKII by retrovirus. The genetic deletion of α-CaMKII by shRNA in MG-63 and 143B cells resulted in decreased proliferation (50 and 41%), migration (22 and 25%) and invasion (95 and 90%), respectively. The overexpression of α-CaMKII in HOS cells resulted in increased proliferation (240%), migration (640%) and invasion (10,000%). Furthermore, α-CaMKII deletion in MG-63 cells significantly reduced tumor burden in vivo (65%), while α-CaMKII overexpression resulted in tumor formation in a previously non-tumor forming osteosarcoma cell line (HOS). Our results suggest that α-CaMKII plays a critical role in determining the aggressive phenotype of osteosarcoma, and its inhibition could be an attractive therapeutic target to combat this devastating adolescent disease. PMID:23364534

  14. Visfatin triggers the in vitro migration of osteosarcoma cells via activation of NF-κB/IL-6 signals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Ji; Shen, Ning-Jiang; Cheng, Liang; Yehan Fang; Huang, Hui; Li, Kang-Hua

    2016-11-15

    Pulmonary metastasis is the major challenge for clinical treatment of osteosarcoma patients. Recent studies indicated that visfatin, a 52kDa adipocytokine, can trigger the cell motility of various cancers, while its role in the progression of osteosarcoma remains not clear. Our present study revealed that visfatin can significantly promote the in vitro migration and invasion of osteosarcoma MG-63 and HOS cells and up regulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and fibronectin (FN). Furthermore, visfatin treatment also increased the expression of IL-6 in both MG-63 and HOS cells via a time dependent manner, while anti-IL-6 antibody can significantly attenuate visfatin induced cell invasion and up regulation of MMP-2 and FN. It suggested that up regulation of IL-6 mediated visfatin induced in vitro motility of osteosarcoma cells. Visfatin treatment can increase the phosphorylation of both p65 and ERK1/2 in MG-63 and HOS cells, while only the inhibitor of NF-κB, BAY 11-7082, can abolish visfatin induced up regulation of IL-6. BAY 11-7082 also attenuated visfatin induced upregulation of MMP-2 and FN in MG-63 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that visfatin treatment can significantly increase the phosphorylation of IκBα and IKKβ in MG-63 cells. ACHP, the inhibitor of IKK-β, blocked visfatin induced expression of IL-6 mRNA in both MG-63 and HOS cells. Collectively, our data suggested that visfatin can increase the motility of osteosarcoma cells via up regulation of NF-κB/IL-6 signals. It indicated that visfatin might be a potential therapeutic target of osteosarcoma treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Patients assessing students' assignments; making the patient experience real.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jane; Whyte, Fiona; Stewart, Jim; Letters, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    The care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently falls short of the highest standards. This is noted in several publications, including national standards, despite nursing students being taught the importance of listening to and understanding patients. Teaching staff at the University of Glasgow primarily responsible for teaching third year undergraduate nursing students undertook a radical rethink of the planning, delivery and assessment of lectures on IBD. The subject had previously been delivered in a modified lecture format. Although the topic could be included in the end-of-year exams, there was little evidence to show whether this traditional teaching method had any effect on students' clinical practice. In a novel approach to learning and assessment, students were invited to research and produce an information leaflet for newly diagnosed patients with IBD. The leaflets were then assessed and grades awarded by an expert panel of patients and carers. Such enquiry based learning (EBL) intended to demonstrate in practice, the key role patients can play in both undergraduate nurse education and in service planning and delivery in the National Health Service (NHS). The panel found the exercise both interesting and insightful, while the students reported being invigorated and felt the expert assessment meant they were forced to achieve a higher level of work. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Patient Safety Dilemma: Obesity in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Goode, Victoria; Phillips, Elayne; DeGuzman, Pamela; Hinton, Ivora; Rovnyak, Virginia; Scully, Kenneth; Merwin, Elizabeth

    2016-12-01

    Patient safety and the delivery of quality care are major concerns for healthcare in the United States. Special populations (eg, obese patients) need study in order to support patient safety, quantify risks, advance education for healthcare-workers, and establish healthcare policy. Obesity is a complex chronic disease and is considered the second leading cause of preventable death in the United States with approximately 300,000 deaths per year. Obesity is recognized by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a comorbid condition. These concerns emphasize the need to focus further research on the obese patient. Through the use of clinical and administrative data, this study examines the incidence of adverse outcomes in the obese surgical population through AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) and allows for the engagement PSIs as measures to guide and improve performance. In this study, the surgical population was overwhelmingly positive for obesity. Body mass index (BMI) was also a significant positive predictor for 2 of 3 postoperative outcomes. This finding suggests that as BMI reaches the classification of obesity, the risk of these adverse outcomes increases. It further suggests there exists a threshold BMI that requires anticipation of alterations to systems and processes to revise outcomes. Copyright© by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists.

  17. Supporting patient autonomy: the importance of clinician-patient relationships.

    PubMed

    Entwistle, Vikki A; Carter, Stacy M; Cribb, Alan; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2010-07-01

    Personal autonomy is widely valued. Recognition of its vulnerability in health care contexts led to the inclusion of respect for autonomy as a key concern in biomedical ethics. The principle of respect for autonomy is usually associated with allowing or enabling patients to make their own decisions about which health care interventions they will or will not receive. In this paper, we suggest that a strong focus on decision situations is problematic, especially when combined with a tendency to stress the importance of patients' independence in choosing. It distracts attention from other important aspects of and challenges to autonomy in health care. Relational understandings of autonomy attempt to explain both the positive and negative implications of social relationships for individuals' autonomy. They suggest that many health care practices can affect autonomy by virtue of their effects not only on patients' treatment preferences and choices, but also on their self-identities, self-evaluations and capabilities for autonomy. Relational understandings de-emphasise independence and facilitate well-nuanced distinctions between forms of clinical communication that support and that undermine patients' autonomy. These understandings support recognition of the value of good patient-professional relationships and can enrich the specification of the principle of respect for autonomy.

