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Sample records for ankle prosthesis initial

  1. Contributions of knee swing initiation and ankle plantar flexion to the walking mechanics of amputees using a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed powered prostheses are capable of producing near-physiological joint torque at the knee and/or ankle joints. Based on previous studies of biological joint impedance and the mechanics of able-bodied gait, an impedance-based controller has been developed for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that integrates knee swing initiation and powered plantar flexion in late stance with increasing ankle stiffness throughout stance. In this study, five prosthesis configuration conditions were tested to investigate the individual contributions of each sub-strategy to the overall walking mechanics of four unilateral transfemoral amputees as they completed a clinical 10-m walk test using a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The baseline condition featured constant ankle stiffness and no swing initiation or powered plantar flexion. The four remaining conditions featured knee swing initiation alone (SI) or in combination with powered plantar flexion (SI+PF), increasing ankle stiffness (SI+IK), or both (SI+PF+IK). Self-selected walking speed did not significantly change between conditions, although subjects tended to walk the slowest in the baseline condition compared to conditions with swing initiation. The addition of powered plantar flexion resulted in significantly higher ankle power generation in late stance irrespective of ankle stiffness. The inclusion of swing initiation resulted in a significantly more flexed knee at toe off and a significantly higher average extensor knee torque following toe off. Identifying individual contributions of intrinsic control strategies to prosthesis biomechanics could help inform the refinement of impedance-based prosthesis controllers and simplify future designs of prostheses and lower-limb assistive devices alike.

  2. The Salto Talaris XT Revision Ankle Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    The Salto Talaris XT Revision Ankle Prosthesis is an anatomically designed fixed-bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the design of previous Salto systems. The Salto Talaris XT Revision Ankle Prosthesis design optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene conformity. Two tibial component designs, both with the same base plate dimensions, are available, the standard conical fixation plug affixed to a short keel and a long-stemmed version. The author presents an overview of the Salto Talaris XT Revision Ankle Prosthesis surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  3. Self-Contained Powered Knee and Ankle Prosthesis: Initial Evaluation on a Transfemoral Amputee

    PubMed Central

    Sup, Frank; Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Mitchell, Jason; Withrow, Thomas J.; Goldfarb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the design and control of a fully self-contained prosthesis, which is intended to improve the mobility of transfemoral amputees. A finite-state based impedance control approach, previously developed by the authors, is used for the control of the prosthesis during walking and standing. The prosthesis was tested on an unilateral amputee subject for over-ground walking. Prosthesis sensor data (joint angles and torques) acquired during level ground walking experiments at a self-selected cadence demonstrates the ability of the device to provide a functional gait similar to normal gait biomechanics. Battery measurements during level ground walking experiments show that the self-contained device provides over 4,500 strides (9.0 km of walking at a speed of 5.1 km/h) between battery charges. PMID:20228944

  4. [Ankle joint prosthesis for bone defects].

    PubMed

    Lampert, C

    2011-11-01

    Large defects of the talus, i.e. due to tumors, large areas of osteolysis in total ankle replacement (TAR) and posttraumatic talus body necrosis are difficult to manage. The gold standard in these circumstances is still tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis with all the negative aspects of a completely rigid hindfoot. We started 10 years ago to replace the talus by a custom-made, all cobalt-chrome implant (laser sintering). The first patient with a giant cell tumor did very well but the following patients showed all subsidence of the metal talus into the tibia due to missing bony edges. Therefore, we constructed a custom-made talus (mirrored from the healthy side) and combined it with a well functioning total ankle prosthesis (Hintegra). So far we have implanted this custom-made implant into 3 patients: the first had a chondrosarcoma of the talus (1 year follow-up), the second had massive osteolysis/necrosis of unknown origin (6 months follow-up) and the third massive osteolysis following a correct TAR (2 months follow-up). The results are very encouraging as all of the patients are practically pain free and have a good range of movement (ROM): D-P flexion 15°-0-20° but less motion in the lower ankle joint: ROM P-S 5°-0-5°. No subsidence was detected in the tibia or the calcaneus. The custom-made talus combined with the Hintegra total ankle replacement will probably be an interesting alternative to a tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis in selected cases with massive defects of the talus.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of a prototype foot/ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Quesada, P M; Pitkin, M; Colvin, J

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, we report on our pilot evaluation of a prototype foot/ankle prosthesis. This prototype has been designed and fabricated with the intention of providing decreased ankle joint stiffness during the middle portion of the stance phase of gait, and increased (i.e., more normal) knee range of motion during stance. Our evaluation involved fitting the existing prototype foot/ankle prosthesis, as well as a traditional solid ankle cushioned heel (SACH) foot, to an otherwise healthy volunteer with a below-knee (BK) amputation. We measured this individual's lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics during walking using a video motion analysis system and force platform. These measurements permitted direct comparison of prosthetic ankle joint stiffness and involved side knee joint motion, as well as prosthetic ankle joint moment and power.

  6. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle...

  9. Conversion of ankle autofusion to total ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Emilie R C; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-09-01

    Few reports in the literature have described the conversion of a surgically fused ankle to a total ankle replacement. The takedown of an autofusion and conversion to a prosthesis has not been described. We report the case of a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis with an ankle autofusion fixed in equinus and severe talonavicular arthritis that was converted to ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision system. We describe the reasons why the decision was made to perform total ankle arthroplasty while concomitantly fusing the talonavicular joint, and discuss the rationale of the various surgical treatment options considered. We describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes achieved in this case. At 12 months post-operatively the patient reported significant reduction of pain, increased FAOS scores and had increased ankle range of motion.

  10. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  14. Robotic cadaver testing of a new total ankle prosthesis model (German Ankle System).

    PubMed

    Richter, Martinus; Zech, Stefan; Westphal, Ralf; Klimesch, Yvone; Gosling, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into possible increased forces, torques, and altered motions during load-bearing ankle motion after implantation of two different total ankle prostheses. We hypothesized that the parameters investigated would not differ in relation to the two implants compared. We included two different ankle prostheses (Hintegra, Newdeal, Vienne, France; German Ankle System, R-Innovation, Coburg, Germany). The prostheses were implanted in seven paired cadaver specimens. The specimens were mounted on an industrial robot that enables complex motion under predefined conditions (RX 90, Stäubli, Bayreuth, Germany). The robot detected the load-bearing (30 kg) motion of the 100(th) cycle of the specimens without prostheses as the baseline for the later testing, and mimicked that exact motion during 100 cycles after the prostheses were implanted. The resulting forces, torques, and bone motions were recorded and the differences between the prostheses compared. The Hintegra and German Ankle System, significantly increased the forces and torques in relation to the specimen without a prosthesis with one exception (one-sample-t-test, each p < or = 0.01; exception, parameter lateral force measured with the German Ankle System, p = 0.34). The force, torque, and motion differences between the specimens before and after implantation of the prostheses were lower with the German Ankle System than with the Hintegra (unpaired t-test, each p < or = 0.05). The German Ankle System prosthesis had less of an effect on resulting forces and torques during partial weightbearing passive ankle motion than the Hintegra prosthesis. This might improve function and minimize loosening during the clinical use.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3110 Section 888.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  4. Running with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Amanda H; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a running control architecture for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that enables a transfemoral amputee to run with a biomechanically appropriate running gait and to intentionally transition between a walking and running gait. The control architecture consists firstly of a coordination level controller, which provides gait biomechanics representative of healthy running, and secondly of a gait selection controller that enables the user to intentionally transition between a running and walking gait. The running control architecture was implemented on a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints, and the efficacy of the controller was assessed in a series of running trials with a transfemoral amputee subject. Specifically, treadmill trials were conducted to assess the extent to which the coordination controller provided a biomechanically appropriate running gait. Separate trials were conducted to assess the ability of the user to consistently and reliably transition between walking and running gaits.

  5. Variable Cadence Walking and Ground Adaptive Standing with a Powered Ankle Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Amanda H.; Lawson, Brian E.; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes a control approach that provides walking and standing functionality for a powered ankle prosthesis, and demonstrates the efficacy of the approach in experiments in which a unilateral transtibial amputee subject walks with the prosthesis at variable cadences, and stands on various slopes. Both controllers incorporate a finite-state structure that emulates healthy ankle joint behavior via a series of piecewise passive impedance functions. The walking controller incorporates an algorithm to modify impedance parameters based on estimated cadence, while the standing controller incorporates an algorithm to modulate the ankle equilibrium angle in order to adapt to the ground slope and user posture, and the supervisory controller selects between the walking and standing controllers. The system is shown to reproduce several essential biomechanical features of the healthy joint during walking, particularly relative to a passive prosthesis, and is shown to adapt to variable cadences. The system is also shown to adapt to slopes over a range of ± 15 deg and to provide support to the user in a manner that is biomimetic, as validated by quasi-static stiffness measurements recorded by the prosthesis. Data from standing trials indicate that the user places more weight on the powered prosthesis than on his passive prosthesis when standing on sloped surfaces, particularly at angles of 10 deg or greater. The authors also demonstrated that the prosthesis typically began providing support within 1 s of initial contact with the ground. Further, the supervisory controller was shown to be effective in switching between walking and standing, as well as in determining ground slope just prior to the transition from the standing controller to the walking controller, where the estimated ground slope was within 1.25 deg of the actual ground slope for all trials. PMID:25955789

  6. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2015-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years. PMID:27022527

  7. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis for the improvement of amputee ambulation.

    PubMed

    Au, Samuel K; Herr, Hugh; Weber, Jeff; Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, control scheme, and clinical evaluation of a novel, motorized ankle-foot prosthesis, called MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis. Unlike a conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prosthesis, this prosthesis can provide active mechanical power during the stance period of walking. The basic architecture of the prosthesis is a unidirectional spring, configured in parallel with a force-controllable actuator with series elasticity. With this architecture, the anklefoot prosthesis matches the size and weight of the human ankle, and is also capable of delivering high mechanical power and torque observed in normal human walking. We also propose a biomimetic control scheme that allows the prosthesis to mimic the normal human ankle behavior during walking. To evaluate the performance of the prosthesis, we measured the rate of oxygen consumption of three unilateral transtibial amputees walking at self-selected speeds to estimate the metabolic walking economy. We find that the powered prosthesis improves amputee metabolic economy from 7% to 20% compared to the conventional passive-elastic prostheses (Flex-Foot Ceterus and Freedom Innovations Sierra), even though the powered system is twofold heavier than the conventional devices. This result highlights the benefit of performing net positive work at the ankle joint to amputee ambulation and also suggests a new direction for further advancement of an ankle-foot prosthesis.

  8. [Aseptic loosening of total ankle replacement : Two-stage revision with bone augmentation of osseous defects and secondary prosthesis implantation].

    PubMed

    Barg, A; Wiewiorski, M; Valderrabano, V

    2017-06-01

    To remove loosened ankle prosthesis components, perform osseous defect augmentation, and reimplant definitive prosthesis components to preserve ankle range of motion. Aseptic loosening of the tibial and/or talar ankle prosthesis components with substantial bone defect. General surgical/anesthesiological risks, infections, critical soft tissue conditions, nonmanageable hindfoot instability, neurovascular impairment of the lower extremity, neuroarthropathy, substantial nonreconstructable osseous defects with or without cysts on the tibial and/or talar side, noncompliance, primary total ankle replacement (TAR) using intramedullary fixation (stem fixation), severely reduced bone quality, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, smoking, unrealistic patients' expectations, high activity in sports. Exposure of the ankle joint using the previous incision. Mobilization and removal of loosened prosthesis components. Debridement of bone stock. Assessment and measurement of osseous defects. Harvesting of iliac crest autograft. Screw fixation of iliac crest autograft. Placement of polyethylene inlay as a spacer. Wound closure in layers at the ankle and the iliac crest. Implantation of definitive prosthesis components. A soft wound dressing. Thromboprophylaxis recommended. Mobilization on postoperative day 1 using a stabilizing walking boot/cast for 6 weeks (sole contact but no weight bearing). Clinical and radiographic follow-up 3 months postoperatively including computed tomography to assess osseous consolidation. After the second surgery, patient mobilization on postoperative day 1 with 15 kg partial weight bearing using a stabilizing walking boot/cast for 6 weeks. Following clinical and radiographic follow-up at 6 weeks, full weight bearing is initiated gradually. From January 2007 to December 2012, a two-stage revision TAR was performed in 5 patients (46.8 and 71.4 years). The time between the initial TAR and revision was 2.4-11.5 years. No intra

  9. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis to assist level-ground and stair-descent gaits.

    PubMed

    Au, Samuel; Berniker, Max; Herr, Hugh

    2008-05-01

    The human ankle varies impedance and delivers net positive work during the stance period of walking. In contrast, commercially available ankle-foot prostheses are passive during stance, causing many clinical problems for transtibial amputees, including non-symmetric gait patterns, higher gait metabolism, and poorer shock absorption. In this investigation, we develop and evaluate a myoelectric-driven, finite state controller for a powered ankle-foot prosthesis that modulates both impedance and power output during stance. The system employs both sensory inputs measured local to the external prosthesis, and myoelectric inputs measured from residual limb muscles. Using local prosthetic sensing, we first develop two finite state controllers to produce biomimetic movement patterns for level-ground and stair-descent gaits. We then employ myoelectric signals as control commands to manage the transition between these finite state controllers. To transition from level-ground to stairs, the amputee flexes the gastrocnemius muscle, triggering the prosthetic ankle to plantar flex at terminal swing, and initiating the stair-descent state machine algorithm. To transition back to level-ground walking, the amputee flexes the tibialis anterior muscle, triggering the ankle to remain dorsiflexed at terminal swing, and initiating the level-ground state machine algorithm. As a preliminary evaluation of clinical efficacy, we test the device on a transtibial amputee with both the proposed controller and a conventional passive-elastic control. We find that the amputee can robustly transition between the finite state controllers through direct muscle activation, allowing rapid transitioning from level-ground to stair walking patterns. Additionally, we find that the proposed finite state controllers result in a more biomimetic ankle response, producing net propulsive work during level-ground walking and greater shock absorption during stair descent. The results of this study highlight the

  10. Midterm results of the Salto Total Ankle Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Judet, T; Colombier, J A; Buscayret, F; Graveleau, N; Piriou, P

    2004-07-01

    The Salto Total Ankle Prosthesis is noncemented with mobile bearings and is characterized by an anatomic design and a dual Ti-HA coating. Between 1997 and 2000, 98 consecutive Salto prostheses were implanted. At last followup, two patients were deceased, one patient was lost to followup, and two prostheses were removed in two patients. Ninety-three implants in 91 patients were available with a mean followup of 35 months (range, 24-68 months). Survivorship at 68 months, with the end point implant removal, then was 98% (favorable scenario) to 94.9% (unfavorable scenario). The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 32.3 points preoperatively and 83.1 points at followup. Seventy-two patients are pain-free, 54 patients walk unlimited distances, and 25 patients have limitation but walk more than 1 km. Sixty-seven patients have no limp but seven need walking aids. Fifty-eight patients can walk on tiptoes, 49 patients can walk on uneven ground, 14 patients can run, 76 patients ascend stairs normally, and 63 patients descend stairs normally. Range of motion as measured on stress radiographs improved from 15.2 degrees preoperatively to 28.3 degrees at followup. Preliminary results of the Salto prosthesis are encouraging and validate the concept of anatomic replacement.

  11. Design and Characterization of a Quasi-Passive Pneumatic Foot-Ankle Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeffrey D; Mooney, Luke M; Rouse, Elliott J

    2017-07-01

    The majority of commercially available passive prosthetic feet are not capable of providing joint mechanics that match that of the intact human ankle. Due to their cantilever design, their stiffness characteristics contrast with what has been observed in the biological ankle, namely, an increase in stiffness during the stance phase of walking. In this paper, we introduce the design and control of a pneumatic foot-ankle prosthesis that attempts to provide biomimetic mechanics. The prosthesis is comprised of a pneumatic cylinder in series with a fiberglass leaf spring, and a solenoid valve to control the flow of air between the two sides of the cylinder. The solenoid valve acts as a mechanical clutch, enabling resetting of the ankle's equilibrium position. By adjusting the pressure inside the cylinder, the prosthesis can be customized to provide a range of ankle mechanics. A mechanical testing machine is used to compare the torque-angle curve of the pneumatic prosthesis with a low-profile passive prosthetic foot. Finally, data are presented of one transtibial amputee walking with the prosthesis at 1.2 m/s. The testing shows that the pneumatic prosthesis is capable of providing an appropriate range of motion as well a maximum torque of 94 Nm, while returning approximately 11.5 J of energy.

  12. In vivo kinematics of the salto total ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Leszko, Filip; Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Ratron, Yves-Alain; Judet, Thierry; Bonnin, Michel; Colombier, Jean-Alain; Lin, Sheldon S

    2008-11-01

    Recent technological advancements in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) have included the introduction of the mobile bearing concept. This bearing has several advantages, but researchers have questioned whether or not increased mobility sacrifices joint stability or durability of the implant. The present study evaluated the kinematics of this type of prosthesis implanted in patients. Fluoroscopy and 3D-to-2D registration techniques were used to determine the in vivo kinematics for 20 TAA subjects performing two activities: gait and step-up. The motion of the prostheses was described in terms of clinical rotations and as rotation about the helical (screw) axis. Then, the anterior-posterior translation and axial rotation of the mobile bearing insert were determined. Among the clinical rotations, the dorsi-/plantarflexion was the most dominant, revealing the greatest pattern change and the largest magnitude. During gait, the orientation of the prosthetic components changed smoothly from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion. The average range of this motion was 9.2 degrees. For step-up activity, the range was 8.0 degrees. However, between 33% and 66% of stance phase, the talar component's orientation changed from dorsiflexion to plantarflexion. The average absolute range of anterior-posterior translation of the mobile bearing insert was 1.5 mm and 2.3 mm for gait and step-up, respectively. These measured translations were relatively small and may suggest that the rotational portion of the motion was more dominant than translational and provided sufficient mobility.

  13. Configuring a powered knee and ankle prosthesis for transfemoral amputees within five specific ambulation modes.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ann M; Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Finucane, Suzanne B; Lipschutz, Robert D; Young, Aaron J; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies--which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140) had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes) was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide.

  14. Configuring a Powered Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Transfemoral Amputees within Five Specific Ambulation Modes

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Ingraham, Kimberly A.; Fey, Nicholas P.; Finucane, Suzanne B.; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Young, Aaron J.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies—which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140) had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes) was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide. PMID:24914674

  15. Design and development of ankle-foot prosthesis with delayed release of plantarflexion.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael; Craig, Katelynn; Kyberd, Peter; Biden, Edmund; Bush, Greg

    2013-01-01

    A computer-controlled mechanism that fits a standard ankle-foot prosthesis was designed to capture the absorbed energy in the ankle and delay its release until specific times in the gait cycle. This mechanism used a direct current motor to take up and hold the compression of a carbon-fiber ankle joint. Based on the timing of the contact forces between the foot and the ground, a microprocessor released the spring at preset times later in the gait cycle. This mechanism was added to a Talux prosthetic foot and was employed by a user of a conventional energy-storage ankle-foot prosthesis. His gait was recorded using a motion analysis system. Five settings: 0, 55, 65, 75, and 85 ms delay were tested on separate days, and the standard kinematic and kinetic gait data were recorded. The user reported some settings were more comfortable than others. When these preferences were tested with a randomized double-blind trial, the preferences were not consistent. A second user showed a preference for the 55 ms delay. The modifications to the device resulted in changes to the gait of the subjects, including increased cadence and kinematics of the unaffected joints and a longer, slower push from the ankle, which was noticed by both of the subjects.

  16. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    PubMed

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  17. Stresses in polyethylene liners in a semiconstrained ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Miller, M C; Smolinski, P; Conti, S; Galik, K

    2004-10-01

    A finite element model of a semiconstrained ankle implant with the tibia and fibula was constructed so that the stresses in the polyethylene liner could be computed. Two different widths of talar components were studied and proximal boundary conditions were computed from an inverse process providing a load of five times body weight appropriately distributed across the osseous structures. von Mises stresses indicated small regions of localized yielding and contact stresses that were similar to those in acetabular cup liners. A wider talar component with 36% more surface area reduced contact stress and von Mises stresses at the center of the polyethylene component by 17%.

  18. Within-socket myoelectric prediction of continuous ankle kinematics for control of a powered transtibial prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Samuel; Silver-Thorn, Barbara; Voglewede, Philip; Beardsley, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Powered robotic prostheses create a need for natural-feeling user interfaces and robust control schemes. Here, we examined the ability of a nonlinear autoregressive model to continuously map the kinematics of a transtibial prosthesis and electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded within socket to the future estimates of the prosthetic ankle angle in three transtibial amputees. Approach. Model performance was examined across subjects during level treadmill ambulation as a function of the size of the EMG sampling window and the temporal ‘prediction’ interval between the EMG/kinematic input and the model’s estimate of future ankle angle to characterize the trade-off between model error, sampling window and prediction interval. Main results. Across subjects, deviations in the estimated ankle angle from the actual movement were robust to variations in the EMG sampling window and increased systematically with prediction interval. For prediction intervals up to 150 ms, the average error in the model estimate of ankle angle across the gait cycle was less than 6°. EMG contributions to the model prediction varied across subjects but were consistently localized to the transitions to/from single to double limb support and captured variations from the typical ankle kinematics during level walking. Significance. The use of an autoregressive modeling approach to continuously predict joint kinematics using natural residual muscle activity provides opportunities for direct (transparent) control of a prosthetic joint by the user. The model’s predictive capability could prove particularly useful for overcoming delays in signal processing and actuation of the prosthesis, providing a more biomimetic ankle response.

  19. Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the contralateral limb: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hill, David; Herr, Hugh

    2013-06-01

    Lower-extremity amputees encounter a series of stress-related challenges. Among them is an increased risk of chronic joint disorders. For unilateral, transtibial amputees, we hypothesize that increasing the power output of the trailing, ankle-foot prosthesis during powered plantar flexion could mitigate kinetic loading applied to the leading, contralateral leg during walking. Here, we present a case series that analyzes kinetic factors of unilateral, transtibial amputee gait and forms a comparison between two types of ankle prostheses with varying power outputs. The factors examined here are impact resultant force, peak foot pressure at heel-strike, step-to-step transition work, and knee external adduction moment. The two prostheses are the amputee participant's daily-use passive ankle-foot prosthesis and the BiOM powered ankle-foot prosthesis capable of biologically accurate powered plantar flexion during late stance. In a preliminary study on two transtibial amputees walking over level terrain at a controlled speed (1.25 m/s), we observed average reductions of 8% in peak impact resultant force, 18% in impact resultant force loading rate, 8% in peak heel-strike foot pressure, and 15% in the 1(st) peak knee external adduction moment when the powered ankle-foot prosthesis was compared to the conventional passive prosthesis. Overall, our preliminary results suggest that more biomimetic prosthetic ankle-foot push-off during late stance may limit leading-leg musculoskeletal stress in walking.

  20. Radiographic Assessment of a Medullary Total Ankle Prosthesis: A Test of Agreement and Reliability.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Berlet, Gregory C; Scott, Ryan T; Daigre, Justin L; Bull, Patrick E; Peterson, Kyle S; Collins, Christy L; Hyer, Christopher F

    2016-07-13

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a viable alternative to ankle fusion in certain patients with end-stage ankle arthritis. Despite the importance of understanding alignment and movement of the prosthesis, there is no standardized radiographic method for evaluating the position and movement of the INBONE 2 prosthesis. The aims of this study were to describe a radiographic measurement protocol for INBONE 2 for clinical practice and research while determining the interobserver and intraobserver reliability using standard weightbearing radiographs. Fifteen patients were randomly selected with operative dates from January 2011 to January 2014 who underwent primary TAR using the INBONE 2 prosthesis. Most recent preoperative and first postoperative weightbearing anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were pulled and deidentified. Three foot and ankle surgeons blinded from the patient selection and deidentification, measured the described measurements on separate occasions. Intraobserver reliability: surgeon 1 had acceptable reliability for 9 of 13 continuous radiographic measurements (69.2%), surgeon 2 had acceptable reliability for 8 of 13 measurements (61.5%), and surgeon 3 had acceptable reliability for 12 of 13 measurements (92.3%). Interobserver reliability: among the first measurements, 6 of 13 continuous radiographic measurements (46.2%) had acceptable reliability. Among the second measurements, 7 of 13 measurements (53.8%) had acceptable reliability. Among the first and second measurements combined, 7 of 13 measurements (53.8%) had acceptable reliability. This study promotes the need for meticulous evaluation of annual radiographic findings following TAR in an effort to avoid catastrophic failure and represents moderate agreement can be obtained by employing the proposed measurements for surveillance of INBONE 2 TAR at annual postoperative visits. Measurements on the anteroposterior radiograph appear to demonstrate more consistent results for surveillance than

  1. Control of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis based on a neuromuscular model.

    PubMed

    Eilenberg, Michael F; Geyer, Hartmut; Herr, Hugh

    2010-04-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle-foot prostheses rely upon fixed torque-ankle state relationships obtained from measurements of intact humans walking at target speeds and across known terrains. Although effective at their intended gait speed and terrain, these controllers do not allow for adaptation to environmental disturbances such as speed transients and terrain variation. Here we present an adaptive muscle-reflex controller, based on simulation studies, that utilizes an ankle plantar flexor comprising a Hill-type muscle with a positive force feedback reflex. The model's parameters were fitted to match the human ankle's torque-angle profile as obtained from level-ground walking measurements of a weight and height-matched intact subject walking at 1 m/s. Using this single parameter set, clinical trials were conducted with a transtibial amputee walking on level ground, ramp ascent, and ramp descent conditions. During these trials, an adaptation of prosthetic ankle work was observed in response to ground slope variation, in a manner comparable to intact subjects, without the difficulties of explicit terrain sensing. Specifically, the energy provided by the prosthesis was directly correlated to the ground slope angle. This study highlights the importance of neuromuscular controllers for enhancing the adaptiveness of powered prosthetic devices across varied terrain surfaces.

  2. Design and Control of an Active Electrical Knee and Ankle Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sup, Frank; Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Mitchell, Jason; Withrow, Thomas; Goldfarb, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the design and control of an electrically powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The prosthesis design incorporates two motor-driven ball screw units to drive the knee and ankle joints. A spring in parallel with the ankle motor unit is employed to decrease the power consumption and increase the torque output for a given motor size. The device’s sensor package includes a custom load cell to measure the sagittal socket interface moment above the knee joint, a custom sensorized foot to measure the ground reaction force at the heel and ball of the foot, and commercial potentiometers and load cells to measure joint positions and torques. A finite-state based impedance control approach, previously developed by the authors, is used and experimental results on level treadmill walking are presented that demonstrate the potential of the device to restore normal gait. The experimental power consumption of the device projects a walking distance of 5.0 km at a speed of 2.8 km/hr with a lithium polymer battery pack. PMID:20648239

  3. The VSPA Foot: A Quasi-Passive Ankle-Foot Prosthesis with Continuously Variable Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Max K; Rouse, Elliott J

    2017-09-07

    Most commercially available prosthetic feet do not exhibit a biomimetic torque-angle relationship, and are unable to modulate their mechanics to assist with other mobility tasks, such as stairs and ramps. In this work, we present a quasi-passive ankle-foot prosthesis with a customizable torque-angle curve and an ability to quickly modulate ankle stiffness between tasks. The customizable torque-angle curve is obtained with a cam-based transmission and a fiberglass leaf spring. To achieve variable stiffness, the leaf spring's support conditions can be actively modulated by a small motor, shifting the torque-angle curve to be more or less stiff. We introduce the design, characterize the available torque-angle curves, and present kinematics from a transtibial amputee subject performing level-ground walking, stair ascent/descent, and ramp ascent/descent. The subject exhibited a more normative range of motion on stairs and ramps at lower stiffness levels, and preferred different stiffness levels for each task. Paired with an appropriate intent recognition system, our novel ankle prosthesis could improve gait biomechanics during walking and many other mobility tasks.

  4. Estimation of ground reaction force and zero moment point on a powered ankle-foot prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Herr, Hugh; Farrell, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The ground reaction force (GRF) and the zero moment point (ZMP) are important parameters for the advancement of biomimetic control of robotic lower-limb prosthetic devices. In this document a method to estimate GRF and ZMP on a motorized ankle-foot prosthesis (MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis) is presented. The method proposed is based on the analysis of data collected from a sensory system embedded in the prosthetic device using a custom designed wearable computing unit. In order to evaluate the performance of the estimation methods described, standing and walking clinical studies were conducted on a transtibial amputee. The results were statistically compared to standard analysis methodologies employed in a gait laboratory. The average RMS error and correlation factor were calculated for all experimental sessions. By using a static analysis procedure, the estimation of the vertical component of GRF had an averaged correlation coefficient higher than 0.94. The estimated ZMP location had a distance error of less than 1 cm, equal to 4% of the anterior-posterior foot length or 12% of the medio-lateral foot width.

  5. Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background People with a lower-extremity amputation that use conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prostheses encounter a series of stress-related challenges during walking such as greater forces on their unaffected leg, and may thus be predisposed to secondary musculoskeletal injuries such as chronic joint disorders. Specifically, people with a unilateral transtibial amputation have an increased susceptibility to knee osteoarthritis, especially in their unaffected leg. Previous studies have hypothesized that the development of this disorder is linked to the abnormally high peak knee external adduction moments encountered during walking. An ankle-foot prosthesis that supplies biomimetic power could potentially mitigate the forces and knee adduction moments applied to the unaffected leg of a person with a transtibial amputation, which could, in turn, reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that compared to using a passive-elastic prosthesis, people with a transtibial amputation using a powered ankle-foot prosthesis would have lower peak resultant ground reaction forces, peak external knee adduction moments, and corresponding loading rates applied to their unaffected leg during walking over a wide range of speeds. Methods We analyzed ground reaction forces and knee joint kinetics of the unaffected leg of seven participants with a unilateral transtibial amputation and seven age-, height- and weight-matched non-amputees during level-ground walking at 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75 m/s. Subjects with an amputation walked while using their own passive-elastic prosthesis and a powered ankle-foot prosthesis capable of providing net positive mechanical work and powered ankle plantar flexion during late stance. Results Use of the powered prosthesis significantly decreased unaffected leg peak resultant forces by 2-11% at 0.75-1.50 m/s, and first peak knee external adduction moments by 21 and 12% at 1.50 and 1.75 m/s, respectively. Loading rates were not

  6. SIMULTANEOUS CONTROL OF AN ANKLE-FOOT PROSTHESIS MODEL USING A VIRTUAL CONSTRAINT

    PubMed Central

    Nanjangud, Akshay; Gregg, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Amputee locomotion can benefit from recent advances in robotic prostheses, but their control systems design poses challenges. Prosthesis control typically discretizes the nonlinear gait cycle into phases, with each phase controlled by different linear controllers. Unfortunately, real-time identification of gait phases and tuning of controller parameters limit implementation. Recently, biped robots have used phase variables and virtual constraints to characterize the gait cycle as a whole. Although phase variables and virtual constraints could solve issues with discretizing the gait cycle, the virtual constraints method from robotics does not readily translate to prosthetics because of hard-to-measure quantities, like the interaction forces between the user and prosthesis socket, and prosthesis parameters which are often altered by a clinician even for a known patient. We use the simultaneous stabilization approach to design a low-order, linear time-invariant controller for ankle prostheses independent of such quantities to enforce a virtual constraint. We show in simulation that this controller produces suitable walking gaits for a simplified amputee model. PMID:25554734

  7. [Three-dimensional analysis of the foot following implantation of a HINTEGRA ankle prosthesis: evaluation with the Heidelberg foot model].

    PubMed

    Müller, S; Wolf, S; Döderlein, L

    2006-05-01

    Detailed foot kinematics after total ankle replacement has not yet been investigated. In this study 11 patients with unilateral Hintegra ankle prosthesis were analysed with the Heidelberg Foot Model. This model measures the kinematics of the fore-, mid- and hindfoot in three clinical planes. Moreover, the kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle was captured. A diminished ROM was found in all foot segments investigated. The timing of the kinematics between sound and involved side appeared similar. A limitation in the hindfoot mobility, as experienced after ankle arthrodesis, was not observed. However, a careful hindfoot alignment is essential for optimal foot function, and previous malalignments should be corrected. Concerning the kinetics, the replaced ankle showed a decreased power generation compensated by an increase in power in the ipsilateral knee. For a more detailed evaluation, further studies are required which include pre- and postoperative data and also take into account different types of prostheses.

  8. A controlled clinical trial of a clinically-tuned powered ankle prosthesis in people with transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Emily S; Kelly, Brian M; Wensman, Jeffrey; Gates, Deanna H

    2017-07-01

    To determine whether there are changes in level walking performance for people using a powered ankle prosthesis that was tuned by an independent, manufacturer-certified prosthetist in accordance with device recommendations. Intervention study with cross-over design. Laboratory. Convenience sample of 10 individuals with unilateral, transtibial amputation, and 10 age- and gender-matched control participants. Powered ankle prosthesis (BiOM T2 Ankle System). Main outcome metrics: Metabolic costs of walking, preferred walking speed. There were no significant differences in oxygen consumption (2.9% difference; P = 0.606, d = 0.26), cost of transport (~1% difference; P = 0.652, d = 0.23), or preferred walking speed (~1% difference; P = 0.147, d = 0.76) when using the powered ankle compared to unpowered prostheses. Secondary analyses of user characteristics revealed that participants who were classified as having the highest function (K4 on Medicare's 5-point scale from K0 to K4) were significantly more likely to exhibit energy cost savings than those classified as having lower function (K3; P = 0.014, d = 2.36). Participants did not demonstrate significant improvements in energetics or preferred speed when wearing a clinically tuned powered ankle prosthesis compared to their non-powered prostheses. Prescribers of powered devices should understand that not all users will show an immediate reduction in energy expenditure.

  9. Volitional control of ankle plantar flexion in a powered transtibial prosthesis during stair-ambulation.

    PubMed

    Kannape, Oliver A; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-01-01

    Although great advances have been made in the design and control of lower extremity prostheses, walking on different terrains, such as ramps or stairs, and transitioning between these terrains remains a major challenge for the field. In order to generalize biomimetic behaviour of active lower-limb prostheses top-down volitional control is required but has until recently been deemed unfeasible due to the difficulties involved in acquiring an adequate electromyographic (EMG) signal. In this study, we hypothesize that a transtibial amputee can extend the functionality of a hybrid controller, designed for level ground walking, to stair ascent and descent by volitionally modulating powered plantar-flexion of the prosthesis. We here present data illustrating that the participant is able to reproduce ankle push-off behaviour of the intrinsic controller during stair ascent as well as prevent inadvertent push-off during stair descent. Our findings suggest that EMG signal from the residual limb muscles can be used to transition between level-ground walking and stair ascent/descent within a single step and significantly improve prosthesis performance during stair-ambulation.

  10. A universal ankle-foot prosthesis emulator for human locomotion experiments.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Joshua M; Collins, Steven H

    2014-03-01

    Robotic prostheses have the potential to significantly improve mobility for people with lower-limb amputation. Humans exhibit complex responses to mechanical interactions with these devices, however, and computational models are not yet able to predict such responses meaningfully. Experiments therefore play a critical role in development, but have been limited by the use of product-like prototypes, each requiring years of development and specialized for a narrow range of functions. Here we describe a robotic ankle-foot prosthesis system that enables rapid exploration of a wide range of dynamical behaviors in experiments with human subjects. This emulator comprises powerful off-board motor and control hardware, a flexible Bowden cable tether, and a lightweight instrumented prosthesis, resulting in a combination of low mass worn by the human (0.96 kg) and high mechatronic performance compared to prior platforms. Benchtop tests demonstrated closed-loop torque bandwidth of 17 Hz, peak torque of 175 Nm, and peak power of 1.0 kW. Tests with an anthropomorphic pendulum "leg" demonstrated low interference from the tether, less than 1 Nm about the hip. This combination of low worn mass, high bandwidth, high torque, and unrestricted movement makes the platform exceptionally versatile. To demonstrate suitability for human experiments, we performed preliminary tests in which a subject with unilateral transtibial amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 ms-1 while the prosthesis behaved in various ways. These tests revealed low torque tracking error (RMS error of 2.8 Nm) and the capacity to systematically vary work production or absorption across a broad range (from -5 to 21 J per step). These results support the use of robotic emulators during early stage assessment of proposed device functionalities and for scientific study of fundamental aspects of human-robot interaction. The design of simple, alternate end-effectors would enable studies at other joints or with

  11. Increasing ankle push-off work with a powered prosthesis does not necessarily reduce metabolic rate for transtibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Roberto E; Caputo, Joshua M; Collins, Steven H

    2016-10-03

    Amputees using passive ankle-foot prostheses tend to expend more metabolic energy during walking than non-amputees, and reducing this cost has been a central motivation for the development of active ankle-foot prostheses. Increased push-off work at the end of stance has been proposed as a way to reduce metabolic energy use, but the effects of push-off work have not been tested in isolation. In this experiment, participants with unilateral transtibial amputation (N=6) walked on a treadmill at a constant speed while wearing a powered prosthesis emulator. The prosthesis delivered different levels of ankle push-off work across conditions, ranging from the value for passive prostheses to double the value for non-amputee walking, while all other prosthesis mechanics were held constant. Participants completed six acclimation sessions prior to a data collection in which metabolic rate, kinematics, kinetics, muscle activity and user satisfaction were recorded. Metabolic rate was not affected by net prosthesis work rate (p=0.5; R(2)=0.007). Metabolic rate, gait mechanics and muscle activity varied widely across participants, but no participant had lower metabolic rate with higher levels of push-off work. User satisfaction was affected by push-off work (p=0.002), with participants preferring values of ankle push-off slightly higher than in non-amputee walking, possibly indicating other benefits. Restoring or augmenting ankle push-off work is not sufficient to improve energy economy for lower-limb amputees. Additional necessary conditions might include alternate timing or control, individualized tuning, or particular subject characteristics.

  12. Prospective study of a cementless, mobile-bearing, third generation total ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Katja; Lieske, Sebastian; John, Michael; Franke, Konrad; Mouly, Stéphane; Lizee, Emmanuel; Neumann, Wolfram

    2011-08-01

    The SALTO total ankle prosthesis is a noncemented mobile bearing anatomic design characterized by dual Ti-HA coating. This study reviews our results with this prosthesis. Between 2001 and 2007, 413 consecutive SALTO prostheses were implanted in our institution in 215 women and 198 men, aged 57.1 +/- 11.9 years. At the last visit, 401 implants (47% in the left ankle) were available with a mean followup of 29 (range, 1 to 84) months. Based on the results of the 218 patients with at least 2 years of postoperative followup, the 5-year estimated survivorship, with the primary end-point being implant removal, was 86.6% and ranged from 85.1% in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis to 95.6% in those with rheumatoid arthritis. The AOFAS score increased from 50.9 +/- 16.8 points preoperatively to 82.2 +/- 14 points at followup (mean difference, 31.1 +/- 1.4, 95% confidence interval (C.I.) for the difference, 28.3 to 33.8, p < 0.001). Visual analog scale for pain decreased from 7.4 +/- 1.1 preoperatively to 2.0 +/- 2.0 postoperatively (mean difference, -5.4 +/- 0.7, 95% C.I. for the difference, -5.6 to -5.2, p < 0.001). Flexion/extension ROM increased from 25.2 +/- 14.1 degrees to 33.1 +/- 13.6 degrees at the last followup visit (mean difference, 7.9 +/- 0.5 degrees, 95% C.I. for the difference, 4.3 to 7.2, p < 0.001), while pronation/supination ROM increased from 23.8 +/- 13.7 degrees to 25.4 +/- 14.5 degrees (mean difference, 1.6 +/- 0.7 degrees, 95% C.I. for the difference, 0.9 to 2.2, p = 0.005). The SALTO prosthesis provided good clinical and functional results and we believe helps validate the concept of anatomic replacement.

  13. Walking cycle control for an active ankle prosthesis with one degree of freedom monitored from a personal computer.

    PubMed

    Cordero Andrés, Guzhñay; Arévalo Luis, Calle; Abad Julio, Zambrano

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a fuzzy control algorithm for human walking cycle of an active ankle prosthesis for people who have suffered amputation of the lower limb, the system has one degree of freedom in the sagittal plane. Also, a biomechanical analysis of foot and ankle is shown to define the phases of plantar support and swinging. The used actuator is an intelligent servomotor, Dynamixel MX-106T which has torque, current and position feedback, among others, allowing real-time telemetry of the prototype implemented in a microcontroller system.

  14. Design and Preliminary Evaluation of a Two DOFs Cable-Driven Ankle-Foot Prosthesis with Active Dorsiflexion-Plantarflexion and Inversion-Eversion.

    PubMed

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Dallali, Houman; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an ankle-foot robotic prosthesis controllable in the sagittal and frontal planes. The prosthesis was designed to meet the mechanical characteristics of the human ankle including power, range of motion, and weight. To transfer the power from the motors and gearboxes to the ankle-foot mechanism, a Bowden cable system was used. The Bowden cable allows for optimal placement of the motors and gearboxes in order to improve gait biomechanics such as the metabolic energy cost and gait asymmetry during locomotion. Additionally, it allows flexibility in the customization of the device to amputees with different residual limb sizes. To control the prosthesis, impedance controllers in both sagittal and frontal planes were developed. The impedance controllers used torque feedback from strain gages installed on the foot. Preliminary evaluation was performed to verify the capability of the prosthesis to track the kinematics of the human ankle in two degrees of freedom (DOFs), the mechanical efficiency of the Bowden cable transmission, and the ability of the prosthesis to modulate the impedance of the ankle. Moreover, the system was characterized by describing the relationship between the stiffness of the impedance controllers to the actual stiffness of the ankle. Efficiency estimation showed 85.4% efficiency in the Bowden cable transmission. The prosthesis was capable of properly mimicking human ankle kinematics and changing its mechanical impedance in two DOFs in real time with a range of stiffness sufficient for normal human walking. In dorsiflexion-plantarflexion (DP), the stiffness ranged from 0 to 236 Nm/rad and in inversion-eversion (IE), the stiffness ranged from 1 to 33 Nm/rad.

  15. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  16. Strategies to reduce the configuration time for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis across multiple ambulation modes.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ann M; Fey, Nicholas P; Finucane, Suzanne B; Lipschutz, Robert D; Hargrove, Levi J

    2013-06-01

    Recently developed powered lower limb prostheses allow users to more closely mimic the kinematics and kinetics of non-amputee gait. However, configuring such a device, in particular a combined powered knee and ankle, for individuals with a transfemoral amputation is challenging. Previous attempts have relied on empirical tuning of all control parameters. This paper describes modified stance phase control strategies - which mimic the behavior of biological joints or depend on the instantaneous loads within the prosthesis - developed to reduce the number of control parameters that require individual tuning. Three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations walked with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis across five ambulation modes (level ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). Starting with a nominal set of impedance parameters, the modified control strategies were applied and the devices were individually tuned such that all subjects achieved comfortable and safe ambulation. The control strategies drastically reduced the number of independent parameters that needed to be tuned for each subject (i.e., to 21 parameters instead of a possible 140 or approximately 4 parameters per mode) while relative amplitudes and timing of kinematic and kinetic data remained similar to those previously reported and to those of non-amputee subjects. Reducing the time necessary to configure a powered device across multiple ambulation modes may allow users to more quickly realize the benefits such powered devices can provide.

  17. Energetic consequences of using a prosthesis with adaptive ankle motion during slope walking in persons with a transtibial amputation

    PubMed Central

    Darter, Benjamin J; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    Background Technological advances in prosthetic design include the use of microprocessors that adapt device performance based on user motion. The Proprio ankle unit prepositions the foot to adjust for walking on slopes and increases foot clearance during swing to minimize gait deviations. Study design Comparative analysis. Objectives To investigate the effect of a prosthesis with adaptive ankle motion on physiological gait performance during slope walking. Methods Six persons with a unilateral transtibial amputation completed treadmill walking tests at three slopes (−5°, 0°, and 5°). The participants were tested wearing a customary device, active Proprio (Pon), and an identical inactivated Proprio (Poff). Results Metabolic energy expenditure, energy cost for walking, and rating of walking difficulty were not statistically different between the Pon and Poff for all tested slopes. However, for slope descent, energy expenditure and energy cost for walking improved significantly by an average of 10%–14% for both the Pon and Poff compared to the customary limb. Rating of walking difficulty also showed an improvement with slope descent for both the Pon and Poff compared to the customary device. An improvement with slope ascent was found for Pon compared to the customary limb only. Conclusions Adaptive ankle motion provided no meaningful physiological benefit during slope walking. The Proprio was, however, less demanding than the customary device for slope descent. Differences in the mechanical properties of the prosthetic feet likely contributed to the changes. PMID:23525888

  18. Energetic consequences of using a prosthesis with adaptive ankle motion during slope walking in persons with a transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Darter, Benjamin J; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-02-01

    Technological advances in prosthetic design include the use of microprocessors that adapt device performance based on user motion. The Proprio ankle unit prepositions the foot to adjust for walking on slopes and increases foot clearance during swing to minimize gait deviations. Comparative analysis. To investigate the effect of a prosthesis with adaptive ankle motion on physiological gait performance during slope walking. Six persons with a unilateral transtibial amputation completed treadmill walking tests at three slopes (-5°, 0°, and 5°). The participants were tested wearing a customary device, active Proprio (Pon), and an identical inactivated Proprio (Poff). Metabolic energy expenditure, energy cost for walking, and rating of walking difficulty were not statistically different between the Pon and Poff for all tested slopes. However, for slope descent, energy expenditure and energy cost for walking improved significantly by an average of 10%-14% for both the Pon and Poff compared to the customary limb. Rating of walking difficulty also showed an improvement with slope descent for both the Pon and Poff compared to the customary device. An improvement with slope ascent was found for Pon compared to the customary limb only. Adaptive ankle motion provided no meaningful physiological benefit during slope walking. The Proprio was, however, less demanding than the customary device for slope descent. Differences in the mechanical properties of the prosthetic feet likely contributed to the changes. While the adaptive ankle motion did not affect metabolic energy expenditure or energy cost for walking, the results suggest close attention should be paid to the mechanical properties of the foot component. Assessment of gait on nonlevel surfaces is recommended to better understand the implications of different prosthetic design features.

