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Sample records for ankle joint fractures

  1. [Arthroscopy-guided fracture management. Ankle joint and calcaneus].

    PubMed

    Schoepp, C; Rixen, D

    2013-04-01

    Arthroscopic fracture management of the ankle and calcaneus requires a differentiated approach. The aim is to minimize surgical soft tissue damage and to visualize anatomical fracture reduction arthroscopically. Moreover, additional cartilage damage can be detected and treated. The arthroscopic approach is limited by deep impressions of the joint surface needing cancellous bone grafting, by multiple fracture lines on the articular side and by high-grade soft tissue damage. An alternative to the minimally invasive arthroscopic approach is open arthroscopic reduction in conventional osteosynthesis. This facilitates correct assessment of surgical reduction of complex calcaneal fractures, otherwise remaining non-anatomical reduction might not be fluoroscopically detected during surgery.

  2. [Conventional X-Rays of Ankle Joint Fractures in Older Patients are Not Always Predictive].

    PubMed

    Jubel, A; Faymonville, C; Andermahr, J; Boxberg, S; Schiffer, G

    2017-02-01

    Background: Ankle fractures are extremely common in the elderly, with an incidence of up to 39 fractures per 100,000 persons per year. We found a discrepancy between intraoperative findings and preoperative X-ray findings. It was suggested that many relevant lesions of the ankle joint in the elderly cannot be detected with plain X-rays. Methods: Complete data sets and preoperative X-rays of 84 patients aged above 60 years with ankle fractures were analysed retrospectively. There were 59 women and 25 men, with a mean age of 69.9 years. Operation reports and preoperative X-rays were analysed with respect to four relevant lesions: multifragmentary fracture pattern of the lateral malleolus, involvement of the medial malleolus, posterior malleolar fractures and bony avulsion of anterior syndesmosis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and prevalence were calculated. Results: The prevalence of specific ankle lesions in the analyzed cohort was 24 % for the multifragmentary fracture pattern of the lateral malleolus, 38 % for fractures of the medial malleolus, 25 % for posterior malleolar fractures and 22.6 % for bony avulsions of the anterior syndesmosis. Multifragmentary fracture patterns of the lateral malleolus (sensitivity 0 %) and bony avulsions of the anterior syndesmosis (sensitivity 5 %) could not be detected in plain X-rays of the ankle joint at all. Fractures of the medial malleolus and involvement of the dorsal tibial facet were detected with a sensitivity of 96.8 % and 76.2 %, respectively, and specificity of 100 % in both cases. Conclusions: This study confirms that complex fracture patterns, such as multifragmentary involvement of the lateral malleolus, additional fracture of the medial malleolus, involvement of the dorsal tibial facet or bony avulsion of the anterior syndesmosis are common in ankle fractures of the elderly. Therefore, CT scans should be routinely considered for primary

  3. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  4. Inverse Dynamics Model for the Ankle Joint with Applications in Tibia Malleolus Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budescu, E.; Merticaru, E.; Chirazi, M.

    The paper presents a biomechanical model of the ankle joint, in order to determine the force and the torque of reaction into the articulation, through inverse dynamic analysis, in various stages of the gait. Thus, knowing the acceleration of the foot and the reaction force between foot and ground during the gait, determined by experimental measurement, there was calculated, for five different positions of the foot, the joint reaction forces, on the basis of dynamic balance equations. The values numerically determined were compared with the admissible forces appearing in the technical systems of osteosynthesis of tibia malleolus fracture, in order to emphasize the motion restrictions during bone healing.

  5. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  6. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  7. [Surgery of ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractures via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws].

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Dong, Q R; Wang, Z Y; Chen, B; Wan, J H; Wang, L

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To explore the manual operation skills of operative treatment of ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractures via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws, and to study the clinical results. Method: From Jan 2009 to Dec 2014, the clinical data of 13 patients with ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractres via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws were retrospectively analyzed in our department.There were 10 males and 3 female, ranging in age from 20 to 60 years with an average age of 31.5 years.The fractures occurred on the right side in 9 patients and on the left side in 4 patients.Three cases had the complication of medial malleolar fracture.Ten cases had the complication of medial and lateral malleolar fracture. Totally 11 cases were made calcaneal skeletal traction, and all the were made CT with three-dimensional image reconstruction.Two cases were treated with emergency operation.Eleven cases were treated with selective operation.The operation time was 5 hours-10 days after injury. The functional results were evaluated by American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). Result: The average duration of follow-up was 22.6 months (range, 14-65 months). There was skin necrosis in one cases, no incision infection, malunion and nonunion of the fractures and loss of reduction. At final follow-up, AOFAS ankle score was 75.2 (range, 42 to 93), higher than preoperative 39.2 (range, 23 to 60), the difference was statistically significant (P=0.023). The result was excellent in 4 cases, good in 5 cases, fair in 3 cases and 1 cases in poor, and the overall excellent or good rate was 69.2%. Avascular necrosis occurred in 3 cases (23.1%, 3/13). Traumatic arthritis was found in 5 cases (38.5%, 5/13), involved tibial astragaloid joint in 2 cases, involved subtalar joint in 1 case, involved tibial astragaloid joint and subtalar joint in 2 cases. Conclusion: The effect of surgical treatment for ipsilateral

  8. Expedited Patient-Specific Assessment of Contact Stress Exposure in the Ankle Joint Following Definitive Articular Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Andrew M.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Acute injury severity, altered joint kinematics, and joint incongruity are three important mechanical factors linked to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Finite element analysis (FEA) was previously used to assess the influence of increased contact stress due to joint incongruity on PTOA development. While promising agreement with PTOA development was seen, the inherent complexities of contact FEA limited the numbers of subjects that could be analyzed. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a simplified methodology for contact stress computation, which idealizes contact surfaces as a bed of independent linear springs. In this study, DEA was explored as an expedited alternative to FEA contact stress exposure computation. DEA was compared to FEA using results from a previously completed validation study of two cadaveric human ankles, as well as a previous study of post-operative contact stress exposure in 11 patients with tibial plafond fracture. DEA-computed maximum contact stresses were within 19% of those experimentally measured, with 90% of the contact area having computed contact stress values within 1 MPa of those measured. In the 11 fractured ankles, maximum contact stress and contact area differences between DEA and FEA were 0.85±0.64 MPa and 22.5±11.5 mm2. As a predictive measure for PTOA development, both DEA and FEA had 100% concordance with presence of OA (KL grade ≥ 2) and >95% concordance with KL grade at 2 years. These results support DEA as a reasonable alternative to FEA for computing contact stress exposures following surgical reduction of a tibial plafond fracture. PMID:26105660

  9. Expedited patient-specific assessment of contact stress exposure in the ankle joint following definitive articular fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Kern, Andrew M; Anderson, Donald D

    2015-09-18

    Acute injury severity, altered joint kinematics, and joint incongruity are three important mechanical factors linked to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Finite element analysis (FEA) was previously used to assess the influence of increased contact stress due to joint incongruity on PTOA development. While promising agreement with PTOA development was seen, the inherent complexities of contact FEA limited the numbers of subjects that could be analyzed. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a simplified methodology for contact stress computation, which idealizes contact surfaces as a bed of independent linear springs. In this study, DEA was explored as an expedited alternative to FEA contact stress exposure computation. DEA was compared to FEA using results from a previously completed validation study of two cadaveric human ankles, as well as a previous study of post-operative contact stress exposure in 11 patients with tibial plafond fracture. DEA-computed maximum contact stresses were within 19% of those experimentally measured, with 90% of the contact area having computed contact stress values within 1MPa of those measured. In the 11 fractured ankles, maximum contact stress and contact area differences between DEA and FEA were 0.85 ± 0.64 MPa and 22.5 ± 11.5mm(2). As a predictive measure for PTOA development, both DEA and FEA had 100% concordance with presence of OA (KL grade ≥ 2) and >95% concordance with KL grade at 2 years. These results support DEA as a reasonable alternative to FEA for computing contact stress exposures following surgical reduction of a tibial plafond fracture.

  10. Pediatric Ankle Fractures: Concepts and Treatment Principles

    PubMed Central

    Su, Alvin W.; Larson, A. Noelle

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Current clinical concepts are reviewed regarding the epidemiology, anatomy, evaluation and treatment of pediatric ankle fractures. Correct diagnosis and management relies on appropriate exam, imaging, and knowledge of fracture patterns specific to children. Treatment is guided by patient history, physical examination, plain film radiographs and, in some instances, CT. Treatment goals are to restore acceptable limb alignment, physeal anatomy, and joint congruency. For high risk physeal fractures, patients should be monitored for growth disturbance as needed until skeletal maturity. PMID:26589088

  11. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  12. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open Weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Katherine; Ramesh, Ashwanth; McGoldrick, Niall; Cove, Richard; Walsh, James C; Stephens, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described.

  13. [Arthroscopically assisted treatment of ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Braunstein, M; Baumbach, S F; Böcker, W; Mutschler, W; Polzer, H

    2016-02-01

    Acute ankle fractures are one of the most common fractures in adults with an incidence of 0.1-0.2 % per year. Operative treatment by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is the standard method of treatment for unstable or dislocated fractures. The main goal of the operation is the anatomical realignment of the joint and restoration of ankle stability; nevertheless, anatomical reduction does not automatically lead to favorable clinical results. According to several studies the mid-term and in particular the long-term outcome following operative treatment is often poor with residual symptoms including chronic pain, stiffness, recurrent swelling and ankle instability. There is growing evidence that this poor outcome might be related to occult intra-articular injuries involving cartilage and soft tissues. In recent studies the frequency of fracture-related osteochondral lesions was reported to be approximately 64 %. By physical examination, standard radiography or even computed tomography (CT), these intra-articular pathologies cannot be reliably diagnosed; therefore, many authors emphasize the value of ankle arthroscopy in acute fracture treatment as it has become a safe and effective diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Arthroscopically assisted open reduction and internal fixation (AORIF) allows control of the reduction as well examination of all intra-articular structures. If necessary, intra-articular pathologies can be addressed by removing ruptured ligaments and loose bodies, performing chondroplasty or microfracturing. So far there is no evidence that supplementary ankle arthroscopy increases the complication rate. On the other hand, the positive effect of AORIF has also not been clearly documented; nevertheless, there are clear indications that arthroscopically assisted fracture treatment is beneficial, especially in complex fractures.

  14. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle is also known as frozen ankle and results in marked fibrosis and contracture of the ankle capsule. Arthroscopic capsular release is indicated for symptomatic frozen ankle that is resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated for ankle stiffness due to degenerative joint disease, intra-articular malunion, or adhesion of the extensors of the ankle. The procedure consists of endoscopic posterior ankle capsulectomy and arthroscopic anterior ankle capsulotomy. It has the advantages of being minimally invasive surgery and allowing early postoperative vigorous mobilization of the ankle joint.

  15. Complications of Pediatric Foot and Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Denning, Jaime R

    2017-01-01

    Ankle fractures account for 5% and foot fractures account for approximately 8% of fractures in children. Some complications are evident early in the treatment or natural history of foot and ankle fractures. Other complications do not become apparent until weeks, months, or years after the original fracture. The incidence of long-term sequelae like posttraumatic arthritis from childhood foot and ankle fractures is poorly studied because decades or lifelong follow-up has frequently not been accomplished. This article discusses a variety of complications associated with foot and ankle fractures in children or the treatment of these injuries.

  16. Ankle fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Sandro; Chiarello, Eugenio; Persiani, Valentina; Luciani, Deianira; Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of ankle fractures (AFs) in the elderly is rising due to the increase in life expectancy. Rather than directly related to osteoporosis, AFs are a predictor of osteoporotic fractures in other sites. In women AFs are associated with weight and BMI. AFs are difficult to categorize; therapeutic options are non-operative treatment with plaster casts or surgical treatment with Kirschner's wires, plates and screws. The choice of treatment should be based not only on the fracture type but also on the local and general comorbidity of the patient. Considering the new evidence that postmenopausal women with AFs have disrupted microarchitecture and decreased stiffness of the bone compared with women with no fracture history, in our opinion low-trauma AFs should be considered in a similar way to the other classical osteoporotic fractures.

  17. Stresses in the ankle joint and total ankle replacement design.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Rahul; Siddique, M S

    2011-06-01

    The ankle is a highly congruent joint with a surface area of 11-13 cm(2). Total ankle replacements have been attempted since the early 1970s and design has continually evolved as the early designs were a failure. This was because the stresses involved and the mutiaxial motion of the ankle has not been understood until recently. It has been shown that the talus slides as well as rolls during the ankle arc of motion from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion. Furthermore, the articular surfaces and the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments have been shown to form a four bar linkage dictating ankle motion. A new design ankle replacement has been suggested recently which allows multiaxial motion at the ankle while maintaining congruency throughout the arc of motion. The early results of this ankle replacement have been encouraging without any reported failures due to mechanical loosening.

  18. [High complication rate after surgical treatment of ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars; Lind, Marianne; Mersø, Camilla

    2014-08-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the quality and re-operation rate of the surgical treatment of ankle fractures at a large university hospital. X-rays and patient records of 137 patients surgically treated for ankle fractures were analyzed for: 1) correct classification according to Lauge-Hansen, 2) if congruity of the ankle joint was achieved, 3) selection and placement of the hardware, and 4) the surgeon's level of education. Totally 32 of 137 did not receive an optimal treatment, 11 were re-operated. There was no clear correlation between incorrect operation and the surgeon's level of education.

  19. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  20. Gradual reduction of chronic fracture dislocation of the ankle using ilizarov/taylor spatial frame.

    PubMed

    Tellisi, Nazzar; Deland, Jonathan T; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2011-02-01

    With the advances in trauma care, chronic fracture dislocation of the ankle is not a condition commonly seen in modern clinical practice. When encountered, it can be difficult to preserve the ankle joint. We present a case of a 65-year-old female, with a chronic fracture dislocation of the ankle. The ankle joint was subluxated with posterior translation of the talus, displacement of the posterior malleolus fragment, and a distal fibula fracture. A minimally traumatic approach was devised to treat this complex fracture dislocation which included gradual reduction of the ankle with a Taylor spatial frame, followed by stabilization with internal fixation and removal of the frame. Bony union and restoration of the ankle joint congruency was achieved.

  1. In vitro measurement of intraarticular pressure in the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Suckel, Andreas; Muller, Otto; Wachter, Nikolaus; Kluba, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    Ankle joint affections and injuries are common problems in sports traumatology and in the daily routine of arthroscopic surgeons. However, there is little knowledge regarding intraarticular loads. Pressures on the ankle were determined in a dynamic model on 8 cadaver specimens, applying forces to tendons of the foot over the stance phase under vertical loading. A characteristic course of loading in the tibiotalar joint with a rapid increase upon heel contact was observed. It increased gradually to reach a maximum after 70% of the stance phase, during the push-off phase. The major torque in the ankle joint is located anterolaterally. A dynamic loading curve of the ankle joint can be demonstrated. These observations explain phenomena such as the appearance of osteophytes on the anterior tibia in the case of ankle osteoarthritis and the relatively low incidence of posterior tibial edge fragments in the case of trimalleolar ankle fracture. Furthermore, the medial side of the talus is less loaded compared to the lateral side, which appears relevant to the treatment of osteochondrosis dissecans.

  2. Movements causing ankle fractures in parachuting.

    PubMed Central

    Ellitsgaard, N; Warburg, F

    1989-01-01

    The parachutist injured in a dramatic accident often describes the injury in an incomplete and biased way and evaluation of materials based solely upon subjective information of this kind can be misleading and of no value for recommendations. As the relation between the mechanical factors of the injury and the lesion in ankle fractures is well documented, an investigation of clinical, radiological and operative findings in 46 parachutists with ankle fractures was conducted. Classification was possible in 44 of 46 fractures. The description of the cause of the trauma in 21 supination-eversion fractures and in 13 pronation-eversion fractures was most frequently faulty landing position or obstacles. The cause of seven supination fractures was oscillation of the parachutist whilst descending with sudden impact against the lateral aspect of the foot. For prophylaxis we recommend improvement of landing and steering techniques and the support of semi-calf boots. PMID:2730996

  3. Is Hardware Removal Recommended after Ankle Fracture Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Jin-Il; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jong-Tae; Eom, Joon-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The indications and clinical necessity for routine hardware removal after treating ankle or distal tibia fracture with open reduction and internal fixation are disputed even when hardware-related pain is insignificant. Thus, we determined the clinical effects of routine hardware removal irrespective of the degree of hardware-related pain, especially in the perspective of patients' daily activities. This study was conducted on 80 consecutive cases (78 patients) treated by surgery and hardware removal after bony union. There were 56 ankle and 24 distal tibia fractures. The hardware-related pain, ankle joint stiffness, discomfort on ambulation, and patient satisfaction were evaluated before and at least 6 months after hardware removal. Pain score before hardware removal was 3.4 (range 0 to 6) and decreased to 1.3 (range 0 to 6) after removal. 58 (72.5%) patients experienced improved ankle stiffness and 65 (81.3%) less discomfort while walking on uneven ground and 63 (80.8%) patients were satisfied with hardware removal. These results suggest that routine hardware removal after ankle or distal tibia fracture could ameliorate hardware-related pain and improves daily activities and patient satisfaction even when the hardware-related pain is minimal. PMID:27819005

  4. [Chronic diseases of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Rand, T; Trattnig, S; Breitenseher, M; Kreuzer, S; Wagesreither, S; Imhof, H

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint comprises a wide spectrum including chronic inflammatory processes and chronic degenerative, tumorous and neuropathic processes, as well as some specific syndromes based on chronic changes of the ankle joint. Of the inflammatory processes, chronic juvenile arthritis (JVC) is the most common disease. However, also Reiter disease, psoriasis or chronic monoarthritid diseases such as gout, as well as granulomatous diseases (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and fungal infections, may affect the ankle joint in a chronic course. Chronic degenerative changes are usually secondary due to abnormal positioning of the joint constituents or repetitive trauma. Neuropathic changes, as frequently seen in the course of diabetes, present with massive osseous destruction and malposition of the articular constituents. Chronic osseous as well as cartilaginous and synovial changes are seen in hemophilic patients. Chronic traumatic changes are represented by pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and chondromatosis, both with a predilection for the ankle joint. Due to the possibilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnosis of chronic ankle changes includes chronic ligamentous, tendinous and soft tissue changes. With the use of MRI, specific syndromes can be defined which particularly affect the ankle joint in a chronic way, such as the os trigonum syndrome, the anterolateral impingement syndrome and the sinus tarsi syndrome. Nevertheless, plain film radiographs are still the basic element of any investigation. MRI, however, can be potentially used as a second investigation, saving an unnecessary cascade of investigations with ultrasound and CT. The latter investigations are used only with very specific indications, for instance CT for subtle bone structures and sonography for a limited investigation of tendons or evaluation of fluid. Particularly due to the possibilities of MRI and the development of special gradient-echo imaging

  5. [Lateral instability of the upper ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Harrasser, N; Eichelberg, K; Pohlig, F; Waizy, H; Toepfer, A; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2016-11-01

    Because of their frequency, ankle sprains are of major clinical and economic importance. The simple sprain with uneventful healing has to be distinguished from the potentially complicated sprain which is at risk of transition to chronic ankle instability. Conservative treatment is indicated for the acute, simple ankle sprain without accompanying injuries and also in cases of chronic instability. If conservative treatment fails, good results can be achieved by anatomic ligament reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments. Arthroscopic techniques offer the advantage of joint inspection and addressing intra-articular pathologies in combination with ligament repair. Accompanying pathologies must be adequately addressed during ligament repair to avoid persistent ankle discomfort. If syndesmotic insufficiency and tibiofibular instability are suspected, the objective should be early diagnosis with MRI and surgical repair.

  6. [Ankle joint arthritis--etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Uri, Ofir; Haim, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Ankle joint arthritis causes functional limitation and affects the quality of life many patients. It follows traumatic injuries, inflammatory joint arthritis, primary osteoarthritis, hemochromatosis and infections. Understanding the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle is important for diagnosis and treatment of ankle joint pathology. The treatment of ankle joint arthritis has advanced considerably in recent years and it is still a surgical challenge. Total ankle replacement seems to be a promising form of treatment, even though current data does not demonstrate advantages over ankle joint arthrodesis.

  7. Posterior malleolar fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Rammelt, S; Tuček, M; Naňka, O

    2015-12-01

    Despite an increasing awareness of injuries to PM in ankle fracture-dislocations, there are still many open questions. The mere presence of a posterior fragment leads to significantly poorer outcomes. Adequate diagnosis, classification and treatment require preoperative CT examination, preferably with 3D reconstructions. The indication for surgical treatment is made individually on the basis of comprehensive assessment of the three-dimensional outline of the PM fracture and all associated injuries to the ankle including syndesmotic instability. Anatomic fixation of the avulsed posterior tibiofibular ligament will contribute to syndesmotic stability and restore the integrity of the incisura tibiae thus facilitating anatomic reduction of the distal fibula. A necessary prerequisite is mastering of posterolateral and posteromedial approaches and the technique of direct reduction and internal fixation. Further clinical studies with higher numbers of patients treated by similar methods and evaluation of pre- and postoperative CT scans will be necessary to determine reliable prognostic factors associated with certain types of PM fractures and associated injuries to the ankle.

  8. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  9. Reliability and smallest real difference of the ankle lunge test post ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Simondson, David; Brock, Kim; Cotton, Susan

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and the smallest real difference of the Ankle Lunge test in an ankle fracture patient population. In the post immobilisation stage of ankle fracture, ankle dorsiflexion is an important measure of progress and outcome. The Ankle Lunge test measures weight bearing dorsiflexion, resulting in negative scores (knee to wall distance) and positive scores (toe to wall distance), for which the latter has proven reliability in normal subjects only. A consecutive sample of ankle fracture patients with permission to commence weight bearing, were recruited to the study. Three measurements of the Ankle Lunge Test were performed each by two raters, one senior and one junior physiotherapist. These occurred prior to therapy sessions in the second week after plaster removal. A standardised testing station was utilised and allowed for both knee to wall distance and toe to wall distance measurement. Data was collected from 10 individuals with ankle fracture, with an average age of 36 years (SD 14.8). Seventy seven percent of observations were negative. Intra and inter-rater reliability yielded intra class correlations at or above 0.97, p < .001. There was a significant systematic bias towards improved scores during repeated measurement for one rater (p = .01). The smallest real difference was calculated as 13.8mm. The Ankle Lunge test is a practical and reliable tool for measuring weightbearing dorsiflexion post ankle fracture.

  10. The "not so simple" ankle fracture: avoiding problems and pitfalls to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J; Egol, Kenneth A; Gardner, Michael J; Haskell, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Ankle fractures are among the most common injuries managed by orthopaedic surgeons. Many ankle fractures are simple, with straightforward management leading to successful outcomes. Some fractures, however, are challenging, and debate arises regarding the best treatment to achieve an optimal outcome. Some patients have medical comorbidities that increase the risk for complications or may require modifications to standard surgical techniques and fixation methods. Several recent investigations have highlighted the pitfalls in accurately reducing syndesmotic injuries. Controversy remains regarding the number and diameter of screws, the duration of weight-bearing limitations, and the need or timing of screw removal. Open reduction may allow more accurate reduction than standard closed methods. Direct fixation of associated posterior malleolus fractures may provide improved syndesmotic stability. Posterior malleolus fractures vary in size and can be classified based on the orientation of the fracture line. As the size of the posterior malleolus fracture fragment increases, the load pattern in the ankle is altered. Direct or indirect reduction and surgical fixation may be required to prevent posterior talar subluxation and restore articular congruency. The supination-adduction fracture pattern is also important to recognize. Articular depression of the medial tibial plafond may require reduction and bone grafting. Optimal fixation requires directing screws parallel to the ankle joint or using a buttress plate. Identifying ankle fractures that may present additional treatment challenges is essential to achieving a successful outcome. A careful review of radiographs and CT scans, a thorough patient assessment, and detailed preoperative planning are needed to improve patient outcomes.

  11. The hematoma block: a simple, effective technique for closed reduction of ankle fracture dislocations.

    PubMed

    Ross, Adrianne; Catanzariti, Alan R; Mendicino, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Management of a dislocated ankle fracture can be challenging because of instability of the ankle mortise, a compromised soft tissue envelope, and the potential neurovascular compromise. Every effort should be made to quickly and efficiently relocate the disrupted ankle joint. Within the emergency department setting, narcotics and benzodiazepines can be used to sedate the patient before attempting closed reduction. The combination of narcotics and benzodiazepines provides relief of pain and muscle guarding; however, it conveys a risk of seizure as well as respiratory arrest. An alternative to conscious sedation is the hematoma block, or an intra-articular local anesthetic injection in the ankle joint and the associated fracture hematoma. The hematoma block offers a comparable amount of analgesia to conscious sedation without the additional cardiovascular risk, hospital cost, and procedure time.

  12. Talar Osteochondroma Fracture Presenting as Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondromas are the most common benign bone tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. When symptomatic, the symptoms are usually due to its location and size. Fracture of an osteochondroma presenting as posterior ankle impingement is a rare condition. We describe a 22-year-old man with solitary exostosis who presented with a posterior ankle mass and posterior ankle impingement with 2 years of follow-up. Surgical intervention was the treatment of choice in this patient, and histologic examination revealed a benign osteochondroma. Osteochondromas found in the posterior aspect of the talus can be complicated by fracture due to persistent motion of the ankle. Talar osteochondroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement causes. Posterior talar osteochondromas, especially when a stalk is present, should be treated surgically before it is more complicated by a fracture and posterior ankle impingement.

  13. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain. PMID:26776564

  14. [Ankle joint prosthesis for bone defects].

    PubMed

    Lampert, C

    2011-11-01

    Large defects of the talus, i.e. due to tumors, large areas of osteolysis in total ankle replacement (TAR) and posttraumatic talus body necrosis are difficult to manage. The gold standard in these circumstances is still tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis with all the negative aspects of a completely rigid hindfoot. We started 10 years ago to replace the talus by a custom-made, all cobalt-chrome implant (laser sintering). The first patient with a giant cell tumor did very well but the following patients showed all subsidence of the metal talus into the tibia due to missing bony edges. Therefore, we constructed a custom-made talus (mirrored from the healthy side) and combined it with a well functioning total ankle prosthesis (Hintegra). So far we have implanted this custom-made implant into 3 patients: the first had a chondrosarcoma of the talus (1 year follow-up), the second had massive osteolysis/necrosis of unknown origin (6 months follow-up) and the third massive osteolysis following a correct TAR (2 months follow-up). The results are very encouraging as all of the patients are practically pain free and have a good range of movement (ROM): D-P flexion 15°-0-20° but less motion in the lower ankle joint: ROM P-S 5°-0-5°. No subsidence was detected in the tibia or the calcaneus. The custom-made talus combined with the Hintegra total ankle replacement will probably be an interesting alternative to a tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis in selected cases with massive defects of the talus.

  15. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint.

  16. Biomechanics of the ankle joint and clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Michael, Junitha M; Golshani, Ashkahn; Gargac, Shawn; Goswami, Tarun

    2008-10-01

    Until the 1970s ankle arthrodesis was considered to be the "gold-standard" to treat arthritis. But the low fusion rate of ankle arthrodeses along with the inability to achieve normal range of motion led to the growing interest in the development of total ankle replacements. Though the short-term outcomes were good, their long-term outcomes were not as promising. To date, most models do not exactly mimic the anatomical functionality of a natural ankle joint. Therefore, research is being conducted worldwide to either enhance the existing models or develop new models while understanding the intricacies of the joint more precisely. This paper reviews the anatomical and biomechanical aspects of the ankle joint. Also, the evolution and comparison of clinical outcomes of various total ankle replacements are presented.

  17. Posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture or diastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Love, M B

    1993-02-01

    This case report describes a patient with posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture and without disruption of the tibiofibular syndesmosis. The pathogenesis of this uncommon lesion is discussed.

  18. [Lateral ligament injuries of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Walther, M; Kriegelstein, S; Altenberger, S; Volkering, C; Röser, A; Wölfel, R

    2013-09-01

    Lateral ligament injuries are the most common sports injury and have a high incidence even in non-sportive activities. Although lateral ligament injuries are very common there is still a controversial debate on the best management. The diagnosis is based on clinical examination and X-ray images help to rule out fractures. Further imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to diagnose associated injuries. According to the recommendations of the various scientific societies the primary therapy of lateral ligament injuries is conservative. Chronic ankle instability develops in 10-20 % of patients and the instability can be a result of sensomotoric deficits or insufficient healing of the lateral ligament complex. If the patient does not respond to an intensive rehabilitation program an operative reconstruction of the lateral ligaments has to be considered. Most of the procedures currently performed are anatomical reconstructions due to better long-term results compared to tenodesis procedures.

  19. [Kirschner wire transfixation of unstable ankle fractures: indication, surgical technique and outcomes].

    PubMed

    Marvan, J; Džupa, V; Bartoška, R; Kachlík, D; Krbec, M; Báča, V

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of the study was to assess treatment outcomes in patients undergoing K-wire transfixation of unstable ankle fractures and compare the results with those of patients in whom it was possible to perform primary one-stage osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Between 2009 and 2012, a total of 358 patients (191 women and 167 men) had surgery for unstable ankle fracture. At 1-year follow-up, their subjective feelings, objective findings and ankle radiographs were evaluated. The fractures were categorised according to the Weber classification. A patient group treated by one-stage osteosynthesis, a group with definitive transfixation and a group of patients in whom temporary transfixation was converted to definitive osteosynthesis were assessed and compared. RESULTS The group treated by one-stage osteosynthesis included 278 patients with an average age of 47 years; the group of 20 patients with definitive transfixation had an average age of 67 years, and the group of 60 patients who had temporary transfixation with subsequent conversion to internal osteosynthesis were 55 years on average. In the group with one-stage osteosynthesis, 223 (80%) ankle fractures on post-injury radiographs were associated with minor joint dislocations and 55 (20%) with major dislocations. On the other hand, the radiographs of the patients treated by temporary transfixation and delayed open reduction with internal fixation showed major dislocations in 38 (63%) and minor dislocations in the rest of the patients (37%); the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p<0.001). Posterior malleolar fractures were most frequent in the group with temporary transfixation (60%) and least frequent in the group with primary osteosynthesis (44%); also this difference was statistically significant (p=0.032). At one-year follow-up, in the group with one-stage osteosynthesis, 220 patients (79%) had no radiographic signs of posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis while

  20. Test-Retest Reliability of Sudden Ankle Inversion Measurements in Subjects With Healthy Ankle Joints

    PubMed Central

    Eechaute, Christophe; Vaes, Peter; Duquet, William; Van Gheluwe, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Context: Sudden ankle inversion tests have been used to investigate whether the onset of peroneal muscle activity is delayed in patients with chronically unstable ankle joints. Before interpreting test results of latency times in patients with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects, the reliability of these measures must be first demonstrated. Objective: To investigate the test-retest reliability of variables measured during a sudden ankle inversion movement in standing subjects with healthy ankle joints. Design: Validation study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 15 subjects with healthy ankle joints (30 ankles). Intervention(s): Subjects stood on an ankle inversion platform with both feet tightly fixed to independently moveable trapdoors. An unexpected sudden ankle inversion of 50° was imposed. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured latency and motor response times and electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle, along with the time and angular position of the first and second decelerating moments, the mean and maximum inversion speed, and the total inversion time. Correlation coefficients and standard error of measurements were calculated. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.17 for the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle (standard error of measurement = 2.7 milliseconds) to 0.89 for the maximum inversion speed (standard error of measurement = 34.8 milliseconds). Conclusions: The reliability of the latency and motor response times of the peroneus longus muscle, the time of the first and second decelerating moments, and the mean and maximum inversion speed was acceptable in subjects with healthy ankle joints and supports the investigation of the reliability of these measures in subjects with chronic ankle instability. The lower reliability of the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle and the angular positions of both decelerating moments calls the use of these

  1. Epidemiologic study of ankle fractures in a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sakaki, Marcos Hideyo; Matsumura, Bruno Akio Rodrigues; Dotta, Thiago De Angelis Guerra; Pontin, Pedro Augusto; dos Santos, Alexandre Leme Godoy; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the epidemiology of ankle fractures surgically treated at the Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: Medical records of patients admitted with foot and ankle fractures between 2006 and 2011 were revised. Seventy three ankle fractures that underwent surgical treatment were identified. The parameters analyzed included age, gender, injured side, AO and Gustilo & Anderson classification, associated injuries, exposure, need to urgent treatment, time to definitive treatment and early post-operative complications. Study design: retrospective epidemiological study. RESULTS: Male gender was predominant among subjects and the mean age was 27.5 years old. Thirty nine fractures resulted from traffic accidents and type B fracture according to AO classification was the most common. Twenty one were open fractures and 22 patients had associated injuries. The average time to definitive treatment was 6.5 days. Early post-operative complications were found in 21.3% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Ankle fractures treated in a tertiary hospital of a large city in Brazil affect young people victims of high-energy accidents and present significant rates of associated injuries and post-operative complications. Level of Evidence IV, Cases Series. PMID:24868187

  2. Treatment of anterolateral impingements of the ankle joint by arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Al-Husseiny Moustafa

    2007-09-01

    Impingement syndromes of the ankle joint are among the most common intraarticular ankle lesions. Soft tissue impingement lesions of the ankle usually occur as a result of synovial, or capsular irritation secondary to traumatic injuries, usually ankle sprains, leading to chronic ankle pain. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate arthroscopic debridement of an anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle. During the period between October 2000 and February 2004, 23 patients with residual complaints after an ankle sprain were diagnosed as anterolateral impingement of the ankle, and were treated by arthroscopic debridement. At a minimum of 6 months follow up, patients were asked to complete an American orthopaedic foot and ankle society (AOFAS) ankle and hind foot score. The average follow-up was 25 months (range 12-38). The average pre-operative patient assessed AOFAS score was 34 (range 4-57). At the end of follow-up the mean AOFAS score was 89 (range 60-100). In terms of patient satisfaction 22 patients said they would accept the same arthroscopic procedure again for the same complaints. At the end of follow-up, 7 patients had excellent results, and 14 patients had good results while two patients had fair results. We believe that arthroscopic debridement of the anterolateral impingement soft tissues are a good, and effective method of treatment.

  3. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  4. Stability-based classification for ankle fracture management and the syndesmosis injury in ankle fractures due to a supination external rotation mechanism of injury.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Harri

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this thesis was to confirm the utility of stability-based ankle fracture classification in choosing between non-operative and operative treatment of ankle fractures, to determine how many ankle fractures are amenable to non-operative treatment, to assess the roles of the exploration and anatomical repair of the AITFL in the outcome of patients with SER ankle fractures, to establish the sensitivities, specificities and interobserver reliabilities of the hook and intraoperative stress tests for diagnosing syndesmosis instability in SER ankle fractures, and to determine whether transfixation of unstable syndesmosis is necessary in SER ankle fractures. The utility of stability based fracture classification to choose between non-operative and operative treatment was assessed in a retrospective study (1) of 253 ankle fractures in skeletally mature patients, 160 of whom were included in the study to obtain an epidemiological profile in a population of 130,000. Outcome was assessed after a minimum follow-up of two years. The role of AITFL repairs was assessed in a retrospective study (2) of 288 patients with Lauge-Hansen SE4 ankle fractures; the AITFL was explored and repaired in one group (n=165), and a similar operative method was used but the AITFL was not explored in another group (n=123). Outcome was measured with a minimum follow-up of two years. Interobserver reliability of clinical syndesomosis tests (study 3) and the role of syndesmosis transfixation (study 4) were assessed in a prospective study of 140 patients with Lauge-Hansen SE4 ankle fractures. The stability of the distal tibiofibular joint was evaluated by the hook and ER stress tests. Clinical tests were carried out by the main surgeon and assistant, separately, after which a 7.5-Nm standardized ER stress test for both ankles was performed; if it was positive, the patient was randomized to either syndesmosis transfixation (13 patients) or no fixation (11 patients) treatment groups. The

  5. Bosworth fracture-dislocation of the ankle: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Ching Sing; Tan, Gek Meng Jeffrey

    2013-08-01

    Bosworth fracture-dislocation of the ankle is a rare injury in which the proximal fibular fragment is entrapped behind the tibia. Closed reduction is extremely difficult to achieve. Early open reduction and internal fixation enables a better outcome by minimising soft-tissue damage. We report on a 36-year-old man who underwent open reduction and internal fixation for a Bosworth fracture-dislocation of the ankle complicated by severe soft-tissue swelling and an impending risk of skin necrosis after failed closed reduction.

  6. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  7. Does ice immersion influence ankle joint position sense?

    PubMed

    Hopper, D; Whittington, D; Davies, J; Chartier, J D

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a fifteen minute ice immersion treatment influenced the normal ankle joint position sense at 40% and 80% range of inversion and to establish the length of treatment effect through monitoring the rewarming process. Forty nine healthy volunteers between the ages of 17 and 28 were tested. Subjects were screened to exclude those with a history of ankle injuries. The subject's skin temperature over antero-lateral aspect of the ankle was measured using a thermocouple device during the fifteen minutes ice intervention and thirty minutes post-intervention. Testing of ankle joint position sense using the pedal goniometer was performed before and after a clinical application of ice immersion. The testing required the subject to actively reposition their ankle at 40% and 80% of their total range of inversion. The majority of subjects experienced numbness of the foot and ankle by the fifth or sixth minute during ice immersion. One minute after immersion skin temperatures averaged 15 degrees C + 1.7 degrees C. Skin temperature was seen to rise relatively rapidly for the first ten minutes and then slowed considerably. Subjects had not returned to the pre-test skin temperatures by thirty minutes. A significant difference in ankle joint position sense (p < 0.0499) following fifteen minutes of ice immersion was found. However, the magnitude of this difference (0.5 degree) would not be deemed significant in clinical practice. The research found no significant difference in joint position sense between 40% and 80% of the range of inversion both before and after cryotherapy. These findings suggest that the clinical application of cryotherapy is not deleterious to joint position sense and assuming normal joint integrity patients may resume exercise without increased risk of injury.

  8. Complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Manuel; Torres, Raúl; Guillén, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the complications after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Complications are classified as perioperative (malreduction, inadequate fixation, and intra-articular penetration of hardware), early postoperative (wound edge dehiscence, necrosis, infection and compartment syndrome), and late (stiffness, distal tibiofibular synostosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and hardware related complications). Emphasis is placed on preventive measures to avoid such complications.

  9. Risk Factors for Thromboembolic Events After Surgery for Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Basques, Bryce A; Miller, Christopher P; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a retrospective national-cohort study to determine the incidence of and independent risk factors for venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of ankle fractures. Using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database, we identified patients who underwent ORIF for ankle fracture between 2005 and 2012. VTE was defined as the occurrence of a deep vein thrombosis or a pulmonary embolism within the first 30 postoperative days. Of the 4412 ankle fracture patients who met the inclusion criteria, 33 (0.8%) had a VTE. Multivariate analysis revealed that body mass index (BMI) of 30 to 35 kg/m2 (odds ratio [OR], 4.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-21.72; P = .044), BMI of 35 kg/m2 or higher (OR, 4.71; 95% CI, 1.03-21.68; P = .046), heart disease (OR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.20-8.97; P = .020), and dependent functional status (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.11-6.04; P = .028) were independently associated with occurrence of VTE after ankle fracture ORIF. Patients with higher BMI and patients with heart disease or dependent functional status may be considered for VTE prophylaxis.

  10. [Revision arthroplasty of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-11-01

    In the last 20 years total ankle replacement has become a viable alternative to arthrodesis for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. Numerous ankle prosthesis designs have appeared on the market in the past and attracted by the encouraging intermediate results reported in the literature, many surgeons have started to perform this procedure. With increased availability on the market the indications for total ankle replacement have also increased in recent years. In particular, total ankle replacement may now be considered even in younger patients. Therefore, despite progress in total ankle arthroplasty the number of failures may increase. Up to now, arthrodesis was considered to be the gold standard for salvage of failed ankle prostheses. Because of extensive bone loss on the talar side, in most instances tibiocalcaneal fusion is the only reliable solution. An alternative to such extended hindfoot fusions would be revision arthroplasty. To date, however, there are no reported results of revision arthroplasty for salvage of a failed ankle replacement.Based on our experience prosthetic components with a flat undersurface are most likely to be able to find solid support on remaining bone stock. The first 83 cases (79 patients, 46 males, 33 females, average age 58.9 years, range 30.6-80.7 years) with a average follow-up of 5.4 years (range 2-11 years) showed excellent to good results in 69 cases (83%), a satisfactory result in 12 cases (15%) and a fair result in 2 cases (2%) and 47 patients (56%) were pain free. Primary loosening was noted in three cases and of these two cases were successfully revised by another total ankle replacement and in one case with arthrodesis. Another case with hematogenous infection was also revised by arthrodesis. At the last follow-up control two components were considered to be loose and the overall loosening rate was thus 6%.This series has proven that revision arthroplasty can be a promising option for patients with failed total

  11. Foot and ankle fractures in dancers.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Megan; O'Malley, Martin J; Hodgkins, Christopher W; Charlton, Timothy P

    2008-04-01

    Fractures in the dance population are common. Radiography, CT, MRI, and bone scan should be used as necessary to arrive at the correct diagnosis after meticulous physical examination. Treatment should address the fracture itself and any surrounding problems such as nutritional/hormonal issues and training/performance techniques and regimens. Compliance issues in this population are a concern, so treatment strategies should be tailored accordingly. Stress fractures in particular can present difficulties to the treating physician and may require prolonged treatment periods. This article addresses stress fractures of the fibula, calcaneus, navicular, and second metatarsal; fractures of the fifth metatarsal, sesamoids, and phalanges; and dislocation of toes.

  12. Supramalleolar osteotomies for degenerative joint disease of the ankle joint: indication, technique and results.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Pagenstert, Geert I; Horisberger, Monika; Paul, Jochen; Gloyer, Marcel; Henninger, Heath B; Valderrabano, Victor

    2013-09-01

    Patients with varus or valgus hindfoot deformities usually present with asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis. In-vitro biomechanical studies have shown that varus or valgus hindfoot deformity may lead to altered load distribution in the tibiotalar joint which may result in medial (varus) or lateral (valgus) tibiotalar joint degeneration in the short or medium term. The treatment of asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis remains challenging, because more than half of the tibiotalar joint surface is usually preserved. Therefore, joint-sacrificing procedures like total ankle replacement or ankle arthrodesis may not be the most appropriate treatment options. The shortand midterm results following realignment surgery, are very promising with substantial pain relief and functional improvement observed post-operatively. In this review article we describe the indications, surgical techniques, and results from of realignment surgery of the ankle joint in the current literature.

  13. The medial malleolus osteoligamentous complex and its role in ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Davidovitch, Roy I; Egol, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    Ankle stability in ankle fractures is dependent on multiple factors. The medial malleolus and the associated deltoid ligament provide for ankle stability on the medial side. Over the years, the relative importance of this medial malleolar osteoligamentous complex (MMOLC) has been debated. This review will describe the evolution of ankle fracture surgery from the perspective of the contribution of the MMOLC to re-establishing ankle stability. Also discussed are the surgical and nonsurgical treatment options, various presentations of medial sided injuries in ankle fractures, and, finally, current recommendations for fixation.

  14. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient. PMID:25364480

  15. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  16. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function. PMID:28265157

  17. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  18. Fixation orientation in ankle fractures with syndesmosis injury.

    PubMed

    Nimick, Craig J; Collman, David R; Lagaay, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate reduction of the syndesmosis has been shown to be an important prognostic factor for functional outcome in ankle injuries that disrupt the syndesmosis. The purpose of the present case series was to assess the fixation orientation and the position of the fibula within the tibial incisura after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures with syndesmosis injury. Computed tomography was used to assess the accuracy of the reduction. Twelve patients were included in the present case series. A ratio representing the relationship between the tibia and fibula and the orientation of the syndesmotic fixation was measured preoperatively and postoperatively and compared with the uninjured contralateral ankle, representing the patient's normal anatomy. The measurements were accomplished electronically to one tenth of 1 mm using Stentor Intelligent Informatics, I-site, version 3.3.1 (Phillips Electronics; Andover, MA). Posteriorly oriented syndesmotic fixation caused posterior translation of the fibula with respect to the tibia and anteriorly oriented syndesmotic fixation caused anterior translation.

  19. Engineering considerations in the design of an ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kempson, G E; Freeman, M A; Tuke, M A

    1975-05-01

    A prothesis has been designed to replace the articulating surfaces of the human ankle joint. The prothesis is in two parts, each forming a segment of a right circular cylinder with a single axis of rotation. The concave tibial component is manufactured from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and the talar component is manufactured from medical grade stainless steel. It is likely, however, that the talar component will be commercially manufactured from cobalt chrome alloy (Vitallium or Vinertia). The two components are secured to the cancellous bone by polymethylmethacrylate bone cement and laboratory tests have indicated that the bond should be strong enough to withstand the loads encountered at the ankle joint in vivo. The tests have also shown that the stability and strength of the ankle are not seriously reduced by implantation of the prosthesis. Laboratory wear tests and clinical experience over the last two years encourage optimism over the long term performance of the prothesis.

  20. Diagnosing deltoid injury in ankle fractures: the gravity stress view.

    PubMed

    Michelson, J D; Varner, K E; Checcone, M

    2001-06-01

    In the lateral malleolar ankle fracture without talar shift there is much uncertainty regarding the diagnosis of deltoid ligament injury severe enough to require surgical treatment. The current study evaluated the mechanical integrity of the ankle using a novel gravity-stress mortise radiographic view, which is practical for clinical use. Eight cadaveric lower extremities were tested under the following conditions: (1) intact ankle, (2) distal fibular oblique osteotomy, (3) plated fibula after osteotomy, (4) transection of the superficial deltoid with fibula osteotomized or plated, and (5) all possible combinations of deep deltoid transection with superficial deltoid transected or repaired and fibula osteotomized or plated. For each condition, a mortise radiograph was taken of the specimen while it was mounted horizontally, lateral side down. Fibular osteotomy with or without transection of the superficial deltoid did not alter the mortise radiograph appearance of the ankles. With combined deep and superficial deltoid transection and fibular osteotomy, the talus always (eight of eight specimens) showed a lateral shift of 2 mm or greater and a valgus tilt of 15 degrees or more. The gravity stress view of the ankle was found to reproducibly document destabilizing deltoid ligament damage.

  1. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  16. Fractures and Soft Tissue Injuries of the Feet and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    English, Edward

    1985-01-01

    An accurate clinical diagnosis of foot and ankle pain can be made by a history, physical examination and routine X-rays of the affected part. Each problem has a specific treatment; however, fractures and dislocations around the foot and ankle can be thought of in an organized fashion by proper physical examination and then the appropriate treatment. Fractures and soft tissue injuries can be treated rationally by understanding the mechanism of injury and the possibility of subsequent deformity. This article classifies specific injuries as a group and indicates a treatment program for each problem. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7aFig. 7bFig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:21274230

  17. [Treatment of lateral ankle joint instability. Open or arthroscopic?].

    PubMed

    Galla, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle joint instability often necessitates operative treatment. Operative treatment methods are classified into non-anatomical tenodesis, anatomical reconstruction and direct repair. In addition to open approaches, arthroscopic techniques are increasingly becoming established. This article describes the various operative treatment procedures, their advantages and disadvantages and in particular the arthroscopic feasibility.

  18. Articular Ankle Fracture Results in Increased Synovitis, Synovial Macrophage Infiltration, and Synovial Fluid Concentrations of Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Bridgette D.; Kimmerling, Kelly A.; Zura, Robert D.; Reilly, Rachel M.; Zlowodzki, Michal P.; Huebner, Janet L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Guilak, Farshid; Olson, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The inflammatory response following an articular fracture is thought to play a role in the development of posttraumatic arthritis (PTA) but has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to characterize the acute inflammatory response, both locally and systemically, in joint synovium, synovial fluid (SF), and serum following articular fracture of the ankle. We hypothesized that intraarticular fracture would alter the synovial environment and lead to increased local and systemic inflammation. Methods Synovial tissue biopsy specimens, SF samples, and serum samples were collected from patients with an acute articular ankle fracture (n = 6). Additional samples (normal, ankle osteoarthritis [OA], and knee OA [n = 6 per group]) were included for comparative analyses. Synovial tissue was assessed for synovitis and macrophage count. SF and serum were assessed for cytokines (interferon-γ [IFNγ], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, and tumor necrosis factor α) and chemokines (eotaxin, eotaxin 3, IFNγ-inducible 10-kd protein, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1], MCP-4, macrophage-derived chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and thymus and activation–regulated chemokine). Results Synovitis scores were significantly higher in ankle fracture tissue compared with normal ankle tissue (P = 0.007), and there was a trend toward an increased abundance of CD68+ macrophages in ankle fracture synovium compared with normal knee synovium (P = 0.06). The concentrations of all cytokines and chemokines were elevated in the SF of patients with ankle fracture compared with those in SF from OA patients with no history of trauma. Only the concentration of IL-6 was significantly increased in the serum of patients with ankle fracture compared with normal serum (P = 0.027). Conclusion Articular fracture of the ankle increased acute local inflammation, as indicated by increased synovitis, increased macrophage infiltration into

  19. Effects of ankle joint cooling on peroneal short latency response.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, J Ty; Hunter, Iain; McLoda, Todd

    2006-01-01

    While cryotherapy has direct physiological effects on contractile tissues, the extent to which joint cooling affects the neuromuscular system is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to detect changes in ankle dynamic restraint (peroneal short latency response and muscle activity amplitude) during inversion perturbation following ankle joint cryotherapy. A 2x3 factorial design was used to compare reaction time and EMG amplitude data of treatment conditions (cryotherapy and control) across time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 30 min post-treatment). Thirteen healthy volunteers (age 23 ± 4 yrs, ht 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass 78.8 ± 16.6 kg), with no history of lower extremity joint injury participated in this study. Surface EMG was collected from the peroneus longus (PL) of the dominant leg during an ankle inversion perturbation triggered while walking. Subjects walked the length of a 6.1 m runway 30 times. A trap door mechanism, inducing inversion perturbation, was released at heel contact during six randomly selected trials for each leg. Following baseline measurements, a 1.5 L bag of crushed ice was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the treatment group with an elastic wrap. A bag similar in weight and consistency was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare treatment conditions across time (p < 0.05). Maximum inversion range of motion was 28.4 ± 1.8° for all subjects. No overall condition by time difference was detected (p > 0.05) for PL reaction time. Average RMS EMG, normalized to an isometric reference position, increased in the cryotherapy group at the 30 min post-treatment interval relative to the control group (p < 0.05). Joint cooling does not result in deficiencies in reaction time or immediate muscle activation following inversion perturbation compared to a control. Key PointsJoint cooling is used as a treatment intervention prior to activity. Whether ankle cooling

  20. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  1. Stress fractures of the ankle and forefoot in patients with inflammatory arthritides.

    PubMed

    Mäenpää, Heikki; Lehto, Matti U K; Belt, Eero A

    2002-09-01

    Twenty-four stress fractures occurring in the metatarsal bones and ankle region were examined in 17 patients with inflammatory arthritides. There were 16 metatarsal, four distal fibular, two distal tibial, and two calcaneus fractures. Radiographic analyses were performed to determine the presence of possible predisposing factors for stress fractures. Metatarsal and ankle region stress fractures were analyzed separately. Stress fractures occurred most frequently in the second and third metatarsals. In metatarsal fractures, there was a trend for varus alignment of the ankle to cause fractures of the lateral metatarsal bones and valgus alignment of the medial metatarsal bones. Valgus deformity of the ankle was present in patients with distal fibular fractures in the ankle region group. Calcaneus fractures showed neutral ankle alignment. Malalignment of the ankle and hindfoot is often present in distal tibial, fibular, and metatarsal stress fractures. Additionally, patients tend to have long disease histories with diverse medication, reconstructive surgery and osteoporosis. If such patients experience sudden pain, tenderness, or swelling in the ankle region, stress fractures should be suspected and necessary examinations performed.

  2. [Arthrodesis versus total joint replacement of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Mittlmeier, T

    2013-06-01

    In general, for the treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint arthrodesis is considered to be the gold standard based on its versatility and eligibility for numerous indications. Nowadays, total ankle arthroplasty represents a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis taking into account distinct premises as both procedures provide a calculable reduction of the preoperative pain level and a comparable functional gain. Furthermore, current 10-year-survival rates of total ankle replacement are reported to range between 76 % and 89 %. Revision rates of up to 10 % for both techniques have been reported with manifest differences within the respective spectrum of complications. Due to the fact that more than two thirds of patients suffer from post-traumatic osteoarthritis with a relatively low average of age concomitant malalignment, soft tissue damage or instability may frequently occur. A restoration of anatomic axes and an adequate centering of the talus under the tibia appear to be crucial for the outcome as well as an adequate soft tissue balancing, in particular in total ankle replacement. Thus, the selection of the correct indication and the right choice of treatment on the basis of complete preoperative diagnostics considering necessary additive surgical measures are of paramount importance for the final outcome.

