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Sample records for ankylosing spondylitis ct

  1. Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a diagnosis, but both have some limitations. Medical History The medical history involves answering questions, such as ... are commonly used to treat ankylosing spondylitis. Aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen are examples of NSAIDs. All NSAIDs ...

  2. Overview of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spondylitis › Types of SpondylitisAnkylosing Spondylitis Overview of Ankylosing Spondylitis Ankylosing spondylitis (pronounced ank-kih-low-sing spon- ... of treatment. Learn More About Treatments Causes of Ankylosing Spondylitis Although the exact cause of AS is unknown, ...

  3. Ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jeanette; Fasching, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is an autoimmune disease of unknown cause belonging to the group of spondyloarthritides associated with HLA B27. This disease affects the spine and sacroiliac joints, but may also concern peripheral joints and different organs. Symptoms include morning stiffness and dull low back pain, both improving by exercise. AS causes reduction in life expectancy due to subsequent manifestation in different organs, so early diagnosis and treatment are of great importance.

  4. Ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Edavalath, Mukesh

    2010-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis belongs to a group of rheumatic diseases known as the spondyloarthropathies (SpA), which show a strong association with the genetic marker HLA-B27. Inflammatory back pain and stiffness are prominent early in the disease, whereas chronic, aggressive disease may produce pain and marked axial immobility or deformity. Modern medicine has no established treatment for it. From the Ayurvedic perspective, the disease can fall under amavata, which may be effectively managed when intervention is started in its early stages. Niruha basthi with Balaguduchyadi yoga, combined by Shamana treatment with Rasnerandadi kwatha and Simhanada guggulu have been found effective in curbing its progression. This article presents a single case report in which these treatments achieved considerable success. PMID:21547050

  5. Ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Edavalath, Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis belongs to a group of rheumatic diseases known as the spondyloarthropathies (SpA), which show a strong association with the genetic marker HLA-B27. Inflammatory back pain and stiffness are prominent early in the disease, whereas chronic, aggressive disease may produce pain and marked axial immobility or deformity. Modern medicine has no established treatment for it. From the Ayurvedic perspective, the disease can fall under amavata, which may be effectively managed when intervention is started in its early stages. Niruha basthi with Balaguduchyadi yoga, combined by Shamana treatment with Rasnerandadi kwatha and Simhanada guggulu have been found effective in curbing its progression. This article presents a single case report in which these treatments achieved considerable success.

  6. Alternative Treatments for Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePlus

    Login/Register Site Feedback About Spondylitis Overview Types of Spondylitis For The Newly Diagnosed Could I Have Spondylitis? Treatment ... Vehicle Purchase from our Store Shop Cart Login Register About Spondylitis Overview Types of Spondylitis Ankylosing Spondylitis ...

  7. Ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Haslock, I

    1993-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory disease involving entheses and joints, especially those in and around the spine. The most widespread involvement of the respiratory system by this disease occurs when this pathological process gives rise to chest wall pain, diminished chest wall movement and a dorsal stoop. As healing of the inflammatory process takes place, calcification occurs which leads to rigidity of these structures, with consequent loss of chest expansion which is exacerbated by the increasingly kyphotic spinal posture and intercostal muscle inefficiency. Fortunately diaphragmatic function is unimpaired and compensates well, so that there are only minor restrictive changes found in tests of respiratory function. Treatment is by mobilizing physiotherapy coupled with a home exercise programme encouraging mobility and improved cardiovascular fitness. As with many physical treatment methods, good quality controlled studies of efficacy are rare. The role of medication is to ease symptoms and hence enable exercise. Apical fibrobullous lung disease is found in a small proportion of AS patients. The initial changes are mainly fibrotic, with bullae becoming more important as the condition progresses. The disease may progress to major cavitation, which is prone to infection, especially with aspergillae. No methods exist which can either prevent the development of fibrobullous disease or halt its progression, although this may happen spontaneously. The main effects of therapy are aimed at the diagnosis and treatment of superinfection. Treatment of established aspergillosis, especially when aspergilloma formation has taken place, is unsatisfactory and carries substantial risks of morbidity and death. Non-apical pleural involvement, including pleural effusion, is very rare. The most common cause of breathlessness in AS patients is cardiac involvement by the disease.

  8. Ankylosing spondylitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... SE, Mclnnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 75. Ward MM, Deodhar A, Akl EA, et al. American College of Rheumatology/Spondylitis Association of America/Spondyloarthritis Research ...

  9. Treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Sari, İsmail; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Akkoç, Nurullah

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic, inflammatory, rheumatic disease that can reduce the quality of life and increase the risk of disability and mortality. It also causes direct and indirect economic losses due to health expenses and as a result of workforce loss. Management of this disease consists of pharmacological and nonpharmacological modalities. Until recently, pharmacological treatment options have been very limited. However, development of novel biological drugs revolutionized the management of this disease. The aim of this review article is to present an updated overview of the pharmacologic treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. Nonpharmacological treatment modalities including physiotherapy and exercise are only briefly mentioned and surgical treatment is not discussed.

  10. [Rehabilitation in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Skoumal, Martin; Haberhauer, Guenther; Strehblow, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Modern treatment of patients with ankylosing spondylitis consists of therapies according to the ASAS criteria. Rehabilitation is a necessary process for enabling persons with disabilities caused by inflammatory destructions. The goal is to reach optimal physical, sensory, psychiatric and social health to reach higher levels of independence. It includes a wide range of measures and activities for changing the behaviour and increases activity, participation, strength, stability and coordination.

  11. Rehabilitation in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Francine Ton; Donohue, John Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Medical therapy of ankylosing spondylitis has improved dramatically with the advent of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy, but nonpharmacologic therapies have long been employed to treat the condition. The purpose of this review is to summarize the most recent data to assess the role of exercise and nonpharmacologic therapies in ankylosing spondylitis. We review six articles published since 2005. The most common outcome measures (validated scores from Bath group) were only formally utilized in two studies. Four of the six studies were randomized controlled trials. One study using balneotherapy did not reveal any significant improvement in the medium term. One study used a multimodal exercise program, which revealed some benefit. Two studies assessed short and long-term efficacy of an experimental exercise protocol and suggested a prolonged benefit. Two small studies looking at biologic markers suggested that exercise may impact cytokine production. All studies we reviewed had small numbers of participants without a standardized control group and each study used different outcome measures. This review demonstrates the importance of continued emphasis on exercise therapy, the need for a standardized approach to exercise therapy, and a potential biologic effect. Exercise therapy should remain a mainstay of ankylosing spondylitis treatment complementing medical therapy.

  12. [Prognosis in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Diethelm, U; Schüler, G

    1991-05-21

    Based on the literature we describe the prognosis and natural history of ankylosing spondylitis. The data on mortality are controversial and it seems that only a small group of patient show a decreased survival. It is a chronic disease with most prominent features of pain and increasing stiffness during the first decade. After a course of 40 years 90% of patients have none or only mild disability. Generally quality of life is slightly reduced. Most patients remain engaged in full-time employment, but job adaptations are often unavoidable and vocational counseling seems to be worthwhile.

  13. Sulfasalazine for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junmin; Lin, Shaopeng; Liu, Chao

    2014-11-27

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown cause and affects mainly the spine, but can also affect other joints. Disease progression may result in loss of mobility and function. Sulfasalazine is a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug used in the treatment of AS. However, its efficacy remains unclear. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2005. To evaluate the benefits and harms of sulfasalazine for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We searched for relevant randomized and quasi-randomized trials in any language, using the following sources: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 11); MEDLINE (2003 to 28 November 2013); EMBASE (2003 to 27 November 2013); CINAHL (2003 to 28 November 2013); Ovid MEDLINE data, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (28 November 2013); and the reference sections of retrieved articles. We evaluated randomized and quasi-randomized trials examining the benefits and harms of sulfasalazine on AS. Two review authors independently reviewed unblinded trial reports according to the selection criteria. Disagreements on the inclusion of the studies were resolved, when necessary, by recourse to a third review author. The same authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included trials and entered the data extracted from the included trials. We combined results using mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) for continuous data, and risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous data.We restructured outcome measures for this update based on recommendations from the editorial group. Major outcomes included: pain, Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), Bath ankylosing spondylitis function index (BASFI), Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI), radiographic progression, total number of withdrawals due to adverse events, and serious adverse events. We did not

  14. Medical Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Tae

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis is often delayed due to ambiguous clinical manifestations and strict diagnostic criteria. However, imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging have been found effective for the early diagnosis of non-radiographic sacroiliitis. New tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors have good efficacy for patients with persistently high disease activity despite conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment. Thus, early diagnosis and aggressive treatments are essential for ankylosing spondylitis patients. Because many patients complain of musculoskeletal pains, especially around the sacroiliac joint area, hip specialists should be informed of up-to-date knowledge. In this review, we discuss new diagnostic criteria for ankylosing spondylitis, administration methods of TNF-α inhibitors, and the long-term follow-up results for patients treated with TNF-α inhibitors. PMID:27536570

  15. Imaging in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Robert G.W.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging is an integral part of the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Characteristic radiographic and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings are key in the diagnosis. Radiography and MRI are also useful in monitoring the disease. Radiography is the conventional, albeit quite insensitive, gold standard method for assessment of structural damage in spine and sacroiliac joints, whereas MRI has gained a decisive role in monitoring disease activity in clinical trials and practice. MRI may also, if ongoing research demonstrates a sufficient reliability and sensitivity to change, become a new standard method for assessment of structural damage. Ultrasonography allows visualization of peripheral arthritis and enthesitis, but has no role in the assessment of axial manifestations. Computed tomography is a sensitive method for assessment of structural changes in the spine and sacroiliac joints, but its clinical utility is limited due to its use of ionizing radiation and lack of ability to assess the soft tissues. It is exciting that with continued dedicated research and the rapid technical development it is likely that even larger improvements in the use of imaging may occur in the decade to come, for the benefit of our patients. PMID:22859929

  16. Imaging in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, Mikkel; Lambert, Robert G W

    2012-08-01

    Imaging is an integral part of the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Characteristic radiographic and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings are key in the diagnosis. Radiography and MRI are also useful in monitoring the disease. Radiography is the conventional, albeit quite insensitive, gold standard method for assessment of structural damage in spine and sacroiliac joints, whereas MRI has gained a decisive role in monitoring disease activity in clinical trials and practice. MRI may also, if ongoing research demonstrates a sufficient reliability and sensitivity to change, become a new standard method for assessment of structural damage. Ultrasonography allows visualization of peripheral arthritis and enthesitis, but has no role in the assessment of axial manifestations. Computed tomography is a sensitive method for assessment of structural changes in the spine and sacroiliac joints, but its clinical utility is limited due to its use of ionizing radiation and lack of ability to assess the soft tissues. It is exciting that with continued dedicated research and the rapid technical development it is likely that even larger improvements in the use of imaging may occur in the decade to come, for the benefit of our patients.