  18. [Nutritional support in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Segurola Gurrutxaga, Hegoi; Bretón Lesmes, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a public health problem of the first order. In developed countries is one of the leading causes of death, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition, stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in adulthood. Many of the patients who survive do so with significant sequelae that limit them in their activities of daily living. Most strokes (80-85%) are due to ischemia, while the rest are hemorrhagic. We have identified many modifiable risk factors, some with an important relationship with dietary factors or comorbidities in wich the diet has a significant impact. The incidence of malnutrition in stroke patients is not well known, but most likely impacts on patient prognosis. Furthermore, the nutritional status of patients admitted for stroke often deteriorates during hospitalization. It is necessary to perform a nutritional assessment of the patient in the early hours of admission, to determine both the nutritional status and the presence of dysphagia. Dysphagia, through alteration of the safety and efficacy of swallowing, is a complication that has an implication for nutritional support, and must be treated to prevent aspiration pneumonia, which is the leading cause of mortality in the stroke patient. Nutritional support should begin in the early hours. In patients with no or mild dysphagia that can be controlled by modifying the texture of the diet, they will start oral diet and oral nutritional supplementation will be used if the patient does not meet their nutritional requirements. There is no evidence to support the use of nutritional supplements routinely. Patients with severe dysphagia, or decreased level of consciousness will require enteral nutrition. Current evidence indicates that early nutrition should be initiated through a nasogastric tube, with any advantages of early feeding gastrostomy. Gastrostomy will be planned when the enteral nutrition support will be expected for long-term (4 weeks). Much evidence points to the

  19. Antimicrobial Dose in Obese Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kassab, Sawsan; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Abdul Aziz, Noorizan

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a chronic disease that has become one of major public health issue in Malaysia because of its association with other disease states including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Despite continuous efforts to educate the public about the health risks associated with obesity, prevalence of the disease continues to increase. Dosing of many medications are based on weight, limited data are available on how antimicrobial agents should be dosed in obesity. The aim of this case presentation is to discuss dose of antibiotic in obese patient. Case report: Patient: GMN, Malay, Female, 45 year old, 150kg, transferred from medical ward to ICU with problems of fever, orthopnea, sepsis secondary to nosocomial pneumonia. She was admitted to hospital a week ago for SOB on exertion, cyanosis, mildly dyspneic, somasthenia, bilateral ankle swelling. There was no fever, cough, chest pain, clubbing, flapping tremor. Her grand father has pre-morbid history of obesity, HPT, DM and asthma. She was non alcoholic, smoker, and not on diet control. The diagnosis Pickwickian syndrome was made. Patient was treated with IV Dopamine 11mcg/kg/min, IV Morphine 4mg/h. IV GTN 15mcg/min, IV Ca gluconate 10g/24h for 3/7, IV Zantac 50mg tds, IV Augmentin 1.2g tds, IV Lasix 40mg od, IV Plasil 10mg tds, S.c heparin 5000IU bd. patient become stable and moved to medical ward to continue her treatment. Discussion: The altered physiologic function seen in obese patients is a concern in patients receiving antimicrobial agents because therapeutic outcomes depend on achieving a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The therapeutic effect of any drug can be altered when any of the 4 pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination) are altered. Decreased blood flow rates and increased renal clearance in obese patients can affect drug distribution and elimination. Changes in serum protein levels can change the metabolism and distribution of drugs that are

  20. [Enteral nutrition in burn patients].

    PubMed

    Pereira, J L; Garrido, M; Gómez-Cía, T; Serrera, J L; Franco, A; Pumar, A; Relimpio, F; Astorga, R; García-Luna, P P

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional support plays an important role in the treatment of patients with burns. Due to the severe hypercatabolism that develops in these patients, oral support is insufficient in most cases, and this makes it essential to initiate artificial nutritional support (either enteral or parenteral). Enteral nutrition is more physiological than parenteral, and data exist which show that in patients with burns, enteral nutrition exercises a protective effect on the intestine and may even reduce the hypermetabolic response in these patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of enteral nutritional support with a hypercaloric, hyperproteic diet with a high content of branched amino acids in the nutritional support of patients suffering from burns. The study included 12 patients (8 males and 4 females), admitted to the Burns Unit. Average age was 35 +/- 17 years (range: 21-85 years). The percentage of body surface affected by the burns was 10% in two cases, between 10-30% in three cases, between 30-50% in five cases and over 50% in two cases. Initiation of the enteral nutrition was between twenty-four hours and seven days after the burn. The patients were kept in the unit until they were discharged, and the average time spent in the unit was 31.5 days (range: 17-63 days). Total energetic requirements were calculated based on Harris-Benedict, with a variable aggression factor depending on the body surface burned, which varied from 2,000 and 4,000 cal day. Nitrogenous balance was determined on a daily basis, and plasmatic levels of total proteins, albumin and prealbumin on a weekly basis. There was a significant difference between the prealbumin values at the initiation and finalization of the enteral nutrition (9.6 +/- 2.24 mg/dl compared with 19.75 +/- 5.48 mg/dl; p < 0.001). The nitrogenous balance improved, changing from -5.4 in the second week to positive values by the fourth and fifth weeks of treatment. Tolerance to the enteral

  1. ETHICAL MODELS OF PHYSICIAN--PATIENT RELATIONSHIP REVISITED WITH REGARD TO PATIENT AUTONOMY, VALUES AND PATIENT EDUCATION.

    PubMed

    Borza, Liana Rada; Gavrilovici, Cristina; Stockman, René

    2015-01-01

    The present paper revisits the ethical models of patient--physician relationship from the perspective of patient autonomy and values. It seems that the four traditional models of physician--patient relationship proposed by Emanuel & Emanuel in 1992 closely link patient values and patient autonomy. On the other hand, their reinterpretation provided by Agarwal & Murinson twenty years later emphasizes the independent expression of values and autonomy in individual patients. Additionally, patient education has been assumed to join patient values and patient autonomy. Moreover, several authors have noted that, over the past few decades, patient autonomy has gradually replaced the paternalistic approach based on the premise that the physician knows what is best for the patient. Neither the paternalistic model of physician-patient relationship, nor the informative model is considered to be satisfactory, as the paternalistic model excludes patient values from decision making, while the informative model excludes physician values from decision making. However, the deliberative model of patient-physician interaction represents an adequate alternative to the two unsatisfactory approaches by promoting shared decision making between the physician and the patient. It has also been suggested that the deliberative model would be ideal for exercising patient autonomy in chronic care and that the ethical role of patient education would be to make the deliberative model applicable to chronic care. In this regard, studies have indicated that the use of decision support interventions might increase the deliberative capacity of chronic patients.