  3. Long-term neuromuscular training and ankle joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Kynsburg, A; Pánics, G; Halasi, T

    2010-06-01

    Preventive effect of proprioceptive training is proven by decreasing injury incidence, but its proprioceptive mechanism is not. Major hypothesis: the training has a positive long-term effect on ankle joint position sense in athletes of a high-risk sport (handball). Ten elite-level female handball-players represented the intervention group (training-group), 10 healthy athletes of other sports formed the control-group. Proprioceptive training was incorporated into the regular training regimen of the training-group. Ankle joint position sense function was measured with the "slope-box" test, first described by Robbins et al. Testing was performed one day before the intervention and 20 months later. Mean absolute estimate errors were processed for statistical analysis. Proprioceptive sensory function improved regarding all four directions with a high significance (p<0.0001; avg. mean estimate error improvement: 1.77 degrees). This was also highly significant (p< or =0.0002) in each single directions, with avg. mean estimate error improvement between 1.59 degrees (posterior) and 2.03 degrees (anterior). Mean absolute estimate errors at follow-up (2.24 degrees +/-0.88 degrees) were significantly lower than in uninjured controls (3.29 degrees +/-1.15 degrees) (p<0.0001). Long-term neuromuscular training has improved ankle joint position sense function in the investigated athletes. This joint position sense improvement can be one of the explanations for injury rate reduction effect of neuromuscular training.

  4. [Prognostic value of Lauge-Hansen and Danis-Weber classification in nonoperative and operative tibia ankle fracture treatment].

    PubMed

    Tomiak, Michał; Czubak, Jarosław

    2007-01-01

    Tibia ankle fractures and traumatic injuries of the ankle-tibia joint area are one of the most intractable problems in orthopedic and traumatic surgery. Because of the displacement of these fractures they require precise opening of the joint surface area to undertake the early repositioning in order to gain eficient walk. The objective of this paper was to evaluate and compare the final results of nonoperative and operative treament methods, specificlly the two most common prognosis values of tibia ankle fracture clasifications by Danis-Weber and Lauge-Hansen. This is the prognositic marking in the range of functional and radiological results dependant upon the method beeing applied. The repetetiveness and accordance of these two classifications has been evaluated as well. This research was conducted on the retrospective evalutaion based on the X-rays of 61 patients (28 women and 33 men) between the ages of 20-76 making the average age 49.5. The definition of accordance and repetitivenes was conducted by three doctors, who evaluated the x-rays from the standard fornt, back, and side projection of relaxed joint ankle.

  5. Osteonecrosis of the distal tibia after a pronation external rotation ankle fracture: literature review and management.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, S; Lloyd, J; Upadhyay, Vishal; Sangar, A; Taylor, H P

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteonecrosis of the distal tibia is a rare but recognized complication of Weber C ankle fractures. To our knowledge, we report the first documented case managed with early percutaneous drilling of the defect. The patient noticed an improvement in symptoms, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed resolution of the avascular area. The previously reported complication of secondary periarticular collapse and subsequent osteoarthritis was avoided. We advocate that a high index of suspicion, early detection, and drilling can encourage neovascularisation and prevent secondary joint destruction.

  6. Biomechanics of the natural, arthritic, and replaced human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The human ankle joint complex plays a fundamental role in gait and other activities of daily living. At the same time, it is a very complicated anatomical system but the large literature of experimental and modelling studies has not fully described the coupled joint motion, position and orientation of the joint axis of rotation, stress and strain in the ligaments and their role in guiding and stabilizing joint motion, conformity and congruence of the articular surfaces, patterns of contact at the articular surfaces, patterns of rolling and sliding at the joint surfaces, and muscle lever arm lengths. The present review article addresses these issues as described in the literature, reporting the most recent relevant findings. PMID:24499639

  7. Safety profile of sural nerve in posterolateral approach to the ankle joint: MRI study.

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Husami, Yaya; McLeod, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The posterolateral approach to ankle joint is well suited for ORIF of posterior malleolar fractures. There are no major neurovascular structures endangering this approach other than the sural nerve. The sural nerve is often used as an autologous peripheral nerve graft and provides sensation to the lateral aspect of the foot. The aim of this paper is to measure the precise distance of the sural nerve from surrounding soft tissue structures so as to enable safe placement of skin incision in posterolateral approach. This is a retrospective image review study involving 64 MRI scans. All measurements were made from Axial T1 slices. The key findings of the paper is the safety window for the sural nerve from the lateral border of tendoachilles (TA) is 7 mm, 1.3 cm and 2 cm at 3 cm above ankle joint, at the ankle joint and at the distal tip of fibula respectively. Our study demonstrates the close relationship of the nerve in relation to TA and fibula in terms of exact measurements. The safety margins established in this study should enable the surgeon in preventing endangerment of the sural nerve encountered in this approach.

  8. Prevalence and clinical significance of occult fractures in children with radiograph-negative acute ankle injury

    PubMed Central

    Najaf-Zadeh, Abolfazl; Nectoux, Eric; Dubos, François; Happiette, Laurent; Demondion, Xavier; Gnansounou, Magloire; Herbaux, Bernard; Martinot, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Plain radiographs may fail to reveal an ankle fracture in children because of developmental and anatomical characteristics. In this systematic review and meta- analysis, we estimated the prevalence of occult fractures in children with acute ankle injuries and clinical suspicion of fracture, and assessed the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound (US) in the detection of occult fractures. Methods We searched the literature and included studies reporting the prevalence of occult fractures in children with acute ankle injuries and clinical suspicion of fracture. Proportion meta-analysis was performed to calculate the pooled prevalence of occult fractures. For each individual study exploring the US diagnostic accuracy, we calculated US operating characteristics. Results 9 studies (involving 187 patients) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n = 5) or late radiographs (n = 4) as reference standard were included, 2 of which also assessed the diagnostic accuracy of US. Out of the 187 children, 41 were found to have an occult fracture. The pooled prevalence of occult fractures was 24% (95% CI: 18–31). The operating characteristics for detection of occult ankle fractures by US ranged in positive likelihood ratio (LR) from 9 to 20, and in negative LR from 0.04 to 0.08. Interpretation A substantial proportion of fractures may be overlooked on plain radiographs in children with acute ankle injuries and clinical suspicion of fracture. US appears to be a promising method for detection of ankle fractures in such children when plain radiographs are negative. PMID:24875057

  9. Biomechanical changes at the ankle joint after stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Thilmann, A F; Fellows, S J; Ross, H F

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of the relaxed ankle to slow displacement over the joint movement range was measured on both sides of a group of hemiparetic stroke patients, in whom spasticity had been established for at least one year and who showed no clinical signs of contractures. The ankle joints of the age-matched normal subjects were flexible over most of the movement range, showing dramatically increasing stiffness only when the foot was dorsiflexed beyond 70 degrees, with a neutral range between 90-100 degrees, and a less dramatic increase in stiffness during plantarflexion. Hemiparetic patients showed identical curves to the normal subjects on the "healthy" side, ipsilateral to the causative cerebral lesion, but were significantly stiffer in dorsiflexion on the contralateral side, without change in the minimum stiffness range or during plantarflexion. Therefore significant changes in passive biomechanical properties occur at the affected ankle of hemiparetic subjects, predominantly as the result of a loss of compliance in the Achilles tendon, although an increase in the passive stiffness of the triceps surae may also occur. The contribution of these changes to the locomotor disability of hemiparetic patients is discussed. PMID:2019838

  10. The axis of rotation of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, A; Svensson, O K; Németh, G; Selvik, G

    1989-01-01

    The axis of the talo-crural joint was analysed by roentgen stereophotogrammetry in eight healthy volunteers. Examinations were performed at 10 degrees increments of flexion and pronation/supination of the foot as well as medial and lateral rotation of the leg. Results indicate that the talo-crural joint axis changes continuously throughout the range of movement. In dorsiflexion it tended to be oblique downward and laterally. In rotation of the leg, the axis took varying inclinations between horizontal and vertical. All axes in each subject lay close to the midpoint of a line between the tips of the malleoli. Our study indicates that the talo-crural joint axis may alter considerably during the arc of motion and differ significantly between individuals. This prompts caution in the use of hinge axes in orthoses and prostheses for the ankle.

  11. Understanding risks and complications in the management of ankle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Saurabh Sagar; Rees, Kishan; Cutler, Lucy; Mangwani, Jitendra

    2014-01-01

    Ankle fracture (AF) is a common injury with potentially significant morbidity associated with it. The most common age groups affected are young active patients, sustaining high energy trauma and elderly patients with comorbidities. Both these groups pose unique challenges for appropriate management of these injuries. Young patients are at risk of developing posttraumatic osteoarthritis, with a significant impact on quality of life due to pain and impaired function. Elderly patients, especially with poorly controlled diabetes and osteoporosis are at increased risk of wound complications, infection and failure of fixation. In the most severe cases, this can lead to amputation and mortality. Therefore, individualized approach to the management of AF is vital. This article highlights commonly encountered complications and discusses the measures needed to minimize them when dealing with these injuries. PMID:25298549

  12. Use of circular external fixation for combined subtalar joint fusion and ankle distraction.

    PubMed

    Zgonis, Thomas; Stapleton, John J; Roukis, Thomas S

    2008-10-01

    The authors discuss a novel technique not previously published that incorporates a subtalar joint arthrodesis with an ankle joint arthrodiastasis as an alternative to a tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. Young and active patients who experience refractory pain and stiffness to the rearfoot and ankle secondary to combined severe subtalar and ankle arthrosis are suitable candidates for this surgical procedure. This new approach is based on sound principles in the treatment of severe arthrosis affecting the ankle and subtalar joint. The authors are currently prospectively reviewing their surgical experience with this procedure and believe that it provides an alternative option for the patient, with potentially promising long-term results.

  13. Misdiagnosis of Talar Body or Neck Fractures as Ankle Sprains in Low Energy Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki-Won; Kim, Jin-Su; Cho, Hun-Ki; Choo, Ho-Sik; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures. Methods Of the total 102 cases from January 2005 to December 2012, 7 patients had confirmed cases of missed/delayed diagnosis of a talus body or neck fracture and were included in the study population. If available, medical records, X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the confirmed cases were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results In the 7-patient population, there were 3 talar neck fractures and 4 talar body fractures (coronal shearing type). The mechanisms of injuries were all low energy trauma episodes. The causes of the injuries included twisting of the ankle during climbing (n = 2), jumping to the ground from a 1-m high wall (n = 2), and twisting of the ankle during daily activities (n = 3). Conclusions A talar body fracture and a talar neck fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute and chronic ankle pain after a minor ankle injury. PMID:27583114

  14. Compartment syndrome of the thigh complicating surgical treatment of ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. R.; Garfin, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures. The patient was treated with interlocking nail of his femur fracture, followed by open reduction and internal fixation of his ankle fracture under tourniquet control. Postoperatively, the patient developed compartment syndrome of his thigh with elevated pressures, requiring decompressive fasciotomies. This case illustrates the possible complication of treating a femur fracture with intramedullary nailing and then immediately applying a tourniquet to treat an ipsilateral extremity fracture. Because of the complication with this patient, we feel the procedure should be staged, or a tourniquet should be avoided if possible.

  15. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  16. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  17. Life impact of ankle fractures: Qualitative analysis of patient and clinician experiences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ankle fractures are one of the more commonly occurring forms of trauma managed by orthopaedic teams worldwide. The impacts of these injuries are not restricted to pain and disability caused at the time of the incident, but may also result in long term physical, psychological, and social consequences. There are currently no ankle fracture specific patient-reported outcome measures with a robust content foundation. This investigation aimed to develop a thematic conceptual framework of life impacts following ankle fracture from the experiences of people who have suffered ankle fractures as well as the health professionals who treat them. Methods A qualitative investigation was undertaken using in-depth semi-structured interviews with people (n=12) who had previously sustained an ankle fracture (patients) and health professionals (n=6) that treat people with ankle fractures. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Each phrase was individually coded and grouped in categories and aligned under emerging themes by two independent researchers. Results Saturation occurred after 10 in-depth patient interviews. Time since injury for patients ranged from 6 weeks to more than 2 years. Experience of health professionals ranged from 1 year to 16 years working with people with ankle fractures. Health professionals included an Orthopaedic surgeon (1), physiotherapists (3), a podiatrist (1) and an occupational therapist (1). The emerging framework derived from patient data included eight themes (Physical, Psychological, Daily Living, Social, Occupational and Domestic, Financial, Aesthetic and Medication Taking). Health professional responses did not reveal any additional themes, but tended to focus on physical and occupational themes. Conclusions The nature of life impact following ankle fractures can extend beyond short term pain and discomfort into many areas of life. The findings from this research have provided an empirically derived framework from which a

  18. Finite element stress analysis of some ankle joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Falsig, J; Hvid, I; Jensen, N C

    1986-05-01

    A three-dimensional finite element stress analysis was employed to calculate stresses in a distal tibia modelled with three simple total ankle joint replacement tibial components. The bone was modelled as a composite structure consisting of cortical and trabecular bone in which the trabecular bone was either homogeneous with a constant modulus of elasticity or heterogenous with experimentally determined heterogeneity. The results were sensitive to variations in trabecular bone material property distributions, with lower stresses being calculated in the heterogeneous model. An anterolateral application of load, which proved the least favourable, was used in comparing the prosthetic variants. Normal and shear stresses at the trabecular bone-cement interface and supporting trabecular bone were slightly reduced by addition of metal backing to the polyethylene articular surface, and a further reduction to very low values was obtained by addition of a long intramedullary peg bypassing stresses to the cortical bone.

  19. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  20. [Condylar fracture and temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    This article summarized the advances in treatment and research of temporomandibular joint surgery in the last 5 years which was presented in "The 2nd Condyle Fracture and Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis Symposium". The content includes 5 parts: non-surgical treatment of children condyle fracture and long-term follow-up, the improvement of operative approach for condyle fracture and key techniques, the importance and the method for the simultanesous reduction of disc in condylar fracture treatment, the development of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis similar to hypertrophic non-union and the improved safety and accuracy by applying digital surgery in joint surgery.

  1. The effects of a semi-rigid ankle brace on a simulated isolated subtalar joint instability.

    PubMed

    Choisne, Julie; Hoch, Matthew C; Bawab, Sebastian; Alexander, Ian; Ringleb, Stacie I

    2013-12-01

    Subtalar joint instability is hypothesized to occur after injuries to the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) in isolation or in combination with the cervical and the talocalcaneal interosseous ligaments. A common treatment for hindfoot instability is the application of an ankle brace. However, the ability of an ankle brace to promote subtalar joint stability is not well established. We assessed the kinematics of the subtalar joint, ankle, and hindfoot in the presence of isolated subtalar instability, investigated the effect of bracing in a CFL deficient foot and with a total rupture of the intrinsic ligaments, and evaluated how maximum inversion range of motion is affected by the position of the ankle in the sagittal plane. Kinematics from nine cadaveric feet were collected with the foot placed in neutral, dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion. Motion was applied with and without a brace on an intact foot and after sequentially sectioning the CFL and the intrinsic ligaments. Isolated CFL sectioning increased ankle joint inversion, while sectioning the CFL and intrinsic ligaments affected subtalar joint stability. The brace limited inversion at the subtalar and ankle joints. Additionally, examining the foot in dorsiflexion reduced ankle and subtalar joint motion.

  2. Soluble Flt-1 improves the repair of ankle joint injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Xiang, Liangbi; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    The ankle injuries create great pain to a great number of patients worldwide. Past studies have focused on the development of practical treatments to relieve pain and improve recovery, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the ankle injuries, especially the local inflammation in the damaged ankle joint, have been rarely studied. Moreover, although reduction of production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines may reduce the pain and promote the recovery, a practical approach is currently lacking. Here, we detected significantly higher levels of placental growth factor (PLGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joint fluid from the patients of acute ankle joint injury (AAJI). Interestingly, the levels of PLGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joint fluid strongly correlated. In order to examine whether PLGF may regulate the production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the injured joint, we used a rat carrageenan-induced ankle injury model for AAJI in humans. We injected soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) into the articular cavity of the injured ankle joint to block PLGF signaling and found that injection of sFlt-1 significantly improved the rat behavior in activity wheels test, which appeared to result from reduced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the ankle joint. Thus, our study suggests that blocking PLGF signaling may be a novel therapeutic approach for treating AAJI in humans. PMID:27904694

  3. Effects of focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static balance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Application of cryotherapy over an injured joint has been shown to improve muscle function, yet it is unknown how ankle cryotherapy affects postural control. Our purpose was to determine the effects of a 20-min focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static stance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen young subjects with CAI (9 males, 6 females) and 15 healthy gender-matched controls participated. All subjects underwent two intervention sessions on different days in which they had a 1.5L plastic bag filled with either crushed ice (active treatment) or candy corn (sham) applied to the ankle. Unipedal stance with eyes closed for 10s were assessed with a forceplate before and after each intervention. Center of pressure (COP) data were used to compute 10 specific dependent measures including velocity, area, standard deviation (SD), and percent range of COP excursions, and mean and SD of time-to-boundary (TTB) minima in the anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral directions. For each measure a three-way (Group-Intervention-Time) repeated ANOVAs found no significant interactions and main effects involving intervention (all Ps > 0.05). There were group main effects found for mean velocity (F(1,28) = 6.46, P = .017), area (F(1,28) = 12.83, P = .001), and mean of TTB minima in the AP direction (F(1,28) = 5.19, P = .031) indicating that the CAI group demonstrated greater postural instability compared to the healthy group. Postural control of unipedal stance was not significantly altered following focal ankle joint cooling in groups both with and without CAI. Ankle joint cryotherapy was neither beneficial nor harmful to single leg balance.

  4. Ankle Instability Effects on Joint Position Sense When Stepping Across the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Witchalls, Jeremy; Waddington, Gordon; Blanch, Peter; Adams, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Context Individuals with and without functional ankle instability have been tested for deficits in lower limb proprioception with varied results. Objective To determine whether a new protocol for testing participants' joint position sense during stepping is reliable and can detect differences between participants with unstable and stable ankles. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting University clinical laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Sample of convenience involving 21 young adult university students and staff. Ankle stability was categorized by score on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool; 13 had functional ankle instability, 8 had healthy ankles. Intervention(s) Test-retest of ankle joint position sense when stepping onto and across the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus twice, separated by an interim test, standing still on the apparatus and moving only 1 ankle into inversion. Main Outcome Measure(s) Difference in scores between groups with stable and unstable ankles and between test repeats. Results Participants with unstable ankles were worse at differentiating between inversion angles underfoot in both testing protocols. On repeated testing with the stepping protocol, performance of the group with unstable ankles was improved (Cohen d = 1.06, P = .006), whereas scores in the stable ankle group did not change in the second test (Cohen d = 0.04, P = .899). Despite this improvement, the unstable group remained worse at differentiating inversion angles on the stepping retest (Cohen d = 0.99, P = .020). Conclusions The deficits on proprioceptive tests shown by individuals with functional ankle instability improved with repeated exposure to the test situation. The learning effect may be the result of systematic exposure to ankle-angle variation that led to movement-specific learning or increased confidence when stepping across the apparatus. PMID:23182010

  5. Effects of wearing ankle weight on knee joint repositioning sense in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooyoung; Jung, Daeun; Han, Jintae; Jung, Jaemin

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of different ankle weights on knee joint repositioning sense in elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one subjects were divided for assessment as follows: young (20-30 years, n=10) and elderly (60-70 years, n=11). Knee joint repositioning error was measured by asking the subjects to reposition the target angle of their knee joints while wearing different ankle weights (0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) in an open kinetic chain. The Hawk Digital System (60 Hz; Motion Analysis, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) was used to measure knee joint repositioning error. Differences in knee joint repositioning error between the young and elderly groups according to ankle weight load were examined by using two-way mixed repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The knee joint repositioning error was lower with than without ankle weights in both groups. The error value was lowest with the 1.0% weight, though not significantly. Knee joint repositioning error was significantly higher in the elderly under all the ankle weight conditions. [Conclusion] Knee joint repositioning sense can be improved in elderly individuals by wearing proper ankle weights. However, weights that are too heavy might disturb knee joint positioning sense.

  6. Effects of wearing ankle weight on knee joint repositioning sense in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyoung; Jung, Daeun; Han, Jintae; Jung, Jaemin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of different ankle weights on knee joint repositioning sense in elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one subjects were divided for assessment as follows: young (20–30 years, n=10) and elderly (60–70 years, n=11). Knee joint repositioning error was measured by asking the subjects to reposition the target angle of their knee joints while wearing different ankle weights (0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) in an open kinetic chain. The Hawk Digital System (60 Hz; Motion Analysis, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) was used to measure knee joint repositioning error. Differences in knee joint repositioning error between the young and elderly groups according to ankle weight load were examined by using two-way mixed repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The knee joint repositioning error was lower with than without ankle weights in both groups. The error value was lowest with the 1.0% weight, though not significantly. Knee joint repositioning error was significantly higher in the elderly under all the ankle weight conditions. [Conclusion] Knee joint repositioning sense can be improved in elderly individuals by wearing proper ankle weights. However, weights that are too heavy might disturb knee joint positioning sense. PMID:27799664

  7. Measurement of the passive stiffness of ankle joint in 3 DOF using stewart platform type ankle foot device.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kenta; Yonezawa, Teru; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Takemura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a method to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint in three degrees of freedom (DOF) under two motion speeds (1 Hz and 5 degree/s) using a developed Stewart platform-type device. The developed device can reproduce input motions of the foot in 6 DOF by controlling six pneumatic linear motion actuators. We used the device to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint undergoing three kinds of motion, namely dorsi-plantar flexion, inversion-eversion, and adduction-abduction. The measured values of the passive stiffness of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion that we obtained agreed well with that obtained in a previous study, indicating that the developed device is useful for measuring the passive stiffness of ankle joint. In addition, the developed device can be used to measure the stiffness in inversion-eversion and adduction-abduction motions as well, parameters that have never been measured. The results we obtained demonstrated certain interesting features as we varied both the direction and pace of motion (e.g., there were significant differences in the stiffness not only between adduction and abduction during the faster pace, but also between these and the other motions).

  8. Fatigue Stress Fracture of the Talar Body: An Uncommon Cause of Ankle Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Kim, Jong Pil; Moon, Han Sol

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue stress fractures of the talus are rare and usually involve the head of the talus in military recruits. We report an uncommon cause of ankle pain due to a fatigue stress fracture of the body of the talus in a 32-year-old male social soccer player. Healing was achieved after weightbearing suppression for 6 weeks. Although rare, a stress fracture of the body of the talus should be considered in an athlete with a gradual onset of chronic ankle pain. Magnetic resonance imaging and bone scan are useful tools for early diagnosis.

  9. Tillaux fracture of the ankle in an adult: a rare injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narinder; Prasad, Manish

    2014-01-01

    The Tillaux fracture of the ankle is an external rotation ankle injury resulting in an avulsion fracture of the anterolateral tibial plafond. This injury is known to occur in adolescents, although it has rarely been reported in adults. We report a case of a Tillaux fracture in an adult. A brief description of the history, mechanism of injury, required imaging, and treatment and other management options are provided in the present report. Anatomic reduction, rigid fixation, and early mobilization are emphasized to obtain a satisfactory functional outcome, shown by the long-term follow-up findings.

  10. Diagnostic Ultrasonography of an Ankle Fracture Undetectable by Conventional Radiography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Clinton J.; Welk, Aaron B.; Enix, Dennis E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to present diagnostic ultrasonography assessment of an occult fracture in a case of persistent lateral ankle pain. Clinical Features A 35-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with bruising, swelling, and pain along the distal fibula 3 days following an inversion ankle trauma. Prior radiographic examination at an urgent care facility was negative for fracture. Conservative care over the next week noted improvement in objective findings, but the pain persisted. Intervention and Outcome Diagnostic ultrasonography was ordered to assess her persistent ankle pain and showed a minimally displaced fracture of the fibula 4 cm proximal to the lateral malleolus. The patient was referred to her primary care physician and successfully managed with conservative care. Conclusion In this case, diagnostic ultrasonography was able to identify a Danis-Weber subtype B1 fracture that was missed by plain film radiography. PMID:27069430

  11. Unusual exostosis formation of the subtalar joint following an inversion ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Cisco, R W; Shaffer, M; Kuchler, L

    1993-01-01

    Exostosis formation following trauma isnot uncommon to the joints of the foot and ankle. The etiology and treatment of these boney lesions is well-documented in the literature. The following is a report of an unusual exostosis of the subtalar joint following inversion ankle injury. This case is unusual in respect to the formation of an adventitious articulation, the size of the lesion, and the pathology.

  12. Arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1A ankle Fractures in Children: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The risk of growth arrest following paediatric ankle fractures type 1 A is very high. Therefore all attempts should be done to anatomically reduce this kind of fracture. The advances in ankle arthroscopy have brought the possibility to reduce these fractures under direct vision, without the need of capsulotomy. The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance of the use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures. Case Report: We describe two cases with SH type IV fractures of the distal medial tibia, one treated with open reduction and percutaneous screw fixation and the other treated with arthroscopically assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation. The first case ended with severe growth disturbance, while the second gave a very good result. Conclusion: The use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures should be considered to ensure anatomical reduction. PMID:27298899

  13. [The Significance of Early Reposition in Patients with Visible Malposition of the Upper Ankle Joint].

    PubMed

    Wohlrath, B; Schweigkofler, U; Barzen, S; Heinz, S M; Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Hoffmann, R

    2016-12-01

    Background: Protracted dislocation of the upper ankle joint can lead to substantial damage to the surrounding soft tissue, possibly followed by local complications and longer hospitalisation. Although reposition is usually easy to conduct, it is commonly recommended that this should only be performed by an experienced specialist, as long as there is no neurovascular restriction. There are however no exact data or studies on this problem. The aim of the present study is to examine whether early reposition is of benefit for subsequent treatment. Methods: Retrospective study of all patients in a supra-regional trauma centre during the period from January 2009 to July 2015, with either prehospital reposition of the ankle joint because of visible malposition or documented visible malposition on arrival at hospital. Patients with relevant concomitant injuries elsewhere were excluded. Data on the duration of dislocation were matched with diagnostic findings at the time of hospital admission, the kind of primary care, local complications and the time of hospitalisation, using linear regression analysis and ANOVA calculations. Results: Of a total of 391 patients with a dislocation or a fracture dislocation of the ankle joint within this period, 132 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. These patients were divided into 5 groups on the basis of the time of dislocation. Time to reposition was less than one hour for 39 patients, between one and two hours for 29 patients, between two and six hours for 41 patients, between six and 24 hours for 13 patients and more than 24 hours for 10 patients, all with a visible dislocation. The results on admission showed a significant increase in skin bruises and tension bullae with increasing time of dislocation. A longer time of dislocation was associated with more two stage surgical procedures with external fixators and a decreasing number of single stage procedures. While there was immediate definitive treatment of 79.5 % of the patients in

  14. Acute syndesmosis injuries associated with ankle fractures: current perspectives in management.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason C; McLaurin, Toni M

    2009-01-01

    Ankle syndesmosis injuries frequently occur with ankle fractures, but their treatment remains controversial. Although specific clinical and radiographic diagnostic measures are generally well-accepted, there remains a lack of consensus with respect to the treatment of these injuries. Controversy arises at almost every phase of treatment including: type of fixation (screw size, type of implant), number of cortices required for fixation, and need for hardware removal. Regardless of fixation technique chosen, the most important goal should be anatomic reduction and restoration of the syndesmosis and ankle mortise as this is the only significant predictor of functional outcome.

  15. Footwear affects the gearing at the ankle and knee joints during running.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Bjoern; Arampatzis, Adamantios; Eysel, Peer; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2010-08-10

    The objective of the study was to investigate the adjustment of running mechanics by wearing five different types of running shoes on tartan compared to barefoot running on grass focusing on the gearing at the ankle and knee joints. The gear ratio, defined as the ratio of the moment arm of the ground reaction force (GRF) to the moment arm of the counteracting muscle tendon unit, is considered to be an indicator of joint loading and mechanical efficiency. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics of 14 healthy volunteers were quantified three dimensionally and compared between running in shoes on tartan and barefoot on grass. Results showed no differences for the gear ratios and resultant joint moments for the ankle and knee joints across the five different shoes, but showed that wearing running shoes affects the gearing at the ankle and knee joints due to changes in the moment arm of the GRF. During barefoot running the ankle joint showed a higher gear ratio in early stance and a lower ratio in the late stance, while the gear ratio at the knee joint was lower during midstance compared to shod running. Because the moment arms of the counteracting muscle tendon units did not change, the determinants of the gear ratios were the moment arms of the GRF's. The results imply higher mechanical stress in shod running for the knee joint structures during midstance but also indicate an improved mechanical advantage in force generation for the ankle extensors during the push-off phase.

  16. Design and simulation of a cable-pulley-based transmission for artificial ankle joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaxin; Ceccarelli, Marco; Huang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a mechanical transmission based on cable pulley is proposed for human-like actuation in the artificial ankle joints of human-scale. The anatomy articular characteristics of the human ankle is discussed for proper biomimetic inspiration in designing an accurate, efficient, and robust motion control of artificial ankle joint devices. The design procedure is presented through the inclusion of conceptual considerations and design details for an interactive solution of the transmission system. A mechanical design is elaborated for the ankle joint angular with pitch motion. A multi-body dynamic simulation model is elaborated accordingly and evaluated numerically in the ADAMS environment. Results of the numerical simulations are discussed to evaluate the dynamic performance of the proposed design solution and to investigate the feasibility of the proposed design in future applications for humanoid robots.

  17. The effect of strapping on the motor performance of the ankle and wrist joints.

    PubMed

    Kauranen, K; Siira, P; Vanharanta, H

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of strapping on different components of motor performance of wrist and ankle joints. The subjects were 14 healthy volunteers (12 females, two males), aged 21-33 years, with no known previous injuries of the ankle and wrist joints. The measurements were made with the HPM/BEP system and Isokinetic Lido Active Multi-joint system. First, the subjects performed the test without strapping and then, on the following day, with strapped right wrist and ankle joints. The strapping of the wrist increased the simple reaction time by 9%, choice reaction time by 9% and decreased the wrist tapping speed by 21%. Wrist strength decreased in flexion (180 degrees/s) by 14% and ulnar deviation (180 degrees/s) by 8%. The strapping of the ankle increased the simple reaction time by 12%, choice reaction time by 9% and decreased foot tapping speed by 14%. Ankle strength in plantar flexion decreased in 60 degrees/s by 22% and 180 degrees/s by 14% and in inversion in 60 degrees/s by 28% and 180 degrees/s by 15%. These results suggest the strapping of ankle and wrist joints reduces motor performance in the above-mentioned directions as measured by the following parameters: simple reaction time, choice reaction time, tapping speed, and muscle strength.

  18. In vivo kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints with functional ankle instability during weight-bearing ankle internal rotation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; No, Yumi; Yoneta, Kei; Sadakiyo, Masashi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics. However, reliable quantitative data for kinematics of FAI have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine if the abnormal kinematics exist in the talocrural and subtalar joints in patients with FAI. Five male subjects with unilateral FAI (a mean age of 33.4 ± 13.2 years) were enrolled. All subjects were examined with stress radiography and found to have no mechanical ankle instability (MAI). Lateral radiography at weight-bearing ankle internal rotation of 0° and 20° was taken with the ankle at 30° dorsiflexion and 30° plantar flexion. Patients underwent computed tomography scan at 1.0 mm slice pitch spanning distal one third of the lower leg and the distal end of the calcaneus. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints as well as the ankle joint complex (AJC) were determined using a 3D-to-2D registration technique using a 3D-to-2D registration technique with 3D bone models and plain radiography. FAI joints in ankle dorsiflexion demonstrated significantly greater subtalar internal rotation from 0° to 20° internal rotation. No statistical differences in plantar flexion were detected in talocrural, subtalar or ankle joint complex kinematics between the FAI and contralateral healthy joints. During ankle internal rotation in dorsiflexion, FAI joints demonstrated greater subtalar internal rotation. The FAI joints without mechanical instability presented abnormal kinematics. This suggests that abnormal kinematics of the FAI joints may contribute to chronic instability. FAI joints may involve unrecognized abnormal subtalar kinematics during internal rotation in ankle dorsiflexion which may contribute to chronic instability and frequent feelings of instability.

  19. Foot and ankle fractures during childhood: review of the literature and scientific evidence for appropriate treatment.

    PubMed

    Rammelt, Stefan; Godoy-Santos, Alexandre Leme; Schneiders, Wolfgang; Fitze, Guido; Zwipp, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Foot and ankle fractures represent 12% of all pediatric fractures. Malleolar fractures are the most frequent injuries of the lower limbs. Hindfoot and midfoot fractures are rare, but inadequate treatment for these fractures may results in compartment syndrome, three-dimensional deformities, avascular necrosis and early post-traumatic arthritis, which have a significant impact on overall foot and ankle function. Therefore, the challenges in treating these injuries in children are to achieve adequate diagnosis and precise treatment, while avoiding complications. The objective of the treatment is to restore normal anatomy and the correct articular relationship between the bones in this region. Moreover, the treatment needs to be planned according to articular involvement, lower-limb alignment, ligament stability and age. This article provides a review on this topic and presents the scientific evidence for appropriate treatment of these lesions.

  20. Online estimation algorithm for a biaxial ankle kinematic model with configuration dependent joint axes.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Y H; Xie, S Q

    2011-02-01

    The kinematics of the human ankle is commonly modeled as a biaxial hinge joint model. However, significant variations in axis orientations have been found between different individuals and also between different foot configurations. For ankle rehabilitation robots, information regarding the ankle kinematic parameters can be used to estimate the ankle and subtalar joint displacements. This can in turn be used as auxiliary variables in adaptive control schemes to allow modification of the robot stiffness and damping parameters to reduce the forces applied at stiffer foot configurations. Due to the large variations observed in the ankle kinematic parameters, an online identification algorithm is required to provide estimates of the model parameters. An online parameter estimation routine based on the recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm was therefore developed in this research. An extension of the conventional biaxial ankle kinematic model, which allows variation in axis orientations with different foot configurations had also been developed and utilized in the estimation algorithm. Simulation results showed that use of the extended model in the online algorithm is effective in capturing the foot orientation of a biaxial ankle model with variable joint axis orientations. Experimental results had also shown that a modified RLS algorithm that penalizes a deviation of model parameters from their nominal values can be used to obtain more realistic parameter estimates while maintaining a level of estimation accuracy comparable to that of the conventional RLS routine.

  1. Management of complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alan; Barnes, Esther S

    2009-01-01

    The management of complications resulting from the open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures is discussed in detail. The initial radiographic findings of the most common postsurgical complications of ankle fracture reduction are briefly discussed, namely lateral, medial, and posterior malleolar malunion or nonunion, syndesmotic widening, degenerative changes, and septic arthritis with or without concomitant osteomyelitis. Emphasis is placed on the management of these complications, with a review of the treatment options proposed in the literature, a detailed discussion of the authors' recommendations, and an inclusion of different case presentations.

  2. The effect of changing plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis on ankle and knee joint angles and moments while walking in patients post stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Singer, Madeline L.; Orendurff, Michael S.; Gao, Fan; Daly, Wayne K.; Foreman, K. Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background The adjustment of plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis is considered important in patients post stroke, but the evidence is still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changing the plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis on ankle and knee joint angles and moments in patients post stroke. Methods Gait analysis was performed on 10 subjects post stroke under four different plantarflexion resistive moment conditions using a newly designed articulated ankle-foot orthosis. Data were recorded using a Bertec split-belt instrumented treadmill in a 3-dimensional motion analysis laboratory. Findings The ankle and knee sagittal joint angles and moments were significantly affected by the amount of plantarflexion resistive moment of the ankle-foot orthosis. Increasing the plantarflexion resistive moment of the ankle-foot orthosis induced significant decreases both in the peak ankle plantarflexion angle (P<0.01) and the peak knee extension angle (P<0.05). Also, the increase induced significant increases in the internal dorsiflexion moment of the ankle joint (P<0.01) and significantly decreased the internal flexion moment of the knee joint (P<0.01). Interpretation These results suggest an important link between the kinematic/kinetic parameters of the lower-limb joints and the plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis. A future study should be performed to clarify their relationship further so that the practitioners may be able to use these parameters as objective data to determine an optimal plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis for improved orthotic care in individual patients. PMID:26149007

  3. Supramalleolar osteotomy for realignment of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Noman A; Herzenberg, John E; Lamm, Bradley M

    2012-10-01

    Ankle replacement systems have not been as reliable as hip replacements in providing long-term relief of pain, increased motion, and return to full activity. Supramalleolar Osteotomy is an extraarticular procedure that realigns the mechanical axis, thereby restoring ankle function. The literature discussing knee arthritis has shown that realignment osteotomies of the tibia improve function and prolong total knee replacement surgery. The success of the procedure is predicated on understanding the patient's clinical and radiographic presentation and proper preoperative assessment and planning.

  4. Compression stockings in the management of fractures of the ankle: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sultan, M J; Zhing, T; Morris, J; Kurdy, N; McCollum, C N

    2014-08-01

    In this randomised controlled trial, we evaluated the role of elastic compression using ankle injury stockings (AIS) in the management of fractures of the ankle. A total of 90 patients with a mean age of 47 years (16 to 79) were treated within 72 hours of presentation with a fracture of the ankle, 31 of whom were treated operatively and 59 conservatively, were randomised to be treated either with compression by AIS plus an Aircast boot or Tubigrip plus an Aircast boot. Male to female ratio was 36:54. The primary outcome measure was the functional Olerud-Molander ankle score (OMAS). The secondary outcome measures were; the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score (AOFAS); the Short Form (SF)-12v2 Quality of Life score; and the frequency of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Compression using AIS reduced swelling of the ankle at all time points and improved the mean OMAS score at six months to 98 (95% confidence interval (CI) 96 to 99) compared with a mean of 67 (95% CI 62 to 73) for the Tubigrip group (p < 0.001). The mean AOFAS and SF-12v2 scores at six months were also significantly improved by compression. Of 86 patients with duplex imaging at four weeks, five (12%) of 43 in the AIS group and ten (23%) of 43 in the Tubigrip group developed a DVT (p = 0.26). Compression improved functional outcome and quality of life following fracture of the ankle. DVTs were frequent, but a larger study would be needed to confirm that compression with AISs reduces the incidence of DVT.

  5. Compensatory strategies during walking in response to excessive muscle co-contraction at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoli; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2014-03-01

    Excessive co-contraction causes inefficient or abnormal movement in several neuromuscular pathologies. How synergistic muscles spanning the ankle, knee and hip adapt to co-contraction of ankle muscles is not well understood. This study aimed to identify the compensation strategies required to retain normal walking with excessive antagonistic ankle muscle co-contraction. Muscle-actuated simulations of normal walking were performed to quantify compensatory mechanisms of ankle and knee muscles during stance in the presence of normal, medium and high levels of co-contraction of antagonistic pairs gastrocnemius+tibialis anterior and soleus+tibialis anterior. The study showed that if co-contraction increases, the synergistic ankle muscles can compensate; with gastrocmemius+tibialis anterior co-contraction, the soleus will increase its contribution to ankle plantarflexion acceleration. At the knee, however, almost all muscles spanning the knee and hip are involved in compensation. We also found that ankle and knee muscles alone can provide sufficient compensation at the ankle joint, but hip muscles must be involved to generate sufficient knee moment. Our findings imply that subjects with a rather high level of dorsiflexor+plantarflexor co-contraction can still perform normal walking. This also suggests that capacity of other lower limb muscles to compensate is important to retain normal walking in co-contracted persons. The compensatory mechanisms can be useful in clinical interpretation of motion analyses, when secondary muscle co-contraction or other deficits may present simultaneously in subjects with motion disorders.

  6. Use of a Hybrid Operating Room to Improve Reduction of Syndesmotic Injuries in Ankle Fractures: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Crosen, Matelin P; Yarboro, Seth R

    2016-01-01

    Ankle fractures are one of the most common orthopedic injuries requiring operative treatment, and approximately 1 in 4 ankle fractures will have an associated distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruption. Syndesmotic reduction is crucial to restoring ankle function and preventing the development of arthritis. The hybrid operating room provides 3-dimensional intraoperative imaging capabilities that can enable the surgeon to ensure the syndesmosis is appropriately reduced, particularly by comparing it with the contralateral ankle. By confirming the syndesmosis reduction intraoperatively, the risk of a return to the operating room for revision surgery is decreased.

  7. Ankle Joint Angle and Lower Leg Musculotendinous Unit Responses to Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akehi, Kazuma; Long, Blaine C; Warren, Aric J; Goad, Carla L

    2016-09-01

    Akehi, K, Long, BC, Warren, AJ, and Goad, CL. Ankle joint angle and lower leg musculotendinous unit responses to cryotherapy. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2482-2492, 2016-The use of cold application has been debated for its influence on joint range of motion (ROM) and stiffness. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a 30-minute ice bag application to the plantarflexor muscles or ankle influences passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM and lower leg musculotendinous stiffness (MTS). Thirty-five recreationally active college-aged individuals with no history of lower leg injury 6 months before data collection volunteered. On each testing day, we measured maximum passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM (°) and plantarflexor torque (N·m) on an isokinetic dynamometer to calculate the passive plantarflexor MTS (N·m per degree) at 4 joint angles before, during, and after a treatment. Surface electromyography amplitudes (μV), and skin surface and ambient air temperature (°C) were also measured. Subjects received an ice bag to the posterior lower leg, ankle joint, or nothing for 30 minutes in different days. Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle did not influence passive ROM (F(12,396) = 0.67, p = 0.78). Passive torque increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.21, p = 0.011). Passive MTS at the initial joint angle increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.14, p = 0.014) but not at the other joint angles (p > 0.05). Surface electromyography amplitudes for gastrocnemius and soleus muscles increased after ice application to the lower leg (F(2,66) = 5.61, p = 0.006; F(12,396) = 3.60, p < 0.001). Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle joint does not alter passive dorsiflexion ROM but increases passive ankle plantarflexor torque in addition to passive ankle plantarflexor MTS at the initial joint angle.

  8. Reliability of metatarsophalangeal and ankle joint torque measurements by an innovative device.

    PubMed

    Man, Hok-Sum; Leung, Aaron Kam-Lun; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Sterzing, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    The toe flexor muscles maintain body balance during standing and provide push-off force during walking, running, and jumping. Additionally, they are important contributing structures to maintain normal foot function. Thus, weakness of these muscles may cause poor balance, inefficient locomotion and foot deformities. The quantification of metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) stiffness is valuable as it is considered as a confounding factor in toe flexor muscles function. MPJ and ankle joint stiffness measurement is still largely depended on manual skills as current devices do not have good control on alignment, angular joint speed and displacement during measurement. Therefore, this study introduces an innovative dynamometer and protocol procedures for MPJ and ankle Joint torque measurement with precise and reliable foot alignment, angular joint speed and displacement control. Within-day and between-day test-retest experiments on MPJ and ankle joint torque measurement were conducted on ten and nine healthy male subjects respectively. The mean peak torques of MPJ and ankle joint of between-day and within-day measurement were 1.50±0.38Nm/deg and 1.19±0.34Nm/deg. The corresponding torques of the ankle joint were 8.24±2.20Nm/deg and 7.90±3.18Nm/deg respectively. Intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) of averaged peak torque of both joints of between-day and within-day test-retest experiments were ranging from 0.91 to 0.96, indicating the innovative device is systematic and reliable for the measurements and can be used for multiple scientific and clinical purposes.

  9. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases.

  10. Ankle fracture configuration following treatment with and without arthroscopic-assisted reduction and fixation

    PubMed Central

    Angthong, Chayanin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report ankle fracture configurations and bone quality following arthroscopic-assisted reduction and internal-fixation (ARIF) or open reduction and internal-fixation (ORIF). METHODS: The patients of ARIF (n = 16) or ORIF (n = 29) to treat unstable ankle fracture between 2006 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Baseline data, including age, sex, type of injury, immediate postoperative fracture configuration (assessed on X-rays and graded by widest gap and largest step-off of any intra-articular site), bone quality [assessed with bone mineral density (BMD) testing] and arthritic changes on X-rays following surgical treatments were recorded for each group. RESULTS: Immediate-postoperative fracture configurations did not differ significantly between the ARIF and ORIF groups. There were anatomic alignments as 8 (50%) and 8 (27.6%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.539) respectively. There were acceptable alignments as 12 (75%) and 17 (58.6%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.341) respectively. The arthritic changes in follow-up period as at least 16 wk following the surgeries were shown as 6 (75%) and 10 (83.3%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.300) respectively. Significantly more BMD tests were performed in patients aged > 60 years (P < 0.001), ARIF patients (P = 0.021), and female patients (P = 0.029). There was no significant difference in BMD test t scores between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Ankle fracture configurations following surgeries are similar between ARIF and ORIF groups, suggesting that ARIF is not superior to ORIF in treatment of unstable ankle fractures. PMID:27114933

  11. Effects of deep brain stimulation and medication on strength, bradykinesia, and electromyographic patterns of the ankle joint in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Prodoehl, Janey; Sturman, Molly M; Bakay, Roy A E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the control of movement in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after they received surgically implanted high-frequency stimulating electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The experiment studied ankle strength, movement velocity, and the associated electromyographic patterns in PD patients, six of whom had tremor at the ankle. The patients were studied off treatment, ON STN deep brain stimulation (DBS), on medication, and on medication plus STN DBS. Twelve matched control subjects were also examined. Medication alone and STN DBS alone increased patients' ankle strength, ankle velocity, agonist muscle burst amplitude, and agonist burst duration, while reducing the number of agonist bursts during movement. These findings were similar for PD patients with and without tremor. The combination of medication plus STN DBS normalized maximal strength at the ankle joint, but ankle movement velocity and electromyographic patterns were not normalized. The findings are the first to demonstrate that STN DBS and medication increase strength and movement velocity at the ankle joint.

  12. Ankle rehabilitation device with two degrees of freedom and compliant joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racu (Cazacu, C.-M.; Doroftei, I.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a rehabilitation device that we intend to be low cost and easy to manufacture. The system will ensure functionality but also have a small dimensions and low mass, considering the physiological dimensions of the foot and lower leg. To avoid injure of the ankle joint, this device is equipped with a compliant joint between the motor and mechanical transmission. The torque of this joint is intended to be adjustable, according to the degree of ankle joint damage. To choose the material and the dimensions of this compliant joint, in this paper we perform the first stress simulation. The minimum torque is calculated, while the maximum torque is given by the preliminary chosen actuator.

  13. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  14. Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Miranda E G; Cairns, Benjamin J; Banks, Emily; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    While increasing age, decreasing body mass index (BMI), and physical inactivity are known to increase hip fracture risk, whether these factors have similar effects on other common fractures is not well established. We used prospectively-collected data from a large cohort to examine the role of these factors on the risk of incident ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women. 1,155,304 postmenopausal participants in the Million Women Study with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years, provided information about lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors at recruitment in 1996-2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions. During follow-up for an average of 8.3 years per woman, 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 an incident hip fracture. Adjusted absolute and relative risks (RRs) for incident ankle, wrist, and hip fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. Age-specific rates for wrist and hip fractures increased sharply with age, whereas rates for ankle fracture did not. Cumulative absolute risks from ages 50 to 84 years per 100 women were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2-2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4-5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5-7.0) for hip fracture. Compared with lean women (BMI<20 kg/m(2)), obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR=3.07; 95%CI 2.53-3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR=0.57; 0.51-0.64 and 0.23; 0.21-0.27, respectively). Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk. Ankle, wrist and hip fractures are extremely common in postmenopausal women, but the associations with age, adiposity, and physical activity differ substantially between the three fracture sites.

  15. Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Miranda E.G.; Cairns, Benjamin J.; Banks, Emily; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K.; Beral, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    While increasing age, decreasing body mass index (BMI), and physical inactivity are known to increase hip fracture risk, whether these factors have similar effects on other common fractures is not well established. We used prospectively-collected data from a large cohort to examine the role of these factors on the risk of incident ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women. 1,155,304 postmenopausal participants in the Million Women Study with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years, provided information about lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors at recruitment in 1996–2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions. During follow-up for an average of 8.3 years per woman, 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 an incident hip fracture. Adjusted absolute and relative risks (RRs) for incident ankle, wrist, and hip fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. Age-specific rates for wrist and hip fractures increased sharply with age, whereas rates for ankle fracture did not. Cumulative absolute risks from ages 50 to 84 years per 100 women were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2–2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4–5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5–7.0) for hip fracture. Compared with lean women (BMI < 20 kg/m2), obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR = 3.07; 95%CI 2.53–3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR = 0.57; 0.51–0.64 and 0.23; 0.21–0.27, respectively). Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk. Ankle, wrist and hip fractures are extremely common in postmenopausal women, but the associations with age, adiposity, and physical activity differ substantially between the three fracture sites. PMID:22465850

  16. Corrective supramalleolar osteotomy for malunited pronation-external rotation fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-10-01

    We undertook a prospective study to analyse the outcome of 48 malunited pronation-external rotation fractures of the ankle in 48 patients (25 females and 23 males) with a mean age of 45 years (21 to 69), treated by realignment osteotomies. The interval between the injury and reconstruction was a mean of 20.2 months (3 to 98). In all patients, valgus malalignment of the distal tibia and malunion of the fibula were corrected. In some patients, additional osteotomies were performed. Patients were reviewed regularly, and the mean follow-up was 7.1 years (2 to 15). Good or excellent results were obtained in 42 patients (87.5%) with the benefit being maintained over time. Congruent ankles without a tilted talus (Takakura stage 0 and 1) were obtained in all but five cases. One patient required total ankle replacement.

  17. [The reorientational rearthrodesis of the upper ankle joint following failed arthrodesis].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Grass, R; Rammelt, S

    2005-12-01

    There are three important principles for the correction of nonunion and/or malunion of the ankle joint: (1) reorientation back to anatomic shape and to the normal biomechanical axis of the ankle and foot; (2) respect for the biology of bone by resecting all sclerotic bone and/or transplantation of autogenous bone graft; and (3) achievement of optimal biomechanical stability by using the four-screw technique, a limited-contact dynamic-compression plate or a blade plate. CT scanning is the most reliable method for detecting nonunion of the ankle joint after arthrodesis. According to Saltzman, in order to understand the pathology of malunions and nonunions and to plan their correction, weight-bearing anteroposterior radiographs with a 20 degrees internal rotation of the feet, precise lateral views, and rear views of both sides are highly recommended.

  18. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  19. Ankle replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You had an ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped damaged bones, and put in an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were shown how to treat swelling around your new ankle joint.

  20. Effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, R.I.; Coradini, J.G.; Silva, L.I.; Bertolini, G.R.F.; Brancalhão, R.M.C.; Ribeiro, L.F.C.

    2014-01-01

    A sprained ankle is a common musculoskeletal sports injury and it is often treated by immobilization of the joint. Despite the beneficial effects of this therapeutic measure, the high prevalence of residual symptoms affects the quality of life, and remobilization of the joint can reverse this situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint of Wistar rats. Eighteen male rats had their right hindlimb immobilized for 15 days, and were divided into the following groups: G1, immobilized; G2, remobilized freely for 14 days; and G3, remobilized by swimming and jumping in water for 14 days, performed on alternate days, with progression of time and a series of exercises. The contralateral limb was the control. After the experimental period, the ankle joints were processed for microscopic analysis. Histomorphometry did not show any significant differences between the control and immobilized/remobilized groups and members, in terms of number of chondrocytes and thickness of the articular cartilage of the tibia and talus. Morphological analysis of animals from G1 showed significant degenerative lesions in the talus, such as exposure of the subchondral bone, flocculation, and cracks between the anterior and mid-regions of the articular cartilage and the synovial membrane. Remobilization by therapeutic exercise in water led to recovery in the articular cartilage and synovial membrane of the ankle joint when compared with free remobilization, and it was shown to be an effective therapeutic measure in the recovery of the ankle joint. PMID:25140815

  1. Surgery for Type B Ankle Fracture Treatment: a Combined Randomised and Observational Study (CROSSBAT)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ian A; Naylor, Justine M

    2017-01-01

    Background Isolated type B ankle fractures with no injury to the medial side are the most common type of ankle fracture. Objective This study aimed to determine if surgery is superior to non-surgical management for the treatment of these fractures. Methods A pragmatic, multicentre, single-blinded, combined randomised controlled trial and observational study. Setting Participants between 18 and 65 years with a type B ankle fracture and minimal talar shift were recruited from 22 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Participants willing to be randomised were randomly allocated to undergo surgical fixation followed by mobilisation in a walking boot for 6 weeks. Those treated non-surgically were managed in a walking boot for 6 weeks. Participants not willing to be randomised formed the observational cohort. Randomisation stratified by site and using permuted variable blocks was administered centrally. Outcome assessors were blinded for the primary outcomes. Primary outcomes Patient-reported ankle function using the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Foot and Ankle Outcomes Questionnaire (FAOQ) and the physical component score (PCS) of the SF-12v2 General Health Survey at 12 months postinjury. Primary analysis was intention to treat; the randomised and observational cohorts were analysed separately. Results From August 2010 to October 2013, 160 people were randomised (80 surgical and 80 non-surgical); 139 (71 surgical and 68 non-surgical) were analysed as intention to treat. 276 formed the observational cohort (19 surgical and 257 non-surgical); 220 (18 surgical and 202 non-surgical) were analysed. The randomised cohort demonstrated that surgery was not superior to non-surgery for the FAOQ (49.8 vs 53.0; mean difference 3.2 (95% CI 0.4 to 5.9), p=0.028), or the PCS (53.7 vs 53.2; mean difference 0.6 (−2.9 to 1.8), p=0.63). 23 (32%) and 10 (14%) participants had an adverse event in the surgical and non-surgical groups, respectively. Similar results were

  2. Malleolar fractures and their ligamentous injury equivalents have similar outcomes in supination-external rotation type IV fractures of the ankle treated by anatomical internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Berkes, M B; Little, M T M; Lazaro, L E; Sculco, P K; Cymerman, R M; Daigl, M; Helfet, D L; Lorich, D G

    2012-11-01

    It has previously been suggested that among unstable ankle fractures, the presence of a malleolar fracture is associated with a worse outcome than a corresponding ligamentous injury. However, previous studies have included heterogeneous groups of injury. The purpose of this study was to determine whether any specific pattern of bony and/or ligamentous injury among a series of supination-external rotation type IV (SER IV) ankle fractures treated with anatomical fixation was associated with a worse outcome. We analysed a prospective cohort of 108 SER IV ankle fractures with a follow-up of one year. Pre-operative radiographs and MRIs were undertaken to characterise precisely the pattern of injury. Operative treatment included fixation of all malleolar fractures. Post-operative CT was used to assess reduction. The primary and secondary outcome measures were the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and the range of movement of the ankle. There were no clinically relevant differences between the four possible SER IV fracture pattern groups with regard to the FAOS or range of movement. In this population of strictly defined SER IV ankle injuries, the presence of a malleolar fracture was not associated with a significantly worse clinical outcome than its ligamentous injury counterpart. Other factors inherent to the injury and treatment may play a more important role in predicting outcome.