  17. Ankylosing spondylitis: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Sieper, J; Braun, J; Rudwaleit, M; Boonen, A; Zink, A

    2002-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a complex, potentially debilitating disease that is insidious in onset, progressing to radiological sacroiliitis over several years. Patients with symptomatic AS lose productivity owing to work disability and unemployment, have a substantial use of healthcare resources, and reduced quality of life. The pathogenesis of AS is poorly understood. However, immune mediated mechanisms involving human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27, inflammatory cellular infiltrates, cytokines (for example, tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin 10), and genetic and environmental factors are thought to have key roles. The detection of sacroiliitis by radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, or computed tomography in the presence of clinical manifestations is diagnostic for AS, although the presence of inflammatory back pain plus at least two other typical features of spondyloarthropathy (for example, enthesitis and uveitis) is highly predictive of early AS. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) effectively relieve inflammatory symptoms and are presently first line drug treatment. However, NSAID treatment has only a symptomatic effect and probably does not alter the disease course. For symptoms refractory to NSAIDs, second line treatments, including corticosteroids and various disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, are employed but are of limited benefit. Emerging biological therapies target the inflammatory processes underlying AS, and thus, may favourably alter the disease process, in addition to providing symptom relief. PMID:12381506

  18. Osteoporosis in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Magrey, Marina; Khan, Muhammad Asim

    2010-10-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a frequent complication of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), even in early stages of the disease, and is associated with elevated levels of biochemical markers of bone turnover, proinflammatory cytokines, and acute-phase reactants. This suggests that systemic inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, may be involved. Various factors that conceivably work in conjunction with one another also cause bone loss in AS (eg, genetic polymorphisms of vitamin D, low levels of osteoprotegerin and sex steroid hormones, and impaired calcium and vitamin D absorption). Dual x-ray absorptiometry for assessing bone mineral density (BMD) has limitations in patients with AS because of unreliability of spinal measurements, particularly in advanced disease with new bone formation. Femoral neck BMD is reduced and correlates with increased risk of vertebral fractures. Hence, measurement of BMD at the femoral neck may provide the most accurate means of detecting osteopenia and OP and could assess fracture risk in AS patients. No guidelines are available for detection and treatment of OP in AS, and most patients are young men, who are less likely to be screened. The only evidence-based recommendation is that optimal control of disease activity in AS prevents bone loss. A recent study showed a beneficial effect of infliximab therapy on bone turnover markers and BMD in AS. Also, bisphosphonates may be useful in managing OP in AS.

  19. Crohn's disease unmasked following etanercept treatment for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Jethwa, H; Mann, S

    2013-06-21

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old man with ankylosing spondylitis being treated with etanercept who presented with a 1 month history of abdominal pain. CT abdomen revealed an ileocaecal mass associated with an abscess, resulting in a laparotomy and right hemi-colectomy. Histology of the resected specimen showed the classical features of Crohn's disease. Etanercept was stopped and he was started on adalimumab. He is currently in clinical remission from both ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease.

  20. Ankylosing spondylitis and uveitis: overview.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Enéias Bezerra; Elmann, Dório; Morales, Maira Saad de Ávila

    2012-10-01

    The present article reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and its association with ocular changes. The authors used the PubMed (MEDLINE), LILACS, and Ophthalmology Library databases. Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that usually affects the axial skeleton and can progress to stiffness and progressive functional limitation. Ankylosing spondylitis usually begins around the second to third decade of life, preferentially in HLA-B27-positive white males. Its etiology and pathogenesis are not completely understood, and its diagnosis is difficult. Clinical control and treatment are frequently satisfactory. Acute anterior uveíte is the most common extra-articular manifestation, occurring in 20%-30% of the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Approximately half of the acute anterior uveíte cases are associated with the presence of the HLA-B27 antigen. It can be the first manifestation of an undiagnosed rheumatic disease, usually having a good prognosis and appropriate response to treatment. In conclusion, for better assessment and treatment of patients with uveitis, ophthalmologists and rheumatologists should work together.

  1. Cardiopulmonary Manifestations of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Mahnaz; Taylor, Nora; Tehrani, Mahsa

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory condition that usually affects young men. Cardiac dysfunction and pulmonary disease are well-known and commonly reported extra-articular manifestation, associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). AS has also been reported to be specifically associated with aortitis, aortic valve diseases, conduction disturbances, cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease. The pulmonary manifestations of the disease include fibrosis of the upper lobes, interstitial lung disease, ventilatory impairment due to chest wall restriction, sleep apnea, and spontaneous pneumothorax. They are many reports detailing pathophysiology, hypothesized mechanisms leading to these derangements, and estimated prevalence of such findings in the AS populations. At this time, there are no clear guidelines regarding a stepwise approach to screen these patients for cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. PMID:21547038

  2. [Axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Nordström, Dan; Kauppi, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Current classification criteria for ankylosing spondylitis do not allow diagnosis before radiographic changes are visible in sacroiliacal joints. The the new axial spondyloarthropathy (SpA) criteria include axial SpA without radiographic changes as well as established ankylosing spondylitis, recognizing them as a continuum of the same disease. This is of major importance as the burden of early SpA is comparable to that of later stage disease. Diagnosis relies on inflammatory MRI findings which is the most significant change compared to earlier criteria. Emerging data on the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blocking therapies already in early but also in established disease have given new promising alternatives for treatment of this often very cumbersome disease, that rarely responds to classic DMARDs.

  3. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  4. Juvenile onset ankylosing spondylitis with ankylosing tarsitis: a rare combination.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, A B; Hasan, S A; Abdullah, A M; Azad, S A; Khan, E H; Khasru, M R

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is the most common whereas ankylosing tarsitis is the least common subgroup of juvenile onset spondyloarthritides. In our recent study a male presented with ankle joint pain and swelling with limited movements and characteristic radiological changes including; periarticular swelling, thickened heel pad, hyperostosis and reduced ankle, calcaneo-cuboid and talo-navicular joint space for ankylosing tarsitis. He also had persistent inflammatory low back pain with radiological sacroilitis satisfying the clinical features for ankylosing spondylitis. The patient was treated with different anti-inflammatory agents including intra-articular methyl-prednisolone with short-term relief. Associated back pain was improved with spine mobilizing exercise.

  5. Cardiac Involvement in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is one of the subgroup of diseases called “seronegative spondyloarthropathy”. Frequently, it affects the vertebral colon and sacroiliac joint primarily and affects the peripheral joints less often. This chronic, inflammatory and rheumatic disease can also affect the extraarticular regions of the body. The extraarticular affections can be ophthalmologic, cardiac, pulmonary or neurologic. The cardiac affection can be 2-10% in all patients. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular dysfunction, aortitis, aortic regurgitation, pericarditis and cardiomegaly are reviewed. PMID:27222669

  6. Scintigraphic findings in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Jackson, F I

    1977-06-01

    A prospective study of bone scintigraphic findings has been carried out in 63 patients, firmly diagnosed as having ankylosing spondylitis. In addition to abnormal uptake of the radiotracer at the sacroiliac joints, a peripheral arthropathy has been a common finding, particularly in the proximal joints, occurring in up to 50% of patients. Increased uptake of radiotracer in the spine has also been found both diffusely and focally. Focal increases have been noted at the apophyseal joints in 40% of patients and in three patients with a sterile intervertebral diskitis, an unusual complication of this disease only diagnosed in two patients after bone scintigraphy.

  7. Lymphocyte abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, P T; Clements, P J; Yu, D T; Opelz, G; Bluestone, R

    1977-01-01

    Peripheral blood T (SRBC rosette) and B (AgG- and C-receptor) lymphocyte subpopulations and responsiveness to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) were assayed in 40 patients with ankylosing spondylitis and in 55 normal subjects. There was no significant difference in the lymphocyte concentrations or responsiveness to PHA between the two groups. However, the percentages of T lymphocytes were significantly lower in the patients irrespective of their HLA typing. This was probably due to an increase in the 'null' population since the percentages of both the AgG- and C-receptor cells were normal. PMID:303501

  8. Improved precision of syndesmophyte measurement for the evaluation of ankylosing spondylitis using CT: a phantom and patient study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Yao, Lawrence; Ward, Michael M.