  2. [Depressive disorders in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Manoudi, F; Chagh, R; Benhima, I; Asri, F; Diouri, A; Tazi, I

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes is a public health problem. Its global prevalence was 2.8% in 2000 and it will reach 4.4% in 2030 to be 366 million diabetics. In Morocco, this true "epidemic" affects 6.6% of the population. Many epidemiologic studies have shown that patients with diabetes are more susceptible to depression. Diabetes and depression align in a non-accidental way and complicate one another. We report a cross-sectional study conducted in association with the endocrinology department of the Mohammed VI university hospital during the period spread between April and September 2006. The aim was to evaluate the prevalence of depressive disorders in patients with diabetes and to describe their sociodemographic and clinical profile. The study included 187 patients. The scales used were the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and Hamilton's depression. Sociodemographics and diabetic characteristics were evaluated by self-questionnaire. The average age of our patients was 53±14 years and the percentage of females was high: 71.2%. Diabetes type 2 was the most representative (85.6%), diabetes type 1 (11.8%) and gestational diabetes (2.7%). Half of diabetics were treated with an association of healthy dietary measures (MHD) and oral anti-diabetics; 31.6% were under MHD and insulin therapy; 33.2% of patients had acute complications and 43.5% had degenerative complications. Only 11 patients (5.9%) had antecedents of depression. The prevalence of major depressive episode was 41.2%; 27.8% of patients suffered from dysthymia and 21.9% from double depression. Hamilton's depression scale indicates that all depressed patients had mild depression (total of 17 items from 8 to 17). Major depressive episode and dysthymia were frequent in out patients. Dysthymia was predominant in diabetic patients in the 46 to 55 years age group, never been schooled and without any comorbidity. The vast majority of patients with EDM had type 2 diabetes with 89.6%, 7.8% type 1 diabetes and 2

  3. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  4. Mycoses in the transplanted patient.

    PubMed

    Dictar, M O; Maiolo, E; Alexander, B; Jacob, N; Verón, M T

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infection (IFI) has increased considerably over the past 20 years, and transplant recipients are at especially high risk for fungal infections owing to their overall immunosuppressed condition. Organ transplantation procedures were incorporated as a therapeutic option for many patients who lacked the normal functions of organs such as the heart, liver, kidney, lung, pancreas and small bowel. The prevalence of IFI in solid organ transplant (SOTR) patients ranges from 5 to 50% in kidney and liver transplants, respectively. In bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients, IFI are major causes of morbidity and mortality due to the protracted neutropenic period and graft-versus-host disease. Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. account for >80% of fungal episodes in both SOTR and BMT. The development of new immunosuppressive agents, new prophylaxis strategies (as pre-emptive therapy) and the improvement in surgical techniques led to increase survival of transplant recipients. In this session, a clear and concise update of the recent advances in the laboratory diagnosis of candidiasis and aspergillosis in this kind of patients was presented. However, we still need to establish more rapid, sensitive and specific methods for IFI diagnosis. Representatives of the 'Subcomision de Infecciones en el Paciente Neutropenico y Transplantado (SIPNYT)' de la Sociedad Argentina de Infectologia (SADI), presented the results of an unusual multicenter study both retrospective and descriptive studies of IFI in SOTR and BMT patients in Argentina. In addition, a study of IFI in 1,861 SOTR patients from four centers and the analysis of IFI in 2,066 BMT patients from all 12 BMT centers from Argentina was presented. From these studies it can be concluded that 'all transplant recipients are not the same' and that they should be stratified according to their different risk degrees in order to determine the best prophylaxis and treatment strategies.

  5. Survival of Sami cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-07-02

    The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300-500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979-2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modelling. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85-1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86-1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  6. Survival of Sami cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300-500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979-2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modelling. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85-1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86-1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  7. Insomnia in Patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Budhiraja, Pooja; Habib, Michael P.; Wendel, Christopher; Quan, Stuart F.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and may frequently be associated with sleep disturbances. However, the correlates of insomnia in COPD patients have not been well characterized. The aim of the current study was to describe the prevalence of insomnia disorder in COPD and to elucidate the demographic and clinical characteristics of COPD patients that are associated with insomnia. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Clinic-based sample from an academic hospital. Participants: Patients with stable COPD. Measurements: An interviewer-conducted survey was administered to 183 participants with COPD. Seventy-two of these participants (30 with and 42 without insomnia) maintained a sleep diary and underwent actigraphy for 7 days. Results: Insomnia (chronic sleep disturbance associated with impaired daytime functioning) was present in 27.3% of participants. Current tobacco users (odds ratio (OR), 2.13) and those with frequent sadness/anxiety (OR, 3.57) had higher odds, but oxygen use was associated with lower odds (OR, 0.35) of insomnia. Patients with insomnia had worse quality of life and a higher prevalence of daytime sleepiness. Actigraphy revealed shorter sleep duration and lower sleep efficiency, and a sleep diary revealed worse self-reported sleep quality in participants with insomnia. Conclusion: Insomnia disorder is highly prevalent in patients with COPD; current tobacco use and sadness/anxiety are associated with a higher prevalence, and oxygen use with a lower prevalence of insomnia; patients with insomnia have poorer quality of life and increased daytime sleepiness; and insomnia is associated with worse objective sleep quality. Citation: Budhiraja R; Parthasarathy S; Budhiraja P; Habib MP; Wendel C; Quan SF. Insomnia in patients with COPD. SLEEP 2012;35(3):369-375. PMID:22379243

  8. Patient Informatics: Technology in the Service of Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    1990-01-01

    Care of the patient at home challenges the health care system with both the quantity and diversity of services required. Informatics technologies may provide mechanisms to relieve the burden of traditional services while meeting the unique needs of home-based patients in a timely and effective manner. Capitalizing on an existing, free, public-access computer network we developed the COMPUTERLINK, a set of utilities designed to provide home-care support to persons living with AIDS/ARC (PLWA) in the community. The pilot study presented here we demonstrate the feasibility of using home-based computer networks to provide information, communication and decision assistance to PLWA. The success experienced with this particular group provides sufficient encouragement to extend this intervention to other groups of community-based patients.