  19. Finger movement improves ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, K; Kamata, N; Iwata, A; Minamida, F; Abe, K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of finger movement on ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD patients). The subjects were 13 PD patients and 6 age-matched healthy adults. The subjects moved fingers before or after gait initiation, or initiated gait without finger movement. Ankle joint movement in the stance leg was recorded to estimate the duration of ankle dorsiflexion (DIF duration), which reflects the degree of disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients. In the PD patients with prolonged D/F duration, finger movement that preceded gait initiation shortened the D/F duration, but in the PD patients without prolonged D/F duration and in healthy subjects, the effect was not found. Accordingly, finger movement that precedes gait initiation improves ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients who suffer disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation.

  20. Evaluation of a Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis during Slope Ascent Gait

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Passive prosthetic feet lack active plantarflexion and push-off power resulting in gait deviations and compensations by individuals with transtibial amputation (TTA) during slope ascent. We sought to determine the effect of active ankle plantarflexion and push-off power provided by a powered prosthetic ankle-foot (PWR) on lower extremity compensations in individuals with unilateral TTA as they walked up a slope. We hypothesized that increased ankle plantarflexion and push-off power would reduce compensations commonly observed with a passive, energy-storing-returning prosthetic ankle-foot (ESR). We compared the temporal spatial, kinematic, and kinetic measures of ten individuals with TTA (age: 30.2 ± 5.3 yrs) to matched abled-bodied (AB) individuals during 5° slope ascent. The TTA group walked with an ESR and separately with a PWR. The PWR produced significantly greater prosthetic ankle plantarflexion and push-off power generation compared to an ESR and more closely matched AB values. The PWR functioned similar to a passive ESR device when transitioning onto the prosthetic limb due to limited prosthetic dorsiflexion, which resulted in similar deviations and compensations. In contrast, when transitioning off the prosthetic limb, increased ankle plantarflexion and push-off power provided by the PWR contributed to decreased intact limb knee extensor power production, lessening demand on the intact limb knee. PMID:27977681

  1. HYBRID ANKLE PROSTHESIS IN A CASE OF POST-TRAUMATIC AVASCULAR NECROSIS OF THE TALUS

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Ricardo Jorge Gomes; Pinto, Ricardo Pedro Ferreira Rodrigues; de Oliveira Massada, Marta Maria Teixeira; Pereira, Manuel Alexandre Negrais Pinho Gonçalves; Geada, José Muras; Costa, Isabel Maria Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Talus fractures often lead to late post-traumatic arthrosis. In such cases, the use of latest generation, cementless prostheses has been hindered by the presence of avascular necrosis. We report the case of a 65-year-old patient who presented four years after a talus neck fracture. He had painful ankle arthrosis (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 19) and avascular necrosis, with collapse of the entire talar dome. Given the extent of the necrosis, it was decided to cement the talus prosthetic component. One year after the surgery, the patient shows good clinical and radiological results (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 87) and is satisfied with the procedure. We are not aware of any similar reports in the literature. PMID:27026994

  2. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed. PMID:26807889

  3. Identifying the learning curve for total ankle replacement using a mobile bearing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Usuelli, Federico G; Maccario, Camilla; Pantalone, Andrea; Serra, Nicola; Tan, Eric W

    2017-06-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty remains a technically demanding surgery highly influenced by the operator experience. However, no consensus exists regarding the ideal number of cases that need to be performed before a surgeon is considered proficient. The aim of this study was to identify the learning curve of a specific replacement system with regards to intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. The first 31 patients undergoing total ankle arthroplasty were examined. No additional procedures were performed at the time of the TAA. Intraoperative characteristics, postoperative complications, as well as clinical and radiologic outcomes were assessed with 24-month follow-up. Learning curves, examining the relationship between surgeon experience and patient outcomes, were determined using the Moving Average Method. The operatory time, and the risk of intraoperative fractures decreased with increasing surgeon experience with the learning curve stabilizing after the 14th and 24th patient, respectively. Furthermore, there appeared to be a learning curve associated with most of the important clinical and radiological outcomes. The number of patients required to stabilize the learning curve for the VAS, ROM, and AOFAS was 11, 14 and 28, respectively. Radiographically, there appeared to be a learning curve of 22 patients required to stabilize the tibio-talar ratio. There was no learning curve associated with the SF-12 PCS and MCS as well as the α-, β-, and γ-angle. This study demonstrates that a surgical learning curve does indeed exist when performing TAA. Most of the operative variables as well as clinical and radiological outcomes stabilize after a surgeon has performed 28 cases. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Informing Ankle-Foot Prosthesis Prescription through Haptic Emulation of Candidate Devices.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Joshua M; Adamczyk, Peter G; Collins, Steven H

    2015-05-01

    Robotic prostheses can improve walking performance for amputees, but prescription of these devices has been hindered by their high cost and uncertainty about the degree to which individuals will benefit. The typical prescription process cannot well predict how an individual will respond to a device they have never used because it bases decisions on subjective assessment of an individual's current activity level. We propose a new approach in which individuals 'test drive' candidate devices using a prosthesis emulator while their walking performance is quantitatively assessed and results are distilled to inform prescription. In this system, prosthesis behavior is controlled by software rather than mechanical implementation, so users can quickly experience a broad range of devices. To test the viability of the approach, we developed a prototype emulator and assessment protocol, leveraging hardware and methods we previously developed for basic science experiments. We demonstrated emulations across the spectrum of commercially available prostheses, including traditional (e.g. SACH), dynamic-elastic (e.g. FlexFoot), and powered robotic (e.g. BiOM(®) T2) prostheses. Emulations exhibited low error with respect to reference data and provided subjectively convincing representations of each device. We demonstrated an assessment protocol that differentiated device classes for each individual based on quantitative performance metrics, providing feedback that could be used to make objective, personalized device prescriptions.

  5. Informing Ankle-Foot Prosthesis Prescription through Haptic Emulation of Candidate Devices

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Joshua M.; Adamczyk, Peter G.; Collins, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Robotic prostheses can improve walking performance for amputees, but prescription of these devices has been hindered by their high cost and uncertainty about the degree to which individuals will benefit. The typical prescription process cannot well predict how an individual will respond to a device they have never used because it bases decisions on subjective assessment of an individual’s current activity level. We propose a new approach in which individuals ‘test drive’ candidate devices using a prosthesis emulator while their walking performance is quantitatively assessed and results are distilled to inform prescription. In this system, prosthesis behavior is controlled by software rather than mechanical implementation, so users can quickly experience a broad range of devices. To test the viability of the approach, we developed a prototype emulator and assessment protocol, leveraging hardware and methods we previously developed for basic science experiments. We demonstrated emulations across the spectrum of commercially available prostheses, including traditional (e.g. SACH), dynamic-elastic (e.g. FlexFoot), and powered robotic (e.g. BiOM® T2) prostheses. Emulations exhibited low error with respect to reference data and provided subjectively convincing representations of each device. We demonstrated an assessment protocol that differentiated device classes for each individual based on quantitative performance metrics, providing feedback that could be used to make objective, personalized device prescriptions. PMID:27570639

  6. The influence of push-off timing in a robotic ankle-foot prosthesis on the energetics and mechanics of walking.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Philippe; Quesada, Roberto E; Caputo, Joshua M; Collins, Steven H

    2015-02-22

    Robotic ankle-foot prostheses that provide net positive push-off work can reduce the metabolic rate of walking for individuals with amputation, but benefits might be sensitive to push-off timing. Simple walking models suggest that preemptive push-off reduces center-of-mass work, possibly reducing metabolic rate. Studies with bilateral exoskeletons have found that push-off beginning before leading leg contact minimizes metabolic rate, but timing was not varied independently from push-off work, and the effects of push-off timing on biomechanics were not measured. Most lower-limb amputations are unilateral, which could also affect optimal timing. The goal of this study was to vary the timing of positive prosthesis push-off work in isolation and measure the effects on energetics, mechanics and muscle activity. We tested 10 able-bodied participants walking on a treadmill at 1.25 m · s(-1). Participants wore a tethered ankle-foot prosthesis emulator on one leg using a rigid boot adapter. We programmed the prosthesis to apply torque bursts that began between 46% and 56% of stride in different conditions. We iteratively adjusted torque magnitude to maintain constant net positive push-off work. When push-off began at or after leading leg contact, metabolic rate was about 10% lower than in a condition with Spring-like prosthesis behavior. When push-off began before leading leg contact, metabolic rate was not different from the Spring-like condition. Early push-off led to increased prosthesis-side vastus medialis and biceps femoris activity during push-off and increased variability in step length and prosthesis loading during push-off. Prosthesis push-off timing had no influence on intact-side leg center-of-mass collision work. Prosthesis push-off timing, isolated from push-off work, strongly affected metabolic rate, with optimal timing at or after intact-side heel contact. Increased thigh muscle activation and increased human variability appear to have caused the lack

  7. Once-per-step control of ankle-foot prosthesis push-off work reduces effort associated with balance during walking.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghee; Collins, Steven H

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with below-knee amputation have more difficulty balancing during walking, yet few studies have explored balance enhancement through active prosthesis control. We previously used a dynamical model to show that prosthetic ankle push-off work affects both sagittal and frontal plane dynamics, and that appropriate step-by-step control of push-off work can improve stability. We hypothesized that this approach could be applied to a robotic prosthesis to partially fulfill the active balance requirements of human walking, thereby reducing balance-related activity and associated effort for the person using the device. We conducted experiments on human participants (N = 10) with simulated amputation. Prosthetic ankle push-off work was varied on each step in ways expected to either stabilize, destabilize or have no effect on balance. Average ankle push-off work, known to affect effort, was kept constant across conditions. Stabilizing controllers commanded more push-off work on steps when the mediolateral velocity of the center of mass was lower than usual at the moment of contralateral heel strike. Destabilizing controllers enforced the opposite relationship, while a neutral controller maintained constant push-off work regardless of body state. A random disturbance to landing foot angle and a cognitive distraction task were applied, further challenging participants' balance. We measured metabolic rate, foot placement kinematics, center of pressure kinematics, distraction task performance, and user preference in each condition. We expected the stabilizing controller to reduce active control of balance and balance-related effort for the user, improving user preference. The best stabilizing controller lowered metabolic rate by 5.5% (p = 0.003) and 8.5% (p = 0.02), and step width variability by 10.0% (p = 0.009) and 10.7% (p = 0.03) compared to conditions with no control and destabilizing control, respectively. Participants tended to prefer stabilizing controllers

  8. Limb Salvage After Failed Initial Operative Management of Bimalleolar Ankle Fractures in Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vaudreuil, Nicholas J; Fourman, Mitchell S; Wukich, Dane K

    2017-03-01

    Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) can be difficult to manage, especially in the presence of peripheral neuropathy. In patients who fail initial operative management, attempts at limb salvage can be challenging, and no clear treatment algorithm exists. This study examined outcomes of different procedures performed for limb salvage in this population. This study retrospectively reviewed 17 patients with DM complicated by peripheral neuropathy who sustained a bimalleolar ankle fracture and failed initial operative management. Patients were treated with revision open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) (3/17), closed reduction external fixation (CREF) (8/17), or primary ankle joint fusion (3/17 tibiotalocalcaneal fusion with hindfoot nail [TTCN] and 3/17 with tibiotalar arthrodesis using plates and screws [TTA]). Median follow-up was 20 months. The overall rate of limb salvage was 82.3% (14/17). All patients who went on to amputation presented with infection and were treated initially with CREF (3/3). All patients who achieved successful limb salvage ended up with a clinically fused ankle joint (14/14); 9 underwent a primary or delayed formal fusion and 5 had a clinically fused ankle joint at study conclusion after undergoing revision ORIF or CREF with adjunctive procedures. This small study suggests that in this complicated group of patients it is difficult to achieve limb salvage with an end result of a functional ankle joint. CREF can be a viable option in cases where underlying infection or poor bone quality is present. Treatment with revision ORIF frequently requires supplementary external fixator or tibiotalar Steinman pin placement for additional stability. All patients who underwent revision ORIF ended up with clinically fused ankle joints at the end of the study period. Primary fusion procedures (TTA, TTCN) were associated with a high rate of limb salvage and a decreased number of operations. Level III, retrospective case series.

  9. Myoelectric neural interface enables accurate control of a virtual multiple degree-of-freedom foot-ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tkach, D C; Lipschutz, R D; Finucane, S B; Hargrove, L J

    2013-06-01

    Technological advances have enabled clinical use of powered foot-ankle prostheses. Although the fundamental purposes of such devices are to restore natural gait and reduce energy expenditure by amputees during walking, these powered prostheses enable further restoration of ankle function through possible voluntary control of the powered joints. Such control would greatly assist amputees in daily tasks such as reaching, dressing, or simple limb repositioning for comfort. A myoelectric interface between an amputee and the powered foot-ankle prostheses may provide the required control signals for accurate control of multiple degrees of freedom of the ankle joint. Using a pattern recognition classifier we compared the error rates of predicting up to 7 different ankle-joint movements using electromyographic (EMG) signals collected from below-knee, as well as below-knee combined with above-knee muscles of 12 trans-tibial amputee and 5 control subjects. Our findings suggest very accurate (5.3 ± 0.5%SE mean error) real-time control of a 1 degree of freedom (DOF) of ankle joint can be achieved by amputees using EMG from as few as 4 below-knee muscles. Reliable control (9.8 ± 0.7%SE mean error) of 3 DOFs can be achieved using EMG from 8 below-knee and above-knee muscles.

  10. Real-time Gait Mode Intent Recognition of a Powered Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Standing and Walking

    PubMed Central

    Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Sup, Frank; Goldfarb, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a real-time gait mode intent recognition approach for the supervisory control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis. The proposed approach infers user intent by recognizing patterns in the prosthesis sensor's signals in real-time, eliminating the need for sound-side instrumentation and allowing fast mode switching. Simple time based features extracted from frames of prosthesis signals are reduced to lower dimensions. Gaussian Mixture Models are trained using an experimental database for gait mode classification. A voting scheme is applied as a post-processing step to increase the robustness of decision making. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown via gait experiments on a treadmill with a healthy subject using an able bodied adapter. PMID:20431692

  11. Design and Control of a Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sup, Frank; Bohara, Amit; Goldfarb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the design and control of a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints. The initial prototype is a pneumatically actuated powered-tethered device, which is intended to serve as a laboratory test bed for a subsequent self-powered version. The prosthesis design is described, including its kinematic optimization and the design of a three-axis socket load cell that measures the forces and moments of interaction between the socket and prosthesis. A gait controller is proposed based on the use of passive impedance functions that coordinates the motion of the prosthesis with the user during level walking. The control approach is implemented on the prosthesis prototype and experimental results are shown that demonstrate the promise of the active prosthesis and control approach in restoring fully powered level walking to the user. PMID:19898683

  12. Design and Control of a Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Sup, Frank; Bohara, Amit; Goldfarb, Michael

    2008-02-01

    The paper describes the design and control of a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints. The initial prototype is a pneumatically actuated powered-tethered device, which is intended to serve as a laboratory test bed for a subsequent self-powered version. The prosthesis design is described, including its kinematic optimization and the design of a three-axis socket load cell that measures the forces and moments of interaction between the socket and prosthesis. A gait controller is proposed based on the use of passive impedance functions that coordinates the motion of the prosthesis with the user during level walking. The control approach is implemented on the prosthesis prototype and experimental results are shown that demonstrate the promise of the active prosthesis and control approach in restoring fully powered level walking to the user.

  13. Bivalved fiberglass cast compared with plaster splint immobilization for initial management of ankle fracture-dislocations: a treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jeffrey R; Patel, Shail N; Teichman, Adam J; Bochat, Summer E S; Fleischer, Adam E; Knight, Jessica M

    2012-06-01

    The initial management of ankle fracture-dislocations is the crucial step in the treatment of these emergent traumatic injuries. A stepwise approach is necessary to properly evaluate, diagnose, and treat ankle fracture-dislocations. The goal of initial management is to evaluate the vascular status of the extremity and then restore proper alignment of the talus underneath the tibia. A retrospective review was performed on 40 patients, who presented to a community-based hospital emergency room, treated by the foot and ankle service for ankle fracture-dislocation. An analysis of patient demographics, injury pattern/classification, number of reduction attempts, and immobilization method was performed and evaluated. This analysis was correlated with a review of the literature to develop an algorithm for the initial management of ankle fracture-dislocations recommending the use of a bivalved below-the-knee fiberglass cast for maintained stabilization post reduction. Therapeutic Level IV.

  14. The initial effects of a Mulligan's mobilization with movement technique on dorsiflexion and pain in subacute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Collins, Natalie; Teys, Pamela; Vicenzino, Bill

    2004-05-01

    Physiotherapists frequently use manipulative therapy techniques to treat dysfunction and pain resulting from ankle sprain. This study investigated whether a Mulligan's mobilization with movement (MWM) technique improves talocrural dorsiflexion, a major impairment following ankle sprain, and relieves pain in subacute populations. Fourteen subjects with subacute grade II lateral ankle sprains served as their own control in a repeated measures, double-blind randomized controlled trial that measured the initial effects of the MWM treatment on weight bearing dorsiflexion and pressure and thermal pain threshold. The subacute ankle sprain group studied displayed deficits in dorsiflexion and local pressure pain threshold in the symptomatic ankle. Significant improvements in dorsiflexion occurred initially post-MWM ( F(2,26) = 7.82, P = 0.002 ), but no significant changes in pressure or thermal pain threshold were observed after the treatment condition. Results indicate that the MWM treatment for ankle dorsiflexion has a mechanical rather than hypoalgesic effect in subacute ankle sprains. The mechanism by which this occurs requires investigation if we are to better understand the role of manipulative therapy in ankle sprain management.

  15. Effectiveness of emergency nurses' use of the Ottawa Ankle Rules to initiate radiographic tests on improving healthcare outcomes for patients with ankle injuries: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jonathan Ka-Ming; Chau, Janita Pak-Chun; Cheung, Nancy Man-Ching

    2016-11-01

    The Ottawa Ankle Rules provide guidelines for clinicians on the recommendation of radiographic tests to verify fractures in patients with ankle injuries. The use of the Ottawa Ankle Rules by emergency nurses has been suggested to minimise unnecessary radiographic-test requests and reduce patients' length of stay in emergency departments. However, the findings of studies in this area are inconsistent. A systematic review was conducted to synthesise the most accurate evidence available on the extent to which emergency nurses' use of the Ottawa Ankle Rules to initiate radiographic tests improves healthcare outcomes for patients with ankle injuries. The systematic review attempted to identify all relevant published and unpublished studies in English and Chinese from databases such as Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, ProQuest Health and Medical Complete, EBM Reviews, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL Plus, the British Nursing Index, Scopus, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China Journal Net, WanFang Data, the National Central Library Periodical Literature System, HyRead, the Digital Dissertation Consortium, MedNar and Google Scholar. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of all of the studies identified during the search, based on their titles and abstracts. If a study met the criteria for inclusion, or inconclusive information was available in its title and abstract, the full text was retrieved for further analysis. The methodological quality of all of the eligible studies was assessed independently by the two reviewers. The search of databases and other sources yielded 1603 records. The eligibility of 17 full-text articles was assessed, and nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All nine studies were subjected to narrative analysis, and five were meta-analysed. All of the studies investigated the use of the refined Ottawa Ankle Rules. The results indicated that emergency nurses' use of the refined Ottawa Ankle Rules minimised unnecessary radiographic-test requests

  16. Muscle and prosthesis contributions to amputee walking mechanics: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-08-31

    Unilateral, below-knee amputees have altered gait mechanics, which can significantly affect their mobility. Below-knee amputees lose the functional use of the ankle muscles, which are critical during walking to provide body support, forward propulsion, leg-swing initiation and mediolateral balance. Thus, either muscles must compensate or the prosthesis must provide the functional tasks normally provided by the ankle muscles. Three-dimensional (3D) forward dynamics simulations of amputee and non-amputee walking were generated to identify muscle and prosthesis contributions to amputee walking mechanics, including the subtasks of body support, forward propulsion, leg-swing initiation and mediolateral balance. Results showed that the prosthesis provided body support in the absence of the ankle muscles. The prosthesis contributed to braking from early to mid-stance and propulsion in late stance. The prosthesis also functioned like the uniarticular soleus muscle by transferring energy from the residual leg to the trunk to provide trunk propulsion. The residual-leg vasti and rectus femoris reduced their contributions to braking in early stance, which mitigated braking from the prosthesis during this period. The prosthesis did not replace the function of the gastrocnemius, which normally generates energy to the leg to initiate swing. As a result, lower overall energy was delivered to the residual leg. The prosthesis also acted to accelerate the body laterally in the absence of the ankle muscles. These results provide further insight into muscle and prosthesis function in below-knee amputee walking and can help guide rehabilitation methods and device designs to improve amputee mobility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Does it pay to have a damper in a powered ankle prosthesis? A power-energy perspective.

    PubMed

    Eslamy, Mahdy; Grimmer, Martin; Rinderknecht, Stephan; Seyfarth, Andre

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we investigated on peak power (PP) and energy (ER) requirements for different active ankle actuation concepts that can have both elasticity and damping characteristics. A lower PP or ER requirement is an important issue because it will lead to a smaller motor or battery. In addition to spring, these actuation concepts are assumed to have (passive) damper in series (series elastic-damper actuator SEDA) or parallel (parallel elastic-damper actuator PEDA) to the motor. For SEA (series elastic actuator), SEDA and PEDA, we calculated the required minimum motor PP and ER in different human gaits: normal level walking, ascending and descending the stairs. We found that for level walking and ascending the stairs, the SEA concept, and for descending, the SEDA, were the favorable concepts to reduce required minimum PP and ER in comparison to a DD (direct drive) concept. In SEDA concept, the minimum PP could be reduced to half of what SEA would require. Nevertheless, it was found that spring was always required, however damper showed 'task specific' advantages. As a result, if a simple design perspective is in mind, from PP-ER viewpoint, SEA could be the best compromise to be used for different above-mentioned gaits. For SEDA or PEDA concepts, a controllable damper should be used. In addition, our results show that it is beneficial to select spring stiffness in SEA, based on level walking gait. The PP and ER requirements would increase very slightly for stairs ascending, and to some extent (10.5%) for descending as a consequence of this selection. In contrast, stiffness selection based on stair ascending or descending, increases the PP requirements of level walking more noticeably (17-24%).

  18. Effect of prosthetic ankle units on the gait of persons with bilateral trans-femoral amputations.

    PubMed

    McNealy, Lexyne L; Gard, Steven A

    2008-03-01

    In able-bodied individuals, the ankle joint functions to provide shock absorption, aid in foot clearance during the swing phase, and provides a rocker mechanism during stance phase to facilitate forward progression of the body. Prosthetic ankles currently used by persons with lower limb amputations provide considerably less function than their anatomical counterparts. However, increased ankle motion in the sagittal plane may improve the gait of persons with lower limb amputations while providing a more versatile prosthesis. The primary aim of this study was to examine and quantify temporal-spatial, kinematic, and kinetic changes in the gait of four male subjects with bilateral trans-femoral amputations who walked with and without prosthetic ankle units. Two prosthesis configurations were examined: (i) Baseline with only two Seattle LightFoot2 prosthetic feet, and (ii) with the addition of Endolite Multiflex Ankle units. Data from the gait analyses were compared between prosthetic configurations and with a control group of able-bodied subjects. The amputee subjects' freely-selected walking speeds, 0.74 +/- 0.19 m/s for the Baseline condition and 0.81 +/- 0.15 m/s with the ankle units, were much less than that of the control subjects (1.35 +/- 0.10 m/s). The amputee subjects demonstrated no difference in walking speed, step length, cadence, or ankle, knee, and hip joint moments and powers between the two prosthesis configurations. Sagittal plane ankle range of motion, however, increased by 3-8 degrees with the addition of the prosthetic ankle units. Compared to the control group, following initial contact the amputee subjects passively increased the rate of energy storage or dissipation at the prosthetic ankle joint, actively increased the power generation at the hip, and increased the extension moment at the hip while wearing the prosthetic ankle configuration. The amputee subjects increased the power generation at their hips, possibly as compensation for the

  19. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ficanha, Evandro M; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE) angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to -4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  20. Ankle Cheilectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... your primary doctor. Treatments of the Ankle Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery Ankle Arthrodesis Ankle ... for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus Insertional Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction Lateral Ankle Stabilization ...

  1. Initial results for combined orchiectomy and prosthesis exchange for unsalvageable testicular torsion in adolescents: description of intravaginal prosthesis placement at orchiectomy.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nicol Corbin; Bagrodia, Aditya

    2012-10-01

    Historically the placement of testicular prosthesis during orchiectomy for torsion is delayed despite reports of safe prosthesis placement during mastectomy and orchiectomy for cancer as well as the removal of infected penile prostheses. We describe our experience with intravaginal testicular prosthesis at orchiectomy in adolescents with torsion. Consecutive pubertal patients undergoing exploration for torsion from 2010 to 2011 were offered orchiectomy with staged prosthesis or combined orchiectomy and prosthesis exchange for nonsalvageable testis. Through a midline scrotal incision the ipsilateral tunica vaginalis was opened, testis detorsed and contralateral orchiopexy performed. When verified as unviable, the ipsilateral spermatic cord was suture ligated within the tunica vaginalis and preplaced sutures secured the saline filled prosthesis in the tunica vaginalis. Patients were discharged home on the day of surgery with 5 days of oral antibiotics and narcotics. Demographic, surgical and postoperative measures were prospectively recorded. Of 19 patients 6 had testes deemed salvageable at surgery with a median time to presentation of 6 hours (range 4 to 48) vs 96 (range 14 to 168, p = 0.002) in the 13 patients with nonsalvageable torsion. Of these patients 12 (median age 15 years, range 12 to 16) elected combined orchiectomy and prosthesis exchange. With a median followup of 4.8 months (range 1.5 to 16) there were no infectious complications or extrusions. Eleven (91.7%) patients had a symmetric appearing scrotum with the prosthesis located in a mid to dependent scrotal position. We demonstrate the feasibility of intravaginal prosthesis placement for immediate scrotal reconstruction in adolescents with nonsalvageable testicular torsion. Advantages of combined orchiectomy and prosthesis exchange include orthotopic prosthetic position, extra tunica vaginalis barrier layer and avoidance of a second anesthetic. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association

  2. [Case-control study on modified femoral prosthesis in reducing the incidence of patellar clunk syndrome after the initial posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Bo; Yuan, Jian-Dong; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Kai; Chen, Lei

    2014-04-01

    To explore therapeutic effects of modified femoral prosthesis applied in the initial posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. From April 1, 2012 to January 1, 2013, 156 patients with knee osteoarthritis underwent posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty by the same director of orthopedic surgeon. Sixty-one patients were treated with modified femoral prosthesis, including 7 males and 54 females, with an average age of (68.34 +/- 5.41) years old; and 95 patients were treated with conventional designed femoral prosthesis, including 14 males and 81 females, with an average age of (69.92 +/- 5.11) years old. Indexes including age, body mass index, Insall-Salvati index, type of prosthesis, occurrence rate of patella click syndrome, postoperative line of force of lower extremity and postoperative function of the knee joint were observed and recorded. And American Knee Society (AKS) score was used to evaluate the clinical results. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 36 to 56 weeks, with a mean of 45.31 weeks. Among patients in the conventional designed femoral prosthesis group, 7 patients had patella click syndrome, but there was no patient having patellar click syndrome in the modified femoral prosthesis group. Postoperative knee activity of patients in the modified femoral prosthesis group was (110.98 +/- 10.32) degrees, which was better than (107.05 +/- 8.61) degrees in the conventional designed femoral prosthesis group. The AKS score in the modified femoral prosthesis group was 129.79 +/- 9.63 during 21 to 28 days after operation, which was higher than 126.85 +/- 7.79 in the conventional designed femoral prosthesis group. New designed femoral components are effective to reduce the occurrence rate of postoperative patellar click syndrome and obtain better early functional recovery from knee surgery.

  3. Ankle arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle - arthroscopy; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopic References Cerrato R, Campbell J, Triche R. Ankle arthroscopy. In: Miller MD, ... and ankle. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  4. War wounds of the foot and ankle: causes, characteristics, and initial management.

    PubMed

    Bluman, Eric M; Ficke, James R; Covey, Dana C

    2010-03-01

    Foot and ankle trauma sustained in the Global War on Terror have unique causes and characteristics. At least one-quarter of all battle injuries involve the lower extremity. These severe lower extremity wounds require specialized early treatment. Ballistic mechanisms cause almost all injuries, and as such, most combat foot and ankle wounds are open in nature. Wounds are characteristically caused by blast mechanisms, but high velocity gunshot injuries are also common. The severe and polytraumatic nature of injuries sustained frequently call for damage control orthopaedics to be utilized. Cautious early treatment of irregular and highly exudative ballistic wounds with subatmospheric wound dressings may ease their early management.

  5. The Talar Body Prosthesis: Results at Ten to Thirty-six Years of Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Harnroongroj, Thos; Harnroongroj, Thossart

    2014-07-16

    Satisfactory results of implantation of the talar body prosthesis were reported in 1997, although some complications associated with the initial design were noted. The present study evaluated outcomes of treatment with a modified talar body prosthesis. Of the thirty-six talar body prostheses implanted with use of a transmalleolar surgical approach from 1974 to 2011, thirty-three were available for follow-up at ten to thirty-six years or had failed prior to that time. The indication for implantation had been osteonecrosis in twenty-three patients, a comminuted talar fracture in eight, and a talar body tumor in two. Twenty-eight of the thirty-three prostheses were still in place at the time of final follow-up and five had failed prior to five years. The duration of follow-up was ten to twenty years in eight patients, twenty to thirty years in eleven, and thirty to thirty-six years in nine. The AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society) ankle-hindfoot score did not differ significantly among these three groups. Patients over sixty-five years of age with underlying disease that impeded walking ability had lower AOFAS scores. Early prosthesis failure occurred as a result of size mismatch in two patients, tumor recurrence in one, infection in one, and osteonecrosis of the talar head and neck in one. These failures, which occurred at eight to fifty-seven months, were treated with tibiotalar arthrodesis in three patients, prosthesis revision in one, and below-the-knee amputation in one. Although early prosthesis failure may occur, survival of the talar body prosthesis can provide satisfactory ankle and foot function. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  6. Adaptation and Prosthesis Effects on Stride-to-Stride Fluctuations in Amputee Gait

    PubMed Central

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Jacobsen, Adam L.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-four individuals with transtibial amputation were recruited to a randomized, crossover design study to examine stride-to-stride fluctuations of lower limb joint flexion/extension time series using the largest Lyapunov exponent (λ). Each individual wore a “more appropriate” and a “less appropriate” prosthesis design based on the subject's previous functional classification for a three week adaptation period. Results showed decreased λ for the sound ankle compared to the prosthetic ankle (F1,23 = 13.897, p = 0.001) and a decreased λ for the “more appropriate” prosthesis (F1,23 = 4.849, p = 0.038). There was also a significant effect for the time point in the adaptation period (F2,46 = 3.164, p = 0.050). Through the adaptation period, a freezing and subsequent freeing of dynamic degrees of freedom was seen as the λ at the ankle decreased at the midpoint of the adaptation period compared to the initial prosthesis fitting (p = 0.032), but then increased at the end compared to the midpoint (p = 0.042). No differences were seen between the initial fitting and the end of the adaptation for λ (p = 0.577). It is concluded that the λ may be a feasible clinical tool for measuring prosthesis functionality and adaptation to a new prosthesis is a process through which the motor control develops mastery of redundant degrees of freedom present in the system. PMID:24956384

  7. Restricting ankle motion via orthotic bracing reduces toe clearance when walking over obstacles.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulou, Eftychia; Twiste, Martin; Buckley, John G

    2016-01-01

    When trans-tibial amputees cross obstacles leading with their prosthesis, foot clearance is achieved using compensatory swing-phase kinematics. Such compensation would suggest able-bodied individuals normally use swing-phase ankle dorsiflexion to attain adequate obstacle clearance; however, direct evidence of such contribution is equivocal. This study determined the contribution of sagittal plane ankle motion in achieving lead-limb clearance during obstacle negotiation. Twelve male able-bodied individuals (ages 18-30) completed obstacle crossing trials while walking on a flat surface. Lead-limb (right) ankle motion was manipulated using a knee-ankle-foot orthosis. Trials were completed with the ankle restricted at a neutral angle or unrestricted (allowing ∼±15° plantar/dorsiflexion). Restricted ankle motion caused significant increase in trail-limb foot placement distance before the obstacle (p=0.005); significant decrease in vertical toe clearance (p<0.003), vertical heel clearance (p=0.045), and lead-limb foot placement distance after the obstacle (p=0.045); but no significant changes in knee angle at instant of crossing or in average walking speed. The shifts in foot placements altered the part of swing that the lead-limb was in when the foot crossed the obstacle, which led to a decrease in clearance. These adaptations may have been due to being unable to dorsiflex the ankle to 'lift' the toes in mid-swing or to plantarflex the ankle during initial contact following crossing, which changed how the lead-limb was to be loaded. These findings suggest individuals using ankle bracing or those with ankle arthrodesis, will have reduced gait safety when negotiating obstacles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ankle Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or outside of your ankle or along the Achilles tendon, which connects the muscles in your lower ... home. Accessed Dec. 15, 2015. Draper TR. Non-Achilles ankle tendinopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed ...

  9. A running controller for a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Huff, Amanda M; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a running controller for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The running controller was implemented on a powered prosthesis prototype and evaluated by a transfemoral amputee subject running on a treadmill at a speed of 2.25 m/s (5.0 mph). The ability of the prosthesis and controller to provide the salient features of a running gait was assessed by comparing the kinematics of running provided by the powered prosthesis to the averaged kinematics of five healthy subjects running at the same speed. This comparison indicates that the powered prosthesis and running controller are able to provide essential features of a healthy running gait.

  10. Total ankle replacement using HINTEGRA, an unconstrained, three-component system: surgical technique and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Knupp, Markus; Henninger, Heath B; Zwicky, Lukas; Hintermann, Beat

    2012-12-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) has become a valuable treatment option in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. One popular 3-component system, the HINTEGRA TAR, is an unconstrained system that provides inversion-eversion stability. More natural biomechanics of the replaced ankle may be expected when anatomic considerations drive prosthesis design. The HINTEGRA prosthesis includes 2 anatomically contoured metal components and a polyethylene insert, providing axial rotation and physiologic flexion-extension mobility. This article describes the HINTEGRA TAR design and surgical technique. Use of the prosthesis for complex hindfoot reconstruction in patients with an osteoarthritic, varus, or valgus ankle deformity is described.

  11. Initial experience of two national centers in transcatheter aortic prosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Lluberas, Sebastián; Abizaid, Alexandre; Siqueira, Dimytri; Ramos, Auristela; Costa, J Ribamar; Arrais, Magaly; Kambara, Antônio; Bihan, David Le; Sousa, Amanda; Sousa, J Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective alternative to surgical treatment of severe aortic stenosis in patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. To report the immediate and follow-up clinical and echocardiographic results of the initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. From 2009 June to 2013 February, 112 patients underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Mean age was 82.5 ± 6.5 years, and the logistic EuroSCORE was 23.6 ± 13.5. Procedural success was 84%. After the intervention, a reduction in the mean systolic gradient was observed (pre: 54.7 ± 15.3 vs. post: 11.7 ± 4.0 mmHg; p < 0.01). Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 3.6%, vascular complications in 19% and permanent pacemaker was required by 13% of the patients. Thirty-day mortality and at follow-up of 16 ± 11 months was 14% and 8.9% respectively. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only predictor of mortality at 30 days and at follow-up. During follow up, aortic valve area and mean systolic gradient did not change significantly. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective and safe procedure for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-surgical risk or inoperable patients. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only independent predictor of mortality identified both in the first month post-intervention and at follow-up.

  12. Initial Experience of Two National Centers in Transcatheter Aortic Prosthesis Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lluberas, Sebastián; Abizaid, Alexandre; Siqueira, Dimytri; Ramos, Auristela; Costa, J. Ribamar; Arrais, Magaly; Kambara, Antônio; Bihan, David Le; Sousa, Amanda; Sousa, J. Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective alternative to surgical treatment of severe aortic stenosis in patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. Objectives To report the immediate and follow-up clinical and echocardiographic results of the initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods From 2009 June to 2013 February, 112 patients underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Results Mean age was 82.5 ± 6.5 years, and the logistic EuroSCORE was 23.6 ± 13.5. Procedural success was 84%. After the intervention, a reduction in the mean systolic gradient was observed (pre: 54.7 ± 15.3 vs. post: 11.7 ± 4.0 mmHg; p < 0.01). Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 3.6%, vascular complications in 19% and permanent pacemaker was required by 13% of the patients. Thirty-day mortality and at follow-up of 16 ± 11 months was 14% and 8.9% respectively. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only predictor of mortality at 30 days and at follow-up. During follow up, aortic valve area and mean systolic gradient did not change significantly. Conclusions Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective and safe procedure for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-surgical risk or inoperable patients. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only independent predictor of mortality identified both in the first month post-intervention and at follow-up. PMID:24844875

  13. Biomechanics of the Ankle-Foot System during Stair Ambulation: Implications for Design of Advanced Ankle-Foot Prostheses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-15

    A.H., 2007. Effect of ankle–foot orthosis on roll-over shape in adults with hemiplegia. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development 44 (1), 11...20. Gates, D.H., 2004. Characterizing Ankle Function During Stair Ascent, Descent, And Level Walking For Ankle Prosthesis And Orthosis Design. M.S

  14. Is goniometry suitable for measuring ankle range of motion in female ballet dancers? An initial comparison with radiographic measurement.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Shave, Ruth M; Kruse, David W; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2011-06-01

    Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion to attain the demi-plié (weight-bearing full dorsiflexion [DF]) and en pointe (weight-bearing full plantar flexion [PF]) positions of ballet. However, techniques for assessing this amount of motion have not yet received sufficient scientific scrutiny. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine possible differences between weight-bearing goniometric and radiographic ankle range of motion measurements in female ballet dancers. Ankle range of motion in 8 experienced female ballet dancers was assessed by goniometry and 2 radiographic measurement methods. The latter were performed on 3 mediolateral x-rays, in demi-plié, neutral, and en pointe positions; one of them used the same landmarks as goniometry. DF values were not significantly different among the methods, but PF values were (P < .05). Not only was PF of the talocrural joint significantly less than the other 2 measurements (P < .001), PF from the goniometric method applied to the x-rays was significantly less than PF obtained from clinical goniometry (P < .05). These data provide insight into the extreme ankle and foot motion, particularly PF, required in female ballet dancers and suggest that goniometry may not be ideal for assessing ankle range of motion in these individuals. Therefore, further research is needed to standardize how DF and PF are measured in ballet dancers. Diagnostic, Level I.

  15. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Elliott J; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C; Emerson, Robert W; Herr, Hugh M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work.

  16. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C.; Emerson, Robert W.; Herr, Hugh M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work. PMID:26285201

  17. Effect of Triage Nurse Initiated Radiography Using the Ottawa Ankle Rules on Emergency Department Length of Stay at a Tertiary Centre.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wailliam W; Filiatrault, Lyne; Abu-Laban, Riyad B; Rashidi, Anita; Yau, Lawrence; Liu, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    To determine the effect of triage nurse initiated radiographs using the Ottawa Ankle Rules (OAR) on emergency department (ED) throughput. We hypothesized OAR use would reduce median ED length of stay (LOS) by 25 minutes or more. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at a tertiary centre ED with an annual census of over 90,000 patients. Adult patients presenting within 10 days of isolated blunt ankle trauma were eligible. Participants were randomly assigned to standard triage or OAR application by 15 explicitly trained triage nurses. Our primary outcome was ED LOS. Secondary outcomes included triage nurses' and patients' satisfaction. A power calculation indicated 142 patients were required. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the medians between the two groups. Of 176 patients with blunt ankle injury screened, 146 were enrolled (83.0%); baseline characteristics in the two groups were similar. The median/mean ED LOS in the control and OAR groups were 128/143 minutes and 108/115 minutes respectively (median difference 20 minutes; p=0.003). Agreement in OAR use between emergency physicians and nurses was moderate (kappa 0.46/0.77 for foot/ankle rule components), and satisfaction of both nurses and participants was high. Triage nurse initiated radiography using OAR leads to a statistically significant decrease of 20 minutes in the median ED LOS at a tertiary care centre. The overall impact of implementing such a process is likely site-specific, and the decision to do so should involve consideration of the local context.

  18. Prosthesis coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reswick, J. B.; Mooney, V.; Bright, C. W.; Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coupling for use in an apparatus for connecting a prosthesis to the bone of a stump of an amputated limb is described which permits a bio-compatible carbon sleeve forming a part of the prosthesis connector to float so as to prevent disturbing the skin seal around the carbon sleeve. The coupling includes a flexible member interposed between a socket that is inserted within an intermedullary cavity of the bone and the sleeve. A lock pin is carried by the prosthesis and has a stem portion which is adapted to be coaxially disposed and slideably within the tubular female socket for securing the prosthesis to the stump. The skin around the percutaneous carbon sleeve is able to move as a result of the flexing coupling so as to reduce stresses caused by changes in the stump shape and/or movement between the bone and the flesh portion of the stump.

  19. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  20. Prosthetic ankle push-off work reduces metabolic rate but not collision work in non-amputee walking

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Joshua M.; Collins, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with unilateral below-knee amputation expend more energy than non-amputees during walking and exhibit reduced push-off work and increased hip work in the affected limb. Simple dynamic models of walking suggest a possible solution, predicting that increasing prosthetic ankle push-off should decrease leading limb collision, thereby reducing overall energy requirements. We conducted a rigorous experimental test of this idea wherein ankle-foot prosthesis push-off work was incrementally varied in isolation from one-half to two-times normal levels while subjects with simulated amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 m·s−1. Increased prosthesis push-off significantly reduced metabolic energy expenditure, with a 14% reduction at maximum prosthesis work. In contrast to model predictions, however, collision losses were unchanged, while hip work during swing initiation was decreased. This suggests that powered ankle push-off reduces walking effort primarily through other mechanisms, such as assisting leg swing, which would be better understood using more complete neuromuscular models. PMID:25467389

  1. Prosthetic ankle push-off work reduces metabolic rate but not collision work in non-amputee walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Joshua M.; Collins, Steven H.

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with unilateral below-knee amputation expend more energy than non-amputees during walking and exhibit reduced push-off work and increased hip work in the affected limb. Simple dynamic models of walking suggest a possible solution, predicting that increasing prosthetic ankle push-off should decrease leading limb collision, thereby reducing overall energy requirements. We conducted a rigorous experimental test of this idea wherein ankle-foot prosthesis push-off work was incrementally varied in isolation from one-half to two-times normal levels while subjects with simulated amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 m.s-1. Increased prosthesis push-off significantly reduced metabolic energy expenditure, with a 14% reduction at maximum prosthesis work. In contrast to model predictions, however, collision losses were unchanged, while hip work during swing initiation was decreased. This suggests that powered ankle push-off reduces walking effort primarily through other mechanisms, such as assisting leg swing, which would be better understood using more complete neuromuscular models.

  2. Novel modification of voice prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Al Kadah, Basel; Papaspyrou, George; Schneider, Mathias; Schick, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    The undesired dilatation of the tracheooesophageal shunt after surgical implantation of voice prosthesis is a typical complication of this procedure. Temporary removal of the prosthesis and reinsertion after a short period of time is a first-line therapeutical option aiming shrinkage of the shunt. Failure of this measure generally is an indication of revision surgery. We present first experiences treating leakage problems with novel modified voice prosthesis without surgical intervention in specified cases. 11 patients (1 female, 10 male) aging between 51 and 71 years were presented with shunt leakage between 11/2008 and 11/2012 in the ENT-Department of the University Hospital of Homburg/Saar after a custom built voice prosthesis had been used initially successfully. A "Provox 2"(®) voice prosthesis was modified with two discs made of silicone each on the tracheal and oesophageal side and additionally reinforcing the diameter of the prosthesis by a silicone tube. The modified prosthesis was inserted in a retrograde way under general anesthesia, analogical to the approach used with the "Provox 1"(®)-prosthesis. The period of observation ranged between 12 and 48 months. As a measure of control swallowing of methylene blue was used. In all cases leakage suspended. Durability of the modified prosthesis ranged between 2 and 6 months. Neither the patients' complained about, nor did the physicians notice subjectively an impairment of the voice quality. Modifications of "Provox 2"(®)-prosthesis should be regarded in individual cases and constitute a reasonable alternative to revision surgery. A surgical approach is more intricate and costly, more taxing for the patient and susceptible to failure. We regard the necessity of general anesthesia for the insertion of the modified prosthesis as a disadvantage.

  3. Robotic lower limb prosthesis design through simultaneous computer optimizations of human and prosthesis costs.

    PubMed

    Handford, Matthew L; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2016-02-09

    Robotic lower limb prostheses can improve the quality of life for amputees. Development of such devices, currently dominated by long prototyping periods, could be sped up by predictive simulations. In contrast to some amputee simulations which track experimentally determined non-amputee walking kinematics, here, we explicitly model the human-prosthesis interaction to produce a prediction of the user's walking kinematics. We obtain simulations of an amputee using an ankle-foot prosthesis by simultaneously optimizing human movements and prosthesis actuation, minimizing a weighted sum of human metabolic and prosthesis costs. The resulting Pareto optimal solutions predict that increasing prosthesis energy cost, decreasing prosthesis mass, and allowing asymmetric gaits all decrease human metabolic rate for a given speed and alter human kinematics. The metabolic rates increase monotonically with speed. Remarkably, by performing an analogous optimization for a non-amputee human, we predict that an amputee walking with an appropriately optimized robotic prosthesis can have a lower metabolic cost--even lower than assuming that the non-amputee's ankle torques are cost-free.