  3. Emergency department external fixation for provisional treatment of pilon and unstable ankle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Craig R.; Daniels, Alan H.; Vopat, Bryan G.; Kane, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Unstable ankle fractures and impacted tibial pilon fractures often benefit from provisional external fixation as a temporizing measure prior to definitive fixation. Benefits of external fixation include improved articular alignment, decreased articular impaction, and soft tissue rest. Uniplanar external fixator placement in the Emergency Department (ED ex-fix) is a reliable and safe technique for achieving ankle reduction and stability while awaiting definitive fixation. This procedure involves placing transverse proximal tibial and calcaneal traction pins and connecting the pins with two external fixator rods. This technique is particularly useful in austere environments or when the operating room is not immediately available. Additionally, this bedside intervention prevents the patient from requiring general anesthesia and may be a cost-effective strategy for decreasing valuable operating time. The ED ex-fix is an especially valuable procedure in busy trauma centers and during mass casualty events, in which resources may be limited. PMID:25709258

  4. Successful treatment of nonunion with an Ilizarov ring fixator after ankle fracture for Charcot arthropathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus have long been recognized as a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. Nonunion and lengthy wound healing in high-risk patients with diabetes, particularly patients with peripheral arterial disease and renal failure, occur secondary to several clinical conditions and are often fraught with complications. Whether diabetic ankle fractures are best treated noninvasively or surgically is controversial. Case presentation A 53-year-old Japanese man fractured his right ankle. The fractured ankle was treated nonsurgically with a plaster cast. Although he remained non-weight-bearing for 3 months, radiography at 3 months showed nonunion. The nonunion was treated by Ilizarov external fixation of the ankle. The external fixator was removed 99 days postoperatively, at which time the patient exhibited anatomical and functional recovery and was able to walk without severe complications. Conclusion In patients with diabetes mellitus, severe nonunion of ankle fractures with Charcot arthropathy in which the fracture fragment diameter is very small and the use of internal fixation is difficult is a clinical challenge. Ilizarov external fixation allows suitable fixation to be achieved using multiple Ilizarov wires. PMID:25103697

  5. Ankle, knee, and hip joint contribution to body support during gait

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Tsutomu; Ueda, Yasuhisa; Kamijo, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Support moment was defined as the sum of ankle plantar flexion, knee and hip extension moments. There are some mechanical relationships among the 3 joints. If these relationships were understood, it might be possible to determine which joint should be strengthened to improve gait. The aims of this study were to examine the mutual relationship among kinetic variables of the 3 joints during different phases. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy subjects volunteered for this study. They were asked to walk on a platform at a self-selected speed. Correlation coefficients between support moment and vertical ground reaction force were calculated for each subject. Pearson correlation analysis was performed among the 3 joint moments and between each joint moment and vertical ground reaction force. [Results] Knee and hip extension moments showed negative correlation throughout the stance. Ankle moment had a positive with hip but a negative correlation with knee moment except in the initial contact and pre-swing. Hip moment in the initial contact, knee moment in the loading response, and ankle moment from the terminal stance to pre-swing had a high correlation with vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] The results may indicate which joint should be strengthened to improve gait pattern. PMID:27821945

  6. Interventions for increasing ankle joint dorsiflexion: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle joint equinus, or restricted dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), has been linked to a range of pathologies of relevance to clinical practitioners. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effects of conservative interventions on ankle joint ROM in healthy individuals and athletic populations. Methods Keyword searches of Embase, Medline, Cochrane and CINAHL databases were performed with the final search being run in August 2013. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they assessed the effect of a non-surgical intervention on ankle joint dorsiflexion in healthy populations. Studies were quality rated using a standard quality assessment scale. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and results were pooled where study methods were homogenous. Results Twenty-three studies met eligibility criteria, with a total of 734 study participants. Results suggest that there is some evidence to support the efficacy of static stretching alone (SMDs: range 0.70 to 1.69) and static stretching in combination with ultrasound (SMDs: range 0.91 to 0.95), diathermy (SMD 1.12), diathermy and ice (SMD 1.16), heel raise exercises (SMDs: range 0.70 to 0.77), superficial moist heat (SMDs: range 0.65 to 0.84) and warm up (SMD 0.87) in improving ankle joint dorsiflexion ROM. Conclusions Some evidence exists to support the efficacy of stretching alone and stretching in combination with other therapies in increasing ankle joint ROM in healthy individuals. There is a paucity of quality evidence to support the efficacy of other non-surgical interventions, thus further research in this area is warranted. PMID:24225348

  7. Dynamic Postural-Stability Deficits After Cryotherapy to the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Fullam, Karl; Caulfield, Brian; Coughlan, Garrett F.; McGroarty, Mark; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context  Decreased postural stability is a primary risk factor for lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. During athletic competitions, cryotherapy may be applied during short breaks in play or during half-time; however, its effects on postural stability remain unclear. Objective  To investigate the acute effects of a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application on dynamic postural stability. Design  Controlled laboratory study. Setting  University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 29 elite-level collegiate male field-sport athletes (age = 20.8 ± 1.12 years, height = 1.80 ± 0.06 m, mass = 81.89 ± 8.59 kg) participated. Intervention(s)  Participants were tested on the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Normalized reach distances; sagittal-plane kinematics of the hip, knee, and ankle joints; and associated mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path during performance of the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test. Results  We observed a decrease in reach-distance scores for the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05). No differences were observed in hip-, knee-, or ankle-joint sagittal-plane kinematics (P > .05). We noted a decrease in mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05) in all reach directions. Conclusions  Dynamic postural stability was adversely affected immediately after cryotherapy to the ankle joint. PMID:26285088

  8. A three-dimensional ankle kinetostatic model to simulate loaded and unloaded joint motion.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Margherita; Sancisi, Nicola; Parenti-Castelli, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    A kinetostatic model able to replicate both the natural unloaded motion of the tibiotalar (or ankle) joint and the joint behavior under external loads is presented. The model is developed as the second step of a sequential procedure, which allows the definition of a kinetostatic model as a generalization of a kinematic model of the joint defined at the first step. Specifically, this kinematic model taken as the starting point of the definition procedure is a parallel spatial mechanism which replicates the ankle unloaded motion. It features two rigid bodies (representing the tibia-fibula and the talus-calcaneus complexes) interconnected by five rigid binary links, that mimic three articular contacts and two nearly isometric fibers (IFs) of the tibiocalcaneal ligament (TiCaL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CaFiL). In the kinetostatic model, the five links are considered as compliant; moreover, further elastic structures are added to represent all the main ankle passive structures of the joint. Thanks to this definition procedure, the kinetostatic model still replicates the ankle unloaded motion with the same accuracy as the kinematic model. In addition, the model can replicate the behavior of the joint when external loads are applied. Finally, the structures that guide these motions are consistent with the anatomical evidence. The parameters of the model are identified for two specimens from both subject-specific and published data. Loads are then applied to the model in order to simulate two common clinical tests. The model-predicted ankle motion shows good agreement with results from the literature.

  9. Factors affecting the range of motion of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis who walk daily

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Nobumasa; Shoji, Morio; Kitagawa, Takashi; Terada, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Increased plantar pressure during walking is a risk factor for foot ulcers because of reduced range of motion at the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints. However, the range of motion in patients undergoing hemodialysis has not yet been determined. A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the factors affecting the range of motion of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis who walk daily. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy feet of 35 patients receiving hemodialysis therapy were examined. Measurements included the passive range of motion of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle joint, and flexion and extension of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. [Results] Hemodialysis duration was not associated with ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Diabetes duration was significantly associated with limited ankle joint mobility. Finally, blood hemoglobin levels, body mass index, and age were associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion. [Conclusion] The present study identified age, diabetes, and decreased physical activity, but not hemodialysis duration, to be risk factors for limited joint mobility of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:27313371

  10. Estimation of ankle joint angle from peroneal and tibial electroneurograms based on muscle spindle model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Chan, Ching-Chao

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a new method of estimating the angle of the passively stretched ankle joint, based on structural muscle spindle models of the tibial and peroneal electroneurograms (ENG). Passive ramp-and-hold and alternating stretches of the ankle joint were performed in a rabbit. Simultaneously, two cuff electrodes were used to record the ENGs of peroneal and tibial nerves. Based on the two ENGs and the joint angle trajectory, two muscle spindle models were constructed and their inverse models were integrated to compute angle estimates. The model parameters were optimized. The performance of our approach was compared with those of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and artificial neural network model. The results revealed that our model had a better performance of estimating the ankle joint angle in large-range movements and smaller tracking errors. This study provides a new estimation algorithm to extract the joint angle from the information conveyed in a nerve.

  11. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle, part 2: site-specific etiology, imaging, and treatment, and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Jacob C; Khurana, Bharti; Smith, Stacy E

    2017-03-25

    Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a commonly encountered problem among athletes and individuals participating in a wide range of activities. This illustrated review, the second of two parts, discusses site-specific etiological factors, imaging appearances, treatment options, and differential considerations of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. The imaging and clinical management of stress fractures of the foot and ankle are highly dependent on the specific location of the fracture, mechanical forces acting upon the injured site, vascular supply of the injured bone, and the proportion of trabecular to cortical bone at the site of injury. The most common stress fractures of the foot and ankle are low risk and include the posteromedial tibia, the calcaneus, and the second and third metatarsals. The distal fibula is a less common location, and stress fractures of the cuboid and cuneiforms are very rare, but are also considered low risk. In contrast, high-risk stress fractures are more prone to delayed union or nonunion and include the anterior tibial cortex, medial malleolus, navicular, base of the second metatarsal, proximal fifth metatarsal, hallux sesamoids, and the talus. Of these high-risk types, stress fractures of the anterior tibial cortex, the navicular, and the proximal tibial cortex may be predisposed to poor healing because of the watershed blood supply in these locations. The radiographic differential diagnosis of stress fracture includes osteoid osteoma, malignancy, and chronic osteomyelitis.

  12. Effects of changing speed on knee and ankle joint load during walking and running.

    PubMed

    de David, Ana Cristina; Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Joint moments can be used as an indicator of joint loading and have potential application for sports performance and injury prevention. The effects of changing walking and running speeds on joint moments for the different planes of motion still are debatable. Here, we compared knee and ankle moments during walking and running at different speeds. Data were collected from 11 recreational male runners to determine knee and ankle joint moments during different conditions. Conditions include walking at a comfortable speed (self-selected pacing), fast walking (fastest speed possible), slow running (speed corresponding to 30% slower than running) and running (at 4 m · s(-1) ± 10%). A different joint moment pattern was observed between walking and running. We observed a general increase in joint load for sagittal and frontal planes as speed increased, while the effects of speed were not clear in the transverse plane moments. Although differences tend to be more pronounced when gait changed from walking to running, the peak moments, in general, increased when speed increased from comfortable walking to fast walking and from slow running to running mainly in the sagittal and frontal planes. Knee flexion moment was higher in walking than in running due to larger knee extension. Results suggest caution when recommending walking over running in an attempt to reduce knee joint loading. The different effects of speed increments during walking and running should be considered with regard to the prevention of injuries and for rehabilitation purposes.

  13. Long-term outcome after supination-external rotation type-4 fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Stufkens, S A S; Knupp, M; Lampert, C; van Dijk, C N; Hintermann, B

    2009-12-01

    We have compared the results at a mean follow-up of 13 years (11 to 14) of two groups of supination-external rotation type-4 fractures of the ankle, in one of which there was a fracture of the medial malleolus and in the other the medial deltoid ligament had been partially or completely ruptured. Of 66 patients treated operatively between 1993 and 1997, 36 were available for follow-up. Arthroscopy had been performed in all patients pre-operatively to assess the extent of the intra-articular lesions. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hind-foot score was used for clinical evaluation and showed a significant difference in both the total and the functional scores (p < 0.05), but not in those for pain or alignment, in favour of the group with a damaged deltoid ligament (p < 0.05). The only significant difference between the groups on the short-form 36 quality-of-life score was for bodily pain, again in favour of the group with a damaged deltoid ligament. There was no significant difference between the groups in the subjective visual analogue scores or in the modified Kannus radiological score. Arthroscopically, there was a significant difference with an increased risk of loose bodies in the group with an intact deltoid ligament (p < 0.005), although there was no significant increased risk of deep cartilage lesions in the two groups. At a mean follow-up of 13 years after operative treatment of a supination-external rotation type-4 ankle fracture patients with partial or complete rupture of the medial deltoid ligament tended to have a better result than those with a medial malleolar fracture.

  14. Retrospective analysis of the rate and interval to union for joint arthrodesis of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, Roya; Wilde, Brandon; Nielsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Arthrodesis is a common procedure indicated for surgical treatment of end-stage degenerative joint disease of the foot and ankle. Many published studies have reviewed the union rate, focusing on specific technique or fixation. However, studies reporting on the average period required to achieve fusion, irrespective of the type of fixation or surgical method used, have been lacking. We report on the union rate and interval to fusion in patients who had undergone primary arthrodesis of various joints of the foot and ankle. A retrospective review of the medical records of 135 patients was performed. The specific joints studied were ankle, and the subtalar, triple, first tarsometatarsal, first metatarsophalangeal, and hallux interphalangeal joints. Our results showed that the average interval for complete fusion was significantly less for the joints in the forefoot, with the subtalar joint, ankle, and triple arthrodesis requiring a longer period to achieve complete fusion. The nonunion rate was also greater when the fusion involved the joints of the rearfoot. Our results have refuted the idea that 6 weeks is the minimum period required to achieve fusion in the foot and ankle. The results of our study support the need for additional education of the patients and surgeons that the interval required for recovery after foot and ankle fusion depends on the location and surface area that has been fused.

  15. Changes in joint position sense after conservatively treated chronic lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kynsburg, A; Halasi, T; Tállay, A; Berkes, I

    2006-12-01

    Improvement of ankle proprioception through physiotherapy (a.k.a. proprioceptive training) is a widely accepted conservative treatment modality of chronic functional lateral ankle instability. Clinical studies provided controversial data on its proprioceptive effect. Aim of this study was to gain evidence on the efficacy of proprioceptive training on ankle joint position sense. Ten patients (five males and five females, aged 23.3+/-5.4 years) were treated conservatively for chronic lateral ankle instability with a special training programme over 6 weeks. For the assessment of joint position sense we used the slope-box test, first applied and described by Robbins et al. (Br J Sports Med 29:242-247, 1995). The test was performed before the start and after the end of the training programme, measuring joint position sense on 11 different slope amplitudes in four directions (anterior, posterior, lateral and medial) in random order each on both ankles. Comparisons were made between pre- and post-training results as well as versus a control-group of ten healthy athletes. Overall the proprioceptive sensory function of the studied group has improved, but this improvement was not significant in all directions. Only two patients have shown significant improvement of joint position sense in all directions (mean estimate error improvement: 2.47 degrees ), while conservative treatment was partially successful in five others (mean estimate error improvement: 0.73 degrees ). The follow-up results of these seven patients were comparable with the values measured in the control-group. Three patients did not show any improvements (mean estimate error improvement: -0.55 degrees ) (overall difference between improving and non-improving patients: P<0.0001). Mean absolute estimate error profiles of the seven improving patients became similar to the profiles of healthy athletes, while these changes could not be observed in the case of the three non-improving participants. Proprioceptive

  16. [Resorbable rods and screws for fixation of ankle fractures. A randomized clinical prospective study].

    PubMed

    Springer, M A; van Binsbergen, E A; Patka, P; Bakker, F C; Haarman, H J

    1998-05-01

    A prospective randomized clinical trial was performed to evaluate the use of self-reinforced absorbable composites (Biofix) in the fixation of ankle fractures. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that fixation with Biofix rods and screws is as good as the standard A.O. fixation. The benefits of Biofix rods and screws are: a reduction in costs since no secondary operation is needed, prevention of stress-shielding and thereby diminishing the risk of bone porosity. Patients aged between 16 and 75 years old with closed, non-comminuted fractures of the lateral and/or medial malleolus and dislocation of the fracture fragments greater than 2 mm were included in the study. 22 patients were treated with Biofix rods and screws and the control group of 19 patients with a standard technique. After 3, 6 and 12 months, rontgenograms were taken. At the same time functional results were evaluated following the criteria of Olerud and Molander. Two patients were withdrawn from the trial for non-medical reasons. 22 patients (12 from the Biofix group, 10 from the AO group) operated two or more years ago were contacted to see if any complications had occurred since they were last seen. In 4 cases a Biofix screw broke down just beneath the head during insertion. This did not result in an insufficient fixation of the fracture. There were no early post-operative complications. The functional and rontgenological results in both groups were equal. In three cases a sterile sinus developed at the site of screw insertion. Biofix rods and screws, made of polylactic acid, are a good alternative for the fixation of fractures of the ankle. The use of resorbable fracture fixation material has the advantage that a second operation to remove osteosynthesis material is not necessary. The long term results are good. There is, however, a possibility of development of tissue reaction to the resorbable material.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wenxin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis. Methods A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The simulated impact velocities were from 2.0 to 7.0 m/s with 1.0 m/s interval. Results At 5.0 m/s impact velocity, the maximum von Mises stress of the trabecular calcaneus and talus were 3.21MPa and 2.41MPa respectively, while that of the Tresca stress were 3.46MPa and 2.55MPa. About 94% and 84% of the trabecular calcaneus and talus exceeded the shear yielding stress, while 21.7% and 18.3% yielded the compressive stress. The peak stresses were distributed around the talocalcaneal articulation and the calcaneal tuberosity inferiorly, which corresponded to the common fracture sites. Conclusions The prediction in this study showed that axial compressive impact at 5.0 m/s could produce considerable yielding of trabecular bone in both calcaneus and talus, dominantly by shear and compounded with compression that predispose the rearfoot in the risk of fracture. This study suggested the injury pattern and fracture mode of high energy trauma that provides insights in injury prevention and fracture management. PMID:27119740

  18. Joint Loads in Marsupial Ankles Reflect Habitual Bipedalism versus Quadrupedalism

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kristian J.; Jashashvili, Tea; Houghton, Kimberley; Westaway, Michael C.; Patel, Biren A.

    2013-01-01

    Joint surfaces of limb bones are loaded in compression by reaction forces generated from body weight and musculotendon complexes bridging them. In general, joints of eutherian mammals have regions of high radiodensity subchondral bone that are better at resisting compressive forces than low radiodensity subchondral bone. Identifying similar form-function relationships between subchondral radiodensity distribution and joint load distribution within the marsupial postcranium, in addition to providing a richer understanding of marsupial functional morphology, can serve as a phylogenetic control in evaluating analogous relationships within eutherian mammals. Where commonalities are established across phylogenetic borders, unifying principles in mammalian physiology, morphology, and behavior can be identified. Here, we assess subchondral radiodensity patterns in distal tibiae of several marsupial taxa characterized by different habitual activities (e.g., locomotion). Computed tomography scanning, maximum intensity projection maps, and pixel counting were used to quantify radiodensity in 41 distal tibiae of bipedal (5 species), arboreal quadrupedal (4 species), and terrestrial quadrupedal (5 species) marsupials. Bipeds (Macropus and Wallabia) exhibit more expansive areas of high radiodensity in the distal tibia than arboreal (Dendrolagus, Phascolarctos, and Trichosurus) or terrestrial quadrupeds (Sarcophilus, Thylacinus, Lasiorhinus, and Vombatus), which may reflect the former carrying body weight only through the hind limbs. Arboreal quadrupeds exhibit smallest areas of high radiodensity, though they differ non-significantly from terrestrial quadrupeds. This could indicate slightly more compliant gaits by arboreal quadrupeds compared to terrestrial quadrupeds. The observed radiodensity patterns in marsupial tibiae, though their statistical differences disappear when controlling for phylogeny, corroborate previously documented patterns in primates and xenarthrans

  19. Joint loads in marsupial ankles reflect habitual bipedalism versus quadrupedalism.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kristian J; Jashashvili, Tea; Houghton, Kimberley; Westaway, Michael C; Patel, Biren A

    2013-01-01

    Joint surfaces of limb bones are loaded in compression by reaction forces generated from body weight and musculotendon complexes bridging them. In general, joints of eutherian mammals have regions of high radiodensity subchondral bone that are better at resisting compressive forces than low radiodensity subchondral bone. Identifying similar form-function relationships between subchondral radiodensity distribution and joint load distribution within the marsupial postcranium, in addition to providing a richer understanding of marsupial functional morphology, can serve as a phylogenetic control in evaluating analogous relationships within eutherian mammals. Where commonalities are established across phylogenetic borders, unifying principles in mammalian physiology, morphology, and behavior can be identified. Here, we assess subchondral radiodensity patterns in distal tibiae of several marsupial taxa characterized by different habitual activities (e.g., locomotion). Computed tomography scanning, maximum intensity projection maps, and pixel counting were used to quantify radiodensity in 41 distal tibiae of bipedal (5 species), arboreal quadrupedal (4 species), and terrestrial quadrupedal (5 species) marsupials. Bipeds (Macropus and Wallabia) exhibit more expansive areas of high radiodensity in the distal tibia than arboreal (Dendrolagus, Phascolarctos, and Trichosurus) or terrestrial quadrupeds (Sarcophilus, Thylacinus, Lasiorhinus, and Vombatus), which may reflect the former carrying body weight only through the hind limbs. Arboreal quadrupeds exhibit smallest areas of high radiodensity, though they differ non-significantly from terrestrial quadrupeds. This could indicate slightly more compliant gaits by arboreal quadrupeds compared to terrestrial quadrupeds. The observed radiodensity patterns in marsupial tibiae, though their statistical differences disappear when controlling for phylogeny, corroborate previously documented patterns in primates and xenarthrans

  20. Modeling and simulating the neuromuscular mechanisms regulating ankle and knee joint stiffness during human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Maculan, Marco; Pizzolato, Claudio; Reggiani, Monica; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an electrophysiologically and dynamically consistent musculoskeletal model to predict stiffness in the human ankle and knee joints as derived from the joints constituent biological tissues (i.e., the spanning musculotendon units). The modeling method we propose uses electromyography (EMG) recordings from 13 muscle groups to drive forward dynamic simulations of the human leg in five healthy subjects during overground walking and running. The EMG-driven musculoskeletal model estimates musculotendon and resulting joint stiffness that is consistent with experimental EMG data as well as with the experimental joint moments. This provides a framework that allows for the first time observing 1) the elastic interplay between the knee and ankle joints, 2) the individual muscle contribution to joint stiffness, and 3) the underlying co-contraction strategies. It provides a theoretical description of how stiffness modulates as a function of muscle activation, fiber contraction, and interacting tendon dynamics. Furthermore, it describes how this differs from currently available stiffness definitions, including quasi-stiffness and short-range stiffness. This work offers a theoretical and computational basis for describing and investigating the neuromuscular mechanisms underlying human locomotion. PMID:26245321

  1. Effects of plyometric training on passive stiffness of gastrocnemii and the musculo-articular complex of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Fouré, A; Nordez, A; Guette, M; Cornu, C

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to determine simultaneously the effects of plyometric training on the passive stiffness of the ankle joint musculo-articular complex, the gastrocnemii muscle-tendon complex (MTC) and the Achilles tendon in order to assess possible local adaptations of elastic properties. Seventeen subjects were divided into a trained (TG) group and a control (CG) group. They were tested before and after 8 weeks of a plyometric training period. The ankle joint range of motion (RoM), the global musculo-articular passive stiffness of the ankle joint, the maximal passive stiffness of gastrocnemii and the stiffness of the Achilles tendon during isometric plantar flexion were determined. A significant increase in the jump performances of TG relative to CG was found (squat jumps: +17.6%, P=0.008; reactive jumps: +19.8%, P=0.001). No significant effect of plyometric training was observed in the ankle joint RoM, musculo-articular passive stiffness of the ankle joint or Achilles tendon stiffness (P>0.05). In contrast, the maximal passive stiffness of gastrocnemii of TG increased after plyometric training relative to CG (+33.3%, P=0.001). Thus, a specific adaptation of the gastrocnemii MTC occurred after plyometric training, without affecting the global passive musculo-articular stiffness of the ankle joint.

  2. One-degree-of-freedom spherical model for the passive motion of the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Sancisi, Nicola; Baldisserri, Benedetta; Parenti-Castelli, Vincenzo; Belvedere, Claudio; Leardini, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Mathematical modelling of mobility at the human ankle joint is essential for prosthetics and orthotic design. The scope of this study is to show that the ankle joint passive motion can be represented by a one-degree-of-freedom spherical motion. Moreover, this motion is modelled by a one-degree-of-freedom spherical parallel mechanism model, and the optimal pivot-point position is determined. Passive motion and anatomical data were taken from in vitro experiments in nine lower limb specimens. For each of these, a spherical mechanism, including the tibiofibular and talocalcaneal segments connected by a spherical pair and by the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligament links, was defined from the corresponding experimental kinematics and geometry. An iterative procedure was used to optimize the geometry of the model, able to predict original experimental motion. The results of the simulations showed a good replication of the original natural motion, despite the numerous model assumptions and simplifications, with mean differences between experiments and predictions smaller than 1.3 mm (average 0.33 mm) for the three joint position components and smaller than 0.7° (average 0.32°) for the two out-of-sagittal plane rotations, once plotted versus the full flexion arc. The relevant pivot-point position after model optimization was found within the tibial mortise, but not exactly in a central location. The present combined experimental and modelling analysis of passive motion at the human ankle joint shows that a one degree-of-freedom spherical mechanism predicts well what is observed in real joints, although its computational complexity is comparable to the standard hinge joint model.

  3. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is surgery to replace the damaged bone and cartilage in the ankle joint. Artificial joint parts (prosthetics) ... Your surgeon will remove the damaged bone and cartilage. Your surgeon will replace the damaged part of: ...

  4. The Effect of Cryotherapy on the Normal Ankle Joint Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    khanmohammadi, Roya; Someh, Marjan; Ghafarinejad, Farahnaze

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a fifteen-minute water immersion treatment affects the normal ankle joint position sense (JPS) at the middle range of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion actively and passively. Methods Thirty healthy female volunteers aged between 18 and 30 years were treated by a 15-minute cryotherapy (6 ± 1°C). The subject's skin temperature over antromedial aspect of dominant ankle was measured by the Mayomed device before, immediate and 15 minutes after water immersion. Ankle JPS was tested trough the pedal goniometer at 3 stages similar to the skin temperature. ANOVA (α = 0.05) was performed on each of variables using SPSS 19.0 software. Results Skin temperature was seen to decrease after water immersion but subjects did not return to pre-test skin temperature after 15 minutes (P<0.001). The research found no significant difference in JPS at middle range of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion actively and passively before and after cryotherapy. Conclusion These findings suggest that 15-minute water immersion at 6°C dose not significantly alter the middle range of plantar flexion/ dorsiflexion JPS at the ankle and is not deleterious to JPS. PMID:22375224

  5. Comparative study on isokinetic capacity of knee and ankle joints by functional injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Seo, Byoung-Do; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To collect basic data for exercise programs designed to enhance functional knee and ankle joint stability based on isokinetic measurement and muscle strength evaluations in normal and impaired functional states. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the athlete group and the control group (n = 12 each). Data were collected of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Results] Significant intergroup differences were observed in peak torque of the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and the right flexors at 240°/sec. Significant differences were observed in peak torque/body weight in the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and in the right flexors at 180°/sec and 240°/sec. Significant peak torque differences were noted in the left ankle joint dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, right plantar flexor at 120°/sec, left plantar flexor at 30°/sec, left dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, and right dorsiflexor at 120°/sec. [Conclusion] Isokinetic evaluation stimulates muscle contraction at motion-dependent speeds and may contribute to the development of intervention programs to improve knee and ankle joint function and correct lower-extremity instability. PMID:26957768

  6. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint.

  7. Reconstruction of the form and function of lateral malleolus and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kiduka, Yuichiro; Inoue, Yojiro; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Tai, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction alone cannot obtain normal ankle function in patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus. The authors report a functional reconstructive method for the lateral malleolus, utilized in a male patient whose osteosarcoma in the fibula was resected with surrounding soft tissue. In order to reconstruct the lateral malleolus, the remaining half of the fibula at the knee was removed, and the fibular head was fixed with the tibia at the ankle joint. Ligaments were reconstructed with tendon grafts. Skin and soft-tissue defects were reconstructed with a combined composite flap comprised of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and a serratus anterior muscle flap. Dead space around the bone graft was filled with the serratus anterior muscle flap that was divided into two portions. The surface was covered with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The patient regained almost normal function of the ankle joint. This technique would be a useful functional reconstructive method for patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus.

  8. A Biomechanical Comparison of Locking Versus Conventional Plate Fixation for Distal Fibula Fractures in Trimalleolar Ankle Injuries.

    PubMed

    Nguyentat, Annie; Camisa, William; Patel, Sandeep; Lagaay, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Previous biomechanical studies have advocated the use of locking plates for isolated distal fibula fractures in osteoporotic bone. Complex rotational ankle injuries involve an increased number of fractures, which can result in instability, potentially requiring the same fixed angle properties afforded by locking plates. However, the mechanical indication for locking plate technology has not been tested in this fracture model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of locking and conventional plate fixation for distal fibula fractures in trimalleolar ankle injuries. Fourteen (7 matched pairs) fresh-frozen cadaver leg specimens were used. The bone mineral density of each was obtained using dual x-ray absorptiometry scans. The fracture model simulated an OTA 44-B3.3 fracture. The syndesmosis was not disrupted. Each fracture was fixated in the same fashion, except for the distal fibula plate construct: locking (n = 7) and one-third tubular (n = 7). The specimens underwent axial and torsional cyclic loading, followed by torsional loading to failure. No statistically significant differences were found between the locking and conventional plate constructs during both fatigue and torque to failure testing (p > .05). Our specimen bone mineral density averages did not represent poor bone quality. The clinical implication of the present study is that distal fibular locking plates do not provide a mechanical advantage for trimalleolar ankle injuries in individuals with normal bone density and in the absence of fracture comminution.

  9. Consideration of equilibrium equations at the hip joint alongside those at the knee and ankle joints has mixed effects on knee joint response during gait.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2013-02-01

    Accurate estimation of muscle forces during daily activities such as walking is critical for a reliable evaluation of loads on the knee joint. To evaluate knee joint muscle forces, the importance of the inclusion of the hip joint alongside the knee and ankle joints when treating the equilibrium equations remains yet unknown. An iterative kinematics-driven finite element model of the knee joint that accounts for the synergy between passive structures and active musculature is employed. The knee joint muscle forces and biomechanical response are predicted and compared with our earlier results that did not account for moment equilibrium equations at the hip joint. This study indicates that inclusion of the hip joint in the optimization along the knee and ankle joints only slightly (<10%) influences total forces in quadriceps, lateral hamstrings and medial hamstrings. As a consequence, even smaller differences are found in predicted ligament forces, contact forces/areas, and cartilage stresses/strains during the stance phase of gait. The distribution of total forces between the uni- and bi-articular muscle components in quadriceps and in lateral hamstrings; however, substantially alter at different stance phases.

  10. In Vivo Syndesmotic Over-Compression After Fixation of Ankle Fractures with a Syndesmotic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Steven M.; Haynes, Jacob A.; Spraggs-Hughes, Amanda; McAndrew, Christopher M.; Ricci, William M.; Gardner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goals of this study were to assess syndesmotic reductions utilizing computerized tomography (CT) scans, and to determine if malreductions were associated with certain injury types or reduction forceps. Design Prospective cohort Setting Urban Level 1 Trauma center Patients Twenty-seven patients with operatively treated syndesmotic injuries were recruited prospectively. Intervention Patients underwent postoperative bilateral CT scans of the ankle and hindfoot to assess syndesmotic reduction. The uninjured extremity was used as a control. Main outcome measurement Side-to-side differences of fibula position within the tibial incisura were measured at several anatomic points and analyzed based on injury type, the presence of posterior malleolar injury, level of fracture, and type of reduction forceps used. Results On average, operatively treated syndesmotic injuries were over-compressed (fibular medialization) by 1mm (p < .001) and externally rotated by 5° (p = .002) when compared to the uninjured extremity. The absence of a posterior malleolar injury and Weber B (OTA 44-B) fractures seemed to have a protective effect against malrotation, but not against over-compression. There was no difference in malreduction based on type of clamp used. Conclusions It is possible, and highly likely based on these data, to over-compress the syndesmosis when using a reduction forceps. Care should be taken to avoid over-compression, as this may affect ankle motion and functional outcome. This is the first in vivo series of syndesmotic over-compression to our knowledge. PMID:26295735

  11. [Results of the surgical treatment of ankle fractures in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Bartłomiej; Lejman, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    We present results of treatment in 36 cases of distal tibial epiphyseolysis in 34 patients treated between 1999 and 2005 with a minimal follow up of 12 months (average 28,5, range 13-84 months). The mean age at injury was 12 years (range from 7 to 16). There were 22 cases of type II injury according to the Salter-Harris classification, 5 cases of type VII, 3 of type IV, 2 of type I and two cases of triplane fracture, one case of retrospectively recognised type V and one of type III. 12 children required open reduction and K-wire fixation, the rest of 22 children underwent closed reduction followed by percutaneus fixation in 12 cases. Concomitant fibular fracture occured in 30 cases and required open reduction and fixation in 4. There were 18 good, 14 fair and 3 bad results according to Gleizes. The mean AOFAS scale result was 92.7. One child underwent 2 weeks of intravenous antybiotic therapy to recover from superficial skin infection around percutaneus K-wires. Four cases of physeal bar formation were noted. In two of them distal tibial osteotomy to correct ankle varus was necessary and one underwent bony bridge removal followed by fatty tissue interposition. The remaining physeal bar resulted in 10 degree of ankle valgus without functional dispairement.

  12. Changes in joint position sense after surgically treated chronic lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Halasi, T; Kynsburg, A; Tallay, A; Berkes, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: A search of the literature shows that the effect of surgery on ankle proprioception has been hardly investigated. Objective: To examine the effect of anatomical reconstruction of the anterolateral capsuloligamentous complex on ankle joint position sense. Methods: A prospective study using the "slope box" test. Ten consecutive patients were included in the study, and 10 healthy athletes represented the control group. Results: Similar test-retest reliability rates (overall reliability 0.92; p = 0.0013) were obtained to those of the original designers of the method. There were no significant differences with respect to side dominance (p = 0.9216). Investigation of the characteristics of mean absolute estimate errors showed that the controls tested became error prone in the range of slope altitudes 7.5–25° in every direction, compared with the range 0–5° (range of p values 0.00003–0.00072). The results of the intervention group showed that, for the two main directions of interest (anterior and lateral), preoperative differences in mean absolute estimate errors between injured (anterior 3.91 (2.81)°; lateral 4.06 (2.85)°) and healthy (anterior 2.94 (2.21)°, lateral 3.19 (2.64)°) sides (anterior, p = 0.0124; lateral, p = 0.0250) had disappeared (postoperative differences: anterior, p = 0.6906; lateral, p = 0.4491). The afflicted ankle had improved significantly after surgery in both important directions (anterior, p<0.0001; lateral, p = 0.0023). Conclusions: The study shows that differences in joint position sense between healthy and injured ankles disappeared as the result of surgery. Preoperative data show that proprioceptive malfunction is a cause of functional instability. If treatment is by means of surgery, the retensioning of the original anterolateral structures is inevitable, even if other grafting or surgical techniques are used. PMID:16244190

  13. Adaptations to long-term strength training of ankle joint muscles in old age.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Emilie; Martin, Alain; Van Hoecke, Jacques

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to enquire whether older adults, who continue plantar-flexion (PF) strength training for an additional 6-month period, would achieve further improvements in neuromuscular performance, in the ankle PFs, and in the antagonist dorsi-flexors (DFs). Twenty-three healthy older volunteers (mean age 77.4 +/- 3.7 years) took part in this investigation and 12 of them followed a 1-year strength-training program. Both neural and muscular factors were examined during isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torques in ankle PF and DF pre-training, post 6 and post 12 months. The main finding was that 6 months of additional strength training of the PFs, beyond 6 months, allowed further improvements in neuromuscular performance at the ankle joint in older adults. Indeed, during the first 6 months of progressive resistance training, there was an increase in the PF MVC torque of 11.1 +/- 19.9 N m, and then of 11.1 +/- 17.9 N m in the last 6-month period. However, it was only after 1 year that there was an improvement in the evoked contraction at rest in PF (+ 8%). The strength training of the agonist PF muscles appeared to have an impact on the maximal resultant torque in DF. However, it appeared that this gain was first due to modifications occurring in the trained PFs muscles, then, it seemed that the motor drive of the DFs per se was altered. In conclusion, long-term strength training of the PFs resulted in continued improvements in neuromuscular performance at the ankle joint in older adults, beyond the initial 6 months.

  14. A novel ultrasound technique for detection of osteochondral defects in the ankle joint: a parametric and feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Loeve, Arjo J; van Dongen, Koen W A; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2014-12-24

    (Osteo)chondral defects (OCDs) in the ankle are currently diagnosed with modalities that are not convenient to use in long-term follow-ups. Ultrasound (US) imaging, which is a cost-effective and non-invasive alternative, has limited ability to discriminate OCDs. We aim to develop a new diagnostic technique based on US wave propagation through the ankle joint. The presence of OCDs is identified when a US signal deviates from a reference signal associated with the healthy joint. The feasibility of the proposed technique is studied using experimentally-validated 2D finite-difference time-domain models of the ankle joint. The normalized maximum cross correlation of experiments and simulation was 0.97. Effects of variables relevant to the ankle joint, US transducers and OCDs were evaluated. Variations in joint space width and transducer orientation made noticeable alterations to the reference signal: normalized root mean square error ranged from 6.29% to 65.25% and from 19.59% to 8064.2%, respectively. The results suggest that the new technique could be used for detection of OCDs, if the effects of other parameters (i.e., parameters related to the ankle joint and US transducers) can be reduced.

  15. Ankle Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... of place and may require that you not put weight on it for a few months. Simply put, the more bones that are broken, the more ... severe pain • Swelling • Bruising • Tender to touch • Cannot put any weight on the injured foot • Deformity (“out ...

  16. Asking for the 22-modifier in isolated ankle fractures: does the operative note make the case?

    PubMed

    Thakore, Rachel V; Greenberg, Sarah E; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Prablek, Marc A; Elmashat, David; Hinson, Julian K; Joyce, David; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the operative notes for justification on the use of the 22-modifier in ankle fracture cases and compared the differences in physician billing and reimbursement. A total of 265 patients who had undergone operative management of isolated ankle fractures across a 10-year period were identified at a level I trauma center through a retrospective chart review. Of the 265 patients, 61 (23.0%) had been billed with the 22-modifier. The radiographs were reviewed by 3 surgeons to determine the complexity of the case. The amount of the professional fees and payments was obtained from the financial services department. Operative reports were reviewed for inclusion of eight 22-modifier criteria and word count. Mann-Whitney U tests of means were used to compare cases with and without the 22-modifier. From our analysis of preoperative radiographs, 37 (60%) showed evidence of a significantly complex fracture that justified the use of the 22-modifier. A review of the operative reports showed that 42 (68%) did not identify 2 or more reasons for requesting the 22-modifier in the report. Overall, the 22-modifier cases were not always reimbursed significantly greater amounts than the nonmodifier cases. No significant difference in the average word count of the operative notes was found. We have concluded that orthopedic trauma surgeons do not appropriately justify the use of the 22-modifier within their operative report. Further education on modifiers and the use of the operative report as billing documentation is required to ensure surgeons are adequately reimbursed for difficult trauma cases.

  17. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: “spasticity” vs. “contracture”). Differentiation between these components is hard to achieve by common manual tests. We applied an assessment instrument to obtain quantitative measures of neural and non-neural contributions to ankle joint stiffness in CP. Methods Twenty-three adolescents with CP and eleven healthy subjects were seated with their foot fixated to an electrically powered single axis footplate. Passive ramp-and-hold rotations were applied over full ankle range of motion (RoM) at low and high velocities. Subject specific tissue stiffness, viscosity and reflexive torque were estimated from ankle angle, torque and triceps surae EMG activity using a neuromuscular model. Results In CP, triceps surae reflexive torque was on average 5.7 times larger (p = .002) and tissue stiffness 2.1 times larger (p = .018) compared to controls. High tissue stiffness was associated with reduced RoM (p < .001). Ratio between neural and non-neural contributors varied substantially within adolescents with CP. Significant associations of SPAT (spasticity test) score with both tissue stiffness and reflexive torque show agreement with clinical phenotype. Conclusions Using an instrumented and model based approach, increased joint stiffness in CP could be mainly attributed to higher reflexive torque compared to control subjects. Ratios between contributors varied substantially within adolescents with CP. Quantitative differentiation of neural and non-neural stiffness contributors in CP allows for assessment of individual patient characteristics and tailoring of therapy. PMID:23880287

  18. The effect of the ankle joint angle in the level of soleus Ia afferent presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Patikas, D A; Kotzamanidis, C; Robertson, C T; Koceja, D M

    2004-12-01

    The factors that are responsible for the relationship between motoneuron excitability and muscle length may have both mechanical and/or neurophysiologic origins. The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in the level of presynaptic inhibition, as measured with a soleus H-reflex conditioning protocol, and muscle length. Ten healthy volunteers were measured at three different ankle angles: 30 degrees plantar flexion, neutral position (0 degrees) and 15 degrees dorsiflexion. At each position the soleus H-reflex and the maximum M-wave were measured while the limb was relaxed. The H-reflex was conditioned by a stimulation of the common peroneal nerve, 100 ms prior to the tibial nerve stimulation. The results revealed that the level of presynaptic inhibition was higher at the neutral position in comparison to the dorsiflexed or plantarflexed positions. Additionally, the HMAX/MMAX ratio was significantly decreased when the joint position was set at dorsiflexion. Further, there was a significant correlation, independent of ankle joint angle, between presynaptic inhibition levels and the HMAX/MMAX ratio. The above findings support the concept that peripheral feedback from passive, static modifications in the joint angle and consequently in muscle length, can modify the input/output threshold of the motoneurons on a presynaptic level.

  19. Anatomical variations of the anterior talofibular ligament of the human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    MILNER, C. E.; SOAMES, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Compared with other joints, the ligaments of the ankle have not been studied in great detail; consequently relatively little literature exists. The positions of the 3 major bands of the lateral collateral ligament are well known and documented (Schafer et al. 1915; Sarrafian, 1983; McMinn, 1994; Palastanga et al. 1994; Williams et al. 1995). The detailed anatomy of the ligaments is, however, relatively complex with variations of the major bands and several minor additional bands being reported (Sarrafian, 1993; Burks & Morgan, 1994; Rosenberg et al. 1995). PMID:9419003

  20. Open Dislocation of the High Ankle Joint After Fibular Graft Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Anđelković, Slađana Z; Vučković, Čedo Đ; Palibrk, Tomislav D; Milutinović, Suzana M; Bumbaširević, Marko Ž

    2015-01-01

    The free microvascular fibula and soft tissue transfer has become a widely used method for reconstruction of different regions. Donor site morbidity for free fibula microvascular flaps has generally been reported to be low, or at least acceptable. We describe the case of a patient who underwent vascularized free fibula graft harvest for mandibular reconstruction. After 21 months, he had sustained an open dislocation of the left high ankle joint during recreational sports activity. We did not found such case in the published data.

  1. IINCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN SOCCER PLAYERS WITH JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Bertolini, Fabricio Melo; Vieira, Tallys Campos; Aguiar, Rodrigo Manso; Pinheiro, Guilherme Baldez; Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Eighty-three soccer players aged between 14 and 19 years, in the basic category of a professional soccer club in the city of Belo Horizonte, were followed up during the 2009 season. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted, in which these soccer players were divided randomly into two groups. The first consisted of individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), totaling 22 players, and the second was a control group with 61 players without this syndrome, determined through a physical examinati. Results: Both groups were studied with regard to incidence of ankle sprains. At the end of this period, the data were compiled and statistical analysis was performed. A total of 43 cases of ankle injury due to sprains were recorded, of which nine episodes were in players with JHS, thus making p = 0.106. The significance level was 5%. Conclusion: We were able to conclude that in our study there was insufficient evidence to assert that there is an association with increased incidence of ankle sprains among patients with JHS. PMID:27047888

  2. Vibrotactile stimulation of fast-adapting cutaneous afferents from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2016-04-15

    It has previously been shown that cutaneous sensory input from across a broad region of skin can influence proprioception at joints of the hand. The present experiment tested whether cutaneous input from different skin regions across the foot can influence proprioception at the ankle joint. The ability to passively match ankle joint position (17° and 7° plantar flexion and 7° dorsiflexion) was measured while cutaneous vibration was applied to the sole (heel, distal metatarsals) or dorsum of the target foot. Vibration was applied at two different frequencies to preferentially activate Meissner's corpuscles (45 Hz, 80 μm) or Pacinian corpuscles (255 Hz, 10 μm) at amplitudes ∼3 dB above mean perceptual thresholds. Results indicated that cutaneous input from all skin regions across the foot could influence joint-matching error and variability, although the strongest effects were observed with heel vibration. Furthermore, the influence of cutaneous input from each region was modulated by joint angle; in general, vibration had a limited effect on matching in dorsiflexion compared with matching in plantar flexion. Unlike previous results in the upper limb, we found no evidence that Pacinian input exerted a stronger influence on proprioception compared with Meissner input. Findings from this study suggest that fast-adapting cutaneous input from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint in a passive joint-matching task. These results indicate that there is interplay between tactile and proprioceptive signals originating from the foot and ankle.

  3. Physiological coxa varus-genu valgus influences internal knee and ankle joint moments in females during crossover cutting.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J A; Caborn, D N M

    2004-07-01

    This study evaluated the ankle and knee electromyographic, kinematic, and kinetic differences of 20 nonimpaired females with either neutral (group 1) or coxa varus-genu valgus (group 2) alignment during crossover cutting stance phase. Two-way mixed model ANOVA (group, session) assessed mean differences ( p<0.05) and correlation analysis further delineated relationships. During impact absorption, group 2 displayed earlier peak horizontal braking (anterior-posterior) ground reaction force timing, decreased and earlier peak internal knee extension moments (eccentric function), and earlier peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment timing (eccentric function). During the pivot phase, group 2 displayed later and eccentrically-biased peak ankle plantar flexion moments, increased peak internal knee flexion moments (eccentric function), and later peak knee internal rotation timing. Correlation analysis revealed that during impact absorption, subjects with coxa varus-genu valgus alignment (group 2) displayed a stronger relationship between knee internal rotation velocity and peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment onset timing ( r= -0.64 vs r = -0.26) and between peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces and peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment onset timing ( r= 0.61 vs r= 0.24). During the pivot phase these subjects displayed a stronger relationship between peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces and peak internal ankle plantar flexion moment onset timing ( r= -0.63 vs r= -0.09) and between peak horizontal braking forces and peak internal ankle plantar flexion moments ( r= -0.72 vs r= -0.26). Group differences suggest that subjects with coxa varus-genu valgus frontal-plane alignment have an increased dependence on both ankle dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscle group function during crossover cutting. Greater dependence on ankle muscle group function during the performance of a task that requires considerable 3D dynamic knee joint control suggests a greater

  4. A cadaveric study showing the anatomical variations in the branches of the dorsalis pedis artery at the level of the ankle joint and its clinical implication in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S; Dawe, E; Lee, C; Whitehead-Clarke, T; Smith, C; Bendall, S

    2016-09-23

    Introduction Pseudoaneurysm formation following ankle arthroscopy is a rare but potentially catastrophic complication. The placement of anterior ankle portals carries inherent risk to the superficial and deep peroneal nerves, as well as to the dorsalis pedis artery. Anatomical variations in the dorsalis pedis and the presence of branches at the joint line may increase the risk of vascular injury and pseudoaneurysm formation during arthroscopy. There is limited anatomical evidence available regarding the branches of the dorsalis pedis artery, which occur at the point at which they cross the ankle joint. Objectives The objective of the study was to describe the frequency and direction of branches of the dorsalis pedis crossing the ankle joint. Materials and Methods Nineteen cadaveric feet were carefully dissected to explore the course of the dorsalis pedis artery, noting in particular the branching pattern at the joint line. Results Eleven of the nineteen feet had a branch of the dorsalis pedis artery that crossed the level of the ankle joint. Out of these, six were lateral, four medial and one bilateral. Eight of the eleven specimens had one branch at, or just before, the level of the joint. Two specimens had two branches and one had three branches crossing the ankle, which were all in the same direction, crossing laterally to the main trunk of the dorsalis pedis. Conclusions Our study demonstrated high rates of branching of the dorsalis pedis artery at the level of the ankle joint. The role of these branches in pseudoaneurysm formation during anterior hindfoot surgery remains unclear.

  5. Effect of Obesity on Bone Healing After Foot and Ankle Long Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Thorud, Jakob C; Mortensen, Spencer; Thorud, Jennifer L; Shibuya, Naohiro; Maldonado, Yolanda Munoz; Jupiter, Daniel C

    As obesity has become more common, fractures in the obese population have become more frequent. Concern exists regarding alterations in bone health and healing in obese patients. A matched case-control study was performed at 1 institution to evaluate whether an association exists between nonunion and a high body mass index in metatarsal and ankle fractures. A total of 48 patients with nonunion were identified, and control patients matched 2 to 1 (n = 96) were selected. The control patients were matched for age, sex, and fracture type. No association was identified between nonunion and the continuous body mass index (p = .23) or morbid obesity, with a body mass index of ≥40 kg/m(2) (p = .51). However, the results from both univariate and multivariate analysis suggested that patients with a current alcohol problem or a history of an alcohol problem might have a greater risk of nonunion. The odds ratio of a patient with a history of alcohol use experiencing nonunion was 2.7 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 6.2). Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  6. Joint sparing treatments in early ankle osteoarthritis: current procedures and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Castagnini, Francesco; Pellegrini, Camilla; Perazzo, Luca; Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Ankle osteoarthritis (AOA) is a severe pathology, mostly affecting a post-traumatic young population. Arthroscopic debridement, arthrodiastasis, osteotomy are the current joint sparing procedures, but, in the available studies, controversial results were achieved, with better outcomes in case of limited degeneration. Only osteotomy in case of malalignment is universally accepted as a joint sparing procedure in case of partial AOA. Recently, the biological mechanism of osteoarthritis has been intensively studied: it is a whole joint pathology, affecting cartilage, bone and synovial membrane. In particular, the first stage is characterized by a reversible catabolic activity with a state of chondropenia. Thus, biological procedures for early AOA were proposed in order to delay or to avoid end stage procedures. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be a good solution to prevent or reverse degeneration, due to their immunomodulatory features (able to control the catabolic joint environment) and their regenerative osteochondral capabilities (able to treat the chondral defects). In fact, MSCs may regulate the cytokine cascade and the metalloproteinases release, restoring the osteochondral tissue as well. After interesting reports of mesenchymal stem cells seeded on scaffold and applied to cartilage defects in non-degenerated joints, bone marrow derived cells transplantation appears to be a promising technique in order to control the degenerative pathway and restore the osteochondral defects.

  7. Proprioception in classical ballet dancers. A prospective study of the influence of an ankle sprain on proprioception in the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Eriksson, E; Nilsson, C; Wykman, A

    1996-01-01

    We studied prospectively the influence of ankle sprains on proprioception as measured by recording the postural sway of classical ballet dancers. Excellent balance and coordination are important for classical ballet dancers, and postural stability requires adequate proprioception from the ankle joint. Fifty-three professional dancers from the Royal Swedish Ballet, Stockholm, and 23 nonathletes, the control group, participated in the investigation. Postural sway was recorded and analyzed with a stabilimeter using a specially designed, portable, computer-assisted force plate. Six dancers sustained ankle sprains during followup. The recordings were obtained of these dancers before and after the injuries. The stabilometry results differed among the male and female dancers and the control group as follows: 1) the male dancers demonstrated a smaller total area of sway, and 2) both the male and female dancers had a smaller mean sway on the left foot than on the right (no mean difference in sway was found between the left and right foot in the control group). In comparison with the condition before injury and with the uninjured foot, the postural stability of the dancer was impaired for several weeks after the ankle sprain. Postural stability gradually improved during rehabilitation and improvement still occurred several weeks after professional dancing had resumed.