  9. Research without informed patient consent in incompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Dobb, G J

    2015-05-01

    Most patients needing intensive care cannot give informed consent to participation in research. This includes the most acutely and severely ill, with the highest mortality and morbidity where research has the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. In these circumstances consent is usually sought from a substitute decision maker, but while survivors of intensive care believe substitute decision makers will look after their interests, evidence suggests substitute decision makers are poorly equipped for this task. Various models have been suggested for research without patient informed consent when intervention is urgent and cannot wait until first person consent is possible, including a waiver of consent if conditions are met. A nationally consistent model is proposed for Australia with a robust process for initial waiver of consent followed by first person consent to further research-related procedures or ongoing follow-up when this can be competently provided.

  10. [Tracheotomy in brain injured patients: which patients? Why? When? How?].

    PubMed

    Richard, I; Hamon, M-A; Ferrapie, A-L; Rome, J; Brunel, P; Mathé, J-F

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine, from the data available in the literature, the indications of tracheostomy in brain injured patients, the incidence and risk factors for complications and the follow-up required until decannulation. The incidence of tracheostomy is 10% in TBI and 50 to 70% in subpopulations with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) below 9. Early complications are not specific. The most frequent late complication is laryngotracheal stenosis, which occurs in 15% and is more frequently observed in the most severe patients with major hypertonia. It is likely that tracheostomy, if needed, should be performed early and the prognosis as to whether it will be required, can be made at the end of the first week. The follow-up of these patients includes surveillance of multiresistant colonisations and systematic performance of fibroscopy before decannulation. Cuffless, small diameters, soft tracheostomy tubes, are preferred on the long-term unless the risk of aspiration remains high.

  11. Incorporating the Patient into Urologic Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Gore, John L

    2017-09-01

    Patient engagement in research has been increasingly prioritized by funders and adopted by health researchers. In this Seminars issue, we explore several different mechanisms of engagement in the reciprocal relationship between patients and researchers. This includes the generation of understandable patient health information, how patients engage in treatment decision-making for urologic cancers, patient involvement in the development of research ideas and research design, and patient engagement in their personalized survivorship care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Patients' decision for aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Haller, S

    2011-12-01

    Aesthetic surgery is a service which entails a high degree of trust. Service evaluation prior to provision is difficult for the patient. This leads to the question of how to manage the service successfully while still focusing on the medical needs. The decision to undergo an operation is not influenced by the operation itself, but by preoperative events which induce the patient to have the operation done. According to "buying decisions" for products or in service management, the decision for an aesthetic operation is extensive; the patient is highly involved and actively searching for information using different directed sources of information. The real "buying decision" consists of 5 phases: problem recognition, gathering of information, alternative education, purchase decision, and post purchase behaviour. A retrospective survey of 40 female patients who have already undergone an aesthetic operation assessed for problem recognition, which types of information were collected prior to the appointment with the surgeon, and why the patients have had the operation at our hospital. They were also asked how many alternative surgeons they had been seen before. Most of the patients had been thinking about undergoing an operation for several years. They mainly used the web for their research and were informed by other (non-aesthetic) physicians/general practitioners. Requested information was about the aesthetic results and possible problems and complications. Patients came based on web information and because of recommendations from other physicians. 60% of all interviewees did not see another surgeon and decided to have the operation because of positive patient-doctor communication and the surgeon's good reputation. Competence was considered to be the most important quality of the surgeon. However, the attribute was judged on subjective parameters. Environment, office rooms and staff were assessed as important but not very important. Costs of surgery were ranked second

  13. Prescribing and partnership with patients

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Christine; Blenkinsopp, Alison; Raynor, David K

    2012-01-01

    There have been widespread changes in society and the roles of professionals. This change is also reflected in health care, where there is now acceptance of the need to involve patients in decision making. In prescribing specifically, the concordance agenda was developed alongside these initiatives to encourage improved medication taking and reduce wastage. However the extent to which these partnerships are delivered in practice remains unclear. This paper explores some of the issues to be considered when preparing patients and professionals for partnership and summarizes the limited evidence of barriers to, and benefits of, this approach. Firstly patients must be given the confidence, skills and knowledge to be partners. They need information about medicines, provided in ways known to be acceptable to them. Likewise professionals may need new skills to be partners. They need to understand the patient agenda and may need training and support to change the ways in which they consult with patients. There are also practical issues such as the perceived increase in time taken when consulting in partnership mode, room layout, computer interfaces and record keeping. Health care professionals other than doctors are also expected to behave in partnership mode, whether this is as prescribers in their own right or in supporting the prescribing of others. Whilst much has been claimed for the benefit of partnership approaches, hard evidence is limited. However whilst there is still much more to understand there will be no going back to the paternalistic model of the mid 20th century. PMID:22621201

  14. Patient blood management in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Shander, A.; Van Aken, H.; Colomina, M. J.; Gombotz, H.; Hofmann, A.; Krauspe, R.; Lasocki, S.; Richards, T.; Slappendel, R.; Spahn, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Preoperative anaemia is common in patients undergoing orthopaedic and other major surgery. Anaemia is associated with increased risks of postoperative mortality and morbidity, infectious complications, prolonged hospitalization, and a greater likelihood of allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Evidence of the clinical and economic disadvantages of RBC transfusion in treating perioperative anaemia has prompted recommendations for its restriction and a growing interest in approaches that rely on patients' own (rather than donor) blood. These approaches are collectively termed ‘patient blood management’ (PBM). PBM involves the use of multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategies to minimize RBC transfusion with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes. PBM relies on approaches (pillars) that detect and treat perioperative anaemia and reduce surgical blood loss and perioperative coagulopathy to harness and optimize physiological tolerance of anaemia. After the recent resolution 63.12 of the World Health Assembly, the implementation of PBM is encouraged in all WHO member states. This new standard of care is now established in some centres in the USA and Austria, in Western Australia, and nationally in the Netherlands. However, there is a pressing need for European healthcare providers to integrate PBM strategies into routine care for patients undergoing orthopaedic and other types of surgery in order to reduce the use of unnecessary transfusions and improve the quality of care. After reviewing current PBM practices in Europe, this article offers recommendations supporting its wider implementation, focusing on anaemia management, the first of the three pillars of PBM. PMID:22628393