    2012-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease characterized by abnormal bone formation (syndesmophyte) at the margins of inter-vertebral disc spaces. Syndesmophyte growth is currently typically monitored by the visual inspection of radiographs. The limitations inherent to the modality (2D projection of a 3D object) and rater (qualitative human judgment) may compromise sensitivity. With newly available treatments, more precise measures of syndesmophytes are needed to determine whether treatment can slow rates of syndesmophyte growth. We previously presented a computer algorithm measuring syndesmophyte volumes and heights in the 3D space of CT scans. In this study, we present improvements to the original algorithm and evaluate the gain in precision as applied to an anthropomorphic vertebral phantom and patients. Each patient was scanned twice in one day, thus providing two syndesmophyte volume and height measures. The difference between those two measures (ideally zero) determines our algorithm's precision. The technical improvements to the algorithm decreased the mean volume difference (standard deviation) between scans from 3.01% (2.83%) to 1.31% (0.95%) and the mean height difference between scans from 3.16% (2.99%) to 1.56% (1.13%). The high precision of the improved algorithm holds promise for application to longitudinal clinical studies.

  9. Role for imaging studies in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; d'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Loeuille, Damien

    2011-03-01

    Although the diagnosis and structural monitoring of ankylosing spondylitis relies classically on standard radiography, recent classification criteria and recommendations issued by the ASAS-OMERACT working group give considerable weight to modern imaging methods, most notably magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI and, more recently, ultrasonography, yield three major benefits: they ensure the early diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis in the absence of radiographic sacroiliitis, they provide therapeutic guidance at any time during the course of the disease, and they supply objective information on the degree of inflammation and response to treatment. Prospective longitudinal studies are under way to determine the respective roles for MRI and ultrasonography in the diagnosis and monitoring of axial and peripheral forms of ankylosing spondylitis. The introduction of whole-body MRI, new MRI sequences and positron emission tomography can be expected to further benefit the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis.

  10. Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Leone, Antonio; Marino, Marzia; Dell'Atti, Claudia; Zecchi, Viola; Magarelli, Nicola; Colosimo, Cesare

    2016-10-01

    The ankylosed spine is prone to fracture even after minor trauma due to its changed biomechanical properties. The two central features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) that promote the pathological remodeling of the spine are inflammation and new bone formation. AS is also associated with osteoporosis that is attributed to an uncoupling of the bone formation and bone resorption processes. Therefore, bone resorption occurs and promotes weakening of the spine as well as increased risk of vertebral fractures which can be hugely different in terms of clinical relevance. Even in the presence of symptomatic clinical vertebral fractures, the diagnosis can be overruled by attributing the pain to disease activity. Furthermore, given the highly abnormal structure of the spine, vertebral fracture diagnosis can be difficult on the basis of radiography alone. CT can show the fractures in detail. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered the method of choice for the imaging of spinal cord injuries, and a reasonable option for exclusion of occult fractures undetected by CT. Since it is equally important for radiologists and clinicians to have a common knowledge base rather than a compartmentalized view, the aim of this review article was to provide the required clinical knowledge that radiologists need to know and the relevant radiological semiotics that clinicians require in diagnosing clinically significant injury to the ankylosed spine.

  11. Erectile dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Santana, Thiago; Skare, Thelma; Delboni, Vitor Steil; Simione, Juliana; Campos, Ana Paula B; Nisihara, Renato

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS) may be associated with sexual dysfunction. To study erectile function of a group of Brazilian AS patients comparing them with controls. This was a cross sectional study approved by the local Committee of Ethics in Research. The questionnaire IIEF (International Index of Erectile Function) was applied to 40 AS patients and 40 healthy controls. AS patients had determination of disease activity (through BASDAI or Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease activity index), ASDAS (Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score, MASES or Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Score and SPARCC or Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada), function (through BASFI or Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index and HAQ or Health Assessment Questionnaire) and BASMI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrological Index). AS patients had a median score on IIEF of 22.0 (IQR=18-25) while controls had 29 (IQR=27-30) with p<0.0001 Only 17.5% of the AS patients had no erectile dysfunction, in opposite to 87.5% of controls (p<0.0001). IIEF scores had a negative association with BASDAI (p<0.0001), HAQ (p=0.05), body mass index (P=0.03), MASES (P=0.02) and SPARCC (P=0.02) in a univariate analysis. Multiple regression showed that BASDAI was the only variable independently associated with IIEF. There is a high prevalence of erectile dysfunction among AS patients that is associated with disease activity measured by BASDAI. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  12. Medical management of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Khalessi, Alexander A; Oh, Bryan C; Wang, Michael Y

    2008-01-01

    In the following literature review the authors consider the available evidence for the medical management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and they critically assess current treatment guidelines. Medical therapy for axial disease in AS emphasizes improvement in patients' pain and overall function. First-line treatments include individualized physical therapy and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in conjunction with gastroprotective therapy. After an adequate trial of therapy with two NSAIDs exceeding 3 months or limited by medication toxicity, the patient may undergo tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockade therapy. Response should occur within 6-12 weeks, and patients must undergo tuberculosis screening. Evidence does not currently support the use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, corticosteroids, or radiotherapy in AS.

  13. Physiotherapy interventions for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, H; Hagen, K

    2001-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic disease. Due to the consequences of the disease, physiotherapy is regarded to be an important part of the treatment. The objective is to summarise the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the management of AS. We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group Trial register, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Pedro up to February 2000 for all relevant publications, limited to English and Scandinavian languages. The reference lists of relevant articles were checked and the authors of included articles were contacted. We included randomised and quasi randomised studies where the participants were patients with AS, classified by the New York criteria, and where at least one of the comparison groups received some kind of physiotherapy. The main outcomes of interest were spinal mobility, pain, stiffness, physical function and global assessment of change. Both reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed trial quality. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Three trials were included with 241 participants, and all were assessed to have moderate to high risk of bias. Two trials compared the effect of supervised group physical therapy with an individualised home exercise program, and reported differences in favour of the supervised group. For pain and stiffness, the relative difference in change from baseline for the supervised group compared to the home exercise group was 50% after treatment. One trial compared an individual program of exercises and disease education with no intervention, and found differences in favour of the exercise group. The tendency toward positive effects of physiotherapy, in the management of AS, call for further research in this field in order to reach sufficient evidence on which physiotherapy modalities and applications are to be recommended. New trials should

  14. [Modern treatment of ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Rehart, S; Kerschbaumer, F; Braun, J; Sieper, J

    2007-11-01

    Bechterew's disease belongs to subgroup of spondyloarthritis. Even today there is still a delay of 5-10 years between the first occurrence of symptoms and the final diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. Without treatment the spine increasingly stiffens and the peripheral (mostly large) joints are often destroyed by inflammatory processes. Ankyloses of the joints between vertebrae and ribs may cause stiffness of the thorax. As the complaints most often start within the third decade of life and show a chronic progressive course, even young adults often have to deal with a considerable impairment due to pain and stiffness. Thus, early diagnosis is of utmost importance as today treatment with novel drugs is feasible and the TNFalpha inhibitors are particularly effective during the early stages of the disease. All conservative orthopedic measure used concomitantly. Surgery encompasses the early resection of inflamed mucosa in joints. In later stages of the disease reconstructive methods, i.e. prosthetics are often applied. Spondylodesis to erect the body, necessary in the end stage of the disease, is beneficial, but elaborate.

  15. [Interdisciplinary rehabilitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Béla; Varga, János; Somfay, Attila

    2016-07-01

    Complex pulmonary assessment related to respiratory manifestation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis may contribute to adaptation of an appropriate rehabilitation program. To examine the relationship between lung function, exercise physiological variables and change in quality of life after rehabilitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. 5 patients in Seyfried's Stage 2 and 11 patients in Stage 3 underwent spinal physiotherapy, ultrasound, massage and paraffin Pack, 15 times each, followed by a high-intensity cycling 3 times a week for 8 weeks. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Indexes were recorded before and after rehabilitation. Lung function with exercise physiological variables were examined after rehabilitation. Both indexes showed a post-treatment significant improvement compared to the initial scores (p<0.05). These functional indices correlated with lung function at rest and physiological variables during exercise (p<0.05). Based on this study, it is possible that an initial pulmonary assessment may serve to develop a more effective program for ankylosing spondylitis. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1126-1132.

  16. Adhesive arachnoiditis causing cauda equina syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis: CT and MRI demonstration of dural calcification and a dorsal dural diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, I G; Yunten, N; Ustun, E E; Oksel, F; Gumusdis, G

    1999-07-01

    We present the radiological features of a 42-year-old man with long-standing inactive ankylosing spondylitis (AS), demonstrating that arachnoiditis is a cause of a cauda equina syndrome (CES) in this disease. CT showed a dorsal arachnoid diverticulum causing scalloped erosion of the laminae, and punctate and curvilinear dural calcification. MRI revealed adhesion and convergence of the cauda equina dorsally into the arachnoid pouch, causing the dural sac to appear empty canal. To the best of our knowledge, dural calcification on CT is a new finding in AS, which may be related to the CES. Our findings support the hypothesis that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis with subsequent loss of meningeal elasticity may be the main cause of CES in AS.