  8. Control of torque direction by spinal pathways at the cat ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T R; Lawrence, J H; Bonasera, S J

    1993-01-01

    To study the biomechanics of the calcaneal tendon's complex insertion onto the calcaneus, we measured torque-time trajectories exerted by the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles in eight unanesthetized decerebrate cats using a multi-axis force-moment sensor placed at the ankle joint. The ankle was constrained to an angle of 110 degrees plantarflexion. Muscles were activated using crossed-extension (XER), flexion (FWR), and caudal cutaneous sural nerve (SNR) reflexes. Torque contributions of other muscles activated by these reflexes were eliminated by denervation or tenotomy. In two animals, miniature pressure transducers were implanted among tendon fibers from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle that insert straight into the calcaneus or among tendon fibers from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) that cross over and insert on the lateral aspect of calcaneus. Reflexively evoked torques had the following directions: FWR, dorsiflexion and adduction; SNR, plantarflexion and abduction; and XER, plantarflexion and modest abduction or adduction. The proportion of abduction torque to plantarflexion torque was always greater for SNR than XER; this difference was about 50% of the magnitude of abduction torque generated by tetanic stimulation of the peronei. During SNR, pressures were higher in regions of the calcaneal tendon originating from MG than regions originating from LG. Similarly, pressures within the MG portion of the calcaneal tendon were higher during SNR than during XER, although these two reflexes produced matched ankle plantarflexion forces. Selective tenotomies and electromyographic recordings further demonstrated that MG generated most of the torque in response to SNR, while soleus, LG, and MG all generated torques in response to XER.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Kinesio-Taping Application and Corticospinal Excitability at the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Francois; Karam, Siobhan

    2015-01-01

    Context Physiotherapists and athletic trainers often use Kinesio Taping (KT) to prevent and treat musculoskeletal injuries in athletes, yet evidence about its effects on neuromuscular performance is conflicting. Objective To investigate the influence of a KT application directed at the ankle joint on measures of corticospinal excitability with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Twelve healthy young women (age = 23.1 ± 1.9 years; range, 19–26 years). Intervention(s) Participants were tested under no-tape and KT conditions according to a random sequence order. The KT was applied to the skin overlying the dorsiflexor and plantar-flexor muscles of the ankle. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed changes in the amplitude of motor-evoked potentials elicited at rest and during movement and changes in the silent period and background muscle activity during movement. Results Taping conditions had no effect on motor-evoked potential amplitude at rest or during movement or on the silent-period duration and background muscle activity. Conclusions Our results concur with other recent reports, showing KT applications have little influence at the neuromuscular level. Alterations in sensory feedback ascribed to elastic taping are likely insufficient to modulate corticospinal excitability in a functionally meaningful manner. PMID:26090708

  10. Inverted Pendulum Standing Apparatus for Investigating Closed-Loop Control of Ankle Joint Muscle Contractions during Functional Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, John F; Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Zariffa, José; Robinson, Mark; Lynch, Cheryl; Popovic, Milos R

    2014-01-01

    The restoration of arm-free standing in individuals with paraplegia can be facilitated via functional electrical stimulation (FES). In developing adequate control strategies for FES systems, it remains challenging to test the performance of a particular control scheme on human subjects. In this study, we propose a testing platform for developing effective control strategies for a closed-loop FES system for standing. The Inverted Pendulum Standing Apparatus (IPSA) is a mechanical inverted pendulum, whose angular position is determined by the subject's ankle joint angle as controlled by the FES system while having the subject's body fixed in a standing frame. This approach provides a setup that is safe, prevents falling, and enables a research and design team to rigorously test various closed-loop controlled FES systems applied to the ankle joints. To demonstrate the feasibility of using the IPSA, we conducted a case series that employed the device for studying FES closed-loop controllers for regulating ankle joint kinematics during standing. The utilized FES system stimulated, in able-bodied volunteers, the plantarflexors as they prevent toppling during standing. Four different conditions were compared, and we were able to show unique performance of each condition using the IPSA. We concluded that the IPSA is a useful tool for developing and testing closed-loop controlled FES systems for regulating ankle joint position during standing.

  11. Manual Stress Ankle Radiography Has Poor Ability to Predict Deep Deltoid Ligament Integrity in a Supination External Rotation Fracture Cohort.

    PubMed

    Schottel, Patrick C; Fabricant, Peter D; Berkes, Marschall B; Garner, Matthew R; Little, Milton T M; Hentel, Keith D; Mintz, Douglas N; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-01-01

    Stress ankle radiographs are routinely performed to determine deep deltoid ligament integrity in supination external rotation (SER) ankle fractures. However, variability is present in the published data regarding what medial clear space (MCS) value constitutes a positive result. The purposes of the present study were to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different MCS cutoff values and determine whether this clinical test could accurately discriminate between patients with and without a deep deltoid ligament disruption. MCS measurements were recorded for stress ankle injury radiographs in an SER ankle fracture cohort. Preoperative ankle magnetic resonance imaging studies, obtained for all patients, were then read independently by 2 musculoskeletal attending radiologists to determine deep deltoid ligament integrity. The MCS measurements were compared with the magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis using receiver operating characteristic analyses to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and optimal data-driven cutoff values. SER II-III patients demonstrated a mean stress MCS distance of 4.3 ± 0.98 mm compared with 5.8 ± 1.76 mm in the SER IV cohort (p < .001). An analysis of differing MCS positive cutoff thresholds revealed that a stress MCS of 5.0 mm maximized the combined sensitivity and specificity of the external rotation test: 65.8% sensitive and 76.5% specific. Using the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of the MCS measurement, the calculated area under the curve was 0.77, indicating inadequate discriminative ability for diagnosing SER pattern fractures with or without a deep deltoid ligament tear. Judicious use of additional diagnostic testing in patients with a stress MCS result between 4.0 mm and 5.5 mm is warranted.

  12. Fracture of Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Joints on Cu Substrates. II: Fracture Mechanism Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Huang, Z.; Dutta, I.; Sidhu, R.; Renavikar, M.; Mahajan, R.

    2012-02-01

    A methodology to construct fracture mechanism maps for Sn-3.8%Ag-0.7%Cu (SAC387) solder joints attached to Cu substrates has been developed. The map, which delineates the operative mechanisms of fracture along with corresponding joint fracture toughness values, is plotted in a space described by two microstructure-dependent parameters, with the abscissa describing the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) and the ordinate representing the strain-rate-dependent solder yield strength. The plot space encompasses the three major mechanisms by which joints fail, namely (i) cohesive fracture of solder, (ii) cleavage fracture of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMC), and (iii) fracture of the solder-IMC interface. Line contours of constant fracture toughness values, as well as constant fraction of each of the above mechanisms, are indicated on the plots. The plots are generated by experimentally quantifying the dependence of the operative fracture mechanism(s) on the two microstructure-dependent parameters (IMC geometry and solder yield strength) as functions of strain rate, reflow parameters, and post-reflow aging. Separate maps are presented for nominally mode I and equi-mixed mode loading conditions (loading angle ϕ = 0° and 45°, respectively). The maps allow rapid assessment of the operative fracture mechanism(s) along with estimation of the expected joint fracture toughness value for a given loading condition (strain rate and loading angle) and joint microstructure without conducting actual tests, and may serve as a tool for both prediction and microstructure design.

  13. Long-term follow-up of mobile-bearing total ankle replacement in patients with inflammatory joint disease.

    PubMed

    Kraal, T; van der Heide, H J L; van Poppel, B J; Fiocco, M; Nelissen, R G H H; Doets, H C

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the long-term outcome of mobile-bearing total ankle replacement (TAR) in the treatment of end-stage arthritis of the ankle, and in particular for patients with inflammatory joint disease. The aim of this study was to assess the minimum ten-year outcome of TAR in this group of patients. We prospectively followed 76 patients (93 TARs) who underwent surgery between 1988 and 1999. No patients were lost to follow-up. At latest follow-up at a mean of 14.8 years (10.7 to 22.8), 30 patients (39 TARs) had died and the original TAR remained in situ in 28 patients (31 TARs). The cumulative incidence of failure at 15 years was 20% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11 to 28). The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score of the surviving patients at latest follow-up was 80.4 (95% CI 72 to 88). In total, 21 patients (23 TARs) underwent subsequent surgery: three implant exchanges, three bearing exchanges and 17 arthrodeses. Neither design of TAR described in this study, the LCS and the Buechel-Pappas, remains currently available. However, based both on this study and on other reports, we believe that TAR using current mobile-bearing designs for patients with end-stage arthritis of the ankle due to inflammatory joint disease remains justified.

  14. Criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the debond growth mechanism of adhesively bonded composite joints under mode I, mixed mode I-II, and mode II static loadings. The bonded system consisted of graphite-epoxy composite adherends bonded with a toughened epoxy adhesive. The mode I, mode II and mixed mode I-II fracture energies of the tested adhesives were found to be equal to each other. The criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints was found.

  15. Mechanics of the ankle and subtalar joints revealed through a 3D quasi-static stress MRI technique.

    PubMed

    Siegler, S; Udupa, J K; Ringleb, S I; Imhauser, C W; Hirsch, B E; Odhner, D; Saha, P K; Okereke, E; Roach, N

    2005-03-01

    A technique to study the three-dimensional (3D) mechanical characteristics of the ankle and of the subtalar joints in vivo and in vitro is described. The technique uses an MR scanner compatible 3D positioning and loading linkage to load the hindfoot with precise loads while the foot is being scanned. 3D image processing algorithms are used to derive from the acquired MR images bone morphology, hindfoot architecture, and joint kinematics. The technique was employed to study these properties both in vitro and in vivo. The ankle and subtler joint motion and the changes in architecture produced in response to an inversion load and an anterior drawer load were evaluated. The technique was shown to provide reliable measures of bone morphology. The left-to-right variations in bone morphology were less than 5%. The left-to-right variations in unloaded hindfoot architecture parameters were less than 10%, and these properties were only slightly affected by inversion and anterior drawer loads. Inversion and anterior drawer loads produced motion both at the ankle and at the subtalar joint. In addition, high degree of coupling, primarily of internal rotation with inversion, was observed both at the ankle and at the subtalar joint. The in vitro motion produced in response to inversion and anterior drawer load was greater than the in vivo motion. Finally, external motion, measured directly across the ankle complex, produced in response to load was much greater than the bone movements measured through the 3D stress MRI technique indicating the significant effect of soft tissue and skin interference.

  16. Metatarsal Shaft Fracture with Associated Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Metatarsophalangeal joint dislocations of lesser toes are often seen in the setting of severe claw toes. Traumatic irreducible dislocations have been reported in rare cases following both low-energy and high-energy injuries to the forefoot. In this case report, I present a previously unreported association of a metatarsal shaft fracture with metatarsophalangeal joint dislocation of a lesser toe. PMID:27597914

  17. Incidence and clinical relevance of tibiofibular synostosis in fractures of the ankle which have been treated surgically.

    PubMed

    Droog, R; Verhage, S M; Hoogendoorn, J M

    2015-07-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, we analysed the incidence and functional outcome of a distal tibiofibular synostosis. Patients with an isolated AO type 44-B or C fracture of the ankle who underwent surgical treatment between 1995 and 2007 were invited for clinical and radiological review. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons score and a visual analogue score for pain were used to assess outcome. A total of 274 patients were available; the mean follow-up was 9.7 years (8 to 18). The extent of any calcification or synostosis at the level of the distal interosseous membrane or syndesmosis on the contemporary radiographs was defined as: no or minor calcifications (group 1), severe calcification (group 2), or complete synostosis (group 3). A total of 222 (81%) patients were in group 1, 37 (14%) in group 2 and 15 (5%) in group 3. There was no significant difference in incidence between AO type 44-B and type 44-C fractures (p = 0.89). Severe calcification or synostosis occurred in 21 patients (19%) in whom a syndesmotic screw was used and in 31 (19%) in whom a syndesmotic screw was not used.(p = 0.70). No significant differences were found between the groups except for a greater reduction in mean dorsiflexion in group 2 (p = 0.004). This is the largest study on distal tibiofibular synostosis, and we found that a synostosis is a frequent complication of surgery for a fracture of the ankle. Although it theoretically impairs the range of movement of the ankle, it did not affect the outcome. Our findings suggest that synostosis of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis in general does not warrant treatment.

  18. [Injuries to the superior ankle joint from the viewpoint of accident surgery].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H

    1991-12-01

    The treatment of bony, osteochondral, and ligamentous injuries of the tibio-talar joint requires precise preoperative planning by radiological investigation. This is essential to a correct understanding of the underlying pathology and will allow a proper classification of the injury, which is the basis of treatment. Conventional radiography using anteroposterior and lateral X-rays with comparative views of the noninjured side and, if necessary, rotated spot views and tomography are of high value especially in osteochondral fractures of the talus. Intraoperative control images in both planes after osteosynthesis are mandatory. For evaluation of the postoperative course and severity of arthrosis formation, the classification system of Bargon has proved its worth. In addition, tomography of the tibio-talar joint in two planes is useful especially in tibial pilon fractures, some malleolar fractures, and peripheral talar fractures. In talar fracture dislocations with concomitant compartment syndrome an emergency CT scan can be helpful to determine the optimal surgical approach. In these cases a 3-D reconstruction also might be of assistance. If there is evidence of partial or total talar necrosis, magnetic resonance imaging can be extremely helpful. However, in most cases implants considerably limit the validity of the image obtained. Ultrasonography offers a noninvasive, reproducible, and very inexpensive alternative and should be performed in cases of chondral-osteochondral talar rim avulsions and juvenile osteochondral ligament ruptures. It can also be used as a dynamic method for stress examination in fibular ligament ruptures and soft tissue injuries such as dislocation of the peroneal tendons. The use of Arthrography, stress tenography, and Arthro-CT scan nowadays has become extremely limited.

  19. [Arthrodesis and endoprostheses of the ankle joint: indications, techniques and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Wirth, S H; Klammer, G; Espinosa, N

    2013-09-01

    If adequate conservative measures for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis have failed, surgery may be taken into consideration. After exorbitant failure rates in the beginning of total ankle replacement, nowadays this kind of treatment has regained lot of interest and has become a viable alternative to ankle fusion. The correct indication and a precise explanation of the surgical procedure, outcomes and potential complications provide a solid base for future success.Currently, there is no doubt that total ankle replacement has become an important player in the treatment of symptomatic and debilitating end-stage ankle arthritis. With increasing number of patients who undergo total ankle replacement the experience with this kind of procedure increases too. As a consequence several surgeons have started to stretch indications favoring total ankle replacement. However, it must be mentioned here, despite progress in terms of improved anatomical and biomechanical understanding of the hindfoot and improved surgical techniques and instruments, total ankle replacement and ankle fusion remain challenging and difficult procedures. We provide a review article including an overview of the relevant techniques. This article should serve as rough guide for surgeons and help in decision-making regarding total ankle replacement and ankle fusion.

  20. Antagonist mechanical contribution to resultant maximal torque at the ankle joint in young and older men.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Emilie M; Billot, Maxime; Martin, Alain; Van Hoecke, Jacques

    2009-04-01

    A recorded muscular torque at one joint is a resultant torque corresponding to the participation of both agonist and antagonist muscles. This study aimed to examine the effect of aging on the mechanical contributions of both plantar- and dorsi-flexors to the resultant maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torques exerted at the ankle joint, in dorsi-flexion (DF) and plantar-flexion (PF). The estimation of isometric agonist and antagonist torques by means of an EMG biofeedback technique was made with nine young (mean age 24 years) and nine older (mean age 80 years) men. While there was a non-significant age-related decline in the measured resultant DF MVC torque (-15%; p=0.06), there was a clear decrease in the estimated agonist MVC torque exerted by the dorsi-flexors (-39%; p=0.001). The DF-to-PF resultant MVC torque ratio was significantly lower in young than in older men (0.25 vs. 0.31; p=0.006), whereas the DF-to-PF agonist MVC torque ratio was no longer different between the two populations (0.38 vs. 0.35; p>0.05). Thus, agonist MVC torques in PF and DF would be similarly affected by aging, which could not be deduced when only resultant torques were examined.

  1. Phenotypic plasticity of climbing-related traits in the ankle joint of great apes and rainforest hunter-gatherers.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Vivek V; Kraft, Thomas S; Desilva, Jeremy M; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2013-01-01

    The "negrito" and African "pygmy" phenotypes are predominately exhibited by hunter-gatherers living in rainforest habitats. Foraging within such habitats is associated with a unique set of locomotor behaviors, most notably habitual vertical climbing during the pursuit of honey, fruit, and game. When performed frequently, this behavior is expected to correlate with developmentally plastic skeletal morphologies that respond to mechanical loading. Using six measurements in the distal tibia and talus that discriminate nonhuman primates by vertical climbing frequency, we tested the prediction that intraspecific variation in this behavior is reflected in the morphology of the ankle joint of habitually climbing human populations. First, to explore the plasticity of climbing-linked morphologies, we made comparisons between chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans from wild and captive settings. The analysis revealed significant differences in two climbing-linked traits (anterior expansion of the articular surface of the distal tibia and increased degree of talar wedging), indicating that these traits are sensitive to climbing behavior. However, our analyses did not reveal any signatures of climbing behavior in the ankles of habitually climbing hunter-gatherers. These results suggest that the detection of fine-grained differences in human locomotor behaviors at the ankle joint, particularly those associated with arboreality, may be obscured by the functional demands of terrestrial bipedalism. Accordingly, it may be difficult to use population-level characteristics of ankle morphology to make inferences about the climbing behavior of hominins in the fossil record, even when facultative arborealism is associated with key fitness benefits.

  2. Muscle, reflex and central components in the control of the ankle joint in healthy and spastic man.

    PubMed

    Sinkjaer, T

    1997-01-01

    In understanding the control of the ankle joint during different motor tasks, we have to investigate at least three components, namely the influence of i) the passive and intrinsic properties of the intact and active muscle system around the joint (termed the non-reflex component), ii) the mechanical importance of the stretch reflex in the stretched and unloaded muscles, and iii) the supraspinal control of the stretch reflex. This thesis is dealing with the importance of the three components in healthy and spastic persons during sitting, standing, and walking. The results are based on stretch reflex and H-reflex measurements from the ankle extensor muscles. During stretch reflex experiments the foot was mounted to a platform (portable during walking) from which the ankle joint torque and the position were measured. To elicit a stretch reflex, the ankle joint was rotated by a strong motor connected to the platform. The mechanical importance of the stretch reflex was investigated by measuring the changes in joint torque. Electrically, the stretch reflex was recorded as the compound muscle action potential through bipolar surface EMG electrodes placed over the soleus muscle. During H-reflex experiments, the tibial nerve was stimulated at the popliteal fossa and the H-reflex recorded over the soleus muscle as during stretch reflex experiments. To investigate how the contractile properties of a muscle in humans depend on the history of activation, we investigated the intrinsic stiffness of the ankle extensors in healthy subjects. At matched background contraction in sitting subjects, a prolonged contraction increased the intrinsic muscle stiffness by 49%. Muscle yielding has been considered especially important for understanding the reflex compensation. We found a general lack of muscle yield and a mechanically important non-reflex stiffness of the ankle extensors showing that non-reflex stiffness is a prominent factor in normal movements of the ankle joint. In both

  3. Classic article: foot & ankle 1:15, 1980 traumatic dislocations of the first metatarsophalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Jahss, Melvin H

    2006-06-01

    The mechanics, anatomy, and pathomechanics of traumatic dorsal dislocation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint are discussed. There are two basic types of dislocations. In Type I, dislocation of the hallux with the sesamoids occurs without disrupting the sesamoid mass. Such cases are usually irreducible on closed reduction, the metatarsal head being incarcerated by the conjoined tendons with their intact sesamoids. In Type II, there is either associated disruption of the intersesamoid ligament (Type IIA) or a transverse fracture of one of the sesamoids (Type IIB). In Type II, the sesamoid disruption usually permits closed reduction.

  4. The effects of ankle joint strategy exercises with and without visual feedback on the dynamic balance of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Si-Nae; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of visual feedback training on the balance of stroke patients performing ankle joint strategy exercises. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 26 stroke patients were randomly and equally assigned to a visual feedback group (VFG) and a visual disuse group (VDG). They performed ankle joint strategy exercises for 30 minutes, three times per week for six weeks. The patients’ balance ability was measured before and after the exercises to compare the effects of visual feedback. To assess balance ability, the limits of stability (LOS) and the distance the center of pressure (CoP) moved were measured using a BT4 portable force platform. The Berg balance scale (BBS) and the timed up and go (TUG) test were also used to assess balance before and after the exercises. [Results] Changes in LOS were significant in the anterior, posterior, left, and right directions in each group, and the interactions between the two groups were significant in the posterior, left, and right directions. The changes in TUG and BBS results between pre-test and the post-test were statistically significant in the two groups, and also between the groups. [Conclusion] Visual feedback training had a positive effect on balance when ankle joint strategy exercises were performed by stroke patients to improve balance. PMID:26355721

  5. Criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the debond growth mechanism of adhesively bonded composite joints under mode I, mixed mode I-II, and mode II static loadings. The bonded system consisted of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) composite adherends bonded with a toughened epoxy (EC 3445) adhesive. The mode I, mode II and mixed-mode I-II fracture energies of the tested adhesive were found to be equal to each other. Furthermore, the criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints was determined.

  6. Effect of isotonic and isokinetic exercise on muscle activity and balance of the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine how the balance of lower limbs and the muscle activities of the tibialis anterior (TA), the medial gastrocnemius (GCM), and the peroneus longus (PL) are influenced by isotonic and isokinetic exercise of the ankle joint. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were healthy adults (n=20), and they were divided into two groups (isotonic=10, isokinetic=10). [Methods] Isotonic group performed 3 sets of 10 contractions at 50% of MVIC and Isokinetic group performed 3 sets of 60°/sec. Muscle activity was measured by EMG and balance was measured by one-leg standing test. [Results] For muscle activity, a main effect of group was found in the non-dominant TA, and the dominant TA, GCM and PL. For balance, a main effect of time was found in both groups for the sway area measured support was provided by the non-dominant side. [Conclusion] In terms of muscle activity, the two groups showed a significant difference, and the isokinetic group showed higher muscle activities. In terms of balance, there was a significant difference between the pre-test and the post-test. The results of this study may help in the selection of exercises for physical therapy, because they show that muscle activity and balance vary according to the type of exercise. PMID:25729181

  7. An EMG-Controlled SMA Device for the Rehabilitation of the Ankle Joint in Post-Acute Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity of flexing one's ankle is an indispensible segment of gait re-learning, as imbalance, wrong compensatory use of other joints and risk of falling may depend on the so-called drop-foot. The rehabilitation of ankle dorsiflexion may be achieved through active exercising of the relevant musculature (especially tibialis anterior, TA). This can be troublesome for patients affected by weakness and flaccid paresis. Thus, as needs evolve during patient's improvements, a therapeutic device should be able to guide and sustain gradual recovery by providing commensurate aid. This includes exploiting even initial attempts at voluntary motion and turns those into effective workout. An active orthosis powered by two rotary actuators containing NiTi wire was designed to obtain ankle dorsiflexion. A computer routine that analyzes the electromyographic (sEMG) signal from TA muscle is used to control the orthosis and trigger its activation. The software also provides instructions and feed-back for the patient. Tests on the orthosis proved that it can produce strokes up to 36° against resisting torques exceeding 180 Ncm. Three healthy subjects were able to control the orthosis by modulating their TA sEMG activity. The movement produced in the preliminary tests is interesting for lower limb rehabilitation, and will be further improved by optimizing body-orthosis interface. It is hoped that this device will enhance early rehabilitation and recovery of ankle mobility in stroke patients.

  8. The Effect of Velocity of Joint Mobilization on Corticospinal Excitability in Individuals With a History of Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Piraino, Andrew; Lee, Ya-Yun; Smith, Jo Armour; Johnson, Sean; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Joint mobilization and manipulation decrease pain and improve patient function. Yet, the processes underlying these changes are not well understood. Measures of corticospinal excitability provide insight into potential mechanisms mediated by the central nervous system. Objectives To investigate the differential effects of joint mobilization and manipulation at the talocrural joint on corticospinal excitability in individuals with resolved symptoms following ankle sprain. Methods Twenty-seven participants with a history of ankle sprain were randomly assigned to the control, joint mobilization, or thrust manipulation group. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) and cortical silent period (CSP) of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were obtained with transcranial magnetic stimulation at rest and during active contraction of the tibialis anterior. The slopes of MEP/CSP input/output curves and the maximal MEP/CSP values were calculated to indicate corticospinal excitability. Behavioral measures, including ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance, were evaluated. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance of the MEP slope showed a significant group-by-time interaction for the tibialis anterior at rest (P = .002) and during active contraction (P = .042). After intervention, the thrust manipulation group had an increase in corticospinal excitability, while the corticospinal excitability decreased in the mobilization group. The thrust manipulation group, but not other groups, also demonstrated a significant increase in the maximal MEP amplitude of the tibialis anterior after intervention. Conclusion The findings suggest that joint manipulation and mobilization have different effects on corticospinal excitability. The increased corticospinal excitability following thrust manipulation may provide a window for physical therapists to optimize muscle recruitment and subsequently movement. The trial was registered at

  9. Total Ankle Replacement Survival Rates Based on Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis of National Joint Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Annette F P; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    National joint registry data provides unique information about primary total ankle replacement (TAR) survival. We sought to recreate survival curves among published national joint registry data sets using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Overall, 5152 primary and 591 TAR revisions were included over a 2- to 13-year period with prosthesis survival for all national joint registries of 0.94 at 2-years, 0.87 at 5-years and 0.81 at 10-years. National joint registry datasets should strive for completion of data presentation including revision definitions, modes and time of failure, and patients lost to follow-up or death for complete accuracy of the Kaplan-Meier estimator.

  10. Functional reconstruction of the TM joint in cases of severely displaced fractures and fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Umstadt, H E; Ellers, M; Müller, H H; Austermann, K H

    2000-04-01

    In a clinical and axiographic study the outcome of patients with severely displaced fractures and fracture dislocations of the mandibular condyle was evaluated. Two operation methods were compared one via an intraoral approach without joint revision and another via a preauricular approach with open reduction of the joint. In the group with joint revision, resorbable material was used for osteosynthesis. Twenty-eight patients (32 joints) treated without revision of the joint and 26 patients (29 joints) with open reduction of the joint were evaluated. The mean observation time following surgery was 3 years and 10 months (range 1-7.5 years). Clinical examination utilized the Helkimo-index, while the electronic axiographical results were evaluated by using a five point scheme of joint-mobility. Concerning clinical evaluation, 20 out of 28 patients (71%) without joint revision and 23 out of 26 (89%) patients with joint revision had none or only slight dysfunction of the stomatognathic system. When focusing on arthralgia and pain in motion (part D and E of Helkimo's-index) significantly better results were achieved by open joint revision (Helkimo D: p< or =0.007; Helkimo E: p = 0.0029). No patient exhibited severe dysfunction (group D3). In axiographic evaluation optimal results (group A1) were achieved in seven joints (24%) with revision and four joints (12%) without revision. Twelve out of 29 joints with revision (41%) and six out of 32 joints without revision (19%) were classified as group A2 with a slightly shortened condylar excursion. Revision of joints with disc reduction and reconstruction of ligaments in cases of severely displaced or dislocated fractures resulted in better mobility and less pain. This was seen clinically and in the axiographic results. Looking at the long-term outcome of patients better mobility of the joint without internal derangement due to surgical repair also protects the contralateral (nonoperated) joint. When managing severe TMJ

  11. A case-control study of surgical site infection following operative fixation of fractures of the ankle in a large U.K. trauma unit.

    PubMed

    Korim, M T; Payne, R; Bhatia, M

    2014-05-01

    Most of the literature on surgical site infections following the surgical treatment of fractures of the ankle is based on small series of patients, focusing on diabetics or the elderly. None have described post-operative functional scores in those patients who develop an infection. We performed an age- and gender-matched case-control study to identify patient- and surgery-related risk factors for surgical site infection following open reduction and internal fixation of a fracture of the ankle. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify significant risk factors for infection and to calculate odds ratios (OR). Function was assessed using the Olerud and Molander Ankle Score. The incidence of infection was 4% (29/717) and 1.1% (8/717) were deep infections. The median ankle score was significantly lower in the infection group compared with the control group (60 vs 90, Mann-Whitney test p < 0.0001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that diabetes (OR = 15, p = 0.031), nursing home residence (OR = 12, p = 0.018) and Weber C fractures (OR = 4, p = 0.048) were significant risk factors for infection. A low incidence of infection following open reduction and internal fixation of fractures of the ankle was observed. Both superficial and deep infections result in lower functional scores.

  12. A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO THE REHABILITATION OF A COLLEGIATE FOOTBALL PLAYER FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Lee D.; Musto, Tony; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A.; Gailey, Robert S.; Kelley, William P.; Alemi, Timothy J.; Espinosa, Braulio; Mandler, Eli; Scavo, Vincent A.; West, Dustin C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Multiple rehabilitation factors including overall wellness need to be considered when an athlete returns to sport after an injury. The purpose of this case report is to describe a multidisciplinary approach for return to sport of a Division I collegiate football player following a traumatic ankle fracture requiring surgical repair. The assessment and treatment approach included the use of a performance-based physical therapy outcome measure, self-reported functional abilities, body composition assessments, and nutritional counseling. Case Description A 21 year-old running back fractured his lateral malleolus due to a mechanism of injury of excessive eversion with external rotation of the ankle. Surgical intervention included an open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) of the fibula and syndesmosis. In addition to six months of rehabilitation, the patient received consultations from the team sports nutritionist specialist to provide dietary counseling and body composition testing. The Comprehensive High-level Activity Mobility Predictor-Sport (CHAMP-S), a performance-based outcome measure, self-report on the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI-ADL, FADI-S), and body composition testing using whole body densitometry (BOD POD®), were administered throughout rehabilitation. Outcomes The subject was successfully rehabilitated, returned to his starting role, and subsequently was drafted by a National Football League (NFL) franchise. High-level mobility returned to above pre-injury values, achieving 105% of his preseason CHAMP-S score at discharge. Self-reported function on the FADI-ADL and FADI-Sport improved to 100% at discharge. Body fat percentages decreased (13.3% to 11.9%) and fat mass decreased (12.0 kg to 11.0kg). Lean body mass (78.1 kg to 81.5 kg) and lbm/in increased (1.14 kg/in to 1.19 kg/in). His BMI changed from 29.8 kg/m2 to 30.6 kg/m2. Discussion This case report illustrates the positive effects of a

  13. Military Exercises, Knee and Ankle Joint Position Sense, and Injury in Male Conscripts: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Azma, Kamran; Naseh, Iman; Emadifard, Reza; Etemadi, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Context: The high incidence of lower limb injuries associated with physical exercises in military conscripts suggests that fatigue may be a risk factor for injuries. Researchers have hypothesized that lower limb injuries may be related to altered ankle and knee joint position sense (JPS) due to fatigue. Objective: To evaluate if military exercises could alter JPS and to examine the possible relation of JPS to future lower extremity injuries in military service. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 50 male conscripts (age = 21.4 ± 2.3 years, height = 174.5 ± 6.4 cm, mass = 73.1 ± 6.3 kg) from a unique military base were recruited randomly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants performed 8 weeks of physical activities at the beginning of a military course. In the first part of the study, we instructed participants to recognize predetermined positions before and after military exercises so we could examine the effects of military exercise on JPS. The averages of the absolute error and the variable error of 3 trials were recorded. We collected data on the frequency of lower extremity injuries over 8 weeks. Next, the participants were divided into 2 groups: injured and uninjured. Separate 2 × 2 × 2 (group-by-time-by-joint) mixed-model analyses of variance were used to determine main effects and interactions of these factors for each JPS measure. In the second part of the study, we examined whether the effects of fatigue on JPS were related to the development of injury during an 8-week training program. We calculated Hedges effect sizes for JPS changes postexercise in each group and compared change scores between groups. Results: We found group-by-time interactions for all JPS variables (F range = 2.86–4.05, P < .01). All participants showed increases in JPS errors postexercise (P < .01), but the injured group had greater changes for all the variables (P < .01). Conclusions: Military conscripts who sustained lower

  14. Assessment of ankle and hindfoot stability and joint pressures using a human cadaveric model of a large lateral talar process excision: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E; Richards, R Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-03-01

    Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability.A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment.In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P = .04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm excision in comparison with the pre-excison state.An excision of up to 10 cm of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection.

  15. Triceps surae muscle-tendon unit length changes as a function of ankle joint angles and contraction levels: the effect of foot arch deformation.

    PubMed

    Iwanuma, Soichiro; Akagi, Ryota; Hashizume, Satoru; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-09-23

    The purpose of this study was to clarify how foot deformation affects the relationship between triceps surae muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length and ankle joint angle. For six women and six men a series of sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) images of the right foot were taken, and changes in MTU length (the displacement of the calcaneal tuberosity), foot arch angle, and ankle joint angle were measured. In the passive session, each subject's ankle joint was secured at 10° dorsiflexed position, neutral position (NP), and 10° and 20° plantar flexed positions while MR images were acquired. In the active session, each subject was requested to perform submaximal isometric plantar flexions (30%, 60%, and 80% of voluntary maximum) at NP. The changes in MTU length in each trial were estimated by two different formulae reported previously. The changes of the measured MTU length as a function of ankle joint angles observed in all trials of the active session were significantly (p<0.05) larger than corresponding values in the passive session and by the estimation formulae. In the passive session, MTU length changes were significantly smaller than the estimated values when the ankle was plantar flexed. The foot arch angle increased as the contraction level increased from rest (117 ± 4°) to 80% (125 ± 3°), and decreased as the ankle was positioned further into plantar flexion in the passive session (115 ± 3°). These results indicate that foot deformation profoundly affects the triceps surae MTU length-ankle joint angle relationship during plantar flexion.

  16. Effects of Ankle Arthrodesis on Biomechanical Performance of the Entire Foot

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Zengyong; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background/Methodology Ankle arthrodesis is one popular surgical treatment for ankle arthritis, chronic instability, and degenerative deformity. However, complications such as foot pain, joint arthritis, and bone fracture may cause patients to suffer other problems. Understanding the internal biomechanics of the foot is critical for assessing the effectiveness of ankle arthrodesis and provides a baseline for the surgical plan. This study aimed to understand the biomechanical effects of ankle arthrodesis on the entire foot and ankle using finite element analyses. A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle, involving 28 bones, 103 ligaments, the plantar fascia, major muscle groups, and encapsulated soft tissue, was developed and validated. The biomechanical performances of a normal foot and a foot with ankle arthrodesis were compared at three gait instants, first-peak, mid-stance, and second-peak. Principal Findings/Conclusions Changes in plantar pressure distribution, joint contact pressure and forces, von Mises stress on bone and foot deformation were predicted. Compared with those in the normal foot, the peak plantar pressure was increased and the center of pressure moved anteriorly in the foot with ankle arthrodesis. The talonavicular joint and joints of the first to third rays in the hind- and mid-foot bore the majority of the loading and sustained substantially increased loading after ankle arthrodesis. An average contact pressure of 2.14 MPa was predicted at the talonavicular joint after surgery and the maximum variation was shown to be 80% in joints of the first ray. The contact force and pressure of the subtalar joint decreased after surgery, indicating that arthritis at this joint was not necessarily a consequence of ankle arthrodesis but rather a progression of pre-existing degenerative changes. Von Mises stress in the second and third metatarsal bones at the second-peak instant increased to 52 MPa and 34 MPa, respectively, after

  17. Age and gender differences in the control of vertical ground reaction force by the hip, knee and ankle joints.

    PubMed

    Toda, Haruki; Nagano, Akinori; Luo, Zhiwei

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the relationships between joint moment and the control of the vertical ground reaction force during walking in the elderly and young male and female individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly people, 65 years old or older (20 males and 20 females), and 40 young people, 20 to 29 years old (20 males and 20 females), participated in this study. Joint moment and vertical ground reaction force during walking were obtained using a 3D motion analysis system and force plates. Stepwise linear regression analysis determined the joint moments that predict the amplitude of the vertical ground reaction force. [Results] Knee extension moment was related to the vertical ground reaction force in the young males and females. On the other hand, in the elderly females, hip, ankle, and knee joint moments were related to the first peak and second peak forces, and the minimum value of vertical ground reaction force, respectively. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that the young males and females make use of the knee joint moment to control of the vertical ground reaction force. There were differences between the elderly and the young females with regard to the joints used for the control of the vertical ground reaction force.

  18. Combined total ankle replacement and modified bridle tendon transfer for end-stage ankle joint arthrosis with paralytic dropfoot: report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Christopher; Baronofsky, Hyim J; Jaffe, Leland

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, total ankle replacement has become a reasonable option for many patients with end-stage ankle arthrosis. In order to be successful, total ankle replacement requires a relatively balanced alignment of the foot in relation to the leg. Such alignment is traditionally achieved surgically by means of stabilization of the hindfoot in conjunction with relocation osteotomy of the calcaneus and/or tibia. In this report, we describe the unconventional combination of total ankle replacement in an adult patient with concomitant paralysis that was addressed by means of tendon transfer.

  19. Posttraumatic severe infection of the ankle joint - long term results of the treatment with resection arthrodesis in 133 cases.

    PubMed

    Kienast, Benjamin; Kiene, J; Gille, J; Thietje, R; Gerlach, U; Schulz, A P

    2010-02-26

    Although there is a clear trend toward internal fixation for ankle arthrodesis, there is general consensus that external fixation is required for cases of posttraumatic infection. We retrospectively evaluated the technique and clinical long term results of external fixation in a triangular frame for cases of posttraumatic infection of the ankle. From 1993 to 2006 a consecutive series of 155 patients with an infection of the ankle was included in our study. 133 cases of the advanced "Gächter" stage III and IV were treated with arthrodesis. We treated the patients with a two step treatment plan. After radical debridement and sequestrectomy the malleoli and the joint surfaces were resected. An AO fixator was applied with two Steinmann-nails inserted in the tibia and in the calcaneus and the gap was temporary filled with gentamicin beads as the first step. In the second step we performed an autologous bone graft after a period of four weeks. The case notes were evaluated regarding trauma history, medical complaints, further injuries and illnesses, walking and pain status and occupational issues. Mean age at the index procedure was 49.7 years (18-82), 104 patients were male (67.1%). Follow up examination after mean 4.5 years included a standardised questionnaire and a clinical examination including the criteria of the AOFAS-Score and radiographs. 92.7% of the cases lead to a stable arthrodesis. In 5 patients the arthrodesis was found partly-stable. In six patients (4,5%) the infection was not controllable during the treatment process. These patients had to be treated with a below knee amputation. The mean AOFAS score at follow up was 63.7 (53-92). Overall there is a high degree of remaining disability. The complication rate and the reduced patient comfort reserve this method mainly for infection. Joint salvage is possible in the majority of cases with an earlier stage I and II infection.

  20. Inferring Muscle-Tendon Unit Power from Ankle Joint Power during the Push-Off Phase of Human Walking: Insights from a Multiarticular EMG-Driven Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inverse dynamics joint kinetics are often used to infer contributions from underlying groups of muscle-tendon units (MTUs). However, such interpretations are confounded by multiarticular (multi-joint) musculature, which can cause inverse dynamics to over- or under-estimate net MTU power. Misestimation of MTU power could lead to incorrect scientific conclusions, or to empirical estimates that misguide musculoskeletal simulations, assistive device designs, or clinical interventions. The objective of this study was to investigate the degree to which ankle joint power overestimates net plantarflexor MTU power during the Push-off phase of walking, due to the behavior of the flexor digitorum and hallucis longus (FDHL)–multiarticular MTUs crossing the ankle and metatarsophalangeal (toe) joints. Methods We performed a gait analysis study on six healthy participants, recording ground reaction forces, kinematics, and electromyography (EMG). Empirical data were input into an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model to estimate ankle power. This model enabled us to parse contributions from mono- and multi-articular MTUs, and required only one scaling and one time delay factor for each subject and speed, which were solved for based on empirical data. Net plantarflexing MTU power was computed by the model and quantitatively compared to inverse dynamics ankle power. Results The EMG-driven model was able to reproduce inverse dynamics ankle power across a range of gait speeds (R2 ≥ 0.97), while also providing MTU-specific power estimates. We found that FDHL dynamics caused ankle power to slightly overestimate net plantarflexor MTU power, but only by ~2–7%. Conclusions During Push-off, FDHL MTU dynamics do not substantially confound the inference of net plantarflexor MTU power from inverse dynamics ankle power. However, other methodological limitations may cause inverse dynamics to overestimate net MTU power; for instance, due to rigid-body foot assumptions. Moving

  1. Shoe collar height effect on athletic performance, ankle joint kinematics and kinetics during unanticipated maximum-effort side-cutting performance.

    PubMed

    Lam, Gilbert Wing Kai; Park, Eun Jung; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man

    2015-01-01

    Side-step cutting manoeuvres comprise the coordination between planting and non-planting legs. Increased shoe collar height is expected to influence ankle biomechanics of both legs and possibly respective cutting performance. This study examined the shoe collar height effect on kinematics and kinetics of planting and non-planting legs during an unanticipated side-step cutting. Fifteen university basketball players performed maximum-effort side-step cutting to the left 45° direction or a straight ahead run in response to a random light signal. Seven successful cutting trials were collected for each condition. Athletic performance, ground reaction force, ankle kinematics and kinetics of both legs were analysed using paired t-tests. Results indicated that high-collar shoes resulted in less ankle inversion and external rotation during initial contact for the planting leg. The high-collar shoes also exhibited a smaller ankle range of motion in the sagittal and transverse planes for both legs, respectively. However, no collar effect was found for ankle moments and performance indicators including cutting performance time, ground contact time, propulsion ground reaction forces and impulses. These findings indicated that high-collar shoes altered ankle positioning and restricted ankle joint freedom movements in both legs, while no negative effect was found for athletic cutting performance.

  2. Glenohumeral Joint Kinematics following Clavicular Fracture and Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Walley, Kempland C.; Harlow, Ethan R.; Haghpanah, Babak; Vaziri, Ashkan; Ramappa, Arun J.; DeAngelis, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this biomechanical study was to determine the effect of shortened clavicle malunion on the center of rotation of the glenohumeral (GH) joint, and the capacity of repair to restore baseline kinematics. Methods Six shoulders underwent automated abduction (ABD) and abbreviated throwing motion (ATM) using a 7-DoF automated upper extremity testing system in combination with an infrared motion capture system to measure the center of rotation of the GH joint. ATM was defined as pure lateral abduction and late cocking phase to the end of acceleration. Torsos with intact clavicle underwent testing to establish baseline kinematics. Then, the clavicles were subjected to midshaft fracture followed by kinematics testing. The fractured clavicles underwent repairs first by clavicle length restoration with plate fixation, and then by wiring of fragments with a 2-cm overlap to simulate shortened malunion. Kinematic testing was conducted after each repair technique. Center of rotation of the GH joint was plotted across all axes to outline 3D motion trajectory and area under the curve. Results Throughout ABD, malunion resulted in increased posterior and superior translation compared to baseline. Plate fixation restored posterior and superior translations at lower abduction angles but resulted in excess anterior and inferior translation at overhead angles. Throughout ATM, all conditions were significantly anterior and superior to baseline. Translation with malunion was situated anterior to the fractured and ORIF conditions at lower angles of external rotation. Plate fixation did not restore baseline anteroposterior or superoinferior translation at any angle measured. Conclusions This study illustrates the complex interplay of the clavicle and the GH joint. While abnormal clavicle alignment alters shoulder motion, restoration of clavicle length does not necessarily restore GH kinematics to baseline. Rehabilitation of the injured shoulder must address the

  3. Design of a Robotic Ankle Joint for a Microspine-Based Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thatte, Nitish

    2011-01-01

    Successful robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids necessitates a method of securely anchoring to the surface of these bodies without gravitational assistance. Microspine grip- per arrays that can grasp rock faces are a potential solution to this problem. A key component of a future microspine-based rover will be the ankle used to attach each microspine gripper to the robot. The ankle's purpose is twofold: 1) to allow the gripper to conform to the rock so a higher percentage of microspines attach to the surface, and 2) to neutralize torques that may dislodge the grippers from the wall. Parts were developed using computer aided design and manufactured using a variety of methods including selective laser sintering, CNC milling, and traditional manual machining techniques. Upon completion of the final prototype, the gripper and ankle system was tested to demonstrate robotic engagement and disengagement of the gripper and to determine load bearing ability. The immediate application of this project is to out t the Lemur IIb robot so it can climb and hang from rock walls.

  4. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to ‘conventional’ methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions. PMID:24352667

  5. Reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting for one-stage soft tissue reconstruction of foot and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Duke-Whan

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this report is to present the clinical result and efficacy of reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting for one stage soft tissue reconstruction of the foot and ankle joints. Reconstruction using a reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting was performed in eight cases between January 2005 and March 2009. All the subjects were male with a mean age of 53 years. The mean follow-up period was 20 months. The reasons for soft tissue defects were diabetic foot, infected bursitis, open injuries of the foot, and chronic osteomyelitis. The mean size of the flaps was 3.5 (3-4) × 4.5 (4-6) cm. The flaps were elevated in the form of an adipofascial flap and split-thickness skin grafting was performed over the flaps and adjoining raw areas. Flaps survived in all cases. The implantation of the split-thickness skin graft over the flap was also successful in all cases. Neither partial necrosis in the adipofascial flap nor venous congestion was observed. At the last follow-up, there were no limited motions in the ankle and the toe. No cases complained of inconveniences in ambulation or had difficulties in selecting footwear. In cases that require a flap for the exposed bone or tendon of the foot with a small-sized defect, reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting is considered a useful method as it lowers the morbidity rate of the donor site and reconstructs soft tissues.

  6. Bilateral Arthrodesis of the Ankle Joint: Self-Reported Outcomes in 35 Patients From the Swedish Ankle Registry.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Anders; Kamrad, Ilka; Rosengren, Björn; Carlsson, Åke

    Bilateral ankle arthrodesis is seldom performed, and results concerning the outcome and satisfaction can only sparsely be found in published studies. We analyzed the data from 35 patients who had undergone bilateral ankle arthrodesis in the Swedish Ankle Registry using patient-reported generic and region-specific outcome measures. Of 36 talocrural arthrodeses and 34 tibio-talar-calcaneal arthrodeses, 6 ankles (9%) had undergone repeat arthrodesis because of nonunion. After a mean follow-up period of 47 ± 5 (range 12 to 194) months, the mean scores were as follows: self-reported foot and ankle score, 33 ± 10 (range 4 to 48); the EuroQol Group's EQ-5D(™) score, 0.67 ± 0.28 (range -0.11 to 1), the EuroQol Group's visual analog scale score, 70 ± 19 (range 20 to 95), 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical domain, 39 ± 11 (range 16 to 58); and SF-36 mental domain, 54 ± 14 (range 17 to 71). Patients with rheumatoid arthritis seemed to have similar self-reported foot and ankle scores but possibly lower EQ-5D(™) and SF-36 scores. Those with talocrural arthrodeses scored higher than did those with tibio-talar-calcaneal arthrodeses on the EQ5D(™) and SF-36 questionnaires (p = .03 and p = .04). In 64 of 70 ankles (91%), the patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the outcome. In conclusion, we consider bilateral ankle arthrodesis to be a reasonable treatment for symptomatic hindfoot arthritis, with high postoperative mid-term satisfaction and satisfactory scores on the patient-reported generic and region-specific outcome measures, when no other treatment option is available.

  7. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  8. Changes in the radiological measurements of the tibiofibular syndesmal area in patients with Weber C ankle fractures who were treated with open reduction, internal fixation, and transyndesmal screw.

    PubMed

    Jasqui-Remba, S; Torres-Gómez, A; Salas-Morales, G A; Hernández-Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    The tibiofibular syndesmosis provides stability to the ankle mortise. The ankle syndesmosis is compromised in all Weber C type injuries. The radiographic method described by Merle DAubigné considers the bony relationships as a measure of syndesmotic widening. We sought to investigate whether the patients with a C type ankle fracture treated with ORIF and placement of a transyndesmal screw have an increment of the tibiofibular space and decrease of the tibiofibular overlap after the transyndesmal screw is removed. Our sample included 52 patients with Weber C ankle fractures treated by ORIF and transyndesmal screw at a level II trauma center. We measured the tibiofibular clear space and tibiofibular overlap in each phase of the treatment. The transyndesmal screw was removed at day 55.56 (± 21.83). We found an increase of the tibiofibular overlap of 0.20 mm (± 2.29, p = 0.532); and 0.21 mm (± 0.97, p = 0.146) in the tibiofibular clear space. The changes of 2.38% in the tibiofibular overlap and 5.29% in the tibiofibular clear space between the postoperative and post-removal periods were not statistically significant. After removal of the syndesmal screw, there is a slight radiographic broadening of the syndesmosis; however, it is small and statistically not significant.

  9. Posterior talar fracture with dislocation of both talo-navicular and subtalar joints: a variant type II of the Sneppens classification

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old man fell from a ladder, thus causing an axial compression injury to the right ankle. Severe deformity was evident and the ankle could not be reduced by simple manipulation. The skin was tented and appearing critically contused. Radiographs revealed an oblique fracture of the posterior aspect of the talar body with dislocation of both the talo-navicular and subtalar joints, an injury previously not described in the literature. The fracture–dislocation was anatomically reduced within 3 h of presentation and stability achieved with two headless buried compression screws. CT scan confirmed anatomical reduction and the patient remained non-weight bearing in a cast for 6 weeks. One year postoperatively, the patient remains pain-free with no radiological signs of avascular necrosis of the talus. This injury is unique and despite its severity and soft tissue compromise good quality reduction and internal fixation resulted in an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:22847568

  10. A Review of 399 Total Ankle Replacements: Analysis of Ipsilateral Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis and Associated Talar Component Subsidence.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is an accepted treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis. When concurrent subtalar joint pathologic features exist, ipsilateral subtalar joint arthrodesis (STJA) can be performed either simultaneous with TAR or as a staged procedure. Limited data exist on the effect of talar component subsidence and prosthesis survivorship. The present study purpose was to evaluate the effect of STJA on talar component subsidence after primary TAR and its effect on TAR survivorship. All patients, a minimum of 18 years old, from a single institution with modern-generation TAR and 1-year minimum follow-up data available were evaluated. The study group included patients who had also undergone STJA, and the control group (no STJA) was matched 1:1 by age, gender, and prosthesis. The initial postoperative weightbearing and most recent weightbearing radiographs were compared for talar component subsidence. We reviewed 399 primary TARs from 2004 to 2012. A total of 33 patients with ipsilateral STJA met the inclusion criteria and had an appropriate control group match. In the study group, 8 patients required a return to the operating room for 4 revisions and 4 reoperations at a median follow-up point of 24.3 months. Of the controls, 9 patients required a return to the operating room, with 4 revisions and 5 reoperations at a median follow-up point of 38.4 months. No statistically significant radiographic differences were found between the 2 groups. Primary TAR and ipsilateral STJA were infrequently required (41 of 399; 10.3%). TAR did not result in decreased survivorship when performed with ipsilateral STJA at an early follow-up point. Further study is warranted to determine any differences among previous, simultaneous, and subsequent STJA with ipsilateral TAR, and a matched longitudinal analysis is needed to determine longer term survivorship.

  11. Sodium Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ankle Joint in Cadaver Specimens, Volunteers, and Patients After Different Cartilage Repair Techniques at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Zbýň, Štefan; Brix, Martin O.; Juras, Vladimir; Domayer, Stephan E.; Walzer, Sonja M.; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Apprich, Sebastian; Buckenmaier, Kai; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of cartilage repair techniques such as microfracture (MFX) or matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) is to produce repair tissue (RT) with sufficient glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a direct and noninvasive evaluation of the GAG content in native cartilage and RT. In the femoral cartilage, this method was able to distinguish between RTs produced by MFX and MACT having different GAG contents. However, it needs to be clarified whether sodium MRI can be useful for evaluating RT in thin ankle cartilage. Thus, the aims of this 7-T study were (1) to validate our sodium MRI protocol in cadaver ankle samples, (2) to evaluate the sodium corrected signal intensities (cSI) in cartilage of volunteers, (3) and to compare sodium values in RT between patients after MFX and MACT treatment. Materials and Methods Five human cadaver ankle samples as well as ankles of 9 asymptomatic volunteers, 6 MFX patients and 6 MACT patients were measured in this 7-T study. Sodium values from the ankle samples were compared with histochemically evaluated GAG content. In the volunteers, sodium cSI values were calculated in the cartilages of ankle and subtalar joint. In the patients, sodium cSI in RT and reference cartilage were measured, morphological appearance of RT was evaluated using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system, and clinical outcome before and after surgery was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score and Modified Cincinnati Knee Scale. All regions of interest were defined on morphological images and subsequently transferred to the corresponding sodium images. Analysis of variance, t tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. Results In the patients, significantly lower sodium cSI values were found in RT than in reference cartilage for the MFX (P = 0.007) and MACT patients (P = 0.008). Sodium cSI and

  12. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  13. The proportion of distal fibula Salter-Harris type I epiphyseal fracture in the paediatric population with acute ankle injury: a prospective MRI study.

    PubMed

    Hofsli, Mikael; Torfing, Trine; Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2016-03-01

    Ankle injuries are common among the paediatric population. There are few prospective studies utilizing MRI to diagnose a clinically suspected Salter-Harris type I of the distal fibula (SH1FDF). The aim of this study was to examine the proportion of clinically suspected SH1FDF in children. All paediatric patients with ankle injury, seen at the emergency room from September 2012 to May 2013 at a single institution, underwent a standardized clinical examination, and their radiographs were obtained if found necessary. All images and data were recorded prospectively and patients suspected of having SH1FDF were referred for MRI of the ankle joint. Out of 391 paediatric patients seen at the emergency room with ankle injury, 38 patients had a clinical suspicion of SH1FDF. A total of 31 patients, 18 male and 13 female, with a mean age of 10 ± 2.86 years, were included in the study. Only seven patients were excluded from the study. MRI was obtained on an average of 6.9 ± 2.87 days. None of the included patients had evidence of SH1FDF on MRI. Our study and review of the literature verifies the high false-positive rate of clinically suspected SH1FDF. Most children had ligamentous lesions, bone contusion or joint effusion, rather than SH1FDF.