  15. Conditional Reasoning in Schizophrenic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, Charles; Delle-Vigne, Dyna; Brevers, Damien; Tecco, Juan; Campanella, Salvatore; Noël, Xavier; Verbanck, Paul; Ermer, Elsa

    2017-01-01

    Conditional reasoning (if p then q) is used very frequently in everyday situations. Conditional reasoning is impaired in brain-lesion patients, psychopathy, alcoholism, and polydrug dependence. Many neurocognitive deficits have also been described in schizophrenia. We assessed conditional reasoning in 25 patients with schizophrenia, 25 depressive patients, and 25 controls, using the Wason selection task in three different domains: social contracts, precautionary rules, and descriptive rules. Control measures included depression, anxiety, and severity of schizophrenia measures as a Verbal Intelligence Scale. Patients with schizophrenia were significantly impaired on all conditional reasoning tasks compared to depressives and controls. However, the social contract and precautions tasks yielded better results than the descriptive tasks. Differences between groups disappeared for social contract but remained for precautions and descriptive tasks when verbal intelligence was used as a covariate. These results suggest that domain-specific reasoning mechanisms, proposed by evolutionary psychologists, are relatively resilient in the face of brain network disruptions that impair more general reasoning abilities. Nevertheless, patients with schizophrenia could encounter difficulties understanding precaution rules and social contracts in real-life situations resulting in unwise risk-taking and misunderstandings in the social world.

  16. Verbal hallucinations in psychotic patients.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, B; Telerand, A; Kronenberg, Y; Gaoni, B

    1991-01-01

    "Verbal hallucinations" are sentences that psychotic patients may say repeatedly throughout a conversation which are out of context or unconnected to the topic of conversation. These hallucinations are not the outcome of a remembrance of an experience or an event and do not bring about any emotional relief or catharsis, but they supply valuable information. They resemble Jacques Lacan's description of the psychotic mechanism "Forclusion." This mechanism relates to experiences that did not undergo the process of primary symbolization through language, and experiences where words were attached but were not bound to the language structure. The result being that these experiences did not enter into the unconscious discourse of the subject. This information can reappear as verbal hallucinations in the psychotic patient. In such cases, the therapist, with the assistance of the patient's family, must investigate the meaning of the verbal hallucinations through research into the patient's and family's history in the phase prior to language development. When such a connection is discovered, the therapist must then bridge the hallucinations with the events unknown to the patient but contained in his subconscious. The therapist's role in such cases resembles that of a parent with a child: To translate the subject's experience through language from the physical schema to the body image and symbolic plane and in so doing, give meaning to meaninglessness. In our paper three short clinical cases are presented.

  17. Care models for polypathological patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández Moyano, A; Machín Lázaro, J M; Martín Escalante, M D; Aller Hernandez, M B; Vallejo Maroto, I

    Polypathological patients have specific clinical, functional, psychoaffective, social, family and spiritual characteristics. These patients are generally elderly and frail and have frequent decompensations. They frequently use healthcare resources, have significant functional impairment and have a high index of dependence. This results in a significant social impact, high mortality and a high consumption of resources. The current healthcare models have not answered these needs, which causes problems with accessibility to healthcare services, a lack of coordination among these services, a higher probability of adverse events related to polypharmacy and a high consumption of resources. In the past decade, the healthcare models have changed and are characterized by work in multidisciplinary and interlevel teams, patient self-care, the availability of tools for decision making, information and communication systems and prevention. The goal is to have prepared and proactive health teams and an informed and active patient population. The assessment of health results, processes and the costs for these programs is still based on moderate to low evidence. It is therefore not an easy task to determine the type and intensity of interventions or to determine the patient groups that could gain more benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Patient adherence to allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reisacher, William R; Visaya, Jiovani M

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the literature on patient adherence to two different approaches to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic disease. Factors related to adherence in general, as well as the various methods used to measure adherence, will be discussed. Although a complex interaction of factors related to both the physician and the patient influence the adherence to a particular therapeutic regimen, effective communication between these two parties and the simplicity of the regimen are frequently noted to be of primary importance. Variability with respect to the definition of adherence, the method of measuring adherence, and the length of the measuring period has resulted in a wide range of adherence rates to allergy immunotherapy reported in the literature. Patients most often site inconvenience, side-effects, and poor efficacy as reasons for discontinuing allergy immunotherapy. Adherence to therapy not only improves individual patient outcomes, but also helps determine the best treatment modalities and reduces the burden of disease on society. As new methods of delivering immunotherapy are being developed, such as allergy immunotherapy tablets and oral mucosal immunotherapy, the factors associated with patient adherence should be carefully considered.

  19. Immunoglobulin levels of vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rubaiya; Ahsan, Mohammad Shamsul; Azad, Mohammad Abul Kalam; Ullah, Md Ashik; Bari, Wasimul; Islam, Sheikh Nazrul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Hasnat, Abul

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the serum immunoglobulin profiles of vitiligo patients were compared with that of cohort control and evaluated the correlation between immunoglobulin level with their socioeconomic factors and nutritional status. Thirty vitiligo patients were recruited randomly from the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh for this study. Thirty healthy individuals as control group matched by age, sex, education and socioeconomic factors to the patient group were selected. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations were determined by turbidimetry method using immunoglobulin kit. The concentration of IgG and IgA decreased significantly (P<0.05), but the change of IgM was not significant. Socioeconomic data revealed that most of the patients were young and female. Moreover statistical analysis revealed that there was significant correlation between immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA only) concentrations and BMI and number of depigmented patches with IgG concentrations. Finally it can be concluded that the change of serum immunoglobulin concentration in vitiligo patients could be due to the disease condition as pathomechanism suggested the aberrations in cellular immunity. But study with larger number of population is required for further evaluation of the relationship between the immune response and disease state to confirm these findings.