  4. Robotic lower limb prosthesis design through simultaneous computer optimizations of human and prosthesis costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handford, Matthew L.; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2016-02-01

    Robotic lower limb prostheses can improve the quality of life for amputees. Development of such devices, currently dominated by long prototyping periods, could be sped up by predictive simulations. In contrast to some amputee simulations which track experimentally determined non-amputee walking kinematics, here, we explicitly model the human-prosthesis interaction to produce a prediction of the user’s walking kinematics. We obtain simulations of an amputee using an ankle-foot prosthesis by simultaneously optimizing human movements and prosthesis actuation, minimizing a weighted sum of human metabolic and prosthesis costs. The resulting Pareto optimal solutions predict that increasing prosthesis energy cost, decreasing prosthesis mass, and allowing asymmetric gaits all decrease human metabolic rate for a given speed and alter human kinematics. The metabolic rates increase monotonically with speed. Remarkably, by performing an analogous optimization for a non-amputee human, we predict that an amputee walking with an appropriately optimized robotic prosthesis can have a lower metabolic cost - even lower than assuming that the non-amputee’s ankle torques are cost-free.

  5. Robotic lower limb prosthesis design through simultaneous computer optimizations of human and prosthesis costs

    PubMed Central

    Handford, Matthew L.; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Robotic lower limb prostheses can improve the quality of life for amputees. Development of such devices, currently dominated by long prototyping periods, could be sped up by predictive simulations. In contrast to some amputee simulations which track experimentally determined non-amputee walking kinematics, here, we explicitly model the human-prosthesis interaction to produce a prediction of the user’s walking kinematics. We obtain simulations of an amputee using an ankle-foot prosthesis by simultaneously optimizing human movements and prosthesis actuation, minimizing a weighted sum of human metabolic and prosthesis costs. The resulting Pareto optimal solutions predict that increasing prosthesis energy cost, decreasing prosthesis mass, and allowing asymmetric gaits all decrease human metabolic rate for a given speed and alter human kinematics. The metabolic rates increase monotonically with speed. Remarkably, by performing an analogous optimization for a non-amputee human, we predict that an amputee walking with an appropriately optimized robotic prosthesis can have a lower metabolic cost – even lower than assuming that the non-amputee’s ankle torques are cost-free. PMID:26857747

  6. Adaptive sports ankle prosthetics. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    PubMed

    Lyle, David K

    2012-09-01

    Participating in sport at all levels is gaining a dedicated following and this is also apparent in individuals with an amputation. Currently, there is a wide variety of ankle prostheses available which attempt to provide function, control, and comfort, as well as good aesthetic appeal. Participation in sport, however, increases the demands placed upon ankle prostheses. This can compromise function and performance, and constrain the opportunities of participation in various outdoor and water sports. In acknowledging this limitation and the need to develop more versatile ankle prostheses, this article introduces the evolution of a prototype ankle prosthesis referred to as "Adaptive Sports Ankle." The ankle prosthesis, which is compatible with any foot pyramid adapter, offers the same range of motion as the normal human ankle joint and is made up of components that are chemical and corrosion resistant. These design features that are specifically created to accommodate below-the-knee amputees provide an ideal prosthesis for those wishing to lead an active lifestyle and participate in aquatic (i.e. swimming, surfing, and scuba diving), snowboarding, and equestrian activities. Although it is acknowledged that there is a need to establish research on the Adaptive Sports Ankle, its introduction to the market will enhance and expand opportunities of those individuals with a lower limb amputation to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

  7. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sole of the foot is facing inwards, stretching and possibly damaging the ligaments on the outer ... sprains: Always warm up and use the recommended stretching techniques for your ankles before playing sports, exercising, ...

  8. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is surgery to replace the damaged bone and cartilage in the ankle joint. Artificial joint parts (prosthetics) ... Your surgeon will remove the damaged bone and cartilage. Your surgeon will replace the damaged part of: ...

  9. Acute ankle sprain: an update.

    PubMed

    Ivins, Douglas

    2006-11-15

    Acute ankle injury, a common musculoskeletal injury, can cause ankle sprains. Some evidence suggests that previous injuries or limited joint flexibility may contribute to ankle sprains. The initial assessment of an acute ankle injury should include questions about the timing and mechanism of the injury. The Ottawa Ankle and Foot Rules provide clinical guidelines for excluding a fracture in adults and children and determining if radiography is indicated at the time of injury. Reexamination three to five days after injury, when pain and swelling have improved, may help with the diagnosis. Therapy for ankle sprains focuses on controlling pain and swelling. PRICE (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) is a well-established protocol for the treatment of ankle injury. There is some evidence that applying ice and using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs improves healing and speeds recovery. Functional rehabilitation (e.g., motion restoration and strengthening exercises) is preferred over immobilization. Superiority of surgical repair versus functional rehabilitation for severe lateral ligament rupture is controversial. Treatment using semirigid supports is superior to using elastic bandages. Support devices provide some protection against future ankle sprains, particularly in persons with a history of recurrent sprains. Ankle disk or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercise regimens also may be helpful, although the literature supporting this is limited.

  10. [Study on the control of dynamic artificial limb ankle based on central pattern generator].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Xu, Caiyu; Li, Mingyue; Su, Longtao

    2014-12-01

    In order to obtain the normal gait for the prosthesis-carrier with the change of external environment and gait, we designed a model of dynamic ankle prosthesis and control system and introduced the strategy of central pattern generator (CPG) about the moving trail of dynamic ankle prosthesis. The dynamic parts, which are incorporated in the model of dynamic ankle prosthesis, provide power in order to have anthropic function and character. The tool of Matlab/simulink was used to simulate the strategy. The simulation results showed that the strategy of CPG learn- ing control in this study was effective and could track the reference trail rapidly and fit the moving trail of a person's normal limb. It can make the prosthetic timely regulation and action, enhance the prosthetic intelligence. It has im- portant practical value for intelligent prosthesis development based on this analysis of technology.

  11. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Eric A.; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users. PMID:28278172

  12. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking.

    PubMed

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R; Nickel, Eric A; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users.

  13. Sprained Ankles

    MedlinePlus

    ... 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Orthopedic > Sprained Ankles Health Issues ...

  14. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this photograph, James Carden uses a NASA-developed prosthesis to moved planks around his home. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  15. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photograph, Amputee Amie Bradly uses a NASA-developed prosthesis to paint her fingernails. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  16. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this photograph, Sandra Rossi user her NASA-developed prosthesis for the first time. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  17. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this photograph, James Carden uses a NASA-developed prosthesis to moved planks around his home. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  18. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this photograph, Sandra Rossi user her NASA-developed prosthesis for the first time. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  19. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photograph, Amputee Amie Bradly uses a NASA-developed prosthesis to paint her fingernails. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  20. Implementation of machine learning for classifying prosthesis type through conventional gait analysis.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Hessel, Anthony; Nishikawa, Kiisa

    2015-01-01

    Current forecasts imply a significant increase in the quantity of lower limb amputations. Synergizing the capabilities of a conventional gait analysis system and machine learning facilitates the capacity to classify disparate types of transtibial prostheses. Automated classification of prosthesis type may eventually advance rehabilitative acuity for selecting an appropriate prosthesis for a given aspect of the rehabilitation process. The presented research utilized a force plate as a conventional gait analysis device to acquire a feature set for two types of prosthesis: passive Solid Ankle Cushioned Heel (SACH) and the iWalk BiOM powered prosthesis. The feature set consists of both temporal and kinetic data with respect to the force plate signal during stance. Intuitively a passive prosthesis and powered prosthesis generate distinctively different force plate recordings. A support vector machine, which is type of machine learning application, achieves 100% classification between a passive prosthesis and powered prosthesis regarding the feature set derived from force plate recordings.

  1. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  2. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    FAB/CAM, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, Inc., approached Marshall for help in replacing the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. Concurrently, Marshall and Martin Marietta were creating a commercial derivative of the foam insulation used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat. FAB/CAM found the foam blanks to be lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the consumer. Martin Marietta markets the foam system, MARCORE, for the prosthesis market. The system also has commercial potential in high temperature insulation and structural applications.

  3. Development of an internally braced prosthesis for total talus replacement

    PubMed Central

    Regauer, Markus; Lange, Mirjam; Soldan, Kevin; Peyerl, Steffen; Baumbach, Sebastian; Böcker, Wolfgang; Polzer, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Total loss of talus due to trauma or avascular necrosis, for example, still remains to be a major challenge in foot and ankle surgery with severely limited treatment options. Implantation of a custom made total talar prosthesis has shown promising results so far. Most important factors for long time success are degree of congruence of articular surfaces and ligamentous stability of the ankle. Therefore, our aim was to develop an optimized custom made prosthesis for total talus replacement providing a high level of primary stability. A custom made hemiprosthesis was developed using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging data of the affected and contralateral talus considering the principles and technology for the development of the S.T.A.R. prosthesis (Stryker). Additionally, four eyelets for fixation of artificial ligaments were added at the correspondent footprints of the most important ligaments. Two modifications can be provided according to the clinical requirements: A tri-articular hemiprosthesis or a bi-articular hemiprosthesis combined with the tibial component of the S.T.A.R. total ankle replacement system. A feasibility study was performed using a fresh frozen human cadaver. Maximum range of motion of the ankle was measured and ligamentous stability was evaluated by use of standard X-rays after application of varus, valgus or sagittal stress with 150 N. Correct implantation of the prosthesis was technically possible via an anterior approach to the ankle and using standard instruments. Malleolar osteotomies were not required. Maximum ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion were measured as 22-0-28 degrees. Maximum anterior displacement of the talus was 6 mm, maximum varus tilt 3 degrees and maximum valgus tilt 2 degrees. Application of an internally braced prosthesis for total talus replacement in humans is technically feasible and might be a reasonable procedure in carefully selected cases with no better alternatives left. PMID:28361015

  4. Development of an internally braced prosthesis for total talus replacement.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Markus; Lange, Mirjam; Soldan, Kevin; Peyerl, Steffen; Baumbach, Sebastian; Böcker, Wolfgang; Polzer, Hans

    2017-03-18

    Total loss of talus due to trauma or avascular necrosis, for example, still remains to be a major challenge in foot and ankle surgery with severely limited treatment options. Implantation of a custom made total talar prosthesis has shown promising results so far. Most important factors for long time success are degree of congruence of articular surfaces and ligamentous stability of the ankle. Therefore, our aim was to develop an optimized custom made prosthesis for total talus replacement providing a high level of primary stability. A custom made hemiprosthesis was developed using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging data of the affected and contralateral talus considering the principles and technology for the development of the S.T.A.R. prosthesis (Stryker). Additionally, four eyelets for fixation of artificial ligaments were added at the correspondent footprints of the most important ligaments. Two modifications can be provided according to the clinical requirements: A tri-articular hemiprosthesis or a bi-articular hemiprosthesis combined with the tibial component of the S.T.A.R. total ankle replacement system. A feasibility study was performed using a fresh frozen human cadaver. Maximum range of motion of the ankle was measured and ligamentous stability was evaluated by use of standard X-rays after application of varus, valgus or sagittal stress with 150 N. Correct implantation of the prosthesis was technically possible via an anterior approach to the ankle and using standard instruments. Malleolar osteotomies were not required. Maximum ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion were measured as 22-0-28 degrees. Maximum anterior displacement of the talus was 6 mm, maximum varus tilt 3 degrees and maximum valgus tilt 2 degrees. Application of an internally braced prosthesis for total talus replacement in humans is technically feasible and might be a reasonable procedure in carefully selected cases with no better alternatives left.

  5. Biomechanics of the ankle-foot system during stair ambulation: implications for design of advanced ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Sinitski, Emily H; Hansen, Andrew H; Wilken, Jason M

    2012-02-02

    Unilateral lower limb prosthesis users display temporal, kinematic, and kinetic asymmetries between limbs while ascending and descending stairs. These asymmetries are due, in part, to the inability of current prosthetic devices to effectively mimic normal ankle function. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive set of biomechanical data for able-bodied and unilateral transtibial amputee (TTA) ankle-foot systems for level-ground (LG), stair ascent (SA), and stair descent (SD), and to characterize deviations from normal performance associated with prosthesis use. Ankle joint kinematics, kinetics, torque-angle curves, and effective shapes were calculated for twelve able-bodied individuals and twelve individuals with TTA. The data from this study demonstrated the prosthetic limb can more effectively mimic the range of motion and power output of a normal ankle-foot during LG compared to SA and SD. There were larger differences between the prosthetic and able-bodied limbs during SA and SD, most evident in the torque-angle curves and effective shapes. These data can be used by persons designing ankle-foot prostheses and provide comparative data for assessment of future ankle-foot prosthesis designs.

  6. Ankle replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped damaged bones, and put in an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were shown how to treat swelling around your new ankle joint.

  7. Relationship between ankle brachial index (ABI), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and initial disability level in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chotik-anuchit, Songkram; Nilanont, Yongchai; Poungvarin, Niphon

    2011-02-01

    Relationship between high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), Ankle Brachial index (ABI), severity of atherosclerosis and risk of ischemic stroke has been well documented. Studies concerning the association of ABI, hs-CRP and initial disability level in acute ischemic stroke are scarce. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between hs-CRP, ABI and level of initial disability in acute stroke setting. We conducted a prospective observational study in patients with acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours of onset. Initial ABI, hs-CRP were measured. Disability level was assessed at admission and 3 months using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and the National Institue of Health Stroke scale (NIHSS). Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. This study included 36 patients with a mean +/-SD age of 67.8 +/- 9.3 years. Sixteen (44.4%) were male. Median NIHSS and mRS were 10 and 4 respectively. Correlation between initial ABI and hs-CRP was poor (r(s) = -0.11, p = 0.57). There was a significant negative relationship between ABI and mRS at 0 and 3 months with a correlation coefficient of -0.45 (p = 0.006) and -0.41 (p = 0.02), respectively. There was a significant inverse relationship between ABI and initial stroke disability. However, correlation coefficient indicated only fair agreement beyond chance. This findings suggest that ABI may be used as a clinical predictor of initial disability level in acute stroke.

  8. [Revision arthroplasty of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-11-01

    In the last 20 years total ankle replacement has become a viable alternative to arthrodesis for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. Numerous ankle prosthesis designs have appeared on the market in the past and attracted by the encouraging intermediate results reported in the literature, many surgeons have started to perform this procedure. With increased availability on the market the indications for total ankle replacement have also increased in recent years. In particular, total ankle replacement may now be considered even in younger patients. Therefore, despite progress in total ankle arthroplasty the number of failures may increase. Up to now, arthrodesis was considered to be the gold standard for salvage of failed ankle prostheses. Because of extensive bone loss on the talar side, in most instances tibiocalcaneal fusion is the only reliable solution. An alternative to such extended hindfoot fusions would be revision arthroplasty. To date, however, there are no reported results of revision arthroplasty for salvage of a failed ankle replacement.Based on our experience prosthetic components with a flat undersurface are most likely to be able to find solid support on remaining bone stock. The first 83 cases (79 patients, 46 males, 33 females, average age 58.9 years, range 30.6-80.7 years) with a average follow-up of 5.4 years (range 2-11 years) showed excellent to good results in 69 cases (83%), a satisfactory result in 12 cases (15%) and a fair result in 2 cases (2%) and 47 patients (56%) were pain free. Primary loosening was noted in three cases and of these two cases were successfully revised by another total ankle replacement and in one case with arthrodesis. Another case with hematogenous infection was also revised by arthrodesis. At the last follow-up control two components were considered to be loose and the overall loosening rate was thus 6%.This series has proven that revision arthroplasty can be a promising option for patients with failed total

  9. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  10. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed "more appropriate" and the other "less appropriate" based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a "more appropriate" prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a "less appropriate" prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  11. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion.

    PubMed

    Wurdeman, Shane R; Myers, Sara A; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed "more appropriate" and the other "less appropriate" based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a "more appropriate" prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a "less appropriate" prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  12. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    SciTech Connect

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-15

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  13. Preliminary Evaluations of a Self-Contained Anthropomorphic Transfemoral Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sup, Frank; Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Mitchell, Jason; Withrow, Thomas J.; Goldfarb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a self-contained powered knee and ankle prosthesis, intended to enhance the mobility of transfemoral amputees. A finite-state based impedance control approach, previously developed by the authors, is used for the control of the prosthesis during walking and standing. Experiments on an amputee subject for level treadmill and overground walking are described. Knee and ankle joint angle, torque, and power data taken during walking experiments at various speeds demonstrate the ability of the prosthesis to provide a functional gait that is representative of normal gait biomechanics. Measurements from the battery during level overground walking indicate that the self-contained device can provide more than 4500 strides, or 9 km, of walking at a speed of 5.1 km/h between battery charges. PMID:20054424

  14. Fusion following failed total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Wünschel, Markus; Leichtle, Ulf G; Leichtle, Carmen I; Walter, Christian; Mittag, Falk; Arlt, Eva; Suckel, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Although mid- to long-term results after total ankle replacement have improved because of available second- and third-generation devices, failure of total ankle replacement is still more common compared with total hip replacement and total knee replacement. The portfolio of available total ankle replacement revision component options is small. Furthermore, the bone stock of the tibiotalar region is scarce making it difficult and in some situations impossible to perform revision total ankle replacement. In these cases tibiotalar and tibiotalocalcaneal fusions are valuable options. This article describes which surgical procedures should be performed depending on the initial situation and gives detailed advice on surgical technique, postoperative care, and clinical results.

  15. Salto Talaris fixed-bearing total ankle replacement system.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Todd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement is an anatomically designed fixed bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the successful design of the mobile-bearing Salto prosthesis available outside the United States. The original mobile-bearing design was modified and the mobile-bearing was transferred to the precision instrumentation at the trial phase evaluation. Instrumentation and technique allow the surgeon to determine the functional joint axis before final implantation. The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement design blends minimal bone resection and optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene conformity. The authors present an overview of the Salto Talaris total ankle replacement surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  16. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  17. Challenges in prosthesis classification.

    PubMed

    Robertsson, Otto; Mendenhall, Stan; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Inacio, Maria C S; Graves, Stephen

    2011-12-21

    Accurate prosthesis classification is critical for total joint arthroplasty surveillance and assessment of comparative effectiveness. Historically, prosthesis classification was based solely on the names of the prosthesis manufacturers. As a result, prosthesis designs changed without corresponding name changes, and other prostheses' names changed over time without substantial design modifications. As the number of prostheses used in total joint arthroplasty on the market increased, catalog and lot numbers associated with prosthesis descriptions were introduced by manufacturers. Currently, these catalog and lot numbers are not standardized, and there is no consensus on categorization of these numbers into brands or subbrands. Classification of the attributes of a prosthesis also varies, limiting comparisons of prostheses across studies and reports. The development of a universal prosthesis classification system would standardize prosthesis classification and enhance total joint arthroplasty research collaboration worldwide. This is a current area of focus for the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries (ICOR).

  18. TEMPER: an acronym for ankle sprain rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rzonca, E C; Lue, B Y

    1988-07-01

    As has been previously discussed, the incidence and resultant associated disabilities of ankle sprains have been well documented in the literature. The staggering statistics on long-term disability show that there is no such thing as a simple ankle sprain. The degree of disability is related to the extent of the initial injury as well as the follow-up medical care provided. It is this fact that requires a complete understanding of the injury as well as a proper treatment and rehabilitation program. One of the reasons cited for the long-term disability or lack of consistently good results in treating ankle sprains is the lack of uniformity in treatment. One possible reason is the lack of agreement in diagnostic techniques as well as the end diagnosis of a particular grade of ankle sprain. If a sprain is managed correctly, resultant disability will be kept to a minimum. A proper rehabilitation program may be the most important factor in preventing chronic instability. The acronym RICE falls short of complete ankle management. RICE primarily addresses the ankle edema. Thus, the patient's ankle is only partially rehabilitated. A rational approach to the management of ankle sprains is given. Upon reviewing a complete protocol for ankle sprain rehabilitation, the acronym TEMPER can be used judiciously to remember the key steps in the treatment plan. Through the use of this acronym, one can institute a complete rehabilitation program.

  19. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging of ankle joint in cadaver specimens, volunteers, and patients after different cartilage repair techniques at 7 T: initial results.

    PubMed

    Zbýň, Štefan; Brix, Martin O; Juras, Vladimir; Domayer, Stephan E; Walzer, Sonja M; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Apprich, Sebastian; Buckenmaier, Kai; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    The goal of cartilage repair techniques such as microfracture (MFX) or matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) is to produce repair tissue (RT) with sufficient glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a direct and noninvasive evaluation of the GAG content in native cartilage and RT. In the femoral cartilage, this method was able to distinguish between RTs produced by MFX and MACT having different GAG contents. However, it needs to be clarified whether sodium MRI can be useful for evaluating RT in thin ankle cartilage. Thus, the aims of this 7-T study were (1) to validate our sodium MRI protocol in cadaver ankle samples, (2) to evaluate the sodium corrected signal intensities (cSI) in cartilage of volunteers, (3) and to compare sodium values in RT between patients after MFX and MACT treatment. Five human cadaver ankle samples as well as ankles of 9 asymptomatic volunteers, 6 MFX patients and 6 MACT patients were measured in this 7-T study. Sodium values from the ankle samples were compared with histochemically evaluated GAG content. In the volunteers, sodium cSI values were calculated in the cartilages of ankle and subtalar joint. In the patients, sodium cSI in RT and reference cartilage were measured, morphological appearance of RT was evaluated using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system, and clinical outcome before and after surgery was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score and Modified Cincinnati Knee Scale. All regions of interest were defined on morphological images and subsequently transferred to the corresponding sodium images. Analysis of variance, t tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. In the patients, significantly lower sodium cSI values were found in RT than in reference cartilage for the MFX (P = 0.007) and MACT patients (P = 0.008). Sodium cSI and MOCART scores in RT did not differ between

  20. Can Chronic Ankle Instability Be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To pose the question, “Can chronic ankle instability be prevented?” The evaluation and treatment of chronic ankle instability is a significant challenge in athletic health care. The condition affects large numbers of athletes and is associated with reinjury and impaired performance. The management of acute injuries varies widely but in athletic training has traditionally focused on initial symptom management and rapid return to activity. A review of practice strategies and philosophies suggests that a more detailed evaluation of all joints affected by the injury, correction of hypomobility, and protection of healing structures may lead to a more optimal long-term outcome. Background: Sprains to the lateral ankle are common in athletes, and the reinjury rate is high. These injuries are often perceived as being isolated to the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. It is, however, becoming apparent that a lateral ankle sprain can injure other tissues and result in joint dysfunction throughout the ankle complex. Description: We begin by addressing the relationship between mechanical and functional instability. We then discuss normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics. Finally, tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and the management of acute lateral ankle sprain are reviewed, with an emphasis on restoring normal mechanics of the ankle-joint complex. A treatment model based on assessment of joint function, treatment of hypomobile segments, and protection of healing tissues at hypermobile segments is described. PMID:12937564

  1. Ratio of Range of Motion of the Ankle and Surrounding Joints After Total Ankle Replacement: A Radiographic Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Travis J; Hamid, Kamran S; Easley, Mark E; DeOrio, James K; Nunley, James A; Adams, Samuel B

    2017-04-05

    This study attempted to identify where motion occurs after total ankle replacement, the difference in range-of-motion contributions between fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total ankle replacements, and the contribution of abnormal peritalar motion. We hypothesized that sagittal plane radiographic assessment would demonstrate that actual ankle motion through the prosthesis is less than the total arc of ankle motion that may be observed clinically secondary to contributions from adjacent joints. Patients underwent routine standardized weight-bearing maximum dorsiflexion and plantar flexion sagittal radiographs. Sagittal plane ankle and foot measurements were performed on each dorsiflexion and plantar flexion radiograph to determine the total arc of ankle motion, actual ankle motion through the prosthesis, motion through the subtalar and talonavicular joints, and midfoot motion. Motion radiographs were routinely made at 1 year postoperatively and at the time of the most recent follow-up. A minimum follow-up of 2 years was required of all patients. There were 197 patients who met the inclusion criteria (75 INBONE, 52 Salto Talaris, and 70 STAR prostheses). The mean time to the latest radiographs (and standard deviation) was 42.9 ± 18.8 months. The mean actual ankle motion through the prosthesis was 25.9° ± 12.2°, which was significantly less (p < 0.001) than the mean total motion arc of 37.6° ± 12.0°. The motion of the ankle accounted for 68% of total range of motion, and motion of the peritalar joints accounted for 32%. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) among the 3 prostheses or when comparing fixed and mobile-bearing designs for both ranges of motion. This study demonstrates that actual ankle motion after total ankle replacement is approximately 12° less than the total arc of motion that might be observed clinically because of increased midfoot and subtalar motion. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of

  2. Chronic Ankle Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk for Newly Active Baby Boomers The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons has a valuable lesson for Baby Boomers now getting back into fitness and sports: Get your ankles checked for chronic instability caused ...

  3. The Effect of Prosthetic Ankle Units on Roll-Over Shape Characteristics During Walking in Persons with Bilateral Transtibial Amputations

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Steven A.; Su, Po-Fu; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Some important functions of walking are adversely affected or eliminated in prosthesis users due to reduced or absent ankle motion. The purpose of this retrospective data analysis was to determine the effect of prosthetic ankle units on the characteristics of the ankle-foot roll-over shape in persons with bilateral transtibial amputations. Seventeen subjects were fitted with Endolite Multiflex Ankles to provide ankle plantar/dorsiflexion during the stance phase of gait. Two quantitative gait analyses were performed as subjects walked with (1) Seattle Lightfoot II feet (baseline condition) and (2) with the prosthetic ankle units added. Roll-over shape radii and effective foot length ratio were calculated and compared for the two prosthetic configurations. When subjects walked with the ankle units, ankle motion increased (p<0.001), peak ankle plantarflexion moment during stance decreased slightly, and ankle-foot roll-over shape radii were significantly less (p<0.001) compared to the baseline condition. The effective foot length ratio of the roll-over shape was found to increase with walking speed (p<0.001), but it was not significantly affected by the prosthetic ankle units (p=0.066). Prosthetists and manufacturers are encouraged to consider the effect of combining prosthetic components on the overall characteristics of the prosthesis and the functions they impart to the user. PMID:22234709

  4. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  5. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  6. The initial safe range of motion of the ankle joint after three methods of internal fixation of simulated fractures of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Yoshio; Kaneko, Kazuo; Kume, Kazuhiko; Maeda, Mutsuhiro; Iwase, Hideaki

    2006-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the safe passive range of ankle motion for inter-bone stiffness after internal fixation under load but there is a lack of information about the safe range of ankle motion for early rehabilitation in the absence of loading. The present study was designed to assess the effect of ankle movement on inter-bone displacement characteristics of medial malleolus fractures following three types of internal fixation to determine the safe range of motion. Five lower legs obtained during autopsy were used to assess three types of internal fixation (two with Kirschner-wires alone; two with Kirschner-wires plus tension band wiring; and, one with an AO/ASIF malleolar screw alone). Following a simulated fracture by sawing through the medial malleolus the displacement between the fractured bone ends was measured during a passive range of movement with continuous monitoring using omega (Omega) shaped transducers and a biaxial flexible goniometer. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated measures analysis of variance. Inter-bone displacement was not proportional to the magnitude of movement throughout the range of ankle motion as, when separation exceeded 25 microm, there was increasingly wide separation as plantar-flexion or dorsal-flexion was increased. There was no statistical significant difference between the small amount of inter-bone displacement observed with three types of fixation within the safe range of dorsal-flexion and plantar-flexion for early rehabilitation. However the inter-bone separation when fixation utilized two Kirschner-wires alone tended to be greater than when using the other two types of fixation during dorsal-flexion and eversion. The present study revealed a reproducible range of ankle motion for early rehabilitation which was estimated to be within the range of 20 degrees of dorsal-flexion and 10 degrees of plantar-flexion without eversion. Also, internal fixation with two Kirschner-wires alone does not seem to

  7. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  8. Conus hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Wagner, M

    2001-01-01

    50 years ago, prosthetic replacement of the hip joint ushered in a new epoch in orthopaedics. Total hip replacement made it possible to remove a severely diseased, painful hip and restore normal function and a normal quality of life to the afflicted patient. The early results of total hip replacement are almost all spectacular and hip replacement has become the most successful type of orthopaedic surgery. These good results using an approach that was technically relatively simple resulted in a temptation to implant prosthetic hip joints with ever increasing frequency in ever younger patients. This led to the emergence of new problems, which were not so clearly recognised at the outset: it emerged that the stability of prosthetic hip joints was of limited duration. This had the following consequence: If a total hip prosthesis is implanted in an elderly person whose remaining life-expectancy is shorter than the longevity of the prosthesis, hip replacement is a life-long solution. We can therefore say that, for a patient who has only 10 to 15 years left to live, their hip problem is solved by total hip replacement. For young people, who still have a long life expectancy in front of them, it is different. They will experience failure of the artificial joint and require further surgery. The commonest and most important type of failure in total hip prostheses is aseptic loosening, which is associated with resorption of bone at the site of the prosthesis. The cause of this phenomenon has only gradually been recognised in the course of the years. Initially, the unanimous opinion was that the methacrylate cement, used to fix the components of the prosthesis in the bone, was the definitive cause of aseptic loosening because fissures and fractures of the cement were almost always found during surgical revision of loosened joints. There was talk of "cement disease" and great efforts were made to improve the quality of the cement and the cementing technique. Moreover, even

  9. Snowboarders' ankle.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Irene Fleur; Brouwers, Lars; Brink, Peter R G; Poeze, Martijn

    2014-10-29

    In this case study we report a fracture of the lateral process of the talus (LPF) in a snowboarder. The fracture is frequently overlooked initially, due to subtle clinical and radiological findings and a low incidence rate. However, LPF are associated with significant morbidity when missed. To address this, we report one case of a patient with a LPF and provide a review of the available literature.

  10. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  11. Visual Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter H.; Tehovnik, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    There are more than 40 million blind individuals in the world whose plight would be greatly ameliorated by creating a visual prosthetic. We begin by outlining the basic operational characteristics of the visual system as this knowledge is essential for producing a prosthetic device based on electrical stimulation through arrays of implanted electrodes. We then list a series of tenets that we believe need to be followed in this effort. Central among these is our belief that the initial research in this area, which is in its infancy, should first be carried out in animals. We suggest that implantation of area V1 holds high promise as the area is of a large volume and can therefore accommodate extensive electrode arrays. We then proceed to consider coding operations that can effectively convert visual images viewed by a camera to stimulate electrode arrays to yield visual impressions that can provide shape, motion and depth information. We advocate experimental work that mimics electrical stimulation effects non-invasively in sighted human subjects using a camera from which visual images are converted into displays on a monitor akin to those created by electrical stimulation. PMID:19065857

  12. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open Weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Katherine; Ramesh, Ashwanth; McGoldrick, Niall; Cove, Richard; Walsh, James C; Stephens, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A multimodal approach to ankle instability: Interrelations between subjective and objective assessments of ankle status in athletes.

    PubMed

    Golditz, Tobias; Welsch, Goetz H; Pachowsky, Milena; Hennig, Friedrich F; Pfeifer, Klaus; Steib, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study is to investigate the association between different subjective and objective assessments of ankle function in a population of athletes with or without functional ankle instability (FAI). 29 athletes with a history of ankle spraining were divided into two groups according to their ankle status: 16 with FAI (initial ankle sprain with residual functional instability) (age 24.6 ± 3.1 years), and 13 COPERS (initial ankle sprain without residual instability) (age 25.3 ± 4.4 years). The assessment of each individual's ankle function was based on three approaches: The "functional-ankle-ability-measure" (FAAM) assessing subjective ankle functionality, measures of sensorimotor control as objective functional measurements and MRI-based T2-mapping as a quantitative marker of compositional joint status. Pearson's product-moment-correlation coefficient, student's t-test and analysis-of-variance were used for statistical analysis. Significant group differences existed for subjective ankle function (FAAM, p = 0.04) and MRI-data mainly in the medial compartment of the ankle joint (p ≤ 0.05). We found unique associations between T2-mapping results and sensorimotor scores in the COPER (r = -0.756-0.849), and "FAI"-group (r = 0.630-0.657). The location and magnitude differed between groups. No correlations existed between these measures and the FAAM. This exploratory study provides preliminary evidence for potential interrelations between various diagnostic measures of ankle function and structure in individuals with and without FAI. We found associations between MRI-results and selected measures of sensorimotor control, indicating a potential link between loss of ankle function and early joint degeneration. Despite these interrelations, each of the different assessment options appears to contain unique information on ankle functionality important in a clinical assessment. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley

  14. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a cost-effective option for many patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the ankle joint. Rehabilitation is generally quicker than conventional open techniques, and rates of fusion are comparable or better than traditional open techniques. Unless the arthroscopic surgeon has considerable experience, the best results are seen in patients with very little deformity in the ankle joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, M W; Uhl, T L; Mattacola, C G; McCluskey, L C

    2001-01-01

    Without adequate care, acute ankle trauma can result in chronic joint instability. Use of a standardized protocol enhances the management of ankle sprains. In patients with grades I or II sprains, emphasis should be placed on accurate diagnosis, early use of RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation), maintenance of range of motion and use of an ankle support. Sprains with complete ligament [corrected] tears (grade III) may require surgical intervention. Although early motion and mobility are recommended, ligamentous strength does not return until months after an ankle sprain.

  16. Posterior ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Mosca, Massimiliano; Parma, Alessandro; Di Caprio, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    Posterior ankle impingement is a common cause of chronic ankle pain and results from compression of bony or soft tissue structures during ankle plantar flexion. Bony impingement is most commonly related to an os trigonum or prominent trigonal process. Posteromedial soft tissue impingement generally arises from an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. Posterolateral soft tissue impingement is caused by an accessory ligament, the posterior intermalleolar ligament, which spans the posterior ankle between the posterior tibiofibular and posterior talofibular ligaments. Finally, anomalous muscles have also been described as a cause of posterior impingement.

  17. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  18. Ankle Sprains. A Round Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Types of ankle sprains, surgical versus nonsurgical treatment, tape versus brace for support, rehabilitation, exercise, and prevention of ankle sprains are discussed by a panel of experts. An acute ankle taping technique is illustrated. (MT)

  19. Engineering considerations in the design of an ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kempson, G E; Freeman, M A; Tuke, M A

    1975-05-01

    A prothesis has been designed to replace the articulating surfaces of the human ankle joint. The prothesis is in two parts, each forming a segment of a right circular cylinder with a single axis of rotation. The concave tibial component is manufactured from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and the talar component is manufactured from medical grade stainless steel. It is likely, however, that the talar component will be commercially manufactured from cobalt chrome alloy (Vitallium or Vinertia). The two components are secured to the cancellous bone by polymethylmethacrylate bone cement and laboratory tests have indicated that the bond should be strong enough to withstand the loads encountered at the ankle joint in vivo. The tests have also shown that the stability and strength of the ankle are not seriously reduced by implantation of the prosthesis. Laboratory wear tests and clinical experience over the last two years encourage optimism over the long term performance of the prothesis.

  20. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  1. Post-Traumatic Periprosthetic Tibial and Fibular Fracture After Total Ankle Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Brock, Amanda K; Tan, Eric W; Shafiq, Babar

    Periprosthetic fractures after total ankle arthroplasty are uncommon, with most cases occurring intraoperatively. We describe a post-traumatic periprosthetic fracture of the distal tibia and fibula after total ankle arthroplasty that was treated with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis. It is important for orthopedic surgeons not only to recognize the risk factors for postoperative periprosthetic total ankle arthroplasty fractures, but also to be familiar with the treatment options available to maximize function and minimize complications. The design of the tibial prosthesis and surgical techniques required to prepare the ankle joint for implantation are important areas of future research to limit the risk of periprosthetic fractures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases.

  3. Chronic ankle instability: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprain is reported to be among the most common recurrent injuries. About 20% of acute ankle sprain patients develop chronic ankle instability. The failure of functional rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain leads to the development of chronic ankle instability. Differentiation between functional and anatomical ankle instability is very essential to guide the proper treatment. Stability testing by varus stress test and anterior drawer test should be carried out. Subtalar instability is an important pathology that is commonly by passed during the assessment of chronic ankle instability. Unlike acute ankle sprain, chronic ankle instability might require surgical intervention. The surgical and conservative management options can be very much developed by in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology. Anatomical repair, augmentation by tendon, or both are the basic methods of surgical intervention. Arthroscopy is becoming more popular in the management of chronic ankle instability. PMID:27843798

  4. The efficacy of using vibrometry to detect osteointegration of the Agility total ankle.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Michael C; Kramer, Patricia A; Reinhall, Per G; Benirschke, Stephen K; Hansen, Sigvard T; Ching, Randal P

    2010-06-18

    Arthritis is a chronic, debilitating disease affecting one in six people in the United States annually. One of the most promising surgical treatments is total joint replacement. After decades of development, some joint replacement (arthroplasty) systems such as the hip and knee enjoy high success rates while others, particularly newer ones for the ankle, have disappointing survival rates. The goal of this study was to investigate, develop, and test a methodology to assess implant osteointegration, specifically for the talar component of a total ankle prosthesis. A vibrometry technique using Doppler ultrasound was developed to non-invasively determine osteointegration clinically. This methodology was evaluated via preliminary experimentation, along with another validation methodology, to access whether design criteria have been met in order to initiate a clinical study of the technique. Bench-top and cadaveric testing demonstrated that the Doppler ultrasound technique could distinguish the level of osteointegration between loose and fixed implant components. The laser vibrometry technique, used for the validation of the ultrasound technique intraoperatively, was also shown to be functional and indicative of the ultrasound technique's testing results. This methodology can provide a much needed tool to determine the integration of implants non-invasively in the clinical and surgical setting, thus allowing each patient's rehabilitation program to be monitored and tailored to maximize the osteointegration and survival rate of their total joint replacement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Design and Control of a Pneumatically Actuated Transtibial Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Shen, Xiangrong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and control of a pneumatically actuated transtibial prosthesis, which utilizes a pneumatic cylinder-type actuator to power the prosthetic ankle joint to support the user's locomotion. The pneumatic actuator has multiple advantages over the traditional electric motor, such as light weight, low cost, and high power-to-weight ratio. The objective of this work is to develop a compact and lightweight transtibial prosthesis, leveraging the multiple advantages provided by this highly competitive actuator. In this paper, the design details of the prosthesis are described, including the determination of performance specifications, the layout of the actuation mechanism, and the calculation of the torque capacity. Through the authors’ design calculation, the prosthesis is able to provide sufficient range of motion and torque capacity to support the locomotion of a 75 kg individual. The controller design is also described, including the underlying biomechanical analysis and the formulation of the finite-state impedance controller. Finally, the human subject testing results are presented, with the data indicating that the prosthesis is able to generate a natural walking gait and sufficient power output for its amputee user. PMID:26146497

  6. Estimation of crank angle for cycling with a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, B E; Shultz, A; Ledoux, E; Goldfarb, M

    2014-01-01

    In order for a prosthesis to restore power generation during cycling, it must supply torque in a manner that is coordinated with the motion of the bicycle crank. This paper outlines an algorithm for the real time estimation of the angular position of a bicycle crankshaft using only measurements internal to an intelligent knee and ankle prosthesis. The algorithm assumes that the rider/prosthesis/bicycle system can be modeled as a four-bar mechanism. Assuming that a prosthesis can generate two independent angular measurements of the mechanism (in this case the knee angle and the absolute orientation of the shank), Freudenstein's equation can be used to synthesize the mechanism continuously. A recursive least-squares algorithm is implemented to estimate the Freudenstein coefficients, and the resulting link lengths are used to reformulate the equation in terms of input-output relationships mapping both measured angles to the crank angle. Using two independent measurements allows the algorithm to uniquely determine the crank angle from multi-valued functions. In order to validate the algorithm, a bicycle was mounted on a trainer and configured with the prosthesis using an artificial hip joint attached to the seat post. Motion capture was used to monitor the mechanism for forward and backward pedaling and the results are compared to the output of the presented algorithm. Once the parameters have converged, the algorithm is shown to predict the crank angle within 15° of the externally measured value throughout the entire crank cycle during forward rotation.

  7. An alternative management protocol for lateral ankle sprains*.

    PubMed

    Quillen, W S

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue ankle injuries, particularly lateral ligament sprains, cause considerable disability and loss of time from activities. These injuries are commonly and frequently treated by physical therapists. Controversy exists over the efficacy of various methods for the nonoperative management of these injuries. A comprehensive program for the management of the lateral ankle sprain, involving the fabrication of a thermoplastic ankle stirrup and the initiation of a selfdirected home program of ankle rehabilitation using surgical tubing, is detailed. Based upon the experimental work of Brostrom, Noyes, and others, the early application of stress with protective motion has been found to facilitate the strength and structural integrity of healing ligaments. The ankle stirrup regimen allows weight bearing and easy removal for treatment or exercise. Joint stiffness, muscular atrophy, and circulatory stasis are minimized. The ankle stirrup provides an aggressive yet therapeutically sound approach to the management of this injury. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1981;2(4):187-190.

  8. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle.

    PubMed

    Hung, You-Jou

    2015-06-18

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable.

  9. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hung, You-jou

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable. PMID:26085985

  10. Joint mobilization acutely improves landing kinematics in chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Cusack, Kim; Wilson, Laura; Doherty, Cailbhe

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the acute effect of ankle joint mobilizations akin to those performed in everyday clinical practice on sagittal plane ankle joint kinematics during a single-leg drop landing in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen participants with self-reported CAI (defined as <24 on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool) performed three single-leg drop landings under two different conditions: 1) premobilization and, 2) immediately, postmobilization. The mobilizations performed included Mulligan talocrural joint dorsiflexion mobilization with movement, Mulligan inferior tibiofibular joint mobilization, and Maitland anteroposterior talocrural joint mobilization. Three CODA cx1 units (Charnwood Dynamics Ltd., Leicestershire, UK) were used to provide information on ankle joint sagittal plane angular displacement. The dependent variable under investigation was the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion at the point of initial contact during the drop landing. There was a statistically significant acute decrease in the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion from premobilization (34.89° ± 4.18°) to postmobilization (31.90° ± 5.89°), t(14) = 2.62, P < 0.05 (two-tailed). The mean decrease in the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion as a result of the ankle joint mobilization was 2.98° with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 0.54 to 5.43. The eta squared statistic (0.32) indicated a large effect size. These results indicate that mobilization acted to acutely reduce the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion at initial contact during a single-leg drop landing. Mobilization applied to participants with CAI has a mechanical effect on the ankle joint, thus facilitating a more favorable positioning of the ankle joint when landing from a jump.

  11. Modified Evans peroneus brevis lateral ankle stabilization for balancing varus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, I have described a modification of the Evans peroneus brevis tendon lateral ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis is then transferred either to the anterior distal tibia concomitantly with total ankle replacement or through the tibia when performed after total ankle replacement and secured with plate and screw fixation. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon is useful in providing lateral ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  12. Ankle-Brachial Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... to getting your blood pressure taken in a routine visit to your doctor. You may feel some ... mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/ankle-brachial-index/basics/definition/PRC-20014625 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  13. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  14. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... help to ease pain and swelling. You can buy these medicines without a prescription. DO NOT use ... easily. Your ankle is increasingly discolored (red or black and blue), or it becomes numb or tingly. ...

  15. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study protocol. An additional group of non-injured individuals were also recruited to act as a control group. All participants completed the anterior, posterior-lateral and posterior-medial reach directions of the star excursion balance test. Sagittal plane kinematics of the lower extremity and associated fractal dimension of the centre of pressure path were also acquired. Participants with chronic ankle instability displayed poorer performance in the anterior, posterior-medial and posterior-lateral reach directions compared with controls bilaterally, and in the posterior-lateral direction compared with lateral ankle sprain copers on their 'involved' limb only. These performance deficits in the posterior-lateral and posterior-medial directions were associated with reduced flexion and dorsiflexion displacements at the hip, knee and ankle at the point of maximum reach, and coincided with reduced complexity of the centre of pressure path. In comparison with lateral ankle sprain copers and controls, participants with chronic ankle instability were characterised by dynamic balance deficits as measured using the SEBT. This was attested to reduced sagittal plane motions at the hip, knee and ankle joints, and reduced capacity of the stance limb to avail of its supporting base. III.

  16. Short-Term Effect of Prosthesis Transforming Sensory Modalities on Walking in Stroke Patients with Hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Honda, Keita; Ishiguro, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Sensory impairments caused by neurological or physical disorders hamper kinesthesia, making rehabilitation difficult. In order to overcome this problem, we proposed and developed a novel biofeedback prosthesis called Auditory Foot for transforming sensory modalities, in which the sensor prosthesis transforms plantar sensations to auditory feedback signals. This study investigated the short-term effect of the auditory feedback prosthesis on walking in stroke patients with hemiparesis. To evaluate the effect, we compared four conditions of auditory feedback from plantar sensors at the heel and fifth metatarsal. We found significant differences in the maximum hip extension angle and ankle plantar flexor moment on the affected side during the stance phase, between conditions with and without auditory feedback signals. These results indicate that our sensory prosthesis could enhance walking performance in stroke patients with hemiparesis, resulting in effective short-term rehabilitation. PMID:27547456

  17. Biodynamic total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pipino, F; Calderale, P M

    1987-09-01

    The biodynamic total hip prosthesis which was devised in 1977-78 and implanted in 1979 was derived from a series of experimental studies and a lengthy clinical experience, both dating back to 1968. This prosthesis introduced two new and original concepts into the field of prosthetic hip surgery: 1) the biequatorial design of the cup; 2) the preservation of the femoral neck. This prosthetic system is based on maximum preservation of the bone stock as well as hip function. The biequatorial cup allows for positioning corresponding to that of the normal acetabulum. The femoral component incorporates features (collar, sagittal and frontal angulation, external surface, etc.) which facilitate proximal cortical fixation and cancellous metaphyseal biological anchoring, thus ensuring total adhesion. The average 3.5 years follow-up (maximum 7 years, minimum one year) in 280 cases confirms the effectiveness of this prosthesis and the validity of the basic principles on which it is founded.