  17. Conventional treatments for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Dougados, M; Dijkmans, B; Khan, M; Maksymowych, W; van der Linden, S.; Brandt, J

    2002-01-01

    Management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is challenged by the progressive nature of the disease. To date, no intervention is available that alters the underlying mechanism of inflammation in AS. Currently available conventional treatments are palliative at best, and often fail to control symptoms in the long term. Current drug treatment may perhaps induce a spurious state of "disease remission," which is merely a low level of disease activity. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are first line treatment, but over time, the disease often becomes refractory to these agents. Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs are second line treatment and may offer some clinical benefit. However, conclusive evidence of the efficacy of these drugs from large placebo controlled trials is lacking. Additionally, these drugs can cause treatment-limiting adverse effects. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection guided by arthrography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging is an effective means of reducing inflammatory back pain, but controlled studies are lacking. A controlled study has confirmed moderate but significant efficacy of intravenous bisphosphonate (pamidronate) treatment in patients with AS; further evaluation of bisphosphonate treatment is warranted. Physical therapy and exercise are necessary adjuncts to pharmacotherapy; however, the paucity of controlled data makes it difficult to identify the best way to administer these interventions. Surgical intervention may be required to support severe structural damage. Thus, for patients with AS, the future of successful treatment lies in the development of pharmacological agents capable of both altering the disease course through intervention at sites of disease pathogenesis, and controlling symptoms. PMID:12381510

  18. [The heart and ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Badui, E; Jiménez, J; Robles, E; García Rubí, D E; Mintz, G

    1985-01-01

    We studied 40 consecutive patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis from the cardiological point of view through non-invasive methods. Fourteen (35%) patients had some kind of cardiovascular complication as shown by any of the used methods. a) fifteen (37.5%) refered nonspecific chest pain, five (12.5%) dyspnea on exertion and four (10%) frecuent palpitations. b) two patients (5%) had aortic regurgitation and two (5%) mitral valve disease. c) Electrocardiogram: in seven (17.5%), left ventricular hypertrophy was detected, in two (5%) left atrial hypertrophy and in seven (17.5%) some type of conduction disturbance. d) Chest X Ray: six (15%) had left ventricular hypertrophy, one (2.5%) left atrial hypertrophy and two (5%) dilated ascending aorta. e) Echocardiogram: two cases (5%) had aortic dilatation and other two (5%), mitral valve disease. In three patients (7.5%) pericardial effusion was found, which in our series, it is more frecuent than has been reported up until now in the literature.

  19. Nonsurgical management of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Sangala, Jaypal Reddy; Dakwar, Elias; Uribe, Juan; Vale, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current evidence-based nonsurgical management strategies of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) for spine surgeons. Whereas surgical management is indicated in a highly selected group, nonsurgical management is itself a useful measure for nearly all patients with AS. The authors conducted a literature review of PubMed using relevant search words. All the articles published in English in the last 15 years were reviewed and the level of evidence provided by them was noted. Nonpharmacological treatments in the form of physical therapy and patient education have Level Ib evidence in maintaining function in AS. There is Level Ib evidence supporting the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and coxibs for treatment in patients with symptoms. There is not enough evidence to support the use of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatoid arthritis drugs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha inhibitors (infliximab, etanercept, and adalimumab) are associated with Level Ib evidence in improving spinal pain, function, inflammatory biomarkers, and spinal inflammation detected by magnetic resonance imaging in patients in whom symptom duration has exceeded 3 months. Physical therapy and patient education are useful for all patients diagnosed with AS. If symptomatic, patients are started with either a course of nonselective NSAIDs or a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. The role of NSAIDs as a disease-modifying therapy in the treatment of AS is increasingly being understood. The central role of TNF in the pathogenesis of AS is now known, and the advent of biological treatment in the form of anti-TNFalpha factors has revolutionized the medical management of AS and is used in patients with axial disease whose symptoms persist despite an adequate dose of NSAIDs.

  20. Sexual functions in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Bal, Serpil; Bal, Kaan; Turan, Yasemin; Deniz, Gonca; Gürgan, Alev; Berkit, Işıl Karataş; Sendur, Omer Faruk

    2011-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the axial skeleton. In recent years, several authors reported an increased prevalence of sexual dysfunction among AS patients. We aimed to find out, whether the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among AS patients is different from age-matched healthy controls. Thirty-seven male patients with AS who were diagnosed according to the modified New York criteria and 67 normal healthy controls (NHC) were included in this study. Clinical characteristics of patients including age, disease duration and morning stiffness were noted. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath AS disease activity index (BASDAI), functional statement was evaluated by using Bath AS functional index, and scores of spinal measurements were done by using Bath AS metrology index. Erectile function is evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scoring system. Health-related quality of life was assessed by short form 36. The mean age of the patients and controls were 42.8 + 10.8 and 43.6 + 5.9 years (P = 0.666). The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in AS patients and NHC were 35.1 and 26.9%, respectively (P = 0.335). There was no statistically significant difference between IIEF domain scores of AS patients and NHC except for the sexual desire domain (P = 0.014). Duration of morning stiffness and BASDAI was negatively correlated with sexual desire and overall satisfaction; however, they have no negative impact on erectile function, orgasmic function and intercourse satisfaction domains of IIEF. In this report, we showed that only the sexual desire domain of IIEF was significantly lower in AS patients. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction among AS patients is similar to NHC, which is a finding contrary to previous reports. AS patients do not suffer from erectile dysfunction, they rather have problems of satisfaction from the intercourse.

  1. Coexistence of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Löfgren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kobak, Senol; Sever, Fidan; Sivrikoz, Oya; Karaarslan, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year-old male patient diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis presented to our polyclinic with complaints of pain, swelling, and limitation in joint mobility in both ankles and erythema nodosum skin lesions in both pretibial sites. The sacroiliac joint graphy and the MRI taken revealed active and chronic sacroiliitis. On the thorax CT, multiple mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathies were reported. Mediastinoscopic excisional lymph node biopsy was taken and noncalcified granulomatous structures, lymphocytes, and histiocytes were determined on histopathological examination. The patients were diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis, sarcoidosis, and Löfgren's syndrome. NSAIDs, sulfasalazine, and low dose corticosteroid were started. Significant regression was seen in the patient's subjective and laboratory assessments. PMID:24741443

  2. Ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in royal Egyptian mummies of 18th -20th Dynasties? CT and archaeology studies.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Sahar N; Hawass, Zahi

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To study the computed tomography(CT) images of royal Ancient Egyptian mummies dated to the 18th to early 20th Dynasties for the claimed diagnoses of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and to correlate the findings with the archaeology literature.Methods. We studied the CT images of 13 royal Ancient Egyptian mummies (1492–1153 BC) for evidence of AS and DISH and correlated our findings with the archaeology literature.Results. The findings of the CT scans excluded the diagnosis of AS, based on the absence of sacroiliac joint erosions or fusion of the facet joints. Four mummies fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for DISH:Amenhotep III (18th Dynasty), Ramesses II, his son Merenptah, and Ramesses III (19th to early 20th Dynasties).The diagnosis of DISH, a commonly a symptomatic disease of old age, in the 4 pharaohs is in concordance with their longevity and active lifestyles.Conclusion. CT findings excluded the diagnosis of AS in the studied royal Ancient Egyptian mummies and brought into question the antiquity of the disease. The CT features of DISH during this ancient period were similar to those commonly seen in modern populations,and it is likely that they will also be similar in the future.The affection of Ramesses II and his son Merenptah supports familial clustering of DISH. The process of mummification may induce changes in the spine that should be considered during investigations of disease in ancient mummies.

  3. Physiotherapy interventions for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, H; Kvien, T K; Hagen, K B

    2008-01-23

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, inflammatory rheumatic disease. Physiotherapy is considered an important part of the overall management of AS. To summarise the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the management of AS. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL and PEDro up to January 2007 for all relevant publications, without any language restrictions. We checked the reference lists of relevant articles and contacted the authors of included articles. We included randomised and quasi-randomised studies with AS patients and where at least one of the comparison groups received physiotherapy. The main outcomes of interest were pain, stiffness, spinal mobility, physical function and patient global assessment. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed trial quality. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Eleven trials with a total of 763 participants were included in this updated review. Four trials compared individualised home exercise programs or a supervised exercise program with no intervention and reported low quality evidence for effects in spinal mobility (Relative percentage differences (RPDs) from 5-50%) and physical function (four points on a 33-point scale). Three trials compared supervised group physiotherapy with an individualised home-exercise program and reported moderate quality evidence for small differences in spinal mobility (RPDs 7.5-18%) and patient global assessment (1.46 cm) in favour of supervised group exercises. In one study, a three-week inpatient spa-exercise therapy followed by 37 weeks of weekly outpatient group physiotherapy (without spa) was compared with weekly outpatient group physiotherapy alone; there was moderate quality evidence for effects in pain (18%), physical function (24%) and patient global assessment (27%) in favour of the combined spa

  4. Physiotherapy interventions for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, H; Kvien, T K; Hagen, K B

    2004-10-18

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, inflammatory rheumatic disease. Due to the consequences of the disease, physiotherapy is considered to be an important part of the overall management of AS. The objective of this review was to summarise the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the management of AS. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL and PEDro up to February 2004 for all relevant publications, without any language restrictions. The reference lists of relevant articles were checked and the authors of included articles were contacted. We included randomised and quasi-randomised studies with patients classified by the AS New York criteria and where at least one of the comparison groups received some kind of physiotherapy. The main outcomes of interest were pain, stiffness, spinal mobility, physical function and patient global assessment. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed trial quality. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Six trials with a total of 561 participants were included in this updated review as compared to three trials and 241 patients in the previous version. Two trials compared individualised home exercise programs with no intervention and reported low quality evidence for effects in spinal mobility (relative percentage differences (RPD) 37%) and physical function, in favour of the home exercise program. Three trials compared supervised group physiotherapy with an individualised home-exercise program and reported moderate quality evidence for small differences in spinal mobility (RPD 18%) and patient global assessment in favour of supervised group exercises. Finally, in one study a three week inpatient spa-exercise therapy followed by 37 weeks of weekly outpatient group physiotherapy (without spa) was compared with weekly outpatient group physiotherapy alone

  5. [Some aspects of pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Erdes, Sh

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease of the spine (spondylitis) and sacroiliac joints (sacroileitis) associated in many cases with inflammatory affection of the peripheral joints (arthritis), entesises (entesitis), eyes (uveitis), intestine (enteritis) and aortic root (aortitis). AS is considered now as a prototype of diseases from the group of seronegative spondyloarthritis. AS is a hereditary disease. Predisposition to AS (90%) is associated with genetic factors the key gene of which is HLA-B27. As pathogenesis of AS is not still verified, three hypotheses are considered basing on HLA-B27 biology. The role of environmental factors involved in AS development (tension in enteses and infection) are discussed.