  14. Current thoughts on ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ritterman, Scott A; Fellars, Todd A; Digiovanni, Christopher W

    2013-03-01

    The ankle is the most commonly injured joint in athletic and work activities. In contrast, osteoarthritis of the ankle joint is relatively rare and is typically post-traumatic or inflammatory in nature. Common symptoms that prompt an orthopaedic consultation include pain, disability and altered gait mechanics. Non-operative management has been the mainstay for previously undiagnosed patients. For those with advanced disease, ankle fusion or total ankle replacement may be the only surgical options. Though some recent studies have shown patients' preference for a well functioning ankle replacement, significant long- term follow-up data is lacking.

  15. Ultrasound of ankle and foot: overuse and sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Viviane; Guillin, Raphaël; Dhanju, Jag; Cardinal, Etienne

    2007-06-01

    Sports and overuse injuries of the ankle and foot are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ultrasound (US) has been established as an excellent diagnostic modality for foot and ankle injuries, providing a rapid noninvasive, economical, and readily available tool that is well tolerated by the patient with acute or chronic pain. The opportunity for dynamic examination is another advantage of US in evaluating ankle and foot pathology, where maneuvers such as muscle contraction and stressing of the joint may be particularly helpful. In many cases, US can be used as a first-line and only imaging modality for diagnosis. This article focuses on ankle disorders related to sports or overuse that affect tendons, including tendinosis, tenosynovitis, paratendinitis, rupture, dislocation, and ligaments that are commonly torn. The sonographic features of certain common foot disorders related to physical activity and overuse are also discussed, including plantar fasciitis, Morton's neuroma, stress fractures, and plantar plate injury.

  16. Topography of human ankle joint: focused on posterior tibial artery and tibial nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Yi-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Most of foot pain occurs by the entrapment of the tibial nerve and its branches. Some studies have reported the location of the tibial nerve; however, textbooks and researches have not described the posterior tibial artery and the relationship between the tibal nerve and the posterior tibial artery in detail. The purpose of this study was to analyze the location of neurovascular structures and bifurcations of the nerve and artery in the ankle region based on the anatomical landmarks. Ninety feet of embalmed human cadavers were examined. All measurements were evaluated based on a reference line. Neurovascular structures were classified based on the relationship between the tibial nerve and the posterior tibial artery. The bifurcation of arteries and nerves were expressed by X- and Y-coordinates. Based on the reference line, 9 measurements were examined. The most common type I (55.6%), was the posterior tibial artery located medial to the tibial nerve. Neurovascular structures were located less than 50% of the distance between M and C from M at the reference line. The bifurcation of the posterior tibial artery was 41% in X-coordinate, -38% in Y-coordinate, and that of the tibial nerve was 48%, and -10%, respectively. Thirteen measurements and classification showed statistically significant differences between both sexes (P<0.05). It is determined the average position of neurovascular structures in the human ankle region and recorded the differences between the sexes and amongst the populations. These results would be helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of foot pain. PMID:26140224

  17. The senses of active and passive forces at the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-07-01

    The traditional view of the neural basis for the sense of muscle force is that it is generated at least in part within the brain. Recently it has been proposed that force sensations do not arise entirely centrally and that there is a contribution from peripheral receptors within the contracting muscle. Evidence comes from experiments on thumb flexor and elbow flexor muscles. Here we have studied the sense of force in plantar flexor muscles of the human ankle, looking for further evidence for such a mechanism. The active angle-torque curve was measured for muscles of both legs, and for each muscle, ankle angles were identified on the ascending and descending limbs of the curve where active forces were similar. In a plantar flexion force matching task, subjects were asked to match the force in one foot, generated on the ascending limb of the curve, with force in the other foot, generated on the descending limb. It was hypothesised that despite active forces being similar, the sensation generated in the more stretched muscle should be greater because of the contribution from its peripheral stretch receptors, leading to an overestimation of the force in the stretched muscle. It was found that provided that the comparison was between active forces, there was no difference in the forces generated by the two legs, supporting the central hypothesis for the sense of force. When total forces were matched, including a component of passive force due to muscle stretch, subjects seemed to ignore the passive component. Yet subjects had an acute sense of passive force, provided that the muscles remained relaxed. It was concluded that subjects had two senses, a sense of active force, generated centrally, and a sense of passive force, or perhaps muscle stretch, generated within the muscle itself.

  18. A retrospective study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis secondary to surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-lin; Long, Xing; Deng, Mo-hong; Han, Qian-chao; Meng, Qing-gong; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the incidence of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after open operations for fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analysed possible risk factors in a total of 385 patients with 492 condylar fractures who had been operated on in our department from 2001 to 2010. Sixteen patients developed postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ with 26 joints (5%) affected during a follow-up of 6 months-10 years. Of the 492 condylar fractures, the most common ones that were associated with postoperative ankylosis were those of the condylar head (20/248), followed by the condylar neck (6/193). Subcondylar fractures did not cause postoperative ankylosis (0/51). Among the 16 patients with postoperative ankylosis, 13 had associated anterior mandibular fractures. Long-screw (bicortical screw) fixation of fractures of the condylar head seemed to be associated with a lower incidence of postoperative ankylosis than fixation by miniplate and wire or removal of the fractured fragment. The articular discs were damaged in all ankylosed joints, and the remaining fractured fragment was found in 10 ankylosed joints after fractures of the condylar head. The results suggest that fractures of the condylar head are more prone to lead to postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ, and that the possible risk factors seem to include the technique used for fixation and damage to the disc, together with an anterior mandibular fracture with the fractured fragment remaining.

  19. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern. PMID:27152288

  20. The Effect of Ankle Joint Muscle Strengthening Training and Static Muscle Stretching Training on Stroke Patients’ C.O.P Sway Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Joo Soo; Lee, Jin Hwan

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study implement ankle joint dorsiflexion training for ankle muscle the weakness that impairs stroke patients’ gait performance, to examine the effect of the training on stroke patients’ plantar pressure and gait ability. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 36 stroke patients diagnosed with stroke due to cerebral infarction or cerebral hemorrhage performed the training. Static muscle stretching was performed four times a week for 20 minutes at a time for 6 weeks by the training group. Ankle dorsiflexor training was performed four times a week, two sets per time in the case of females and three sets per time in the case of males for 6 weeks, by another group. Center of pressure sway amplitude was measured using the F-scan system during gait. All subjects were assessed with the same measurements at a pre-study examination and reassessed at eight weeks. Data were analyzed statistically using the paired t-test and one-way ANOVA. [Results] Among the between ankle dorsiflexor training group, static muscle stretching group, and control group, the difference before and after the training were proven to be statistically significant. [Conclusion] Compared to other training groups, the ankle muscle strength training group showed statistically significant increases of forward thrust at stroke patients’ toe-off which positively affected stroke patients’ ability to perform gait. PMID:24409032

  1. Use of the Taylor spatial frame in compression arthrodesis of the ankle: a study of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Thiryayi, Wasiq A; Naqui, Zafar; Khan, Sohail A

    2010-01-01

    Ankle fusion is a well established way of managing a variety of recalcitrant ankle pathologies including severe osteoarthritis and infected malunion of ankle fractures. Compression arthrodesis has been a widely accepted surgical means of achieving ankle fusion. The authors describe compression arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint in 10 cases using the Taylor-Spatial Frame (TSF). From 2003 to 2005, 10 patients (9 male and 1 female) aged between 48 and 71 years (median age 61 years) underwent application of the TSF to achieve compression arthrodesis of 10 ankle joints. The TSF is an external fixator system supported by a computer program. After input of the radiological deformities referenced to one of the rings, the computer provides the detailed strut adjustments necessary to bring about gradual correction. The underlying pathology was severe posttraumatic arthritis (2 cases), malunion (1 case), nonunion of pilon fracture (1 case), and infected ankle (1 case). Five cases presented with previous failed surgical arthrodesis. Clinical, subjective, objective, and radiological analyses were performed regularly and at the end of an average follow-up of 16.7 months (range 12-26 months). Solid fusion in anatomical alignment with return to a fully functional status was obtained in 10 out of 10 ankles. The TSF has shown encouraging results as a simple, effective and versatile means of achieving compression arthrodesis of the ankle joint.

  2. The Ankle Injury Management (AIM) trial: a pragmatic, multicentre, equivalence randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation comparing close contact casting with open surgical reduction and internal fixation in the treatment of unstable ankle fractures in patients aged over 60 years.

    PubMed Central

    Keene, David J; Mistry, Dipesh; Nam, Julian; Tutton, Elizabeth; Handley, Robert; Morgan, Lesley; Roberts, Emma; Gray, Bridget; Briggs, Andrew; Lall, Ranjit; Chesser, Tim Js; Pallister, Ian; Lamb, Sarah E; Willett, Keith

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Close contact casting (CCC) may offer an alternative to open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) surgery for unstable ankle fractures in older adults. OBJECTIVES We aimed to (1) determine if CCC for unstable ankle fractures in adults aged over 60 years resulted in equivalent clinical outcome compared with ORIF, (2) estimate cost-effectiveness to the NHS and society and (3) explore participant experiences. DESIGN A pragmatic, multicentre, equivalence randomised controlled trial incorporating health economic evaluation and qualitative study. SETTING Trauma and orthopaedic departments of 24 NHS hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Adults aged over 60 years with unstable ankle fracture. Those with serious limb or concomitant disease or substantial cognitive impairment were excluded. INTERVENTIONS CCC was conducted under anaesthetic in theatre by surgeons who attended training. ORIF was as per local practice. Participants were randomised in 1 : 1 allocation via remote telephone randomisation. Sequence generation was by random block size, with stratification by centre and fracture pattern. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Follow-up was conducted at 6 weeks and, by blinded outcome assessors, at 6 months after randomisation. The primary outcome was the Olerud-Molander Ankle Score (OMAS), a patient-reported assessment of ankle function, at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were quality of life (as measured by the European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions, Short Form questionnaire-12 items), pain, ankle range of motion and mobility (as measured by the timed up and go test), patient satisfaction and radiological measures. In accordance with equivalence trial US Food and Drug Administration guidance, primary analysis was per protocol. RESULTS We recruited 620 participants, 95 from the pilot and 525 from the multicentre phase, between June 2010 and November 2013. The majority of participants, 579 out of 620 (93%), received the allocated treatment; 52 out of 275 (19%) who received CCC later

  3. Use of a posterior antiglide plate in a pediatric ankle fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Justin J; Kooner, Rajdeep K; Soondar, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a 13-year-old male with a Salter-Harris II fracture-subluxation of the fibula. Open reduction and internal fixation with a posterior antiglide plate achieved mortise stability and avoided penetration of the fibular physis by fixation devices. After searching the Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library databases, to our knowledge, there have been no published reports describing the advantages associated with the use of a posterior antiglide plate for fixation of the immature fibula.

  4. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  5. The effects of powered ankle-foot orthoses on joint kinematics and muscle activation during walking in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Domingo, Antoinette; Ferris, Daniel P

    2006-01-01

    Background Powered lower limb orthoses could reduce therapist labor during gait rehabilitation after neurological injury. However, it is not clear how patients respond to powered assistance during stepping. Patients might allow the orthoses to drive the movement pattern and reduce their muscle activation. The goal of this study was to test the effects of robotic assistance in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury using pneumatically powered ankle-foot orthoses. Methods Five individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (ASIA C-D) participated in the study. Each subject was fitted with bilateral ankle-foot orthoses equipped with artificial pneumatic muscles to power ankle plantar flexion. Subjects walked on a treadmill with partial bodyweight support at four speeds (0.36, 0.54, 0.72 and 0.89 m/s) under three conditions: without wearing orthoses, wearing orthoses unpowered (passively), and wearing orthoses activated under pushbutton control by a physical therapist. Subjects also attempted a fourth condition wearing orthoses activated under pushbutton control by them. We measured joint angles, electromyography, and orthoses torque assistance. Results A therapist quickly learned to activate the artificial pneumatic muscles using the pushbuttons with the appropriate amplitude and timing. The powered orthoses provided ~50% of peak ankle torque. Ankle angle at stance push-off increased when subjects walked with powered orthoses versus when they walked with passive-orthoses (ANOVA, p < 0.05). Ankle muscle activation amplitudes were similar for powered and passive-orthoses conditions except for the soleus (~13% lower for powered condition; p < 0.05). Two of the five subjects were able to control the orthoses themselves using the pushbuttons. The other three subjects found it too difficult to coordinate pushbutton timing. Orthoses assistance and maximum ankle angle at push-off were smaller when the subject controlled the orthoses compared to when the therapist

  6. Fracture analyses of thin films, interfaces, and joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, Jack Lee, Jr.

    This thesis presents fracture analyses related to three practical problems. Chapter 2 and 3 both address the problem of cracking of thin bonded films in tension. In Chapter 2, solutions are obtained for two plan strain problems relevant to the cracking of a thin elastic film bonded to a dissimilar, thick elastic substrate material. Complete results from the solution of each problem are given over the full range of practical elastic mismatches. Dimensionless quantities important in describing the cracking of thin films are introduced and accurate approximate formulas based on the solution results are given for them. Applications are discussed, including criteria for avoiding thin film crack extension and a formula for the curvature change induced by the cracking of a thin film bonded to a substrate of finite thickness. In Chapter 3, a numerical analysis is made extending some of the results from Chapter 2 so that plastic yielding of the substrate is allowed. A simple shear-lag model of the problem is also presented which gives reasonable predictions for the dependence of the dimensionless fracture quantities on the normalized loading over a wide range of material mismatches. In Chapter 4, a recently-developed interfacial fracture toughness specimen is analyzed to allow the determination of interfacial fracture toughness values as a function of mode mixity for any two bonded materials. An analytic steady-state formula for the complex stress intensity factor for the specimen is presented. All parameters in the formula are known except for a single parameter, omega, which can be interpreted as the difference in phase between the far-field applied displacements and the near-tip crack face displacements. The parameter w is solved for numerically and presented as a function of the problem parameters. Also, some work is presented on the role of crack face interpenetration or contact in the analysis and use of the specimen. In Chapter 5, an analysis is presented of MSD or

  7. Development of an Intelligent Stretching Device for Ankle Joints With Contracture/Spasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    7] T. G. Olmstead, H. W. Wevers, J. T. Bryant, and G. J. Gouw, "Effect of Muscular Activity on Valgus /Varus Laxity and Stiffness of the Knee ," J...Biomech., vol. 19, pp. 565-577, 1986. [8] L.-Q. Zhang and G. Wang, " Dynamic and Static Control of the Human Knee Joint in Abduction-Adduction," J...casting, dynamic splinting and traction, the continuous passive motion (CPM) device, and advanced robot-aided devices [3-6]. However, existing devices

  8. [External femorotibial transfixation in femoral fracture with joint involvement in a child].

    PubMed

    Nounla, J; Bennek, J; Bühligen, U; Rolle, U

    2001-07-01

    Long bone fractures combined with joint injuries run a high risk of destabilising the articulations. Remaining joints incongruence can lead to early arthosis especially in cases of severe injuries or not achieved anatomical reduction. A number of osteosynthesis methods are available for anatomical repair of the articular facet. This report presents a seven years old boy with an open comminuted fracture of the distal femur and consecutive joint instability, treated with a Transfixation (Orthofix) of the knee joint. The functional results suggest this method as an alternative treatment.

  9. [Epiphyseal fractures of the distal tibia. Treatment and results].

    PubMed

    Wicky, B; Stauffer, U G

    1982-11-01

    Epiphyseal fractures of the distal end of the tibia generally require operative treatment. A conservative treatment can be recommended only in minimally displaced fractures with undisturbed ankle joint congruity. Among 48 patients treated (40 operatively, 8 conservatively) 6 developed angular deformities, 3 of which required a corrective osteotomy. After the initial treatment follow-up is necessary until bone growth is complete.

  10. Results of Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis with Fixation Using Two Parallel Headless Compression Screws in a Heterogenic Group of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, Lukas; Sadlik, Boguslaw; Sokolowski, Sebastian; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Background: As orthopedic surgeons become skilled in ankle arthroscopy technique and evidence -based data is supporting its use, arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis (AAA) will likely continue to increase, but stabilization methods have not been described clearly. We present a technique for two parallel 7.3-mm headless compression screws fixation (HCSs) for AAA in cases of ankle arthritis with different etiology, both traumatic and non-traumatic, including neuromuscular and inflammatory patients. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively verified 24 consecutive patients (25 ankles) who underwent AAA between 2011 and 2015. The average follow-up was 26 months (range 18 to 52 months). Arthrodesis was performed in 16 patients due to posttraumatic arthritis (in 5 as a sequela of pilon, 6 ankles, 3 tibia fractures, and 2 had arthritis due to chronic instability after lateral ligament injury), in 4 patients due to neuromuscular ankle joint deformities, and in 4 patients due to rheumatoid arthritis. Results: Fusion occurred in 23 joints (92%) over an average of 12 weeks (range 6 to 18 weeks). Ankle arthrodesis was not achieved in 2 joints (8%), both in post-pilon fracture patients. The correct foot alignment was not achieved in 4 feet (16%). None of the treated patients required hardware removal. Conclusion: The presented technique was effective in achieving a high fusion rate in a variety of diseases, decreasing intra- and post-operative hardware complications while maintaining adequate bone stability.

  11. Gender differences in hip and ankle joint kinematics on knee abduction during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Ogawa, Haruna; Shimizu, Norifumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The knee is the most common site of running injuries, particularly prevalent in females. The purpose of this study was to clarify gender differences in the lower extremity kinematics during running, with a specific emphasis on the relationships between the distal and proximal factors and the knee joint kinematics. Eleven female and 11 male runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions were recorded with a motion analysis system while the subjects ran along a 25 m runway at a speed of 3.5 m/s. Kinematic variables were analyzed for the stance phase of the right leg. Female runners demonstrated significantly greater peak knee abduction (P<0.05), hip adduction (P<0.01) and internal rotation (P<0.05), whereas male runners demonstrated significantly greater peak rearfoot eversion (P<0.01). The knee abduction angles were positively correlated with hip adduction angles (r=0.49, P<0.05) and negatively correlated with rearfoot eversion (r= -0.69, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in normalised step width between genders (P>0.05). Smaller rearfoot eversion and greater hip adduction related closely to the greater knee abduction as the distal and proximal factors, respectively. These relationships are thought to be the compensatory joint motions in the frontal plane, because there was no significant difference in the normalised step width between females and males. The current results suggest that if the step width is identical, the subjects with greater knee abduction had smaller rearfoot eversion to compensate for greater hip adduction, which were more apparent in females. This explains greater knee abduction found in female runners, which can be linked to a high risk of knee injury.

  12. Impact of the difference in the plantar flexor strength of the ankle joint in the affected side among hemiplegic patients on the plantar pressure and walking asymmetry.

    PubMed

    You, Young Youl; Chung, Sin Ho; Lee, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the changes in the gait lines and plantar pressures in static and dynamic circumstances, according to the differences in the strengths of the plantar flexors in the ankle joints on the affected sides of hemiplegic patients, and to determine their impacts on walking symmetry. [Subjects and Methods] A total of thirty hospitalized stroke patients suffering from hemiplegia were selected in this study. The subjects had ankylosing patterns in the ankle joints of the affected sides. Fifteen of the patients had plantar flexor manual muscle testing scores between poor and fair, while fifteen of the patients had zero and trace. [Results] The contact pattern of the plantar surface with the ground is a reliable method for walking analysis, which is an important index for understanding the ankle mechanism and the relationship between the plantar surface and the ground. [Conclusion] The functional improvement of patients with stroke could be supported through a verification of the analysis methods of the therapy strategy and walking pattern.

  13. Impact of the difference in the plantar flexor strength of the ankle joint in the affected side among hemiplegic patients on the plantar pressure and walking asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    You, Young Youl; Chung, Sin Ho; Lee, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the changes in the gait lines and plantar pressures in static and dynamic circumstances, according to the differences in the strengths of the plantar flexors in the ankle joints on the affected sides of hemiplegic patients, and to determine their impacts on walking symmetry. [Subjects and Methods] A total of thirty hospitalized stroke patients suffering from hemiplegia were selected in this study. The subjects had ankylosing patterns in the ankle joints of the affected sides. Fifteen of the patients had plantar flexor manual muscle testing scores between poor and fair, while fifteen of the patients had zero and trace. [Results] The contact pattern of the plantar surface with the ground is a reliable method for walking analysis, which is an important index for understanding the ankle mechanism and the relationship between the plantar surface and the ground. [Conclusion] The functional improvement of patients with stroke could be supported through a verification of the analysis methods of the therapy strategy and walking pattern. PMID:27942112

  14. Patient-specific finite element analysis of chronic contact stress exposure after intraarticular fracture of the tibial plafond.

    PubMed

    Li, Wendy; Anderson, Donald D; Goldsworthy, Jane K; Marsh, J Lawrence; Brown, Thomas D

    2008-08-01

    The role of altered contact mechanics in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) following intraarticular fracture remains poorly understood. One proposed etiology is that residual incongruities lead to altered joint contact stresses that, over time, predispose to PTOA. Prevailing joint contact stresses following surgical fracture reduction were quantified in this study using patient-specific contact finite element (FE) analysis. FE models were created for 11 ankle pairs from tibial plafond fracture patients. Both (reduced) fractured ankles and their intact contralaterals were modeled. A sequence of 13 loading instances was used to simulate the stance phase of gait. Contact stresses were summed across loadings in the simulation, weighted by resident time in the gait cycle. This chronic exposure measure, a metric of degeneration propensity, was then compared between intact and fractured ankle pairs. Intact ankles had lower peak contact stress exposures that were more uniform and centrally located. The series-average peak contact stress elevation for fractured ankles was 38% (p = 0.0015; peak elevation was 82%). Fractured ankles had less area with low contact stress exposure than intact ankles and a greater area with high exposure. Chronic contact stress overexposures (stresses exceeding a damage threshold) ranged from near zero to a high of 18 times the matched intact value. The patient-specific FE models represent substantial progress toward elucidating the relationship between altered contact stresses and the outcome of patients treated for intraarticular fractures.

  15. [The Use of Pedobarographic Examination to Biomechanical Evaluation of Foot and Ankle Joint in Adult - Own Experience].

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Grzegorowska, Oliwia; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive method, that can be used to describe the underfoot pressure distribution during stance and gait, is pedobarography. This examination helps to describe biomechanics of foot and ankle. It has been used to diagnose foot disorders, assess the disease progression, monitor the progress of rehabilitation and also evaluate the effectivness of undergone surgical treatment. In this article we describe chosen issues of pedobarographic examination in diagnostics and treatment of foot and ankle in adults. We base on our own experience (about 10 thousand examinations) and review of literature. In our opinion, pedobarography should be used in diagnostics and treatment of foot and ankle more often and widely than now.

  16. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  17. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  18. Lubrication of the human ankle joint in walking with the synovial fluid filtrated by the cartilage with the surface zone worn out: steady pure sliding motion.

    PubMed

    Hlavácek, M

    1999-10-01

    A mixture model of synovial fluid filtration by cartilage in the human ankle joint during walking is presented for steady sliding motion of the articular surfaces. In the paper the cartilage surface zone is assumed worn out. The same model has been recently applied to the squeeze-film problem for the human hip joint loaded by the body weight during standing (Hlavácek, Journal of Biomechanics 26, 1145-1150, 1151-1160, 1993; Hlavácek and Novák, Journal of Biomechanics 28, 1193-1198, 1199-1205, 1995). The linear biphasic model for cartilage (elastic porous matrix + ideal fluid) due to Prof. V. C. Mow and his co-workers and the biphasic model for synovial fluid (viscous fluid + ideal fluid), as used in the above-mentioned squeeze-film problem, are applied. For the physiologic parameters of the ankle joint during walking, a continuous synovial fluid film about 1 microm thick is maintained under steady entraining motion according to the classical model without the fluid transport across the articular surface. This is not the case in the filtration model with the cartilage surface zones worn out. On the contrary, this filtration model indicates that synovial fluid is intensively filtrated by such cartilage, so that no continuous fluid film is maintained and a synovial gel layer, about 10(-8) m thick, develops over the majority of the contact. Thus, if the cartilage surface zones are worn out, boundary lubrication should prevail in the ankle joint under steady sliding motion for the mean values of loading and the sliding velocity encountered in walking cycle.

  19. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by chondroid hyperplasia from the callus of condylar neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min; Park, Jung Min; Kim, Ji Hyuck; Kwon, Kwang Jun; Park, Young Wook; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Sang Shin; Lee, Suk Keun

    2009-01-01

    A patient who complained of difficulty in opening his mouth after condylar neck fracture 1 year ago presented typical features of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in clinical and radiologic examinations. To demonstrate a possible pathogenesis of temporomandibular joint ankylosis after condylar neck fracture, the fractured condylar portion removed was examined by histologic and immunohistochemical stainings. Interpositional gap arthroplasty was performed by removing the inferomesially displaced fractured condyle, and reconstruction with subcutaneous dermis to the previous vertical height was performed immediately. The fractured condylar portion was almost intact with slight erosion of the condylar cartilage. In the hematoxylin and eosin and Masson trichrome stainings, an extensive chondroid hyperplasia with abundant hyaline cartilage was shown in the removed condylar portion. There were also hyperplastic features of the synovial membrane, which were abnormally distributed throughout the chondroid tissues. In the immunohistochemical stainings of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-4, the chondroid tissues were conspicuously hyperplastic and strongly positive for BMP-4 but sparse for BMP-2. From these results, we think that the hyperplastic chondroid tissue was derived from the callus of the primary fractured site of the condylar neck and propose that the chondroid tissue could proliferate continuously because of synovial tissue support from around the temporomandibular joint, resulting in temporomandibular joint ankylosis. This pathogenesis is quite different from those of other diaphyseal fracture of long bones.

  20. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

  1. The surface geometry of inherited joint and fracture trace patterns resulting from active and passive deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Gold, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypothetical models are considered for detecting subsurface structure from the fracture or joint pattern, which may be influenced by the structure and propagated to the surface. Various patterns of an initially orthogonal fracture grid are modeled according to active and passive deformation mechanisms. In the active periclinal structure with a vertical axis, fracture frequency increased both over the dome and basin, and remained constant with decreasing depth to the structure. For passive periclinal features such as a reef or sand body, fracture frequency is determined by the arc of curvature and showed a reduction over the reefmound and increased over the basin.

  2. Measurement of adhesive joint fracture properties as a function of environmental degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wylde, J.W.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The increased use of structural adhesives in industry would benefit from a comprehensive failure load prediction tool to ensure competent design. The work of Fernlund and Spelt has proposed a fracture envelope that relates the critical strain energy release rate to the nominal phase angle of loading. The work of Plasinus and Spelt extended this work to incorporate the viscoelastic effect of the adhesive. The objective of the present research is to incorporate the effects of temperature and water absorption into the prediction of adhesive joint fracture. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate the notion that absorbed water has an effect predominantly detrimental, on the strength of an adhesive joint. Past work was concentrated on degrading typical, in service joints such as the Single Lap Shear (SLS) joint or the Cracked Lap Shear (CLS) joint. Since water is absorbed through the exposed edges, typically small in area compared to the volume of the joint, degradation times are usually long and the water concentration varies both with time and spatially throughout the joint. In this research, a novel method of degrading adhesive fracture specimens to a spatially constant degradation condition is being used to incorporate environmental effects into the fracture load prediction tool of Spelt et al.

  3. Comparison of screw fixation with elastic fixation methods in the treatment of syndesmosis injuries in ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Donmez, Ferdi; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Cakmak, Selami; Mutlu, Serhat; Guler, Olcay

    2015-07-01

    17 patients with ankle syndesmosic injury were treated with a 4.5mm single cortical screw fixation (passage of screw 4 cortices) and 15 patients were treated with single-level elastic fixation material. All patients were evaluated according to the AOFAS ankle and posterior foot scale at the third, sixth and twelfth months after the fixation. The ankle range of movement was recorded together with the healthy side. The Student's t test was used for statistical comparisons. No statistical significant difference was observed between the AOFAS scores (p>0.05). The range of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion motion of the elastic fixation group at the 6th and 12th months were significantly better compared to the screw fixation group (p<0.01). Elastic fixation is as functional as screw fixation in the treatment of ankle syndesmosis injuries. The unnecessary need of a second surgical intervention for removal of the fixation material is another advantageous aspect of this method of fixation.

  4. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES – IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Tang, Lars; Zebis, Mette; Nielsen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). Design Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using reflective markers and 3-dimensional recordings and expressed as inversion-eversion range of motion variability, peak velocity of inversion and number of inversion-eversion direction changes. Peroneus longus EMG activity was averaged and normalized to maximal activity during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and in addition amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) between 90 and 10% was calculated as a measure of muscle activation variability. Results Balancing on BOSU® Ball and wobble board generally resulted in increased ankle kinematic and muscle activity variables, compared to the other surfaces. BOSU® Ball was the most challenging in terms of inversion-eversion variability while wobble board was associated with a higher number of inversion-eversion direction changes. No differences in average muscle activation level were found between these two surfaces, but the BOSU® Ball did show a more variable activation pattern in terms of APDF. Conclusion The results showed large kinematic variability among different balance training devices and

  5. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements

    PubMed Central

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met. PMID:26955224

  6. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements.

    PubMed

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-03-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met.

  7. Movement within foot and ankle joint in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a 3-dimensional ultrasound analysis of medial gastrocnemius length with correction for effects of foot deformation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), a limited range of motion of the foot (ROM), limits gait and other activities. Assessment of this limitation of ROM and knowledge of active mechanisms is of crucial importance for clinical treatment. Methods For a comparison between spastic cerebral palsy (SCP) children and typically developing children (TD), medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon complex length was assessed using 3-D ultrasound imaging techniques, while exerting externally standardized moments via a hand-held dynamometer. Exemplary X-ray imaging of ankle and foot was used to confirm possible TD-SCP differences in foot deformation. Results SCP and TD did not differ in normalized level of excitation (EMG) of muscles studied. For given moments exerted in SCP, foot plate angles were all more towards plantar flexion than in TD. However, foot plate angle proved to be an invalid estimator of talocrural joint angle, since at equal foot plate angles, GM muscle-tendon complex was shorter in SCP (corresponding to an equivalent of 1 cm). A substantial difference remained even after normalizing for individual differences in tibia length. X-ray imaging of ankle and foot of one SCP child and two typically developed adults, confirmed that in SCP that of total footplate angle changes (0-4 Nm: 15°), the contribution of foot deformation to changes in foot plate angle (8) were as big as the contribution of dorsal flexion at the talocrural joint (7°). In typically developed individuals there were relatively smaller contributions (10 -11%) by foot deformation to changes in foot plate angle, indicating that the contribution of talocrural angle changes was most important. Using a new estimate for position at the talocrural joint (the difference between GM muscle–tendon complex length and tibia length, GM relative length) removed this effect, thus allowing more fair comparison of SCP and TD data. On the basis of analysis of foot plate angle and GM relative length as a function

  8. Microstructure-fracture toughness relationship of vanadium alloy/stainless steel brazed joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Y. X.; Aglan, H. A.; Steward, R. V.; Chin, B. A.; Grossbeck, M. L.

    2001-11-01

    In this work, brazing V-5Ti-5Cr to 304 stainless steel (SS 304) using Au-18Ni alloy as filler material was conducted under high vacuum condition. Sessile drop technique was used to determine the wettability of filler alloy to the stainless steel and the vanadium alloy substrates upon which the relationship between the contact angles with time was obtained. Tensile tests were performed on unnotched and notched specimens to demonstrate the overloading behavior and the fracture toughness of the base materials and the brazed joint. Fracture surface was examined for both the V-5Ti-5Cr and the joint to identify the failure mechanisms under static loadings. It was found that the Au-18Ni filler material exhibited good wettability with the SS 304 and V-5Ti-5Cr. The ultimate tensile strength of the brazed joint reached 245 MPa. The strain to failure was about 1.3%. Young's modulus was about 351 GPa. The fracture toughness ( KIc) of this joint was 19.1 MPa √ m. The fracture surface of the joint showed well brazed area with good wettability and proper amount of residual filler material which came from the solidification of residual liquid filler alloy of Au-Ni. The failure of the joint occurred along the interface of the vanadium/filler under static load.

  9. Mini hook plate fixation for palmar fracture-dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Komura, Shingo; Yokoi, Tatsuo; Nonomura, Hidehiko

    2011-04-01

    Fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint are challenging to treat, since it is difficult to achieve both rigid fixation and early joint motion simultaneously. Palmar fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint are less frequent injuries and a small number of treatment methods have been reported. We describe here a patient with a chronic palmar fracture-dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint, who was treated with a new surgical technique. In the surgery, a mini hook plate that was made by adapting a 1.5 mm AO hand modular system straight plate was used. Despite the thinness of the fragment, rigid fixation was achieved, resulting in early active motion. At final follow up, the active ranges of motion were 0°-100° at the proximal and 0°-80° at the distal interphalangeal joint, and there were no complications. This technique may become a useful surgical method to treat palmar fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

  10. Joints and Mineral Veins in Limestone-Marl Alternations: Arrest and Fracture Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, S. L.; Reyer, D.

    2009-05-01

    Layering is a common feature of many rock masses. In particular, many sedimentary rocks are layered because of depositional changes (stratification), and diagenetic processes. Mechanical layering, where the mechanical properties, particularly the Young's moduli (stiffness), change between layers, may coincide with changes in grain size, mineral content or facies. The mechanical layering of the rock is important because layering commonly results in abrupt changes in local stress fields that may lead to fracture arrest. However, if all the beds in a rock mass have essentially the same Young's modulus and their contacts are welded together (sealed or healed) the beds may function mechanically as a single layer. Here we explore how mechanical layers relate to sedimentary layers in limestone-marl alternations. This we do by investigating the effects of sedimentary layering of the host rock, on the emplacement and geometries of extension fractures such as joints and mineral veins. Detailed field studies were carried out at two localities of well-exposed limestone-marl alternations: (1) the Jurassic Blue Lias at the Glamorgan Coast of South Wales, UK, and (2) the Triassic Muschelkalk in the Kraichgau area, Southwest Germany. In both study areas, calcite veins occur almost exclusively in the cores and damage zones of faults, whereas jointing is pervasive. Fracture arrest, common in mechanically layered host rocks, is primarily controlled by local variations in the stress field, mainly due to three factors: discontinuities (fractures and contacts), changes in host rock mechanical properties, and stress barriers, where the local stress field is unfavorable to fracture propagation. These factors are related in that changes in stiffness and stress barriers are common at contacts between different rock types. A fourth mechanism, namely the material toughness (critical strain energy release rate) of the contact in relation to that of the adjacent layers has been much studied in

  11. Joint loading modality: its application to bone formation and fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Malacinski, G M; Yokota, H

    2008-07-01

    Sports-related injuries such as impact and stress fractures often require a rehabilitation programme to stimulate bone formation and accelerate fracture healing. This review introduces a recently developed joint loading modality and evaluates its potential applications to bone formation and fracture healing in post-injury rehabilitation. Bone is a dynamic tissue whose structure is constantly altered in response to its mechanical environments. Indeed, many loading modalities can influence the bone remodelling process. The joint loading modality is, however, able to enhance anabolic responses and accelerate wound healing without inducing significant in situ strain at the site of bone formation or fracture healing. This review highlights the unique features of this loading modality and discusses its potential underlying mechanisms as well as possible clinical applications.

  12. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: Immobilisation of stable ankle fractures: plaster cast or functional brace?

    PubMed

    Thackray, Anna J; Taylor, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    A short-cut review of the literature was carried out to establish whether a functional brace was as good as a traditional plaster of Paris to immobilise a stable ankle fracture in terms of functionality and recovery speed. A total of 260 papers was found using the below outlined search method, of which five were thought to represent the best evidence to answer the specific clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these are shown in table 2. The clinical bottom line is that the limited evidence seems to suggest that a functional brace appears to give more favourable outcomes. Good quality studies involving large populations are, however, needed to delineate a clear answer to this specific question.

  13. A joint fracture toughness evaluation of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, H.; Sargent, G. A.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point bend specimens cut from hot-pressed beryllium obtained from two suppliers. The test specimens had dimensions conforming to ASTM fracture toughness standard E399-72. A total of 42 specimens were machined from each batch of material. Six specimens from each batch were then distributed to seven independent laboratories for testing. The test data from the laboratories were collected and analyzed for differences between the laboratories and the two batches of material. It is concluded that ASTM 399-72 can be used as a valid test procedure for determining the fracture toughness of beryllium, providing that Kf(max) in fatigue cracking could be up to 80 percent of the K(0) value.

  14. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  15. Strength and fracture toughness of heterogeneous blocks with joint lognormal modulus and failure strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimas, Leon S.; Veneziano, Daniele; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-07-01

    We obtain analytical approximations to the probability distribution of the fracture strengths of notched one-dimensional rods and two-dimensional plates in which the stiffness (Young's modulus) and strength (failure strain) of the material vary as jointly lognormal random fields. The fracture strength of the specimen is measured by the elongation, load, and toughness at two critical stages: when fracture initiates at the notch tip and, in the 2D case, when fracture propagates through the entire specimen. This is an extension of a previous study on the elastic and fracture properties of systems with random Young's modulus and deterministic material strength (Dimas et al., 2015a). For 1D rods our approach is analytical and builds upon the ANOVA decomposition technique of (Dimas et al., 2015b). In 2D we use a semi-analytical model to derive the fracture initiation strengths and regressions fitted to simulation data for the effect of crack arrest during fracture propagation. Results are validated through Monte Carlo simulation. Randomness of the material strength affects in various ways the mean and median values of the initial strengths, their log-variances, and log-correlations. Under low spatial correlation, material strength variability can significantly increase the effect of crack arrest, causing ultimate failure to be a more predictable and less brittle failure mode than fracture initiation. These insights could be used to guide design of more fracture resistant composites, and add to the design features that enhance material performance.

  16. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  17. [Anterior dislocation of the elbow joint without peri-articular fracture in an adult].

    PubMed

    Chbani, B; Lahrach, K; Amar, M-F; Ibnlkadi, K; Elmoubaker, S; Bennani, A; Marzouki, A; Boutayeb, F

    2012-12-01

    In view of the comparative frequency of posterior dislocations of the elbow, it is rather remarkable that anterior dislocations of that joint should be among the rarest of injuries [1]. Our case is one of the first cases of anterior dislocation of the elbow without any periarticular fracture or pre-existing deformities around the elbow [2].

  18. Evaluation of fracture strength of metal/epoxy joint by interface mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Yoshikazu

    1995-11-01

    Tension tests of metal/epoxy joints with or without interface cracks were conducted and fracture criteria of the joints were discussed based on interface mechanics. The variation of the fracture strength of each specimen was large, and the strength showed Gaussian distribution. The fracture strength of smooth specimens was lower for wider specimens, but the cumulative probability of fracture of smooth specimens was not controlled by the stress singularity parameter. In interface cracked specimens, the cracks were propagated either along the interface or in epoxy resin, depending on crack length. When cracks propagated along the interface, the cumulative probability of the fracture of the specimen was controlled by the real part of the complex stress intensity factor along the interface, K{sub 1}. When cracks kinked to epoxy resin, the angle was almost identical to that of the maximum tangential stress, {sigma}{sub {theta}max}. In this case, the cumulative probability of fracture was controlled by the value of K{sub {theta}max}.

  19. Modeling the Progressive Failure of Jointed Rock Slope Using Fracture Mechanics and the Strength Reduction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Cao, Ping; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Kaihui; Fan, Wenchen

    2015-03-01

    The fracturing process during the progressive failure of a jointed rock slope is numerically investigated by using fracture mechanics and the strength reduction method (SRM). A displacement discontinuity method containing frictional elements is developed for the calculation of the stress intensity factor (SIF). The failure initiation of the jointed rock slope is analyzed by evaluating the SIF. A new joint model is proposed by combining solid elements with interface elements in the commercial software FLAC3D. These represent the discontinuous planes in a rock mass on which sliding or separation can occur. The progressive failure process is simulated by reducing the shear strength of the rock mass, which includes the process of stress concentration, crack initiation, crack propagation, slip weakening, and coalescence of failure surfaces. The factor of safety (FS) and location of the critical failure surface are determined by the SRM. The influence of the joint inclination is investigated using the FS and the SIF. Laboratory experiments on specimens containing an inclined flaw under compression-shear stress are also conducted to investigate the effect of the angle between the shear direction and the flaw inclination, which provides an experimental explanation for the shear behavior of jointed rock. The results show that the joint inclination dominates the failure behavior of jointed rock slope, and two failure patterns have been classified.

  20. Posterior tibial nerve lesions in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramon; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Garcia, Montserrat; Samitier, Gonzalo; Seijas, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides a minimally invasive approach to the diagnosis and treatment of certain ankle disorders. Neurological complications resulting from ankle arthroscopy have been well documented in orthopaedic and podiatric literature. Owing to the superficial location of the ankle joint and the abundance of overlying periarticular neurovascular structures, complications reported in ankle arthroscopy are greater than those reported for other joints. In particular, all reported neurovascular injuries following ankle arthroscopy have been the direct result of distractor pin or portal placement. The standard posteromedial portal has recognized risks because of the proximity of the posterior neurovascular structures. There can be considerable variability in the course of these portals and their proximity to the neurovascular structures. We found one report of intra-articular damage to the posterior tibial nerve as a result of ankle arthroscopy in the English-language literature and we report this paper as a second case described in the literature.

  1. A tension-mode fracture model for bolted joints in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Packman, P.F.; Eisenmann, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    A failure prediction model for bolted joints in generally orthotropic laminated composite plates that fail in the tension mode under bearing loading conditions has been developed. The plate is analyzed as a bulk orthotropic plate whose material properties are determined through the application of classical lamination theory to facilitate practical application of the model. Ply-by-ply laminated analysis is not required. Fracture mechanics concepts are applied to a pseudo-flaw which is related to the physical cracking of the laminate at the joint. The maximum circumferential stress concept is extended to orthotropic materials where both the fracture toughness and stress intensity vary with orientation. Excellent correlation between experimental tests conducted on single-bolt joints for two laminate layups and analytical prediction was found.

  2. Assessment of magnetic resonance images of displacement of the disc of the temporomandibular joint in different types of condylar fracture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, JiSi; Zhang, ShanYong; Yang, Chi; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; He, DongMei; Chiu, HanHsuan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the displacement of the disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in different types of condylar fracture we studied 160 patients (222 joints) from May 2009-June 2014. All patients had computed tomographic scans (CT) and magnetic resonance images (MRI) taken preoperatively, and 24 patients (32 joints) had MRI postoperatively. CT scans were reviewed to categorise the types of condylar fracture (intracapsular, condylar neck, and subcondylar), and intracapsular condylar fractures were further classified into subtypes A, B, C, and M. MRI were then reviewed to record the position of the disc in each type of condylar fracture. The results were compared using the chi square test. There were 160 intracapsular condylar fractures, 40 fractures of the condylar neck, and 22 subcondylar fractures. Of the intracapsular condylar fractures, 75 were type A, 49 type B, 11 type C, and 25 type M. Discs were displaced in 153 intracapsular condylar fractures, 17 fractures of the condylar neck, and eight subcondylar fractures. Among the type A intracapsular condylar fractures, discs were displaced in 71/75, type B in 47/49, type C in 10/11, and in all 25 type M. The incidence of displaced discs between intracapsular condylar fractures on the one hand, and those of the condylar neck or subcondylar region on the other, was significant (p<0.001), but there were no differences among the various subtypes of intracapsular condylar fractures. Postoperative MRI showed successful results in 28/32 joints. Intracapsular condylar fractures were more likely to have displaced discs than the other types. But there were no differences among different subtypes of intracapsular condylar fractures.

  3. Spinopelvic Fixation of Sacroiliac Joint Fractures and Fracture-Dislocations: A Clinical 8 Years Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Sobhan, Mohammad R.; Abrisham, Seyed Mohammad J.; Vakili, Mahmood; Shirdel, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pelvic ring injuries and sacroiliac dislocations have significant impacts on patient’s quality of life. Several techniques have been described for posterior pelvic fixation. The current study has been designed to evaluate the spinopelvic method of fixation for sacroiliac fractures and fracture-dislocations. Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2014, 14 patients with sacroiliac joint fractures, dislocation and fracture-dislocation were treated by Spinopelvic fixation at Shahid Sadoughi Training Hospital, Yazd, Iran. Patients were seen in follow up, on average, out to 32 months after surgery. Computed tomographic (CT) scans of patients with sacral fractures were reviewed to determine the presence of injuries. A functional assessment of the patients was performed using Majeed’s score. Patient demographics, reduction quality, loss of fixation, outcomes and complications, return to activity, and screw hardware characteristics are described Results: The injury was unilateral in 11 (78.5%) patients and bilateral in 3 (21.5%). Associated injuries were present in all patients, including fractures, dislocation and abdominal injuries. Lower limb length discrepancy was less than 10 mm in all patients except two. Displacement, as a measure of quality of reduction was less than 5 mm in 13 patients. The mean Majeed score was 78/100. Wound infection and hardware failure were observed in 3 (21.4%) and 1 (7.1%) cases, respectively. In this study most patients (85%) return to work postoperatively. Conclusion: According to the findings, spinopelvic fixation is a safe and effective technique for treatment of sacroiliac injuries. This method can obtain early partial to full weight bearing and possibly reduce the complications. PMID:27847854

  4. Traumatic conditions of the coxofemoral joint: luxation, femoral head-neck fracture, acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Marchionatti, Emma; Fecteau, Gilles; Desrochers, André

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic conditions of the hip joint in cattle remain a challenge for the veterinarian. This article is intended to give an overview of the most common orthopedic problems of the bovine coxofemoral joint, diagnostic procedures, and treatment options.

  5. Special Features of Fracture of a Solid-State Titanium Alloy - Nickel - Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazgaliev, R. G.; Mukhametrakhimov, M. Kh.; Imaev, M. F.; Shayakhmetov, R. U.; Mulyukov, R. R.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure, nanohardness, and special features of fracture of three-phase titanium alloy and stainless steel joint through a nanostructural nickel foil are investigated. Uniformly distributed microcracks are observed in Ti2Ni and TiN3 layers joined at temperatures above T = 700°C, whereas no microcracks are observed in the TiNi layer. This suggests that the reason for microcracking is an anomalously large change in the linear expansion coefficient of the TiNi layer during austenitic-martensitic transformation. Specimens subjected to mechanical tests at T = 20°C are fractured along different layers of the material, namely, in the central part of the specimen they are fractured along the Ti2Тi/TiNi interface, whereas at the edge they are fractured along the TiNi/TiNi3 interface.

  6. Fracture toughness of low activation ferritic steel (JLF-1) weld joint at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Inoue, N.; Muroga, T.

    1998-10-01

    A low activation ferritic steel has been developed for a candidate of a structural material of nuclear fusion reactors. Since welding must be performed when the support structures are constructed, fracture toughness of the weld joint has to be characterized as well as the base metal in an engineering sense. In this report, 25 mm thick plates of JLF-1, which contains 9% Cr and 2% W, are butt-welded by a tungsten inert gas (TIG) procedure, and the fracture toughness of the base plate and the weld metal is investigated at room temperature using 1T and 0.5T CT specimens. The base metal reveals high fracture toughness of about 430 kJ/m 2. However, the weld metal showed unstable big pop-ins. One sample fractured in a nearly elastic condition and another sample showed a toughness of over 400 kJ/m 2.

  7. Acute traumatic open posterolateral dislocation of the ankle without tearing of the tibiofibular syndesmosis ligaments: a case report.

    PubMed

    Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Komurcu, Mahmut; Ozturk, Cagatay; Ozturan, Kutay; Tasatan, Ersin; Erler, Kaan

    2008-01-01

    Pure open dislocation of the ankle, or dislocation not accompanied by rupture of the tibiofibular syndesmosis ligaments or fractures of the malleoli or of the posterior border of the tibia, is an extremely rare injury. A 62-year-old man injured his right ankle in a motor vehicle accident. Besides posterolateral ankle dislocation, there was a 7-cm transverse skin cut on the medial malleolus, and the distal end of the tibia was exposed. After reduction, we made a 2- to 2.5-cm longitudinal incision on the lateral malleolus; the distal fibular fracture was exposed. Two Kirschner wires were placed intramedullary in a retrograde manner, and the fracture was stabilized. The deltoid ligament and the medial capsule were repaired. The tibiofibular syndesmosis ligaments were intact. At the end of postoperative year 1, right ankle joint range of motion had a limit of approximately 5 degrees in dorsiflexion, 10 degrees in plantarflexion, 5 degrees in inversion, and 0 degrees in eversion. The joint appeared normal on radiographs, with no signs of osteoarthritis or calcification. The best result can be obtained with early reduction, debridement, medial capsule and deltoid ligament restoration, and early rehabilitation. Clinical and radiographic features at long-term follow-up also confirm good mobility of the ankle without degenerative change or mechanical instability.

  8. Apparatus to measure simultaneously 14 isometric leg joint moments. Part 1: Design and calibration of six-axis transducers for the forces and moments at the ankle.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, N N; Munih, M; Perkins, T A; Wood, D E

    1999-03-01

    An apparatus has been developed for making isometric measurements of the joint moments corresponding to the 14 degrees of freedom of the legs, in postures ranging between sitting and near full extension. The apparatus is called the multi-moment chair system (MMCS) and is described in the companion paper. This paper describes the most critical components of the MMCS, which are the six-axis transducers for measuring the force and moment components on the plantar-flexion axis of each ankle while the feet are laced into fixed shoes. The transducers are made of steel bars, on which strain gauges are mounted, joined by clamps. The design of the transducer and methods of calibration and error estimation are described. The RMS errors are less than 2 N for the forces and 1 Nm for the moments, but these may be correlated. A method for error reduction that compensates for the finite compliance of the transducer does not reduce the measured errors.

  9. Reliability of sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle joint angles from a single frame of video data using the GAITRite camera system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sandy A; Rice, Clinton; Von Behren, Kristyn; Meyer, April; Alexander, Rachel; Murfin, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish intra-rater, intra-session, and inter-rater, reliability of sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle angles with and without reflective markers using the GAITRite walkway and single video camera between student physical therapists and an experienced physical therapist. This study included thirty-two healthy participants age 20-59, stratified by age and gender. Participants performed three successful walks with and without markers applied to anatomical landmarks. GAITRite software was used to digitize sagittal hip, knee, and ankle angles at two phases of gait: (1) initial contact; and (2) mid-stance. Intra-rater reliability was more consistent for the experienced physical therapist, regardless of joint or phase of gait. Intra-session reliability was variable, the experienced physical therapist showed moderate to high reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50-0.89) and the student physical therapist showed very poor to high reliability (ICC = 0.07-0.85). Inter-rater reliability was highest during mid-stance at the knee with markers (ICC = 0.86) and lowest during mid-stance at the hip without markers (ICC = 0.25). Reliability of a single camera system, especially at the knee joint shows promise. Depending on the specific type of reliability, error can be attributed to the testers (e.g. lack of digitization practice and marker placement), participants (e.g. loose fitting clothing) and camera systems (e.g. frame rate and resolution). However, until the camera technology can be upgraded to a higher frame rate and resolution, and the software can be linked to the GAITRite walkway, the clinical utility for pre/post measures is limited.

  10. Percutaneous Screw Fixation of Crescent Fracture-Dislocation of the Sacroiliac Joint.

    PubMed

    Shui, Xiaolong; Ying, Xiaozhou; Mao, Chuanwan; Feng, Yongzeng; Chen, Linwei; Kong, Jianzhong; Guo, Xiaoshan; Wang, Gang

    2015-11-01

    Crescent fracture-dislocation of the sacroiliac joint (CFDSIJ) is a type of lateral compression pelvic injury associated with instability. Open reduction and internal fixation is a traditional treatment of CFDSIJ. However, a minimally invasive method has never been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of closed reduction and percutaneous fixation for different types of CFDSIJ and present their clinical outcome. The authors reviewed 117 patients diagnosed with CFDSIJ between July 2003 and July 2013. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation was performed in 73 patients. Treatment selection was based on Day's fracture classification. For type I fractures, fixation perpendicular to the fracture line were performed. For type II fractures, crossed fixation was performed. For type III fractures, fixation was performed with iliosacral screws. Forty-four patients were treated by open reduction and plate fixation. Demographics, fracture pattern distribution, blood loss, incision lengths, revision surgeries, radiological results, and functional scores were compared. All 117 patients were followed for more than 6 months (mean, 14 months [range, 6-24 months]). Blood loss, extensive exposure, duration of posterior ring surgery, duration of hospital stay, and infection rates were lower in the closed group (P<.01). Patients in the closed group achieved better functional performance (P<.01). There were no significant differences in reduction quality (P=.32), revision surgery rates (P=.27), and iatrogenic neurologic injuries (P=.2) between the 2 groups. The authors' results indicate that closed reduction and percutaneous fixation is a safe and effective surgical method for CFDSIJ.