  18. Stabilization of a three-dimensional limit cycle walking model through step-to-step ankle control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghee; Collins, Steven H

    2013-06-01

    Unilateral, below-knee amputation is associated with an increased risk of falls, which may be partially related to a loss of active ankle control. If ankle control can contribute significantly to maintaining balance, even in the presence of active foot placement, this might provide an opportunity to improve balance using robotic ankle-foot prostheses. We investigated ankle- and hip-based walking stabilization methods in a three-dimensional model of human gait that included ankle plantarflexion, ankle inversion-eversion, hip flexion-extension, and hip ad/abduction. We generated discrete feedback control laws (linear quadratic regulators) that altered nominal actuation parameters once per step. We used ankle push-off, lateral ankle stiffness and damping, fore-aft foot placement, lateral foot placement, or all of these as control inputs. We modeled environmental disturbances as random, bounded, unexpected changes in floor height, and defined balance performance as the maximum allowable disturbance value for which the model walked 500 steps without falling. Nominal walking motions were unstable, but were stabilized by all of the step-to-step control laws we tested. Surprisingly, step-by-step modulation of ankle push-off alone led to better balance performance (3.2% leg length) than lateral foot placement (1.2% leg length) for these control laws. These results suggest that appropriate control of robotic ankle-foot prosthesis push-off could make balancing during walking easier for individuals with amputation.

  19. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, p<0.0001). Unstable ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (p<0.005) and more severe functional ankle instability (p<0.0001) than stable ankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (p<0.0001). There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stresses in the ankle joint and total ankle replacement design.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Rahul; Siddique, M S

    2011-06-01

    The ankle is a highly congruent joint with a surface area of 11-13 cm(2). Total ankle replacements have been attempted since the early 1970s and design has continually evolved as the early designs were a failure. This was because the stresses involved and the mutiaxial motion of the ankle has not been understood until recently. It has been shown that the talus slides as well as rolls during the ankle arc of motion from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion. Furthermore, the articular surfaces and the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments have been shown to form a four bar linkage dictating ankle motion. A new design ankle replacement has been suggested recently which allows multiaxial motion at the ankle while maintaining congruency throughout the arc of motion. The early results of this ankle replacement have been encouraging without any reported failures due to mechanical loosening.

  1. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, p<0.05). Not all of the subjects reached a steady-state gait pattern within the two sessions, in contrast to a previous study using a weaker robotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance.

  2. Partial transmalleolar approach for lateral impingement after total ankle arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Nakamura, Ichiro; Miura, Ayumi; Momoyama, Gen; Ito, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in implant technology have made total ankle arthroplasty an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of ankle arthritis. However, a frequent complication of the procedure is nerve impingement related to either to heterotrophic bone growth or the prosthesis itself. Successful resolution of this complication presents a challenge to clinicians. We present a case of lateral impingement following total ankle arthroplasty that was successfully treated using a partial transmalleolar approach to effect a partial osteotomy of the lateral malleolus and create a fragment attached to the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. This approach provides a good operative field in the lateral gutter with minimal soft tissue impairment. It also facilitates curettage, and resolution of tissue impingement. The osteotomy site healed fully by 3 months postoperative, and the pain around the lateral malleolus resolved. Furthermore, the patient's score on the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot Ankle/Hindfoot Scale improved from 33 preoperatively to 82 at 6 months postoperative.

  3. Contributing factors to chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Kramer, Lauren C; Denegar, Craig R; Hertel, Jay

    2007-03-01

    The development of repetitive ankle sprains and persistent symptoms after initial ankle sprain has been termed chronic ankle instability (CAI). There is no clear indication of which measures are most important in discriminating between individuals with and without CAI. Thirty subjects with unilateral CAI and controls had measures of ankle laxity and hypomobility, static and dynamic balance, ankle and hip strength, lower extremity alignments, and flexibility taken on both limbs. Based on comparisons of CAI ankles and side-matched limbs in controls, the measures significantly predictive of CAI were increased inversion laxity (r(2) change = 0.203), increased anterior laxity (r(2) change = 0.11), more missed balance trials (r(2) change = 0.094), and lower plantarflexion to dorsiflexion peak torque (r(2) change = 0.052). Symmetry indices comparing the side-to-side differences of each measure also were calculated for each dependent variable and compared between groups. The measures significantly predictive of CAI were decreased anterior reach (r(2) change = 0.185), decreased plantarflexion peak torque (r(2) change = 0.099), decreased posterior medial reach (r(2) change = 0.094), and increased inversion laxity (r(2) change = 0.041). The results of this study elucidate the specific measures that best discriminate between individuals with and without CAI. Both mechanical (anterior and inversion laxity) and functional (strength, dynamic balance) insufficiencies significantly contribute to the etiology of CAI. Prevention of CAI may be possible with proper initial management of the acute injury with rehabilitation aimed at those factors that best discriminate between individuals with and without CAI.

  4. A Review of 399 Total Ankle Replacements: Analysis of Ipsilateral Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis and Associated Talar Component Subsidence.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is an accepted treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis. When concurrent subtalar joint pathologic features exist, ipsilateral subtalar joint arthrodesis (STJA) can be performed either simultaneous with TAR or as a staged procedure. Limited data exist on the effect of talar component subsidence and prosthesis survivorship. The present study purpose was to evaluate the effect of STJA on talar component subsidence after primary TAR and its effect on TAR survivorship. All patients, a minimum of 18 years old, from a single institution with modern-generation TAR and 1-year minimum follow-up data available were evaluated. The study group included patients who had also undergone STJA, and the control group (no STJA) was matched 1:1 by age, gender, and prosthesis. The initial postoperative weightbearing and most recent weightbearing radiographs were compared for talar component subsidence. We reviewed 399 primary TARs from 2004 to 2012. A total of 33 patients with ipsilateral STJA met the inclusion criteria and had an appropriate control group match. In the study group, 8 patients required a return to the operating room for 4 revisions and 4 reoperations at a median follow-up point of 24.3 months. Of the controls, 9 patients required a return to the operating room, with 4 revisions and 5 reoperations at a median follow-up point of 38.4 months. No statistically significant radiographic differences were found between the 2 groups. Primary TAR and ipsilateral STJA were infrequently required (41 of 399; 10.3%). TAR did not result in decreased survivorship when performed with ipsilateral STJA at an early follow-up point. Further study is warranted to determine any differences among previous, simultaneous, and subsequent STJA with ipsilateral TAR, and a matched longitudinal analysis is needed to determine longer term survivorship.

  5. The effects of prosthetic foot roll-over shape arc length on the gait of trans-tibial prosthesis users.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Andrew H; Meier, Margrit R; Sessoms, Pinata H; Childress, Dudley S

    2006-12-01

    The Shape&Roll prosthetic foot was used to examine the effect of roll-over shape arc length on the gait of 14 unilateral trans-tibial prosthesis users. Simple modifications to the prosthetic foot were used to alter the effective forefoot rocker length, leaving factors such as alignment, limb length, and heel and mid-foot characteristics unchanged. Shortening the roll-over shape arc length caused a significant reduction in the maximum external dorsiflexion moment on the prosthetic side at all walking speeds (p < 0.001 for main effect of arc length), due to a reduction in forefoot leverage (moment arm) about the ankle. Roll-over shape arc length significantly affected the initial loading on the sound limb at normal and fast speeds (p = 0.001 for the main effect of arc length), with participants experiencing larger first peaks of vertical ground reaction forces on their sound limbs when using the foot with the shortest effective forefoot rocker arc length. Additionally, the difference between step lengths on the sound and prosthetic limbs was larger with the shortest arc length condition, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.06 for main effect). It appears that prosthesis users may experience a drop-off effect at the end of single limb stance on prosthetic feet with short roll-over shape arc lengths, leading to increased loading and/or a shortened step on the contralateral limb.

  6. A prosthesis-specific multi-link segment model of lower-limb amputee sprinting.

    PubMed

    Rigney, Stacey M; Simmons, Anne; Kark, Lauren

    2016-10-03

    Lower-limb amputees commonly utilize non-articulating energy storage and return (ESAR) prostheses for high impact activities such as sprinting. Despite these prostheses lacking an articulating ankle joint, amputee gait analysis conventionally features a two-link segment model of the prosthetic foot. This paper investigated the effects of the selected link segment model׳s marker-set and geometry on a unilateral amputee sprinter׳s calculated lower-limb kinematics, kinetics and energetics. A total of five lower-limb models of the Ottobock(®) 1E90 Sprinter were developed, including two conventional shank-foot models that each used a different version of the Plug-in-Gait (PiG) marker-set to test the effect of prosthesis ankle marker location. Two Hybrid prosthesis-specific models were then developed, also using the PiG marker-sets, with the anatomical shank and foot replaced by prosthesis-specific geometry separated into two segments. Finally, a Multi-link segment (MLS) model was developed, consisting of six segments for the prosthesis as defined by a custom marker-set. All full-body musculoskeletal models were tested using four trials of experimental marker trajectories within OpenSim 3.2 (Stanford, California, USA) to find the affected and unaffected hip, knee and ankle kinematics, kinetics and energetics. The geometry of the selected lower-limb prosthesis model was found to significantly affect all variables on the affected leg (p < 0.05), and the marker-set also significantly affected all variables on the affected leg, and none of the unaffected leg variables. The results indicate that the omission of prosthesis-specific spatial, inertial and elastic properties from full-body models significantly affects the calculated amputee gait characteristics, and we therefore recommend the implementation of a MLS model.

  7. 10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis. Patients and methods Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint—excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus. Results Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79–0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67–0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons. Interpretation The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements—even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results. PMID:22066551

  8. Evolution of the reverse total shoulder prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Reza; Kwon, Young W

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has gained significant popularity due to its ability to address difficult reconstructive shoulder problems that could not be adequately treated in the past. The concept of the reverse shoulder prosthesis was introduced in the 1970s, but the initial attempts were associated with high complication and implant failure rates. The pioneering work of Paul Grammont (shifting the center of rotation medially and distally) and the development of the DELTA prosthesis have been fundamental to all subsequent reverse shoulder arthroplasty systems. These semiconstrained prostheses utilize the deltoid to improve function and stability of the shoulder joint by coupling a convex glenoid with a concave humeral component. Modern generations of reverse shoulder prosthesis continue to evolve on the fundamentals of Grammont. Though results of these new prosthesis demonstrate promising outcomes, many controversies and challenges continue to be refined. An historical review of the evolution of reverse shoulder arthroplasty is presented, as well as the currently expanding indications for its application.

  9. Categorization of compensatory motions in transradial myoelectric prosthesis users.

    PubMed

    Hussaini, Ali; Zinck, Arthur; Kyberd, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Prosthesis users perform various compensatory motions to accommodate for the loss of the hand and wrist as well as the reduced functionality of a prosthetic hand. Investigate different compensation strategies that are performed by prosthesis users. Comparative analysis. A total of 20 able-bodied subjects and 4 prosthesis users performed a set of bimanual activities. Movements of the trunk and head were recorded using a motion capture system and a digital video recorder. Clinical motion angles were calculated to assess the compensatory motions made by the prosthesis users. The video recording also assisted in visually identifying the compensations. Compensatory motions by the prosthesis users were evident in the tasks performed (slicing and stirring activities) as compared to the benchmark of able-bodied subjects. Compensations took the form of a measured increase in range of motion, an observed adoption of a new posture during task execution, and prepositioning of items in the workspace prior to initiating a given task. Compensatory motions were performed by prosthesis users during the selected tasks. These can be categorized into three different types of compensations. Clinical relevance Proper identification and classification of compensatory motions performed by prosthesis users into three distinct forms allows clinicians and researchers to accurately identify and quantify movement. It will assist in evaluating new prosthetic interventions by providing distinct terminology that is easily understood and can be shared between research institutions.

  10. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  12. Lateral ankle instability: MR imaging of associated injuries and surgical treatment procedures.

    PubMed

    Alparslan, Leyla; Chiodo, Christopher P

    2008-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability has been defined as the development of recurrent ankle sprains and persistent symptoms after initial lateral ankle sprain. The diagnosis of ankle instability is usually established on the patient's history, physical examination, and radiographic assessment. Patients have signs of both functional and mechanical instability, and the repetitive, chronic nature of the injury may lead to intra-articular and periarticular pathologies. This article discusses the incidence, etiology, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of these pathologies, reviews the surgical treatment procedures for lateral ankle instability, and presents the postoperative MR imaging findings.

  13. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  14. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  15. Are there any relationships among ankle proprioception acuity, pre-landing ankle muscle responses, and landing impact in man?

    PubMed

    Fu, Siu Ngor; Hui-Chan, Christina Wan Ying

    2007-05-01

    Proprioceptive input has been suggested to contribute to the pre-landing muscle responses associated with drop-landing, but its precise role has yet to be delineated. This study set out to examine the relationships among ankle proprioception, pre-landing muscle responses, and landing impact on drop-landing in healthy man. Fifteen healthy male basketball players aged 18 to 26 participated in this study. Passive ankle joint repositioning errors were used to examine ankle joint proprioception. Pre-landing EMG responses in the ankle muscles and the impact force on landing were recorded while the players performed self-initiated drops from a height of 30 cm. Results demonstrated that averaged ankle repositioning errors were significantly correlated with the co-contraction indexes between left tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles (TA/MG CoI) (r=0.67, p=0.006), and showed a trend towards a relationship with the right TA/MG CoI (r=0.47, p=0.079). TA/MG CoI from both ankles were further related to the magnitude of the total impact force on landing (r=0.54 and 0.53, respectively; p<0.05). We concluded that male basketball players with less accurate ankle joint sense adopted greater co-contraction of ankle dorsiflexors and platarflexors, which was in turn associated with greater impact force at the moment of landing.

  16. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  17. Current thoughts on ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ritterman, Scott A; Fellars, Todd A; Digiovanni, Christopher W

    2013-03-01

    The ankle is the most commonly injured joint in athletic and work activities. In contrast, osteoarthritis of the ankle joint is relatively rare and is typically post-traumatic or inflammatory in nature. Common symptoms that prompt an orthopaedic consultation include pain, disability and altered gait mechanics. Non-operative management has been the mainstay for previously undiagnosed patients. For those with advanced disease, ankle fusion or total ankle replacement may be the only surgical options. Though some recent studies have shown patients' preference for a well functioning ankle replacement, significant long- term follow-up data is lacking.

  18. A tactile control prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, James Franklin

    This research involves development and testing of a tactile control prosthesis to aid human operators in control of dynamic vehicles. Specifically, this work includes development and demonstration of a torso mounted tactile drift display that allowed helicopter pilots to hover a Blackhawk helicopter with degraded vision (equivalent to 20/200 acuity), a NASA sponsored pilot-in-the-loop simulator study for a hover display and development and analysis of a tactile control prosthesis to help pilots correctly control an airplane experiencing an engine failure on takeoff. Results of a ten-subject experiment indicate that use of a tactile display in conjunction with a visual display reduces operator delay by 65 msec (SD of 28 msec), (P < 0.001) without a significant increase in error rate. In the pilot-in-the-loop simulation experiment pilots hovered a simulated helicopter better under increased workload conditions with the tactile control prosthesis than without it. The increased workload consisted of an addition drill in which the subject had to agree or disagree with a computer generated sum. Pilots were able to hover more precisely with the tactile display (mean of 5.19, SD of 2.57 feet) than without (mean of 6.39 and SD of 3.31 feet) especially when the secondary task was required (P < 0.001). Although learning effects were exhibited throughout the trials (P < 0.001), the tactile display was of greater benefit in higher workload conditions.

  19. Analysis of PITFL injuries in rotationally unstable ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Warner, Stephen J; Garner, Matthew R; Schottel, Patrick C; Hinds, Richard M; Loftus, Michael L; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-04-01

    Reduction and stabilization of the syndesmosis in unstable ankle fractures is important for ankle mortise congruity and restoration of normal tibiotalar contact forces. Of the syndesmotic ligaments, the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL) provides the most strength for maintaining syndesmotic stability, and previous work has demonstrated the significance of restoring PITFL function when it remains attached to a posterior malleolus fracture fragment. However, little is known regarding the nature of a PITFL injury in the absence of a posterior malleolus fracture. The goal of this study was to describe the PITFL injury pattern based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative observation. A prospective database of all operatively treated ankle fractures by a single surgeon was used to identify all supination-external rotation (SER) types III and IV ankle fracture patients with complete preoperative orthogonal ankle radiographs and MRI. All patients with a posterior malleolus fracture were excluded. Using a combination of preoperative imaging and intraoperative findings, we analyzed the nature of injuries to the PITFL. In total, 185 SER III and IV operatively treated ankle fractures with complete imaging were initially identified. Analysis of the preoperative imaging and operative reports revealed 34% (63/185) had a posterior malleolus fracture and were excluded. From the remaining 122 ankle fractures, the PITFL was delaminated from the posterior malleolus in 97% (119/122) of cases. A smaller proportion (3%; 3/122) had an intrasubstance PITFL rupture. Accurate and stable syndesmotic reduction is a significant component of restoring the ankle mortise after unstable ankle fractures. In our large cohort of rotationally unstable ankle fractures without posterior malleolus fractures, we found that most PITFL injuries occur as a delamination off the posterior malleolus. This predictable PITFL injury pattern may be used to guide new methods for

  20. Lateral ankle triad: the triple injury of ankle synovitis, lateral ankle instability, and peroneal tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Franson, Justin; Baravarian, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Many articles have been published that discuss various lateral ankle injuries and specific lateral ankle pathology. The purpose of this article is to explore and present a specific combination of findings that the author's multiphysician practice has noticed on a frequently recurring basis. The triple injury of ankle synovitis, ankle instability, and peroneal tendon tear can be termed the Lateral Ankle Triad. While it is common to find each of these specific injuries individually, they are often found in combination. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Decompression of Posterior Ankle Impingement With Concomitant Anterior Ankle Pathology by Posterior Ankle Arthroscopy in the Supine Position.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle endoscopy is a safe and effective approach for treatment of posterior ankle impingement. This is usually performed with the patient in prone position. The purpose of this technical note is to describe an arthroscopic approach of decompression of posterior ankle impingement with the patient in supine position. This is indicated if there is posterior ankle impingement together with other ankle pathology requiring anterior ankle arthroscopy. This approach allows treatment of both anterior ankle and posterior ankle pathology with the patient in the supine position. Concomitant anterior ankle arthroscopy can be performed with the usual orientation without the need of change of patient's position.

  2. Registry data trends of total ankle replacement use.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty registry data are meaningful when evaluating the outcomes of total joint replacement, because they provide unbiased objective information regarding survivorship and incidence of use. Critical evaluation of the registry data information will benefit the surgeon, patient, and industry. However, the implementation and acceptance of registry data for total ankle replacement has lagged behind that of hip and knee implant arthroplasty. Currently, several countries have national joint arthroplasty registries, with only some procuring information for total ankle replacement. We performed an electronic search to identify publications and worldwide registry databanks with pertinent information specific to total ankle replacement to determine the type of prostheses used and usage trends over time. We identified worldwide registry data from 33 countries, with details pertinent to total ankle replacement identified in only 6 countries. The obtained information was arbitrarily stratified into 3 distinct periods: 2000 to 2006, 2007 to 2010, and 2011. Within these study periods, the data from 13 total ankle replacement systems involving 3,980 ankles were identified. The vast majority (97%) of the reported ankle replacements were 3-component, mobile-bearing, uncemented prostheses. Three usage trends were identified: initial robust embracement followed by abrupt disuse, minimal use, and initial embracement followed by sustained growth in implantation. Before the widespread acceptance of new total ankle replacements, the United States should scrutinize and learn from the international registry data and develop its own national joint registry that would include total ankle replacement. Caution against the adoption of newly released prostheses, especially those without readily available revision components, is recommended.

  3. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  4. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle is also known as frozen ankle and results in marked fibrosis and contracture of the ankle capsule. Arthroscopic capsular release is indicated for symptomatic frozen ankle that is resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated for ankle stiffness due to degenerative joint disease, intra-articular malunion, or adhesion of the extensors of the ankle. The procedure consists of endoscopic posterior ankle capsulectomy and arthroscopic anterior ankle capsulotomy. It has the advantages of being minimally invasive surgery and allowing early postoperative vigorous mobilization of the ankle joint.

  5. The stump and the prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Day, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    In performing amputations the surgeon must bear in mind the biomechanical and other constraints of the prosthesis likely to be fitted and, so far as possible, should fashion the stump accordingly. The various types of prosthesis and their features are discussed in relation to amputations of the lower and upper limbs at all levels. PMID:7377694

  6. Design and Preliminary Evaluation of a Two DOFs Cable-Driven Ankle–Foot Prosthesis with Active Dorsiflexion–Plantarflexion and Inversion–Eversion

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Dallali, Houman; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an ankle–foot robotic prosthesis controllable in the sagittal and frontal planes. The prosthesis was designed to meet the mechanical characteristics of the human ankle including power, range of motion, and weight. To transfer the power from the motors and gearboxes to the ankle–foot mechanism, a Bowden cable system was used. The Bowden cable allows for optimal placement of the motors and gearboxes in order to improve gait biomechanics such as the metabolic energy cost and gait asymmetry during locomotion. Additionally, it allows flexibility in the customization of the device to amputees with different residual limb sizes. To control the prosthesis, impedance controllers in both sagittal and frontal planes were developed. The impedance controllers used torque feedback from strain gages installed on the foot. Preliminary evaluation was performed to verify the capability of the prosthesis to track the kinematics of the human ankle in two degrees of freedom (DOFs), the mechanical efficiency of the Bowden cable transmission, and the ability of the prosthesis to modulate the impedance of the ankle. Moreover, the system was characterized by describing the relationship between the stiffness of the impedance controllers to the actual stiffness of the ankle. Efficiency estimation showed 85.4% efficiency in the Bowden cable transmission. The prosthesis was capable of properly mimicking human ankle kinematics and changing its mechanical impedance in two DOFs in real time with a range of stiffness sufficient for normal human walking. In dorsiflexion–plantarflexion (DP), the stiffness ranged from 0 to 236 Nm/rad and in inversion–eversion (IE), the stiffness ranged from 1 to 33 Nm/rad. PMID:27200342

  7. Acute ankle sprain in dancers.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers. Because of the relative frequency of this injury and its wide acceptance as a likely part of an active lifestyle, in many individuals it may not receive the careful attention it deserves. An extreme ankle range of motion and excellent ankle stability are fundamental to success in dance. Hence, following a proper treatment protocol is crucial for allowing a dancer who suffers an ankle sprain to return to dance as soon as possible without impaired function. This article reviews the basic principles of the etiology and management of ankle sprain in dancers. Key concepts are on-site examination and treatment, early restoration, dance-specific rehabilitation, and a carefully administered safe return to dance. Additionally, injuries that may occur in conjunction with ankle sprain are highlighted, and practical, clinically relevant summary concepts for dance healthcare professionals, dance scientists, dance teachers, and dancers are provided.

  8. Comparing a passive-elastic and a powered prosthesis in transtibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, Chiara; Patritti, Benjamin L; Tropea, Peppino; Greenwald, Richard M; Casler, Rick; Herr, Hugh; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Passive-elastic foot prostheses cannot produce net work. Consequently, passive-elastic foot prostheses are limited in their ability to enable a biologically-realistic gait pattern in transtibial amputees. This shortcoming results in difficulties in balance and walking and leads to high levels of oxygen consumption during locomotion. A powered prosthesis has the potential for overcoming these problems and allowing transtibial amputees to achieve a biologically-realistic gait pattern. In this study, we compared the effects of the Ceterus by Össur, a traditional passive-elastic prosthesis, with those of the PowerFoot Biom (iWalk, Cambridge, MA), a recently-developed powered prosthesis. Gait biomechanics and metabolic cost were compared in a group of 5 transtibial amputees during level-ground walking. The results provided preliminary evidence that the use of a powered prosthesis leads to a decrease in the level of oxygen consumption during ambulation due to improvements in ankle kinematics and kinetics primarily during late stance. An average decrease in oxygen consumption of 8.4% was observed during the study when subjects used the PowerFoot compared to the Ceterus. An average increase of 54% was observed in the peak ankle power generation during late stance. Our results suggest that powered prostheses have the potential for significantly improving ambulation in transtibial amputees.

  9. Long-term follow-up on 33 TPR ankle joint replacements in 26 patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Niels C; Linde, Frank

    2009-01-01

    There exist very few long-term follow-up studies, on total ankle replacement (TAR). In the present study a cohort of rheumatoid arthritic (RA) were followed for up to 23 years. Thirty-three TAR were performed in 26 RA patients from 1980 to 1993. Removal of the prostheses and radiolucency was considered endpoints. All patients were followed to prosthesis failure or until death of the patients or until January 2008. Two patients with 3 prostheses were still alive with their prosthesis in place. Eighteen patients with 23 prostheses had died with their prosthesis in place. Two patients had their ipsilateral leg amputated 12 and 14 years after operation of unrelated causes. Five prostheses in 4 patients had been removed. The 10 years prosthesis survival was 85%, when removal is the endpoint. The long-term survival of this first generation type of TAR adds some optimism to the development of TAR.

  10. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  11. Parachute Ankle Brace Effectiveness Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    14 Selected outcomes stratified by PAB protocol .............. ... ... . .......... . .... 15 Ankle Injury Model...use of medical services: Rates/1 ,000 male trainees during 2 week risk period, by year of training and PAS protocol , n=68,418 ROC Curve for ankle ...knee injury during 2 week risk period LIST OF TABLES Parachute ankle brace protocol periods, 1998 - 2006 Descriptive characteristics of U.S. Army

  12. Conversion of Tibiotalar Arthrodesis to Total Ankle Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Manuel J; Schiff, Adam P; Adams, Samuel B; Queen, Robin M; DeOrio, James K; Nunley, James A; Easley, Mark E

    2015-12-16

    Conversion of ankle arthrodesis to total ankle arthroplasty remains controversial. Although satisfactory outcomes have been published, not all foot and ankle surgeons performing total ankle arthroplasty have embraced this modality. Twenty-three total ankle arthroplasties were performed in patients who had undergone a prior or an attempted ankle arthrodesis. The mean age at surgery was fifty-nine years (range, forty-one to eighty years), and the mean duration of follow-up was 33.1 months (minimum, twelve months). Indications for the procedure were symptomatic adjacent hindfoot arthritis (twelve patients) or symptomatic tibiotalar or subtalar nonunion (eleven) after tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. We performed concomitant surgical procedures in eighteen ankles (78%), with the most common procedure being prophylactic malleolar fixation (70%). We prospectively evaluated clinical outcomes using the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA), and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and assessed initial weight-bearing radiographs and those made at the most recent follow-up evaluation. The mean VAS pain score (and standard deviation) improved from 65.7 ± 21.8 preoperatively to 18.3 ± 17.6 at the most recent follow-up evaluation (p < 0.001), with five patients being pain-free (VAS score = 0). The mean SMFA bother and function indexes improved from 55 ± 22.9 and 46.7 ± 12.6 preoperatively to 30.6 ± 22.7 and 25.4 ± 17.4 at the most recent follow-up visit (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The mean SF-36 total score improved from 37.7 ± 19.3 to 56.4 ± 23.1 (p = 0.002). The implant survival rate was 87%. Four (20%) of the tibial components and fourteen (70%) of the talar components that were not revised exhibited initial settling and then were seen to be stabilized radiographically without further change in implant position. Three total ankle replacements (13%) showed progressive talar subsidence, prompting revision. Ten patients (43

  13. Three-dimensional printed calcaneal prosthesis following total calcanectomy☆

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Jungo; Choong, Peter F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The majority of patients with extremity sarcoma can be surgically treated without amputation. However, limb-salvage surgery for foot sarcomas including the calcaneus remains challenging. Presentation of case A 71-year-old man presented with a 5-year history of right heel persistent pain. Imaging studies revealed an osteolytic, destructive and highly metabolic lesion in the right calcaneus. Computed tomography guided core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of grade 2 chondrosarcoma. A total calcanectomy was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with a patient matched three-dimensional printed titanium calcaneal prosthesis. Intra-operatively, ligaments including the Achilles tendon, and plantar fascia were reattached. The post-operative course was uneventful, and at the 5-month clinical follow-up, the patient was fully weightbearing, with a mobile ankle without pain. Discussion This case is the first to use additive manufacturing to create a prosthetic calcaneus. The complex peri-calcaneal articular surfaces and reattachment of tendinous structures facilitate efforts to stabilize the prosthesis in situ. Conclusion Three-dimensional-printed prosthesis of the calcaneus is a viable alternative to amputation. PMID:25827294

  14. Effect of lace-up ankle braces on electromyography measures during walking in adults with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Greg; Donovan, Luke; Hart, Joseph M; Hertel, Jay

    2015-02-01

    Lace-up ankle braces reduce the incidence of ankle sprains and have been hypothesized to do so through both mechanical and neuromuscular mechanisms. To determine the effect of lace-up ankle braces on surface electromyography (sEMG) measures during walking in adults with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Randomized crossover. Laboratory. Fifteen adults with CAI. Surface EMG activity was recorded from the anterior tibialis, peroneus longus, lateral gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and gluteus medius during treadmill walking with and without lace-up ankle braces. The dependent variables were sEMG amplitude 100 ms pre- and 200 ms post-initial contact, time of activation relative to initial contact, and percent of activation across the stride cycle. When compared to no brace, ankle bracing resulted in lower pre-contact amplitude of the peroneus longus (p = 0.02). The anterior tibialis, peroneus longus, rectus femoris, and gluteus medius were activated later relative to initial contact (p < 0.03). The peroneus longus and rectus femoris were activated for a shorter percentage of the stride cycle (p < 0.05). Braces cause a change in neuromuscular activity during walking. Clinicians should be aware of these changes when prescribing braces, as it may relate to the mechanism in which braces decrease sprains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Jared; Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Eilenberg, Michael F; Endo, Ken; Barnhart, Chris; Herr, Hugh

    2011-05-27

    Control schemes for powered ankle-foot prostheses would benefit greatly from a means to make them inherently adaptive to different walking speeds. Towards this goal, one may attempt to emulate the intact human ankle, as it is capable of seamless adaptation. Human locomotion is governed by the interplay among legged dynamics, morphology and neural control including spinal reflexes. It has been suggested that reflexes contribute to the changes in ankle joint dynamics that correspond to walking at different speeds. Here, we use a data-driven muscle-tendon model that produces estimates of the activation, force, length and velocity of the major muscles spanning the ankle to derive local feedback loops that may be critical in the control of those muscles during walking. This purely reflexive approach ignores sources of non-reflexive neural drive and does not necessarily reflect the biological control scheme, yet can still closely reproduce the muscle dynamics estimated from biological data. The resulting neuromuscular model was applied to control a powered ankle-foot prosthesis and tested by an amputee walking at three speeds. The controller produced speed-adaptive behaviour; net ankle work increased with walking speed, highlighting the benefits of applying neuromuscular principles in the control of adaptive prosthetic limbs.

  16. US in ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stephane; Meyer, Philippe; Hauger, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Ankle impingement is a common condition occurring secondary to sprain or repeated microtrauma. Clinical symptoms are chronic pain located in the affected region and limited range of ankle motion. There are three types of ankle impingement syndrome: anterior impingement, which can be subdivided into anterolateral, anteromedial and purely anterior impingement; posterior impingement, which can be subdivided into posterior and posteromedial impingement; and calcaneal peroneal impingement which is secondary to planovalgus foot deformity. This paper evaluates physiological and clinical elements of these three types of ankle impingement syndrome as well as the role of ultrasound (US) imaging and US-guided treatment.

  17. How to Care for a Sprained Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed to repair the damage, especially in competitive athletes. For severe ankle sprains, your doctor may also ... includes resting, protecting and reducing swelling of your injured ankle. Phase II includes restoring your ankle's flexibility, ...

  18. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  19. Biomechanical and electromyographic evaluation of ankle foot orthosis and dynamic ankle foot orthosis in spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lam, W K; Leong, J C Y; Li, Y H; Hu, Y; Lu, W W

    2005-11-01

    This study evaluated the biomechanical and electromyographic effects of conventional ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) and dynamic ankle foot orthoses (DAFOs) on gait in patients with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Thirteen patients with dynamic equinus underwent motion analysis with electromyography. Both AFOs and DAFOs provided longer stride length, permitted pre-positioning for initial contact, and successfully controlled the excessive plantarflexion during the swing phase. Median frequency (MF) of EMG signal indicated that extremely high firing was found in the patient's lower limbs compared to controls that resulted in tiredness. The DAFOs allowed a significantly larger total ankle range of motion than the AFOs. However, AFOs significantly reduced the MF while DAFOs did not. The reduced MF seen when wearing AFOs suggested an improvement of walking endurance. The DAFO had the advantage of less restriction on ankle movement, which avoids muscular atrophy and improves orthotic compliance.

  20. Failure to restore sagittal tibiotalar alignment in total ankle arthroplasty: Its relationship to the axis of the tibia and the positioning of the talar component.

    PubMed

    Cho, J; Yi, Y; Ahn, T K; Choi, H J; Park, C H; Chun, D I; Lee, J S; Lee, W C

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the change in sagittal tibiotalar alignment after total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) for osteoarthritis and to investigate factors affecting the restoration of alignment. This retrospective study included 119 patients (120 ankles) who underwent three component TAA using the Hintegra prosthesis. A total of 63 ankles had anterior displacement of the talus before surgery (group A), 49 had alignment in the normal range (group B), and eight had posterior displacement of the talus (group C). Ankles in group A were further sub-divided into those in whom normal alignment was restored following TAA (41 ankles) and those with persistent displacement (22 ankles). Radiographic and clinical results were assessed. Pre-operatively, the alignment in group A was significantly more varus than that in group B, and the posterior slope of the tibial plafond was greater (p < 0.01 in both cases). The posterior slope of the tibial component was strongly associated with restoration of alignment: ankles in which the alignment was restored had significantly less posterior slope (p < 0.001). An anteriorly translated talus was restored to a normal position after TAA in most patients. We suggest that surgeons performing TAA using the Hintegra prosthesis should aim to insert the tibial component at close to 90° relative to the axis of the tibia, hence reducing posterior soft-tissue tension and allowing restoration of normal tibiotalar alignment following surgery.

  1. Short-term ankle motor performance with ankle robotics training in chronic hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindo; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    .006). Gains in all five motor control metrics were retained (p > 0.05) at 48 hours in both groups. Robust maintenance of motor adaptation in the robot-trained paretic ankle over 48 hours may be indicative of short-term motor learning. Our initial results suggest that the anklebot may be a flexible motor learning platform with the potential to detect rapid changes in ankle motor performance poststroke.

  2. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  3. [Guepar anatomical trapeziometacarpal prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Masmejean, E; Alnot, J Y; Chantelot, C; Beccari, R

    2003-02-01

    A choice of surgical techniques of treatment for trapeziometacarpal (TMC) Osteo-Arthritis (OA) have been described. Total arthroplasty is often used, especially in France. Many papers have been published, presenting various prostheses. In English literature, this device is not thoroughly used. [corrected] Guepar total arthroplasty is a cemented ball-in-socket prosthesis in metal-polyethylene. It includes an anatomical stem available in 4 sizes. After failure of the conservative treatment, total arthroplasty must be reserved to elderly patients, painful, with OA Dell stage III or IV aligned or not. The trapezial height must be sufficient. The authors reports the preliminary results of 64 Guepar prostheses, anatomical new design, implanted since 1995. Results of 63 prostheses are presented. One removal had been necessary at 9 months for metacarpal loosening (failure). Mean follow-up was 29 months. Clinical results were judged excellent or good in all cases. Regarding the radiological results, no modifications has been observed in 56 cases. Six radiolucent lines without displacement of the implants has been noted, with no incidence on clinical results. In one case, a metacarpal stem penetrated into the medullary canal in the bone axis but without any clinical modifications. Clinically, in addition to pain relief, trapeziometacarpal prosthesis allows to preserve the first column length and to obtain a better opposition of the thumb as well of a better thumb-digits pinch, compared after trapeziectomy. Radiologically, as for total hip arthroplasty, the exact adaptation of an anatomical stem (new design) to the canal has probably a better prognosis at long term follow-up.

  4. Conservative management of posterior ankle impingement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Senécal, Isabelle; Richer, Nadia

    2016-06-01

    To describe the pain and functional improvements of a patient with posterior ankle impingement following a treatment plan incorporating soft tissue therapy, chiropractic adjustment and a progressive rehabilitation program. A 37-year- old male presented with posterolateral ankle pain exacerbated by plantar flexion two weeks after sustaining an inversion ankle sprain. Oedema was present and the patient was describing a sensation of instability while walking. The initial diagnosis of lateral ankle sprain was found to be complicated by a posterior ankle impingement caused by a tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus sheath suspected during the physical examination and confirmed by MRI. The patient was treated over a 14-week period. Soft tissue therapy, a rehabilitation program and cortisone injection were used to treat this condition. A precise description of the rehabilitation program that contains open kinetic chain, closed kinetic chain, proprioception, and conditioning exercises prescribed to the patient is given. After the treatment plan, the patient returned to play pain free and had no daily living restrictions. A protocol including rest, soft tissue therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises, sport-specific exercises and cortisone injection appeared to facilitate complete recovery of this patient's posterior ankle impingement.

  5. Conservative management of posterior ankle impingement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Isabelle; Richer, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the pain and functional improvements of a patient with posterior ankle impingement following a treatment plan incorporating soft tissue therapy, chiropractic adjustment and a progressive rehabilitation program. Clinical Features: A 37-year- old male presented with posterolateral ankle pain exacerbated by plantar flexion two weeks after sustaining an inversion ankle sprain. Oedema was present and the patient was describing a sensation of instability while walking. The initial diagnosis of lateral ankle sprain was found to be complicated by a posterior ankle impingement caused by a tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus sheath suspected during the physical examination and confirmed by MRI. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated over a 14-week period. Soft tissue therapy, a rehabilitation program and cortisone injection were used to treat this condition. A precise description of the rehabilitation program that contains open kinetic chain, closed kinetic chain, proprioception, and conditioning exercises prescribed to the patient is given. After the treatment plan, the patient returned to play pain free and had no daily living restrictions. Summary: A protocol including rest, soft tissue therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises, sport-specific exercises and cortisone injection appeared to facilitate complete recovery of this patient’s posterior ankle impingement. PMID:27385836

  6. Reverse Evans peroneus brevis medial ankle stabilization for balancing valgus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Medial ankle instability secondary to deltoid ligament insufficiency is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, we describe a "reverse" Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction for medial ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis tendon is brought through a drill hole in the talus from laterally to medially, aiming for the junction of the talar neck and body plantar to the midline. The tendon is the brought superiorly and obliquely to the anterior medial aspect of the distal tibia where it is secured under a plate and screw construct. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction is useful in providing medial ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  7. An ankle protocol for second-degree ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, M L

    1993-12-01

    Returning to full activity is of primary concern for the injured patient with a second-degree ankle sprain. This is especially true of a member of the United States Marine Corps. Unfortunately, many patients are not referred to physical therapy for comprehensive management of acute ankle sprains. An ankle protocol based on previous clinical experience was developed which included an acute and rehabilitative phase. An air stirrup orthosis was used as an adjunct to therapy to resume activities safely. This combination allowed Marines to return to full duty in less than 2 weeks.

  8. [Fracture of macroporous hydroxyapatite prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Adetchessi, A T; Pech-Gourg, G; Metellus, P; Fuentes, S

    2012-12-01

    Different prosthesis implants are offered to perform a cranioplasty after a decompressive craniectomy when autologous bone graft cannot be used. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old man who benefited a unilateral decompressive craniectomy after a severe head trauma. Seven months later, a cranioplasty using custom macroporous hydroxyapatite prosthesis was performed. The postoperative course was marked by a generalized seizure leading to a traumatic head injury. The CT-scan showed a comminutive fracture of the prosthesis and an extradural hematoma. The patient underwent a removal of the fractured prosthesis and an evacuation of the extradural clot. The postoperative course was uneventful with a Glasgow outcome scale score at 5. A second cranioplasty using a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) implant was performed. Among cranioplasty prosthesis solutions, hydroxyapatite implants seem to have similar property to the bone. However, its weak mechanic resistance is an actual problem in patients susceptible to present generalized seizures with consecutive head impact. Hence, in patients with decompressive craniectomy who are exposed to potential brain injury, we favor the use of more resistant implant as PEEK prosthesis.

  9. Management of acute lateral ankle ligament injury in the athlete.

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; McCollum, Graham A; Calder, James D F; van Dijk, C Niek

    2013-06-01

    Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. This article reviews the acute lateral ankle injuries with special emphasis on a rationale for treatment of these injuries in athletes. A narrative review was performed using Pubmed/Medline, Ovid and Embase using key words: ankle ligaments, injury, lateral ligament, ankle sprain and athlete. Articles related to the topic were included and reviewed. It is estimated that one inversion injury of the ankle occurs for every 10,000 people each day. Ankle sprains constitute 7-10 % of all admissions to hospital emergency departments. Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. The lateral ankle ligament complex consists of three ligaments: the anterior talofibular ligament, the calcaneofibular ligament and the posterior talofibular ligament. The most common trauma mechanism is supination and adduction (inversion) of the plantar-flexed foot. Delayed physical examination provides a more accurate diagnosis. Ultrasound and MRI can be useful in diagnosing associated injury and are routine investigations in professional athletes. Successful treatment of grade II and III acute lateral ankle ligament injuries can be achieved with individualized aggressive, non-operative measures. RICE therapy is the treatment of choice for the first 4-5 days to reduce pain and swelling. Initially, 10-14 days of immobilization in a below the knee cast/brace is beneficial followed by a period in a lace-up brace or functional taping reduces the risk of recurrent injury. Acute repair of the lateral ankle ligaments in grade III injuries in professional athletes may give better results.

  10. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  11. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  12. Esophageal lung resection and prosthesis placement in a preterm neonate

    PubMed Central

    Parida, Lalit; Pal, Kamalesh; Buainain, Hussah A.; Al-Umran, Khalid U.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a successful outcome in a preterm baby with an esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula, who initially underwent a primary esophageal repair; but a persistent nonexpanding lung on the side of surgery led to further investigations. A further diagnosis of an esophageal lung resulted in pneumonectomy and prophylactic placement of an intra-thoracic prosthesis to prevent post-pneumonectomy syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prophylactic placement of an intra-thoracic prosthesis in a neonate with the condition of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula and associated esophageal lung. PMID:25829674

  13. [Ankle brachial index measurement].

    PubMed

    Rucigaj, Tanja Planinsek

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasound examinations are noninvasive diagnostic methods which, along with appropriate history and clinical examination, provide basic information on the etiology and spread of the disease, as well as on treatment options required in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and arterial flow impairment. Doppler flow meter offers useful data on venous blood return, primarily in great veins, while both deep and superficial veins as well as arteries can be visualized and data on venous and arterial hemodynamics obtained by duplex ultrasonography. In addition, Doppler flow meter provides data on the peripheral arterial system action through ankle brachial index measurement, which will guide the choice of compression therapy when deciding on the treatment of peripheral arterial disease and mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers. However, diagnosis of arterial insufficiency requires additional examinations.

  14. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  15. Early removal of a Maverick disc prosthesis: surgical findings and morphological changes.

    PubMed

    François, Jens; Coessens, Ronald; Lauweryns, Philippe

    2007-02-01

    We report the case of a patient who underwent explantation of a Maverick total disc prosthesis at the L5S1 level because of severe persisting pain one year after initial implantation. Dynamic radiographic imaging studies showed good position and size of the prosthesis and no evidence of loosening. Intraoperatively residual mobility at the proximal bone-prosthesis interface was detected, as well as gross metallosis around the articulation of the total disc prosthesis. A safe and straightforward technique for the extraction of a Maverick prosthesis using a hooked instrument to hook-on the keel of the device is reported. After removal of the device, an anterior lumbar interbody fusion with subsequent posterior pedicle screw fixation and posterior bone grafting with autologous iliac bone was performed (360 degrees fusion). During this posterior procedure, severe L5S1 facet joint arthrosis was observed. Early clinical and radiographic results were good with excellent patient satisfaction.

  16. Design and validation of a platform robot for determination of ankle impedance during ambulation.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Elliott J; Hargrove, Levi J; Peshkin, Michael A; Kuiken, Todd A

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide natural, biomimetic control to recently developed powered ankle prostheses, we must characterize the impedance of the ankle during ambulation tasks. To this end, a platform robot was developed that can apply an angular perturbation to the ankle during ambulation and simultaneously acquire ground reaction force data. In this study, we detail the design of the platform robot and characterize the impedance of the ankle during quiet standing. Subjects were perturbed by a 3° dorsiflexive ramp perturbation with a length of 150 ms. The impedance was defined parametrically, using a second order model to map joint angle to the torque response. The torque was determined using the inverted pendulum assumption, and impedance was identified by the least squares best estimate, yielding an average damping coefficient of 0.03 ± 0.01 Nms/° and an average stiffness coefficient of 3.1 ± 1.2 Nm/°. The estimates obtained by the proposed platform robot compare favorably to those published in the literature. Future work will investigate the impedance of the ankle during ambulation for powered prosthesis controller development.

  17. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  18. Broken Ankle/Broken Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a condition such as osteoporosis or a stress fracture. You may be at higher risk of a broken foot or ankle if you: Participate in high-impact sports. The stresses, direct blows and twisting injuries ...

  19. [Endourethral prosthesis. Current indications, materials and types of prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Paterlini, Juan Esteban

    2014-01-01

    To update the topic of endourethral prosthesis for the treatment of recurrent urethral stenosis comprehensively, focusing on current indications, materials and types of prosthesis in use nowadays. We used the PubMed database (1995-2013) with the terms "endourethral ", "prostheses","endourethral prosthesis "and selected the most relevant articles for this publication. Results were variable depending on the series published, with great differences among them. They are not homogeneous groups, so they are not comparable to each other. Endourethral prostheses have an important role today in the treatment of recurrent urethral stenosis. More studies are required, with longer follow up to be able to establish which one is the one with the lowest complication rates and best results in terms of urethral caliber and symptom questionnaire.

  20. "Wrap technique": a new operative procedure using a self-adhesive prosthesis for laparoscopic ventral rectopexy.