  6. Plantar pressure distribution in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Elif; Turan, Yasemin; Tastaban, Engin; Kurt Omurlu, Imran; Sendur, Omer Faruk

    2015-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is one of the most common inflammatory rheumatic diseases and is associated with alterations in posture. The aim of this study was to investigate the pedobarographic changes among ankylosing spondylitis patients, in an attempt to understand whether the alterations in the posture affect the plantar pressure distribution. The study population consisted of 38 patients with ankylosing spondylitis and 33 healthy volunteers. The static and dynamic pedobarographic measurements were performed to determine the plantar pressure distribution. Moreover, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Questionnaire and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index were used to assess the clinical state of the patients. The static pedobarographic measurements did not reveal any intergroup difference. There were differences between the groups in the results of dynamic peak pressure measurements under the metatarsal areas and under the midfoot region. The percentage of the midfoot in the dynamic plantar contact area was higher in ankylosing spondylitis patients in comparison to the controls. No clinically significant correlation was found between the clinical scores and static pedobarographic measurements. The plantar pressures under the metatarsal heads, medial and lateral heel regions declined with increasing disease activity according to the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index scores. The lower peak pressures on the forefoot and rearfoot, were associated with the higher Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index scores of the patients. The alterations in the posture may have effects on the plantar pressures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, especially during dynamic activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Concomitant systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, I; Gemignani, G; Balagi, M; Pasquariello, A; Gremignai, G; Pasero, G

    1990-01-01

    The case is reported of a 42 year old white woman meeting currently used diagnostic criteria for both ankylosing spondylitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). As found in a previously described similar case of a black man, HLA typing showed antigens associated with both SLE and seronegative spondyloarthropathy. This case thus supports the hypothesis that the two diseases occur together only when this rare combination of HLA antigens is present. Images PMID:2344214

  8. Fibromyalgia in women with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Aloush, Valerie; Ablin, Jacob N; Reitblat, Tatiana; Caspi, Dan; Elkayam, Ori

    2007-07-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), pre-dominantly found in women, may accompany other pre-existing rheumatic diseases. The association between FM and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is uncertain. We evaluated FM in women with AS. Eighteen women with AS were compared with 18 men with AS (controls) for age, duration of symptoms, time to diagnosis, degree of sacroiliac involvement, history of peripheral arthritis, patient global assessment, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, level of diffuse pain, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). Physical examination included the number of tender points and enthesitis sites, Schober test, distance between occiput and wall, chest expansion, lateral spinal flexion, and intermalleolar distance. Inflammatory activity was measured by the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Of all tested parameters, the ones with significant differences between the groups were time between symptom onset and AS diagnosis (longer for women), FM incidence and the number of tender points and enthesitis sites (higher for women), BASDAI (higher in women and correlated with FM and the number of tender points but not with ESR), and BASFI and BASDAI scores (increased in FM patients). FM was present in 50% of women with AS and associated with higher disease activity indices (BASDAI and BASFI) and not related to severity of physical findings or ESR. The reliability of well-accepted assessment tools of AS, such as BASDAI and BASFI, in evaluating AS activity in women may be called into question due to a confounding effect of FM.

  9. Treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: focus on etanercept

    PubMed Central

    Frech, Tracy

    2007-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory condition which preferentially affects the axial skeleton, often beginning in the sacroiliac joints. The etiology of the pathologic lesions of this condition including enthesitis, erosive articular changes, osteitis, and fibrous ankylosis, as well as changes which occur in the eye, gastrointestinal tract, cardiovascular system, and lungs is unknown; however, there is a strong association with HLA-B27, which indicates altered immunity. One of the major mediators of the immune response is TNF-α, which functions as a pleiotrophic soluble messenger primarily from macrophages. TNF-α is principally involved with activation of both normal and transformed cells, including endothelium, synoviocytes, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, and fibroblasts. The cornerstone of medical management of ankylosing spondylitis includes intensive physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories for symptomatic relief. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that TNF-α blockade has an important role in the reduction of spine and joint inflammation. This review discusses the data that supports use of etanercept in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:19707347

  10. Quantitative metagenomics reveals unique gut microbiome biomarkers in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chengping; Zheng, Zhijun; Shao, Tiejuan; Liu, Lin; Xie, Zhijun; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; He, Zhixing; Zhong, Wendi; Fan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Linshuang; Li, Haichang; Wu, Chunyan; Hu, Changfeng; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Jia; Cai, Shunfeng; Wang, Dawei; Huang, Yun; Breban, Maxime; Qin, Nan; Ehrlich, Stanislav Dusko

    2017-07-27

    The assessment and characterization of the gut microbiome has become a focus of research in the area of human autoimmune diseases. Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease and evidence showed that ankylosing spondylitis may be a microbiome-driven disease. To investigate the relationship between the gut microbiome and ankylosing spondylitis, a quantitative metagenomics study based on deep shotgun sequencing was performed, using gut microbial DNA from 211 Chinese individuals. A total of 23,709 genes and 12 metagenomic species were shown to be differentially abundant between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls. Patients were characterized by a form of gut microbial dysbiosis that is more prominent than previously reported cases with inflammatory bowel disease. Specifically, the ankylosing spondylitis patients demonstrated increases in the abundance of Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella copri, and Prevotella sp. C561 and decreases in Bacteroides spp. It is noteworthy that the Bifidobacterium genus, which is commonly used in probiotics, accumulated in the ankylosing spondylitis patients. Diagnostic algorithms were established using a subset of these gut microbial biomarkers. Alterations of the gut microbiome are associated with development of ankylosing spondylitis. Our data suggest biomarkers identified in this study might participate in the pathogenesis or development process of ankylosing spondylitis, providing new leads for the development of new diagnostic tools and potential treatments.

  11. Endothelial progenitor cell biology in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Inderjeet; Syngle, Ashit; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are unique populations which have reparative potential in overcoming endothelial damage and reducing cardiovascular risk. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial progenitor cell population in AS patients and its potential relationships with disease variables. Endothelial progenitor cells were measured in peripheral blood samples from 20 AS and 20 healthy controls by flow cytometry on the basis of CD34 and CD133 expression. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Functional ability was monitored by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). EPCs were depleted in AS patients as compared to healthy controls (CD34(+) /CD133(+) : 0.027 ± 0.010% vs. 0.044 ± 0.011%, P < 0.001). EPC depletions were significantly associated with disease duration (r = -0.52, P = 0.01), BASDAI (r = -0.45, P = 0.04) and C-reactive protein (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate endothelial progenitor cell depletion in AS patients. EPC depletions inversely correlate with disease duration, disease activity and inflammation, suggesting the pivotal role of inflammation in depletion of EPCs. EPC would possibly also serve as a therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular disease in AS. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. [Sleep quality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Elif; Bayraktar, Kevser; Turan, Yasemin; Omurlu, Imran; Tastaban, Engin; Sendur, Omer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by the inflammation of the pelvis and spine that results in a restriction in the mobility of the spine. Due to the altered posture and nocturnal inflammatory pain, sleep disturbances are likely to occur in patients with AS. This cross-sectional study aimed at determining the differences between the patients with AS and healthy controls in sleep quality, as well as assessing the relationship between the sleep quality and disease activity. In order to assess sleep quality, fifty-five patients with AS (40 men, 15 women; mean age, 43 ± 1 yrs) who fulfilled the modified New York criteria and fifty-five comparable controls (40 men, 15 women; mean age, 42 ± 9 yrs) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. The disease activity was assessed by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Ankylosing spondylitis was associated with a significantly impaired sleep quality according to the total PSQI scores (p = 0.001). Significant differences were found between the patients with AS and healthy controls in PSQI domains, including "subjective sleep quality" (p = 0. 010), "sleep duration" (p = 0. 011), "habitual sleep efficiency" (p = 0. 034), "sleep disturbances" (p = 0. 003) and "daytime dysfunction" (p = 0. 009) but not in "sleep latency", "use of sleep medication". There was a significant positive correlation between the BASDAI and PSQI scores (r = 0.612, p = 0.001). In the current study, we found that the sleep disturbances were significantly higher in patients with AS in comparison to controls. Patients with active disease had worse sleep quality. In addition, disease activity was correlated with the scores of most of the PSQI subscales. Sleep quality assessment should be a tool for evaluating patients with AS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of hip involvement in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mingqiang; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Liang; Xiao, Jun; Li, Zhihan; Shi, Zhanjun

    2013-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory rheumatologic disease characterized by inflammation and progressive structural damage of the affected joints. Hip involvement often results in severe deformities and significant impairment on function. Although, tremendous progress has been made in conservative management for AS, effective prevention strategies for hip involvement and long-term need for total hip arthroplasty (THA) remain indefinite. When hip involvement has progressed to intractable pain and disability, THA is still the most effective treatment strategy to relieve pain and restore function. However, certain AS-specific problems regarding "preoperative preparation," "intraoperative difficulties," "perioperative pharmacological management," "postoperative physiotherapy," "operation benefits," and "operation complications" need more concern and further discussion.