  11. Recreational Sports Activities After Calcaneal Fractures and Subsequent Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Giovanni; Martinelli, Nicolò; Bonifacini, Carlo; Bianchi, Alberto; Sartorelli, Elena; Malerba, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Subtalar joint arthrodesis is a common treatment for the management of hindfoot pathologic entities. Despite pain reduction, hindfoot stiffness is a common concern of active patients, who wish to continue or start exercising for fitness. The purpose of the present retrospective observational clinical study was to assess the rate and type of recreational sports activities in patients before and after subtalar joint arthrodesis and to correlate the clinical outcome and the level of sports activities. In 33 patients (22 males, 11 females) treated with subtalar joint arthrodesis, the pre- and postoperative participation in sports and recreational activities was evaluated. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot scale score, 36-item Short Form Health Survey, and a visual analog scale for pain were used as clinical outcome measures. The weekly session number, session time, and interval to activity recovery after surgery were registered. Patients with a subtalar joint arthrodesis returned to a satisfactory level of activity postoperatively. The sports participation almost reached levels similar to those preoperatively but with a shift from high- to low-impact activities.

  12. Biepicondylar fracture dislocation of the elbow joint concomitant with ulnar nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Konya, M Nuri; Aslan, Ahmet; Sofu, Hakan; Yıldırım, Timur

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a case of humeral biepicondylar fracture dislocation concomitant with ulnar nerve injury in a seventeen year-old male patient. Physical examination of our patient in the emergency room revealed a painful, edematous and deformed-looking left elbow joint. Hypoesthesia of the little finger was also diagnosed on the left hand. Radiological assessment ended up with a posterior fracture dislocation of the elbow joint accompanied by intra-articular loose bodies. Open reduction-Internal fixation of the fracture dislocation and ulnar nerve exploration were performed under general anesthesia at the same session as surgical treatment of our patient. Physical therapy and rehabilitation protocol was implemented at the end of two weeks post-operatively. Union of the fracture lines, as well as the olecranon osteotomy site, was achieved at the end of four months post-operatively. Ulnar nerve function was fully restored without any sensory or motor loss. Range of motion at the elbow joint was 20-120 degrees at the latest follow-up. PMID:23610759

  13. Biepicondylar fracture dislocation of the elbow joint concomitant with ulnar nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Konya, M Nuri; Aslan, Ahmet; Sofu, Hakan; Yıldırım, Timur

    2013-04-18

    In this article, we present a case of humeral biepicondylar fracture dislocation concomitant with ulnar nerve injury in a seventeen year-old male patient. Physical examination of our patient in the emergency room revealed a painful, edematous and deformed-looking left elbow joint. Hypoesthesia of the little finger was also diagnosed on the left hand. Radiological assessment ended up with a posterior fracture dislocation of the elbow joint accompanied by intra-articular loose bodies. Open reduction-Internal fixation of the fracture dislocation and ulnar nerve exploration were performed under general anesthesia at the same session as surgical treatment of our patient. Physical therapy and rehabilitation protocol was implemented at the end of two weeks post-operatively. Union of the fracture lines, as well as the olecranon osteotomy site, was achieved at the end of four months post-operatively. Ulnar nerve function was fully restored without any sensory or motor loss. Range of motion at the elbow joint was 20-120 degrees at the latest follow-up.

  14. Corrective Osteotomies for Malunited Tongue-Type Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ming-Zhu; Yang, Yun-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Displaced tongue-type fractures of the calcaneus can lead to severe pain and disability if not treated appropriately. Failure to reduce articular displacement may require subtalar joint arthrodesis with subsequent loss of function. The subtalar joint is crucial for normal foot and ankle function. In selected cases, if the malunited joint is still in good condition, it is preserved by corrective osteotomy. A joint-preserving osteotomy with axial realignment is a treatment option for malunited tongue-type calcaneal fractures encountered early on, before the development of subtalar arthrosis in carefully selected patients.

  15. Probabilistic Simulation of Progressive Fracture in Bolted-Joint Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes computational methods to probabilistically simulate fracture in bolted composite structures. An innovative approach that is independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness was used to simulate progressive fracture. The effect of design variable uncertainties on structural damage was also quantified. A fast probability integrator assessed the scatter in the composite structure response before and after damage. Then the sensitivity of the response to design variables was computed. General-purpose methods, which are applicable to bolted joints in all types of structures and in all fracture processes-from damage initiation to unstable propagation and global structure collapse-were used. These methods were demonstrated for a bolted joint of a polymer matrix composite panel under edge loads. The effects of the fabrication process were included in the simulation of damage in the bolted panel. Results showed that the most effective way to reduce end displacement at fracture is to control both the load and the ply thickness. The cumulative probability for longitudinal stress in all plies was most sensitive to the load; in the 0 deg. plies it was very sensitive to ply thickness. The cumulative probability for transverse stress was most sensitive to the matrix coefficient of thermal expansion. In addition, fiber volume ratio and fiber transverse modulus both contributed significantly to the cumulative probability for the transverse stresses in all the plies.

  16. Invited Hand Article: Current Concepts in Treatment of Fracture-Dislocations of the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Steven C.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Proximal interphalangeal joint fracture-dislocations are common injuries that require expedient and attentive treatment for the best outcomes. Management can range from protective splinting and early mobilization to complex operations. In this review, the current concepts surrounding the managment of these injuries are reviewed. Methods A literature review was performed of all recent articles pertaining to proximal interphalangeal joint fracture-dislocation, with specific focus on middle phalangeal base fractures. Where appropriate, older articles, or articles on closely related injury types were included for completeness. The methodology and outcomes of each study were analyzed. Results When small avulsion fractures are present, good results are routinely obtained with reduction and early mobilization of stable injuries. Strategies for management of the unstable dorsal fracture-dislocation have evolved over time. To provide early stability, a variety of techniques have evolved, including closed, percutaneous, external, and internal fixation methods. Although each of these techniques can be successful in skilled hands, none have been subjected to rigorous, prospective, comparative trials. Volar dislocations fare less well, with significant loss of motion in many studies. Pilon fractures represent the most complicated injuries, and return of normal motion is not expected. Conclusion The best outcomes can be achieved by (1) establishing enough stability to allow early motion, (2) restoring gliding joint motion rather than non-congruent motion, and (3) restoring the articular surface congruity when possible. Although the majority of literature on this topic consists of expert opinion and retrospective case series, the consensus appears to favor less invasive techniques whenever possible. PMID:25415092

  17. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Schneider, Robert; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Bullough, Peter G

    2010-02-01

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis.

  18. Fracture strengths of HIPed DS-Cu/SS joints for ITER shielding blanket/first wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, T.; Kanari, M.; Sato, S.; Gotoh, M.; Furuya, K.; Kuroda, T.; Saito, M.; Enoeda, M.; Takatsu, H.

    1998-10-01

    Fracture toughness and crack propagation tests were performed to investigate the effect of HIP temperature and fracture behavior of HIPed DS-Cu/SS joints. Test specimens of DS-Cu/SS HIPed joints were manufactured by bonding flat plates of DS-Cu and SS under HIP temperatures of 980°C, 1030°C and 1050°C. JQ of the joint at HIP temperature of 1050°C was larger than the other two joints. For the crack propagation test, two types of test specimens were prepared. One had a notch along the HIPed interface and the other in DS-Cu and normal to the interface. The crack in the former specimen propagated along the interface. On the other hand, the crack in the latter specimen propagated in the DS-Cu perpendicular to the loading direction, stopped at the interface, and then exfoliated along the HIPed interface. In the fracture tests, the crack was observed propagating in DS-Cu side at approximately 5-10 μm away from the interface.

  19. Intraarticular Entrapment of Os Subfibulare Following a Severe Inversion Injury of the Ankle: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Ozkan; Kilicaslan, Omer Faruk; Guler, Ferhat; Aktan, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior Talofibular Ligament (ATFL) rupture is the most commonly injured anatomic structure in lateral ankle sprain. In some cases, ATFL avulsion fracture from the lateral malleolus may occur instead of purely ligamentous injuries. The ATFL avulsion fracture is detected as a small ossicle at the tip of lateral malleolus on direct radiographs, which is called os subfibulare in chronic cases. Case Presentation: Severe displacement of this ossicle to the tibiotalar joint space is an extremely rare injury. Herein, a case of intra-articular entrapment of os subfibulare following a severe inversion injury of the ankle, which caused a diagnostic challenge was presented. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of entrapment of os subfibulare in the talotibial joint space. Fixation of the os subfibulare to lateral malleolus resulted in union and excellent functional results. PMID:26101763

  20. Revision of the aseptic and septic total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Norman; Wirth, Stephan Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Total ankle replacement has become a popular treatment of symptomatic end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Contemporary total ankle replacement systems provide more anatomic and biomechanically sound function. However, longevity is still limited and long-term results of modern total ankle replacement designs are not available. In the case of failure, conversion into arthrodesis has remained the treatment of choice but at the cost of hindfoot function and potential degeneration of the adjacent joints. Thus, revision total ankle replacement by exchange of the prosthetic components represents an attractive solution. This article focuses on revision total ankle replacement and conversion to ankle arthrodesis.

  1. Incidence and Severity of Foot and Ankle Injuries in Men’s Collegiate American Football

    PubMed Central

    Lievers, W. Brent; Adamic, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: American football is an extremely physical game with a much higher risk of injury than other sports. While many studies have reported the rate of injury for particular body regions or for individual injuries, very little information exists that compares the incidence or severity of particular injuries within a body region. Such information is critical for prioritizing preventative interventions. Purpose: To retrospectively analyze epidemiological data to identify the most common and most severe foot and ankle injuries in collegiate men’s football. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Injury data were obtained from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) for all foot and ankle injuries during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 seasons. Injuries were analyzed in terms of incidence and using multiple measures of severity (time loss, surgeries, medical disqualifications). This frequency and severity information is summarized in tabular form as well as in a 4 × 4 quantitative injury risk assessment matrix (QIRAM). Results: The rate of foot and ankle injuries was 15 per 10,000 athletic exposures (AEs). Five injuries were found to be responsible for more than 80% of all foot and ankle injuries: lateral ankle ligament sprains, syndesmotic (high ankle) sprains, medial ankle ligament sprains, midfoot injuries, and first metatarsophalangeal joint injuries. Ankle dislocations were found to be the most severe in terms of median time loss (100 days), percentage of surgeries (83%), and percentage of medical disqualifications (94%), followed by metatarsal fractures (38 days, 36%, and 49%, respectively) and malleolus fractures (33 days, 41%, and 59%, respectively). Statistical analysis suggests that the 3 measures of severity are highly correlated (r > 0.94), thereby justifying the use of time loss as a suitable proxy for injury severity in the construction of the QIRAM. Conclusion: Based on the QIRAM analysis

  2. Evolving fracture patterns: columnar joints, mud cracks, and polygonal terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.

    2012-12-01

    Contraction cracks can form captivating patterns, such as the artistic craquelure sometimes found in pottery glazes, to the cracks in dried mud, or the polygonal networks covering the polar regions of Earth and Mars. Two types are frequently encountered: those with irregular rectilinear patterns, such as that formed by an homogeneous slurry when dried (or cooled) uniformly, and more regular hexagonal patterns, such as those typified by columnar joints. Once cracks start to form in a thin contracting layer, they will sequentially break the layer into smaller and smaller pieces. A rectilinear crack pattern encodes information about the order of cracks, as later cracks tend to intersect with earlier cracks at right angles. In this manner they relieve the stresses perpendicular to the pre-existing crack. In a hexagonal pattern, in contrast, the angles between all cracks at a vertex are near 120°. In this presentation it will be shown how both types of pattern can arise from identical forces, and that a rectilinear, T-junction dominated pattern will develop into to a hexagonal pattern, with Y-junctions, if allowed to. Such an evolution can be explained as the result of three conditions: (1) if cracks advance through space, or heal and recur, that the previous positions of a crack tip acts as a line of weakness, guiding the next iteration of cracking; (2) that the order of opening of cracks can change in each iteration; and (3) that crack tips curve to maximise the local strain energy release rate. The ordering of crack patterns are seen in a number of systems: columnar joints in starch and lava; desiccation cracks in clays that are repeatedly wetted and dried; cracks in eroding gypsum-cemented sand layers; and the cracks in permafrost known as polygonal terrain. These patterns will each be briefly explored, in turn, and shown to obey the above principles of crack pattern evolution.

  3. Fracture-dislocations of the elbow joint--strategy for treatment and results.

    PubMed

    Lill, H; Korner, J; Rose, T; Hepp, P; Verheyden, P; Josten, C

    2001-01-01

    Between January 1993 and December 1996, 41 patients with fracture dislocation of the elbow joint were treated in our department. In 28 patients (median age 46 years, range 15-77 years; 16 male, 12 female), a clinical and radiological follow-up was obtained after median 34 months (range 12-59 months). In addition to the humero-ulnar dislocation, isolated fractures were present in 13 patients and combined fractures in 15 (all with involvement of the radial head). Primary neurological deficits were found in 7 and open fractures in 3 patients. In 7 patients, primary definitive surgical therapy was carried out by open reduction and internal fixation. A two-step surgical management (initial closed reduction and immobilization, 5 patients with external fixator, 7 with plaster; secondary open surgical procedure) was performed in 12 and conservative treatment in 9 patients. According to the Leipzig Elbow Score, taking subjective, clinical and radiological criteria into consideration, 4 patients achieved 'excellent' and 5 patients a 'good' result. Ten patients were scored 'moderate' and 9 'poor'. The rate of secondary complications necessitating revision was 36%. Poor results were primarily caused by extensive initial soft-tissue damage, delayed definitive surgical therapy, and ectopic heterotopic ossification. In contrast, fracture localization and degree of arthrosis were not of significant importance for the final outcome. In fracture dislocations, the goal is a primary definitive surgical treatment aiming for early postoperative physiotherapy.

  4. Conservative and surgical treatment of the chronic Charcot foot and ankle

    PubMed Central

    Güven, Mehmet Fatih; Karabiber, Atakan; Kaynak, Gökhan; Öğüt, Tahir

    2013-01-01

    Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) is a severe joint disease in the foot and ankle that can result in fracture, permanent deformity, and limb loss. It is a serious and potentially limb-threatening lower-extremity late complication of diabetes mellitus. The aim of this manuscript was to evaluate modern concepts of chronic CN through a review of the available literature and to integrate a perspective of management from the authors’ extensive experience. PMID:23919114

  5. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sole of the foot is facing inwards, stretching and possibly damaging the ligaments on the outer ... sprains: Always warm up and use the recommended stretching techniques for your ankles before playing sports, exercising, ...

  6. Sprained Ankles

    MedlinePlus

    ... are usually stronger than the growing bones and cartilage to which they are attached. Therefore, the growing part of the bone might separate or tear away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is ...

  7. Subluxation of the hip joint after internal fixation of a trochanteric fracture.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuo; Murotani, Rentaroh; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Okahara, Hitoshi; Ohbayashi, Osamu; Iwase, Hideaki; Fujita, Hidemine; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2004-02-01

    The authors report an unusual case of hip subluxation after internal fixation without associated sepsis. We report one recently treated case in which a 75-year-old female experienced subluxation of her hip joint after open reduction and internal fixation for a trochanteric fracture. In this paper, we describe a case of progressive, spontaneous subluxation of the hip joint over several weeks. Most previously reported cases are associated with cerebral palsy. This entity has not been reported previously. Our patient was treated by hemi-arthroplasty and repair of the disrupted capsule, and achieved a good long-term functional result. The cause of this particular condition is discussed.

  8. Acute Joint Pathology and Synovial Inflammation is Associated with Increased Intra-Articular Fracture Severity in the Mouse Knee

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John S.; Hembree, W. Chad; Furman, Bridgette D.; Tippets, Lauren; Cattel, Dennis; Huebner, Janet L.; Little, Dianne; DeFrate, Louis E.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Guilak, Farshid; Olson, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Post-traumatic arthritis is a frequent cause of disability and occurs most commonly and predictably after articular fracture. The objective of this investigation was to examine the effect of fracture severity on acute joint pathology in a novel murine model of intra-articular fracture. DESIGN Low and high energy articular fractures (n=25 per group) of the tibial plateau were created in adult male C57BL/6 mice. The acute effect of articular fracture severity on synovial inflammation, bone morphology, liberated fracture area, cartilage pathology, chondrocyte viability, and systemic cytokines and biomarkers levels was assessed at 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days post-fracture. RESULTS Increasing intra-articular fracture severity was associated with greater acute pathology in the synovium and bone compared to control limbs, including increased global synovitis and reduced periarticular bone density and thickness. Applied fracture energy was significantly correlated with degree of liberated cortical bone surface area, indicating greater comminution. Serum concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) were significantly increased one day post-fracture. While articular fracture significantly reduced chondrocyte viability, there was no relationship between fracture severity and chondrocyte viability, cartilage degeneration, or systemic levels of cytokines and biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that articular fracture is associated with a loss of chondrocyte viability and increased levels of systemic biomarkers, and that increased intra-articular fracture severity is associated with increased acute joint pathology in a variety of joint tissues, including synovial inflammation, cortical comminution, and bone morphology. Further characterization of the early events following articular fracture could aid in the treatment of post-traumatic arthritis. PMID:21619936

  9. A rare combined injury of dorsal fracture-dislocation of four carpometacarpal joints and trapezium, trapezoid and distal radius bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Touloupakis, Georgios; Stuflesser, Wilfried; Antonini, Guido; Ferrara, Fabrizio; Crippa, Cornelio; Lettera, Maria Gabriella

    2016-05-06

    Incorrect or delayed diagnosis and treatment of the carpometacarpal fracture-dislocations is often associated with poor prognosis. We present a rare case of unusual pattern of injury, involving dorsal dislocation of four ulnar carpometacarpal joints, associated with fracture of the trapezium, a burst fracture of the trapezoid  bone and an extra-articular fracture of the third distal  of the radius. The first surgical intervention was followed by unsatisfactory results, confirmed by the CT scans. A second surgery followed and an open reduction and pinning with K wires performed. Post-operative follow up lasting for nine months revealed a very good surgical outcome.

  10. Effect of bond thickness on fracture and fatigue strength of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of composite to composite bonded joints was undertaken to study the effect of bond thickness on debond growth rate under cyclic loading and critical strain energy release rate under static loading. Double cantilever beam specimens of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 were tested under mode I loading. A different behavior of fracture and fatigue strength was observed with variation of bondline thickness.

  11. [Modern ideas on the treatment of dislocations and fracture-dislocations in the elbow joint].

    PubMed

    Dul'tsev, I A; Zhabin, G I; Neverov, V A

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe the causes and surgical methods of treatment of fresh and long-standing dislocations and fracture-dislocations in the elbow joint. The indications to using different operative methods and technical-surgical interventions are described in details as well as long-term results of treatment by the literature data. The current methods and the authors' methods of prophylactics and treatment of postoperative complications are analyzed. The methods of rehabilitation of such patients are also described.

  12. Atypical Presentation of Tuberculosis of Elbow Joint in Operated Case of Distal Humerus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Yogesh; Khadilkar, Madhav; Ranade, Ashish S.; Vartak, Devendra N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A typical presentations of tuberculosis are not uncommon. Periprosthetic infection with tuberculosis after total joint replacement has well published. Tuberculosis of the elbow following open reduction internal fixation of a distal humerus fraeture is extremely rare. Case Report: We report case of a healthy, immunocompetenet 49-year-old male who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with bicolumnar plating for distal humerus fracture and presented after 18 month with cystic swelling over medial aspect of operated site. There was no wound dehiscence and the underlying fracture was healed well without any signs of implant loosening or bony involvement. Cystic swelling was excised and histopathology provided the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Patient was treated with anti tubercular chemotherapy and patient made uneventful recovery. Conclusion: Although synovial tuberculosis after fracture fixation is a rare entity, tuberculosis should be kept as a differential diagnosis. Surgeons should have high index of suspicion to diagnose atypical presentations of tuberculosis. PMID:27299044

  13. [Back to the emergency department with a painful ankle].

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Pim W; van de Rest, Hendrik J M; Nolte, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman came to the Emergency Department with a painful ankle 2 days after a fall off a horse. On the day of the accident, she was misdiagnosed with a lateral ankle sprain. A lateral X-ray of the ankle showed a positive 'V-sign', which is pathognomonic for a fracture of the lateral process of the talus.

  14. The relationship between unilateral mandibular angle fracture and temporomandibular joint function.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaityte, Ausra; Surna, Algimantas; Pileicikiene, Gaivile; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Zilinskas, Juozas

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. Aim of this study was to analyze relation of occlusal correction and alterations of temporomandibular joint function during treatment of unilateral mandibular fractures. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We compared 49 patients treated for unilateral mandibular fracture without occlusal correction with 21 patient treated for unilateral mandibular fracture along with early and consequent occlusal analysis and correction and with 49 control subjects. Patients' complaints, mandibular movements and occlusal parameters were evaluated during the period of healing. ZEBRIS ultrasound system (Jaw Motion Analyzer, Zebris Medical GmbH, Isny, Germany) was used for analysis of mandibular movements and T-Scan analyzer (Tekscan, Inc., Boston, MA, USA) was used for occlusal analysis. RESULTS. Findings of our study showed statistically significant (p<0.05) diminution of patients complaints, mandibular movement alterations and occlusal disturbances in patients who received occlusal correction during MF treatment if compared to patients treated without occlusal correction, except noises from the joint in the injured side and mandibular lateral track to the injured side in the final stage of investigation. Despite applied treatment recovery of the TMJ function was not complete and the investigated parameters remained worse if compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS. Results of this study confirmed positive influence of early and subsequent occlusal analysis and correction during stages of MF treatment on diminution of functional alterations of the temporomandibular joint function. Timely occlusal correction improves and hastens process of rehabilitation therefore it is indispensable part of MF treatment.

  15. Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle treated by total ankle replacement: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barg, A; Elsner, A; Hefti, D; Hintermann, B

    2010-07-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint in haemophilic patients has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is still controversial as a treatment option. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the mid-term outcome in patients treated with total ankle replacement using an unconstrained three-component ankle implant. Ten haemophilic ankles in eight patients (mean age: 43.2 years, range 26.7-57.5) treated with total ankle replacement were followed up for a minimum of 2.7 years (mean: 5.6, range 2.7-7.6). The outcome was measured with clinical and radiological evaluations. There were no intra- or peri-operative complications. The AOFAS-hindfoot-score increased from 38 (range 8-57) preoperatively to 81 (range 69-95) postoperatively. All patients were satisfied with the results. Four patients became pain free; in the whole patient cohort pain level decreased from 7.1 (range 4-9) preoperatively to 0.8 (range 0-3) postoperatively. All categories of SF-36 score showed significant improvements in quality of life. In one patient, open ankle arthrolysis was performed because of painful arthrofibrosis. For patients with haemophilic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint, total ankle replacement is a valuable alternative treatment to ankle fusion.

  16. Independent and Joint Effect of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Blood Pressure Control on Incident Stroke in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun; Xu, Benjamin; Xu, Richard; Tung, Renee; Frank, Eric; Tromble, Wayne; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Weiyi; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Chunyan; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianping; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Chen, Yundai; Yang, Tianlun; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Zhao, Lianyou; Hou, Fan Fan; Ge, Junbo; Dong, Qiang; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to influence the effects of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Data are limited on whether PWV is an independent predictor of stroke above and beyond hypertension control. This longitudinal analysis examined the independent and joint effect of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) with hypertension control on the risk of first stroke. This report included 3310 hypertensive adults, a subset of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT) with baseline measurements for baPWV. During a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 111 participants developed first stroke. The risk of stroke was higher among participants with baPWV in the highest quartile than among those in the lower quartiles (6.3% versus 2.4%; hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.60). Similarly, the participants with inadequate hypertension control had a higher risk of stroke than those with adequate control (5.1% versus 1.8%; hazard ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.61). When baPWV and hypertension control were examined jointly, participants in the highest baPWV quartile and with inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with their counterparts (7.5% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 3.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-6.77). There was a significant and independent effect of high baPWV on stroke as shown among participants with adequate hypertension control (4.2% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 2.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.81). In summary, among hypertensive patients, baPWV and hypertension control were found to independently and jointly affect the risk of first stroke. Participants with high baPWV and inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with other groups.

  17. Physical validation of a patient-specific contact finite element model of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald D; Goldsworthy, Jane K; Li, Wendy; James Rudert, M; Tochigi, Yuki; Brown, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    A validation study was conducted to determine the extent to which computational ankle contact finite element (FE) results agreed with experimentally measured tibio-talar contact stress. Two cadaver ankles were loaded in separate test sessions, during which ankle contact stresses were measured with a high-resolution (Tekscan) pressure sensor. Corresponding contact FE analyses were subsequently performed for comparison. The agreement was good between FE-computed and experimentally measured mean (3.2% discrepancy for one ankle, 19.3% for the other) and maximum (1.5% and 6.2%) contact stress, as well as for contact area (1.7% and 14.9%). There was also excellent agreement between histograms of fractional areas of cartilage experiencing specific ranges of contact stress. Finally, point-by-point comparisons between the computed and measured contact stress distributions over the articular surface showed substantial agreement, with correlation coefficients of 90% for one ankle and 86% for the other. In the past, general qualitative, but little direct quantitative agreement has been demonstrated with articular joint contact FE models. The methods used for this validation enable formal comparison of computational and experimental results, and open the way for objective statistical measures of regional correlation between FE-computed contact stress distributions from comparison articular joint surfaces (e.g., those from an intact versus those with residual intra-articular fracture incongruity).

  18. Joint seismic, hydrogeological, and geomechanical investigations of a fracture zone in the Grimsel Rock Laboratory, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.; Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Martel, S.J. ); Bluemling, P.; Vomvoris, S. )

    1990-06-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geologic repository for nuclear waste. From 1987 to 1989 the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Swiss Cooperative for the Storage of Nuclear Waste (Nagra) participated in an agreement to carryout experiments for understanding the effect of fractures in the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. As part of this joint work field and laboratory experiments were conducted at a controlled site in the Nagra underground Grimsel test site in Switzerland. The primary goal of these experiments in this fractured granite was to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media, and to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of subsurface sites for the storage of nuclear waste. The seismic experiments utilizes high frequency (1000 to 10,000 Hertz) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Two-, three-, and four-sided tomographic images of the fractures and geologic structure were produced from over 60,000 raypaths through a 10 by 21 meter region bounded by two nearly horizontal boreholes and two tunnels. Intersecting this region was a dominant fracture zone which was the target of the investigations. In addition to these controlled seismic imaging experiments, laboratory work using core from this region were studied for the relation between fracture content, saturation, and seismic velocity and attenuation. In-situ geomechanical and hydrologic tests were carried out to determine the mechanical stiffness and conductivity of the fractures. 20 refs., 90 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Corrective Osteotomies for Malunited Malleolar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel; Weber, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ankle fractures are common and may be treated nonoperatively or by reduction and internal fixation. Both treatments may lead to nonanatomic healing, called malunions. Malunions lead to joint instability and pathologic load transfer. Arthritic joint destruction may be the consequence. Corrective osteotomies for malunited malleolar fractures have to restore anatomic conditions. Osteotomies of the medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, posterior malleolus (Volkmann's triangle), and the posteromedial corner or combinations thereof described. Corrective osteotomies for malleolar malunions show good results in the majority of mid- and long-term studies. Secondary arthrodesis is needed in about 10% to 15% of patients.

  20. Marked loss of sympathetic nerve fibers in chronic Charcot foot of diabetic origin compared to ankle joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Franz-Xaver; Bobrik, Verena; Fassold, Alexander; Grifka, Joachim; Kessler, Sigurd; Straub, Rainer H

    2009-06-01

    The pathogenesis of Charcot foot is based on three disputed factors: (1) loss of neurotrophic influence, (2) microtraumatic lesions, and (3) neurovascular disturbances. These etiological causes were uncovered by clinicophysiological tests. However, no results of quantitative nerve density studies of sympathetic and sensory substance P-positive (SP+) nerve fibers are available. We studied the density of sympathetic and SP+ nerve fibers in three distinct areas of the tarsus. Fifteen patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA) and 15 patients with diabetic Charcot foot were included. Patients with OA did not differ from those with Charcot foot in SP+ sensory nerve fiber density. However, at all three areas, the density of sympathetic nerve fibers was significantly lower in patients with Charcot foot compared to OA (p = 0.006). In addition, we found that the sympathetic nerve repellent factor semaphorin 3C was highly expressed in inflamed tissue in Charcot patients. In Charcot foot of diabetic origin a severe loss of sympathetic nerve fibers was observed. These findings in chronically inflamed Charcot foot lend support to the neurovascular theory in the late chronic phase, which probably depends on the inflammatory upregulation of nerve repellent factors.

  1. Symptomatic anterior subtalar arthrosis after ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-05-13

    A 76-year-old man reported right lateral heel pain 11 years after ankle arthrodesis. Clinically, there was tenderness in the right sinus tarsi and over the junction point between the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints. Radiographs showed that the joint spaces of the posterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint were preserved although there were osteophytes at both joints. Arthroscopic findings showed degeneration of the anterior subtalar and talonavicular joints. The symptoms subsided after arthroscopic debridement.

  2. Fracture analysis of multi-site cracking in fuselage lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional plane stress elastic fracture mechanics analysis of a cracked lap joint fastened by rigid pins is presented and results are applied to the problem of multi-site damage (MSD) in riveted lap joints of aircraft fuselage skins. Two problems are addressed, the problem of equal length MSD cracks and the problem of alternating length MSD cracks. For the problem of equal length cracks, two models of rivet/skin interactions are studied and the role of residual stresses due to the riveting process is explored. Stress intensity factors are obtained as a function of normalized crack length. Also, the load distribution among rivet rows and the compliance change of the joint due to MSD cracking are obtained. For the problem of alternating length cracks, attention is focussed on how load is distributed between columns of rivets and how this load shedding can alter crack tip stress intensity factors. The equal and alternating length crack analyses reveal no clear-cut mechanism to explain the relative uniformity of fatigue cracks emerging from lap joint rivet holes in actual aircraft and in mechanical lap joint tests.

  3. Divergent elbow dislocation with radial shaft fracture, distal ulnar deformation, and distal radioulnar joint instability: an unclassifiable Monteggia variant.

    PubMed

    Laratta, Joseph L; Yoon, Richard S; Frank, Matthew A; Koury, Kenneth; Donegan, Derek J; Liporace, Frank A

    2014-03-01

    Originally described by Monteggia and later classified by Bado, elbow dislocations with concurrent radial and ulnar shaft fractures with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) disruption are considered operative cases with high-energy injurious etiologies. Here, we present an unclassifiable Monteggia variant fracture suffered through a high axial load mechanism in a 47-year-old female. The fracture pattern initially exhibited included a divergent elbow dislocation, a radial shaft fracture, plastic deformation of the distal ulna, and DRUJ instability. Here we describe the pattern in detail, along with definitive treatment and clinical outcome at 1 year follow-up.

  4. Joint Spanish-American Research uncovers fracture pattern in northeastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, William P.; Acosta, Juan; Uchupi, Elazar; ten Brink, Uri S.

    A joint Spanish-American geophysical cruise north of the Virgin Islands has delineated the fracture pattern of the North American plate as it is overrun by the northeast corner of the Caribbean plate. Previously known fractures parallel to the plate boundary (approximately east-west) probably result from plate flexure, while newly defined crossing fractures (north-northeast) may be related to extension produced by the compound bend of the North American plate. The direction of the fractures may be modified by preexisting spreading tectonic fabric.The fieldwork took place in May 1997 aboard the Spanish research vessel Hespérides as part of an ongoing effort to study plate interactions and their seismotectonic effects on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Multichannel seismic-reflection profiles, multibeam bathymetry, and gravity and magnetic data were collected on the cruise. Also examined were reprocessed regional seismic lines, newly relocated earthquake epicenters, and satellite gravity data. The program was planned by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO), and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  5. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  6. [Combined treatment of long tubular bone fractures and false joints using the bioplastic material collapan (Russia)].

    PubMed

    Kesian, G A; Berchenko, G N; Urazgil'deev, R Z; Arsen'ev, I G; Mikelaishvili, D S; Karapetian, G S

    2008-01-01

    This experimental morphological study on 32 dogs was designed to evaluate the efficiency of hydroxyapatite containing preparation collapan used to promote healing of segmented femur defects. Implantation of collapan was shown to greatly contribute to the formation, maturation and remodelling of bone callus. Combined treatment of 165 patients with comminuted fractures and 148 ones with false joints of long tubular bones using collapan implants proved to efficaciously promote bone consolidation in 99.4% of the total 313 subjects. Collapan activated reparative osteogenesis, reduced the duration of hospitalization, the frequency of inflammatory complications, and the requirement of secondary inpatient care.

  7. Determination of Some Parameters for Fatigue Life in Welded Joints Using Fracture Mechanics Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mukhtar, A. M.; Biermann, H.; Hübner, P.; Henkel, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, the parameters stress intensity factor (SIF), initial and final crack lengths ( a i and a f), crack growth parameters ( C and m), and fatigue strength (FAT) are investigated. The determination of initial crack length seems to be the most serious factor in fatigue life and strength calculations for welded joints. A fracture mechanics approach was used in these calculations based on SIF which was calculated with the finite element method (FEM). The weld toe crack was determined to be equal to 0.1 mm, whereas the weld root crack's length was varied depending on the degree of the weld penetration. These initial crack length values are applicable for all types of joints which have the same crack phenomenon. As based on the above calculated parameters, the new limits of FAT for new geometries which are not listed yet in recommendations can be calculated according to the current approach.

  8. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000553.htm Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that ...

  9. [Endoprosthesis for the fractured elbow: uni- and bicompartmental alloarthroplasty of the humero-ulnar joint].

    PubMed

    Weber, O; Burger, C; Stein, G; Gravius, S; Wirtz, D C; Pennekamp, P H; Kraft, C N; Müller, M

    2010-12-01

    Posttraumatic arthrosis or rheumatoid arthritis located at the elbow, in particular at the humero-ulnar joint will probably not occur in increasing numbers in the future due to new antirheumatic medications and modern implants. However, the demographic development with an increase of the geriatric population and the typical physical changes is evident. Due to osteoporosis with a resulting poor bone quality severe fracture patterns may occur at the site of the distal humerus after a simple collapse. The usual surgical aim consisting of an exact anatomic reduction may be impossible to achieve by applying the standard operative treatment. Several studies have proven that a prosthetic replacement of such a severely damaged elbow is a viable solution for elderly people. A mobile, pain-free and stable elbow joint promotes a fast recovery of the patient with a quick return to former activities. Nevertheless, elbow prostheses cannot withstand great strains and the surgeon has to identify those fractures which require a prosthetic replacement. The surgical implantation procedure requires an adequate knowledge of both elbow anatomy and prosthetic options.

  10. [An inveterate fracture of the barton type of the distal radius with dislocation in the radiocarpal joint--case history].

    PubMed

    Bednarenko, Marcin; Kotela, Ireneusz; Bołtuć, Witold; Jakubowski, Lukasz

    2006-01-01

    Barton's fracture was first described and isolated as a disease entity in 1839. It is a quite rare fracture constituting, according to various authors 1.5-2.3% of the distal radius fractures. It is usually accompanied with subluxation or luxation in the radiocarpal joint. In the study we present treatment, dealing with operative difficulties and rehabilitation in a 52-year-old patient with an inveterate fracture of the Barton type of the distal radius with dislocation in the radiocarpal joint. He was previously treated by a local quack. The patient underwent an operative treatment; fragments were anatomically repositioned and a stable fixation was applied. As a result of treatment and intensive rehabilitation, we achieved synostosis and functionality of the wrist and left hand.

  11. The effectiveness of the parachutist ankle brace in reducing ankle injuries in an airborne ranger battalion.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J T; Creedon, J F; Pope, R W

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the parachutist ankle brace (PAB) decreases the number and severity of ankle injuries in an airborne Ranger battalion. A retrospective study was performed covering a 38-month period. A computer database was used to track all jump injuries with a diagnosis of ankle pain, sprain, or fracture. The frequency was calculated for ankle injuries per 1,000 jumps and the average length of medically restricted duty per ankle injury. A total of 13,782 static line parachute jumps were conducted during the study period. Without the PAB, 35 ankle injuries were seen (4.5/1,000 jumps), with 9 fractures and 316 days of medical restriction per 1,000 jumps. Using the PAB, 9 ankle injuries were seen (1.5/1,000 jumps), with 3 fractures and 71 days of medical restriction per 1,000 jumps. The correct use of the PAB appeared to significantly decrease the incidence of ankle injuries in this battalion.

  12. Total ankle replacement – surgical treatment and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting. PMID:27407223

  13. Neglected fracture of the medial humeral epicondyle that was entrapped into the elbow joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Vito; Farsetti, Pasquale; Caterini, Roberto; Bisicchia, Salvatore; De Luna, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Ernesto

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report clinical and radiographic long-term results of a neglected fracture of the medial humeral epicondyle, which was entrapped into the elbow joint. At follow-up, 48 years after the trauma, the patient complained of occasional discomfort around the elbow, but the joint had a normal range of motion and good stability. Radiographs showed that the epicondylar fragment was fused to the medial border of the olecranon. The authors conclude that an old fracture of the medial humeral epicondyle, presenting a fusion of the fragment to the olecranon with normal range of motion and without pain, may be managed expectantly.

  14. Chronic Ankle Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  15. Modeling of Human Joint Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Radial Lateral " epicondyle Olecranon Radius Ulna Figure 3. Lateral aspect of the right elbow joint. -17- Annular Ligament This strong band encircles... elbow joint, knee joint, human joints, shoulder joint, ankle joint, joint models, hip joint, ligaments. 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If...ligaments. -A rather extended discussion of the articulations and anatomical descriptions of the elbow , shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints are

  16. Compliance to The Joint Commission proposed Core Measure set on osteoporosis-associated fracture: review of different secondary fracture prevention programs in an open medical system from 2010 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Fojas, Ma Conchitina; Southerland, Lauren T; Phieffer, Laura S; Stephens, Julie A; Srivastava, Tanya; Ing, Steven W

    2017-12-01

    There are care gaps in the evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis after a fragility fracture. The Joint Commission is considering adoption of core measures. We compared compliance between two secondary fracture prevention programs in our institution. Incorporating strengths of both may provide the best outcomes for secondary fracture prevention.

  17. Implementation of an Empirical Joint Constitutive Model into Finite-Discrete Element Analysis of the Geomechanical Behaviour of Fractured Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qinghua; Latham, John-Paul; Xiang, Jiansheng

    2016-12-01

    An empirical joint constitutive model (JCM) that captures the rough wall interaction behaviour of individual fractures associated with roughness characteristics observed in laboratory experiments is combined with the solid mechanical model of the finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM). The combined JCM-FEMDEM formulation gives realistic fracture behaviour with respect to shear strength, normal closure, and shear dilatancy and includes the recognition of fracture length influence as seen in experiments. The validity of the numerical model is demonstrated by a comparison with the experimentally established empirical solutions. A 2D plane strain geomechanical simulation is conducted using an outcrop-based naturally fractured rock model with far-field stresses loaded in two consecutive phases, i.e. take-up of isotropic stresses and imposition of two deviatoric stress conditions. The modelled behaviour of natural fractures in response to various stress conditions illustrates a range of realistic behaviour including closure, opening, shearing, dilatancy, and new crack propagation. With the increase in stress ratio, significant deformation enhancement occurs in the vicinity of fracture tips, intersections, and bends, where large apertures can be generated. The JCM-FEMDEM model is also compared with conventional approaches that neglect the scale dependency of joint properties or the roughness-induced additional frictional resistance. The results of this paper have important implications for understanding the geomechanical behaviour of fractured rocks in various engineering activities.

  18. Arthroscopic-assisted fibular synthesis and syndesmotic stabilization of a complex unstable ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio; Metelli, Giovanni Pietro; Bettinsoli, Rosita; Hacking, Steven Adam

    2009-03-01

    Traditional treatment of complex ankle fracture consists of open reduction and internal fixation. Nevertheless, this treatment can delay fracture healing and cause prolonged oedema. The surgeon should consider necessity of early recovery when treating athletes, especially football players. In this light, it was decided to perform an arthroscopy-assisted percutaneous minimal osteosynthesis of a fibular fracture together with a syndesmotic disruption in order to permit the patient, a 24-year-old male, to resume quicker and easier full sport activities. The outcome was good and allowed patient to play soccer since 6 months following surgery. The complete and detailed articular evaluation provided by the arthroscope permitted to manage carefully a complex articular traumatism, avoiding the necessity of plating the fracture and improving a rapid full recovery of the joint function.

  19. Conversion of ankle autofusion to total ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Emilie R C; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-09-01

    Few reports in the literature have described the conversion of a surgically fused ankle to a total ankle replacement. The takedown of an autofusion and conversion to a prosthesis has not been described. We report the case of a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis with an ankle autofusion fixed in equinus and severe talonavicular arthritis that was converted to ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision system. We describe the reasons why the decision was made to perform total ankle arthroplasty while concomitantly fusing the talonavicular joint, and discuss the rationale of the various surgical treatment options considered. We describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes achieved in this case. At 12 months post-operatively the patient reported significant reduction of pain, increased FAOS scores and had increased ankle range of motion.

  20. Snowboarders' ankle.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Irene Fleur; Brouwers, Lars; Brink, Peter R G; Poeze, Martijn

    2014-10-29

    In this case study we report a fracture of the lateral process of the talus (LPF) in a snowboarder. The fracture is frequently overlooked initially, due to subtle clinical and radiological findings and a low incidence rate. However, LPF are associated with significant morbidity when missed. To address this, we report one case of a patient with a LPF and provide a review of the available literature.

  1. Failure modes of current total ankle replacement systems.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Michael J; Buechel, Frederick F

    2013-04-01

    Methodology for evaluation of total ankle replacements is described. Fusion and its problems are discussed as are those of total ankle joint replacement. Fusion is an imperfect solution because it reduces ankle functionality and has significant complications. Early fixed-bearing total ankles were long-term failures and abandoned. Currently available fixed-bearing ankles have proved inferior to fusion or are equivalent to earlier devices. Only mobile-bearing devices have been shown reasonably safe and effective. One such device, the STAR, has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration after a rigorous controlled clinical trial and is available for use in the United States.

  2. Effect of Interfacial Microstructure Evolution on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Al-Cu Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, P.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2015-07-01

    The interfacial microstructure evolution of Al-Cu joints during friction stir welding and post-welding annealing and its influence on the tensile strength and the fracture behavior were investigated in detail. An obvious interface including three sub-layers of α-Al, Al2Cu, and Al4Cu9 intermetallic compound (IMC) layers is generated in the as-FSW joint. With the development of annealing process, the α-Al layer disappeared and a new IMC layer of AlCu formed between initial two IMC layers of Al2Cu and Al4Cu9. The growth rate of IMC layers was diffusion controlled before the formation of Kirkendall voids, with activation energy of 117 kJ/mol. When the total thickness of IMC layers was less than the critical value of 2.5 μm, the FSW joints fractured at the heat-affected zone of Al side with a high ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of ~100 MPa. When the thickness of IMC layers exceeded 2.5 μm, the joints fractured at the interface. For relatively thin IMC layer, the joints exhibited a slightly decreased UTS of ~90 MPa and an inter-granular fracture mode with crack propagating mainly between the Al2Cu and AlCu IMC layers. However, when the IMC layer was very thick, crack propagated in the whole IMC layers and the fracture exhibited trans-granular mode with a greatly decreased UTS of 50-60 MPa.

  3. Effects of Microstructure and Loading on Fracture of Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu Joints on Cu Substrates with ENIG Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Kumar, P.; Dutta, I.; Sidhu, R.; Renavikar, M.; Mahajan, R.

    2014-12-01

    When dropped, electronic packages often undergo failure by propagation of an interfacial crack in solder joints under a combination of tensile and shear loading. Hence, it is crucial to understand and predict the fracture behavior of solder joints under mixed-mode high-rate loading conditions. In this work, the effects of the loading conditions (strain rate and loading angle) and microstructure [interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) morphology and solder yield strength] on the mixed-mode fracture toughness of Sn-3.8 wt.%Ag-0.7 wt.%Cu solder joints sandwiched between two Cu substrates with electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) metallization have been studied, and compared with the fracture behavior of joints attached to bare Cu. Irrespective of the surface finish, the fracture toughness of the solder joints decreased monotonically with strain rate and mode-mixity, both resulting in increased fracture proportion through the interfacial IMC layer. Furthermore, the proportion of crack propagation through the interfacial IMC layer increased with increase in the thickness and the roughness of the interfacial IMC layer and the yield strength of the solder, resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness of the joint. However, under most conditions, solder joints with ENIG finish showed higher resistance to fracture than joints attached directly to Cu substrates without ENIG metallization. Based on the experimental observations, a fracture mechanism map is constructed correlating the yield strength of the solder, the morphology and thickness of the interfacial IMC, and the fracture mechanisms as well as the fracture toughness values for different solder joints under mode I loading.

  4. The management of hip fracture in the older population. Joint position statement by Gruppo Italiano Ortogeriatria (GIOG).

    PubMed

    Pioli, Giulio; Barone, A; Mussi, C; Tafaro, L; Bellelli, G; Falaschi, P; Trabucchi, M; Paolisso, G

    2014-10-01

    This document is a Joint Position Statement by Gruppo Italiano di OrtoGeriatria (GIOG) supported by Società Italiana di Gerontologia e Geriatria (SIGG), and Associazione Italiana Psicogeriatria (AIP) on management of hip fracture older patients. Orthogeriatric care is at present the best model of care to improve results in older patients after hip fracture. The implementation of orthogeriatric model of care, based on the collaboration between orthopaedic surgeons and geriatricians, must take into account the local availability of resources and facilities and should be integrated into the local context. At the same time the programme must be based on the best available evidences and planned following accepted quality standards that ensure the efficacy of the intervention. The position paper focused on eight quality standards for the management of hip fracture older patients in orthogeriatric model of care. The GIOG promotes the development of a clinic database with the aim of obtaining a qualitative improvement in the management of hip fracture.

  5. Extraarticular Supramalleolar Osteotomy for Managing Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis, Alternatives for Osteotomy: How and Why?

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    The supramalleolar osteotomy has been reported to be a joint preserving surgery with good clinical outcome for asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis, especially varus ankle osteoarthritis. Conventional supramalleolar osteotomy of the tibia and fibula creates angulation and translation of the ankle joint without changing the width of the ankle mortise. Distal tibial oblique osteotomy improved the preoperative clinical and radiological parameters; however, mean talar tilt angle did not decrease. Assessment of the ankle arthritis in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes may be helpful to achieve a decrease of the talar tilt in ankle osteoarthritis.

  6. Multiscale organization of joints and faults in a fractured reservoir revealed by geostatistical, multifractal and wavelet techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Castaing, C.; Genter, A.; Ouillon, G.

    1995-08-01

    Datasets of the geometry of fracture systems were analysed at various scales in the western Arabian sedimentary platform by means of geostatistical, multifractal, and anisotropic-wavelet techniques. The investigations covered a wide range of scales, from regional to outcrops in a well-exposed area, and were based on field mapping of fractures, and the interpretation and digitizing of fracture patterns on aerial photographs and satellite images. As a first step, fracture data sets were used to examine the direction, size, spacing and density systematics, and the variability in these quantities with space and scale. Secondly, a multifractal analysis was carried out, which consists in estimating the moments of the spatial distribution of fractures at different resolutions. This global multifractal method was complemented by a local wavelet analysis, using a new anisotropic technique tailored to linear structures. For a map with a given scale of detail, this procedure permits to define integrated fracture patterns and their associated directions at a more regional scale. The main result of this combined approach is that fracturing is not a self-similar process from the centimeter scale up to the one-million-kilometer scale. Spatial distribution of faults appears as being highly controlled by the thickness of the different rheological layers that constitute the crust. A proceeding for upscaling fracture systems in sedimentary reservoirs can be proposed, based on (i) a power law for joint-length distribution, (ii) characteristic joint spacing depending on the critical sedimentary units, and (iii) fractal fault geometry for faults larger than the whole thickness of the sedimentary basin.

  7. Ankle impingement syndromes: a review of etiology and related implications.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory William

    2011-10-01

    Ankle injuries are common occurrences in athletics involving and requiring extreme ranges of motion. Ankle sprains specifically occur with a 1 in 10,000 person rate in active individuals each day. If trauma is repetitive, the ankle structures have potential to experience secondary injury and dysfunction. Included in this category of dysfunction are both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes where disruption of the bony structures, joint capsule, ligaments, and tendons typically occurs. Ankle impingement is described as ankle pain that occurs during athletic activity, with recurrent, extreme dorsiflexion or plantar flexion with the joint under a load. Ankle impingements can be classified according to what structures become involved both anteriorly and posteriorly. Osseous impingement, soft tissue impingement, impingement of the distal fascicle of anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and meniscoid lesions are all documented causes of ankle impingement. These changes tend to be brought about and exacerbated by extreme ranges of motion. Understanding various impingement types will better enable the clinician to prevent, identify, treat, and rehabilitate affected ankles. Acknowledging activities that predispose to ankle impingement syndrome will enhance prevention and recovery processes. Description of ankle impingement etiology and pathology is the objective of the current review.

  8. Range of Motion of the Ankle According to Pushing Force, Gender and Knee Position

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee; Lee, Hyunkeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference of range of motion (ROM) of ankle according to pushing force, gender and knee position. Methods One hundred and twenty-eight healthy adults (55 men, 73 women) between the ages of 20 and 51, were included in the study. One examiner measured the passive range of motion (PROM) of ankle by Dualer IQ Inclinometers and Commander Muscle Testing. ROM of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) and plantarflexion (PF) according to change of pushing force and knee position were measured at prone position. Results There was significant correlation between ROM and pushing force, the more pushing force leads the more ROM at ankle DF and ankle PF. Knee flexion of 90° position showed low PF angle and high ankle DF angle, as compared to the at neutral position of knee joint. ROM of ankle DF for female was greater than for male, with no significant difference. ROM of ankle PF for female was greater than male regardless of the pushing force. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the relationship between pushing force and ROM of ankle joint. There was significant correlation between ROM of ankle and pushing force. ROM of ankle PF for female estimated greater than male regardless of the pushing force and the number of measurement. The ROM of the ankle is measured differently according to the knee joint position. Pushing force, gender and knee joint position are required to be considered when measuring the ROM of ankle joint. PMID:27152277

  9. Limiting the use of routine radiography for acute ankle injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cockshott, W. P.; Jenkin, J. K.; Pui, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the diagnosis of ankle injuries routine radiography is often productive. An international survey of the average number of radiographs made of injured ankles suggested that two projections are adequate to detect fractures. This was confirmed in a prospective study of 242 patients coming to a hospital emergency department with recent ankle injuries. All the fractures could be identified on an anteroposterior or a lateral projection, although some were more obvious on an oblique view. As well, all the fractures were associated with malleolar soft-tissue swelling. Thus, radiography for acute ankle injuries could safely be restricted to patients with soft-tissue swelling, and fractures could be diagnosed using only two routine projections, though for management purposes additional projections might be needed. With a policy of limiting the use of radiography substantial cost reductions are possible. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6407744

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of sports injuries of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Morrison, William B

    2003-04-01

    Basic sports-related injuries of the ankle include ligament tear, tendon degeneration and tear, bone bruise, fracture, impingement, osteochondral defect, and plantar fasciitis. This article discusses the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of these injuries.

  11. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hung, You-jou

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable. PMID:26085985

  12. Biomechanical and injury response of human foot and ankle under complex loading.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaeho; Untaroiu, Costin D

    2013-10-01

    Ankle and subtalar joint injuries of vehicle front seat occupants are frequently recorded during frontal and offset vehicle crashes. A few injury criteria for foot and ankle were proposed in the past; however, they addressed only certain injury mechanisms or impact loadings. The main goal of this study was to investigate numerically the tolerance of foot and ankle under complex loading which may appear during automotive crashes. A previously developed and preliminarily validated foot and leg finite element (FE) model of a 50th percentile male was employed in this study. The model was further validated against postmortem human subjects (PMHS) data in various loading conditions that generates the bony fractures and ligament failures in ankle and subtalar regions observed in traffic accidents. Then, the foot and leg model were subjected to complex loading simulated as combinations of axial, dorsiflexion, and inversion loadings. An injury surface was fitted through the points corresponding to the parameters recorded at the time of failure in the FE simulations. The compelling injury predictions of the injury surface in two crash simulations may recommend its application for interpreting the test data recorded by anthropometric test devices (ATD) during crash tests. It is believed that the methodology presented in this study may be appropriate for the development of injury criteria under complex loadings corresponding to other body regions as well.

  13. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  14. Three-dimensional in vivo kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint in malunited distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Moore, Douglas C; Hogan, Kathleen A; Crisco, Joseph J; Akelman, Edward; Dasilva, Manuel F; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2002-03-01

    How malunion of the distal radius affects the kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint in vivo was evaluated. A novel computed tomography image-based technique was used to quantify radioulnar motion in both wrists of 9 patients who had unilateral malunited distal radius fractures. In the injured wrists dorsal angulation averaged 21 degrees +/- 6 degrees, radial inclination averaged 18 degrees +/- 5 degrees, and radial shortening averaged 21 +/- 3 mm. Clinically, the average range of motion of the injured wrists was 75 degrees +/- 25 degrees pronation and 73 degrees +/- 23 degrees supination. Kinematics of the radius during pronation and supination in the malunited forearms was indistinguishable from that in the uninjured forearms. In both the axis of rotation of the radius passed through the center of the ulnar head, although it shifted slightly ulnar and volar in supination and radial and dorsal during pronation. In contrast to previous in vitro biomechanical findings, there was no dorsovolar radial translation at the extremes of pronation or supination and no translation of the radius along the rotation axis. Soft tissues may play a larger role in limiting function than previously appreciated, and treatment may require correction of altered soft tissue structures as well as any abnormal bone anatomy.

  15. Does metaphyseal cement augmentation in fracture management influence the adjacent subchondral bone and joint cartilage?: an in vivo study in sheep stifle joints.