    PubMed

    Gravié, J-F; Maigné, C

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe and assess a new method of fixation using a self-adhesive prosthesis (Adhesix(™)) in laparoscopic ventral rectopexy (LVR). The technical principles are based on a very low dissection and the adhesive properties of the prosthesis which can be applied to the rectum without stitches or staples. The prosthesis is made from polypropylene coated with a synthetic hydrogel. The binding of the prosthesis to rectum and vagina takes place in a wet environment after a few minutes and enables the shaping of the mesh on the surface of the rectum (wrap effect). Between March 2010 and March 2013, 41 patients were operated on using LVR with a self-adhesive prosthesis. The effectiveness of prosthesis fixation was evaluated in a subset of 27 patients suffering from complete rectal prolapse. With a median follow-up of 30 months, there were no major complications and no recurrence. In this initial experience, LVR with a self-adhesive prosthesis does not increase the risk of recurrence. No undesirable effects were associated with the prosthesis.

  1. [Ossiculoplasty with KURZ titanium prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D-Q; Morel, N; Dumas, G; Troussier, J; Lavieille, J-P; Schmerber, S

    2005-09-01

    Report the functional and anatomic results of ossicular reconstruction by titanium prosthesis. Retrospective chart reviews were performed for 111 patients who had undergone titanium ossicular implants between November 1998 and 2002 (61 PORP, 50 TORP). The anatomical and audiometric data were analyzed on average at 3 and 20 months. At 20 months, the improvement of air-bone-gap mean was 12.7 dB with better results at low frequencies. The global success rate was 66% (PORP 77%, TORP 52%). It decreased significantly in the open techniques. Extrusion rate was low (2/111) and the labyrinthization rate was 3.6%. Twenty patients required a surgical revision (18%). In 9 patients, the prosthesis was too short. At long-term follow-up, the gains were stable in 60 patients, improved in 32 patients and worsened in 19 patients. The success rate is higher in the group of the PORP with the closed technique. The stability of the TORP in open technique still remains problematic. In all cases, the risk of extrusion requires a large cartilage graft recovering the plate of the prosthesis. The high rate of luxation (9/111 prosthesis too short) has led us to increase slightly the length of the prosthesis (+1.22 mm mean).

  2. An exoskeleton using controlled energy storage and release to aid ankle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Wiggin, M Bruce; Sawicki, Gregory S; Collins, Steven H

    2011-01-01

    Symmetric ankle propulsion is the cornerstone of efficient human walking. The ankle plantar flexors provide the majority of the mechanical work for the step-to-step transition and much of this work is delivered via elastic recoil from the Achilles' tendon - making it highly efficient. Even though the plantar flexors play a central role in propulsion, body-weight support and swing initiation during walking, very few assistive devices have focused on aiding ankle plantarflexion. Our goal was to develop a portable ankle exoskeleton taking inspiration from the passive elastic mechanisms at play in the human triceps surae-Achilles' tendon complex during walking. The challenge was to use parallel springs to provide ankle joint mechanical assistance during stance phase but allow free ankle rotation during swing phase. To do this we developed a novel `smart-clutch' that can engage and disengage a parallel spring based only on ankle kinematic state. The system is purely passive - containing no motors, electronics or external power supply. This `energy-neutral' ankle exoskeleton could be used to restore symmetry and reduce metabolic energy expenditure of walking in populations with weak ankle plantar flexors (e.g. stroke, spinal cord injury, normal aging). © 2011 IEEE

  3. Intermediate-Term Follow-up After Ankle Distraction for Treatment of End-Stage Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai P.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Gao, Yubo; Saltzman, Charles L.; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis remains challenging, especially in young patients. Initial reports have shown early benefits of joint distraction for the treatment of ankle osteoarthritis. We report the five to ten-year results of a previously described patient cohort following ankle distraction surgery. Methods: All thirty-six patients who had undergone ankle distraction surgery between December 2002 and October 2006 were contacted. Patients were evaluated by a clinical investigator and completed the Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) surveys. Radiographs as well as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the ankles were obtained at the follow-up visits. Results: Twenty-nine patients (81%) were followed for a minimum of five years (mean and standard deviation, 8.3 ± 2.2 years). Sixteen (55%) of the twenty-nine patients still had the native ankle joint whereas thirteen patients (45%) had undergone either ankle arthrodesis or total ankle arthroplasty. Positive predictors of ankle survival included a better AOS score at two years (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.048, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.0028 to 0.84, p = 0.04), older age at surgery (HR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.83 to 0.99, p = 0.04), and fixed distraction (HR = 0.094, 95% CI = 0.017 to 0.525, p < 0.01). Radiographs and advanced imaging revealed progression of ankle osteoarthritis at the time of final follow-up. Conclusions: Ankle function following joint distraction declines over time. Patients should be well informed of the commitment that they must make during the treatment period as well as the long-term results after surgery. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:25834084

  4. Criterion and Construct Validity of Prosthesis-Integrated Measurement of Joint Moment Data in Persons with trans-tibial Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Goeran; Slavens, Brooke; Smith, Roger O.; Briggs, Douglas; Hafner, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Prosthesis-integrated sensors are appealing for use in clinical settings where gait analysis equipment is unavailable, but accurate knowledge of patients’ performance is desired. Data obtained from load cells (inferring joint moments) may aid clinicians in the prescription, alignment and gait rehabilitation of persons with limb loss. Purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of prosthesis-integrated load cells for routine use in clinical practice. Level ground walking of persons with transtibial amputation was concurrently measured with a commercially-available prosthesis-integrated load cell, a 10-camera motion analysis system, and piezoelectric force plates. Ankle and knee flexion/extension moments were derived and measurement methods were compared via correlation analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients ranged from 0.661 for ankle pronation/supination moments to 0.915 for ankle flexion/extension moments (p<0.001). Root mean squared errors between measurement methods were in the magnitude of 10% of the measured range and were explainable. Differences in results depicted differences between systems in definition and computation of measurement variables. They may not limit clinical use of the load cell, but should be considered when data are compared directly to conventional gait analysis data. Construct validity of the load cell (i.e., ability to measure joint moments in-situ) is supported by the study results. PMID:24603673

  5. Biomechanical risk factors for knee osteoarthritis when using passive and powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-12-01

    Gait compensations following transtibial amputation negatively affect sound limb loading and increase the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Push-off assistance provided by new powered prostheses may decrease the demands on the sound limb. However, their effects in a young population in the early stages of prosthetic use are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare limb loading between 1. passive and powered ankle-foot prostheses, 2. sound and amputated limbs, and 3. individuals with amputations in the relatively early stages of prosthetic use and controls. Ten young, active individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation and 10 controls underwent biomechanical gait analysis at three speeds. The peak external knee flexor and adductor moments, adductor moment's angular impulse, peak vertical ground reaction force and loading rate were calculated. Repeated measures ANOVAs compared between limbs, prostheses, and groups. The powered prosthesis did not decrease the sound limb's peak adduction moment or its impulse, but did decrease the external flexor moment, peak vertical force and loading rate as speed increased. The powered prosthesis decreased the loading rate from controls. The sound limb did not display a significantly greater risk for knee osteoarthritis than the intact limb or than controls in either device. In the early stages of prosthetic use, young individuals with transtibial amputation display few biomechanical risk factors for knee osteoarthritis development. However, a powered ankle-foot prosthesis still offers some benefits and may be used prophylactically to mitigate potential increases of these variables with continued prosthetic use over time. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability. PMID:26311206

  7. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability.

  8. Effects of positioning on radiographic measurements of ankle morphology: a computerized tomography-based simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurements of the morphology of the ankle joint, performed mostly for surgical planning of total ankle arthroplasty and for collecting data for total ankle prosthesis design, are often made on planar radiographs, and therefore can be very sensitive to the positioning of the joint during imaging. The current study aimed to compare ankle morphological measurements using CT-generated 2D images with gold standard values obtained from 3D CT data; to determine the sensitivity of the 2D measurements to mal-positioning of the ankle during imaging; and to quantify the repeatability of the 2D measurements under simulated positioning conditions involving random errors. Method Fifty-eight cadaveric ankles fixed in the neutral joint position (standard pose) were CT scanned, and the data were used to simulate lateral and frontal radiographs under various positioning conditions using digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR). Results and discussion In the standard pose for imaging, most ankle morphometric parameters measured using 2D images were highly correlated (R > 0.8) to the gold standard values defined by the 3D CT data. For measurements made on the lateral views, the only parameters sensitive to rotational pose errors were longitudinal distances between the most anterior and the most posterior points of the tibial mortise and the tibial profile, which have important implications for determining the optimal cutting level of the bone during arthroplasty. Measurements of the trochlea tali width on the frontal views underestimated the standard values by up to 31.2%, with only a moderate reliability, suggesting that pre-surgical evaluations based on the trochlea tali width should be made with caution in order to avoid inappropriate selection of prosthesis sizes. Conclusions While highly correlated with 3D morphological measurements, some 2D measurements were affected by the bone poses in space during imaging, which may affect surgical decision-making in total

  9. Ankle impingement: a review of multimodality imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Zappia, M; Reginelli, A; Carfora, M; D'Agosto, G F; La Porta, M; Genovese, E A; Fonio, P

    2013-08-01

    Ankle impingement is defined as entrapment of an anatomic structure that leads to pain and decreased range of motion of the ankle and can be classified as either soft tissue or osseous (Bassett et al. in J Bone Joint Surg Am 72:55-59, 1990). The impingement syndromes of the ankle are a group of painful disorders that limit full range of movement. Symptoms are due to compression of soft-tissues or osseous structures during particular movements (Ogilvie-Harris et al. in Arthroscopy 13:564-574, 1997). Osseous impingement can result from spur formation along the anterior margin of the distal tibia and talus or as a result of a prominent posterolateral talar process, the os trigonum. Soft-tissue impingement usually results from scarring and fibrosis associated with synovial, capsular, or ligamentous injury. Soft-tissue impingement most often occurs in the anterolateral gutter, the medial ankle, or in the region of the syndesmosis (Van den Bekerom and Raven in Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 15:465-471, 2007). The main impingement syndromes are anterolateral, anterior, anteromedial, posterior, and posteromedial impingement. These conditions arise from initial ankle injuries, which, in the subacute or chronic situation, lead to development of abnormal osseous and soft-tissue thickening within the ankle joint. The relative contributions of the osseous and soft-tissue abnormalities are variable, but whatever component is dominant there is physical impingement and painful limitation of ankle movement. Conventional radiography is usually the first imaging technique performer and allows assessment of any potential bone abnormality, particularly in anterior and posterior impingement. Computed tomography (CT) and isotope bone scanning have been largely superseded by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MR imaging can demonstrate osseous and soft-tissue edema in anterior or posterior impingement. MR imaging is the most useful imaging modality in evaluating suspected soft

  10. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a) Identification. A testicular prosthesis is an implanted device that consists of a solid or gel-filled...

  11. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a) Identification. A testicular prosthesis is an implanted device that consists of a solid or gel-filled...

  12. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a) Identification. A testicular prosthesis is an implanted device that consists of a solid or gel-filled...

  13. Powered Sit-to-Stand and Assistive Stand-to-Sit Framework for a Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Sup, Frank; Goldfarb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This work extends the three level powered knee and ankle prosthesis control framework previously developed by the authors by adding sitting mode. A middle level finite state based impedance controller is designed to accommodate sitting, sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions. Moreover, a high level Gaussian Mixture Model based intent recognizer is developed to distinguish between standing and sitting modes and switch the middle level controllers accordingly. Experimental results with unilateral transfemoral amputee subject show that sitting down and standing up intent can be inferred from the prosthesis sensor signals by the intent recognizer. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the prosthesis generates net active power of 50 W during standing up and dissipates up to 50 W of power during stand-to-sit transition at the knee joint. PMID:20046838

  14. Painful knee prosthesis: surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Villano, Marco; Carulli, Christian; Puccini, Serena; Soderi, Stefano; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary There are many conditions that may be responsible of a painful knee prosthesis. The possible causes are not always easily diagnosed. Common causes of prosthetic failure, such as aseptic loosening, infection, instability, progressive patellar arthropathy and recurrent synovitis are associated with clearly defined radiographic and/or clinical evidence. Prosthetic infection should always be considered first until any other cause has been demonstrated. In the presence of an infected prosthesis we carry out a two-step revision. Aseptic loosening needs implant revision more often with increasing prosthesis stability. Varus-valgus, anteroposterior, global and patello-femoral instability are failures often due to technical errors; superstabilized or constrained implants are needed depending on the instability entity. In presence of patello-femoral pain it is necessary to evaluate the stability of the patellar component and any alterations in its motion. Patellar progressive arthropathy can often cause late-onset knee pain; in this case patella resurfacing is needed. Altered patellar tracking, may need a lateral release but in some cases is related to misalignment of the components and the revision procedure is mandatory. Nevertheless, the diagnosis and treatment of a painful knee prosthesis can be extremely difficult if there is no clear evidence of any of the most common causes of failure. Referred pain, ligament and tendon dysfunction, cutaneous neuromas, synovitis, a patellar clunk have to be diagnosed and treated. A possible aetiological understimated factor is painful knee prosthesis due to metals sensibilization, in particular to nickel. In this event the quantity of nickel in the revision prosthesis must be minimal. PMID:22461812

  15. The initiation of gait in lower limb amputees: some related data.

    PubMed

    Nissan, M

    1991-01-01

    The initiation of gait, from balanced standing position to the toe-off of the stance leg, was analyzed in 8 unilateral above-knee (AK) and 10 unilateral below-knee (BK) males amputees. Thirty-one parameters were measured, including ground-foot forces and the movements and timing of hip, knee, and ankle joints. The significant changes from the normal pattern of initiation of gait found in the AK and BK amputees, as well as significant changes between the two amputees groups themselves, are described. The amputees were divided into two subgroups: those who start walking with their prosthesis and those starting with their normal leg. The two groups were compared statistically for each amputation level and all were compared to a normal subjects group. Differences relating to the choice of the swing leg were found. The findings are reported as part of a future databank.

  16. Chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Gerstner Garces, Juan Bernardo

    2012-09-01

    Chronic instability of the ankle and anterolateral impingement syndrome are abnormalities that present as a result of inversion and forced plantar-flexion traumas of the foot, despite strict conservative management in the ER and in rehabilitation. A conservative approach is always the first choice of treatment, including anti-inflammatory medications, rehabilitation and proprioception, infiltration with steroids in impingement cases, and use of orthotics, whose true effectiveness is the subject of multiple studies and much debate. Good to excellent results can be obtained surgically with a minimally invasive approach, such as the arthroscopic technique presented herein. Such an approach is useful in managing a combination of conditions such as anterolateral impingement, synovitis, and osteochondral lesions of the talus. The method is easily reproducible, its learning curve is rapid, and it has the advantage of not preventing the use other arthroscopic methods, or open anatomic or nonanatomic methods (tendon transfers), in the case of failure. No nerve lesion was recorded, probably owing to the use of the security zone, and neither was there any arthrofibrosis, possibly related to the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications in the immediate postsurgical period coupled with aggressive rehabilitation from the fourth week. The success of the technique is due to multidisciplinary team work leading to the ultimate achievement of patient satisfaction. This technique is not indicated for patients with a high sports demand or for sport professionals, until further biomechanical studies on its use and success are completed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A composite athletic tape with hyperelastic material properties improves and maintains ankle support during exercise.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Sorin; Marchetto, Paul; Murphy, Daniel J; Gadikota, Hemanth R

    2011-12-01

    Controlled laboratory testing using a single-group, prospective, repeated-measures design. To compare the material properties of a hyperelastic athletic tape to a conventional tape and to compare the passive ankle support of these tapes before and after exercise. The near-linear material properties of conventional athletic tape may interfere with ankle motion, resulting in reduced athletic performance. Conventional athletic tape is also known to lose much of its initial support during exercise. It was assumed that a tape constructed of Kevlar fibers embedded in a silicon matrix would possess hyperelastic material properties that would improve ankle support. A tensile testing machine was used to determine the tensile material properties of 11 samples of conventional and hyperelastic tape. The ankles of 11 young, healthy athletes were taped, one ankle with conventional tape and the other ankle with hyperelastic tape. The passive ankle support of each tape was measured with an instrumented linkage (the ankle flexibility tester) before and after 30 minutes of exercise. The composite tape had a significantly higher load to failure than the conventional tape. It had significantly lower initial stiffness and higher late stiffness than conventional tape, thus demonstrating highly hyperelastic behavior. The hyperelastic tape maintained a significantly higher portion of its support during the 30 minutes of exercise than the conventional tape. Composite athletic tape with highly hyperelastic properties can be constructed and maintains a larger portion of its support during short-duration exercises (less than 30 minutes) than conventional athletic tape.

  18. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  19. Early Intra-Articular Complement Activation in Ankle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Salzmann, Gian M.; Niemeyer, Philipp; Guo, Renfeng

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine regulation possibly influences long term outcome following ankle fractures, but little is known about synovial fracture biochemistry. Eight patients with an ankle dislocation fracture were included in a prospective case series and matched with patients suffering from grade 2 osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture and collection of effusion were only significantly associated with synovial aggrecan and C5b-9 levels (P < 0.001). Furthermore, synovial expressions of both proteins correlated with each other (P < 0.001). Although IL-1β expression was relatively low, intra-articular levels correlated with C5a (P < 0.01) and serological C-reactive protein concentrations 2 days after surgery (P < 0.05). Joint effusions were initially dominated by neutrophils, but the portion of monocytes constantly increased reaching 50% at day 6 after fracture (P < 0.02). Whereas aggrecan and IL-1β concentrations were not different in fracture and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P < 0.01). Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures. PMID:24967368

  20. Management of chronic lateral ankle instability in military service members.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Robbins, Justin; Waterman, Brian R

    2014-10-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is a condition frequently encountered by orthopedic surgeons treating highly active patient populations, particularly military service members. Providers treating military service members must have a high index of suspicion for this condition when signs and symptoms of functional or mechanical instability exist. Stress testing and ankle MRI, although not definitive in sensitivity for detecting instability or other concomitant injuries, should be considered during the treatment decision-making process. Appropriate nonoperative treatment should be attempted initially; however, when nonoperative treatment fails, surgical management is warranted to prevent untoward long-term sequelae. Proper surgical treatment and subsequent postoperative management are at the discretion of the individual surgeon but must account for the concomitant diseases frequently associated with chronic lateral ankle instability. Low recurrence of lateral instability can be achieved even in high-demand military patient populations with a focused treatment plan. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Distally based perforator sural flaps for foot and ankle reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shi-Min; Li, Xiao-Hua; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Distally based perforator sural flaps from the posterolateral or posteromedial lower leg aspect are initially a neurofasciocutaneous flap that can be transferred reversely to the foot and ankle region with no need to harvest and sacrifice the deep major artery. These flaps are supplied by a perforating artery issued from the deep peroneal artery or the posterior tibial artery, and the chain-linked adipofascial neurovascular axis around the sural/saphenous nerve. It is a versatile and reliable technique for soft-tissue reconstruction of the heel and ankle region with 180-degrees rotation. In this paper, we present its developing history, vascular basis, surgical techniques including flap design and elevation, flap variations in pedicle and component, surgical indications, and illustrative case reports with different perforating vessels as pivot points for foot and ankle coverage. PMID:25893175

  2. Manual testing for ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Emily Jane; Hunt, Adrienne; Nightingale, Elizabeth Jean; Munn, Joanne; Kilbreath, Sharon Lynne; Refshauge, Kathryn Margaret

    2012-12-01

    To assess inter-rater reliability of ankle manual tests. We also correlated the manual tests with the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT). One ankle from each of 60 participants was assessed using four different manual tests (anterior drawer in supine and crook lying, talar tilt, inversion tilt). Three different raters, varying in experience, tested each participant. The CAIT questionnaire was also administered. The study received ethics approval from the University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of the mean (SEM) and percent close agreement (PCA) were used to determine reliability of the four tests. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to determine relationships between the manual tests and CAIT scores. Inter-rater reliability for the four manual tests was poor regardless of therapist's experience (ICC([1,1]) -0.12 to 0.33; SEM 0.93-1.69). Correlations between the CAIT and manual tests were also low varying between r = -0.12 and -0.42. Inter-rater reliability was poor for manual tests of ankle stability. Reliability may be improved by using a grading scale with fewer intervals. The CAIT scores and manual tests correlated poorly, potentially reflecting the variety of conditions leading to ankle instability. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Evolution and Utility of the Small-Carrion Prosthesis, Its Impact, and Progression to the Modern-Day Malleable Penile Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Daniel R; Terlecki, Ryan; Brant, William O

    2015-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction has plagued humanity for millennia. For years, treatment had been in the hands of mental health professionals. It was not until the 1970s that urologists created a modality that was marketable, reproducible, and consistently successful at treating impotence, the Small-Carrion Penile Prosthesis. We present the evolution of the malleable/semi-rigid penile prosthesis, concentrating our efforts reviewing and critiquing the pivotal article published by Drs. Michael P. Small, Hernan M. Carrion, and Julian A. Gordon. We then discuss its continued advancement, current-day utilization, and the future of the malleable prosthesis. From the early 1900s, surgeons have been toying with the idea of creating a penile implant. These initial attempts utilized rib cartilage, and eventually synthetic materials, including acrylic, silicone, and polyethylene. In 1975, Drs. Carrion and Small presented their initial experience of 31 patients utilizing their silicone implant. In their manuscript titled, "The Small-Carrion Penile Prosthesis: New Implant for the Management of Impotence," they discuss their technique, perioperative management of complications, and results. The malleable penile prosthesis continued to evolve throughout the years to the current day Genesis and Spectra. Although the current market is dominated by the inflatable penile prosthesis, there are specific situations where the malleable is ideally utilized. The pivotal article by Drs. Carrion and Small helped pave the way for the "New Era" of penile prosthetics and still remains one of the most impactful contributions to the management of erectile dysfunction. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  4. American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week @ ACFAS Poll Results Arthroscopy e-Book The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery Read some of the latest research from the official peer-reviewed scientific journal of ACFAS, The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery ( ...

  5. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  6. [Ankle sprains: from diagnosis to management. the physiatric view].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vítor; Antunes, Filipe

    2008-01-01

    Ankle injuries are the most frequently encountered injuries in clinical practice. They are often managed by general practicians, and not only by orthopaedic or physiatric physicians. This injury is usually non-complicated, but some care should be taken to assure an adequate management and to exclude severe lesions. The stability of the ankle is necessary for functional activity of lower extremity, allowing walking and participation in other high demanding activities like running or jumping. There is a constant concern in adopting the best diagnostic and treatment procedures to enhance the recovery and to prevent the chronic joint instability. According to this, there should be proposed comprehensive strategies focusing the rehabilitation view. The ankle is a complex articular structure with contributions from the talocrural, subtalar, and inferior tibiofibular joints. The full understanding of the functional anatomy and biomechanics is the first step for the evaluation of the etiologic factors. The recognition of the mechanism of injury, and the risk factors, should be carefully addressed to make an accurate diagnosis, proper management and to implement prophylactic measures, knowing that the lateral ligamentous complex is the most commonly injured. As always, diagnosis can be made taking an adequate history, performing a thorough physical examination, and when necessary, requesting complementary studies. The priority in initial assessment it's to clear out some severe complications, like fractures, that can mimic or that can be associated with ankle sprains. Although the conventional radiology is suitable for most cases, that has been greatly improved through the institution of the Ottawa Rules, in selected patients the severity of the damage is best evaluated with other imaging resources. Treatment of acute ankle sprains depends on the severity of the injury. Most acute lateral ligament injuries are best treated nonsurgically and will regain satisfactory ankle

  7. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes. PMID:27299131

  8. [Interposition arthrodesis of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Vienne, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Bony fusion of the ankle in a functionally favorable position for restitution of a painless weight bearing while avoiding a leg length discrepancy. Disabling, painful osteoarthritis of the ankle with extensive bone defect secondary to trauma, infection, or serious deformities such as congenital malformations or diabetic osteoarthropathies. Acute joint infection. Severe arterial occlusive disease of the involved limb. Lateral approach to the distal fibula. Fibular osteotomy 7 cm proximal to the tip of the lateral malleolus and posterior flipping of the distal fibula. Exposure of the ankle. Removal of all articular cartilage and debridement of the bone defect. Determination of the size of the defect and harvesting of a corresponding tricortical bone graft from the iliac crest. Also harvesting of autogenous cancellous bone either from the iliac crest or from the lateral part of the proximal tibia. Insertion of the tricortical bone graft and filling of the remaining defect with cancellous bone. Fixation with three 6.5-mm titanium lag screws. Depending on the extent of the defect additional stabilization of the bone graft with a titanium plate. Fixation of the lateral fibula on talus and tibia with two 3.5-mm titanium screws for additional support. Wound closure in layers. Split below-knee cast with the ankle in neutral position. Between January 2002 and January 2004 this technique was used in five patients with extensive bone defects (four women, one man, average age 57 years [42-77 years]). No intra- or early postoperative complications. The AOFAS (American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society) Score was improved from 23 points preoperatively to 76 points postoperatively (average follow-up time of 25 months). Two patients developed a nonunion and underwent a revision with an ankle arthrodesis nail. A valgus malposition after arthrodesis in one patient was corrected with a supramalleolar osteotomy.

  9. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  10. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain.

  11. Associations between ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and foot and ankle strength in young adults.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Rogel, Paloma; San Emeterio, Cristina; Marín, Pedro J

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the relationships between the ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and foot and ankle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine healthy (young adults) volunteers participated in this study. Each participant completed tests for ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, hallux flexor strength, and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength. [Results] The results showed (1) a moderate correlation between ankle dorsiflexor strength and dorsiflexion range of motion and (2) a moderate correlation between ankle dorsiflexor strength and first toe flexor muscle strength. Ankle dorsiflexor strength is the main contributor ankle dorsiflexion range of motion to and first toe flexor muscle strength. [Conclusion] Ankle dorsiflexion range of motion can play an important role in determining ankle dorsiflexor strength in young adults.

  12. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    stimulus duration (P < .05). In all groups, short duration pulses (40, 80, and 120 microseconds) were more efficient in terms of total charge (the product of pulse amplitude and pulse duration) than longer (500 and 1,000 microseconds) pulses (P < .05). In all groups, applying a pulse train did not lead to more efficient charge usage (P < .05). Psychophysical experiments: In high-contrast tests, facial recognition rates of over 75% were achieved for all subjects with dot sizes of up to 31.5 minutes of arc when using a 25 x 25 grid with 4.5 arc minute gaps, a 30% dropout rate, and 6 gray levels. Even with a 4 x 4 array of pixels, some subjects were able to accurately describe 2 of the objects. Subjects who were able to read the 4-pixel letter height sentences (on the 6 x 10 and 16 x 16 array) seemed to have a good scanning technique. Scanning at the proper velocity tends to bring out more contrast in the lettering. The reading speed for the 72-point font is a bit slower than for the next smaller font. This may be due to the limited number of letters (3) visible in the window with this large font. CONCLUSIONS: Specific parameters needed to stimulate the retina were identified. Delineating the optimum parameters will decrease the current requirements. Psychophysical tests show that with limited pixels and image processing, useful vision is possible. Both these findings should greatly simplify the engineering of an electronic retinal prosthesis. PMID:11797315

  13. Tendinopathies of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Michael R; Howard, Thomas M

    2009-11-15

    Because our understanding of tendinopathy has evolved in recent years, the condition is now considered a degenerative process; this affects the approach to treatment. Initial therapy should always involve relative rest and modification of physical activity, use of rehabilitative exercises, and evaluation of intrinsic and extrinsic causes of injury. The posterior tibial tendon is a dynamic arch stabilizer; injury to this tendon can cause a painful flat-footed deformity with hindfoot valgus and midfoot abduction (characterized by the too many toes sign). Treatment of posterior tibial tendinopathy is determined by its severity and can include immobilization, orthotics, physical therapy, or subspecialty referral. Because peroneal tendinopathy is often misdiagnosed, it can lead to chronic lateral ankle pain and instability and should be suspected in a patient with either of these symptoms. Treatment involves physical therapy and close monitoring for surgical indications. Achilles tendinopathy is often caused by overtraining, use of inappropriate training surfaces, and poor flexibility. It is characterized by pain in the Achilles tendon 4 to 6 cm above the point of insertion into the calcaneus. Evidence from clinical trials shows that eccentric strengthening of the calf muscle can help patients with Achilles tendinopathy. Flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy is most common among ballet dancers. Patients may complain of an insidious onset of pain in the posteromedial aspect of the ankle; treatment involves correcting physical training errors, focusing on body mechanics, and strengthening the body's core. Anterior tibial tendinopathy is rare, but is typically seen in patients older than 45 years. It causes weakness in dorsiflexion of the ankle; treatment involves short-term immobilization and physical therapy.

  14. Conservative treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jason M; Maleski, Richard M

    2002-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are among the most common sports injuries. Although ankle sprains are treated conservatively at the present time, for years the treatment was based on acute repair of the ruptured ligaments. Several differing opinions currently exist as to the treatment of lateral ankle sprains. A review of the literature and explanation of the benefits and risks of each treatment protocol is undertaken.

  15. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  16. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Jared; Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Eilenberg, Michael F.; Endo, Ken; Barnhart, Chris; Herr, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle–foot prostheses would benefit greatly from a means to make them inherently adaptive to different walking speeds. Towards this goal, one may attempt to emulate the intact human ankle, as it is capable of seamless adaptation. Human locomotion is governed by the interplay among legged dynamics, morphology and neural control including spinal reflexes. It has been suggested that reflexes contribute to the changes in ankle joint dynamics that correspond to walking at different speeds. Here, we use a data-driven muscle–tendon model that produces estimates of the activation, force, length and velocity of the major muscles spanning the ankle to derive local feedback loops that may be critical in the control of those muscles during walking. This purely reflexive approach ignores sources of non-reflexive neural drive and does not necessarily reflect the biological control scheme, yet can still closely reproduce the muscle dynamics estimated from biological data. The resulting neuromuscular model was applied to control a powered ankle–foot prosthesis and tested by an amputee walking at three speeds. The controller produced speed-adaptive behaviour; net ankle work increased with walking speed, highlighting the benefits of applying neuromuscular principles in the control of adaptive prosthetic limbs. PMID:21502131

  17. Effects of prosthetic foot forefoot flexibility on gait of unilateral transtibial prosthesis users.

    PubMed

    Klodd, Elizabeth; Hansen, Andrew; Fatone, Stefania; Edwards, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Five solid-ankle experimental prosthetic feet were used in this double-blind randomized crossover study to determine the effects of forefoot flexibility on gait of 14 unilateral transtibial prosthesis users. Flexibility in experimental feet was altered by changing the number of flexural hinges in their forefoot sections. When experimental prosthetic foot conditions were compared, measured prosthetic ankle dorsiflexion range of motion increased as much as 3.3° with increasing flexibility (p < 0.001) and the foot's anterior moment arm (measured as the effective foot length ratio) increased as much as 23% of the foot length with decreasing flexibility (p < 0.001). Subjects also showed increases in the difference between sound and prosthetic ankle moments as high as 0.53 Nm/kg in late stance phase of walking as flexibility decreased (p < 0.001). The difference between first peaks of the vertical ground reaction forces on the sound and prosthetic sides increased as much as 9% of body weight when subjects used the foot with the greatest flexibility (p = 0.001). The results of this study suggest solid-ankle prosthetic foot designs with overly flexible forefoot sections can cause a "drop-off" effect in late stance phase and during the transition of loading between prosthetic and contralateral limbs.

  18. A new paradigm for rehabilitation of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Luke; Hertel, Jay

    2012-11-01

    Lateral ankle sprains have been shown to be one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries in both athletes and the recreationally active population. Moreover, it is estimated that approximately 30% of people who incur a lateral ankle sprain will sustain recurrent ankle sprains and experience symptoms of pain and instability that last > 1 year. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is the term used to describe cases involving repetitive ankle sprains, multiple episodes of the ankle "giving way," persistent symptoms, and diminished self-reported function for > 1 year after the initial ankle sprain. The optimal conservative treatment for CAI is yet to be determined; however, comparison between patients with CAI and individuals showing no history of ankle sprain has revealed several characteristic features of CAI. These include diminished range of motion, decreased strength, impaired neuromuscular control, and altered functional movement patterns. We propose a new treatment paradigm for conservative management of CAI with the aim of assessing and treating specific deficits exhibited by individual patients with CAI.

  19. Neural Excitability and Joint Laxity in Chronic Ankle Instability, Coper, and Control Groups.

    PubMed

    Bowker, Samantha; Terada, Masafumi; Thomas, Abbey C; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Hiller, Claire E; Gribble, Phillip A

    2016-04-01

    Neuromuscular and mechanical deficiencies are commonly studied in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Few investigators have attempted to comprehensively consider sensorimotor and mechanical differences among people with CAI, copers who did not present with prolonged dysfunctions after an initial ankle sprain, and a healthy control group. To determine if differences exist in spinal reflex excitability and ankle laxity among participants with CAI, copers, and healthy controls. Case-control study. Research laboratory. Thirty-seven participants with CAI, 30 participants categorized as copers, and 26 healthy control participants. We assessed spinal reflex excitability of the soleus using the Hoffmann reflex protocol. Participants' ankle laxity was measured with an instrumented ankle arthrometer. The maximum Hoffmann reflex : maximal muscle response ratio was calculated. Ankle laxity was measured as the total displacement in the anterior-posterior directions (mm) and total rotation in the inversion and eversion directions (°). Spinal reflex excitability was diminished in participants with CAI compared with copers and control participants (P = .01). No differences were observed among any of the groups for ankle laxity. Changes in the spinal reflex excitability of the soleus that likely affect ankle stability were seen only in the CAI group, yet no mechanical differences were noted across the groups. These findings support the importance of finding effective ways to increase spinal reflex excitability for the purpose of treating neural excitability dysfunction in patients with CAI.

  20. [Tracheobronchial prosthesis in Mounier-Kuhn syndrome: New perspectives].

    PubMed

    Sauvage, M; Tiffet, O; Vergnon, J-M

    2015-05-01

    Mounier-Kuhn syndrome or tracheobronchomegaly is a rare congenital condition, the management of which is complex. We report the case of a patient who was treated with interventional endoscopy. We describe the case of a 74-year-old man with a diagnosis of tracheobronchomegaly who was admitted in 2003 with a background of deteriorating respiratory status and the occurrence of postural syncope. He initially received a tracheobronchial silicone Y prosthesis, extended with metal prostheses at the tracheal and bronchial level. This arrangement remained stable until 2011. He then began to develop episodes of asphyxia related to posterior dislocation of the tracheobronchial prosthesis, after breakage of the metallic mesh tracheal prosthesis. A new tracheobronchial prosthesis Y was then placed, custom-made from a 3D model of the airways. This was clinically and functionally effective. This case describes the management of a patient with Mounier-Kuhn syndrome by interventional bronchoscopy, with the adaptation of prosthetic materials, on an individual basis, to the anatomy of the patient's airway. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Adjuvant Maneuvers for Residual Curvature Correction During Penile Prosthesis Implantation in Men with Peyronie's Disease.

    PubMed

    Berookhim, Boback M; Karpman, Edward; Carrion, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The surgical treatment of comorbid erectile dysfunction and Peyronie's disease has long included the implantation of an inflatable penile prosthesis as well as a number of adjuvant maneuvers to address residual curvature after prosthesis placement. To review the various surgical options for addressing curvature after prosthesis placement, with specific attention paid to an original article by Wilson et al. reporting on modeling over a penile prosthesis for the management of Peyronie's disease. A literature review was performed analyzing articles reporting the management of penile curvature in patients undergoing implantation of an inflatable penile prosthesis. Reported improvement in Peyronie's deformity as well as the complication rate associated with the various surgical techniques described. Modeling is a well-established treatment modality among patients with Peyronie's disease undergoing penile prosthesis implantation. A variety of other adjuvant maneuvers to address residual curvature when modeling alone is insufficient has been presented in the literature. Over 20 years of experience with modeling over a penile prosthesis have proven the efficacy and safety of this treatment option, providing the surgeon a simple initial step for the management of residual curvature after penile implantation which allows for the use of additional adjuvant maneuvers in those with significant deformities. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  2. Role of Ankle Arthroscopy in Management of Acute Ankle Fracture.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwok Bill; Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-11-01

    To report the operative findings of ankle arthroscopy during open reduction and internal fixation of acute ankle fractures. This was a retrospective review of 254 consecutive patients with acute ankle fractures who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation of the fractures, and ankle arthroscopy was performed at the same time. The accuracy of fracture reduction, the presence of syndesmosis disruption and its reduction, and the presence of ligamentous injuries and osteochondral lesions were documented. Second-look ankle arthroscopy was performed during syndesmosis screw removal 6 weeks after the key operation. There were 6 patients with Weber A, 177 patients with Weber B, 51 patients with Weber C, and 20 patients with isolated medial malleolar fractures. Syndesmosis disruption was present in 0% of patients with Weber A fracture, 52% of patients with Weber B fracture, 92% of patients with Weber C fracture, and 20% of the patients with isolated medial malleolar fracture. Three patients with Weber B and one patient with Weber C fracture have occult syndesmosis instability after screw removal. Osteochondral lesion was present in no patient with Weber A fracture, 26% of the Weber B cases, 24% of the Weber C cases, and 20% of isolated medial malleolar fracture cases. The association between the presence of deep deltoid ligament tear and syndesmosis disruption (warranting syndesmosis screw fixation) in Weber B cases was statistically significant but not in Weber C cases. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of posterior malleolar fracture and syndesmosis instability that warrant screw fixation. Ankle arthroscopy is a useful adjuvant tool to understand the severity and complexity of acute ankle fracture. Direct arthroscopic visualization ensures detection and evaluation of intra-articular fractures, syndesmosis disruption, and associated osteochondral lesions and ligamentous injuries. Level IV, case series

  3. Minimum reporting standards for copers in chronic ankle instability research.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Erik A; Brown, Cathleen N

    2014-02-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LASs) are among the most common sports-related injuries and a high percentage of individuals who sprain their ankle go on to develop chronic ankle instability (CAI). The condition of CAI is often classified as having pain, loss of function, and a restriction of, or failure to, return to levels of previous activity. Historically, uninjured healthy controls are used as a comparison group to study the biomechanical and neuromuscular consequences of CAI. However, this model is not ideal to determine why a portion of the population experiencing an ankle sprain does not recover. A more appropriate comparison may be individuals who had an ankle sprain, and thus the exposure, but did not go on to develop CAI (i.e., copers). Thus, the purpose of this review was to determine the existing discrepancies and common standards in definitions of, terminology used for, and the inclusionary/exclusionary criteria used to describe copers within the CAI literature. Multiple databases were searched by keywords and specific authors. Potential studies were screened independently by both authors. Inclusion criteria consisted of an explicit definition of copers and explicit inclusionary/exclusionary criteria. A total of 21 studies were included in the current study and had four outcomes extracted: (1) the definition of copers; (2) the terminology used; (3) specific inclusionary/exclusionary criteria; and (4) injury characteristics of the copers. Based on the included operational definitions, it is recommend that future operational definitions of copers include three key components: (1) an initial LAS; (2) subsequent lack of CAI symptoms (i.e., no complaints of disability or giving way); and (3) a time since injury component. The term coper was overwhelming used within the existing literature (n = 15) and is thus recommended to be used in future studies when describing individuals who have suffered an LAS but failed to develop CAI. Minimal inclusionary criteria should

  4. [Speech rehabilitation using Provox voice prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Morshed, Kamal; Gołabek, Wiesław; Szymański, Marcin; Olszański, Witold

    2005-01-01

    The first voice prosthesis was described in 1972 by Mozolewski. Eight years later Blom and Singer constructed the first commercial prosthesis. In 1988 another prosthesis was presented as Provox system prosthesis. The aim of the study was to describe the technique of tracheoesophageal puncture (TEP) and to present two years results of the technique performed in 21 patients. Primary TEP with immediate implantation of the Provox 2 prosthesis was applied in 16 (76%) patients. In five patients (24%) secondary TEP was performed. All the patient with primary TEP had cricopharyngeal myotomy. In 7 patients the vocal prosthesis was exchanged. In five because of leakage through the valve and in two patients the vocal prosthesis was extruded. Leakage around the prosthesis occurred in two patients with secondary TEP. The mean device-related lifetime was 216 days and ranged from 30 to 540 days. In non-radiated patients the lifetime of the prosthesis was 255 days and in patients after radiotherapy the lifetime was 150 days. In all the patients the prosthetic voice was more similar to normal voice than in patients with esophageal speech. The implantation of the voice prosthesis is a simple method of restoring of a good quality voice enabling communication.

  5. A controlled, comparative study of a fixed-bearing versus mobile-bearing ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gaudot, Fabrice; Colombier, Jean-Alain; Bonnin, Michel; Judet, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty is available with fixed-bearing (FB) or mobile-bearing (MB) versions, and there is little consensus on the benefits and drawbacks of each type. This study aimed to compare clinical outcomes of statistically paired series of FB and MB versions of the same ankle prosthesis. The study was a multicenter retrospective comparison between 2 groups: the FB group of 33 consecutive Talaris cases and the MB group of 33 "paired" Salto cases, selected from a database of 313 consecutive cases to statistically match etiology, age, and preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. All patients were operated upon with the same operative technique and received identical pre- and postoperative clinical and radiographic assessments. The mean follow-up was 24 months for the FB group and 23 months for the MB group. There was no statistical difference between results of the 2 groups in terms of accuracy of positioning, clinical and radiographic mobility, and morbidity. The most recent postoperative AOFAS scores were higher for the FB group than for the MB group (P = .05). Radiolucent lines were observed in 4 FB patients versus 13 MB patients (P = .02). Subchondral cysts were noted in 1 FB patient and in 8 MB patients (P = .01). There was no notable difference in clinical performance of the FB and MB implants with the numbers available. This short-term study demonstrated that FB ankle arthroplasty had results equivalent to, if not better than, MB ankle arthroplasty. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine the success of this new generation of ankle arthroplasty. Level III, retrospective case control study.

  6. Ankle function and sports activity after total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, Michel P; Laurent, Jean-Raphael; Casillas, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The return to sporting activities after ankle arthroplasty has rarely been evaluated. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate function and return to sports after total ankle arthroplasty. One hundred seventy-nine Salto Total Ankle Arthroplasties (TAA) were implanted between 1997 and 2005. A self-administered questionnaire including the Foot Function Index (FFI) and Foot and Ankle Ability Measurement (FAAM) was sent to all patients. At last followup, six were deceased, 22 were not available for evaluation, and six questionnaires were incomplete. One hundred forty-five questionnaires were available. The mean age was 60.9 years and the mean followup was 53.8 months. The main indications for TAA were osteoarthritis (OA) in 100 cases and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 40 cases. 15.2% of the patients said that their operated ankle was "normal'' 60.7%" nearly normal''; 20% "abnormal'' and 4.1% "highly abnormal.'' The FFI scores were 13.7 +/- 17 for "activity limitations'', 31.7 +/- 23 for "disability'' and 16.9 +/- 19 for "pain''. The FAAM scores were 74.9 +/- 18 for activities of daily living and 48.9 +/- 28 for sports activities. On a Visual Analog Scales (0 to 100 were 100 is the "pre-pathology level'') the mean rating was 70.2 +/- 19.6 for Activities of Daily Living and 53.7 +/- 28 for sport activities. In the OA patients, 38 regularly road bicycle, 21 perform recreational gymnastics, 58 swimming, 50 home gardening, 27 dancing, and 43 hiking. Seven patients regularly practice tennis, nine cross-country skiing, 17 downhill skiing, and six regularly run more than 500 m. This study showed that TAA improved the quality of life and that return to recreational activities was generally possible but the return to impact sport was rarely possible.

  7. [Ankle arthrodesis with an posterolateral approach using a polyaxial angle stable Talarlock® plate].

    PubMed

    Gutteck, N; Lebek, S; Zeh, A; Gradl, G; Delank, K-S; Wohlrab, D

    2013-12-01

    Safe arthrodesis of the ankle as well as load carrying capacity free of pain. Painful arthritis of the ankle joint occurring idiopathic or posttraumatic, resulting from rheumatoid arthritis or neuromuscular diseases. Extensive bony defects in varus or valgus ankle deformities and after failed prosthesis. Complex hindfoot deformities in neurological disease, paralysis and instabilities. Joint destruction after infection. Active osteitis, extensive skin ulcers in the approach area, periphery artery occlusive disease. Posterolateral skin incision. Sparing cartilage resection. Penetrating sclerosis zones. Reorientating anatomic positioning of the talus thereby correcting axis deformities. Talarlock(®) plate positioning and tibiotalar arthrodesis. Full weight bearing in an arthodesis boot for 6 weeks. After bone grafting partial weight bearing (20 kg) in an arthrodesis boot for 8 weeks. Full weight bearing after 10weeks. Ten patients were operated on using this procedure. The follow-up time was 1 year. There were no complications requiring further surgical procedures. Ankle fusion and a good clinical outcome could be achieved in all cases.