  14. [Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Mariacher-Gehler, S; Wyss-Näther, A; Aeschlimann, A G

    2001-08-01

    Both Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) are chronic, inflammatory systemic diseases. RA predominantly manifests itself in the peripheral joints, whereas AS most prominently in the spine. As time progresses the roles of active and physical therapy become increasingly important. The aims of intensive and dynamic exercise for patients with RA and AS are formulated following the ICIDH-2. Thus, the aims are a direct equation of body function, activities and participation. The benefits of exercise therapy are increased joint mobility, increased muscle strength, improved functional ability and better cardiorespiratory function without incurring a flare of the disease.

  15. Living with Ankylosing Spondylitis: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-West, Kate E; Quine, Lyn

    2009-09-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a potentially debilitating chronic condition that necessitates a biopsychosocial approach for successful long-term management. However, the psychosocial consequences of AS are not well understood. In this study patients (N = 68) reported impacts of AS across a wide range of life domains; negative impacts included physical effects of AS, changes in mood or personality, effects on social life and relationships with friends and family, low self-esteem, stigma and worry about the future; positive impacts included increased exercise, feelings of achievement and empathy, stronger relationships, slower pace of life and a more positive perspective. Implications for treatment are discussed.

  16. Spa and exercise treatment in ankylosing spondylitis: fact or fancy?

    PubMed

    van Tubergen, Astrid; Hidding, Alita

    2002-09-01

    Physical therapy plays an important role in the overall treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. Apart from exercising at home, patients are advised to follow weekly group physical therapy. In addition, many patients often follow annual courses of in-patient physiotherapy or spa therapy in which exercises also play a central role. This chapter focuses on evidence for benefits of physical therapy and spa therapy in ankylosing spondylitis.

  17. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHENGGONG; LIAO, QIANDE; HU, YIHE; ZHONG, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25452811

  18. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggong; Liao, Qiande; Hu, Yihe; Zhong, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

  19. The effectiveness of exercise therapy for ankylosing spondylitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Yi; Chiang, Pin-Yen; Lee, Hong-Shen; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2009-09-01

    Exercise therapy is an important component of current standard therapy for patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The purpose of this review is to provide important guidelines when prescribing exercises by reviewing articles evaluating the effectives and usefulness of exercise therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylosis.

  20. Ankylosing Spondylitis and Pregnancy: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Kontomanolis, Emmanuel

    2017-03-17

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is the prototype of a group of systemic rheumatic diseases collectively referred to as Spondyloarthitides (SpA). It is has recently become clear that AS is not as rare as previously thought and, although it has an early onset in life affecting patients in their reproductive years, it has not been proved to adversely affect fertility in females. Furthermore, new pharmaceutical agents have been introduced for its therapeutical management. The interaction between systematic rheumatic diseases and pregnancy has been under investigation with the majority of studies focusing on systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AS is the most studied in relation to pregnancy, among the group of SpA. The aim of this review is to summarize all the recent data on AS and pregnancy in terms of fertility, disease course and pregnancy outcome from a clinical perspective.

  1. Ankylosing spondylitis is indigenous to Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lavín, M; Mansilla, J; Pineda, C; Pijoán, C

    1995-12-01

    Paleopathology helps to define the origin and the migration of diseases. It has been established that genetic and environmental factors play a role in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We investigated whether AS was present in Mesoamerica before contact with the European civilization. We studied the collection of Mesoamerican human skeletal remains preserved at the National Museum of Anthropology of Mexico, searching for features of AS. We found one incomplete specimen of a man of the Postclassic period (900-1521 AD). It showed fusion of the vertebral column from T8 to L5 due to ankylosis of the apophyseal joints and of the spinal processes. The pelvis was not preserved. Radiographs demonstrated ossification of both supraspinous and interspinous ligaments. Our findings suggest AS was present in Mesoamerica before the arrival of Europeans.

  2. Juvenile ankylosing spondylitis in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, P; Danda, Debashish; Danda, Sumita; Srivastava, Vivi M

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile ankylosing spondylitis (JAS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder which causes considerable morbidity when left untreated; it occurs predominantly in men. We describe an Asian Indian woman who had JAS with phenotypic features of Turner syndrome (TS) and was found to be a mosaic for 45, X/46, X, psu idic (X) (p11) by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies of peripheral blood. The absence of Y chromosome material was confirmed by FISH. Haplo-insufficiency of the X chromosome can predispose to autoimmunity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of JAS in association with mosaic Turner syndrome. This case highlights the possible effects of gene dosage in development of an autoimmune disease.

  3. Osteoporosis: a paradox in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Shea; Lories, Rik J

    2011-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic and severe inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton and the joints. Inflammation is associated with trabecular bone loss leading to osteoporosis but also with corcal new bone formation leading to progressive ankylosis of the spine and sacroiliac joints. This results in an apparent paradox of bone formation and loss taking place at sites closesly located to each other. Osteoporosis can be explained by the impact of inflammation of the bone remodeling cycle. In contrast, new bone formation has been linked to aberrant acvaon of bone morphogenec protein and Wnt signaling. In this commentary, we review recent data on this bone paradox and highlight recent advances including the effect of current drug therapies and the idenfication of new therapeutic targets.

  4. Predicting the outcome of ankylosing spondylitis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vastesaeger, Nathan; van der Heijde, Désirée; Inman, Robert D; Wang, Yanxin; Deodhar, Atul; Hsu, Benjamin; Rahman, Mahboob U; Dijkmans, Ben; Geusens, Piet; Vander Cruyssen, Bert; Collantes, Eduardo; Sieper, Joachim; Braun, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To create a model that provides a potential basis for candidate selection for anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment by predicting future outcomes relative to the current disease profile of individual patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods ASSERT and GO–RAISE trial data (n=635) were analysed to identify baseline predictors for various disease-state and disease-activity outcome instruments in AS. Univariate, multivariate, receiver operator characteristic and correlation analyses were performed to select final predictors. Their associations with outcomes were explored. Matrix and algorithm-based prediction models were created using logistic and linear regression, and their accuracies were compared. Numbers needed to treat were calculated to compare the effect size of anti-TNF therapy between the AS matrix subpopulations. Data from registry populations were applied to study how a daily practice AS population is distributed over the prediction model. Results Age, Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) score, enthesitis, therapy, C-reactive protein (CRP) and HLA-B27 genotype were identified as predictors. Their associations with each outcome instrument varied. However, the combination of these factors enabled adequate prediction of each outcome studied. The matrix model predicted outcomes as well as algorithm-based models and enabled direct comparison of the effect size of anti-TNF treatment outcome in various subpopulations. The trial populations reflected the daily practice AS population. Conclusion Age, BASFI, enthesitis, therapy, CRP and HLA-B27 were associated with outcomes in AS. Their combined use enables adequate prediction of outcome resulting from anti-TNF and conventional therapy in various AS subpopulations. This may help guide clinicians in making treatment decisions in daily practice. PMID:21402563

  5. Comparable long-term efficacy, as assessed by patient-reported outcomes, safety and pharmacokinetics, of CT-P13 and reference infliximab in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: 54-week results from the randomized, parallel-group PLANETAS study.

    PubMed

    Park, Won; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Jaworski, Janusz; Brzezicki, Jan; Gnylorybov, Andriy; Kadinov, Vladimir; Sariego, Irmgadt Goecke; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Escalante, William Jose Otero; Kang, Seong Wook; Andersone, Daina; Blanco, Francisco; Hong, Seung Suh; Lee, Sun Hee; Braun, Jürgen

    2016-01-20

    CT-P13 (Remsima®, Inflectra®) is a biosimilar of the infliximab reference product (RP; Remicade®) and is approved in Europe and elsewhere, mostly for the same indications as RP. The aim of this study was to compare the 54-week efficacy, immunogenicity, pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of CT-P13 with RP in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), with a focus on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). This was a multinational, double-blind, parallel-group study in patients with active AS. Participants were randomized (1:1) to receive CT-P13 (5 mg/kg) or RP (5 mg/kg) at weeks 0, 2, 6 and then every 8 weeks up to week 54. To assess responses, standardized assessment tools were used with an intention-to-treat analysis of observed data. Anti-drug antibodies (ADAs), PK parameters, and safety outcomes were also assessed. Of 250 randomized patients (n = 125 per group), 210 (84.0 %) completed 54 weeks of treatment, with similar completion rates between groups. At week 54, Assessment of Spondylo Arthritis international Society (ASAS)20 response, ASAS40 response and ASAS partial remission were comparable between treatment groups. Changes from baseline in PROs such as mean Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI; CT-P13 -3.1 versus RP -2.8), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI; -2.9 versus -2.7), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores (9.26 versus 10.13 for physical component summary; 7.30 versus 6.54 for mental component summary) were similar between treatment groups. At 54 weeks, 19.5 % and 23.0 % of patients receiving CT-P13 and RP, respectively, had ADAs. All observed PK parameters of CT-P13 and RP, including maximum and minimum serum concentrations, were similar through 54 weeks. The influence of ADAs on PK was similar in the two treatment groups. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. There was no notable difference between treatment groups in the incidence of adverse events, serious adverse events