    PubMed

    Goetzen, Michael; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Arens, Daniel; Zeiter, Stephan; Stadelmann, Vincent; Nehrbass, Dirk; Richards, R Geoff; Blauth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation of implants with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement in osteoporotic fractures is a promising approach to increase implant purchase. Side effects of PMMA for the metaphyseal bone, particularly for the adjacent subchondral bone plate and joint cartilage, have not yet been studied. The following experimental study investigates whether subchondral PMMA injection compromises the homeostasis of the subchondral bone and/or the joint cartilage.Ten mature sheep were used to simulate subchondral PMMA injection. Follow-ups of 2 (4 animals) and 4 (6 animals) months were chosen to investigate possible cartilage damage and subchondral plate alterations in the knee. Evaluation was completed by means of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) imaging, histopathological osteoarthritis scoring, and determination of glycosaminoglycan content in the joint cartilage. Results were compared with the untreated contralateral knee and statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests.Evaluation of the histological osteoarthritis score revealed no obvious cartilage damage for the treated knee; median histological score after 2 months 0 (range 4), after 4 months 1 (range 5). There was no significant difference when compared with the untreated control site after 2 and 4 months (P = 0.23 and 0.76, respectively). HRpQCT imaging showed no damage to the metaphyseal trabeculae. Glycosaminoglycan measurements of the treated joint cartilage after 4 months revealed no significant difference compared with the untreated cartilage (P = 0.24).The findings of this study support initial clinical observation that PMMA implant augmentation of metaphyseal fractures appears to be a safe procedure for fixation without harming the subchondral bone plate and adjacent joint cartilage.

  16. Retrograde nail for tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis as a limb salvage procedure for open distal tibia and talus fractures with severe bone loss.

    PubMed

    Ochman, Sabine; Evers, Julia; Raschke, Michael J; Vordemvenne, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of complex fractures of the distal tibia, ankle, and talus with soft tissue damage, bone loss, and nonreconstructable joints for which the optimal timing for reduction and fixation has been missed is challenging. In such cases primary arthrodesis might be a treatment option. We report a series of multi-injured patients with severe soft tissue damage and bone loss, who were treated with a retrograde tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis nail as a minimally invasive treatment option for limb salvage. After a median follow-up of 5.4 years, all patients returned to their former profession. The ankle and bone fusion was complete, with moderate functional results and quality of life. Calcaneotibial arthrodesis using a retrograde nail is a good treatment option for nonreconstructable fractures of the ankle joint with severe bone loss and poor soft tissue quality in selected patients with multiple injuries, in particular, those involving both lower extremities, as a salvage procedure.

  17. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  18. Measurement of passive ankle stiffness in subjects with chronic hemiparesis using a novel ankle robot.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindo; Krebs, Hermano I; Bever, Christopher T; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F; Hogan, Neville

    2011-05-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess passive mechanical stiffness in the ankle of chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors and to compare it with those of healthy young and older (age-matched) individuals. Given the importance of the ankle during locomotion, an accurate estimate of passive ankle stiffness would be valuable for locomotor rehabilitation, potentially providing a measure of recovery and a quantitative basis to design treatment protocols. Using a novel ankle robot, we characterized passive ankle stiffness both in sagittal and in frontal planes by applying perturbations to the ankle joint over the entire range of motion with subjects in a relaxed state. We found that passive stiffness of the affected ankle joint was significantly higher in chronic stroke survivors than in healthy adults of a similar cohort, both in the sagittal as well as frontal plane of movement, in three out of four directions tested with indistinguishable stiffness values in plantarflexion direction. Our findings are comparable to the literature, thus indicating its plausibility, and, to our knowledge, report for the first time passive stiffness in the frontal plane for persons with chronic stroke and older healthy adults.

  19. Management of Osseous and Soft-Tissue Ankle Equinus During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Simonson, Devin C

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining functional alignment of a total ankle replacement, including physiologic sagittal plane range of motion, is paramount for a successful outcome. This article reviews the literature on techniques available for correction of osseous and soft-tissue equinus at the time of index total ankle replacement. These techniques include anterior tibiotalar joint cheilectomy, posterior superficial muscle compartment lengthening, posterior ankle capsule release, and release of the posterior portions of the medial and lateral collateral ligament complexes. The rationale for these procedures and the operative sequence of events for these procedures are presented.

  20. Evaluation of J-initiation fracture toughness of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene used in total joint replacements

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, R.; Rimnac, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Fracture of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) total joint replacement components is a clinical concern. Thus, it is important to characterize the fracture resistance of UHMWPE. To determine J-initiation fracture toughness (JQ) for metals and metallic alloys, ASTM E1820 recommends a procedure based on an empirical crack blunting line. This approach has been found to overestimate the initiation toughness of tough polymers like UHMWPE. Therefore, in this study, a novel experimental approach based on crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) was utilized to evaluate JQ of UHMWPE materials. J-initiation fracture toughness was experimentally measured in ambient air and a physiologically-relevant 37°C PBS environment for three different formulations of UHMWPE and compared to the blunting line approach. The CTOD method was found to provide JQ values comparable to the blunting line approach for the UHMWPE materials and environments examined in this study. The CTOD method used in this study is based on experimental observation and, thus, does not rely on an empirical relationship or fracture surface measurements. Therefore, determining JQ using the experimentally based CTOD method proposed in this study may be a more reliable approach for UHMWPE and other tough polymers than the blunting line approach. PMID:20671815

  1. The ankle meter: an instrument for evaluation of anterior talar drawer in ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Gunter

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to work out a clinical test which is possible to measure the anterior talar drawer (ATD) in patients after ankle sprain. The instrument for evaluation was called "ankle meter". The instrument consists of two plastic scales (heal scale and tibia scale). The instrument allows quantifying the results of the anterior drawing test. A total of 38 persons (16 men, 22 women) were available as control group. The persons were 28.8+/-10.1 years old. No proband had any ankle problems in his history. A total of 45 patients (25 males, 20 females) suffering from ankle sprain were included in the study. In these patients stress radiography (147.1 N) was performed to measure the ATD. In control group the clinical measured ATD was 1.7+/-1.3 mm. Measurement for detect the interobserver validity did not detect significant differences. The ATD of the joint after ankle sprain was significantly higher (8.9+/-4.3 mm). The difference between healthy and injured ankle in case of an ankle sprain was 7.4+/-4.2 mm. There was a significant correlation between clinical and radiological measured ATD (R=0.91). The results suggest that it is possible to measure the ATD exactly. The values of the clinical ATD measurement showed a good correlation with the results of stress radiography. Diligent clinical examination in combination with this special test are after this experiences sufficient to classify the severity of injury after ankle sprain.

  2. Effect of treadmill walking with ankle stretching orthosis on ankle flexibility and gait

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-ki; Kim, Si-hyun; Jeon, In-cheol; Ahn, Sun-hee; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematics of the ankle in the lunge to estabilish effectiveness of an ankle stretching orthosis (ASO) on the ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of individuals with limited dorsiflexion ROM. [Subjects and Methods] Forty ankles with decreased dorsiflexion ROM of 20 participants were evaluated in this study. After wearing the ASO, participants walked on a treadmill for 15 minutes. Participants walked on the treadmill at a self-selected comfortable speed. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM, maximum dorsiflexion ROM before heel-off, and time to heel-off during the stance phase of gait were measured before and after 15 minutes of treadmill walking with the ASO. The differences in all variables between before and after treadmill walking with ASO were analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] Ankle active and passive ROM, and dorsiflexion ROM during lunge increased significantly after treadmill walking with ASO. Treadmill walking with the ASO significantly increased the angle of maximal dorsiflexion before heel-off and time to heel-off during the stance phase. [Conclusion] The results of this study show that treadmill walking with the ASO effectively improved ankle flexibility and restored the normal gait pattern of the ankle joint by increasing dorsiflexion ROM, maximal angle of dorsiflexion, and time to heel-off in the stance phase. PMID:25995601

  3. The biomechanical study of the influence to the forefoot plantar pressure of the first tarsometatarsal joint fracture-dislocation fixed by three different implants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao; Pang, Qing-jiang; Chen, Xian-jun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To study the influence of forefoot plantar pressure of the first tarsometatarsal joint fracture-dislocation by three different implants to provide experimental reference in selecting implants. Methods: Eight fresh foot specimens were made into the models of the first tarsometatarsal joint fracture-dislocation, which were fixed with 3.5 mm cortical screw, 1/4 tubular plate and compressive staple in turn. After the loading of 600N, the changes of the plantar pressure in forefoot were measured by the method of the F-scan plantar pressure system. Results: After first tarsometatarsal joint fracture-dislocation, the peak pressure under the first metatarsal head would decrease, while the pressure under the second metatarsal head would increase(P<0.05). When the first tarsometatarsal joint was fixed with screw or plate respectively; the peak pressure under the two metatarsal heads would tend to be normal. However, the staple fixation would show the statistical significant difference, although the peak pressure under the first and second metatarsal heads were recovered in some extent(P<0.05). Conclusions: After the first tarsometatarsal joint fracture-dislocation, the plantar pressure might be compensated partly by the adjacent metatarsal heads. While the first tarsometatarsal joint fracture-dislocation was fixed by screw or plate, the plantar pressure of the forefoot would return to the normal state. However, if the joint was fixed by the staple, it would still be difficult to return the plantar pressure to be normal. PMID:28367189

  4. Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures cont. Page ( 5 ) • Early motion. Many doctors encourage motion of the foot and ankle early in the ... therapy. Specific exercises can improve the range of motion in your foot and ankle, and strengthen supporting ...

  5. ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME AND COMPLICATIONS OF TALAR NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Leonardo Ribeiro; Ferreira, Ricardo Cardenuto; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical, functional and radiographic results from talar neck fractures in patients treated at the Foot and Ankle Surgery Group of Santa Casa de Sao Paulo. Method: We evaluated 20 patients. The mean follow-up time was 71 months. One fracture was classified as Hawkins Type I, 12 as Hawkins type II, five as Hawkins type III, two as Hawkins type IV and four fractures were open. Results: One patient was treated conservatively, 16 were treated with open reduction and internal fixation (three with primary subtalar arthrodesis), one was treated with talectomy and two with tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. The reduction obtained was anatomical in seven feet, acceptable in six feet and poor in four. Seven patients had early complications. There was one case of delayed consolidation and four of talar body osteonecrosis. Four patients required secondary reconstruction procedures. No significant radiographic impairment of the ankle joint was found in 62% of the patients and of the subtalar joint in 25%. Of the patients who did not undergo secondary procedures, 81% complained about the treated foot, 37.5% showed some deformity, 44% presented diminished sensitivity and 50% had to retire from work. The mean loss of motion in the ankle was 49%, and in the subtalar joint, 80%. The average AOFAS score was 73 points. Conclusion: Talar neck fractures are associated with high rates of clinical, functional and radiographic complications. PMID:27022565

  6. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    PubMed

    van Dijk, C Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J A

    2010-05-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone plate. The ankle joint has a high congruency. During loading, compressed cartilage forces its water into the microfractured subchondral bone, leading to a localized high increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone. This will result in local osteolysis and can explain the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion, but is most probably caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking, which results in stimulation of the highly innervated subchondral bone underneath the cartilage defect. Understanding the natural history of osteochondral defects could lead to the development of strategies for preventing progressive joint damage.

  7. Biomechanics of foot/ankle trauma with variable energy impacts

    PubMed Central

    Gallenberger, Kathryn; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank

    2013-01-01

    A total of 60 pendulum impacts to the plantar surface of 15 lower limb PMHS specimens were conducted. Impact conditions were chosen to obtain data from high velocity tests without injury. For 19 impacts the specimen was initially positioned in 20-deg of dorsiflexion. The remaining impacts used neutral positioning. The foot-ankle response was investigated based on impact energy and velocity. Response was characterized by heel pad and joint stiffness. For neutral tests, axial force vs compression corridors were developed for 2–3 m/s, 4–6 m/s, and 7–63 J impacts. For dorsiflexion tests corridors of 1–3 m/s, 6–8 m/s, 7–20 J, and 80–100 J were developed. These results indicate foot/ankle response is not more sensitive to impact energy than velocity. Injury risk curves were developed for both neutral and dorsiflexion positioning using logistic regression. Strain gage data were used to obtain uncensored force values for injury analysis. In neutral, 50% probability of injury occurred at 6800 N. In dorsiflexion, 50% probability occurred at 7900 N, but the regression was not statistically significant. These preliminary results indicate dorsiflexed specimens fracture at a higher force than neutral specimens. PMID:24406952

  8. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  9. Foot and Ankle Injuries in American Football.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Anderson, Robert B

    Physicians need to be aware of a variety of foot and ankle injuries that commonly occur in American football, including turf toe, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, syndesmotic and deltoid disruption, and Achilles ruptures. These injuries are often complex and require early individual tailoring of treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Successful management and return to play requires early diagnosis, a thorough work-up, and prompt surgical intervention when warranted with meticulous attention to restoration of normal foot and ankle anatomy. Physicians should have a high suspicion for subtle injuries and variants that can occur via both contact and noncontact mechanisms.

  10. Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion After Ankle Self-Stretching Using a Strap

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Hwang, Ui-jae

    2015-01-01

    Context  A variety of ankle self-stretching exercises have been recommended to improve ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) in individuals with limited ankle dorsiflexion. A strap can be applied to stabilize the talus and facilitate anterior glide of the distal tibia at the talocrural joint during ankle self-stretching exercises. Novel ankle self-stretching using a strap (SSS) may be a useful method of improving ankle DFROM. Objective  To compare the effects of 2 ankle-stretching techniques (static stretching versus SSS) on ankle DFROM. Design  Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting  University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  Thirty-two participants with limited active dorsiflexion (<20°) while sitting (14 women and 18 men) were recruited. Main Outcome Measure(s)  The participants performed 2 ankle self-stretching techniques (static stretching and SSS) for 3 weeks. Active DFROM (ADFROM), passive DFROM (PDFROM), and the lunge angle were measured. An independent t test was used to compare the improvements in these values before and after the 2 stretching interventions. The level of statistical significance was set at α = .05. Results  Active DFROM and PDFROM were greater in both stretching groups after the 3-week interventions. However, ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle were greater in the SSS group than in the static-stretching group (P < .05). Conclusions  Ankle SSS is recommended to improve ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle in individuals with limited DFROM. PMID:26633750

  11. Are there any relationships among ankle proprioception acuity, pre-landing ankle muscle responses, and landing impact in man?

    PubMed

    Fu, Siu Ngor; Hui-Chan, Christina Wan Ying

    2007-05-01

    Proprioceptive input has been suggested to contribute to the pre-landing muscle responses associated with drop-landing, but its precise role has yet to be delineated. This study set out to examine the relationships among ankle proprioception, pre-landing muscle responses, and landing impact on drop-landing in healthy man. Fifteen healthy male basketball players aged 18 to 26 participated in this study. Passive ankle joint repositioning errors were used to examine ankle joint proprioception. Pre-landing EMG responses in the ankle muscles and the impact force on landing were recorded while the players performed self-initiated drops from a height of 30 cm. Results demonstrated that averaged ankle repositioning errors were significantly correlated with the co-contraction indexes between left tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles (TA/MG CoI) (r=0.67, p=0.006), and showed a trend towards a relationship with the right TA/MG CoI (r=0.47, p=0.079). TA/MG CoI from both ankles were further related to the magnitude of the total impact force on landing (r=0.54 and 0.53, respectively; p<0.05). We concluded that male basketball players with less accurate ankle joint sense adopted greater co-contraction of ankle dorsiflexors and platarflexors, which was in turn associated with greater impact force at the moment of landing.

  12. Effect of soft root weld layer on fracture toughness of under-matched weld joints on Q+T steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1996-12-01

    Welding of quenched and tempered (Q+T) high strength low alloyed steels can cause weld strength undermatching to satisfy the toughness requirements for the weld deposit. Cost of pre-heating of these steels can be saved if one can prove that use of soft electrodes for root passes do not endanger the overall quality of the joint. By welding of 40 mm thick Q+T structural steel (grade HT 80), over-matched condition had appeared in the root area of the X-groove weld despite of welding consumable which would give entire weld under-matched properties. This is the effect of weld metal alloying by elements from base material. So, the weld joint is not protected against cold cracking especially in the root region, therefore, a high preheating should be used to reduce the possibility of this phenomenon. In this work soft (lower strength) filler metal was used for first two and four root passes of X-joint. In this case root area was also alloyed by elements from base material and obtained mis-matching factor M was higher than it was expected. So, one homogeneous and two non homogeneous weld joints (with two and four soft passes) were considered. Mechanical properties of weld joints were measured by round tensile bars taken from different parts of the weld. The under-matching factor of weld joint with two and four soft root passes was around 0.80--0.90 in the soft root layer. It was expected that uneven strength distribution along the fatigue crack tip line would affect fracture initiation behavior of all three different weld joints. The metallographical post-test sectioning has revealed the initiation points mainly at the lowest weld metal strength.

  13. Patellar stress fracture: a complication of knee joint arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Reed, M R; Farhan, M J; Chaudhuri, C

    1999-04-01

    A case of patellar stress fracture after total knee arthroplasty in a man with gout and previous osteonecrosis of the tali is reported. The combination of fat pad excision and lateral release causing disruption to the patellar blood supply during primary total knee arthroplasty resulted in the development of a patellar fracture. Avascular necrosis, caused by gout, may form part of the pathogenesis.

  14. Total ankle replacement--evolution of the technology and future applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, John J; Sheskier, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty was developed to reduce pain and retain motion of the ankle joint in patients with osteoarthritis much like its total hip and knee counterparts. Orthopaedic surgeons are well equipped to evaluate and treat patients with end-stage hip or knee arthritis; however, the management of patients with ankle arthritis represents a challenge to both general orthopaedic surgeons and to the foot and ankle surgeons to whom these patients are often referred. Although techniques for both hip and knee arthroplasty have evolved to provide long-term pain relief and functional improvement, neither ankle arthrodesis nor arthroplasty has demonstrated comparably favorable outcomes in long-term follow-up studies. Early ankle arthroplasty designs with highly constrained cemented components were abandoned due to unacceptably high failure rates and complications. While arthrodesis is still considered the "gold standard" for treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis, progression of adjacent joint arthrosis and diminished gait efficiency has led to a resurgence of interest in ankle arthroplasty. Long-term outcome studies for total ankle replacement found excellent or good results in 82% of patients who received a newer generation ankle device compared with 72% if undergoing ankle fusion. Continued long-term follow-up studies are necessary, but total ankle arthroplasty has become a viable option for surgical treatment of ankle arthritis.

  15. An instrumented pendulum system for measuring energy absorption during fracture insult to large animal joints in vivo.

    PubMed

    Diestelmeier, B W; Rudert, M J; Tochigi, Y; Baer, T E; Fredericks, D C; Brown, T D

    2014-06-01

    For systematic laboratory studies of bone fractures in general and intra-articular fractures in particular, it is often necessary to control for injury severity. Quantitatively, a parameter of primary interest in that regard is the energy absorbed during the injury event. For this purpose, a novel technique has been developed to measure energy absorption in experimental impaction. The specific application is for fracture insult to porcine hock (tibiotalar) joints in vivo, for which illustrative intra-operative data are reported. The instrumentation allowed for the measurement of the delivered kinetic energy and of the energy passed through the specimen during impaction. The energy absorbed by the specimen was calculated as the difference between those two values. A foam specimen validation study was first performed to compare the energy absorption measurements from the pendulum instrumentation versus the work of indentation performed by an MTS machine. Following validation, the pendulum apparatus was used to measure the energy absorbed during intra-articular fractures created in 14 minipig hock joints in vivo. The foam validation study showed close correspondence between the pendulum-measured energy absorption and MTS-performed work of indentation. In the survival animal series, the energy delivered ranged from 31.5 to 48.3 Js (41.3±4.0, mean±s.d.) and the proportion of energy absorbed to energy delivered ranged from 44.2% to 64.7% (53.6%±4.5%). The foam validation results support the reliability of the energy absorption measure provided by the instrumented pendulum system. Given that a very substantial proportion of delivered energy passed--unabsorbed--through the specimens, the energy absorption measure provided by this novel technique arguably provides better characterization of injury severity than is provided simply by energy delivery.

  16. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Rouse, Elliott J; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the "push off" region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane.

  17. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  18. Rehabilitation of Syndesmotic (High) Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Glenn N.; Allen, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: High ankle sprains are common in athletes who play contact sports. Most high ankle sprains are treated nonsurgically with a rehabilitation program. Evidence Acquisition: All years of PUBMED, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL PLUS, SPORTDiscuss, Google Scholar, and Web of Science were searched to August 2010, cross-referencing existing publications. Keywords included syndesmosis ankle sprain or high ankle sprain and the following terms: rehabilitation, treatment, cryotherapy, braces, orthosis, therapeutic modalities, joint mobilization, massage, pain, pain medications, TENS (ie, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation), acupuncture, aquatic therapy, strength, neuromuscular training, perturbation training, and outcomes. Results: Level of evidence, 5. A 3-phase rehabilitation program is described. The acute phase is directed at protecting the joint while minimizing pain, inflammation, muscle weakness, and loss of motion. Most patients are treated with some form of immobilization and have weightbearing restrictions. A range of therapeutic modalities are used to minimize pain and inflammation. Gentle mobilization and resistance exercises are used to gain mobility and maintain muscle size and strength. The subacute phase is directed at normalizing range of motion, strength, and function in activities of daily living. Progressive mobilization and strengthening are hallmarks of this phase. Neuromuscular training is begun and becomes the central component of rehabilitation. The advanced training phase focuses on preparing the patient for return to sports participation. Perturbation of support surfaces, agility drills, plyometrics, and sport-specific training are central components of this phase. Conclusion: The rehabilitation guidelines discussed may assist clinicians in managing syndesmotic ankle sprains. PMID:23015976

  19. Stress fracture of the second metatarsal and sprain of lisfranc joint in a pre-professional ballet dancer.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Peter; Rafferty, Jason; Evangelista, Peter; Van Valkenburg, Scott; DiGiovanni, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old pre-professional ballerina that demonstrates common features of two conditions affecting the midfoot that are often missed or subject to delay in diagnosis in such young athletes: 1. stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal, and 2. sprain of the Lisfranc joint complex. While these represent potentially career-altering injuries in the professional dancer, this case demonstrates that a high index of clinical suspicion, careful physical exam, appropriate radiographic assessment, and prompt treatment are essential to achieving the best possible outcome.

  20. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, p<0.05). Not all of the subjects reached a steady-state gait pattern within the two sessions, in contrast to a previous study using a weaker robotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance.

  1. [Internal Fixation of Sacro-iliac Joint in Unstable Fractures of the Pelvic Ring.].

    PubMed

    Soukup, B

    1999-01-01

    Unstable fractures of the pelvic ring are always serious injuries posing problems from many aspects. Among the most serious are definitely unstable fractures of the pelvic ring with both vertical and rotational instability, i. e. type C fractures according to AO classification scheme. The recent therapeutic concept recommends in case of these fractures an active reconstruction on the dorsal SI complex which evidently improves the final perspective of patients with such a severe injury. The author presents his own clinical experience and literary data relating to the treatment of 11 patients who underwent reconstruction in the region of dorsal sacro-iliac complex due to type C unstable fracture. Clinical results achieved on the basis of the evaluation of a group of 11 patients are favourable and promising despite a significant complexity of the problems of unstable pelvic fractures. In 9 patients the anatomical result on radiograph was excellent, 9 patients regained full mobility after the proper physiotherapy, 10 patients resumed their work and 6 patients resumed even professional sports activity. In the conclusion the author states that in suitable, mainly young and fully stabilized patients the reconstruction surgery on the dorsal pelvic SI segment is fully justified which is documented both by the literary data and his own experience. Key words: unstable pelvic fractures.

  2. Three-dimensional evaluation of healing joint morphology after closed treatment of condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Inoue, M; Aijima, R; Danjo, A; Goto, M

    2016-03-01

    Closed treatment for condylar fractures has long been widely accepted. With closed treatment, the deviated bone fragments heal in their new positions, and this may subsequently cause a range of functional impairments. The association between healing morphology and post-treatment functional impairment is unclear. In this study, computed tomography images of 26 patients (35 sides) who had undergone closed treatment for condylar fractures were used to perform a comparative investigation of three-dimensional (3D) bone morphology before and after treatment. As a result, the morphology of the condylar process after treatment was classified into four different patterns: unchanged, spherical, L-shaped, and detached. In terms of the association between fracture types and healing morphology, fractures of the condylar head healed in the spherical pattern, simple fractures of the condylar neck healed in the spherical or L-shaped pattern, and comminuted fractures of the condylar neck healed in the spherical, L-shaped, or detached pattern. The association between mandibular deviation and healing morphology was also investigated, and it was found that deviation was greater for the spherical and detached patterns than for the L-shaped pattern. The present findings indicate that 3D evaluation of the fractured condylar process is required to elucidate the association with functional impairment after healing.

  3. Sequential approach to joint flow-seismic inversion for improved characterization of fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Peter K.; Zheng, Yingcai; Fang, Xinding; Wojcik, Rafal; McLaughlin, Dennis; Brown, Stephen; Fehler, Michael C.; Burns, Daniel R.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    Seismic interpretation of subsurface structures is traditionally performed without any account of flow behavior. Here we present a methodology for characterizing fractured geologic reservoirs by integrating flow and seismic data. The key element of the proposed approach is the identification—within the inversion—of the intimate relation between fracture compliance and fracture transmissivity, which determine the acoustic and flow responses of a fractured reservoir, respectively. Owing to the strong (but highly uncertain) dependence of fracture transmissivity on fracture compliance, the modeled flow response in a fractured reservoir is highly sensitive to the geophysical interpretation. By means of synthetic models, we show that by incorporating flow data (well pressures and tracer breakthrough curves) into the inversion workflow, we can simultaneously reduce the error in the seismic interpretation and improve predictions of the reservoir flow dynamics. While the inversion results are robust with respect to noise in the data for this synthetic example, the applicability of the methodology remains to be tested for more complex synthetic models and field cases.

  4. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-07-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  5. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  6. Short-term effect of ultrasound-guided low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid injection on clinical outcomes and imaging changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle and foot joints. A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien-Chih; Lee, Si-Huei; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Liu, Fu-Wei; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chan, Rai-Chi; Chou, Chen-Liang

    2017-01-06

    To determine whether hyaluronic acid (HA) injection into rheumatoid arthritis ankles and feet can achieve improvement in foot function and reduce synovial hyper-vascularization. Forty-four patients with RA having unilateral or bilateral painful ankle and foot involvement (N = 75) were studied. All the patients were randomized to receive HA (N = 40) or lidocaine (LI) (N = 35) injection at 2-week intervals; Clinical assessments were performed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and foot function index (FFItotal) including subscales of pain (FFIpain) before injection at baseline, 4 weeks (first evaluation) and 12 weeks (secondary evaluation). Imaging evaluation based on color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and synovitis scores was performed simultaneously. HA injection improved the VAS score (p = .009), FFIpain (p = .041), and FFItotal (p = .032) considerably more than LI injections did at the first evaluation. The CDUS values at first evaluation (p = .005) and secondary evaluation (p < .001) decreased significantly compared with the base line values. HA injections reduced the CDUS values of more than half of the joints (54%, p = .042) while the control group exhibited no change (20%, p = .56). However, HA injection did not reduce the CDUS values more than LI injection did. Regarding the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy, no significant difference was observed between or within the groups in the synovitis scores. HA injection improved short-term foot function and pain reduction. HA injection may have a modest effect in reducing synovial hyper-vascularization. Further large-scale study is warranted to confirm this result.

  7. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tp; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick Sh; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-07-30

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing - a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60-90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41-45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not be

  8. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  9. Biomechanical study of tarsometatarsal joint fusion using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Zengyong; Zhang, Ming

    2014-11-01

    Complications of surgeries in foot and ankle bring patients with severe sufferings. Sufficient understanding of the internal biomechanical information such as stress distribution, contact pressure, and deformation is critical to estimate the effectiveness of surgical treatments and avoid complications. Foot and ankle is an intricate and synergetic system, and localized intervention may alter the functions to the adjacent components. The aim of this study was to estimate biomechanical effects of the TMT joint fusion using comprehensive finite element (FE) analysis. A foot and ankle model consists of 28 bones, 72 ligaments, and plantar fascia with soft tissues embracing all the segments. Kinematic information and ground reaction force during gait were obtained from motion analysis. Three gait instants namely the first peak, second peak and mid-stance were simulated in a normal foot and a foot with TMT joint fusion. It was found that contact pressure on plantar foot increased by 0.42%, 19% and 37%, respectively after TMT fusion compared with normal foot walking. Navico-cuneiform and fifth meta-cuboid joints sustained 27% and 40% increase in contact pressure at second peak, implying potential risk of joint problems such as arthritis. Von Mises stress in the second metatarsal bone increased by 22% at midstance, making it susceptible to stress fracture. This study provides biomechanical information for understanding the possible consequences of TMT joint fusion.

  10. Dietary and viscosupplementation in ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Shaun K; Baumhauer, Judith F

    2008-09-01

    Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are the most well-marketed dietary supplements directed toward managing symptoms associated with osteoarthritis. The presumption of their benefit in the ankle is based largely on promising results from their use in knee osteoarthritis. Likewise, viscosupplementation has proved to be efficacious in the management of osteoarthritis of the knee. Preliminary studies demonstrate a realization of this benefit in the ankle joint, but further research is required. So far, the literature has shown the dietary and viscosupplementation discussed in this article to be relatively safe for use.

  11. Gait generation for powered Hip-Ankle-Linkage-Orthosis.

    PubMed

    Jaeryoung Lee; Mizumoto, Ryota; Obinata, Goro; Genda, Eiichi; Stefanov, Dimitar; Aoki, Hirofumi; Yanling Pei

    2015-08-01

    A hip-knee-ankle-foot orthotic system called `HALO'(Hip and Ankle Linked Orthosis) for paraplegic walking has been developed in our previous study. Each ankle joint of the HALO system is linked with a medial single joint via a wire which allows both feet of the orthosis to stay always parallel to the floor during walking and assists swinging the leg. The tests of the HALO system demonstrated that it allows smoother walking and easy don/doff. In order to improve further the characteristics of the previous design, we started a new project called pHALO aiming at further reducing of the energy expenditure during walking. As a difference from the previous solution where ankle joints were restrained, the new solution will incorporate two actuators to control the ankle joints angles. As an intermediate step from the development of the pHALO system, in this study we added to the existing system a feedback PI controller to control the ankle joint angle of the right foot in the push-off phase and conducted an experiment to evaluate the effect of the new design on the walking patterns and energy efficiency. The results showed longer stride length, faster gait speed, smaller variation of the CoG, and less energy consumption.

  12. Serum phosphorus levels and the spectrum of ankle-brachial index in older men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jerry; Wassel, Christina L; Kestenbaum, Bryan R; Collins, Tracie C; Criqui, Michael H; Lewis, Cora E; Cummings, Steve R; Ix, Joachim H

    2010-04-15

    A higher serum phosphorus level is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among community-living populations. Mechanisms are unknown. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) provides information on both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. In this cross-sectional study (2000-2002), the authors evaluated the association of serum phosphorus levels with low (<0.90) and high (> or =1.40 or incompressible) ABI as compared with intermediate ABI in 5,330 older US men, among whom the mean serum phosphorus level was 3.2 mg/dL (standard deviation, 0.4), 6% had a low ABI, and 5% had a high ABI. Each 1-mg/dL increase in serum phosphorus level was associated with a 1.6-fold greater prevalence of low ABI (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2, 2.1; P < 0.001) and a 1.4-fold greater prevalence of high ABI (95% CI: 1.0, 1.9; P = 0.03) in models adjusted for demographic factors, traditional CVD risk factors, and kidney function. However, the association of phosphorus with high ABI differed by chronic kidney disease (CKD) status (in persons with CKD, prevalence ratio = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.61, 5.45; in persons without CKD, prevalence ratio = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.61; interaction P = 0.04). In conclusion, among community-living older men, higher phosphorus levels are associated with low ABI and are also associated with high ABI in persons with CKD. These associations may explain the link between serum phosphorus levels and CVD events.

  13. Mode I and Mode III fractures in intermediate zone of full-thickness porcine temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Mark W; Hohl, Rebecca H; Nickel, Jeffrey C; Iwasaki, Laura R; Pidaparti, Ramana M

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the critical energy required to induce flaw propagation in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc when tensile and shear stresses were applied. J-integrals were measured for Mode I and III fractures because excessive tensile and shear stresses promote disc failure. Single edge notch (Mode I) and trouser tear (Mode III) specimens were constructed with flaws oriented parallel to the predominant anteroposteriorly oriented collagen fibers of the TMJ disc. Disks with and without an impulsive pre-load of 3 N s were studied to compare impact-damaged and healthy tissues. Results demonstrated that impulsive loading stiffened the tissues and significantly increased the Mode I fracture energy (J (IC)) but not Mode III (J (IIIC)) (p < or = 0.05). J (IC) and J (IIIC) values were similar for undamaged tissues, but J (IC) values were 2.3 times higher for impulsively loaded tissues (p < or = 0.05). This suggests that when flaws are introduced through impact, the TMJ disc responds by requiring more energy for tensile flaw extension. This research is a first step towards characterizing the mechanical microenvironment that initiates joint disease. This characterization is essential for successful integration of engineered replacement tissues for damaged TMJs.

  14. Fracture Analysis of Competing Failure Modes of Aluminum-CFRP Joints Using Three-Layer Titanium Laminates as Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woizeschke, P.; Vollertsen, F.

    2015-09-01

    The structural properties of lightweight constructions can be adapted to specific local requirements using multi-material designs. Aluminum alloys and carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are materials of great interest requiring suitable joining techniques in order to transfer the advantages of combining the materials to structural benefits. Thus, the research group "Schwarz-Silber" investigates novel concepts to enable frontal aluminum-CFRP joints using transition structures. In the foil concept titanium foils are used as transition elements. Specimens have been produced using three-layer titanium laminates. In tensile tests, three failure locations have been observed: (1) Al-Ti seam, (2) Ti-CFRP hybrid laminate, and (3) CFRP laminate. In this paper, the fracture mechanisms of these failure modes are investigated by analyzing metallographic micrographs and fracture surfaces as well as by correlating load-displacement curves to video imaging of tensile tests. The results show that the cracking of the CFRP layers can be traced back to an assembly error. The laminate character of the titanium part tends to reduce the Al-Ti seam strength. However, two sub-joint tests demonstrate that the Al-Ti seam can endure loads up to 9.5 kN. The ductile failure behavior of the Ti-CFRP hybrid laminates is caused by plastic deformations of the titanium laminate liners.

  15. Characterization of Sheet Fracture Patterns in Polygonal-Jointed Lavas at Kokostick Butte, OR, and Mazama Ridge, WA: Investigation and Interpretation of Their Formation and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodge, R. W.; Lescinsky, D. T.

    2006-12-01

    Polygonal joints in lava flows ("columns") are commonly equant leading to a model of formation associated with cooling in an isotropic stress field. This model, however, does not explain rectangular columns, sheet-like fractures, fractures with crosscutting relationships, and fractures with orientations other than perpendicular to the cooling surface. These fracture patterns are often observed at glaciated volcanoes. The presence of preferential fracture orientations suggests an applied stress component likely due to environmental conditions such as the presence of glaciers or flow dynamics such as down-slope settling or flow margin inflation. During this study we investigated the formation and significance of these non-equant fracture patterns to propose a model for their formation. These `abnormal' fracture patterns have not been discussed in the literature and may be important to better understanding the cooling conditions of such lava flows. To test these possibilities we studied Kokostick Butte dacite flow, OR (near South Sister), and Mazama Ridge andesite flow at Mount Rainier, WA. Both of these flows have well developed sheet-like fractures and display evidence of ice-contact during eruption and emplacement. Sheet fractures are long and continuous fractures that have perpendicular connecting fractures forming rectangular columns. The sheet-like fractures are largely parallel to each other on the exposure surface and the connecting fractures vary locally from primary fractures (associated with cooling toward flow interior) to secondary fractures (associated with cooling by water infiltration). Detailed measurements of fracture orientations and spacing were collected at Kokostick Butte and Mazama Ridge to examine the relationship between the sheet fractures and flow geometry. Preliminary results support this relationship and suggest these patterns likely form due to shear associated with small amounts of flow advance by the rapidly cooling lava. Laboratory

  16. Crushing injuries of the foot and ankle, with complex open fractures: result of a prospective study with a 3 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    DA, Edelstein; I, Florescu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the compared results of both the reconstruction surgery and the amputation in severe crushing of the foot, which led to open fractures. The type of study. Prospective. Background. Two major trauma hospitals (Floreasca Clinical Emergency Hospital and "Bagdasar Arseni" Clinical Emergency Hospital) from the university center in Bucharest. Patients. 21 patients, who sustained crushing of the foot with resulting Gustilo type III open fractures, were involved. The exclusion criteria were represented by open fractures that had very gross destructions of the neurovascular bundle, for which the amputation was the only solution, with no modality to reconstruct whatsoever. Treatment. An immediate amputation (at 24, 48 hours after a thorough debridement, proper patient resuscitation, and detailed imaging investigation - the technique of delayed emergency) and reconstruction surgery were performed. Methods of evaluation. Three variables were used: the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) score, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for the residual pain and the number of rehospitalizations for secondary surgical procedures. Results. When comparing the two lots of patients, first in which the amputation patients were included and second in which the reconstruction patients were included, it was noticed that there was a less favorable prognostic in the second lot for a three-year follow up period. Conclusions. The patients with a mangled foot, in which reconstruction surgery of the bone and soft tissue envelope was performed, had a worse prognostic than those who had an amputation as a first intention. Abbreviations: SIP = Sickness Impact Profile, VAS = Visual Analogue Scale, MVA = Motor Vehicle Accident, STSG = Split Thickness Skin Graft.

  17. Joints, shear fractures and ductile shear zones in a cooling pluton: the example of the Lake Edison Granodiorite (Sierra Nevada, California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    In the Lake Edison (LE) granodiorite (88Ma) of the Bear Creek area (Cretaceous Mono Pass intrusive suite, Sierra Nevada, CA) different sets of fractures developed during the high temperature stages of post-magmatic cooling. These fractures strongly localized successive ductile and later brittle shear deformation, but many pristine fractures do not show any shear offset (i.e. are joints). Away from the contact with the younger (86Ma) Mono Creek granite, the LE granodiorite mainly show a single dominant set of steeply dipping fractures striking around E-W to ENE-WSW which were exploited as left-handed strike-slip ductile shear zones and later as faults with identical kinematics. In the proximity of the contact, a second (dominant) set of steeply dipping fractures is present, striking about NNE-SSW, with a right-handed ductile shear reactivation and forming a conjugate array with the E-W set; many leucocratic dykes (including pegmatite) also localized the shear deformation within the granodiorite. Left-handed shear zones and the precursory joint/fractures commonly overprint the right-handed ones, but the opposite is also observed. The two conjugate sets of ductile shear zones are associated with a background solid state foliation in the host granodiorite which is mainly developed towards the pluton contact and which has been referred to the Rosy Finch Shear Zone in the area. The attitude of the foliation is orthogonal to the bisector of the small angle between the two sets of joints/fractures/ductile shears. The mineral fabric along the foliation and along both the left- and right-handed localized shear zones indicate deformation T>500°C. This suggests that all the structures are coeval developing under the same stress field and that joints actually develop in an orientation typical of shear fractures.

  18. Registry data trends of total ankle replacement use.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty registry data are meaningful when evaluating the outcomes of total joint replacement, because they provide unbiased objective information regarding survivorship and incidence of use. Critical evaluation of the registry data information will benefit the surgeon, patient, and industry. However, the implementation and acceptance of registry data for total ankle replacement has lagged behind that of hip and knee implant arthroplasty. Currently, several countries have national joint arthroplasty registries, with only some procuring information for total ankle replacement. We performed an electronic search to identify publications and worldwide registry databanks with pertinent information specific to total ankle replacement to determine the type of prostheses used and usage trends over time. We identified worldwide registry data from 33 countries, with details pertinent to total ankle replacement identified in only 6 countries. The obtained information was arbitrarily stratified into 3 distinct periods: 2000 to 2006, 2007 to 2010, and 2011. Within these study periods, the data from 13 total ankle replacement systems involving 3,980 ankles were identified. The vast majority (97%) of the reported ankle replacements were 3-component, mobile-bearing, uncemented prostheses. Three usage trends were identified: initial robust embracement followed by abrupt disuse, minimal use, and initial embracement followed by sustained growth in implantation. Before the widespread acceptance of new total ankle replacements, the United States should scrutinize and learn from the international registry data and develop its own national joint registry that would include total ankle replacement. Caution against the adoption of newly released prostheses, especially those without readily available revision components, is recommended.

  19. Severe thalassaemia intermedia with multiple fractures: role of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saqib Qayyum; Iqbal, Mudassar; Wahla, Madiha Saeed; Tarrar, Aimel Munir

    2011-11-01

    Thalassaemia intermedia includes thalassaemias with clinical severity intermediate between asymptomatic thalassaemia minor and transfusion dependent thalassaemia major. By definition patients of thalassaemia intermedia maintain a haemoglobin level of 7-10 g/dl and do not, or only occasionally, require blood transfusion. An eight-year-old girl who was a known case of thalassaemia intermedia and had been occasionally transfused presented with fever, pain and swelling over the wrists, ankles and above the right knee joint. Radiographs showed medullary widening, cortical thinning and; multiple, recent and old, partially healed fractures of metadiaphseal regions of long bones. Her fractures have been immobilized by means of back slabs. In view of her recurrent fractures and growth retardation we advised a regular transfusion-chelation regimen to our patient to suppress her ineffective dyserythropoiesis. The treatment is expected to prevent further bone fragility and fractures, as well as improve her life quality.

  20. Chronic ankle instability: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprain is reported to be among the most common recurrent injuries. About 20% of acute ankle sprain patients develop chronic ankle instability. The failure of functional rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain leads to the development of chronic ankle instability. Differentiation between functional and anatomical ankle instability is very essential to guide the proper treatment. Stability testing by varus stress test and anterior drawer test should be carried out. Subtalar instability is an important pathology that is commonly by passed during the assessment of chronic ankle instability. Unlike acute ankle sprain, chronic ankle instability might require surgical intervention. The surgical and conservative management options can be very much developed by in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology. Anatomical repair, augmentation by tendon, or both are the basic methods of surgical intervention. Arthroscopy is becoming more popular in the management of chronic ankle instability. PMID:27843798

  1. Lateral ligament reconstruction procedures for the ankle.

    PubMed

    Tourné, Y; Mabit, C

    2017-02-01

    Capsule/ligament lesions of the lateral compartment of the ankle lead to lateral laxity, which is a prime contributor to chronic ankle instability. Lateral ligament reconstruction stabilizes the joint. Exhaustive preoperative clinical and paraclinical work-up is essential. The present article classifies, presents and criticizes the main techniques in terms of long-term stabilization and reduction of osteoarthritis risk. Anatomic ligament repair with reinforcement (mainly extensor retinaculum) or anatomic ligament reconstruction are the two recommended options. Non-anatomic reconstructions using the peroneus brevis should be abandoned. Arthroscopy is increasingly being developed, but results need assessment on longer follow-up than presently available. Postoperative neuromuscular reprogramming is fundamental to optimal recovery. Finally, the concept of complex ankle instability is discussed from the diagnostic and therapeutic points of view. The various forms of ligament reconstruction failure and corresponding treatments are reported.

  2. Physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula (Salter-Harris Type I, II, III, and IV fractures).

    PubMed

    Podeszwa, David A; Mubarak, Scott J

    2012-06-01

    Physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula are common and can be seen at any age, although most are seen in the adolescent. An understanding of the unique anatomy of the skeletally immature ankle in relation to the mechanism of injury will help one understand the injury patterns seen in this population. A thorough clinical exam is critical to the diagnosis and treatment of these injuries and the avoidance of potentially catastrophic complications. Nondisplaced physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula can be safely treated nonoperatively. Displaced fractures should undergo a gentle reduction with appropriate anesthesia while multiple reduction attempts should be avoided. Gapping of the physis >3 mm after reduction should raise the suspicion of entrapped periosteum that will increase the risk of premature physeal closure. Open reduction of displaced Salter-Harris type III and IV fractures is critical to maintain joint congruity and minimize the risk of physeal arrest.

  3. Fracture dislocation of the sacro-coccygeal joint in a 12-year-old boy. A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hamoud, K; Abbas, J

    2015-11-01

    A case report and literature review. To present a rare case of facture dislocation of the sacro-coccygeal joint in a 12-year-old boy who was treated conservatively. Fracture dislocations of the sacrum or the sacro-coccygeal joint are infrequent injuries and are rarely reported. The treatment for these disorders is usually conservative. Detailed description of the anterior dislocation (Salter-Harris type I) of the sacro-coccygeal joint in this child and its management are presented, with review of the relevant literature. A conservative treatment was performed, with excellent clinical and radiological result at three years after the injury. MR imaging obtained at two years showed very good healing and alignment. Fracture dislocation of the sacro-coccygeal joint in the pediatric population should be treated conservatively, as the potential of healing and remodeling is great. Closed reduction should not be attempted.

  4. The yielding, plastic flow, and fracture behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene used in total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, S M; Pruitt, L; Jewett, C W; Crawford, R P; Crane, D J; Edidin, A A

    1998-11-01

    The yielding, plastic flow, and fracture behavior of UHMWPE plays an important role in wear and failure mechanisms of total joint replacement components. The primary objective of this study was to compare the yielding, plastic flow, and fracture behavior of two implantable grades of UHMWPE (GUR 1120 vs 4150 HP). The first part of this work explored the hypothesis that up to the polymer yield point, the monotonic loading behavior of UHMWPE displays similar true stress strain behavior in tension and compression. Uniaxial tension and compression tests were conducted to compare the equivalent true stress vs strain response of UHMWPE up to 0.12 true strain. During monotonic loading, the equivalent true stress strain behavior was similar in tension and compression up to the yield point. However, investigation of the unloading behavior and permanent plastic deformations showed that classical deviatoric rate independent plasticity theory may dramatically overpredict the permanent strains in UHMWPE. A secondary goal of this study was to determine the ultimate true stress and strain for UHMWPE and to characterize the fracture surfaces after failure. Using a fracture mechanics approach, the critical flaw sizes were used in combination with the true ultimate stresses to predict the fracture toughness of the two resins. A custom video-based strain measurement system was developed and validated to characterize the true stress-strain behavior up to failure and to verify the accuracy of the incompressibility assumption in calculating the true stress-strains up to failure. In a detailed uncertainty analysis, theoretical expressions were derived for the relative uncertainty in digital video-based estimates of nominal strain, true strain, homogeneous stress, and true stress. Although the yielding behavior of the two UHMWPE resins was similar, the hardening and plastic flow behavior clearly discriminated between the GUR 1120 and 4150 HP. A statistically significant difference between

  5. Severe injury of bilateral elbow joints with unilateral terrible triad of the elbow and unilateral suspected terrible triad of the elbow complicated with olecranon fracture: one case report

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Guoqing; Niu, Xiaofeng; Yu, Weiguang; Xiao, Liangbao

    2015-01-01

    Terrible triad of the elbow is characterized as posterior dislocation of the elbow joint accompanied by the fractures of the radial head and coronoid process of the ulna, which is rarely seen in clinical practice, especially because the mild fracture is barely detected by imaging method In this study, we reported one case of serious complex bilateral elbow injury, presenting with unilateral typical terrible triad of the elbow and suspected terrible triad of the elbow complicated with olecranon fracture on the other side. Clinical experience was obtained during the diagnosis and treatment procedures. PMID:26550399

  6. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated. PMID:27524881

  7. Finite element analysis of a composite artificial ankle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Leigh Ann; Johnston, Lawrence; Denniston, Charles; Czekalski, Blaise E.

    1993-01-01

    Ultra-light carbon fiber composite materials are being utilized in artificial limbs with increasing frequency in recent years. Dr. Arthur Copes, an orthotist from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has developed a graphite expoxy composite material artificial ankle (Copes/Bionic Ankle) that is intended to be used by amputees who require the most advanced above-and-below-the-knee prosthetic devices. The Copes/Bionic Ankle is designed to reproduce the function of the natural ankle joint by allowing the composite material to act as a spring mechanism without the use of metal mechanical parts. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has agreed to participate in the design effort by providing the structural analysis of the artificial ankle design.

  8. Association of the type of trauma, occurrence of bone bruise, fracture and joint effusion with the injury to the menisci and ligaments in MRI of knee trauma

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshki, Sina; Vogl, Thomas J.; Pezeshki, Mohammad Zakaria; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Pourisa, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a noninvasive diagnostic tool may help clinicians in the evaluation of injuries to menisci and ligaments. Purpose this study assessed the associations between type of trauma to knee joint, bone bruise, fracture and pathological joint effusion with injuries to menisci and ligaments of knee joint. Methods we reviewed knee joint MRI of 175 patients aged less than 45 years old who were referred to MRI center of our University. Results statistical analysis showed that tearing of medial meniscus (MM) is significantly more common in sport related trauma (p= 0.045) but tearing of medial collateral ligament (MCL) is significantly more common in non-sport related trauma (p= 0.005). Existence of bone bruise in knee MRI is negatively associated with tearing of medial meniscus (MM) (p=0.004) and positively associated with tearing of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) (p=0.00047) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) (p = 0.0001). Existence of fracture is associated with decreased risk of the tearing of ACL and MM (p=0.04, p=0.001 respectively). Pathologic joint effusion is significantly more common in ACL and MCL tearing (p=0.0001, p=0.004 respectively). Conclusions as diagnostic clues, bone bruise, fracture and joint effusion may help radiologists for better assessment of injury to menisci and ligaments in MRI of patients with knee trauma. PMID:27331046

  9. Fracture Flow Research, Volume 2: Modeling Joint Patterns Using Combinations of Mechanical and Probabilistic Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    evidenced by tectonic breccia ) then it is classified as a fault zone (solid vertical lines in Figure 243, relative vertical displacement is also sketched...observed breccia in the chert layers. This means that the chert may be heavily fractured. The material properties that were assumed for the chert in the

  10. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  11. Forces predicted at the ankle during running.

    PubMed

    Burdett, R G

    1982-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the ankle joint was developed and was used to predict the forces at the ankle during the stance phase of running. Measurements from five cadavers were averaged to obtain insertion points and directions of pull of equivalent tendons with respect to the assumed center of the ankle joint. A minimum joint force solution was obtained by assuming that only two equivalent muscle groups could exert force at one time. Three subjects ran at 4.47 m/s across a force platform that recorded the external forces and moments acting on the foot. Cinematography was used to measure the foot and leg positions during stance. Peak resultant joint forces ranging from 9.0 to 13.3 times body weight and peak Achilles tendon forces ranging from 5.3 to 10.0 times body weight were predicted. Small variations in some cases resulted in large differences in predicted forces. The highest tendon forces predicted exceeded those reported to cause damage to cadaver tendons in other studies.

  12. Investigation of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Spot-Welded Joints Based on Fracture Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanifard, S.; Bonab, M. A. Mohtadi; Jabbari, Gh.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fatigue crack propagation life of resistance spot welds in tensile-shear specimens is investigated based on the calculation of stress intensity factors and J-integral using three-dimensional finite element method. For comparison, experimental works on 5083-O aluminum alloy spot-welded joints have been carried out to verify the numerical predictions of fatigue crack propagation of welded joints. A lot of analyses have been performed to obtain stress intensity factors and J-integral in tensile-shear specimens of spot-welded joints by using commercial software ANSYS. These gathered data have been formulated by using statistical software SPSS. The results of fatigue propagation life and predicted fatigue crack path revealed very good agreement with the experimental fatigue test data and photograph of cross-section of the fatigued spot-weld specimens.

  13. The Sauve-Kapandji procedure and the Darrach procedure for distal radio-ulnar joint dysfunction after Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    George, M S; Kiefhaber, T R; Stern, P J

    2004-12-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the results of the Darrach procedure and the Sauve-Kapandji procedure for the treatment of distal radio-ulnar joint derangement following malunion of dorsally displaced, unstable, intraarticular fractures of the distal radius in patients under 50 years of age. Twelve of 18 possible patients in the Sauve-Kapandji group completed the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand survey at a mean of 4 years postoperatively and nine of the 18 returned for a follow-up examination at a mean of 2 years. Twenty-one of 30 possible patients in the Darrach group completed the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand survey at a mean of 6 years postoperatively and 13 of these 30 returned for follow-up examination at a mean of 4 years. The Darrach procedure and the Sauve-Kapandji procedure yielded comparable and unpredictable results with respect to both subjective and objective parameters.

  14. Arthroscopic Management of Posteromedial Ankle Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Posteromedial ankle impingement is a rare clinical entity. It usually follows an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. This can be treated by posterior ankle endoscopy through the posteromedial and posterolateral portals. The flexor hallucis longus tendon can be examined for any tenosynovitis or tendinopathy. The posteromedial corner of the ankle joint is reached with the instruments staying on the lateral side of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The inflamed synovium, scar tissue, and fibrillated cartilage are debrided. PMID:26697299

  15. Arthroscopic Management of Posteromedial Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Posteromedial ankle impingement is a rare clinical entity. It usually follows an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. This can be treated by posterior ankle endoscopy through the posteromedial and posterolateral portals. The flexor hallucis longus tendon can be examined for any tenosynovitis or tendinopathy. The posteromedial corner of the ankle joint is reached with the instruments staying on the lateral side of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The inflamed synovium, scar tissue, and fibrillated cartilage are debrided.