  8. Early to mid-term results of fixed-bearing total ankle arthroplasty with a modular intramedullary tibial component.

    PubMed

    Adams, Samuel B; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Queen, Robin M; Easley, Mark E; DeOrio, James K; Nunley, James A

    2014-12-03

    There has been a continuing increase in the use of total ankle arthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. Our aim was to determine the clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes of total ankle arthroplasties done with a prosthesis with a modular intramedullary stem and intramedullary referencing to align the tibia. A consecutive series of patients who underwent total ankle arthroplasty with the INBONE Total Ankle Replacement from June 2007 to December 2010 were enrolled in this study. Pain and patient-reported function were assessed with use of a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score, the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA), and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey. Objective function was measured with assessment of walking speed, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, the Sit-to-Stand (STS) test, and the Four Square Step Test (4SST). Standardized weight-bearing radiographs obtained preoperatively and after total ankle arthroplasty were evaluated. We analyzed clinical, functional, and radiographic measurements with a series of repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with post-hoc testing to assess differences between preoperative, one-year postoperative, and most recent follow-up data. On the basis of the number of statistical comparisons, a Bonferroni correction was completed (alpha < 0.003). We identified 194 primary INBONE total ankle arthroplasties with a mean duration of clinical follow-up of 3.7 years (range, 2.2 to 5.5 years). Patients demonstrated a significant improvement (p < 0.003) in VAS pain, AOFAS, SMFA, and SF-36 scores at the time of final follow-up, compared with preoperative values, and in walking speed, STS time, TUG time, and 4SST time at two years postoperatively, compared with preoperatively. The mean coronal tibiotalar angle for varus and valgus ankles significantly improved postoperatively and was maintained until the time of

  9. [ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF PIGMENTED VILLONODULAR SYNOVITIS OF ANKLE].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Li, Jian; Li, Qi

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the ankle. Twelve patients who were initially diagnosed as having PVNS of the ankle were treated between January 2005 and May 2012. There were 6 males and 6 females, aged 20-50 years (mean, 35.4 years). Disease duration ranged from 6 months to 12 years (median, 3.6 years). One case of recurrence was included. The preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score was 55.5 ± 7.6. According to degree and range of the PVNS lesions, 4 cases of local PVNS were treated with arthroscopic debridement, and 8 cases of diffuse PVNS were treated with arthroscopically assisted arthrotomy; and local radiotherapy was given in all patients after operation. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients. The mean follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 1-6 years). At 12 months after operation, no obvious pain, swelling, and limited range of motion of the ankle were observed. The AOFAS score was increased to 84.3 ± 3.4 at 12 months, and it was significantly higher than that at preoperation (P < 0.05) and at 3 months after operation (82.8 ± 3.8) (P < 0.05). There was no recurrence during follow-up. Arthroscopic arthrotomy combined with postoperative radiotherapy are recommended for PVNS of the ankle according to the PVNS lesion degree and range. And arthroscopically assisted surgery has many advantages of less traumas and hemorrhage, fast recovery, and less complications.

  10. Total ankle replacement with use of a new three-component implant.

    PubMed

    Rippstein, Pascal F; Huber, Martin; Coetzee, J Chris; Naal, Florian D

    2011-08-03

    Total ankle arthroplasty has evolved over the past decade, and newer three-component implants have demonstrated favorable clinical results and improved survivorship. The present study analyzed the clinical and radiographic results of the first 240 total ankle arthroplasties performed by the authors with one of these new three-component prostheses. Two hundred and forty consecutive primary total ankle arthroplasties were performed in 233 patients (115 women and 118 men; mean age, 61.6 years) between November 2003 and October 2007 with the Mobility prosthesis. Intraoperative and postoperative complications, reoperations, and failures were recorded. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot score and a visual analog scale score assessment of pain were determined at each follow-up visit. Range of ankle motion was measured on functional radiographs, and the radiographs were studied to assess component positioning, radiolucencies, new bone formation, and periprosthetic bone cysts. Two hundred and thirty-three of the arthroplasties were available for follow-up at least one year after surgery. The mean duration of follow-up was 32.8 ± 15.3 months. There were ten intraoperative complications (4.2%) and twenty postoperative complications (8.6%). A reoperation was necessary in eighteen ankles (7.7%). Five arthroplasties (2.1%) failed at a mean of twenty-seven months after surgery. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot score improved from 48.2 to 84.1 points (p < 0.001). The mean pain level decreased from 7.7 to 1.7 points (p < 0.001). The mean total range of ankle motion improved from 19.8° to 21.9° (p < 0.001). The tibial component had a mean of 2.1° of varus and a mean posterior slope of 6.0° relative to the tibial axis. The prevalence of nonprogressive radiolucency ranged from 1.8% to 37.3% in the ten zones surrounding the tibial component, and from 0 to 2.2% in the three zones surrounding the talar component. The short-term clinical

  11. Syndesmotic ankle sprains in athletes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glenn N; Jones, Morgan H; Amendola, Annunziato

    2007-07-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common athletic injuries and represent a significant source of persistent pain and disability. Despite the high incidence of ankle sprains in athletes, syndesmosis injuries have historically been underdiagnosed, and assessment in terms of severity and optimal treatment has not been determined. More recently, a heightened awareness in sports medicine has resulted in more frequent diagnoses of syndesmosis injuries. However, there is a low level of evidence and a paucity of literature on this topic compared with lateral ankle sprains. As a result, no clear guidelines are available to help the clinician assess the severity of injury, choose an imaging modality to visualize the injury, make a decision in terms of operative versus nonoperative treatment, or decide when the athlete may return to play. Increased knowledge and understanding of these injuries by clinicians and researchers are essential to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of this significant condition. This review will discuss the anatomy, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment of syndesmosis sprains of the ankle while identifying controversies in management and topics for future research.

  12. Ankle surgery: focus on arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, M; Natali, S; Ruffilli, A; Buda, R; Vannini, F; Castagnini, F; Ferranti, E; Giannini, S

    2013-12-01

    The ankle joint can be affected by several diseases, with clinical presentation varying from mild pain or swelling to inability, becoming in some cases a serious problem in daily life activities. Arthroscopy is a widely performed procedure in orthopedic surgery, due to the low invasivity compared to the more traditional open field surgery. The ankle joint presents anatomical specificities, like small space and tangential view that make arthroscopy more difficult. From 2000 more than 600 ankle arthroscopies were performed at our institution. The treated pathologies were mostly impingement syndrome and osteochondral lesions, and in lower percentage instabilities and ankle fractures. In the impingement, the AOFAS scores at FU showed an increase compared to scores collected preoperatively, with improvement of symptoms in most of the cases, good or excellent results in 80 % of cases. In ligament injuries, AOFAS score significatively improved at the maximum follow-up. In fractures all patients had an excellent AOFAS score at maximum follow-up, with complete return to their pre-injury activities. In osteochondral injuries, the clinical results showed a progressive improvement over time with  the different performed procedures. Control MRI and bioptic samples showed a good regeneration of the cartilage and bone tissue in the lesion site. The encouraging obtained clinical results, in line with the literature, show how the arthroscopic technique, after an adequate learning curve, may represent a precious aid for the orthopedic surgeon and for the patient's outcome. Case series, Level IV.

  13. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  14. [Chronic instability in the ankle area].

    PubMed

    Dubrana, F; Poichotte, A; Toullec, E; Colin, D; Guillodo, Y; Moati, J-C; Brilhauht, J; Musset, T; Feron, F; Richou, J; Henri, M; Guillemot, E

    2006-06-01

    For ankle sprains, the initial radiological work-up must include weight-bearing AP and lateral stress views of the sprained and healthy ankle. Films are taken in auto-varus. Other explorations included arthroMRI, arthroscanner or MRI which can be indicated preoperatively to confirm suspected cartilage injury or an associated ligament tear. These techniques should be employed when pertinent information can be expected according to the clinical situation and the operator's experience. In the emergency setting, ultrasonography can provide a simple low-cost confirmation of joint hematoma which is more precise than x-rays with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. The objective and subjective clinical outcome after surgical anatomic repair or ligamentoplasty are quite similar. The two principal differences relate to persistent subjective instability and post-operative surgical complications. Thus there are advantages and disadvantages for each option advantage for anatomical repair because of the low rate of surgical complications and advantage for ligament repairs which stabilize the subtalar joint with a low rate of residual instability.

  15. Evaluation and management of lateral ankle injuries.

    PubMed

    Lee, M S; Hofbauer, M H

    1999-10-01

    The diagnosis and management of lateral ankle injuries require the physician to obtain an accurate history, complete a thorough physical examination, and institute appropriate treatment protocol. Labeling all acute lateral ankle injuries as ankle sprains can lead to long-term mechanical and functional instability and chronic pain around the ankle. Appropriate and aggressive functional rehabilitation of the acute ankle limits the postinjury convalescence and need for surgical reconstruction. If surgical repair of the chronic or acute ankle is warranted, the Brostrom-Gould procedure serves as a highly successful anatomic repair. Lateral ankle tenodesing procedures also are effective; however, in most cases, the loss of rearfoot motion limits this procedure to a secondary reconstructive procedure.

  16. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains fall into two main categories: acute ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability, which are among the most common recurrent injuries during occupational activities, athletic events, training and army service. Acute ankle sprain is usually managed conservatively and functional rehabilitation failure by conservative treatment leads to development of chronic ankle instability, which most often requires surgical intervention. Enhancing the in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics and pathology helps greatly in deciding the management options. Cite this article: Al-Mohrej OA, Al-Kenani NS. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach? EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:34-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000010. PMID:28461926

  17. Posterior tibial nerve lesions in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramon; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Garcia, Montserrat; Samitier, Gonzalo; Seijas, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides a minimally invasive approach to the diagnosis and treatment of certain ankle disorders. Neurological complications resulting from ankle arthroscopy have been well documented in orthopaedic and podiatric literature. Owing to the superficial location of the ankle joint and the abundance of overlying periarticular neurovascular structures, complications reported in ankle arthroscopy are greater than those reported for other joints. In particular, all reported neurovascular injuries following ankle arthroscopy have been the direct result of distractor pin or portal placement. The standard posteromedial portal has recognized risks because of the proximity of the posterior neurovascular structures. There can be considerable variability in the course of these portals and their proximity to the neurovascular structures. We found one report of intra-articular damage to the posterior tibial nerve as a result of ankle arthroscopy in the English-language literature and we report this paper as a second case described in the literature.

  18. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, S; Ariga, P; Aggarwal, P; Viswanath, A

    2014-01-01

    Patients with orocutaneous fistulas suffer from discomfort in terms of facial esthetics, food spill over and lack of psychological confidence to present them socially. Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention.

  19. Tracheostomy cannulas and voice prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kramp, Burkhard; Dommerich, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Cannulas and voice prostheses are mechanical aids for patients who had to undergo tracheotomy or laryngectomy for different reasons. For better understanding of the function of those artificial devices, first the indications and particularities of the previous surgical intervention are described in the context of this review. Despite the established procedure of percutaneous dilatation tracheotomy e.g. in intensive care units, the application of epithelised tracheostomas has its own position, especially when airway obstruction is persistent (e.g. caused by traumata, inflammations, or tumors) and a longer artificial ventilation or special care of the patient are required. In order to keep the airways open after tracheotomy, tracheostomy cannulas of different materials with different functions are available. For each patient the most appropriate type of cannula must be found. Voice prostheses are meanwhile the device of choice for rapid and efficient voice rehabilitation after laryngectomy. Individual sizes and materials allow adaptation of the voice prostheses to the individual anatomical situation of the patients. The combined application of voice prostheses with HME (Head and Moisture Exchanger) allows a good vocal as well as pulmonary rehabilitation. Precondition for efficient voice prosthesis is the observation of certain surgical principles during laryngectomy. The duration of the prosthesis mainly depends on material properties and biofilms, mostly consisting of funguses and bacteries. The quality of voice with valve prosthesis is clearly superior to esophagus prosthesis or electro-laryngeal voice. Whenever possible, tracheostoma valves for free-hand speech should be applied. Physicians taking care of patients with speech prostheses after laryngectomy should know exactly what to do in case the device fails or gets lost. PMID:22073098

  20. Tracheostomy cannulas and voice prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Burkhard; Dommerich, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Cannulas and voice prostheses are mechanical aids for patients who had to undergo tracheotomy or laryngectomy for different reasons. For better understanding of the function of those artificial devices, first the indications and particularities of the previous surgical intervention are described in the context of this review. Despite the established procedure of percutaneous dilatation tracheotomy e.g. in intensive care units, the application of epithelised tracheostomas has its own position, especially when airway obstruction is persistent (e.g. caused by traumata, inflammations, or tumors) and a longer artificial ventilation or special care of the patient are required. In order to keep the airways open after tracheotomy, tracheostomy cannulas of different materials with different functions are available. For each patient the most appropriate type of cannula must be found. Voice prostheses are meanwhile the device of choice for rapid and efficient voice rehabilitation after laryngectomy. Individual sizes and materials allow adaptation of the voice prostheses to the individual anatomical situation of the patients. The combined application of voice prostheses with HME (Head and Moisture Exchanger) allows a good vocal as well as pulmonary rehabilitation. Precondition for efficient voice prosthesis is the observation of certain surgical principles during laryngectomy. The duration of the prosthesis mainly depends on material properties and biofilms, mostly consisting of funguses and bacteries. The quality of voice with valve prosthesis is clearly superior to esophagus prosthesis or electro-laryngeal voice. Whenever possible, tracheostoma valves for free-hand speech should be applied. Physicians taking care of patients with speech prostheses after laryngectomy should know exactly what to do in case the device fails or gets lost.

  1. Prediction model for penile prosthesis implantation for erectile dysfunction management.

    PubMed

    Segal, Robert L; Camper, Stephen B; Ma, Larry; Burnett, Arthur L

    2014-10-01

    Penile prosthesis surgery is indicated based on undesirability, contraindication or ineffectiveness of non-surgical options for erectile dysfunction. This definitive treatment is often delayed after initial diagnosis. Our objective was to develop a prediction tool based on a patient's clinical history to determine likelihood of ultimately receiving a penile prosthesis. This retrospective analysis used claims data from Commercial and Medicare supplemental databases. Inclusion criteria were 18 years of age with 1 year of continuous enrollment at the first diagnosis of erectile dysfunction. Patients' demographics, co-morbidities and erectile dysfunction therapy were derived based on enrollment, medical and prescription histories. The Cox proportional hazards model with stepwise selection was used to identify and quantify (using relative risk) factors associated with a future penile prosthesis implant. Co-morbidities and therapies present prior to the index erectile dysfunction diagnosis were analyzed as fixed covariates. Approximately 1% of the dataset's population (N = 310,303 Commercial, N = 74,315 Medicare, respectively) underwent penile prosthesis implantation during the study period (3928 patients in the overall population: 2405 patients [0.78%] in the Commercial and 1523 patients [2.05%] in the Medicare population). Factors with the greatest predictive strength of penile prosthesis implantation included prostate cancer diagnosis (relative risk: 3.93, 2.29; 95% CI, 3.57-4.34, 2.03-2.6), diabetes mellitus (2.31, 1.23; 2.12-2.52, 1.1-1.37) and previous treatment with first-line therapy (1.39, 1.33; 1.28-1.5, 1.2-1.47) (all P < 0.01). The presence and extent of specific medical history factors at the time of erectile dysfunction diagnosis predict an individual's future likelihood of penile prosthesis. Calculating the likelihood of penile prosthesis implantation based on the weight of these factors may assist clinicians with the definition of a care plan

  2. Dosimetry of a silicone breast prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    McGinley, P.H.; Powell, W.R.; Bostwick, J.

    1980-04-01

    Dose measurements were conducted in a phantom which simulates breast tissue and in another phantom which simulates a breast containing a silicone prosthesis. No detectable difference was found when the irradiations were carried out with tangential beams of /sup 60/Co radiation. The degree of backscatter and absorption of radiation by the prosthesis and phantom were also similar. A slight decrease in dose of approximately 8% was found at the interface between the prosthesis and muscle-equivalent material.

  3. Contact dermatitis from a prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Carla A; Gaspari, Anthony; Goldner, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Patients wearing a prosthesis face a wide variety of medical problems. Skin complications have long been recognized, but their prevalence is still unknown. The most frequently reported disorders are allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), acroangiodermatitis, epidermoid cysts, epidermal hyperplasia, follicular hyperkeratosis, verrucous hyperplasia, bullous diseases, hyperhidrosis, infections, malignancies, and ulcerations. Contact dermatitis represents one-third of the dermatoses in amputees wearing prostheses. All patients who are suspected of having ACD should be patch tested with standard allergen series as well as materials from the patient's own prosthesis, topical medicaments, moisturizers, and cosmetics. We report a patient with an ACD to mixed dialkyl thiourea present in the rubber parts of his below-the-knee prosthesis. Thiourea derivates are used as accelerators in the manufacture of chloroprene rubber and as fixatives in photography and photocopy paper. Allergy to thiourea is relatively uncommon; different studies have shown a prevalence of 0.7% up to 2.4% in patch-tested patients. Thiourea derivates are often the allergic sources in ACD involving high-grade rubber products made of neoprene such as diving suits, protective goggles, knee braces, and continuous positive airway pressure masks. They are also present in the rubber material of prostheses, as in the case of our patient.

  4. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  5. Fracture reduction and primary ankle arthrodesis: a reliable approach for severely comminuted tibial pilon fracture.

    PubMed

    Beaman, Douglas N; Gellman, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Posttraumatic arthritis and prolonged recovery are typical after a severely comminuted tibial pilon fracture, and ankle arthrodesis is a common salvage procedure. However, few reports discuss the option of immediate arthrodesis, which may be a potentially viable approach to accelerate overall recovery in patients with severe fracture patterns. (1) How long does it take the fracture to heal and the arthrodesis to fuse when primary ankle arthrodesis is a component of initial fracture management? (2) How do these patients fare clinically in terms of modified American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores and activity levels after this treatment? (3) Does primary ankle arthrodesis heal in an acceptable position when anterior ankle arthrodesis plates are used? During a 2-year period, we performed open fracture reduction and internal fixation in 63 patients. Eleven patients (12 ankles) with severely comminuted high-energy tibial pilon fractures were retrospectively reviewed after surgical treatment with primary ankle arthrodesis and fracture reduction. Average patient age was 58 years, and minimum followup was 6 months (average, 14 months; range, 6-22 months). Anatomically designed anterior ankle arthrodesis plates were used in 10 ankles. Ring external fixation was used in nine ankles with concomitant tibia fracture or in instances requiring additional fixation. Clinical evaluation included chart review, interview, the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score, and radiographic evaluation. All of the ankle arthrodeses healed at an average of 4.4 months (range, 3-5 months). One patient had a nonunion at the metaphyseal fracture, which healed with revision surgery. The average AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 83 with 88% having an excellent or good result. Radiographic and clinical analysis confirmed a plantigrade foot without malalignment. No patients required revision surgery for malunion. Primary ankle arthrodesis combined with fracture reduction for the severely comminuted

  6. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  7. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain.

  8. Women's Satisfaction with Their Breast Prosthesis: What Determines a Quality Prosthesis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Patricia M.; White, Victoria M.; Roberts, Susan B.; Pritchard, Emma; Hayman, Jane; Gibbs, Anne; Hill, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine what factors constitute a quality prosthesis and ascertain which factors affect prosthesis satisfaction. Sixty-four women who received full funding for their prosthesis and 38 women who received their hospital's usual funding were recruited. Women rated the information provided about breast prostheses very…

  9. Women's Satisfaction with Their Breast Prosthesis: What Determines a Quality Prosthesis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Patricia M.; White, Victoria M.; Roberts, Susan B.; Pritchard, Emma; Hayman, Jane; Gibbs, Anne; Hill, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine what factors constitute a quality prosthesis and ascertain which factors affect prosthesis satisfaction. Sixty-four women who received full funding for their prosthesis and 38 women who received their hospital's usual funding were recruited. Women rated the information provided about breast prostheses very…

  10. Ankle braces effectively reduce recurrence of ankle sprains in female soccer players.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, S R; Knapik, J; Jones, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of ankle bracing and taping in preventing recurrencess of ankle sprains, specifically in female athletes. Varsity soccer players' medical records over a five-year period were retrospectively reviewed at a Division III women's college. Data were extracted regarding any history of ankle sprain(s), type of intervention used as prophylaxis after the ankle sprain, number of exposures, and any incidence of recurrence. All collegiate varsity soccer players who had suffered a previous sprain to either one or both ankles (38 players) were identified as subjects. Each previously injured ankle (n = 56) was considered as a case for the analysis. Ankles that had a previous sprain received one of four interventions: 1) a canvas, laced ankle brace (n = 19), 2) taping (n = 12), 3) a combination of taping and ankle bracing (n = 8), or 4) no treatment (n = 17). The four intervention groups had a total of 1717 practice exposures and 650 competitive game exposures; exposures did not differ among the 4 groups. Ankle sprain recurrence frequency was 0%, 25%, 25%, and 35% for the braced, taped, combination, and untreated groups, respectively. The recurrence incidence for the braced group was significantly lower than that of the other three groups. The ankle sprain recurrence frequency did not differ among the taped, combination, and no treatment groups. We suggest that prophylactic ankle bracing is effective in reducing the incidence of ankle sprains in female soccer players with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  11. [Ankle sprain. Management of recent lesions and prevention of secondary instability].

    PubMed

    Popovic, N; Gillet, P

    2005-10-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries. The vast majority of these injuries are lateral ligament sprains, resulting from inversion of the plantar-flexed foot. Initial management should include rest, ice, compression and elevation. Functional treatment proved to provide the quickest recovery and an earlier return to work without compromising the lateral mechanical stability. Surgical management of acute ankle sprains is rarely, if ever, indicated. Patients who continue to sustain multiple recurrent inversion sprains despite a supervised rehabilitation program aimed at improving proprioception and strengthening of the peroneal muscles are candidate for surgical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments.

  12. Validation of the Inverted Pendulum Model in standing for transtibial prosthesis users.

    PubMed

    Rusaw, David F; Ramstrand, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Often in balance assessment variables associated with the center of pressure are used to draw conclusions about an individual's balance. Validity of these conclusions rests upon assumptions that movement of the center of pressure is inter-dependent on movement of the center of mass. This dependency is mechanical and is referred to as the Inverted Pendulum Model. The following study aimed to validate this model both kinematically and kinetically, in transtibial prosthesis users and a control group. Prosthesis users (n=6) and matched control participants (n=6) stood quietly while force and motion data were collected under three conditions (eyes-open, eyes-closed, and weight-bearing feedback). Correlation coefficients were used to investigate the relationships between height and excursion of markers and center of masses in mediolateral/anteroposterior-directions, difference between center of pressure and center of mass and the center of mass acceleration in mediolateral/anteroposterior directions, magnitude of mediolateral/anteroposterior-component forces and center of mass acceleration, angular position of ankle and excursion in mediolateral/anteroposterior-directions, and integrated force signals. Results indicate kinematic validity of similar magnitudes (mean (SD) marker-displacement) between prosthesis users and control group for mediolateral- (r=0.77 (0.17); 0.74 (0.19)) and anteroposterior-directions (r=0.88 (0.18); 0.88 (0.19)). Correlation between difference of center of pressure and center of mass and the center of mass acceleration was negligible on the prosthetic side (r = 0.08 (0.06)) vs. control group (r=-0.51(0.13)). Results indicate kinematic validity of the Inverted Pendulum Model in transtibial prosthesis users but kinetic validity is questionable, particularly on the side with a prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvements in survival of the uncemented Nottingham Total Shoulder prosthesis: a prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Nahum; Neumann, Lars; Modi, Amit; Mersich, Istvan J; Wallace, Angus W

    2007-01-01

    Background The uncemented Nottingham Total Shoulder Replacement prosthesis system (Nottingham TSR) was developed from the previous BioModular® shoulder prosthesis taking into consideration the causes of the initial implant's failure. We investigated the impact of changes in the design of Nottingham TSR prosthesis on its survivorship rate. Methods Survivorship analyses of three types of uncemented total shoulder arthroplasty prostheses (BioModular®, initial Nottingham TSR and current Nottingham TSR systems with 11, 8 and 4 year survivorship data respectively) were compared. All these prostheses were implanted for the treatment of disabling pain in the shoulder due to primary and secondary osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Each type of the prosthesis studied was implanted in consecutive group of patients – 90 patients with BioModular® system, 103 with the initial Nottingham TSR and 34 patients with the current Nottingham TSR system. The comparison of the annual cumulative survivorship values in the compatible time range between the three groups was done according to the paired t test. Results The 8-year and 11-year survivorship rates for the initially used modified BioModular® uncemented prosthesis were relatively low (75.6% and 71.7% respectively) comparing to the reported survivorship of the conventional cemented implants. The 8-year survivorship for the uncemented Nottingham TSR prosthesis was significantly higher (81.8%), but still not in the desired range of above 90%, that is found in other cemented designs. Glenoid component loosening was the main factor of prosthesis failure in both prostheses and mainly occurred in the first 4 postoperative years. The 4-year survivorship of the currently re-designed Nottingham TSR prosthesis, with hydroxylapatite coating of the glenoid baseplate, was significantly higher, 93.1% as compared to 85.1% of the previous Nottingham TSR. Conclusion The initial Nottingham shoulder prosthesis showed significantly higher

  14. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements.

    PubMed

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-03-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met.

  15. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements

    PubMed Central

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met. PMID:26955224

  16. Treatment of common deficits associated with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Alison; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are amongst the most common injuries incurred by athletes, with the high rate of reoccurrence after initial injury becoming of great concern. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) refers to the development of repetitive ankle sprains and persistent residual symptoms post-injury. Some of the initial symptoms that occur in acute sprains may persist for at least 6 months post-injury in the absence of recurrent sprains, despite the athlete having returned to full functional activity. CAI is generally thought to be caused by mechanical instability (MI) or functional instability (FI), or both. Although previously discussed as separate entities, recent research has demonstrated that deficits associated with both MI and FI may co-exist to result in CAI. For clinicians, the main deficits associated with CAI include deficits in proprioception, neuromuscular control, strength and postural control. Based on the literature reviewed, it does seem that subjects with CAI have a deficit in frontal plane ankle joint positional sense. Subjects with CAI do not appear to exhibit any increased latency in the peroneal muscles in response to an external perturbation. Preliminary data suggest that feed-forward neuromuscular control may be more important than feed-back neuromuscular control and interventions are now required to address deficits in feed-forward neuromuscular control. Balance training protocols have consistently been shown to improve postural stability in subjects with CAI. Subjects with CAI do not experience decreased peroneus longus strength, but instead may experience strength deficits in the ankle joint invertor muscles. These findings are of great clinical significance in terms of understanding the mechanisms and deficits associated with CAI. An appreciation of these is vital to allow clinicians to develop effective prevention and treatment programmes in relation to CAI.

  17. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood.

  18. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least 9 training sessions for 3 neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood. PMID:25769168

  19. Design, fabrication, and preliminary results of a novel below-knee prosthesis for snowboarding: A case report.

    PubMed

    Minnoye, Sander L M; Plettenburg, Dick H

    2009-09-01

    Snowboarding with a below-knee prosthesis is compromised by the limited rotation capabilities of the existing below-knee prostheses, which are designed for use in normal walking. Based on snowboarding range of motion analyses, a novel below-knee prosthesis was designed with the aim to achieve similar range of motions like able-bodied snowboarders. The new prosthesis allows for passive inversion/eversion, passive plantarflexion/dorsiflexion and additional 'voluntary' plantarflexion/dorsiflexion initiated by lateral or medial rotation of the upper leg and knee. A prototype was built and was subsequently tested on a single subject, a highly professional snowboarder and candidate for the Olympic Winter Games. The movements of the subject were recorded on video, analyzed and compared to the recorded movements of an able-bodied snowboarder, and a snowboarder with a traditional below-knee prosthesis. The results indicated an increased similarity of inversion/eversion and plantarflexion/dorsiflexion between the snowboarder with the new below-knee prosthesis and the able-bodied snowboarder, whereas the snowboarder with the traditional below-knee prosthesis and the able-bodied snowboarder differed considerably. These results indicate that snowboarding with the new prosthesis is more comparable to able-bodied snowboarding. On a subjective basis this is confirmed by the test subject who stated that: "snowboarding with the new prosthesis is like it was before the amputation!".

  20. The effect of combined mechanism ankle support on postural control of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Ismaeil; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Aminian, Gholamreza; Esteki, Ali; Rahgozar, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Chronic ankle instability is associated with neuromechanical changes and poor postural stability. Despite variety of mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses, almost none apply comprehensive mechanisms to improve postural control in all subgroups of chronic ankle instability patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an ankle support implementing combined mechanisms to improve postural control in chronic ankle instability patients. Cross-sectional study. An ankle support with combined mechanism was designed based on most effective action mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses. The effect of this orthosis on postural control was evaluated in 20 participants with chronic ankle instability and 20 matched healthy participants. The single-limb stance balance test was measured in both groups with and without the new orthosis using a force platform. The results showed that application of combined mechanism ankle support significantly improved all postural sway parameters in chronic ankle instability patients. There were no differences in means of investigated parameters with and without the orthosis in the healthy group. No statistically significant differences were found in postural sway between chronic ankle instability patients and healthy participants after applying the combined mechanism ankle support. The combined mechanism ankle support is effective in improving static postural control of chronic ankle instability patients to close to the postural sway of healthy individual. the orthosis had no adverse effects on balance performance of healthy individuals. Clinical relevance Application of the combined mechanism ankle support for patients with chronic ankle instability is effective in improving static balance. This may be helpful in reduction of recurrence of ankle sprain although further research about dynamic conditions is needed.

  1. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports.

  2. Proximal Tibiofibular Synostosis as a Source of Ankle Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Leninbabu, Vinayagam; Shenbaga, Needhirajan; Komarasamy, Baskaran; Paul, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old man who presented with ankle pain of unknown etiology. The actual cause for his pain was missed during his two initial visits when only ankle radiographs were taken. During his third visit, a full-length tibia film revealed a proximal tibiofibular synostosis. He successfully underwent a fibular osteotomy with complete symptomatic relief. A literature review of this topic is presented. PMID:16789462

  3. Development and experimental validation of a finite element model of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Alexandre; Larrea, Xabier; Guerdat, Jonas; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-02-07

    Total ankle replacement remains a less satisfactory solution compared to other joint replacements. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model of total ankle replacement, for future testing of hypotheses related to clinical issues. To validate the finite element model, an experimental setup was specifically developed and applied on 8 cadaveric tibias. A non-cemented press fit tibial component of a mobile bearing prosthesis was inserted into the tibias. Two extreme anterior and posterior positions of the mobile bearing insert were considered, as well as a centered one. An axial force of 2kN was applied for each insert position. Strains were measured on the bone surface using digital image correlation. Tibias were CT scanned before implantation, after implantation, and after mechanical tests and removal of the prosthesis. The finite element model replicated the experimental setup. The first CT was used to build the geometry and evaluate the mechanical properties of the tibias. The second CT was used to set the implant position. The third CT was used to assess the bone-implant interface conditions. The coefficient of determination (R-squared) between the measured and predicted strains was 0.91. Predicted bone strains were maximal around the implant keel, especially at the anterior and posterior ends. The finite element model presented here is validated for future tests using more physiological loading conditions.

  4. A Canadian Electric-Arm Prosthesis for Children

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Peter B.; Stevenson, David A.; Sherman, E. David; Lippay, Andrew L.; Gingras, Gustave

    1967-01-01

    The thalidomide tragedy in Canada initiated new efforts to produce functional prosthetic appliances for very young amputees. In 1962, the Rehabilitation Institute of Montreal began to fit 36 babies with adapted conventional and gas-operated devices. Practical experience with the Soviet prosthesis proved the feasibility of myoelectric control, and indicated the possibility of using skin electrodes over an active muscle for control purposes in children. We obtained assistance from the Northern Electric Company, whose research laboratories produced the prototype arms described in this report. An all-electric prosthetic system was developed which carries out four different movements driven by a single motor. Function is effected by switches, but a myoelectric control system could be readily adapted without major changes. In the description of our needs for the proposed arm, we asked for modular construction and a minimum service life of one year between major repairs. Details of design and performance are outlined in this report. Initial clinical experience indicates that the prosthesis is completely accepted by the young patient, in spite of its excessive weight and inconvenient control. Four powered joints give the child greater functional freedom. In future we plan to fit an older child and will study more bilateral installations in the next 14 months. After further use, study and improvement, this device will become a useful prosthesis. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:6021562

  5. Research and development of a versatile portable speech prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Versatile Portable Speech Prosthesis (VPSP), a synthetic speech output communication aid for non-speaking people is described. It was intended initially for severely physically limited people with cerebral palsy who are in electric wheelchairs. Hence, it was designed to be placed on a wheelchair and powered from a wheelchair battery. It can easily be separated from the wheelchair. The VPSP is versatile because it is designed to accept any means of single switch, multiple switch, or keyboard control which physically limited people have the ability to use. It is portable because it is mounted on and can go with the electric wheelchair. It is a speech prosthesis, obviously, because it speaks with a synthetic voice for people unable to speak with their own voices. Both hardware and software are described.

  6. Atypical Chronic Ankle Instability in a Pediatric Population Secondary to Distal Fibula Avulsion Fracture Nonunion.

    PubMed

    El Ashry, Saad R; El Gamal, Tarek A; Platt, Simon R

    Chronic ankle instability is a disabling condition, often occurring as a result of traumatic ankle injury. A paucity of published data is available documenting chronic ankle instability in the pediatric population. Much of the data has been confined to the adult population. We present 2 cases of chronic ankle instability, 1 in a 12-year-old and 1 in a 9-year-old patient. Unlike the typical adult etiology, the cause of instability was a dysfunctional lateral ligamentous complex as a consequence of bony avulsion of the tip of the fibula. Both patients had sustained a twisting injury to the ankle. The fractures failed to unite. The nonunion resulted in dysfunction of the anterior talofibular ligament with consequent chronic ankle instability. At the initial clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging was requested for both patients. In patient 1 (12 years old), the fracture was fixed with 2 headless screws and was immobilized in a plaster cast for 6 weeks. In patient 2 (9 years old), because of the small size of the avulsed fragment, fixation was not possible. A modified Gould-Broström procedure was undertaken, facilitating repair of the avulsed fragment using anchor sutures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Peroneal electromechanical delay and fatigue in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Flevas, Dimitrios A; Bernard, Manfred; Ristanis, Stavros; Moraiti, Constantina; Georgoulis, Anastasios D; Pappas, Evangelos

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic ankle instability (CAI) on electromechanical delay times (EMD) before and after fatigue. Understanding the mechanisms that contribute to CAI is essential for the development of effective rehabilitation programmes. It was hypothesized that patients with CAI will demonstrate prolonged EMD times compared to healthy subjects and that fatigue will cause greater increases in EMD times in the CAI group. Twenty-one male volunteers participated in the study providing data on 16 ankles with CAI and 26 with no history of ankle injury. EMD was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Measurements were taken with the ankle in neutral (0°) and at 30° of inversion. All subjects followed an isokinetic fatigue protocol until eversion torque fell below 50 % of initial torque for three consecutive repetitions. A 2 × 2 × 2 ANOVA was used to calculate the effect of ankle status (CAI vs. healthy), fatigue, angle (0° vs. 30°) and their interactions on EMD. Fatigue caused a significant increase on EMD [non-fatigued: 122(29)ms vs. fatigue 155(54)ms; p < 0.001]. EMD times were shorter at 30° of inversion compared to neutral [neutral: 145(39)ms vs. 30° of inversion: 132(40)ms, p = 0.015]. An interaction effect for ankle status and angle was found (p = 0.026) with CAI ankles demonstrating longer EMD [CAI: 156(45)ms vs. healthy: 133(40)ms] in neutral but not at 30° of inversion [CAI: 133(46)ms vs. 132(33)ms]. Patients with CAI had longer EMD times in neutral, but not when the ankle was placed in inversion. This suggests that rehabilitation programmes may be more effective when retraining occurs with the ankle in neutral position. It is likely that low EMD times prevent ankle acceleration at the beginning of the mechanism of injury, but they are less important when the ankle has already inverted at 30°. Both CAI and healthy subjects demonstrated longer EMD after fatigue, emphasizing the importance of proper

  8. Penile prosthesis implantation: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Simmons, M; Montague, D K

    2008-01-01

    Penile prosthesis implantation is the oldest effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. This review examines the past, present and future of penile prosthesis implantation. Advances in prosthetic design and implantation techniques have resulted today in devices that produce nearly normal flaccid and erect states, and have remarkable freedom from mechanical failure. The future of prosthetic design holds promises for even more improvements.

  9. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  10. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  11. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  12. 21 CFR 878.3550 - Chin prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chin prosthesis. 878.3550 Section 878.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3550 Chin prosthesis....

  13. 21 CFR 878.3550 - Chin prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chin prosthesis. 878.3550 Section 878.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3550 Chin prosthesis....

  14. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  15. 21 CFR 878.3550 - Chin prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chin prosthesis. 878.3550 Section 878.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3550 Chin prosthesis....

  16. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  17. 21 CFR 878.3680 - Nose prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nose prosthesis. 878.3680 Section 878.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3680 Nose prosthesis....

  18. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  19. 21 CFR 878.3680 - Nose prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nose prosthesis. 878.3680 Section 878.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3680 Nose prosthesis....

  20. 21 CFR 878.3680 - Nose prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nose prosthesis. 878.3680 Section 878.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3680 Nose prosthesis....

  1. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  2. 21 CFR 878.3550 - Chin prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chin prosthesis. 878.3550 Section 878.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3550 Chin prosthesis....

  3. 21 CFR 878.3680 - Nose prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nose prosthesis. 878.3680 Section 878.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3680 Nose prosthesis....

  4. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 878.3680 - Nose prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nose prosthesis. 878.3680 Section 878.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3680 Nose prosthesis....

  6. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 878.3550 - Chin prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chin prosthesis. 878.3550 Section 878.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3550 Chin prosthesis. (a...

  8. BIORESORBABLE POLYMERIC MENISCAL PROSTHESIS: STUDY IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Tulio Pereira; de Rezende Duek, Eliana Aparecida; Amatuzzi, Marco Martins; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To induce growth of a neomeniscus into the pores of a prosthesis in order to protect the knee joint cartilage. Methods: 70 knees of 35 New Zealand rabbits were operated. The rabbits were five to seven months old, weighed 2 to 3.8 kilograms, and 22 were male and 13 were female. Each animal underwent medial meniscectomy in both knees during a single operation. A bioabsorbable polymeric meniscal prosthesis composed of 70% polydioxanone and 30% L-lactic acid polymer was implanted in one side. The animals were sacrificed after different postoperative time intervals. The femoral condyles and neomeniscus were subjected to histological analysis. Histograms were used to measure the degradation and absorption of the prosthesis, the growth of meniscal tissue in the prosthesis and the degree of degradation of the femoral condyle joint cartilage. Results: The data obtained showed that tissue growth histologically resembling a normal meniscus occurred, with gradual absorption of the prosthesis, and the percentages of chondrocytes on the control side and prosthesis side. Conclusion: Tissue growth into the prosthesis pores that histologically resembled the normal rabbit meniscus was observed. The joint cartilage of the femoral condyles on the prosthesis side presented greater numbers of chondrocytes in all its layers. PMID:27022549

  9. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  10. Femoral Prosthesis Infection by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Savini, Vincenzo; Sozio, Federica; Catavitello, Chiara; Talia, Marzia; Manna, Assunta; Febbo, Fabio; Balbinot, Andrea; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Piccolomini, Raffaele; Parruti, Giustino; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    This case report is a case history of a femoral prosthesis infection caused by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in a human immunodeficiency virus patient. Though the pathogenicity of this organism for bone tissue has been previously reported, this is the first reported case of an orthopedic prosthesis infection by this species of the genus Rhodotorula. PMID:18753353

  11. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a...

  12. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a...

  13. Semiconstrained Distal Radioulnar Joint Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Savvidou, Christiana; Murphy, Erin; Mailhot, Emilie; Jacob, Shushan; Scheker, Luis R.

    2013-01-01

    Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) problems can occur as a result of joint instability, abutment, or incongruity. The DRUJ is a weight-bearing joint; the ulnar head is frequently excised either totally or partially, and in some cases it is fused, because of degenerative, rheumatoid, or posttraumatic arthritis. Articles about these procedures report the ability to pronate and supinate, but they rarely discuss grip strength, and even less do they address lifting capacity. We report the long term results of the first 35 patients who underwent total DRUJ arthroplasty with the Aptis DRUJ prosthesis after 5 years follow-up. Surgical indications were all causes of dysfunctional DRUJ (degenerative, posttraumatic, autoimmune, congenital). We recorded data for patient demographics, range of motion (ROM), strength, and lifting capacity of the operated and of the nonoperated extremity. Pain and functional assessments were also recorded. The Aptis DRUJ prosthesis, a bipolar self-stabilizing DRUJ endoprosthesis that restores forearm function, consists of a semiconstained and modular implant designed to replace the function of the ulnar head, the sigmoid notch of the radius, and the triangular fibrocartilage ligaments. The surgical technique is presented in detail. The majority of the patients regained adequate ROM and improved their strength and lifting capacity to the operated side. Pain and activities of daily living were improved. Twelve patients experienced complications, most commonly being extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendinitis, ectopic bone formation, bone resorption with stem loosening, low-grade infection, and need for ball replacement. The Aptis total DRUJ replacement prosthesis is an alternative to salvage procedures that enables a full range of motion as well as the ability to grip and lift weights encountered in daily living activities. PMID:24436788

  14. Penile Prosthesis Implantation in Priapism.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Ömer Barış; Pazır, Yaşar; Kadıoğlu, Ateş

    2017-09-12

    Priapism is defined as a full or partial erection lasting longer than 4 hours after sexual stimulation and orgasm or unrelated to sexual stimulation. The main goal of priapism management is to resolve the episode immediately to preserve erectile function and penile length. Corporal smooth muscle necrosis is likely to have already occurred, and medically refractory erectile dysfunction is expected in patients with a protracted episode. Penile prosthesis implantation (PPI) in the early or late phase of priapism can restore erectile function. To review the literature on PPI in priapism. A PubMed search of all English-language articles published before 2017 was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement using the following search terms: penile prosthesis implantation, priapism, and corporal fibrosis. All publications reporting on PPI during or after priapism episodes were included for review. Three types of priapism were reviewed for management using PPI. Surgical techniques, outcomes, and patient satisfaction were reported. Early implantation (during the episode) is technically easier and has lower complication rates compared with delayed (electively, after the erectile dysfunction is observed) surgery. Immediate PPI also allows preservation of penile length, which is related to higher satisfaction rates. The paradigm is shifting toward immediate PPI in the management of ischemic priapism. Patients with non-ischemic priapism or recurrent priapism, even without a major ischemic episode, are at high risk for erectile dysfunction and are candidates for PPI. Yücel ÖB, Pazir Y, Kadıoğlu A. Penile Prosthesis Implantation in Priapism. Sex Med Rev 2017;X:XXX-XXX. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Light-weight ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Brito Edias, R; Rezende, J R; Carvalho, J C

    1994-01-01

    The authors propose a variation of the technique for making ocular protheses for large ophthalmic cavities introducing an expanded polystyrene (styrofoam) to the acrylic resin at the time of making the prosthetic sclera, aiming at reducing the weight of the prosthesis and thus improving mobility and aesthetics. This study compares the differences in weight, absorption of water and resistance to rupture by hydrostatic pressure of the pieces made of acrylic resin, chemically activated, heat activated and cross-linked by the proposed technique and by the technique for hollow ocular prothesis. The proposed technique presents advantages in manufacturing time and handling of the material.

  16. Parametric modelling of a knee joint prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, L P; Goh, J C; Chow, S L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the establishment of a parametric model of knee joint prosthesis. Four different sizes of a commercial prosthesis are used as an example in the study. A reverse engineering technique was employed to reconstruct the prosthesis on CATIA, a CAD (computer aided design) system. Parametric models were established as a result of the analysis. Using the parametric model established and the knee data obtained from a clinical study on 21 pairs of cadaveric Asian knees, the development of a prototype prosthesis that suits a patient with a very small knee joint is presented. However, it was found that modification to certain parameters may be inevitable due to the uniqueness of the Asian knee. An avenue for rapid modelling and eventually economical production of a customized knee joint prosthesis for patients is proposed and discussed.

  17. Automatic modeling of pectus excavatum corrective prosthesis using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Pedro L; Rodrigues, Nuno F; Pinho, A C M; Fonseca, Jaime C; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Vilaça, João L

    2014-10-01

    Pectus excavatum is the most common deformity of the thorax. Pre-operative diagnosis usually includes Computed Tomography (CT) to successfully employ a thoracic prosthesis for anterior chest wall remodeling. Aiming at the elimination of radiation exposure, this paper presents a novel methodology for the replacement of CT by a 3D laser scanner (radiation-free) for prosthesis modeling. The complete elimination of CT is based on an accurate determination of ribs position and prosthesis placement region through skin surface points. The developed solution resorts to a normalized and combined outcome of an artificial neural network (ANN) set. Each ANN model was trained with data vectors from 165 male patients and using soft tissue thicknesses (STT) comprising information from the skin and rib cage (automatically determined by image processing algorithms). Tests revealed that ribs position for prosthesis placement and modeling can be estimated with an average error of 5.0 ± 3.6mm. One also showed that the ANN performance can be improved by introducing a manually determined initial STT value in the ANN normalization procedure (average error of 2.82 ± 0.76 mm). Such error range is well below current prosthesis manual modeling (approximately 11 mm), which can provide a valuable and radiation-free procedure for prosthesis personalization. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Robotic radical prostatectomy in patients with preexisting inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP).

    PubMed

    Rehman, Jamil; Guru, Khurshid; Chughtai, Bilal; Shabsigh, Ridwan; Samadi, David

    2008-10-01

    We present our initial experience with performing robotic-assisted prostatectomies in men with a 3-piece inflatable penile prosthesis with a pelvic reservoir. Four patients underwent transperitoneal robotic-assisted radical prostatectomies with a penile prosthetic implant in place. The reservoir was left inflated for easy identification. A flaccid reservoir may be more difficult to identify, and be prone to damage. The reservoir was left attached to the abdominal wall. Dissection was performed outside the fibrous capsule of the reservoir. The tissue around the capsule of the reservoir peeled off without difficulty. Cutting current close to the capsule can be used if needed as per American Medical System with no limit to voltage. The penile prosthesis is then inflated to empty the reservoir creating more prevesical space and preventing the reservoir from obscuring visualization. The remaining portion of the procedure is completed using our standard technique. After completing the urethrovesical anastomosis using the 16 French Foley, the prosthesis is cycled under direct vision and the penile prosthesis is deflated (reservoir full). The prosthesis is not used for 6 weeks to prevent stretching of the urethrovesical anastomosis. All patients (n = 4) had no reported complications and all prostheses are functioning properly. The margin status was negative postoperatively. Robotic prostatectomy is technically feasible in patients with inflatable penile prostheses by surgeons experienced in robotic surgery. However, the presence of an indwelling penile prosthesis does increase the complexity of surgery.

  19. Treatment options for ankle ligament sprain.

    PubMed

    Slade, Harmony

    2012-02-01

    There is a wealth of literature on the management of ankle sprains, but the quality of evidence is variable and conclusions diverge. Practice in emergency departments (EDs) also varies and in some cases does not reflect the evidence base. This article reviews some of the most recent research on the subject and suggests air-stirrup ankle braces can be used in EDs for management of moderate and severe ankle sprains.