  6. Inhibition of Complement Retards Ankylosing Spondylitis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chaoqun; Ding, Peipei; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jianquan; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Guang; Hu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) resulting in back pain and progressive spinal ankyloses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutics targeting AS largely due to elusive pathogenesis mechanisms, even as potential candidates such as HLA-B27 autoantigen have been identified. Herein, we employed a proteoglycan (PG)-induced AS mouse model together with clinical specimens, and found that the complement system was substantially activated in the spinal bone marrow, accompanied by a remarkable proportion alteration of neutrophils and macrophage in bone marrow and spleen, and by the significant increase of TGF-β1 in serum. The combined treatment with a bacteria-derived complement inhibitor Efb-C (C-terminal of extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus) remarkably retarded the progression of mouse AS by reducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that two important modulators involved in AS disease, TGF-β1 and RANKL, were elevated upon in vitro complement attack in osteoblast and/or osteoclast cells. These findings further unravel that complement activation is closely related with the pathogenesis of AS, and suggest that complement inhibition may hold great potential for AS therapy. PMID:27698377

  7. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, R; Rovensky, J; Zlnay, M; Radikova, Z; Macho, L; Vigas, M; Koska, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess basal function and responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis during dynamic testing. Methods: Insulin induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) (Actrapid HM 0.1 IU/kg, as intravenous bolus) was induced in 17 patients and 11 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Concentrations of glucose, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) were determined in plasma. Results: Comparable basal cortisol levels were found in the two groups, with a trend to be lower in ankylosing spondylitis. In the ankylosing spondylitis group, there were higher concentrations of IL-6 (mean (SEM): 16.6 (2.8) pg/ml v 1.41 (0.66) pg/ml in controls; p<0.001) and TNFα (8.5 (1.74) pg/ml v 4.08 (0.42) pg/ml in controls; p<0.01). Glucose, insulin, ACTH, DHEAS, and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone did not differ significantly from control. The IIH test was carried out successfully in 11 of the 17 patients with ankylosing spondylitis, and the ACTH and cortisol responses were comparable with control. General linear modelling showed a different course of glycaemia (p = 0.041) in the ankylosing spondylitis patients who met the criteria for a successful IIH test compared with the controls. Conclusions: The results suggest there is no difference in basal HPA axis activity and completely preserved responsiveness of the HPA axis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The interpretation of the different course of glycaemia during IIH in ankylosing spondylitis requires further investigation. PMID:15140773

  8. Surgical Outcomes after Traumatic Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    An, Seong-Bae; Kim, Keung-Nyun; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory rheumatic disease mainly affecting the axial skeleton. The rigid spine may secondarily develop osteoporosis, further increasing the risk of spinal fracture. In this study, we reviewed fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis that had been clinically diagnosed to better define the mechanism of injury, associated neurological deficit, predisposing factors, and management strategies. Methods Between January 2003 and December 2013, 12 patients with 13 fractures with neurological complications were treated. Neuroimaging evaluation was obtained in all patients by using plain radiography, CT scan, and MR imaging. The ASIA Impairment Scale was used in order to evaluate the neurologic status of the patients. Management was based on the presence or absence of spinal instability. Results A total of 9 cervical and 4 thoracolumbar fractures were identified in a review of patients in whom ankylosing spondylitis had been diagnosed. Of these, 7 fractures were associated with a hyperextension mechanism. 10 cases resulted in a fracture by minor trauma. Posttraumatic neurological deficits were demonstrated in 11 cases and neurological improvement after surgery was observed in 5 of these cases. Conclusions Patients with ankylosing spondylitis are highly susceptible to spinal fracture and spinal cord injury even after only mild trauma. Initial CT or MR imaging of the whole spine is recommended even if the patient's symptoms are mild. The patient should also have early surgical stabilization to correct spinal deformity and avoid worsening of the patient's neurological status. PMID:25328647

  9. Efficacy and safety of switching from reference infliximab to CT-P13 compared with maintenance of CT-P13 in ankylosing spondylitis: 102-week data from the PLANETAS extension study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Won; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Miranda, Pedro; Brzosko, Marek; Wiland, Piotr; Gutierrez-Ureña, Sergio; Mikazane, Helena; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Smiyan, Svitlana; Lim, Mie-Jin; Kadinov, Vladimir; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Kim, HoUng; Lee, Sang Joon; Bae, YunJu; Kim, SuYeon; Braun, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the efficacy and safety of switching from infliximab reference product (RP) to its biosimilar or maintaining biosimilar treatment in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods This open-label extension study recruited patients with AS who completed a 54-week, randomised controlled study comparing CT-P13 with RP (PLANETAS). CT-P13 (5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously every 8 weeks from week 62 to week 102. Efficacy end points included the proportion of patients achieving Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS)20. Antidrug antibodies (ADAs) were measured using an electrochemiluminescent method. Data were analysed for patients treated with CT-P13 in the main PLANETAS study and the extension (maintenance group) and those who were switched to CT-P13 during the extension study (switch group). Results Overall, 174 (82.9%) of 210 patients who completed the first 54 weeks of PLANETAS and agreed to participate in the extension were enrolled. Among these, 88 were maintained on CT-P13 and 86 were switched to CT-P13 from RP. In these maintenance and switch groups, respectively, ASAS20 response rates at week 102 were 80.7% and 76.9%. ASAS40 and ASAS partial remission were also similar between groups. ADA positivity rates were comparable (week 102: 23.3% vs 27.4%). Adverse events led to treatment discontinuation during the extension study in 3 (3.3%) and 4 (4.8%) patients, respectively. Conclusions This is the first study to show that switching from RP to its biosimilar CT-P13 is possible without negative effects on safety or efficacy in patients with AS. In the maintenance group, CT-P13 was effective and well tolerated over 2 years of treatment. Trial registration number NCT01571206; Results. PMID:27117698

  10. Somatosensory Evoked Potential Findings in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Cidem, Muharrem; Sahin, Zerrin; Aydin, Teoman; Aysal, Fikret

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) abnormalities were reported in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study aimed to investigate SSEP abnormalities and its relation with clinical findings in AS patients. Materials and Methods: The study included 26 patients with AS and 17 age-matched health volunteers (Control for SSEP). Median nerve SSEP findings were normal in all AS cases. Results: However, delayed latency and/or very low amplitude of tibial nerve SSEP was found in 20 (76.9%) AS patients. There were significant correlations between tibial SSEP latency and disease duration (R=0.433 to 0.635). There was also an inverse correlation between tibial SSEP amplitude and disease duration (R=−0.429, p=0.047). Serum estradiol level, hip total bone mineral density, The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) score and Beck depression score were significantly lower in AS patients with SSEP abnormalities (37.3±10.8 pg/mL, 0.916±0.123 g/cm2, 35.0±27.9, 12.8±8.4, respectively) than in AS patients without SSEP abnormalities (53.7±12.3 pg/mL, 1.103±0.197 g/cm2, 64.8±15.5, 24.8±10.1, respectively). Conclusion: Significant inverse correlations between SSEP latencies and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) levels were found (R=−0.400 to −0.713). There were also significant inverse correlation between SSEP latencies and DHEAS/oestrogen index (R=−0.596 to −0.868), and between SSEP latencies and DHEAS/Progesterone index (R=−0.467 to −0.685). As a conclusion, this study indicates that tibial nerve SSEP abnormalities are common in patients with AS and there are significant correlations between clinical findings of AS and SSEP abnormalities. PMID:25610293

  11. The Effectiveness of Structured Group Education on Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kasapoglu Aksoy, Meliha; Birtane, Murat; Taştekin, Nurettin; Ekuklu, Galip

    2017-04-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common inflammatory rheumatic disease that affects the axial skeleton which can lead to structural and functional impairments. It has a negative impact on the person's daily life activities. Early diagnosis, exercise and patient education are factors playing a major role on prognosis. The purpose of the study was to compare the structured theoretical and exercise educational program with routine clinic educational efforts on the parameters of the disorder over a 3 month follow up. This randomized, educational intervention study was performed on 41 AS patients. A 5 day structured education and exercise program was applied to the first group of patients (Group 1) in subgroups consisting 4-5 patients each. Patients had group exercises throughout the education program. The second group followed routine clinical care. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional (BASFI), Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity (BASDAI), Bath ankylosing spondylitis global (BAS-G), Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology indices (BASMI), chest expansion, short form-36 (SF-36), ankylosing spondylitis quality of life scale (ASQoL) and laboratory parameters in all patients. Patients were evaluated on initiation and after 3 months. Significant improvements in BASFI, BASDAI and BAS-G, chest expansion, SF-36 and ASQoL indices were observed in Group 1 No difference could be found in BASMI and chest expansion. A structured educational and exercise intervention had a positive effect on the functional status,disease activity, and general well-being and quality of life. It also, shows that education programs should be within the routine treatment program for AS.

  12. Physiotherapy in ankylosing spondylitis: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    van der Linden, S; van Tubergen, A; Hidding, A

    2002-01-01

    Evidence on the value of some current physiotherapeutic practices and the ineffectiveness of others is accumulating. This paper addresses the best evidence available on the efficacy and effectiveness of physiotherapeutic modalities in ankylosing spondylitis. General issues in the assessment of physiotherapy in this disease are briefly discussed. Core sets for assessments are nowadays available. A recent Cochrane review on this topic supports the (at least short-term) positive effects of physiotherapy in particular exercise, in the management of ankylosing spondylitis. Some details of the included studies are provided.