  16. Adaptive sports ankle prosthetics. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    PubMed

    Lyle, David K

    2012-09-01

    Participating in sport at all levels is gaining a dedicated following and this is also apparent in individuals with an amputation. Currently, there is a wide variety of ankle prostheses available which attempt to provide function, control, and comfort, as well as good aesthetic appeal. Participation in sport, however, increases the demands placed upon ankle prostheses. This can compromise function and performance, and constrain the opportunities of participation in various outdoor and water sports. In acknowledging this limitation and the need to develop more versatile ankle prostheses, this article introduces the evolution of a prototype ankle prosthesis referred to as "Adaptive Sports Ankle." The ankle prosthesis, which is compatible with any foot pyramid adapter, offers the same range of motion as the normal human ankle joint and is made up of components that are chemical and corrosion resistant. These design features that are specifically created to accommodate below-the-knee amputees provide an ideal prosthesis for those wishing to lead an active lifestyle and participate in aquatic (i.e. swimming, surfing, and scuba diving), snowboarding, and equestrian activities. Although it is acknowledged that there is a need to establish research on the Adaptive Sports Ankle, its introduction to the market will enhance and expand opportunities of those individuals with a lower limb amputation to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

  17. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed.

  18. Fracture tolerance of the small female elbow joint in compression: the effect of load angle relative to the long axis of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Boggess, Brian M; Crandall, Jeff R; Mac Mahon, Conor B

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a fracture tolerance for the elbow joint, or proximal ends of the ulna and radius, relative to the fracture risk under side-impact airbag loading. Forty experiments were performed on the elbow joints of small female cadavers. The energy source, a pneumatic impactor, was configured to apply compressive loads that match the onset rate, peak force, and momentum transfer of previously conducted side-impact airbag tests with small female subjects. Three initial orientations of the impact load angle relative to the longitudinal axis of the forearm were selected based on analysis of side-impact airbag tests with the instrumented dummy upper extremity. These included loading directions that are 0 degrees , 20 degrees , and 30 degrees superior of the longitudinal axis of the forearm. Post-test necropsy revealed that 11 of the 40 tests resulted in chondral, osteochondral, or comminuted fractures of the proximal radial head or the distal trochlear notch. Using the fracture outcome as the binary variable, a generalized estimating equations statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between elbow load angle (p < 0.01) and risk of fracture, as well as peak elbow force (p = 0.04) and risk of fracture. Using data that were mass scaled to the 5(th) percentile female, the analysis produced a multivariate fracture risk function that predicts a 50% risk of elbow fracture at a compressive elbow load of 1780 N and load angle of 30 degrees superior to the longitudinal axis of the forearm (p < 0.01). It is anticipated that this tolerance will be used to reduce the risk of elbow fractures from side airbag deployment.

  19. Antibiotic-loaded cement beads for Charcot ankle osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    The concomitant presence of osteomyelitis and diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle places those patients affected at increased risk for limb loss. Antibiotic-loaded cement has been reported to be useful in the treatment of deep soft tissue and joint infections. The authors present an overview of this adjunctive treatment modality and present a case report using antibiotic-loaded cement beads in staged reconstruction for Charcot ankle osteomyelitis.

  20. Modified Evans peroneus brevis lateral ankle stabilization for balancing varus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, I have described a modification of the Evans peroneus brevis tendon lateral ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis is then transferred either to the anterior distal tibia concomitantly with total ankle replacement or through the tibia when performed after total ankle replacement and secured with plate and screw fixation. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon is useful in providing lateral ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  1. Effects of hip and head position on ankle range of motion, ankle passive torque, and passive gastrocnemius tension.

    PubMed

    Andrade, R J; Lacourpaille, L; Freitas, S R; McNair, P J; Nordez, A

    2016-01-01

    Ankle joint range of motion (ROM) is notably influenced by the position of the hip joint. However, this result remains unexplained. Thus, the aim of this study was to test if the ankle passive torque and gastrocnemius muscle tension are affected by the hip and the head positions. The torque and the muscle shear elastic modulus (measured by elastography to estimate muscle tension) were collected in nine participants during passive ankle dorsiflexions performed in four conditions (by combining hip flexion at 90 or 150°, and head flexed or neutral). Ankle maximum dorsiflexion angle significantly decreased by flexing the hip from 150 to 90° (P < 0.001; mean difference 17.7 ± 2.5°), but no effect of the head position was observed (P > 0.05). Maximal passive torque and shear elastic modulus were higher with the hip flexed at 90° (P < 0.001). During submaximal ROM, no effects of the head and hip positioning (P > 0.05) were found for both torque and shear elastic modulus at a given common ankle angle among conditions. Shifts in maximal ankle angle due to hip angle manipulation are not related neither to changes in passive torque nor tension of the gastrocnemius. Further studies should be addressed to better understand the functional role of peripheral nerves and fasciae in the ankle ROM limits.

  2. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-10-01

    This report contains 40 papers that were presented at the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at the Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the week of October 26--29, 1992. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe recent large-scale fracture (brittle and/or ductile) experiments, analyses of these experiments, and comparisons between predictions and experimental results. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to examine the fracture behavior of various materials and structures under conditions relevant to nuclear reactor components and operating environments. The emphasis was on the ability of various fracture models and analysis methods to predict the wide range of experimental data now available. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  3. Mixed-mode fatigue fracture of adhesive joints in harsh environments and nonlinear viscoelastic modeling of the adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzoumanidis, Alexis Gerasimos

    A four point bend, mixed-mode, reinforced, cracked lap shear specimen experimentally simulated adhesive joints between load bearing composite parts in automotive components. The experiments accounted for fatigue, solvent and temperature effects on a swirled glass fiber composite adherend/urethane adhesive system. Crack length measurements based on compliance facilitated determination of da/dN curves. A digital image processing technique was also utilized to monitor crack growth from in situ images of the side of the specimen. Linear elastic fracture mechanics and finite elements were used to determine energy release rate and mode-mix as a function of crack length for this specimen. Experiments were conducted in air and in a salt water bath at 10, 26 and 90°C. Joints tested in the solvent were fully saturated. In air, both increasing and decreasing temperature relative to 26°C accelerated crack growth rates. In salt water, crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature. Threshold energy release rate is shown to be the most appropriate design criteria for joints of this system. In addition, path of the crack is discussed and fracture surfaces are examined on three length scales. Three linear viscoelastic properties were measured for the neat urethane adhesive. Dynamic tensile compliance (D*) was found using a novel extensometer and results were considerably more accurate and precise than standard DMTA testing. Dynamic shear compliance (J*) was determined using an Arcan specimen. Dynamic Poisson's ratio (nu*) was extracted from strain gage data analyzed to include gage reinforcement. Experiments spanned three frequency decades and isothermal data was shifted by time-temperature superposition to create master curves spanning thirty decades. Master curves were fit to time domain Prony series. Shear compliance inferred from D* and nu* compared well with measured J*, forming a basis for finding the complete time dependent material property matrix for this

  4. Prediction of sub-seismic faults and fractures to ensure carbon traps - joint project PROTECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesch, Jennifer; Tanner, David C.; Beilecke, Thies; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2015-04-01

    Deformation in the form of fractures and faults affects many reservoirs and their overburden. In a 3-D seismic data set we can identify faults on the large scale, while in well data we observe small-scale fractures. A large number of faults at the intermediate scale (sub-seismic space) also plays a very important role, but these are not detectable with conventional geophysical methods. Therefore, we use the retro-deformation approach within the context of long-term CO2 storage integrity to determine the characteristics of potential fluid migration pathways between reservoir and surface. This allows to produce strain maps, in order to analyse fault behaviour in the sub-seismic space. As part of the PROTECT (prediction of deformation to ensure carbon traps) project we focus on the sub-seismic faults of the CO2CRC Otway Project site in Australia. We interpreted a geological 3-D model of 8 km x 7 km x 4.5 km that comprises 8 stratigraphic horizons and 24 large-scale faults. This confirmed the site to contain a complex system of south-dipping normal faults and north-dipping antithetic normal faults. The most important aspect is that two different types of fault kinematics were simultaneously active: Dip-slip and a combination of dip-slip with dextral strike slip movement. After the retro-deformation of the 3-D model we calculated strain tensor maps to locate highly deformed or fractured zones and their orientation within the stratigraphic volume. The e1-strain magnitude shows heterogeneous distribution. The south of the study area is at least twice as much fractured on a sub-seismic scale. Four major faults act as "controlling faults" with smaller faults in between. The overburden is tilted northwards after retro-deformation. Thus, we believe that the area was affected by an even larger normal fault outside of the study area. In summary, this study reveals that good knowledge of the kinematics of the large-scale faults is essential to predict sub-seismic structures

  5. [Anesthesiologic management of ankle joint osteosynthesis in the 35th week of pregnancy in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, U J; Preisz, A

    1996-11-01

    We describe the case of an extremely overweight woman in her 35 th week of pregnancy with a manifest Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome (CMT), on whom a tibial fracture was operated under general anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with thiopental, droperidol, fentanyl and maintained with nitrous oxide and isoflurane. Atracurium was administered as a muscle relaxant agent. Depolarizing muscle relaxants have not been used because of a significantly increased risk of hyperkalemia. The immediate intubation using the principle of a so-called "priming dose" was within normal limits. CMT syndrome is a very rare hereditary autosomal dominant degenerative disease of the peripheral nervous system. The main site of manifestation is the peroneus muscle. In case of affection of the respiratory muscular system, which acutely can occur postoperatively even without any suspicious findings in the preoperatively performed lung function tests, an insufficiency of the respiratory tract is predominant and may require a postoperative intensive care with a prolonged artificial respiration. With the application of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants significant prolongations of the half-life period have occasionally been observed. Therefore we recommend the monitoring of the neuromuscular blockade perioperatively using the train-of-four ratio. An extraordinary progression of the disease frequently occurs during pregnancy.

  6. Is deltoid and lateral ligament reconstruction necessary in varus and valgus ankle osteoarthritis, and how should these procedures be performed?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Macalus V; Dare, David M; Deland, Jonathan T

    2013-09-01

    Varus and valgus ankle deformities represent a challenge to the foot and ankle surgeons. The presence of degenerative changes of the tibiotalar joint articular surfaces introduces an additional layer of complexity. Reconstruction of such deformities requires a customized approach to each patient. Surgical intervention often requires joint-sparing realignment, arthroplasty, and/or arthrodesis, depending on the severity of deformity and the joint surface integrity. The ligamentous stability of the ankle plays an essential role in the preservation and optimization of function. This article reviews the role of deltoid and lateral ligament reconstruction in the treatment of varus and valgus ankle osteoarthritis.

  7. Reconstruction of compound loss of lateral malleolus and lateral ankle ligaments with double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dukhwan; Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Hyeung-June; Cha, Seung-Han; Nam, Kyoung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    Open ankle fracture, including compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and overlying skin, is a severe injury and can result in ankle instability and permanent disability. Treatment of this injury is challenging and requires bone grafting and soft tissue reconstruction. In the present report, we describe a unique reconstruction technique for compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and the overlying skin using a double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft combined with a reverse sural fasciocutaneous flap. The patient obtained a stable ankle with nearly full range of motion and displayed satisfactory function during the follow-up period.

  8. Preoperative gait characterization of patients with ankle arthrosis.

    PubMed

    Khazzam, Michael; Long, Jason T; Marks, Richard M; Harris, Gerald F

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematic changes that occur about the foot and ankle during gait in patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD). By comparing a normal adult population with what was found in the DJD population we determined how the motion of theses groups differed, thereby characterizing how this pathology affects foot and ankle motion. A 15-camera Vicon Motion Analysis System was used in conjunction with weight bearing radiographs to obtain three-dimensional motion of the foot and ankle during ambulation. The study was comprised of 34 patients and 35 ankles diagnosed with DJD (19 men and 15 women) of the ankle and 25 patients with normal ankles (13 men and 12 women). Dynamic foot and ankle motion was analyzed using the four-segment Milwaukee Foot Model (MFM). The data from this model resulted in three-dimensional (3D) kinematic parameters in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes as well as spatial-temporal parameters. Patient health status was evaluated using the SF-36 Health Survey and American Orthopaedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores. The DJD group showed significant differences (p<0.001) as compared to normals with prolonged stance time, shortened stride length, reduced cadence and a walking speed which was only 66.96% of normal. Overall, kinematic data in the DJD cohort showed significant differences (p<0.001) in all planes of motion for tibial, hindfoot and forefoot motion as compared to normals. The average preoperative AOFAS hindfoot score was 26. DJD of the ankle results in decreased range of motion during gait. This decreased range of motion may be related to several factors including bony deformity, muscle weakness, and attempts to decrease the pain associated with weight bearing. To date there has not been a study which describes the effect of this disease process on motion of the foot and ankle. These findings may prove to be useful in the pre-operative assessment of these patients.

  9. The Effect of Modified Brostrom-Gould Repair for Lateral Ankle Instability on In Vivo Tibiotalar Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Wainright, William B; Spritzer, Charles E.; Lee, Jun Young; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lateral ankle instability leads to an increased risk of tibiotalar joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have found abnormal tibiotalar joint motions with lateral ankle instability that may contribute to this increased incidence of osteoarthritis, including increased anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under weight-bearing loading. Surgical repairs for lateral ankle instability have shown good clinical results, but the effects of repair on in vivo ankle motion are not well understood. Hypothesis The modified Broström-Gould lateral ligament reconstruction decreases anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under in vivo weight-bearing loading conditions. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seven patients underwent modified Brostöm-Gould repair for unilateral lateral ankle instability. Ankle joint kinematics as a function of increasing body weight were studied with magnetic resonance imaging and biplanar fluoroscopy. Tibiotalar kinematics were measured in unstable ankles preoperatively and postoperatively at a mean follow-up of 12 months, as well as in the uninjured contralateral ankles of the same individuals. Results Surgical repair resulted in statistically significant decreases in anterior translation of the talus (0.9±0.3mm, p=0.018) at 100% bodyweight and internal rotation of the talus at 75% (2.6±0.8°, p=0.019) and 100% (2.7±0.8°, p=0.013) bodyweight compared to ankle kinematics measured before repair. No statistically significant differences were detected between repaired ankles and contralateral normal ankles. Conclusion The modified Broström-Gould repair improved the abnormal joint motion observed in patients with lateral ankle instability, decreasing anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus. Clinical Relevance Altered kinematics may contribute to the tibiotalar joint degeneration that occurs with chronic lateral ankle instability. The findings of the current study support

  10. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  11. Measurement of Resistive Torques in Major Human Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    Joints Knee Joint Resistive Torques Hip Joint Resistive Moments Elbow Joint Ankle Joint 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary and...applications. The major articulating Joints which are considered are the shoulder, knee, hip, elbow and ankle. Due DD I J 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE...47 Force is being applied by means of the GFA on the subject’s lower arm for the elbow joint resistive force and moment data collection

  12. Broken Ankle/Broken Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... not warming up and stretching, also can cause foot and ankle injuries. Work in certain occupations. Certain work environments, such ... too little light may lead to falls and foot and ankle injuries. Have certain conditions. Having fragile bones (osteoporosis) or ...

  13. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  14. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. MIDFOOT AND FOREFOOT INVOLVEMENT IN LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS AND CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY. PART 1: ANATOMY AND BIOMECHANICS

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The modern human foot is the culmination of more than five million years of evolution. The ankle-foot complex absorbs forces during loading, accommodates uneven surfaces, and acts as a lever for efficient propulsion. The ankle-foot complex has six independent functional segments that should be understood for proper assessment and treatment of foot and ankle injuries: the shank, rearfoot, midfoot, lateral forefoot, and the medial forefoot. The compliance of the individual segments of the foot is dependent on velocity, task, and active and passive coupling mechanisms within each of the foot segments. It is also important to understand the passive, active, and neural subsystems that are functionally intertwined to provide structure and control to the multisegmented foot. The purpose of the first part of this clinical commentary and current concepts review was to examine foot and ankle anatomy, detail the roles of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature from a multisegmented foot perspective, and discuss the biomechanics of the ankle-foot complex during function. The interplay of segmental joint mobility, afferent and efferent sensorimotor function, and movement and stabilization provided by the extrinsic and intrinsic musculature is required to coordinate and execute the complex kinematic movements in the ankle-foot complex during propulsion. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904801

  17. MIDFOOT AND FOREFOOT INVOLVEMENT IN LATERAL ANKLE SPRAINS AND CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY. PART 1: ANATOMY AND BIOMECHANICS.

    PubMed

    Fraser, John J; Feger, Mark A; Hertel, Jay

    2016-12-01

    The modern human foot is the culmination of more than five million years of evolution. The ankle-foot complex absorbs forces during loading, accommodates uneven surfaces, and acts as a lever for efficient propulsion. The ankle-foot complex has six independent functional segments that should be understood for proper assessment and treatment of foot and ankle injuries: the shank, rearfoot, midfoot, lateral forefoot, and the medial forefoot. The compliance of the individual segments of the foot is dependent on velocity, task, and active and passive coupling mechanisms within each of the foot segments. It is also important to understand the passive, active, and neural subsystems that are functionally intertwined to provide structure and control to the multisegmented foot. The purpose of the first part of this clinical commentary and current concepts review was to examine foot and ankle anatomy, detail the roles of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature from a multisegmented foot perspective, and discuss the biomechanics of the ankle-foot complex during function. The interplay of segmental joint mobility, afferent and efferent sensorimotor function, and movement and stabilization provided by the extrinsic and intrinsic musculature is required to coordinate and execute the complex kinematic movements in the ankle-foot complex during propulsion.

  18. Effect of processing, sterilization and crosslinking on UHMWPE fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Farzana; Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used as a bearing surface in total joint replacements (TJR) for nearly five decades. This semi-crystalline polymer has extraordinary energetic toughness owing to its high molecular weight and entanglement density. However, it is challenged by a need to offer a combined resistance to fatigue, wear and oxidation in vivo. The processing, sterilization treatment, and microstructural tailoring of UHMWPE has evolved considerably in the past 50 years but an optimized microstructure remains elusive. This review seeks to provide an overview of this processing history to address two primary questions: First, how does microstructure affect fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in UHMWPE? And second, can microstructure be optimized to provide resistance to fatigue, oxidation and wear in vivo? Previous literature demonstrates that while crosslinking improves resistance to adhesive/abrasive wear, it also reduces resistance to fatigue crack propagation and fatigue wear by restricting molecular mobility and rendering the polymer more brittle. Crystallinity improves fatigue resistance but generally increases elastic modulus and concomitant contact stresses in vivo. The presence of fusion defects or oxidation reduces further fatigue resistance and enhances fatigue wear. Thus, UHMWPE microstructural evolution comes with trade-offs. Currently there is no singular formulation of UHMWPE that is ideal for all TJR applications.

  19. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Relaxed Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic “peanut” shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed. PMID:24686292

  20. Intra-articular Fractures of the Sigmoid Notch of the Distal Radius: Analysis of Progression to Distal Radial Ulnar Joint Arthritis and Impact on Upper Extremity Function in Surgically Treated Fractures.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Mark A; Brogan, David M; Shin, Alexander Y; Berger, Richard A

    2016-03-01

    Background Studies have established an increased risk of radiocarpal joint posttraumatic arthritis in patients with displaced intra-articular fractures of the distal radius, although this phenomenon has yet to be evaluated in the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Purpose We hypothesized that patients with displaced intra-articular fractures of the sigmoid notch would have a higher prevalence of DRUJ arthritis and greater upper extremity dysfunction after operative treatment of distal radius fractures compared with fractures without sigmoid notch involvement. We also hypothesized that the degree of sigmoid notch incongruity would be correlated with the grade of DRUJ arthritis and the severity of upper extremity dysfunction. Patients and Methods A retrospective review was conducted on surgically treated patients with distal radius fractures with pre- and/or postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Patients were divided into groups based on presence or absence of fracture extension into the sigmoid notch. Within the sigmoid notch group, postoperative CT scans were used to measure sigmoid notch fracture step-off and diastasis (mm), as well as volar or dorsal DRUJ subluxation (%). Patients were administered Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaires and radiographs were obtained to grade DRUJ arthritis using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic criteria. Results Thirty-three patients were included (19 with sigmoid notch involvement and 14 without) with an average radiographic follow-up of 6.3 years (range: 3.5-10.1 years). DASH scores were available for all patients, and radiographic follow-up was available in 24 patients (73%). A trend toward higher grade of DRUJ arthritis and poorer average DASH was found in those with sigmoid notch involvement, but was not statistically different. In the sigmoid notch group there were poorer DASH scores in patients with coronal step-off > 1.0-mm (p < 0.05). There were no significant

  1. A new ankle foot orthosis for running.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David; Moore, Allan; Chandrashekar, Naveen

    2009-09-01

    Traumatic knee injuries in automobile accidents and sports often lead to damage of the peroneal nerve. A lack of control of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve due to this damage, results in the inability to dorsiflex and evert the foot and to extend the toes. This condition is commonly known as foot drop. Foot drop reduces the stability in the body while walking and running and may also cause injury due to lack of foot clearance during the swing phase of the gait. Traditionally, an ankle foot orthosis (AFO), comprised of a moulded sheet of plastic that conforms around the posterior calf and distally contains all or part of the calcaneous as well as the plantar foot, is used to treat foot drop. The intent of this orthosis is to dorsiflex the foot to provide clearance during the swing phase of walking and running. Traditional AFO results in increased pressures due to a decrease in dorsiflexion range of motion at the ankle and make the orthosis increasingly uncomfortable to wear. Several other existing designs of foot drop AFO suffer from similar inadequacies. To address these issues, a new AFO was developed. The device was successfully used by one person with foot drop without issues for more than one year. This new design conforms to the lower anterior shin and dorsum of the foot using dorsiassist Tamarack ankle joints to allow for greater plantar and dorsiflexion range of motion. While still limiting ankle inversion it does allow for more ankle eversion. This orthosis can be discretely worn inside shoes due to its smaller size, and can be worn for a longer period of time without discomfort.

  2. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  3. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Page Content Article Body Acute ankle and foot injuries are common in athletes and other active young ... heels by pushing on the balls of your feet. Repeat steps 1 through 3. ... criteria Because injuries and recovery rates are different for every athlete, ...

  4. [Atlas fractures].

    PubMed

    Schären, S; Jeanneret, B

    1999-05-01

    Fractures of the atlas account for 1-2% of all vertebral fractures. We divide atlas fractures into 5 groups: isolated fractures of the anterior arch of the atlas, isolated fractures of the posterior arch, combined fractures of the anterior and posterior arch (so-called Jefferson fractures), isolated fractures of the lateral mass and fractures of the transverse process. Isolated fractures of the anterior or posterior arch are benign and are treated conservatively with a soft collar until the neck pain has disappeared. Jefferson fractures are divided into stable and unstable fracture depending on the integrity of the transverse ligament. Stable Jefferson fractures are treated conservatively with good outcome while unstable Jefferson fractures are probably best treated operatively with a posterior atlanto-axial or occipito-axial stabilization and fusion. The authors preferred treatment modality is the immediate open reduction of the dislocated lateral masses combined with a stabilization in the reduced position using a transarticular screw fixation C1/C2 according to Magerl. This has the advantage of saving the atlanto-occipital joints and offering an immediate stability which makes immobilization in an halo or Minerva cast superfluous. In late instabilities C1/2 with incongruency of the lateral masses occurring after primary conservative treatment, an occipito-cervical fusion is indicated. Isolated fractures of the lateral masses are very rare and may, if the lateral mass is totally destroyed, be a reason for an occipito-cervical fusion. Fractures of the transverse processes may be the cause for a thrombosis of the vertebral artery. No treatment is necessary for the fracture itself.

  5. Finger movement improves ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, K; Kamata, N; Iwata, A; Minamida, F; Abe, K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of finger movement on ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD patients). The subjects were 13 PD patients and 6 age-matched healthy adults. The subjects moved fingers before or after gait initiation, or initiated gait without finger movement. Ankle joint movement in the stance leg was recorded to estimate the duration of ankle dorsiflexion (DIF duration), which reflects the degree of disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients. In the PD patients with prolonged D/F duration, finger movement that preceded gait initiation shortened the D/F duration, but in the PD patients without prolonged D/F duration and in healthy subjects, the effect was not found. Accordingly, finger movement that precedes gait initiation improves ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients who suffer disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation.

  6. Decompression of Posterior Ankle Impingement With Concomitant Anterior Ankle Pathology by Posterior Ankle Arthroscopy in the Supine Position.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle endoscopy is a safe and effective approach for treatment of posterior ankle impingement. This is usually performed with the patient in prone position. The purpose of this technical note is to describe an arthroscopic approach of decompression of posterior ankle impingement with the patient in supine position. This is indicated if there is posterior ankle impingement together with other ankle pathology requiring anterior ankle arthroscopy. This approach allows treatment of both anterior ankle and posterior ankle pathology with the patient in the supine position. Concomitant anterior ankle arthroscopy can be performed with the usual orientation without the need of change of patient's position.

  7. Relationship between two proprioceptive measures and stiffness at the ankle.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Carrie L; Arnold, Brent L; Zinder, Steven M; Granata, Kevin; Gansneder, Bruce M

    2004-06-01

    Previous research has investigated the role of proprioception and stiffness in the control of joint stability. However, to date, no research has been done on the relationship between proprioception and stiffness. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between force sense, joint reposition sense, and stiffness at the ankle. A heterogeneous sample was obtained for this study; 20 of the 40 participants had a history of ankle sprains, and 13 of the 20 had been diagnosed by a physician (two mild ankle sprains, seven moderate sprains, four severe sprains). All subjects were asymptomatic and active at the time of the study. Active joint reposition sense was measured using a custom-built ankle goniometer, force sense was measured unilaterally and contralaterally with a load cell, and ankle muscle stiffness was measured via transient oscillation using a custom-built inversion-eversion cradle. We found no significant correlations between stiffness and joint reposition sense, with values of r ranging from 0.01 to 0.21. Significant correlations were found between stiffness and force sense. Specifically, contralateral force sense reproduction was significantly correlated to stiffness in the injured or "involved" ankle (r's ranging from 0.47 to 0.65; P< or =0.008). Whether the decreased ability to appropriately sense force (increased error) sends information to the central nervous system to increase muscle stiffness in response to an unexpected loss of stability, or whether these two phenomena function independently and both change concurrently as a result of injury to the system requires further investigation.

  8. Incidence and variance of foot and ankle injuries in elite college football players.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Lee D; Jost, Patrick W; Honkamp, Nicholas; Norwig, John; West, Robin; Bradley, James P

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a study on the risk for foot and ankle injuries in college football players on the basis of injury type and player position. In February 2006, we evaluated 320 intercollegiate football players at the National Football League Combine. All pathologic conditions and surgical procedures of the foot and ankle were recorded, and data were analyzed by player position to detect any trends. Seventy-two percent (n = 231) of the players had a history of foot and ankle injuries, with a total of 287 foot and ankle injuries (1.24 injuries/player injured). The most common injuries were lateral ankle sprain (n = 115), syndesmotic sprain (50), metatarsophalangeal dislocation/turf toe (36), and fibular fracture (25). Foot and ankle injuries were most common in kickers/punters (100% incidence), special teams (100%), running backs (83%), wide receivers (83%), and offensive linemen (80%). Lateral ankle sprains, the most common injuries, were treated surgically only 2.6% of the time. Offensive linemen were most likely to have had syndesmotic sprains (32%), and quarterbacks had the highest incidence of fibular fractures (16%). Foot and ankle injuries are common in collegiate football players, affecting 72% of players. Thirteen percent underwent surgical treatment. Trends are seen in the types of injuries for the different player positions.

  9. Mycotic Septic Arthritis of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Adam; Matthews, Scott; Wilson, Alister

    Septic arthritis is a debilitating acute orthopedic emergency. Unfortunately, the diagnosis can be delayed or missed in immunocompromised patients with diabetes mellitus, and the result can be catastrophic. These patients are also at risk for atypical infections, including mycotic subtypes, which are more insidious than their more aggressive, more common Staphylococcus counterparts. The result is increased morbidity. In this article, we report a case of Candida albicans septic arthritis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. Her case highlights the complexities of this specific disease entity. With early diagnosis, treatment is multimodal, involving surgical débridement and prolonged antifungal therapy.

  10. Measurement of T2 value by using 3.0T MRI for patient with ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Ouk

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to evaluate shape of ankle joint cartilage and damage to the ankle joint cartilage by measuring changes in T2 value of cartilage of healthy people without ankle arthritis and patients with ankle arthritis. The multi-echo technique was used for 20 healthy persons who had no ankle arthritis in the past or in the present clinically and 20 patients who were examined to have ankle arthritis in order to obtain T2 map image of knee joint cartilage. We divided the talotibial joint into medial position, middle position and lateral position to calculate the mean values of T2 in 18 spots that included anterior part, middle part and posterior part of cartilage of neck bone and ankle bone. Mean T2 values were measured in the healthy people group and the ankle arthritis patient group. According to the measurement results, the mean T2 value of the ankle arthritis patient group was measured to be higher than that of the healthy people group.

  11. Lisfranc (Midfoot) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... that disrupts multiple different joints and includes multiple fractures. Lisfranc injuries tend to damage the cartilage of ... include ligament strains and tears, as well as fractures and dislocations of bone (far right). (Le ) This ...

  12. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ficanha, Evandro M; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE) angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to -4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  13. Biomechanics of the ankle-foot system during stair ambulation: implications for design of advanced ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Sinitski, Emily H; Hansen, Andrew H; Wilken, Jason M

    2012-02-02

    Unilateral lower limb prosthesis users display temporal, kinematic, and kinetic asymmetries between limbs while ascending and descending stairs. These asymmetries are due, in part, to the inability of current prosthetic devices to effectively mimic normal ankle function. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive set of biomechanical data for able-bodied and unilateral transtibial amputee (TTA) ankle-foot systems for level-ground (LG), stair ascent (SA), and stair descent (SD), and to characterize deviations from normal performance associated with prosthesis use. Ankle joint kinematics, kinetics, torque-angle curves, and effective shapes were calculated for twelve able-bodied individuals and twelve individuals with TTA. The data from this study demonstrated the prosthetic limb can more effectively mimic the range of motion and power output of a normal ankle-foot during LG compared to SA and SD. There were larger differences between the prosthetic and able-bodied limbs during SA and SD, most evident in the torque-angle curves and effective shapes. These data can be used by persons designing ankle-foot prostheses and provide comparative data for assessment of future ankle-foot prosthesis designs.

  14. Quantitative analysis of human ankle characteristics at different gait phases and speeds for utilizing in ankle-foot prosthetic design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankle characteristics vary in terms of gait phase and speed change. This study aimed to quantify the components of ankle characteristics, including quasi-stiffness and work in different gait phases and at various speeds. Methods The kinetic and kinematic data of 20 healthy participants were collected during normal gait at four speeds. Stance moment-angle curves were divided into three sub-phases including controlled plantarflexion, controlled dorsiflexion and powered plantarflexion. The slope of the moment-angle curves was quantified as quasi-stiffness. The area under the curves was defined as work. Results The lowest quasi-stiffness was observed in the controlled plantarflexion. The fitted line to moment-angle curves showed R2 > 0.8 at controlled dorsiflexion and powered plantarflexion. Quasi-stiffness was significantly different at different speeds (P = 0.00). In the controlled dorsiflexion, the ankle absorbed energy; by comparison, energy was generated in the powered plantarflexion. A negative work value was recorded at slower speeds and a positive value was observed at faster speeds. Ankle peak powers were increased with walking speed (P = 0.00). Conclusions Our findings suggested that the quasi-stiffness and work of the ankle joint can be regulated at different phases and speeds. These findings may be clinically applicable in the design and development of ankle prosthetic devices that can naturally replicate human walking at various gait speeds. PMID:24568175

  15. Endoscopic Removal of Loose Bodies of the Posterior Ankle Extra-articular Space Arising From Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovial Osteochondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Loose bodies of the posterior ankle can occur either at the posterior recess of the ankle or subtalar joint or at the posterior ankle extra-articular space. Loose bodies at the extra-articular space can be a result of tenosynovial chondromatosis of the tendons of the posterior ankle, especially the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Endoscopic removal of loose bodies of the posterior ankle extra-articular space is indicated for symptomatic cases that are not improved by conservative treatment. It is contraindicated if there is active infection at the planned portal sites or the surgeon is not familiar with the technique of posterior ankle endoscopy. Systematic assessment of the different parts of the posterior ankle will minimize the risk of loose body retention.

  16. Negative pressure wound therapy for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Hyun; Shon, Oog Jin; Kim, Gi Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures have been treated by initial wide wound debridement, stabilization of fracture with external fixation, and delayed wound closure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of staged treatment using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures, treated using staged protocol by a single surgeon between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed in this retrospective study. The clinical results were assessed using a Puno scoring system for severe open fractures of the tibia at the last followup. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee and ankle joints and postoperative complication were evaluated at the last followup. The radiographic results were assessed using time to bone union, coronal and sagittal angulations and a shortening at the last followup. Results: The mean score of Puno scoring system was 87.4 (range 67–94). The mean ROM of the knee and ankle joints was 121.3° (range 90°–130°) and 37.7° (range 15°–50°), respectively. Bone union developed in all patients and the mean time to union was 25.3 weeks (range 16–42 weeks). The mean coronal angulation was 2.1° (range 0–4°) and sagittal was 2.7° (range 1–4°). The mean shortening was 4.1 mm (range 0–8 mm). Three patients had partial flap necrosis and 1 patient had total flap necrosis. There was no superficial and deep wound infection. Conclusion: Staged treatment using NPWT decreased the risks of infection and requirement of flap surgeries in Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Therefore, staged treatment using NPWT could be a useful treatment option for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. PMID:27746498

  17. US in ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stephane; Meyer, Philippe; Hauger, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Ankle impingement is a common condition occurring secondary to sprain or repeated microtrauma. Clinical symptoms are chronic pain located in the affected region and limited range of ankle motion. There are three types of ankle impingement syndrome: anterior impingement, which can be subdivided into anterolateral, anteromedial and purely anterior impingement; posterior impingement, which can be subdivided into posterior and posteromedial impingement; and calcaneal peroneal impingement which is secondary to planovalgus foot deformity. This paper evaluates physiological and clinical elements of these three types of ankle impingement syndrome as well as the role of ultrasound (US) imaging and US-guided treatment.

  18. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  19. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  20. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  1. Reconstruction of the varus ankle from soft-tissue procedures with osteotomy through arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    LaClair, Susan Mosier

    2007-03-01

    Cavovarus foot and ankle reconstruction is done to preserve motion whenever possible, and to maintain or impart stability, realigning foot and ankle joints into as anatomic a position as possible to restore a more normal mechanical axis to the extremity, and redistribute joint pressure or load more evenly. In patients who have a flexible deformity based on the Coleman block test, this is accomplished through calcaneal and metatarsal osteotomies to preserve joint motion, even in the presence of osteoarthritis. In cases of rigid and nonreducible deformity, the rigid cavovarus foot and ankle are addressed using a modified triple arthrodesis, an ankle arthrodesis, a tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis, or pantalar arthrodesis. In most patients, bony procedures are combined with soft-tissue realignment procedures.

  2. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Displaced Intra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Can; Liu, Hua; Li, Mingqing; Wang, Chenggong; Li, Kanghua

    A better understanding of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures, their effect on joint mechanics, and the relationship between altered mechanics and osteoarthritis could aid in the development or refinement of treatment methods. Finite element modeling is accepted as the reference standard for evaluating joint contact stresses. The objective of the present study was to analyze the in vivo joint mechanical data from finite element modeling for normal and injured subtalar joints. A 3-dimensional model of the ankle-hindfoot was developed and validated. Both height loss and width increases in the calcaneus were simulated. Next, they were used to investigate the relationship between calcaneal height or width and the contact mechanics of the posterior facet of the subtalar joint. The contact area/joint area ratio increased in the subtalar joint with injury when the calcaneal width increased. Moreover, the peak contact pressure and the proportion of the area under high contact pressure (>6 MPa) increased. The contact area/joint area ratio decreased with reduced calcaneal height, but the peak contact pressure remained almost constant. The width increases of the calcaneus somewhat limited the subtalar joint motion, especially for eversion; however, the height loss mostly resulted in subtalar rotatory instability. The height loss diminished the subtalar joint's stability in eversion, internal rotation, and external rotation. The results of the present study support the advisability of surgery for these complex injuries. Reestablishing the calcaneal height and width could restore the normal kinematics and contact stress distribution in the subtalar joint, improve the tibiotalar position, and diminish long-term degeneration in the ankle.

  3. Simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty as a single surgical procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Simultaneous osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint complicates primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In such cases, rehabilitation of TKA is limited by debilitating ankle pain, but varus or valgus ankle arthritis may even compromise placement of knee prosthetic components. Case presentation We present a patient with simultaneous bilateral valgus and patellofemoral OA of the knees and bilateral varus OA of the ankle joints that equally contributed to overall disability. This 63 years old, motivated and otherwise healthy patient was treated by simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty (quadruple total joint arthroplasty, TJA) during the same anesthesia. Two years outcome showed excellent alignment and function of all four replaced joints. Postoperative time for rehabilitation, back to work (6th week) and hospital stay (12 days) of this special patient was markedly reduced compared to the usual course of separate TJA. Conclusions Simultaneous quadruple TJA in equally disabling OA of bilateral deformed knees and ankles resulted in a better functional outcome and faster recovery compared to the average reported results after TKA and TAA in literature. However, careful preoperative planning, extensive patient education, and two complete surgical teams were considered essential for successful performance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report in literature about quadruple major total joint arthroplasty implanted during the same anesthesia in the same patient. PMID:21995682

  4. Effects of ankle biofeedback training on strength, balance, and gait in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-jin; Cho, Hwi-young; Kim, Kyung-hoon; Lee, Suk-min

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of ankle biofeedback training on muscle strength of the ankle joint, balance, and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven subjects who had had a stroke were randomly allocated to either the ankle biofeedback training group (n=14) or control group (n=13). Conventional therapy, which adhered to the neurodevelopmental treatment approach, was administered to both groups for 30 minutes. Furthermore, ankle strengthening exercises were performed by the control group and ankle biofeedback training by the experimental group, each for 30 minutes, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. To test muscle strength, balance, and gait, the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer, functional reach test, and 10 m walk test, respectively, were used. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed a significant increase in muscle strength on the affected side and improved balance and gait. Significantly greater improvements were observed in the balance and gait of the ankle biofeedback training group compared with the control group, but not in the strength of the dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscles of the affected side. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle biofeedback training significantly improves muscle strength of the ankle joint, balance, and gait in patients with stroke. PMID:27799701

  5. Percutaneous screw fixation of fractures of the iliac wing and fracture-dislocations of the sacro-iliac joint (OTA Types 61-B2.2 and 61-B2.3, or Young-Burgess "lateral compression type II" pelvic fractures).

    PubMed

    Starr, Adam J; Walter, James C; Harris, Robert W; Reinert, Charles M; Jones, Alan L

    2002-02-01

    A technique for closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation of fractures of the iliac wing and fracture-dislocations of the sacro-iliac joint is presented. Twenty-seven pelvic fractures were treated with attempted closed reduction followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Closed reduction failed in two patients. In the other twenty-five, closed reduction to within one centimeter of residual displacement was obtained, and was followed by stabilization with percutaneously placed cannulated screws. Complications included dislodgment of a screw from the superior pubic ramus in one patient, and partial cut-out of a screw along the inner cortex of the iliac wing in another. Two patients were lost to follow-up before fracture union occurred. The remaining twenty-three patients were followed-up for an average of twenty-seven months (range, 18-48 months). All of the fractures healed in the twenty-three patients who were not lost to follow-up. All but two of the patients who were working before injury returned to work. All but one of the patients was satisfied with the outcome of their pelvic fracture treatment. Closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation of fractures of the posterior portion of the iliac wing yields acceptable reductions, with minimal blood loss and limited damage to the surrounding soft tissues.

  6. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Score: a study protocol for the translation and validation of the Dutch language version

    PubMed Central

    Van Lieshout, Esther M M; De Boer, A Siebe; Meuffels, Duncan E; Den Hoed, P Ted; Van der Vlies, Cornelis H; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; Verhofstad, Michael H J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Score is among the most commonly used instruments for measuring the outcome of treatment in patients who sustained a complex ankle or hindfoot injury. It combines a clinician-reported and a patient-reported part. A valid Dutch version of this instrument is currently not available. Such a translated and validated instrument would allow objective comparison across hospitals or between patient groups, and with shown validity and reliability it may become a quality of care indicator in future. The main aims of this study are to translate and culturally adapt the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Score questionnaire into Dutch according to international guidelines, and to evaluate the measurement properties of the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Score-Dutch language version (DLV) in patients with a unilateral ankle or hindfoot fracture. Methods and analysis The design of the study will be a multicentre prospective observational study (case series) in patients who presented to the emergency department with a unilateral ankle or hindfoot fracture or (fracture) dislocation. A research physician or research assistant will complete the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Score-DLV based on interview for the subjective part and a physical examination for the objective part. In addition, patients will be asked to complete the Foot Function Index (FFI) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36). Descriptive statistics (including floor and ceiling effects), internal consistency, construct validity, reproducibility (ie, test–retest reliability, agreement and smallest detectable change) and responsiveness will be assessed for the AOFAS DLV. Ethics and dissemination This study has been exempted by the Medical Research Ethics Committee (MREC) Erasmus MC (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Each participant will provide written consent to participate and remain anonymised during the study. The results of the study are planned to be published in an

  7. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  8. Ankle Arthritis: You Can't Always Replace It.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brandon J; Gonzalez, Tyler; Smith, Jeremy T; Chiodo, Christopher P; Bluman, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    End-stage arthritis of the tibiotalar joint is disabling and causes substantial functional impairment. Most often it is the residual effect of a previous traumatic injury. Nonsurgical treatment of end-stage arthritis of the ankle includes bracing, shoe-wear modifications, and selective joint injections. For patients who fail to respond to nonsurgical modalities, the two primary treatment options are arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Each has its proponents. Although no ideal treatment of ankle arthritis exists, high-quality studies can help guide treatment in patients of varying demographics. Inherent risks are linked with each treatment option, but those of greatest concern are early implant loosening that requires revision following arthroplasty and the acceleration of adjacent joint degeneration associated with arthrodesis.

  9. Lisfranc fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Gerhart, Ann E

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of the tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint are rarely seen. Lisfranc fractures and fracture dislocations are among the most frequently misdiagnosed foot injuries in the emergency department. A misdiagnosed injury may have severe consequences including chronic pain and loss of foot biomechanics. Evaluation of a foot injury should include a high level of suspicion of a Lisfranc injury, and a thorough work-up is needed for correct diagnosis.

  10. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    PubMed Central

    Porter, David A; Jaggers, Ryan R; Barnes, Adam Fitzgerald; Rund, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains), and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid) and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on controlling swelling and recovery from surgery. The protocols then progress to restoration of motion, early protected weight bearing, restoration of strength, and eventually a

  11. [Chronic instability in the ankle area].

    PubMed

    Dubrana, F; Poichotte, A; Toullec, E; Colin, D; Guillodo, Y; Moati, J-C; Brilhauht, J; Musset, T; Feron, F; Richou, J; Henri, M; Guillemot, E

    2006-06-01

    For ankle sprains, the initial radiological work-up must include weight-bearing AP and lateral stress views of the sprained and healthy ankle. Films are taken in auto-varus. Other explorations included arthroMRI, arthroscanner or MRI which can be indicated preoperatively to confirm suspected cartilage injury or an associated ligament tear. These techniques should be employed when pertinent information can be expected according to the clinical situation and the operator's experience. In the emergency setting, ultrasonography can provide a simple low-cost confirmation of joint hematoma which is more precise than x-rays with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. The objective and subjective clinical outcome after surgical anatomic repair or ligamentoplasty are quite similar. The two principal differences relate to persistent subjective instability and post-operative surgical complications. Thus there are advantages and disadvantages for each option advantage for anatomical repair because of the low rate of surgical complications and advantage for ligament repairs which stabilize the subtalar joint with a low rate of residual instability.

  12. Salto Talaris fixed-bearing total ankle replacement system.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Todd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement is an anatomically designed fixed bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the successful design of the mobile-bearing Salto prosthesis available outside the United States. The original mobile-bearing design was modified and the mobile-bearing was transferred to the precision instrumentation at the trial phase evaluation. Instrumentation and technique allow the surgeon to determine the functional joint axis before final implantation. The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement design blends minimal bone resection and optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene conformity. The authors present an overview of the Salto Talaris total ankle replacement surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  13. Comparison of the microfracture localization in granite between fracturation and slip of a preexisting macroscopic healed joint by acoustic emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouinaux, Laurence; Masuda, Koji; Lei, Xinglin; Nishizawa, Osamu; Kusunose, Kinichiro; Liu, Liqiang; Ma, Wentao

    2001-05-01

    Experiments of fracturation and slip of a preexisting macroscopic healed joint have been performed under triaxial deformation on granite from Mayet de Montagne (France). This granite shows high grain-scale inhomogeneity. Acoustic emissions have been recorded and hypocenters have been determined during the entire experiments. For both rupture experiment and slip experiment, precursory localization of microfractures in the final rupture plane has been observed in the early stage of deformation, well before the dilatancy. It is likely that not only initial closure of favorably oriented cracks but also breaking of partially cemented grains or slipping between grains may occur in the pseudoelastic phase and are already localized on the final rupture plane where the shear stress seems to be concentrate. This behavior is observed in both cases where stress heterogeneity and rupture nucleation are controlled by (1) medium-scale heterogeneity at the grain scale (HS sample) or (2) macroscopic heterogeneity in the form of a preexisting healed joint (JS sample). The sample with the healed joint exhibited ˜1.6 times more acoustic emission events than the intact sample. The presence of the healed joint significantly weakened the sample.

  14. Dorsal fracture-dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint: a comparative study of percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation versus open reduction and internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Aladin, A; Davis, T R C

    2005-05-01

    Nineteen patients with a dorsal fracture-dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint of a finger were treated with either closed reduction and transarticular Kirschner wire fixation (eight cases) or open reduction and internal fixation, using either one or two lag screws (six cases) or a cerclage wire (five cases). At a mean follow-up of 7 (range 6-9) years, most patients reported satisfactory finger function, even though some of the injuries healed with proximal interphalangeal joint incongruency (seven cases) or subluxation (four cases). Those treated by open reduction complained of more "loss of feeling" in the affected finger and those specifically treated by cerclage wire fixation reported more cold intolerance and had a significantly larger fixed flexion deformity (median, 30 degrees : range 18-38 degrees ) and a smaller arc of motion (median, 48 degrees : range 45-60 degrees ) at the proximal interphalangeal joint, despite having the best radiological outcomes. Closed reduction and transarticular Kirschner wire fixation produced satisfactory results, with none of the eight patients experiencing significant persistent symptoms despite a reduced arc of proximal interphalangeal joint flexion (median=75 degrees ; range 60-108 degrees ). The results of this relatively simple treatment appear at least as satisfactory as those obtained by the two techniques of open reduction and internal fixation, both of which were technically demanding.

  15. Autologous Bone Graft in Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher P; Chiodo, Christopher P

    2016-12-01

    Bone graft is a common adjunct procedure in orthopedic surgery used for fusions, fracture repair, and the reconstruction of skeletal defects in the foot and ankle. Autologous graft, or autograft, involves the transport of bone from a donor site to another location in the same patient. It is considered by many to be the gold standard of bone grafting, as it is provides all biologic factors required for functional graft. Further, autograft is 100% histocompatible with no risk of disease transmission.

  16. Effects of spiral taping on proprioception in subjects with unilateral functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Sook

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The Purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of spiral taping on proprioception in functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five participants in this study had discomfort in only one ankle and Cumberland ankle instability score of ≤23. ST was applied to the unstable ankle, and proprioception was measured baseline and 30 min later. Proprioception was measured using the active joint angle reproduction test. [Results] Plantar flexions of 10° (ES, 0.303) and 20° (ES, 1.369) and inversion 20° (ES, 0.998) showed a significant improvement. [Conclusion] Spiral taping improved on proprioception. Therefore, spiral taping may be an effective method for functional ankle instability. PMID:28210052

  17. Effects of spiral taping on proprioception in subjects with unilateral functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Sook

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The Purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of spiral taping on proprioception in functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five participants in this study had discomfort in only one ankle and Cumberland ankle instability score of ≤23. ST was applied to the unstable ankle, and proprioception was measured baseline and 30 min later. Proprioception was measured using the active joint angle reproduction test. [Results] Plantar flexions of 10° (ES, 0.303) and 20° (ES, 1.369) and inversion 20° (ES, 0.998) showed a significant improvement. [Conclusion] Spiral taping improved on proprioception. Therefore, spiral taping may be an effective method for functional ankle instability.

  18. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  19. Reverse Evans peroneus brevis medial ankle stabilization for balancing valgus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Medial ankle instability secondary to deltoid ligament insufficiency is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, we describe a "reverse" Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction for medial ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis tendon is brought through a drill hole in the talus from laterally to medially, aiming for the junction of the talar neck and body plantar to the midline. The tendon is the brought superiorly and obliquely to the anterior medial aspect of the distal tibia where it is secured under a plate and screw construct. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction is useful in providing medial ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  20. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing for severely displaced distal tibial fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kaiying; Cai, Haiqing; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yunlan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has became a well-accepted method of osteosynthesis of diaphyseal fractures in the skeletally immature patient for many advantages, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the preliminary results of this minimally invasive treatment for severely displaced distal tibial diaphyseal metaphyseal junction (DTDMJ) fractures. This study was carried out over a 6-year period. Twenty-one severely displaced DTDMJ fractures treated using ESIN were evaluated clinically and radiographically. Complications were assessed: the patients were evaluated with regard to nonunion, malunion, infection, growth arrest, leg length discrepancy, implant irritation, and joint function. Mean age at the time of surgery was 7.8 years (range between 5.3 and 14.8 years), mean body weight 34.1 kg, all fractures were transverse or mild oblique type, including 3 open fractures, 5 multifragmented fractures, and 4 fractures associated with polytrauma; 6 cases were treated with antegrade ESIN of tibia while 15 cases need combined retrograde fibula and antegrade tibia fixation treatments. Follow-ups were ranging from 11 to 36 months, 19 fractures showed both clinical and radiographic evidence of healing within 5 months; all cases had full range motion of knee and ankle with symmetrical foot progress angle. Nail removal was at a mean 7.1 months, at final follow-up, no growth arrest or disturbances occurred. Five patients had complications; leg length discrepancy had decreased yet affected 2 patients, 2 cases showed delayed union, and 1 case developed restricted dorsal extension at the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux. ESIN is the treatment of choice for pediatric severely displaced DTDMJ fractures that cannot be reduced by closed reduction or ones that cannot be casted. The advantages include faster fracture healing, excellent functional and cosmetic results, safe and reliable surgical technique, and lower severe complication rate. PMID

  1. Propulsion System with Pneumatic Artificial Muscles for Powering Ankle-Foot Orthosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneva, Ivanka; Vanderborght, Bram; Lefeber, Dirk; Cherelle, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the design of device for control of new propulsion system with pneumatic artificial muscles. The propulsion system can be used for ankle joint articulation, for assisting and rehabilitation in cases of injured ankle-foot complex, stroke patients or elderly with functional weakness. Proposed device for control is composed by microcontroller, generator for muscles contractions and sensor system. The microcontroller receives the control signals from sensors and modulates ankle joint flex- ion and extension during human motion. The local joint control with a PID (Proportional-Integral Derivative) position feedback directly calculates desired pressure levels and dictates the necessary contractions. The main goal is to achieve an adaptation of the system and provide the necessary joint torque using position control with feedback.

  2. [Ankle brachial index measurement].

    PubMed

    Rucigaj, Tanja Planinsek

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasound examinations are noninvasive diagnostic methods which, along with appropriate history and clinical examination, provide basic information on the etiology and spread of the disease, as well as on treatment options required in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and arterial flow impairment. Doppler flow meter offers useful data on venous blood return, primarily in great veins, while both deep and superficial veins as well as arteries can be visualized and data on venous and arterial hemodynamics obtained by duplex ultrasonography. In addition, Doppler flow meter provides data on the peripheral arterial system action through ankle brachial index measurement, which will guide the choice of compression therapy when deciding on the treatment of peripheral arterial disease and mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers. However, diagnosis of arterial insufficiency requires additional examinations.

  3. Rotational stiffness of American football shoes affects ankle biomechanics and injury severity.

    PubMed

    Button, Keith D; Braman, Jerrod E; Davison, Mark A; Wei, Feng; Schaeffer, Maureen C; Haut, Roger C

    2015-06-01

    While previous studies have investigated the effect of shoe-surface interaction on injury risk, few studies have examined the effect of rotational stiffness of the shoe. The hypothesis of the current study was that ankles externally rotated to failure in shoes with low rotational stiffness would allow more talus eversion than those in shoes with a higher rotational stiffness, resulting in less severe injury. Twelve (six pairs) cadaver lower extremities were externally rotated to gross failure while positioned in 20 deg of pre-eversion and 20 deg of predorsiflexion by fixing the distal end of the foot, axially loading the proximal tibia, and internally rotating the tibia. One ankle in each pair was constrained by an American football shoe with a stiff upper, while the other was constrained by an American football shoe with a flexible upper. Experimental bone motions were input into specimen-specific computational models to examine levels of ligament elongation to help understand mechanisms of ankle joint failure. Ankle