  20. Posterior ankle impingement in the dancer.

    PubMed

    Moser, Brad R

    2011-01-01

    Dancers spend a lot of time in the relevé position in demi-pointe and en pointe in their training and their careers. Pain from both osseous and soft tissue causes may start to occur in the posterior aspect of their ankle. This article reviews the potential causes of posterior ankle impingement in dancers. It will discuss the clinical evaluation of a dancer and the appropriate workup and radiographic studies needed to further evaluate a dancer with suspected posterior ankle impingement.

  1. Effects of Neuromuscular Training on the Rear-foot Angle Kinematics in Elite Women Field Hockey Players with Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunkuk; Choi, Hokyung; Cha, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Chul; Kim, Taegyu

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the ankle position, the changes and persistence of ankle kinematics after neuromuscular training in athletes with chronic ankle instability (CAI). A total of 21 national women’s field hockey players participated (CAI = 12, control = 9). Ankle position at heel strike (HS), midstance (MS), and toe touch (TT) in the frontal plane during walking, running and landing were measured using 3D motion analysis. A 6-week neuromuscular training program was undertaken by the CAI group. Measurements of kinematic data for both groups were measured at baseline and the changes in kinematic data for CAI group were measured at 6 and 24 weeks. The kinematic data at HS during walking and running demonstrated that the magnitude of the eversion in the CAI group (−5.00° and −4.21°) was less than in the control group (−13.45°and −9.62°). The kinematic data at MS also exhibited less ankle eversion in the CAI group (−9.36° and −8.18°) than in the control group (−18.52° and −15.88°). Ankle positions at TT during landing were comparable between groups. Following the 6-week training, the CAI participants demonstrated a less everted ankle at HS during walking and running (−1.77° and −1.76°) compared to the previous positions. They also showed less ankle eversion at MS (−5.14° and −4.19°). Ankle orientation at TT changed significantly to an inverted ankle position (from −0.26° to 4.11°). The ankle kinematics were restored back to the previous positions at 24 weeks except for landing. It appeared that athletes with unstable ankle had a relatively inverted ankle position, and that 6-week neuromuscular training had an immediate effect on changing ankle orientation toward a less everted direction. The changed ankle kinematics seemed to persist during landing but not during walking and running. Key points Athletes with unstable ankles had a relatively inverted ankle position during the initial contact and midstance

  2. Non-weight-bearing neural control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses have traditionally been mechanically passive devices without electronic control systems. Microprocessor-controlled passive and powered devices have recently received much interest from the clinical and research communities. The control systems for these devices typically use finite-state controllers to interpret data measured from mechanical sensors embedded within the prosthesis. In this paper we investigated a control system that relied on information extracted from myoelectric signals to control a lower limb prosthesis while amputee patients were seated. Sagittal plane motions of the knee and ankle can be accurately (>90%) recognized and controlled in both a virtual environment and on an actuated transfemoral prosthesis using only myoelectric signals measured from nine residual thigh muscles. Patients also demonstrated accurate (~90%) control of both the femoral and tibial rotation degrees of freedom within the virtual environment. A channel subset investigation was completed and the results showed that only five residual thigh muscles are required to achieve accurate control. This research is the first step in our long-term goal of implementing myoelectric control of lower limb prostheses during both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities for individuals with transfemoral amputation. PMID:23782953

  3. Non-weight-bearing neural control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, Levi J; Simon, Ann M; Lipschutz, Robert; Finucane, Suzanne B; Kuiken, Todd A

    2013-06-19

    Lower limb prostheses have traditionally been mechanically passive devices without electronic control systems. Microprocessor-controlled passive and powered devices have recently received much interest from the clinical and research communities. The control systems for these devices typically use finite-state controllers to interpret data measured from mechanical sensors embedded within the prosthesis. In this paper we investigated a control system that relied on information extracted from myoelectric signals to control a lower limb prosthesis while amputee patients were seated. Sagittal plane motions of the knee and ankle can be accurately (>90%) recognized and controlled in both a virtual environment and on an actuated transfemoral prosthesis using only myoelectric signals measured from nine residual thigh muscles. Patients also demonstrated accurate (~90%) control of both the femoral and tibial rotation degrees of freedom within the virtual environment. A channel subset investigation was completed and the results showed that only five residual thigh muscles are required to achieve accurate control. This research is the first step in our long-term goal of implementing myoelectric control of lower limb prostheses during both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities for individuals with transfemoral amputation.

  4. Functional Anatomy, Pathomechanics, and Pathophysiology of Lateral Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Jay

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the functional anatomy of the ankle complex as it relates to lateral ankle instability and to describe the pathomechanics and pathophysiology of acute lateral ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE (1985–2001) and CINAHL (1982–2001) using the key words ankle sprain and ankle instability. Data Synthesis: Lateral ankle sprains are among the most common injuries incurred during sports participation. The ankle functions as a complex with contributions from the talocrural, subtalar, and inferior tibiofibular joints. Each of these joints must be considered in the pathomechanics and pathophysiology of lateral ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. Lateral ankle sprains typically occur when the rearfoot undergoes excessive supination on an externally rotated lower leg. Recurrent ankle sprain is extremely common; in fact, the most common predisposition to suffering a sprain is the history of having suffered a previous ankle sprain. Chronic ankle instability may be due to mechanical instability, functional instability, or most likely, a combination of these 2 phenomena. Mechanical instability may be due to specific insufficiencies such as pathologic laxity, arthrokinematic changes, synovial irritation, or degenerative changes. Functional instability is caused by insufficiencies in proprioception and neuromuscular control. Conclusions/Recommendations: Lateral ankle sprains are often inadequately treated, resulting in frequent recurrence of ankle sprains. Appreciation of the complex anatomy and mechanics of the ankle joint and the pathomechanics and pathophysiology related to acute and chronic ankle instability is integral to the process of effectively evaluating and treating ankle injuries. PMID:12937557

  5. Ankle instability and arthroscopic lateral ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle ligament insufficiency has focused on 2 main categories: local soft-tissue reconstruction and tendon grafts/transfer procedures. There is an increasing interest in the arthroscopic solutions for chronic instability of the ankle. Recent biomechanical studies suggest the at least one of the arthroscopic techniques can provide equivalent results to current open local soft-tissue reconstruction (such as the modified Brostrom technique). Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction is becoming an increasingly acceptable method for the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Complications of Pediatric Foot and Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Denning, Jaime R

    2017-01-01

    Ankle fractures account for 5% and foot fractures account for approximately 8% of fractures in children. Some complications are evident early in the treatment or natural history of foot and ankle fractures. Other complications do not become apparent until weeks, months, or years after the original fracture. The incidence of long-term sequelae like posttraumatic arthritis from childhood foot and ankle fractures is poorly studied because decades or lifelong follow-up has frequently not been accomplished. This article discusses a variety of complications associated with foot and ankle fractures in children or the treatment of these injuries.

  7. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E.; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice. PMID:27134529

  8. Movement discrimination after intra‐articular local anaesthetic of the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Down, Stuart; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Thomson, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Background The effect on clinical safety of dampening articular mechanoreceptor feedback at the ankle is unknown. Injection of the ankle joint for pain control may result in such dampening. Athletes receiving intra‐articular local anaesthetic may therefore be at increased risk of sustaining ankle injuries, which are a common reason for missed sporting participation. Objective To determine the effect of intra‐articular local anaesthetic on movement discrimination at the ankle joint. Design Prospective, randomised, double‐blinded, placebo‐controlled, cross‐over trial. Setting Australian Institute of Sport Medical Centre, Canberra, Australia. Patients Twenty two healthy subjects (44 ankles) aged 18–26 were recruited for the three visits of the study. Interventions Subjects were tested for their initial movement discrimination scores using the active movement extent discrimination apparatus (AMEDA). They then received ultrasound‐guided intra‐articular injections of local anaesthetic (2% lignocaine hydrochloride) or normal saline, on two separate later occasions, before further AMEDA assessment. Main outcome measures Change in movement discrimination scores after intra‐articular injection of local anaesthetic or saline. Results Movement discrimination scores were not significantly different from control ankles after injection of either local anaesthetic or saline into the ankle joint. Conclusions The intra‐articular injection of neither 2 ml lignocaine nor an equivalent amount of normal saline resulted in significant effects on movement discrimination at the ankle joint. These results suggest that injections of local anaesthetic into the ankle joint are unlikely to significantly affect proprioception and thereby increase injury risk. PMID:17341587

  9. Foot and ankle injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, J; Joy, E

    2000-04-01

    Acute traumatic injuries are common in ballet dancers. A careful history, thorough examination, and appropriate imaging should allow for the diagnosis of most problems. The clinician must have a high index of suspicion for occult bony injuries, especially if the patient fails to recover as expected. Aggressive treatment of the sprained ankle is essential to maintain foot and ankle mobility and prevent prolonged disability and subsequent overuse injuries. Kinetic chain dysfunctions are common in ballet dancers with overuse injuries and commonly follow ankle sprains. They may represent a secondary phenomenon that developed in response to the compensatory movement changes caused by the initial injury. It is important to remember, however, that these dysfunctions may have been long standing and a causative factor in the injury. Regardless of the time of onset of the dysfunction, residual kinetic chain dysfunction associated with incomplete rehabilitation of an injury may predispose the dancer to further injuries. Untreated dysfunctions at one site in the kinetic chain may predispose to compensatory dysfunction at other sites in the chain. Accordingly, it is essential to thoroughly examine the entire chain for functional movements when dealing with an injury, because identification and treatment of the kinetic chain dysfunction is important in the rehabilitation of the dancing athlete. Kinetic chain dysfunctions are common in injured ballet dancers and may be a cause of repeated injury. Why then are these dysfunctions left untreated? Medical personnel caring for dancers are sometimes guilty of tunnel vision, and focus solely on the injured site without considering what is happening at other sites in the kinetic chain. This oversight is compounded when the physicians or therapists are satisfied with discovering simply what injury has occurred rather than asking why the injury has occurred. The significance of kinetic chain dysfunctions is only just beginning to be

  10. Search the Foot and Ankle: Interactive Foot Diagram

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  11. The relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Stephanie; Moore, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    The lateral ligament complex of the ankle is the most frequently injured structure in the body. Although most simple ankle sprains do not result in long-term disability, a significant number do not completely resolve, leading to residual symptoms that may persist for years. The most commonly reported symptoms, particularly among athletes, include instability, re-injury, and tendinitis. Ballet dancers are a combination of artist and high-performance athlete; consequently, they are subjected to the same types of injuries as other athletes, including lateral ankle sprains and their sequelae. Furthermore, ballet dancers perform in unusual positions such as en pointe, which places the ankle in extreme plantar flexion, requiring stabilization by surrounding muscles. Dancers' extraordinary performance demands place them at risk for other ankle injuries as well, including inflammation ofseveral tendons, especially the peroneals. This report reviews the relevant literature to characterize the scope of lateral ankle sprains and sequelae, discuss the importance of the peroneal muscles in ankle stability, and explore a relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers. Informal interviews were conducted with physical therapists who specialize in treating ballet dancers, providing a clinical context for this report. An extensive review of the literature was conducted, including electronic databases, reference lists from papers, and relevant reference texts. Numerous studies have investigated ankle sprains and residual complaints; nearly all report that lateral ankle sprains commonly lead to chronic ankle instability. Studies exploring ankle stability have demonstrated that the peroneal muscles play a crucial role in ankle stabilization; EMG studies confirm they are the first to contract during ankle inversion stress. The dancer's need for exceptional ankle stabilization may lead to peroneal overuse and tendinitis. Studies have linked peroneal

  12. Retinal prosthesis for the blind.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Maia, Mauricio; Weiland, James D; Greenberg, Robert J; Fujii, Gildo Y; Torres, Gustavo; Piyathaisere, Duke V; O'Hearn, Thomas M; Liu, Wentai; Lazzi, Gianluca; Dagnelie, Gislin; Scribner, Dean A; de Juan, Eugene; Humayun, Mark S

    2002-01-01

    Most of current concepts for a visual prosthesis are based on neuronal electrical stimulation at different locations along the visual pathways within the central nervous system. The different designs of visual prostheses are named according to their locations (i.e., cortical, optic nerve, subretinal, and epiretinal). Visual loss caused by outer retinal degeneration in diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration can be reversed by electrical stimulation of the retina or the optic nerve (retinal or optic nerve prostheses, respectively). On the other hand, visual loss caused by inner or whole thickness retinal diseases, eye loss, optic nerve diseases (tumors, ischemia, inflammatory processes etc.), or diseases of the central nervous system (not including diseases of the primary and secondary visual cortices) can be reversed by a cortical visual prosthesis. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of current and future concepts of retinal and optic nerve prostheses. This article will begin with general considerations that are related to all or most of visual prostheses and then concentrate on the retinal and optic nerve designs. The authors believe that the field has grown beyond the scope of a single article so cortical prostheses will be described only because of their direct effect on the concept and technical development of the other prostheses, and this will be done in a more general and historic perspective.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc prosthesis...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint prosthesis...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint prosthesis...

  16. Ankle Injuries and Ankle Strength, Flexibility, and Proprioception in College Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Kristen A.; Berg, Kris; Latin, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To determine if ankle muscular strength, flexibility and proprioception can predict ankle injury in college basketball players and to compare ankle injury rates in female and male players. Design and Setting: In this prospective, correlational study, subjects were tested at the start of the competitive season for ankle joint muscle strength, flexibility, and proprioception. The first ankle injury for each subject was recorded on an injury report form, and the data were analyzed to determine if any of these preseason measurements predicted future injury. The setting was a competitive 9-week season for four women's and four men's college basketball teams. Subjects: A convenience sample of 31 female and 11 male college basketball players. Measurements: Subjects were tested for ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, various measures of ankle proprioception, and isokinetic peak torque of ankle dorsiflexion-plantar flexion and eversion-inversion at 30°/sec and 180°/sec before the start of the conference basketball seasons. Data were analyzed using a series of multiple regression equations to determine the variance in ankle injury attributed to each variable. Results: Various measures of proprioception predicted left ankle injury in all subjects (p < .05), while ankle strength and flexibility measures failed to account for additional variance. There was no statistically significant difference in ankle injury rate between women and men. Conclusions: Ankle joint proprioceptive deficits can be used to predict ankle injury, but further research is needed to identify other sources of variance. In our study, ankle injury rate was similar in female and male college basketball players. PMID:16558453

  17. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    PubMed Central

    Porter, David A; Jaggers, Ryan R; Barnes, Adam Fitzgerald; Rund, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains), and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid) and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on controlling swelling and recovery from surgery. The protocols then progress to restoration of motion, early protected weight bearing, restoration of strength, and eventually a

  18. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries.

    PubMed

    Porter, David A; Jaggers, Ryan R; Barnes, Adam Fitzgerald; Rund, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains), and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid) and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on controlling swelling and recovery from surgery. The protocols then progress to restoration of motion, early protected weight bearing, restoration of strength, and eventually a

  19. Comparison of hearing results of nitinol SMART stapes piston prosthesis with conventional piston prostheses: postoperative results of nitinol stapes prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeffrey P; Gong, Shusheng

    2007-08-01

    Recently, a new stapedotomy piston prosthesis, which is a composite metal alloy of nickel and titanium known as nitinol, has been introduced into medical use. This biocompatible alloy has the unique property of shape-memory, which permits tight self-crimping when heat is applied to the wire. To substantiate the favorable initial observations with the SMART piston, this study was undertaken to compare these results (n=26) with those obtained using conventional stainless steel or platinum ribbon prostheses (n=28). Prospective consecutive case review: consecutive cases performed by the same surgeon were analyzed. Tertiary referral center. Fifty-four healthy patients with otosclerosis. Stapedotomy using either SMART prosthesis or conventional prosthesis. Hearing outcomes by audiological assessment. The postoperative hearing mean pure-tone average was 24.81+/-16.20 dBHL for Group 1 (SMART prosthesis) and 27.46+/-15.57 dBHL for Group 2 (conventional prosthesis). Postoperative mean air-bone gap was 7.07+/-8.14 dBHL for Group 1 and 6.38+/-7.54 dBHL for Group 2 using 0.5-, 1-, 2-, and 4-kHz frequencies. When analyzed according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery reporting criteria using an estimate of 3 kHz as a mean of the 2-and 4-kHz values, the postoperative mean air-bone gap was 5.42+/-5.4 dBHL for Group 1 SMART and 5.98+/-5.47 dBHL for Group 2 conventional prostheses. Postoperative speech discrimination scores were 96%+/-8.64% and 97%+/-5.9%, respectively. These differences were not shown to be statistically different. Results demonstrate that experienced surgeons may achieve comparable results with both prostheses; however, the ease of self-crimping and the tightness of the crimp may provide advantages that may have long-term benefits. The potential issue of nickel allergy is important when considering patients for this prosthesis.

  20. Reverse shoulder prosthesis: implementation and experience in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Benčić, Ivan; Matejčić, Aljoša; Dojčinović, Bojan; Ćuti, Tomislav

    2014-09-01

    Reverse shoulder prosthesis has become one of the most often used prosthetic implants in shoulder replacement surgery. It has a wide spectrum of indications, starting from comminuted humeral fractures and posttraumatic arthritis to arthritis caused by the rotator cuff loss. Its application at our hospital began in 2004, at first in few specific cases and with time in ever growing number of patients. Over 8 years, more than 250 reverse shoulder prostheses were implanted at our institution. In addition, our surgeons supervised its application in other hospitals all over Croatia. In the postoperative course, the shoulder was immobilized for 4-6 weeks with a thoracobrachial cast. After removal of the cast, physical therapy was initiated. The length of physical therapy program depended upon many factors. As a rule, immobilization lasted longer in patients that were operated on due to posttraumatic arthritis and those that suffered from deltoid muscle atrophy and shoulder contracture before surgery. Complications included dislocation of the prosthesis shortly after surgery (in the first four weeks) and infection. Infection was a special problem and treatment included even explantation of the prosthesis.

  1. Lower limb prosthesis utilisation by elderly amputees.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, S; Hébert, R; Desrosiers, J

    2000-08-01

    The goal of prosthetic rehabilitation is to compensate for the loss of a limb by amputation by, in the case of a lower limb, encouraging walking, and to achieve the same level of autonomy as prior to the amputation. However, because of difficulties walking, elderly amputees may use their prosthesis to a greater or lesser degree or simply stop using it during the rehabilitation period. The objective of this research was to study factors such as physical and mental health, rehabilitation, physical independence and satisfaction with the prosthesis to understand why amputees use their prosthesis or not. The sample was composed of 65 unilateral vascular amputees 60 years old or over living at home. The information was collected from medical records, by telephone interview and by mail questionnaire. Prosthesis use was measured by a questionnaire on amputee activities developed by Day (1981). Eighty-one per cent (81%) of the subjects wore their prosthesis every day and 89% of this group wore it 6 hours or more per day. Less use of the prosthesis was significantly related to age, female gender, possession of a wheelchair, level of physical disability, cognitive impairment, poorer self-perceived health and the amputee's dissatisfaction. A multiple regression analysis showed that satisfaction, not possessing a wheelchair and cognitive integrity explained 46% of the variance in prosthesis use.

  2. Functional ankle instability as a risk factor for osteoarthritis: using T2-mapping to analyze early cartilage degeneration in the ankle joint of young athletes.

    PubMed

    Golditz, T; Steib, S; Pfeifer, K; Uder, M; Gelse, K; Janka, R; Hennig, F F; Welsch, G H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, using T2-mapping, the impact of functional instability in the ankle joint on the development of early cartilage damage. Ethical approval for this study was provided. Thirty-six volunteers from the university sports program were divided into three groups according to their ankle status: functional ankle instability (FAI, initial ankle sprain with residual instability); ankle sprain Copers (initial sprain, without residual instability); and controls (without a history of ankle injuries). Quantitative T2-mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at the beginning ('early-unloading') and at the end ('late-unloading') of the MR-examination, with a mean time span of 27 min. Zonal region-of-interest T2-mapping was performed on the talar and tibial cartilage in the deep and superficial layers. The inter-group comparisons of T2-values were analyzed using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical analysis of variance was performed. T2-values showed significant to highly significant differences in 11 of 12 regions throughout the groups. In early-unloading, the FAI-group showed a significant increase in quantitative T2-values in the medial, talar regions (P = 0.008, P = 0.027), whereas the Coper-group showed this enhancement in the central-lateral regions (P = 0.05). Especially the comparison of early-loading to late-unloading values revealed significantly decreasing T2-values over time laterally and significantly increasing T2-values medially in the FAI-group, which were not present in the Coper- or control-group. Functional instability causes unbalanced loading in the ankle joint, resulting in cartilage alterations as assessed by quantitative T2-mapping. This approach can visualize and localize early cartilage abnormalities, possibly enabling specific treatment options to prevent osteoarthritis in young athletes. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relevance of adjacent joint imaging in the evaluation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Antoci, Valentin; Patel, Shaun P; Weaver, Michael J; Kwon, John Y

    2016-10-01

    Routinely obtaining adjacent joint radiographs when evaluating patients with ankle fractures may be of limited clinical utility and an unnecessary burden, particularly in the absence of clinical suspicion for concomitant injuries. One thousand, three hundred and seventy patients who sustained ankle fractures over a 5-year period presenting to two level 1 trauma centers were identified. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, physical examination findings, and radiographic information. Analyses included descriptive statistics along with sensitivity and predictive value calculations for the presence of adjacent joint fracture. Adjacent joint imaging (n=1045 radiographs) of either the knee or foot was obtained in 873 patients (63.7%). Of those, 75/761 patients (9.9%) demonstrated additional fractures proximal to the ankle joint, most commonly of the proximal fibula. Twenty-two of 284 (7.7%) demonstrated additional fractures distal to the ankle joint, most commonly of the metatarsals. Tenderness to palpation demonstrated sensitivities of 0.92 and 0.77 and positive predictive values of 0.94 and 0.89 for the presence of proximal and distal fractures, respectively. Additionally, 19/22 (86.4%) of patients sustaining foot fractures had their injury detectable on initial ankle X-rays. Overall, only 5.5% (75/1370) of patients sustained fractures proximal to the ankle and only 0.2% (3/1370) of patients had additional foot fractures not evident on initial ankle X-rays. The addition of adjacent joint imaging for the evaluation of patients sustaining ankle fractures is low yield. As such, patient history, physical examination, and clinical suspicion should direct the need for additional X-rays. Level IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impulsive ankle push-off powers leg swing in human walking.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Susanne W; Günther, Michael; Renjewski, Daniel; Seyfarth, Andre

    2014-04-15

    Rapid unloading and a peak in power output of the ankle joint have been widely observed during push-off in human walking. Model-based studies hypothesize that this push-off causes redirection of the body center of mass just before touch-down of the leading leg. Other research suggests that work done by the ankle extensors provides kinetic energy for the initiation of swing. Also, muscle work is suggested to power a catapult-like action in late stance of human walking. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the biomechanical process leading to this widely observed high power output of the ankle extensors. In our study, we use kinematic and dynamic data of human walking collected at speeds between 0.5 and 2.5 m s(-1) for a comprehensive analysis of push-off mechanics. We identify two distinct phases, which divide the push-off: first, starting with positive ankle power output, an alleviation phase, where the trailing leg is alleviated from supporting the body mass, and second, a launching phase, where stored energy in the ankle joint is released. Our results show a release of just a small part of the energy stored in the ankle joint during the alleviation phase. A larger impulse for the trailing leg than for the remaining body is observed during the launching phase. Here, the buckling knee joint inhibits transfer of power from the ankle to the remaining body. It appears that swing initiation profits from an impulsive ankle push-off resulting from a catapult without escapement.

  5. Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle treated by total ankle replacement: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barg, A; Elsner, A; Hefti, D; Hintermann, B

    2010-07-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint in haemophilic patients has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is still controversial as a treatment option. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the mid-term outcome in patients treated with total ankle replacement using an unconstrained three-component ankle implant. Ten haemophilic ankles in eight patients (mean age: 43.2 years, range 26.7-57.5) treated with total ankle replacement were followed up for a minimum of 2.7 years (mean: 5.6, range 2.7-7.6). The outcome was measured with clinical and radiological evaluations. There were no intra- or peri-operative complications. The AOFAS-hindfoot-score increased from 38 (range 8-57) preoperatively to 81 (range 69-95) postoperatively. All patients were satisfied with the results. Four patients became pain free; in the whole patient cohort pain level decreased from 7.1 (range 4-9) preoperatively to 0.8 (range 0-3) postoperatively. All categories of SF-36 score showed significant improvements in quality of life. In one patient, open ankle arthrolysis was performed because of painful arthrofibrosis. For patients with haemophilic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint, total ankle replacement is a valuable alternative treatment to ankle fusion.

  6. A configuration dependent muscle model for the myoelectric control of a transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Carl D; Fite, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a torque-based myoelectric impedance controller for an active-knee transfemoral prosthesis. An anthropomorphically inspired agonist-antagonist impedance controller studied in a myoelectric elbow prosthesis is adapted for the knee joint. To parameterize the controller, regression analysis was applied to a recently updated lower-extremity neuromuscular simulation model that provides estimates of knee torque as a function of knee angle and neural activation. Initial results using a constant moment arm suggest physically unreasonable parameters and poor model performance, but the inclusion of an angle-dependent moment arm in the reduced-order muscle model enables good correlation with the high-order neuromuscular model. The resulting limb controller is tested using a 1-DOF active knee prosthesis donned by a non-amputee subject with an able-bodied adapter. Initial treadmill walking tests demonstrate the potential of this controller to enable effective myoelectric control of the prosthetic limb. © 2011 IEEE

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic ankle pain.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K; Tuason, Dominick A

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for chronic ankle pain is quite broad. Ankle pain can be caused by intra-articular or extra-articular pathology and may be a result of a traumatic or nontraumatic event. A detailed patient history and physical examination, coupled with judicious selection of the appropriate imaging modalities, are vital in making an accurate diagnosis and providing effective treatment. Chronic ankle pain can affect all age groups, ranging from young athletes to elderly patients with degenerative joint and soft-tissue disorders. It has been estimated that 23,000 ankle sprains occur each day in the United States, representing approximately 1 sprain per 10,000 people per day. Because nearly one in five ankle injuries result in chronic symptoms, orthopaedic surgeons are likely to see patients with chronic ankle pain. Many patients with chronic ankle pain do not recall any history of trauma. Reviewing the management of the various disorders that can cause chronic ankle pain will help orthopaedic surgeons provide the best treatment for their patients.

  8. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening

  9. Prosthesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... work better. Diseased or missing eyes, arms, hands, legs, or joints are commonly replaced by prosthetic devices. False teeth are known as dental prostheses. An artificial replacement of the jaw bone is called a ...

  10. Is balance impaired by recurrent sprained ankle?

    PubMed Central

    Isakov, E; Mizrahi, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate uninjured and recurrent sprained ankles during single leg standing, both with and without visual input, and the contribution of related proprioceptive feedback in this event. METHODS: A force measuring system was used for monitoring reaction forces in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions during single leg standing. Differences between selected variables obtained in the uninjured and sprained ankles were analysed using two way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Foot-ground reaction forces in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were the same in normal and sprained ankles of each subject while standing with either open or closed eyes. However, standing with closed eyes, irrespective of the ankle status, always produced significantly higher reaction forces than those obtained with open eyes (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The amount of postural sway during single leg standing is similar in the chronically sprained and the uninjured ankle joint. Images p66-a PMID:9132216

  11. [Lateral instability of the upper ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Harrasser, N; Eichelberg, K; Pohlig, F; Waizy, H; Toepfer, A; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2016-11-01

    Because of their frequency, ankle sprains are of major clinical and economic importance. The simple sprain with uneventful healing has to be distinguished from the potentially complicated sprain which is at risk of transition to chronic ankle instability. Conservative treatment is indicated for the acute, simple ankle sprain without accompanying injuries and also in cases of chronic instability. If conservative treatment fails, good results can be achieved by anatomic ligament reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments. Arthroscopic techniques offer the advantage of joint inspection and addressing intra-articular pathologies in combination with ligament repair. Accompanying pathologies must be adequately addressed during ligament repair to avoid persistent ankle discomfort. If syndesmotic insufficiency and tibiofibular instability are suspected, the objective should be early diagnosis with MRI and surgical repair.

  12. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  13. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  14. The effect of a knee ankle foot orthosis incorporating an active knee mechanism on gait of a person with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Chitsazan, Ahmad; Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Ghomshe, Farhad Tabatabai; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this case study was to identify the effect of a powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis on the kinematics and temporospatial parameters of walking by a person with poliomyelitis when compared to a knee ankle foot orthosis. A knee ankle foot orthosis was initially manufactured by incorporating drop lock knee joints and custom molded ankle foot orthoses and fitted to a person with poliomyelitis. The orthosis was then adapted by adding electrically activated powered knee joints to provide knee extension torque during stance and also flexion torque in swing phase. Lower limb kinematic and kinetic data plus data for temporospatial parameters were acquired from three test walks using each orthosis. Walking speed, step length, and vertical and horizontal displacement of the pelvis decreased when walking with the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis compared to the knee ankle foot orthosis. When using the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis, the knee flexion achieved during swing and also the overall pattern of walking more closely matched that of normal human walking. The reduced walking speed may have caused the smaller compensatory motions detected when the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis was used. The new powered SCKAFO facilitated controlled knee flexion and extension during ambulation for a volunteer poliomyelitis person.

  15. Automated lower limb prosthesis design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Gulab H.; Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1994-09-01

    The design of lower limb prostheses requires definitive geometric data to customize socket shape. Optical surface imaging and spiral x-ray computed tomography were applied to geometric analysis of limb residua in below knee (BK) amputees. Residua (limb remnants after amputation) of BK amputees were digitized and measured. Surface (optical) and volumetric (CT) data of the residuum were used to generate solid models and specify socket shape in (SDRC I-DEAS) CAD software. Volume measurements on the solid models were found to correspond within 2% of surface models and direct determinations made using Archimedean weighing. Anatomic 3D reconstruction of the residuum by optical surface and spiral x-ray computed tomography imaging are feasible modalities for prosthesis design.

  16. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-01-01

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis. PMID:23988821

  17. Visuomotor behaviours when using a myoelectric prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent study showed that the gaze patterns of amputee users of myoelectric prostheses differ markedly from those seen in anatomically intact subjects. Gaze behaviour is a promising outcome measures for prosthesis designers, as it appears to reflect the strategies adopted by amputees to compensate for the absence of proprioceptive feedback and uncertainty/delays in the control system, factors believed to be central to the difficulty in using prostheses. The primary aim of our study was to characterise visuomotor behaviours over learning to use a trans-radial myoelectric prosthesis. Secondly, as there are logistical advantages to using anatomically intact subjects in prosthesis evaluation studies, we investigated similarities in visuomotor behaviours between anatomically intact users of a trans-radial prosthesis simulator and experienced trans-radial myoelectric prosthesis users. Methods In part 1 of the study, we investigated visuomotor behaviours during performance of a functional task (reaching, grasping and manipulating a carton) in a group of seven anatomically intact subjects over learning to use a trans-radial myoelectric prosthesis simulator (Dataset 1). Secondly, we compared their patterns of visuomotor behaviour with those of four experienced trans-radial myoelectric prosthesis users (Dataset 2). We recorded task movement time, performance on the SHAP test of hand function and gaze behaviour. Results Dataset 1 showed that while reaching and grasping the object, anatomically intact subjects using the prosthesis simulator devoted around 90% of their visual attention to either the hand or the area of the object to be grasped. This pattern of behaviour did not change with training, and similar patterns were seen in Dataset 2. Anatomically intact subjects exhibited significant increases in task duration at their first attempts to use the prosthesis simulator. At the end of training, the values had decreased and were similar to those seen in Dataset

  18. Comparison of the Otto Bock solid ankle cushion heel foot with wooden keel to the low-cost CR-Equipements(™) solid ankle cushion heel foot with polypropylene keel: A randomized prospective double-blind crossover study assessing patient satisfaction and energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Lacraz, Alain; Armand, Stéphane; Turcot, Katia; Carmona, Gorki; Stern, Richard; Borens, Olivier; Assal, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    The International Committee of the Red Cross supports a worldwide program of prosthetic fitting and rehabilitation. In this context, a prosthetic foot was developed and widely distributed in least developed countries. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study. To compare patient satisfaction and energy expenditure during ambulation between a low-cost prosthetic foot designed with a polypropylene keel (CR-Equipements(™) solid ankle cushion heel, International Committee of the Red Cross) to a well-recognized solid ankle cushion heel foot with a wooden keel (solid ankle cushion heel foot, Otto Bock). A total of 15 participants with unilateral transtibial amputation were evaluated using the two prosthetic feet in a randomized prospective double-blind crossover study. Main outcomes were patient satisfaction questionnaires (Satisfaction with Prosthesis Questionnaire and prosthetic foot satisfaction) and energy expenditure (oxygen consumption-mL/kg/min, oxygen cost-mL/kg/m, and heart rate-bpm). There were no significant differences between the two prosthetic feet for satisfaction and energy expenditure. The low-cost solid ankle cushion heel foot with polypropylene keel provides comparable satisfaction and similar energy expenditure as the solid ankle cushion heel foot with wooden keel. Clinical relevance The results of this study support the application and widespread use of the CR-Equipements(™) solid ankle cushion heel foot. From a cost-effectiveness standpoint, patients are well satisfied and exhibit similar outcomes at a substantially lower cost.

  19. Fixation of the reversed shoulder prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Andrew R; Hansen, Ulrich N; Bull, Anthony M J; Emery, Roger; Amis, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    The last decade has seen an increased interest in reversed shoulder prostheses. Success rates with these designs have been varied, with initial performance marred by failures resulting from improper implant alignment and an emerging engineering understanding. Competitor products to the well-documented Grammont design have yielded increasingly high success rates. Understanding the relationships between implant design, surgical procedure, and clinical outcome is important so that current results can be improved upon. This study considers the performance of 3 different reversed shoulder designs from the perspective of osseointegration, with the results broadly validated through comparison with experimental data. Finite element modeling was used to clarify the relationships between lateral offset of the center of rotation, screw insertion angle, screw length, screw diameter, bone material quality, and the potential for interdigitation of the supporting bone onto the reversed prosthesis. The results indicate that screw length, insertion angle, and diameter, when maximized, allow the least relative motion between the implant and underlying bone. When the bone is stiffer, the relative motion of the implant is lower. In almost all scenarios modeled, the interface micromotion was small enough to suggest that the glenoid was stable enough to encourage bone ingrowth across the majority of the bone-implant interfaces.

  20. Golf hand prosthesis performance of transradial amputees.

    PubMed

    Carey, Stephanie L; Wernke, Matthew M; Lura, Derek J; Kahle, Jason T; Dubey, Rajiv V; Highsmith, M Jason

    2015-06-01

    Typical upper limb prostheses may limit sports participation; therefore, specialized terminal devices are often needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of transradial amputees to play golf using a specialized terminal device. Club head speed, X-factor, and elbow motion of two individuals with transradial amputations using an Eagle Golf terminal device were compared to a non-amputee during a golf swing. Measurements were collected pre/post training with various stances and grips. Both prosthesis users preferred a right-handed stance initially; however, after training, one preferred a left-handed stance. The amputees had slower club head speeds and a lower X-factor compared to the non-amputee golfer, but increased their individual elbow motion on the prosthetic side after training. Amputees enjoyed using the device, and it may provide kinematic benefits indicated by the increase in elbow flexion on the prosthetic side. The transradial amputees were able to swing a golf club with sufficient repetition, form, and velocity to play golf recreationally. Increased elbow flexion on the prosthetic side suggests a potential benefit from using the Eagle Golf terminal device. Participating in recreational sports can increase amputees' health and quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  1. Impact of a stance phase microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis on level walking in lower functioning individuals with a transfemoral amputation.

    PubMed

    Eberly, Valerie J; Mulroy, Sara J; Gronley, JoAnne K; Perry, Jacquelin; Yule, William J; Burnfield, Judith M

    2014-12-01

    For individuals with transfemoral amputation, walking with a prosthesis presents challenges to stability and increases the demand on the hip of the prosthetic limb. Increasing age or comorbidities magnify these challenges. Computerized prosthetic knee joints improve stability and efficiency of gait, but are seldom prescribed for less physically capable walkers who may benefit from them. To compare level walking function while wearing a microprocessor-controlled knee (C-Leg Compact) prosthesis to a traditionally prescribed non-microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis for Medicare Functional Classification Level K-2 walkers. Crossover. Stride characteristics, kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic activity were recorded in 10 participants while walking with non-microprocessor-controlled knee and Compact prostheses. Walking with the Compact produced significant increase in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-limb support, and heel-rise timing compared to walking with the non-microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis. Hip and thigh extension during late stance improved bilaterally. Ankle dorsiflexion, knee extension, and hip flexion moments of the prosthetic limb were significantly improved. Improvements in walking function and stability on the prosthetic limb were demonstrated by the K-2 level walkers when using the C-Leg Compact prosthesis. Understanding the impact of new prosthetic designs on gait mechanics is essential to improve prescription guidelines for deconditioned or older persons with transfemoral amputation. Prosthetic designs that improve stability for safety and walking function have the potential to improve community participation and quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  2. Intraoral angiosarcoma: treatment with a brachytherapy prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Ko, Eugene; Wolden, Suzanne; Huryn, Joseph M; Estilo, Cherry L

    2015-03-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare, malignant neoplasms of vascular origin that account for less than 1% of all soft tissue tumors. Angiosarcomas of the oral cavity are especially rare, and brachytherapy may be prescribed as a localized treatment to manage these malignancies. Intraoral brachytherapy requires collaboration between the radiation oncologist and a dental professional for the fabrication of the brachytherapy delivery prosthesis. This clinical report describes an intraoral angiosarcoma and the fabrication of an intraoral brachytherapy prosthesis to manage this malignancy.

  3. Reliability and smallest real difference of the ankle lunge test post ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Simondson, David; Brock, Kim; Cotton, Susan

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and the smallest real difference of the Ankle Lunge test in an ankle fracture patient population. In the post immobilisation stage of ankle fracture, ankle dorsiflexion is an important measure of progress and outcome. The Ankle Lunge test measures weight bearing dorsiflexion, resulting in negative scores (knee to wall distance) and positive scores (toe to wall distance), for which the latter has proven reliability in normal subjects only. A consecutive sample of ankle fracture patients with permission to commence weight bearing, were recruited to the study. Three measurements of the Ankle Lunge Test were performed each by two raters, one senior and one junior physiotherapist. These occurred prior to therapy sessions in the second week after plaster removal. A standardised testing station was utilised and allowed for both knee to wall distance and toe to wall distance measurement. Data was collected from 10 individuals with ankle fracture, with an average age of 36 years (SD 14.8). Seventy seven percent of observations were negative. Intra and inter-rater reliability yielded intra class correlations at or above 0.97, p < .001. There was a significant systematic bias towards improved scores during repeated measurement for one rater (p = .01). The smallest real difference was calculated as 13.8mm. The Ankle Lunge test is a practical and reliable tool for measuring weightbearing dorsiflexion post ankle fracture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The improvement of postural control in patients with mechanical ankle instability after lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yun; Zheng, Jie-Jiao; Zhang, Jian; Cai, Ye-Hua; Hua, Ying-Hui; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is the most common injury. A previous study demonstrated that patients with mechanical ankle instability suffered deficits in postural control, indicating that structural damage of the lateral ankle ligaments may produce a balance deficit. The purpose of this study was to confirm that lateral ligaments reconstruction could improve postural control in patients with mechanical ankle instability. A total of 15 patients were included in the study. Each patient had a history of an ankle sprain with persistent symptoms of ankle instability and a positive anterior drawer test and had been treated nonoperatively for at least 3 months. All patients were diagnosed with lateral ankle ligaments tear by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. They underwent arthroscopic debridement and open lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction with a modified Broström procedure. One day before and 6 months after the operation, all of the participants underwent single-limb postural sway tests. The anterior drawer test and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score were used to evaluate the clinical results in these patients. At 6 months after the operation, with the patients' eyes closed, there was significantly decreased postural sway in the anteroposterior direction, the circumferential area, and the total path length on the operated ankles compared with those measurements before the operation. With eyes open, however, no difference was found in postural sway before and after the operation. Postural control was improved by reconstructing the lateral ligaments. IV.

  5. Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion After Ankle Self-Stretching Using a Strap.

    PubMed

    Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Hwang, Ui-jae

    2015-12-01

    A variety of ankle self-stretching exercises have been recommended to improve ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) in individuals with limited ankle dorsiflexion. A strap can be applied to stabilize the talus and facilitate anterior glide of the distal tibia at the talocrural joint during ankle self-stretching exercises. Novel ankle self-stretching using a strap (SSS) may be a useful method of improving ankle DFROM. To compare the effects of 2 ankle-stretching techniques (static stretching versus SSS) on ankle DFROM. Randomized controlled clinical trial. University research laboratory. Thirty-two participants with limited active dorsiflexion (<20°) while sitting (14 women and 18 men) were recruited. The participants performed 2 ankle self-stretching techniques (static stretching and SSS) for 3 weeks. Active DFROM (ADFROM), passive DFROM (PDFROM), and the lunge angle were measured. An independent t test was used to compare the improvements in these values before and after the 2 stretching interventions. The level of statistical significance was set at α = .05. Active DFROM and PDFROM were greater in both stretching groups after the 3-week interventions. However, ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle were greater in the SSS group than in the static-stretching group (P < .05). Ankle SSS is recommended to improve ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle in individuals with limited DFROM.

  6. Neural Excitability and Joint Laxity in Chronic Ankle Instability, Coper, and Control Groups

    PubMed Central

    Bowker, Samantha; Terada, Masafumi; Thomas, Abbey C.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Hiller, Claire E.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Neuromuscular and mechanical deficiencies are commonly studied in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Few investigators have attempted to comprehensively consider sensorimotor and mechanical differences among people with CAI, copers who did not present with prolonged dysfunctions after an initial ankle sprain, and a healthy control group. Objective:  To determine if differences exist in spinal reflex excitability and ankle laxity among participants with CAI, copers, and healthy controls. Design:  Case-control study. Setting:  Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants:  Thirty-seven participants with CAI, 30 participants categorized as copers, and 26 healthy control participants. Main Outcome Measure(s):  We assessed spinal reflex excitability of the soleus using the Hoffmann reflex protocol. Participants' ankle laxity was measured with an instrumented ankle arthrometer. The maximum Hoffmann reflex : maximal muscle response ratio was calculated. Ankle laxity was measured as the total displacement in the anterior-posterior directions (mm) and total rotation in the inversion and eversion directions (°). Results:  Spinal reflex excitability was diminished in participants with CAI compared with copers and control participants (P = .01). No differences were observed among any of the groups for ankle laxity. Conclusion:  Changes in the spinal reflex excitability of the soleus that likely affect ankle stability were seen only in the CAI group, yet no mechanical differences were noted across the groups. These findings support the importance of finding effective ways to increase spinal reflex excitability for the purpose of treating neural excitability dysfunction in patients with CAI. PMID:27065189

  7. Task-specific ankle robotics gait training after stroke: a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Larry W; Roy, Anindo; Hafer-Macko, Charlene; Krebs, Hermano I; Macko, Richard F

    2016-06-02

    An unsettled question in the use of robotics for post-stroke gait rehabilitation is whether task-specific locomotor training is more effective than targeting individual joint impairments to improve walking function. The paretic ankle is implicated in gait instability and fall risk, but is difficult to therapeutically isolate and refractory to recovery. We hypothesize that in chronic stroke, treadmill-integrated ankle robotics training is more effective to improve gait function than robotics focused on paretic ankle impairments. Participants with chronic hemiparetic gait were randomized to either six weeks of treadmill-integrated ankle robotics (n = 14) or dose-matched seated ankle robotics (n = 12) videogame training. Selected gait measures were collected at baseline, post-training, and six-week retention. Friedman, and Wilcoxon Sign Rank and Fisher's exact tests evaluated within and between group differences across time, respectively. Six weeks post-training, treadmill robotics proved more effective than seated robotics to increase walking velocity, paretic single support, paretic push-off impulse, and active dorsiflexion range of motion. Treadmill robotics durably improved gait dorsiflexion swing angle leading 6/7 initially requiring ankle braces to self-discarded them, while their unassisted paretic heel-first contacts increased from 44 % to 99.6 %, versus no change in assistive device usage (0/9) following seated robotics. Treadmill-integrated, but not seated ankle robotics training, durably improves gait biomechanics, reversing foot drop, restoring walking propulsion, and establishing safer foot landing in chronic stroke that may reduce reliance on assistive devices. These findings support a task-specific approach integrating adaptive ankle robotics with locomotor training to optimize mobility recovery. NCT01337960. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01337960?term=NCT01337960&rank=1.