  20. [Multifocal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal tuberculosis is defined as the presence of lesions affecting at least two extrapulmonary sites, with or without pulmonary involvement. This retrospective study of 10 cases aims to investigate the clinical and evolutionary characteristics of multifocal tuberculosis. It included 41 cases with tuberculosis collected between 1999 and 2013. Ten patients had multifocal tuberculosis (24%): 9 women and 1 man, the average age was 50 years (30-68 years). Our patients were correctly BCG vaccinated. The evaluation of immunodepression was negative in all patients. 7 cases had lymph node tuberculosis, 3 cases digestive tuberculosis, 2 cases pericardial tuberculosis, 2 cases osteoarticular tuberculosis, 1 case brain tuberculosis, 2 cases urinary tuberculosis, 4 cases urogenital tuberculosis, 1 case adrenal tuberculosis, 1 case cutaneous and 1 case muscle tuberculosis. All patients received anti-tuberculosis treatment for a mean duration of 10 months, with good evolution. Multifocal tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose. It can affect immunocompetent patients but often has good prognosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy must be initiated as soon as possible to avoid sequelae.

  1. Creating Simulated Microgravity Patient Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor; Doerr, Harold K.; Bacal, Kira

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Operational Support Team (MOST) has been tasked by the Space and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to integrate medical simulation into 1) medical training for ground and flight crews and into 2) evaluations of medical procedures and equipment for the International Space Station (ISS). To do this, the MOST requires patient models that represent the physiological changes observed during spaceflight. Despite the presence of physiological data collected during spaceflight, there is no defined set of parameters that illustrate or mimic a 'space normal' patient. Methods: The MOST culled space-relevant medical literature and data from clinical studies performed in microgravity environments. The areas of focus for data collection were in the fields of cardiovascular, respiratory and renal physiology. Results: The MOST developed evidence-based patient models that mimic the physiology believed to be induced by human exposure to a microgravity environment. These models have been integrated into space-relevant scenarios using a human patient simulator and ISS medical resources. Discussion: Despite the lack of a set of physiological parameters representing 'space normal,' the MOST developed space-relevant patient models that mimic microgravity-induced changes in terrestrial physiology. These models are used in clinical scenarios that will medically train flight surgeons, biomedical flight controllers (biomedical engineers; BME) and, eventually, astronaut-crew medical officers (CMO).

  2. OPSI threat in hematological patients

    PubMed Central

    Serio, B; Pezzullo, L; Giudice, V; Fontana, R; Annunziata, S; Ferrara, I; Rosamilio, R; De Luca, C; Rocco, M; Montuori, N; Selleri, C

    Overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) is a rare medical emergency, mainly caused by encapsulated bacteria, shortly progressing from a mild flu-like syndrome to a fulminant, potentially fatal, sepsis. The risk of OPSI is higher in children and in patients with underlying benign or malignant hematological disorders. We retrospectively assessed OPSI magnitude in a high risk cohort of 162 adult splenectomized patients with malignant (19%) and non malignant (81%) hematological diseases, over a 25-year period: 59 of them splenectomized after immunization against encapsulated bacteria, and 103, splenectomized in the previous 12-year study, receiving only life-long oral penicillin prophylaxis. The influence of splenectomy on the immune system, as well as the incidence, diagnosis, risk factors, preventive measures and management of OPSI are also outlined. OPSI occurred in 7 patients (4%) with a median age of 37 years at time interval from splenectomy ranging from 10 days to 12 years. All OPSIs occurred in non immunized patients, except one fatal Staphylococcus aureus -mediated OPSI in a patient adequately immunized before splenectomy. Our analysis further provides evidence that OPSI is a lifelong risk and that current immune prophylaxis significantly decreases OPSI development. Improvement in patients’ education about long-term risk of OPSI and increased physician awareness to face a potentially lethal medical emergency, according to the current surviving sepsis guidelines, represent mandatory strategies for preventing and managing OPSI appropriately. PMID:24251241

  3. Psychoneuroimmunology in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Freda

    2003-02-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is the study of the interactions among behavior, neural, and endocrine functions and the immune system. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the evidence concerning interactions among behavior, the neuroendocrine system, and the immune system, and to show how this evidence relates to critical care patients. It has been shown that the immune function of many patients in the intensive care unit is suppressed as a result of trauma, sepsis, or profound physiologic and psychological stress. Three of the most common stressors among patients in the intensive care unit are pain, sleep deprivation, and fear or anxiety. Findings have shown each of these stressors to be associated with decreased immune functioning. Nurses have an important responsibility to protect their patients from infection and promote their ability to heal. Several actions are suggested that can help the nurse achieve these goals. It is hoped that nurses would keep these interactions in mind while caring for their patients in the intensive care unit.

  4. [Nutrition therapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lövey, József

    2017-09-20

    The majority of cancer patients becomes malnourished during the course of their disease. Malnutrition deteriorates the efficiency of all kinds of oncologic interventions. As a consequence of it, treatment-related toxicity increases, hospital stay is lengthened, chances of cure and survival as well as the quality of life of the patients worsen. Nutritional status therefore influences all aspects of outcome of oncology care. In spite of this the use of nutritional therapy varies across health care providers but its application is far from being sufficient during active oncology interventions as well as rehabilitation and supportive care. It threatens not only the outcome and quality of life of cancer patients but also the success of oncologic treatments which often demand high input of human and financial resources. Meanwhile application of nutritional therapy is legally regulated in Hungary and a very recent update of the European guideline on cancer patient nutrition published in 2017 is available. Moreover, cost effectiveness of nutritional therapy has been proven in a number of studies. In this review we present the basics of nutritional therapy including nutritional screening and evaluation, nutritional plan, the role of nutrition support teams, oral, enteral and parenteral nutrition, the use of different drugs and special nutrients and the follow-up of the patients.

  5. Prognosis of mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, M A; Lee, K K; Browner, W S; Kent, D L; Matchar, D B; Kagawa, M K; Hallenbeck, J; Lee, D; Onishi, R; Charles, G

    1993-01-01

    In this Department of Veterans Affairs cooperative study, we examined predictors of in-hospital and 1-year mortality of 612 mechanically ventilated patients from 6 medical intensive care units in a retrospective cohort design. The outcome variable was vital status at hospital discharge and after 1 year. The results showed that 97% of patients were men, the mean age was 63 +/- 11 years (SD), and hospital mortality was 64% (95% confidence interval, 60% to 68%). Within the next year, an additional 38% of hospital survivors died, for a total 1-year mortality of 77% (95% confidence interval, 73% to 80%). Hospital and 1-year mortality, respectively, for patients older than 70 years was 76% and 94%, for those with serum albumin levels below 20 grams per liter it was 92% and 96%, for those with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score greater than 35 it was 91% and 98%, and for patients who were being mechanically ventilated after cardiopulmonary resuscitation it was 86% and 90%. The mortality ratio (actual mortality versus APACHE II-predicted mortality) was 1.15. Conclusions are that patient age, APACHE II score, serum albumin levels, or the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation may identify a subset of mechanically ventilated veterans for whom mechanical ventilation provides little or no benefit. PMID:8128673

  6. Aztreonam pharmacokinetics in burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L V; White, R L; Kays, M B; Brundage, D M; Yarbrough, D

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of aztreonam in eight adult patients with severe burn injuries (total body surface area burn, 49% +/- 21% [mean +/- standard deviation]) were studied. The time of initiation of study following burn injury was 7.0 +/- 1.4 days. Four patients at first dose and at steady state were studied. Aztreonam concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and a two-compartment model was used to fit the data. No significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between first dose and steady state were observed. Volume of distribution of the central compartment after first dose (0.14 liters/kg) and volume of distribution at steady state (0.31 liters/kg) were approximately 30% higher than those reported for other patient populations. Total drug clearance and renal drug clearance when normalized to creatinine clearance (CLCR) were similar to those previously reported for other critically ill patients. CLCR was strongly correlated with renal drug clearance (r = 0.94) and total drug clearance (r = 0.95). The extent and degree of burn (percent second or third degree burn) were poorly correlated with all pharmacokinetic parameters with the exception of the volume of distribution at steady state, which was correlated with both total body surface area burn (r = 0.95) and percent second degree burn (r = 0.83). Aztreonam pharmacokinetics are altered as a result of thermal injury; however, CLCR can be used to assess the clearance of aztreonam in burn patients. PMID:2014982

  7. Therapeutic inferences for individual patients.

    PubMed

    Flores, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Increased awareness of the gap between controlled research and medical practice has raised concerns over whether the special attention of doctors to probability estimates from clinical trials really improves the care of individuals. Evidence-based medicine has acknowledged that research results are not applicable to all kinds of patients, and consequently, has attempted to overcome this limitation by introducing improvements in the design and analysis of clinical trials. A clinical case is used to highlight the premises required to support reasonable extrapolations from controlled research to individuals. Then, the prospects of two key methodological improvements - pragmatic randomized controlled trials and subgroup analysis - are critically appraised. A principle to guide therapeutic inferences is suggested. According to this principle, the probabilities of interest for purposes of therapeutic decision making are those of the set defined by everything that is relevant to the patient and the outcome of interest at the time of the decision. It is argued that the conditions necessary to authorize automatic extrapolations of research results to specific patients are highly demanding. Furthermore, these requirements are rarely accomplished in real practice, even in the event that probability estimates come from samples generally taken as representative and are derived from specific subsets of patients. Clinicians should generally avoid unreflective extrapolations from research and address, as explicitly as possible, the challenge of estimating probabilities for individual patients. A key element of this task is the integration of data from research and non-research sources. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Patient involvement. The Derby Theatre Project experience.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, David

    2003-12-01

    Patient involvement adds power and value to service redesign. Patient views can be extremely powerful when influencing clinical staff. They also provide a strong management case for change. Patient choice should be built into any service redesign. A model for improvement should form a template that can be amended to suit patient need and should take account of patient views. Patient views should be objective. Patients can give a better opinion of how services should be shaped when given a choice of what could be done. A model should offer different routes along a journey so that patients can say what they would prefer to happen.

  9. PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOMES (PROs): PUTTING THE PATIENT PERSPECTIVE IN PATIENT-CENTERED OUTCOMES RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Claire F.; Jensen, Roxanne E.; Segal, Jodi B.; Wu, Albert W.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) aims to improve care quality and patient outcomes by providing information that patients, clinicians, and family members need regarding treatment alternatives, and emphasizing patient input to inform the research process. PCOR capitalizes on available data sources and generates new evidence to provide timely and relevant information and can be conducted using prospective data collection, disease registries, electronic medical records, aggregated results from prior research, and administrative claims. Given PCOR’s emphasis on the patient perspective, methods to incorporate patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are critical. PROs are defined by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration as “Any report coming directly from patients… about a health condition and its treatment.” However, PROs have not routinely been collected in a way that facilitates their use in PCOR. Electronic medical records, disease registries, and administrative data have only rarely collected, or been linked to, PROs. Recent technological developments facilitate the electronic collection of PROs and linkage of PRO data, offering new opportunities for putting the patient perspective in PCOR. This paper describes the importance of and methods for using PROs for PCOR. We (1) define PROs; (2) identify how PROs can be used in PCOR, and the critical role of electronic data methods for facilitating the use of PRO data in PCOR; (3) outline the challenges and key unanswered questions that need to be addressed for the routine use of PROs in PCOR; and (4) discuss policy and research interventions to accelerate the integration of PROs with clinical data. PMID:23774513

  10. Antibiotic resistance in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Carlota; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the most frequent complications in cancer patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In recent years, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a significant problem worldwide, and cancer patients are among those affected. Treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria represents a clinical challenge, especially in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, since the therapeutic options are often very limited. As the antibiotics active against MDR bacteria present several disadvantages (limited clinical experience, higher incidence of adverse effects, and less knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug), a thorough acquaintance with the main characteristics of these drugs is mandatory in order to provide safe treatment to cancer patients with MDR bacterial infections. Nevertheless, the implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs and infection control measures is the cornerstone for controlling the development and spread of these MDR pathogens.