  8. Sway‐dependent changes in standing ankle stiffness caused by muscle thixotropy

    PubMed Central

    Sakanaka, Tania E.; Lakie, Martin

    2016-01-01

    .1 vs. 0.6 deg). Furthermore, torque responses exhibited a biphasic pattern, consisting of an initial steep rise followed by a shallower increase. This transition occurred earlier during increased levels of ankle sway. These results are consistent with a movement‐dependent change in passive ankle stiffness caused by thixotropic properties of the calf muscle. The consequence is to place increased reliance upon active neural control during times when increased sway renders ankle stiffness low. PMID:26607292

  9. Sway-dependent changes in standing ankle stiffness caused by muscle thixotropy.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Tania E; Lakie, Martin; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2016-02-01

    , torque responses exhibited a biphasic pattern, consisting of an initial steep rise followed by a shallower increase. This transition occurred earlier during increased levels of ankle sway. These results are consistent with a movement-dependent change in passive ankle stiffness caused by thixotropic properties of the calf muscle. The consequence is to place increased reliance upon active neural control during times when increased sway renders ankle stiffness low. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  10. Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yumeno; Jono, Yasutomo; Hatanaka, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Tani, Keisuke; Chujo, Yuta; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of the soleus MEPs. Only trials in which background EMG level, ankle angle, and ankle velocity were similar among the movement conditions were included for data analysis. In addition, only trials with a similar M-wave were included for data analysis in the experiment evoking H-reflexes. Results showed that H reflex and MEP amplitudes in the soleus muscle during discrete movement were not significantly different from those during rhythmic movement. MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement. Higher corticospinal excitability in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement may reflect changes in corticospinal control from the initial cycle to the later cycles of rhythmic movement. PMID:25126066

  11. Foot and ankle problems in Thai monks.

    PubMed

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Wattanarojanaporn, Thongaek; Intharasompan, Piyapong; Theeraamphon, Nipon; Auephanviriyakul, Sansanee; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-01-01

    Foot and ankle problems in Thai monks have not been explored. This is an unshod population, and its members have a unique lifestyle living among others in our modern era. Beginning at their ordainment, they follow strict rules about barefoot walking, the amount of daily walking, and their sitting position, practices that theoretically can increase their risk of developing foot and ankle problems. To evaluate the prevalence ofcommon foot and ankle problems in Thai monks. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in combination with foot and ankle examinations of monks living in northern Thailand Foot morphology was examined using a Harris mat footprint. Results of the interviews and the foot and ankle examinations were evaluated. Two hundred and nine monks from 28 temples were included in this study. Common foot and ankle problems found included callosity (70.8%), toe deformities (18.2%), plantar fasciitis (13.4%), metatarsalgia (3.8%), and numbness (2.9%). Callosity and toe deformities were associated with prolonged barefoot walking over extended periods since ordainment (p < 0.05). The callosity was found on the forefoot (47.3%), lateral malleolus (40.7%), and heel (12%). Arch types were considered normal in 66.4% of cases, high in 21.6%, and low in 12%. No association was found between arch type and foot and ankle problems. Callosity and toe deformity were the most common foot and ankle problems found in Thai monks, especially those with prolonged period of barefoot walking and long-term duration ofordainment. The unique pattern of walking and sitting of Thai monks may have contributed to the development of those feet and ankle problems.

  12. Ankle sprain: pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2010-07-16

    With the high percentage (up to 75%) of initial lateral ankle sprains (LAS) leading to repetitive sprains and chronic symptoms, it is imperative to better understand how best to treat and rehabilitate LAS events. The purpose of this paper is to review LAS pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and the current evidence regarding therapeutic modalities and exercises used in the treatment of LAS. Functional rehabilitation, early mobilization with support, is the current standard of care for LAS. However, the high percentage of reinjury occurrence and development of chronic symptoms (up to 75%) after a LAS, suggests the current standard of care may not be effective. Recent evidence has shown the need for more stringent immobilization to facilitate ligament healing and restoration of joint stability and function after a LAS. Additionally, the importance of adding adjunctive therapies, specifically joint mobilizations and balance training have been shown to improve function and decrease the incidence of reinjury after a LAS. Modifying current rehabilitation protocols to include protecting the ankle joint with stringent immobilization, and including joint mobilizations and balance training may be the first step to decreasing the incidence of short and long term ankle joint dysfunction.

  13. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  14. Revision of the aseptic and septic total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Norman; Wirth, Stephan Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Total ankle replacement has become a popular treatment of symptomatic end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Contemporary total ankle replacement systems provide more anatomic and biomechanically sound function. However, longevity is still limited and long-term results of modern total ankle replacement designs are not available. In the case of failure, conversion into arthrodesis has remained the treatment of choice but at the cost of hindfoot function and potential degeneration of the adjacent joints. Thus, revision total ankle replacement by exchange of the prosthetic components represents an attractive solution. This article focuses on revision total ankle replacement and conversion to ankle arthrodesis.

  15. Ankle fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Sandro; Chiarello, Eugenio; Persiani, Valentina; Luciani, Deianira; Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of ankle fractures (AFs) in the elderly is rising due to the increase in life expectancy. Rather than directly related to osteoporosis, AFs are a predictor of osteoporotic fractures in other sites. In women AFs are associated with weight and BMI. AFs are difficult to categorize; therapeutic options are non-operative treatment with plaster casts or surgical treatment with Kirschner's wires, plates and screws. The choice of treatment should be based not only on the fracture type but also on the local and general comorbidity of the patient. Considering the new evidence that postmenopausal women with AFs have disrupted microarchitecture and decreased stiffness of the bone compared with women with no fracture history, in our opinion low-trauma AFs should be considered in a similar way to the other classical osteoporotic fractures.

  16. Annular lipoatrophic panniculitis of the ankles.

    PubMed

    Corredera, Cristina; Iglesias, Maribel; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Colmenero, Isabel; Dilme, Elisabet; Torrelo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We report a girl with lipophagic lobular panniculitis of unknown origin located on her ankles leading to circumferential fat atrophy of the ankles, a condition usually referred to as "annular lipoatrophy of the ankles." According to our patient's features and five additional cases reported so far, we conclude that this condition is actually an end-stage manifestation of an idiopathic lobular panniculitis of children localized to the lower part of the lower limbs. An association with some autoimmune manifestations is highlighted. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Foot and ankle injuries in theatrical dancers.

    PubMed

    Hardaker, W T; Margello, S; Goldner, J L

    1985-10-01

    The theatrical dancer is a unique combination of athlete and artist. The physical demands of dance class, rehearsal, and performance can lead to injury, particularly to the foot and ankle. Ankle sprains are the most common acute injury. Chronic injuries predominate and relate primarily to the repeated impact loading of the foot and ankle on the dance floor. Contributing factors include anatomic variation, improper technique, and fatigue. Early and aggressive conservative management is usually successful and surgery is rarely indicated. Orthotics play a limited but potentially useful role in treatment. Following treatment, a structured rehabilitation program is fundamental to the successful return to dance.

  18. Biomechanics of the ankle joint and clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Michael, Junitha M; Golshani, Ashkahn; Gargac, Shawn; Goswami, Tarun

    2008-10-01

    Until the 1970s ankle arthrodesis was considered to be the "gold-standard" to treat arthritis. But the low fusion rate of ankle arthrodeses along with the inability to achieve normal range of motion led to the growing interest in the development of total ankle replacements. Though the short-term outcomes were good, their long-term outcomes were not as promising. To date, most models do not exactly mimic the anatomical functionality of a natural ankle joint. Therefore, research is being conducted worldwide to either enhance the existing models or develop new models while understanding the intricacies of the joint more precisely. This paper reviews the anatomical and biomechanical aspects of the ankle joint. Also, the evolution and comparison of clinical outcomes of various total ankle replacements are presented.

  19. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  20. Bacterial colonization of penile prosthesis after its withdrawal due to mechanical failure.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry-Giadrosich, B; Torremadé-Barreda, J; Pujol-Galarza, L; Vigués-Julià, F

    2017-07-12

    Prosthetic surgery to treat erectile dysfunction has a risk of infection of up to 3%, but this risk can increase to 18% when the surgery involves replacement. This increased risk of infection is attributed to the bacterial colonization of the prosthesis during the initial surgery. To analyse the presence of germs in the prosthesis that is withdrawn due to mechanical failure (not infection), as well as the surgical results and its progression. A retrospective study was conducted of all replacements performed between 2013 and 2016 at a single centre. We analysed demographic data, prior type of prosthesis, surgical procedure, microbiological study and follow-up. Of the 12 replacement procedures, a microbiological study of the extracted prosthesis was performed in a total of 10 cases. Of the 10 replacements, the cultures were positive in 5 cases (50%). Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most prevalent germ. All patients underwent a flushing procedure, and an antibiotic-coated prosthesis was implanted. We recorded no infections with the new implanted device after a mean follow-up of 27.33 months (SD 4.13; 95% CI 18.22-36.43). In our study population, we observed a high rate of bacterial colonization of the prostheses that were replaced due to mechanical failure. When a flushing procedure was performed during the replacement surgery, there were no more infections than those reported in treatment-naive cases. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of the in-vitro loading on an artificial spinal disk prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriacou, P. A.; Pancholi, M. P.; Yeh, J.

    2009-07-01

    Spinal diseases imposes considerable burden to both patients and society. In recent years, much surgical efforts have been made in advancing the treatment of neck and back pain. Of particular prominence is the increasing clinical acceptance and use of intervertebral artificial disk prosthesis for the treatment of discogenic back pain. Despite this increased use of such disks, their in-vivo monitoring remains rudimentary. In an effort to develop an intelligent artificial spinal disk where the in-vivo loading of the spine can by studied for the first time an experimental set up has been created in order to initially study the in-vitro loading on an artificial disc prosthesis. Eight strain gauges and two piezoresistive sensors were used and placed suitably in the artificial disk prosthesis. The results from the in-vitro loading showed linear relationship between loading and the outputs from the sensors with good repeatability and less hysteresis.

  2. Subsidence of total ankle component associated with deterioration of an ankle scale in non-inflammatory arthritis but not in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takahiro; Ito, Hiromu; Furu, Moritoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Azukizawa, Masayuki; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Takayuki; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-05-01

    Modern three-component total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has favorable clinical results and survival rates. However, radiographic deterioration and worsening of clinical symptoms may occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or non-inflammatory arthritis (NA). The associations between outcomes and clinical and radiological factors are not clear. We compared midterm clinical and radiographic outcomes after TAA between patients with RA and those with NA. Twenty-six TAAs were performed using a three-component prosthesis, the FINE Total Ankle System during the study period. Fourteen TAAs with 11 RA patients undergoing primary TAA were compared with twelve TAAs with 12 NA patients. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated before and after operation, and at the final follow-up. The Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot (JSSF) scale improved significantly following TAA in both groups (p = 0.0039 and 0.0156, respectively). Tibial subsidence, talar subsidence and age were significantly associated with postoperative JSSF score only in the NA group (p = 0.0027, 0.0017 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Stepwise regression analysis showed that talar subsidence was an independent predictor of a worse JSSF score in the NA group (F = 10.3). The final clinical outcome was negatively influenced by talar subsidence in patients with NA, but not in those with RA.

  3. Short-term natural recovery of ankle sprains following discharge from emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Alice B; Pelland, Lucie; Brison, Robert; Pickett, William; Brouwer, Brenda

    2008-09-01

    Prospective cohort study. To examine the natural recovery from grade I and II ankle injuries over a 1-month period. There is a high rate of injury recurrence and persistence of symptoms following ankle sprains, suggesting that these injuries may not be adequately managed. However, little is known about the recovery process after discharge from emergency departments. Clinical assessment of ankle swelling, strength, and joint mobility and laboratory assessment of peak torque and joint range of motion (ROM) were performed 4 and 30 days following initial clinical assessment in the emergency department. Analyses for repeated measures determined change over time and differences between injured and noninjured ankles. Self-assessed ankle function was evaluated on day 4 and day 30, and its relationship to clinical and laboratory assessments determined. Forty-six subjects entered the study and complete datasets were obtained from 28. Significant swelling, weakness, and mobility restrictions were evident on initial assessment. Symptoms improved over time and, while clinical variables were normal by day 30, laboratory assessment indicated weakness of plantar flexors and limited active and passive ROM at 1 month. Swelling and reduced passive ROM were associated with overall function and limitations in sports and recreation activities, as well as quality of life 1 month postinjury. Clinically assessed strength and ankle dorsiflexion mobility suggested full recovery at 1 month post injury, yet more sensitive measures of ankle impairment and performance detected residual deficits. Persistent impairment and incomplete recovery of self-assessed function suggest the need for management beyond standard emergency department care. Associations between impairment measures and function may provide guidance for treatment intervention.

  4. All-inside, anatomical lateral ankle stabilization for revision and complex primary lateral ankle stabilization: a technique guide.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-12-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common mechanical problem that often requires surgical management when conservative efforts fail. Historically, myriad open surgical approaches have been proposed. Recently, consideration for arthroscopic management of lateral ankle instability has become popular, with promising results. Unfortunately, recurrent inversion ankle injury following lateral ankle stabilization can occur and require revision surgery. To date, arthroscopic management for revision lateral ankle stabilization has not been described. We present a novel arthroscopic technique combining an arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization kit with a suture anchor ligament augmentation system for revision as well as complex primary lateral ankle stabilization. © 2014 The Author(s).

  5. Adherence and effectiveness of rehabilitation in acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Guillodo, Y; Le Goff, A; Saraux, A

    2011-06-01

    To estimate adherence to and effectiveness of rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain. Patients with acute ankle sprain attending four emergency departments were recruited between February and July 2009. After the initial examination (classification of the severity of the sprain), each patient received an Aircast(®) ankle brace and the same, standardized rehabilitation program. Between two and three months later; the patient was contacted by phone (always by the same investigator) in order to find out whether he/she had performed the prescribed rehabilitation, establish whether the physiotherapist had complied with the prescribed rehabilitation programme and assess subjective recovery. If a patient failed to respond to three phone calls, he/she was excluded from the study. Of the 245 patients initially included, 111 (67 men and 44 women; 17 mild sprains, 67 moderate sprains and 27 severe sprains) answered the "phone questionnaire". In terms of treatment adherence by the patient, 92 patients (82.9%) performed their rehabilitation (beginning an average of 13.8 days after the injury). In terms of prescription compliance by the physiotherapist, 88 patients (95.6%) received massage, 71 (77.2%) underwent physiotherapy, 83 (90.2%) performed weight training and 87 (94.5%) received proprioceptive training. Eighty-two patients said that they had received manipulative therapy that was not part of the prescribed programme. Impact on recovery: 61 patients (55%) considered that their injury had healed (10 mild, 42 medium and nine severe sprains), whereas 50 had not healed (seven mild, 25 medium and 18 severe sprains). There was no statistically significant association between recovery and compliance with rehabilitation. However, the application of massage (p=0.004) and proprioceptive training (p=0.017) were significantly associated with recovery, while physiotherapy, weight training and manipulative therapy were not. In acute ankle sprain, adherence with rehabilitation is good

  6. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion – A short term retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S Muthukumar; Selvaraj, V; Devadoss, Sathish; Devadoss, Annamalai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. Materials and Methods: 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years). The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot scale. Results: All cases of ankle fusions (100%) progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3–6 months). All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34). The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42). We found that twenty patients (68.96%) out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13%) had good, and 2 (6.89%) showed fair results. Conclusion: Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup. PMID:28216754

  7. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion - A short term retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S Muthukumar; Selvaraj, V; Devadoss, Sathish; Devadoss, Annamalai

    2017-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years). The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot scale. All cases of ankle fusions (100%) progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3-6 months). All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34). The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42). We found that twenty patients (68.96%) out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13%) had good, and 2 (6.89%) showed fair results. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup.

  8. Different techniques in fabrication of ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Pinar; Dilber, Erhan; Eraslan, Oguz

    2012-11-01

    Loss of an eye caused by cancer, trauma, or congenital defect creates a deep psychological impact on an individual's life especially social and professional life. Custom-made prosthesis, compared to stock prosthesis, provides a better fit to the eye socket, better cosmetic results, and less discomfort to the patient in the long term. The main objective of this article was to describe 3 different alternative and practical techniques of fabricating custom-made ocular prosthesis. An impression of anophthalmic socket was made with the addition of cured silicone-based precision impression material in all techniques. A master cast was prepared and duplicated with condensation silicone. A self-cure acrylic resin was polymerized in the silicone model and was fitted into the patient's eye socket. A digital photograph of the patient's iris was made using a digital camera and printed on good-quality photo paper in various shades and sizes in the first and the second techniques. Then the photo paper was coated with PVC so as not to allow any color flowing. The proper iris was then inserted to the acrylic base. The prosthesis was final processed using orthodontic heat polymerizing clear acrylic resin.In the other technique, after the trying-in process with wax pattern, an acrylic base was fabricated using heat polymerizing scleral acrylic resin. The prosthetic iris was fabricated from a transparent contact lens by painting the lens with watercolor paints and attaching it to an acrylic resin with tissue conditioner. The final process was made with heat polymerizing transparent acrylic resin. Custom-made prosthesis allows better esthetic and functional results to the patient in comparison to stock prosthesis. Further follow-up is necessary to check the condition and fit of the ocular prosthesis in such patients.

  9. Biomechanical characteristics of human ankle ligaments.

    PubMed

    Attarian, D E; McCrackin, H J; DeVito, D P; McElhaney, J H; Garrett, W E

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the biomechanical characteristics of the isolated, individual bone-ligament-bone complexes of the human ankle. Twenty human ankles were dissected of all soft tissues to leave only the tibia, fibula, talus, and calcaneus with their intact anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, posterior talofibular, and deep deltoid ligaments. Specimens were mounted and tested in a Minneapolis Testing System. Protocol consisted of cyclic loading of each isolated bone-ligament-bone preparation, followed by several constant velocity load-deflection tests at varying deflection rates, followed by a final, extremely rapid load to failure test. All ligaments exhibited nonlinearity and strain rate dependence in their load-deflection data. These properties were correlated with ligament function and trauma. The anterior talofibular ligament, the most commonly injured ankle ligament, had the lowest mean maximum load of the specimens tested, whereas the deep deltoid ligament, the least frequently completely disrupted ankle ligament, had the highest load to failure.

  10. Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ...

  11. Foot and ankle injuries in dance.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy J

    2006-11-01

    Although dancers develop overuse injuries common in other athletes, they are also susceptible to unique injuries. This article reviews common foot and ankle problems seen in dancers and provides some basic diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  12. Autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization.

    PubMed

    Budny, Adam M; Schuberth, John M

    2012-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common clinical entity, and a variety of surgical procedures are available for stabilization after conservative management fails. Herein the authors reviewed outcomes after performing autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization, using a previously described surgical technique to anatomically recreate the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. Twenty-five consecutive patients from 2 surgeons' practices underwent reconstruction between March 2007 and January 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 12 (range 12 to 51) months (mean 29.5 months). Follow-up interviews demonstrated 92.0% good or excellent outcomes with only 8.0% rating the outcome as fair and none as poor; 92.0% had no recurrent sprains or difficulty going up or down hills; 88.0% related no difficulty with uneven ground. The authors conclude that the autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization results in a stable ankle with a low rate of complications and high patient satisfaction.

  13. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Ankle Injuries and Disorders URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ankleinjuriesanddisorders.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  14. Arthroscopic Taloplasty for an Anterolateral Snapping Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Anterior ankle snapping syndrome is rare. Snapping of the extensor digitorum longus due to attenuated inferior extensor retinaculum and snapping due to hypertrophied or low-lying peroneal tertius muscle have been reported. We reported a new mechanism of anterolateral snapping due to a hypertrophied talar head. Anterolateral snapping ankle can be revealed by active dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the ankle with the foot inverted. Foot inversion will tension the inferior extensor retinaculum and uncover the dorsolateral prominence of the talar head. The dorsolateral prominence of the talar head will snap over the proximal edge of the inferior extensor retinaculum. This technical note reports the technique of arthroscopic contouring of the talar head via extra-articular ankle arthroscopy. We named this technique arthroscopic taloplasty.

  15. National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement: conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Thomas W; Hertel, Jay; Amendola, Ned; Docherty, Carrie L; Dolan, Michael G; Hopkins, J Ty; Nussbaum, Eric; Poppy, Wendy; Richie, Doug

    2013-01-01

    To present recommendations for athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals in the conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes. Because ankle sprains are a common and often disabling injury in athletes, athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals must be able to implement the most current and evidence-supported treatment strategies to ensure safe and rapid return to play. Equally important is initiating preventive measures to mitigate both first-time sprains and the chance of reinjury. Therefore, considerations for appropriate preventive measures (including taping and bracing), initial assessment, both short- and long-term management strategies, return-to-play guidelines, and recommendations for syndesmotic ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability are presented. The recommendations included in this position statement are intended to provide athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals with guidelines and criteria to deliver the best health care possible for the prevention and management of ankle sprains. An endorsement as to best practice is made whenever evidence supporting the recommendation is available.

  16. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Conservative Management and Prevention of Ankle Sprains in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Thomas W.; Hertel, Jay; Amendola, Ned; Docherty, Carrie L.; Dolan, Michael G.; Hopkins, J. Ty; Nussbaum, Eric; Poppy, Wendy; Richie, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals in the conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes. Background: Because ankle sprains are a common and often disabling injury in athletes, athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals must be able to implement the most current and evidence-supported treatment strategies to ensure safe and rapid return to play. Equally important is initiating preventive measures to mitigate both first-time sprains and the chance of reinjury. Therefore, considerations for appropriate preventive measures (including taping and bracing), initial assessment, both short- and long-term management strategies, return-to-play guidelines, and recommendations for syndesmotic ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability are presented. Recommendations: The recommendations included in this position statement are intended to provide athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals with guidelines and criteria to deliver the best health care possible for the prevention and management of ankle sprains. An endorsement as to best practice is made whenever evidence supporting the recommendation is available. PMID:23855363

  17. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the temporomandibular...

  18. BELOW-ELBOW COSMETIC CONDYLE-SUSPENDED PROSTHESIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    particular appeal to those amputees who desire a prosthesis for cosmetic reasons. However this type of prosthesis can be so built to provide a means for operating the active mechanical terminal device. (Author)

  19. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  20. TOTAL ANKLE REPLACEMENT: WHY, WHEN AND HOW?

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Dettoni, Federico; Femino, John E; Phisitkul, Phinit; Germano, Margherita; Amendola, Annunziato

    2010-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) was first attempted in the 1970s, but poor results led to its being considered inferior to ankle fusion until the late 1980s and early 1990s. By that time, newer designs which more closely replicated the natural anatomy of the ankle, showed improved clinical outcomes.1 Currently, even though controversy still exists about the effectiveness of TAR compared to ankle fusion, TAR has shown promising mid-term results and should no longer be considered an experimental procedure. Factors related to improved TAR outcomes include: 1) better patient selection, 2) more precise knowledge and replication of ankle biomechanics, 3) the introduction of less-constrained designs with reduced bone resection and no need for cementation, and 4) greater awareness of soft-tissue balance and component alignment. When TAR is performed, a thorough knowledge of ankle anatomy, pathologic anatomy and biomechanics is needed along with a careful pre-operative plan. These are fundamental in obtaining durable and predictable outcomes. The aim of this paper is to outline these aspects through a literature review. PMID:21045984

  1. Complex ankle arthrodesis: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Remy V; Haleem, Amgad M; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2015-01-01

    Complex ankle arthrodesis is defined as an ankle fusion that is at high risk of delayed and nonunion secondary to patient comorbidities and/or local ankle/hindfoot factors. Risk factors that contribute to defining this group of patients can be divided into systemic factors and local factors pertaining to co-existing ankle or hindfoot pathology. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of these risk factors and their association with patients’ outcomes after complex ankle fusions. Both external and internal fixations have demonstrated positive outcomes with regards to achieving stable fixation and minimizing infection. Recent innovations in the application of biophysical agents and devices have shown promising results as adjuncts for healing. Both osteoconductive and osteoinductive agents have been effectively utilized as biological adjuncts for bone healing with low complication rates. Devices such as pulsed electromagnetic field bone stimulators, internal direct current stimulators and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound bone stimulators have been associated with faster bone healing and improved outcomes scores when compared with controls. The aim of this review article is to present a comprehensive approach to the management of complex ankle fusions, including the use of biophysical adjuncts for healing and a proposed algorithm for their treatment. PMID:26396936

  2. Test-Retest Reliability of Sudden Ankle Inversion Measurements in Subjects With Healthy Ankle Joints

    PubMed Central

    Eechaute, Christophe; Vaes, Peter; Duquet, William; Van Gheluwe, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Context: Sudden ankle inversion tests have been used to investigate whether the onset of peroneal muscle activity is delayed in patients with chronically unstable ankle joints. Before interpreting test results of latency times in patients with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects, the reliability of these measures must be first demonstrated. Objective: To investigate the test-retest reliability of variables measured during a sudden ankle inversion movement in standing subjects with healthy ankle joints. Design: Validation study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 15 subjects with healthy ankle joints (30 ankles). Intervention(s): Subjects stood on an ankle inversion platform with both feet tightly fixed to independently moveable trapdoors. An unexpected sudden ankle inversion of 50° was imposed. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured latency and motor response times and electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle, along with the time and angular position of the first and second decelerating moments, the mean and maximum inversion speed, and the total inversion time. Correlation coefficients and standard error of measurements were calculated. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.17 for the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle (standard error of measurement = 2.7 milliseconds) to 0.89 for the maximum inversion speed (standard error of measurement = 34.8 milliseconds). Conclusions: The reliability of the latency and motor response times of the peroneus longus muscle, the time of the first and second decelerating moments, and the mean and maximum inversion speed was acceptable in subjects with healthy ankle joints and supports the investigation of the reliability of these measures in subjects with chronic ankle instability. The lower reliability of the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle and the angular positions of both decelerating moments calls the use of these

  3. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to... requirement for premarket approval for any mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the human...

  14. 21 CFR 884.3650 - Fallopian tube prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fallopian tube prosthesis. 884.3650 Section 884... § 884.3650 Fallopian tube prosthesis. (a) Identification. A fallopian tube prosthesis is a device designed to maintain the patency (openness) of the fallopian tube and is used after reconstructive...

  15. 21 CFR 884.3650 - Fallopian tube prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fallopian tube prosthesis. 884.3650 Section 884... § 884.3650 Fallopian tube prosthesis. (a) Identification. A fallopian tube prosthesis is a device designed to maintain the patency (openness) of the fallopian tube and is used after reconstructive...

  16. 21 CFR 884.3650 - Fallopian tube prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fallopian tube prosthesis. 884.3650 Section 884... § 884.3650 Fallopian tube prosthesis. (a) Identification. A fallopian tube prosthesis is a device designed to maintain the patency (openness) of the fallopian tube and is used after reconstructive...

  17. 21 CFR 884.3650 - Fallopian tube prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fallopian tube prosthesis. 884.3650 Section 884... § 884.3650 Fallopian tube prosthesis. (a) Identification. A fallopian tube prosthesis is a device designed to maintain the patency (openness) of the fallopian tube and is used after reconstructive...

  18. 21 CFR 884.3650 - Fallopian tube prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fallopian tube prosthesis. 884.3650 Section 884... § 884.3650 Fallopian tube prosthesis. (a) Identification. A fallopian tube prosthesis is a device designed to maintain the patency (openness) of the fallopian tube and is used after reconstructive...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the temporomandibular...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3720 - Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3720 Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3720 - Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3720 Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3720 - Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3720 Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of silicone...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3720 - Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3720 Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of silicone...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3720 - Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3720 Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of silicone...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3450 - Vascular graft prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vascular graft prosthesis. 870.3450 Section 870... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A vascular graft prosthesis is an implanted device intended to repair..., and to provide vascular access. It is commonly constructed of materials such as...

  20. Fabrication of a provisional nasal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Golden, Marjorie; Huryn, Joseph M

    2014-11-01

    A technique for making a provisional nasal prosthesis for interim use after the ablation of a midface tumor is described. The technique is especially useful for the re-creation of a nasal form in an expedient and cost-effective manner. A preoperative definitive cast, or moulage, of the patient that includes a nasal form is used to fabricate a vacuum form of the midface. The vacuum form is evaluated on the patient, the extension is adjusted, and an external adhesive knit liner is applied to give the appearance of a contoured nasal bandage. The provisional nasal prosthesis is attached with medical adhesive tape and removed daily by the patient. The prosthesis is easily replaced during the course of treatment and has been found to be functional and esthetically acceptable to those patients receiving care from the Dental Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

  1. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function. PMID:28265157

  2. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  3. [EFFECTIVENESS OF ARTHROSCOPY FOR ANKLE IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Han, Guansheng; Xu, Bin; Geng, Chunhui; Cheng, Xinde

    2014-06-01

    To explore the effectiveness of arthroscopy for ankle impingement syndrome. Between March 2009 and April 2013, 30 patients with ankle impingement syndrome were treated. Among them, there were 22 males and 8 females with an average age of 28.6 years (range, 16-55 years). Twenty-six patients had a history of obvious ankle sprains. The disease duration was 6-62 months (mean, 21.5 months). All cases had ankle pain, limitation of activity, and positive results of ankle impact test. According to Meislin scoring criteria, 5 cases were rated as good, 8 cases as medium, and 17 cases as poor; the excellent and good rate was 16.7%. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was 43.3 ± 5.1. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score was 6.7 ± 2.3. Preoperative X-ray film showed ankle loose bodies and hyperplasia osteophyte in 6 cases, and lateral malleolus old avulsion fracture in 4 cases. MRI showed soft tissue in the ankle joint in the 17 cases, and articular cartilage injury of tibiotalar joint and bone marrow edema in 7 cases. The location, degree, and organization of the impact were observed under arthroscopy. The joint debridement, removal of loose body and osteophyte, plasty of articular cartilage, and plasma radiofrequency ablation of lateral and medial ligaments were performed. All incisions healed primarily. No infection of skin and joint, or neurological and vascular injury was found. All patients were followed up 6-32 months (mean, 19.5 months). According to Meislin scoring criteria at last follow-up, 16 cases were rated as excellent, 11 cases as good, and 3 cases as medium; the excellent and good rate was 90.0%, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative value (Z = 6.045, P = 0.000). AOFAS score was 89.8 ± 4.3, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = 38.180, P = 0.000). VAS score was 2.8 ± 1.6, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = 7.624, P = 0.000). A clear

  4. Effect of Custom Orthosis and Rehabilitation Program on Outcomes Following Ankle and Subtalar Fusions.

    PubMed

    Sheean, Andrew J; Tennent, David J; Owens, Johnny G; Wilken, Jason M; Hsu, Joseph R; Stinner, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Fractures of the distal tibia, ankle, and foot sustained through a high-energy mechanism can be extremely debilitating, and ankle and/or subtalar fusion may be indicated if the limb is deemed salvageable. Functional outcomes among this population are often poor. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effect of an advanced rehabilitation program combined with the use of a custom ankle-foot orthosis for patients with ankle or subtalar fusion on selected physical performance measures and patient-derived outcome measures and to determine if the response to treatment was predicated upon the type of fusion. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, observational, cohort study composed of 23 active duty Service Members treated for lower extremity trauma. Patients were separated into 2 groups: group 1 was composed of 12 patients who underwent isolated ankle fusion or ankle fusion combined with ipsilateral subtalar fusion, group 2 was composed of 11 patients who underwent subtalar fusion only. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures and physical performance measures were recorded at baseline and at the conclusion of the rehabilitation program. Significant improvements in both groups were seen in each of the 4 physical performance measures. Only group 2 showed significant improvements in all domains of the Veteran's Rand 12-Item Health Survey (VR-12) and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) at all points during the course of rehabilitation. Among a subset of patients treated for severe lower extremity trauma with ankle and/or subtalar fusion, an integrated orthotic and rehabilitation initiative improved physical performance and PRO measures over an 8-week course. Level III, prospective comparative series. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. The ankle meter: an instrument for evaluation of anterior talar drawer in ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Gunter

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to work out a clinical test which is possible to measure the anterior talar drawer (ATD) in patients after ankle sprain. The instrument for evaluation was called "ankle meter". The instrument consists of two plastic scales (heal scale and tibia scale). The instrument allows quantifying the results of the anterior drawing test. A total of 38 persons (16 men, 22 women) were available as control group. The persons were 28.8+/-10.1 years old. No proband had any ankle problems in his history. A total of 45 patients (25 males, 20 females) suffering from ankle sprain were included in the study. In these patients stress radiography (147.1 N) was performed to measure the ATD. In control group the clinical measured ATD was 1.7+/-1.3 mm. Measurement for detect the interobserver validity did not detect significant differences. The ATD of the joint after ankle sprain was significantly higher (8.9+/-4.3 mm). The difference between healthy and injured ankle in case of an ankle sprain was 7.4+/-4.2 mm. There was a significant correlation between clinical and radiological measured ATD (R=0.91). The results suggest that it is possible to measure the ATD exactly. The values of the clinical ATD measurement showed a good correlation with the results of stress radiography. Diligent clinical examination in combination with this special test are after this experiences sufficient to classify the severity of injury after ankle sprain.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and incidental findings of lateral ankle pathologic features with asymptomatic ankles.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amol; Luhadiya, Amit; Ewen, Brynn; Goumas, Chris

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated 102 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in 100 patients with asymptomatic lateral ankles. The patients were undergoing MRI for other ankle pathologic features, including medial ankle, posterior ankle, soft tissue masses, or Achilles tendon pain. No patient had had a recent lateral ankle injury or any surgery. Whether the anterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament, and peroneal tendons were intact, torn, or absent was recorded. The average patient age was 46.4 years. Of the 100 patients, 67 (66%) had no history of a lateral ankle sprain, and 35 (34%) had sustained 1 or more sprains in the remote past. Also, 72 had an intact anterior talofibular ligament (71%), 90 had an intact calcaneofibular ligament (89%), 67 had intact peroneus brevis tendons (66%), and 68 (67%) had intact peroneus longus tendons. One accessory peroneal tendon was noted. Approximately 30% of asymptomatic patients undergoing MRI had abnormal anterior talofibular ligaments and peronei. Because the published data show that functional rehabilitation is successful for 90% of symptomatic lateral ankle patients, caution is warranted if choosing surgical treatment on the basis of the MRI findings alone. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effectiveness of the parachutist ankle brace in reducing ankle injuries in an airborne ranger battalion.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J T; Creedon, J F; Pope, R W

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the parachutist ankle brace (PAB) decreases the number and severity of ankle injuries in an airborne Ranger battalion. A retrospective study was performed covering a 38-month period. A computer database was used to track all jump injuries with a diagnosis of ankle pain, sprain, or fracture. The frequency was calculated for ankle injuries per 1,000 jumps and the average length of medically restricted duty per ankle injury. A total of 13,782 static line parachute jumps were conducted during the study period. Without the PAB, 35 ankle injuries were seen (4.5/1,000 jumps), with 9 fractures and 316 days of medical restriction per 1,000 jumps. Using the PAB, 9 ankle injuries were seen (1.5/1,000 jumps), with 3 fractures and 71 days of medical restriction per 1,000 jumps. The correct use of the PAB appeared to significantly decrease the incidence of ankle injuries in this battalion.

  8. Do Ankle Orthoses Improve Ankle Proprioceptive Thresholds or Unipedal Balance in Older Persons with Peripheral Neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jaebum; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Richardson, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ankle orthoses that provide medial and lateral support, and have been found to decrease gait variability in older persons with peripheral neuropathy, decrease (improve) frontal plane ankle proprioceptive thresholds or increase unipedal stance time in that same population. Design Observational study in which unipedal stance time was determined with a stopwatch, and frontal plane ankle (inversion and eversion) proprioceptive thresholds were quantified during bipedal stance with and without the ankle orthoses, in 11 older diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy (8 men; age 72 ± 7.1 years) using a foot cradle system which presented a series of 100 rotational stimuli. Results The subjects demonstrated no change in combined frontal plane (inversion + eversion) proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time with versus without the orthoses (1.06 ± 0.56 versus 1.13 ± 0.39 degrees, respectively; p = 0.955 and 6.1 ± 6.5 versus 6.2 ± 5.4 seconds, respectively; p = 0.922). Conclusion Ankle orthoses which provide medial-lateral support do not appear to change ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time in older persons with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Previously identified improvements in gait variability using orthoses in this population are therefore likely related to an orthotically-induced stiffening of the ankle rather than a change in ankle afferent function. PMID:20407302

  9. Effect of treadmill walking with ankle stretching orthosis on ankle flexibility and gait

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-ki; Kim, Si-hyun; Jeon, In-cheol; Ahn, Sun-hee; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematics of the ankle in the lunge to estabilish effectiveness of an ankle stretching orthosis (ASO) on the ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of individuals with limited dorsiflexion ROM. [Subjects and Methods] Forty ankles with decreased dorsiflexion ROM of 20 participants were evaluated in this study. After wearing the ASO, participants walked on a treadmill for 15 minutes. Participants walked on the treadmill at a self-selected comfortable speed. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM, maximum dorsiflexion ROM before heel-off, and time to heel-off during the stance phase of gait were measured before and after 15 minutes of treadmill walking with the ASO. The differences in all variables between before and after treadmill walking with ASO were analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] Ankle active and passive ROM, and dorsiflexion ROM during lunge increased significantly after treadmill walking with ASO. Treadmill walking with the ASO significantly increased the angle of maximal dorsiflexion before heel-off and time to heel-off during the stance phase. [Conclusion] The results of this study show that treadmill walking with the ASO effectively improved ankle flexibility and restored the normal gait pattern of the ankle joint by increasing dorsiflexion ROM, maximal angle of dorsiflexion, and time to heel-off in the stance phase. PMID:25995601

  10. Neuromuscular Control Mechanisms During Single-Leg Jump Landing in Subacute Ankle Sprain Patients: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Allet, Lara; Zumstein, Franziska; Eichelberger, Patric; Armand, Stéphane; Punt, Ilona M

    2017-03-01

    Optimal neuromuscular control mechanisms are essential for preparing, maintaining, and restoring functional joint stability during jump landing and to prevent ankle injuries. In subacute ankle sprain patients, neither muscle activity nor kinematics during jump landing has previously been assessed. To compare neuromuscular control mechanisms and kinematics between subacute ankle sprain patients and healthy persons before and during the initial contact phase of a 25-cm single-leg jump. Case-control study. University hospital. Fifteen patients with grade I or II acute ankle sprains were followed up after 4 weeks of conservative management not involving physical therapy. Subjects performed alternately 3 single-leg forward jumps of 25 cm (toe-to-heel distance) barefoot. Their results were compared with the data of 15 healthy subjects. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the musculus (m.) gastrocnemius lateralis, m. tibialis anterior, and m. peroneus longus as well as kinematics for ankle, knee, and hip joint were recorded for pre-initial contact (IC) phase, post-initial contact phase, and reflex-induced phase. The results showed that EMG activity of the 3 muscles did not differ between ankle sprain patients (n = 15) and healthy persons (n = 15) for any of the analyzed time intervals (all P > .05). However, during the pre-IC phase, ankle sprain patients presented less plantar flexion, as well as during the post-IC phase after jump landing, compared to healthy persons (P < .05). Taken together, these kinematic alterations of the ankle joint can lead to neuromuscular control mechanism disturbances through which functional instability might arise. III. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Cyber Expert System for Auto-Tuning Powered Prosthesis Impedance Control Parameters.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Crouch, Dustin L; Liu, Ming; Sawicki, Gregory S; Wang, Ding

    2016-05-01

    Typically impedance control parameters (e.g., stiffness and damping) in powered lower limb prostheses are fine-tuned by human experts (HMEs), which is time and resource intensive. Automated tuning procedures would make powered prostheses more practical for clinical use. In this study, we developed a novel cyber expert system (CES) that encoded HME tuning decisions as computer rules to auto-tune control parameters for a powered knee (passive ankle) prosthesis. The tuning performance of CES was preliminarily quantified on two able-bodied subjects and two transfemoral amputees. After CES and HME tuning, we observed normative prosthetic knee kinematics and improved or slightly improved gait symmetry and step width within each subject. Compared to HME, the CES tuning procedure required less time and no human intervention. Hence, using CES for auto-tuning prosthesis control was a sound concept, promising to enhance the practical value of powered prosthetic legs. However, the tuning goals of CES might not fully capture those of the HME. This was because we observed that HME tuning reduced trunk sway, while CES sometimes led to slightly increased trunk motion. Additional research is still needed to identify more appropriate tuning objectives for powered prosthetic legs to improve amputees' walking function.

  12. Ankle Joint Angle and Lower Leg Musculotendinous Unit Responses to Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akehi, Kazuma; Long, Blaine C; Warren, Aric J; Goad, Carla L

    2016-09-01

    Akehi, K, Long, BC, Warren, AJ, and Goad, CL. Ankle joint angle and lower leg musculotendinous unit responses to cryotherapy. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2482-2492, 2016-The use of cold application has been debated for its influence on joint range of motion (ROM) and stiffness. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a 30-minute ice bag application to the plantarflexor muscles or ankle influences passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM and lower leg musculotendinous stiffness (MTS). Thirty-five recreationally active college-aged individuals with no history of lower leg injury 6 months before data collection volunteered. On each testing day, we measured maximum passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM (°) and plantarflexor torque (N·m) on an isokinetic dynamometer to calculate the passive plantarflexor MTS (N·m per degree) at 4 joint angles before, during, and after a treatment. Surface electromyography amplitudes (μV), and skin surface and ambient air temperature (°C) were also measured. Subjects received an ice bag to the posterior lower leg, ankle joint, or nothing for 30 minutes in different days. Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle did not influence passive ROM (F(12,396) = 0.67, p = 0.78). Passive torque increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.21, p = 0.011). Passive MTS at the initial joint angle increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.14, p = 0.014) but not at the other joint angles (p > 0.05). Surface electromyography amplitudes for gastrocnemius and soleus muscles increased after ice application to the lower leg (F(2,66) = 5.61, p = 0.006; F(12,396) = 3.60, p < 0.001). Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle joint does not alter passive dorsiflexion ROM but increases passive ankle plantarflexor torque in addition to passive ankle plantarflexor MTS at the initial joint angle.

  13. The results of ankle arthrodesis with screws for end stage ankle arthrosis.

    PubMed

    Torudom, Yingyong

    2010-02-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the results of ankle arthrodesis with screws in patients with ankle arthrosis. The author studied 19 patients (20 feet) who had been treated by ankle arthrodesis with screws from 2003 to 2008. Ten patients were men (11 feet) and nine (9 feet) were women. Their mean age was 56 years (30 to 65), and the average duration of follow-up was four years (2 to 6). Two compression screws were used in all feet. Union was achieved in 19 of the 20 feet (95%). Average scores for pain and clinical condition are increase after operation. One re-operation was performed for nonunion. Author conclude that ankle arthrodesis with screws was effective treatment for ankle arthrosis.

  14. Groningen prosthesis for voice rehabilitation after laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Annyas, A A; Nijdam, H F; Escajadillo, J R; Mahieu, H F; Leever, H

    1984-02-01

    Singer and Blom's endoscopic technique, using a single valved silicone prosthesis, constituted a dramatic advance in speech rehabilitation following total laryngectomy. Since 1980, we have developed a silicone biflanged prosthesis that overcomes some of the inconveniences of previous prostheses. Insertion via the mouth and the oesophagus, or as a primary procedure during total laryngectomy is easily done with the use of specially developed instruments. The success rate in 36 patients in which the voice button was inserted at the time of total laryngectomy was 86.2%.

  15. Fabrication of a Custom Ocular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Tania; Kheur, Mohit; Haylock, Colin; Harianawala, Husain

    2014-01-01

    Defects of the eye may follow removal of a part of or the entire orbit. This results in the patient becoming visually, esthetically and psychologically handicapped. Restoring the defect with a silicone- or acrylic-based prosthesis not only restores esthetics but also gives back the lost confidence to the patient. This is a case report of a patient with a ‘pthisical eye’ and details the steps in fabrication of an ocular prosthesis. Particular attention has been given to the laboratory process in this technique to minimize the residual monomer content in the artificial eye. PMID:25100916

  16. Production of porous coating on a prosthesis

    DOEpatents

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    Preselected surface areas of a prosthesis are covered by a blend of matching primary metallic particles and expendable particles. The particles are compressed and heated to assure that deformation and metallurgical bonding occurs between them and between the primary particles and the surface boundaries of the prosthesis. Porosity is achieved by removal of the expendable material. The result is a coating including discrete bonded particles separated by a network of interconnected voids presenting a homogeneous porous coating about the substrate. It has strength suitable for bone implant usage without intermediate adhesives, and adequate porosity to promote subsequent bone ingrowth.

  17. Acrylic Finger Prosthesis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bandela, Vinod; M, Bharathi; S V, Giridhar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Hands basic function is to grasp, hold and manipulate items. Hand gesture is perhaps the most blatant example of non-verbal communication. Finger and partial finger amputations are most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. Common causes are traumatic injuries, congenital absence or malformations present great clinical challenges. In addition to immediate loss of grasp strength, finger absence may cause marked psychological trauma. Individuals who desire finger replacement usually have high expectation for the appearance of prosthesis. This clinical report portrays simple method to retain acrylic finger prosthesis. PMID:25302271

  18. [Ankle joint arthritis--etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Uri, Ofir; Haim, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Ankle joint arthritis causes functional limitation and affects the quality of life many patients. It follows traumatic injuries, inflammatory joint arthritis, primary osteoarthritis, hemochromatosis and infections. Understanding the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle is important for diagnosis and treatment of ankle joint pathology. The treatment of ankle joint arthritis has advanced considerably in recent years and it is still a surgical challenge. Total ankle replacement seems to be a promising form of treatment, even though current data does not demonstrate advantages over ankle joint arthrodesis.

  19. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  20. [Chronic diseases of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Rand, T; Trattnig, S; Breitenseher, M; Kreuzer, S; Wagesreither, S; Imhof, H

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint comprises a wide spectrum including chronic inflammatory processes and chronic degenerative, tumorous and neuropathic processes, as well as some specific syndromes based on chronic changes of the ankle joint. Of the inflammatory processes, chronic juvenile arthritis (JVC) is the most common disease. However, also Reiter disease, psoriasis or chronic monoarthritid diseases such as gout, as well as granulomatous diseases (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and fungal infections, may affect the ankle joint in a chronic course. Chronic degenerative changes are usually secondary due to abnormal positioning of the joint constituents or repetitive trauma. Neuropathic changes, as frequently seen in the course of diabetes, present with massive osseous destruction and malposition of the articular constituents. Chronic osseous as well as cartilaginous and synovial changes are seen in hemophilic patients. Chronic traumatic changes are represented by pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and chondromatosis, both with a predilection for the ankle joint. Due to the possibilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnosis of chronic ankle changes includes chronic ligamentous, tendinous and soft tissue changes. With the use of MRI, specific syndromes can be defined which particularly affect the ankle joint in a chronic way, such as the os trigonum syndrome, the anterolateral impingement syndrome and the sinus tarsi syndrome. Nevertheless, plain film radiographs are still the basic element of any investigation. MRI, however, can be potentially used as a second investigation, saving an unnecessary cascade of investigations with ultrasound and CT. The latter investigations are used only with very specific indications, for instance CT for subtle bone structures and sonography for a limited investigation of tendons or evaluation of fluid. Particularly due to the possibilities of MRI and the development of special gradient-echo imaging