  11. Polyneuropathy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, C F; Gilbert, J J; Hahn, A F; Sibbald, W J

    1984-01-01

    Five patients developed a severe motor and sensory polyneuropathy at the peak of critical illness (sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction complicating a variety of primary illnesses). Difficulties in weaning from the ventilator as the critical illness subsided and the development of flaccid and areflexic limbs were early clinical signs. However, electrophysiological studies, especially needle electrode examination of skeletal muscle, provided the definite evidence of polyneuropathy. The cause is uncertain, but the electrophysiological and morphological features indicate a primary axonal polyneuropathy with sparing of the central nervous system. Nutritional factors may have played a role, since the polyneuropathy improved in all five patients after total parenteral nutrition had been started, including the three patients who later died of unrelated causes. The features allow diagnosis during life, and encourage continued intensive management since recovery from the polyneuropathy may occur. Images PMID:6094735

  12. Liver Illness and Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Girard, Murielle; Jacques, Jérémie; Nubukpo, Philippe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with psychiatric disorders are usually more exposed to multiple somatic illnesses, including liver diseases. Specific links are established between psychiatric disorders and alcohol hepatitis, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C in the population as a whole, and specifically in drug abusers. Metabolic syndrome criteria, and associated steatosis or non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH) are frequent in patients with chronic psychiatric disorders under psychotropic drugs, and should be screened. Some psychiatric medications, such as neuroleptics, mood stabilizers, and a few antidepressants, are often associated with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In patients with advanced chronic liver diseases, the prescription of some specific psychiatric treatments should be avoided. Psychiatric disorders can be a limiting factor in the decision-making and following up for liver transplantation. PMID:28123443

  13. Doppler ultrasonography in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Bertora, Guillermo O; Bergman, Julia M

    2002-01-01

    Tinnitus can be functionally measured and localized through sensorimotor and neurosensory tests. According to our Neurofisiología Otooftalmológica data bank, 60% of patients requiring a consultation have a history of cardiocirculatory disorders. This figure has moved us to study cerebrovascular processes in those patients seeking consultation for a tinnitus symptom only. The sudden appearance of the tinnitus symptom alone independent of patient age, leads us to consider a pathology of vascular origin, which should be evaluated and treated immediately. A mistake or delay in the diagnosis could cause the symptom to become chronic, owing to the appearance of microlesions at any level of the auditory pathway, as has been demonstrated in former investigations.

  14. Hypertension in patients with pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hanna, N N; Kenady, D E

    1999-12-01

    Adrenal-dependent hypertension syndromes are uncommon forms of hypertension. They include primary aldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, Cushing"s syndrome, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Pheochromocytomas are the cause of hypertension in 0.1% to 0.2% of hypertensive patients. Excess catecholamine release and other neural and humoral mechanisms contribute to the pathophysiology of hypertension. Patients with pheochromocytomas have a potentially curable cause of endocrine hypertension and, if undetected, pheochromocytomas confer a high risk for morbidity and mortality, especially during surgical procedures and pregnancy. All patients with incidental adrenal tumors, regardless of tumor size, should be biochemically screened for pheochromocytoma (especially before resection or needle biopsy) to avoid precipitation of a lethal hypertensive crisis.

  15. Patients as partners in innovation.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Sean J; Katz, Aviva

    2015-06-01

    As the culture of medical practice has evolved, so has the relationship between the physician and patient. This is decidedly true with regards to the introduction of innovative therapies, especially in the surgical arena. A critical challenge is identifying and defining innovative therapy. Is the proposed treatment an incremental change, a research proposal, or more commonly someplace in between? This gray area creates a transition zone commonly referred to as innovative therapy. Given the complexities of the current landscape of innovation, innovation therapy committees may provide a mechanism to help to guide both physicians and patients through such difficult topics as the process of informed consent, managing conflicts of interest, and how to evaluate the outcomes of innovative therapies. As surgical innovation remains critical to the advancement of care, it must occur in a transparent partnership with patients, under the eye of guiding entities, aimed at ultimately improving outcomes and care.

  16. Zinc supplementation in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Caldis-Coutris, Nancy; Gawaziuk, Justin P; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Micronutrient supplementation is a common practice throughout many burn centers across North America; however, uncertainty pertaining to dose, duration, and side effects of such supplements persists. The authors prospectively collected data from 23 hospitalized patients with burn sizes ranging from 10 to 93% TBSA. Each patient received a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement, 50 mg zinc (Zn) daily, and 500 mg vitamin C twice daily. Supplements were administered orally or enterally. Albumin, prealbumin, C-reactive protein, serum Zn, and serum copper were measured weekly during hospital admission until levels were within normal reference range. Our study concluded that 50 mg daily dose of Zn resulted in normal serum levels in 19 of 23 patients at discharge; 50 mg Zn supplementation did not interfere with serum copper levels; and Zn supplements, regardless of administration route, did not result in gastrointestinal side effects.

  17. Gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation.

  18. Diagnostic patient studies in surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sigel, B.

    1986-01-01

    The author's approach has been to present topics that relate to general as well as some specialty applications of patient studies. These topics include all major imaging modes in use today, the commoner endoscopic procedures, and function analyses applicable to most workups of the cardiac, genitourinary, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurologic systems. For most of the patient studies described in this book the author has selected procedures that a surgeon is more likely to request directly. Such procedures may be new or well established. This book aims to acquaint the surgeon with some new procedures and to summarize the current status of other test that might be required during the management of a surgical patient.

  19. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication. PMID:27648203

  20. Gas Gangrene in Orthopaedic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation. PMID:24288638