  13. The role of secukinumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Perry, Lisa; Deodhar, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving the sacroiliac joint, spine and less frequently the peripheral joints. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TNF-α inhibitors are utilized to reduce signs and symptoms. Whether these agents slow disease progression, is still debatable. Secukinumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against IL-17 that has been studied in patients with ankylosing spondylitis with promising results. It has demonstrated improvement in signs, symptoms, patient reported outcomes and functional status and has been well tolerated. The clinical improvement is also mirrored in the improvement in sacroiliac joint magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  14. Infliximab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Grainger, Rebecca; Harrison, Andrew A

    2007-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, progressive disease characterized by inflammation in the spine and sacroiliac joints which causes pain, stiffness and the potential for spinal ankylosis. It is associated with significant functional impairment. It is common and since onset is often in young people, the burden of disease is considerable. Conventional treatment including non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and physiotherapy have proven but limited efficacy in controlling symptoms and preventing progression of spinal manifestations. Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody which binds to and inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), is highly effective in controlling disease activity in AS. In AS, infliximab 5 mg/kg body weight is usually given as an infusion at weeks 0, 2 and 6, and then every 6–8 weeks. When infliximab is used in combination with NSAIDs a rapid improvement in disease activity by at least 50% is seen in as many as 50% of AS patients. Infliximab has been shown to have ongoing efficacy for as long as regular infusions continue and is safe in the medium term. Magnetic resonance studies show major reductions in spinal inflammation during treatment with infliximab, however ongoing studies will assess if infliximab has disease modifying effect in AS. PMID:19707326

  15. Physiotherapy for ankylosing spondylitis: evidence and application.

    PubMed

    Passalent, Laura A

    2011-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a disease that tends to affect younger individuals, many of whom are in the prime of their lives; therefore, incorporating the most up-to-date evidence into physiotherapy practice is critical. The purpose of this review is to update the most recent evidence related to physiotherapy intervention for AS and highlight the application of the findings to current physiotherapy research and clinical practice. The results of this review add to the evidence supporting physiotherapy as an intervention for AS. The emphasis continues to be on exercise as the most studied physiotherapy modality, with very few studies examining other physiotherapy modalities. Results of the studies reviewed support the use of exercise, spa therapy, manual therapy and electrotherapeutic modalities. In addition, the results of this review help to understand who might benefit from certain interventions, as well as barriers to management. A review of recently published articles has resulted in a number of studies that support the body of literature describing physiotherapy as an effective form of intervention for AS. In order to continue to build on the existing research, further examination into physiotherapy modalities, beyond exercise-based intervention, needs to be explored.

  16. Medial olivocochlear reflex in ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Beyazal, M S; Özgür, A; Terzi, S; Çeliker, M; Dursun, E

    2016-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease. Via autoimmune mediators, AS can damage the auditory system similar to other systems. Otoacoustic emission studies in AS patients showed that the damage that causes hearing loss was in the outer hair cells. The medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex is used to evaluate the MOC efferent system (MOES), which includes the outer hair cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of subclinical damage in the inner ear with the aid of the MOC reflex test in AS patients with no hearing complaints. Thirty-four patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. Otoacoustic emission responses, MOC reflex results, and frequency-specific and total suppression findings were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings for the AS patients, and the MOC reflex data were also investigated. Reduced MOC reflex response (p = 0.04) and suppression (p = 0.019) were detected in AS patients. When the clinical and laboratory findings for the AS patients and the MOC reflex test results were compared, a significant correlation was found only between the MOC reflex and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The results showed that AS can damage the inner ear, especially the MOES, and can reduce the MOC reflex response without clinical hearing loss.

  17. Integrative Structural Biomechanical Concepts of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Nair, Kalyani; Andonian, Brian J.; Prus, Kristina M.; Kelly, Joseph; Sanchez, Jose R.; Henderson, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not fully explained by inflammatory processes. Clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and course of disease features indicate additional host-related risk processes and predispositions. Collectively, the pattern of predisposition to onset in adolescent and young adult ages, male preponderance, and widely varied severity of AS is unique among rheumatic diseases. However, this pattern could reflect biomechanical and structural differences between the sexes, naturally occurring musculoskeletal changes over life cycles, and a population polymorphism. During juvenile development, the body is more flexible and weaker than during adolescent maturation and young adulthood, when strengthening and stiffening considerably increase. During middle and later ages, the musculoskeletal system again weakens. The novel concept of an innate axial myofascial hypertonicity reflects basic mechanobiological principles in human function, tissue reactivity, and pathology. However, these processes have been little studied and require critical testing. The proposed physical mechanisms likely interact with recognized immunobiological pathways. The structural biomechanical processes and tissue reactions might possibly precede initiation of other AS-related pathways. Research in the combined structural mechanobiology and immunobiology processes promises to improve understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of AS than prevailing concepts. The combined processes might better explain characteristic enthesopathic and inflammatory processes in AS. PMID:22216409

  18. Employment perspectives of patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Chorus, A; Boonen, A; Miedema, H; van der Linden, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the labour market position of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in relation to disease duration and to identify potential factors in relation to withdrawal from the labour force. Methods: A cross sectional mail survey was conducted among 658 patients with AS. Participation in the labour force was defined as having a paid job. The independent effect of duration of disease was examined by an indirect method of standardisation. A broad variety of risk factors were examined separately and in a combined analysis, including sociodemographic factors, disease related variables, coping styles, and work related factors. Attributable and preventable fractions were calculated from the combined analyses to assess the relative importance of the contributing factors. Results: Probability of participation in the labour force was similarly reduced in patients with AS with different durations of disease. Pacing to cope with limitations was the most relevant factor in increasing the risk of withdrawal from the labour force, accounting for 73% of withdrawals. Coping with limitations by often seeking creative solutions, high disease activity, increased age, and insufficient support from colleagues or management were also positively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. Technical or ergonomic adjustments of the workplace, working in large companies, and coping with dependency style through frequent acceptance were negatively associated. Of these factors, technical or ergonomic adjustment was the most relevant in terms of reducing the risk. Conclusion: Sociodemographic factors, disease related factors, coping styles, and work related factors contribute simultaneously to withdrawal from the labour force. PMID:12117674

  19. [Purine metabolism in ankylosing spondylitis: clinical study].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Balderas, F J; Robles, E J; Juan, L; Badui, E; Arellano, H; Espinosa Said, L; Mintz Spiro, G

    1989-01-01

    We undertook a prospective study of 23 male patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) (New York Criteria), 18 HLA-B27 positive and 5 HLA-B27 negative, five of them had hyperuricemia. The following data of evolution were taken into consideration: age at onset of disease, time course of the disease, presence of urolithiasis, heart disease, flares of uveitis. Clinical activity and degree of disability were evaluated every one to 3 months; on each visit, every patient had determinations of serum and urinary uric acid levels, serum and phosphorus, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), serum protein electrophoresis, as well as X-ray films of the vertebral spine and pelvis. Three groups of patients were detected, all of them with equal age at onset, duration of disease, frequency of B27, peripheral arthritis, and leukocytosis. One group had hyperuricemia (5 of 23 patients, 80% of them HLA-B27 positive) and a lesser degree of clinical activity of the disease (p less than .001, a higher frequency of uveitis (40%, lower levels of serum gammaglobulins (p less than 0.05) and ESR (p less than 0.05), a lesser degree of ankylosis of the spine, and a better functional prognosis than the other groups. Another group (8 of 23 patients, 75% of them were HLA-B27 positive) had normouricemia and hyperuricosuria, and showed a higher frequency of fever (50%), an abnormal urinalysis, and urolithiasis (25%).

  20. Ankylosing spondylitis in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Belachew, D A; Sandu, N; Schaller, B; Guta, Z

    2009-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) represents a chronic inflammatory bone disease of the axial skeleton that manifests as chronic back pain and progressive stiffness of the spine. It characteristically affects young adults with a peak age of onset between 20-30 years. In contrast to Western Europe and North America, the disease is rare in Sub-Saharan Africa where the majority of the population is HLA-B27 negative. Even in some African populations where HLA-B27 is prevalent (for example, in Gambia and Senegal, where 3-6% of the general population has HLA-B27), the disease is also said to be rare. However, some other genetic markers may be involved in the causation of AS in the HLA-B27 negative population, and when it occurs in this subgroup of patients it has a similar manifestation with HLA-B27 negative white patients and these patients rarely develop anterior uveitis. The clinical presentation of the disease in Africa is generally milder; most affected individuals do not have a family history of AS, the patients are older at onset of the disease, and the majority of them lack extra-articular manifestations such as anterior uveitis compared with the situation in Western Europe and North America. In conclusion, AS in sub-Saharan Africa seems to represent a subgroup of the disease, which may open the window to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of the condition.

  1. Secukinumab for ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Ennio; Perrotta, Fabio Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) positively changed since the introduction of anti-TNFα drugs. These treatments were shown to reduce the symptoms and signs of the diseases and improve the quality of life. However, a variable percentage of patients do not respond to anti-TNFα or can exhibit a loss of response and, furthermore, despite anti-TNFα drugs’ proven efficacy in reducing peripheral radiographic progression in PsA, the impact in reducing radiographic damage in AS is still debated. Recently, the discovery of new pathogenic mechanisms paved the way to the development of new drugs that target other pro-inflammatory cytokines. In particular, the inhibition of interleukin (IL)-17, which is the principal cytokine produced by Th17 lymphocytes, a pro-inflammatory subset involved in both inflammation and new bone formation in AS and PsA, demonstrated promising results. The new molecule secukinumab, an IL-17A inhibitor, showed its efficacy and safety in phase III randomized clinical trials in AS and PsA and is the first non-anti-TNFα biologic approved for the treatment of AS, providing a useful alternative treatment strategy in both diseases. The aim of this article was to review the pathophysiological basis, the efficacy and the safety of secukinumab treatment in AS and PsA patients. PMID:27799780

  2. Ankylosing Spondylitis: From Cells to Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano-Zaragoza, José Francisco; Agraz-Cibrian, Juan Manuel; González-Reyes, Christian; Durán-Avelar, Ma. de Jesús; Vibanco-Pérez, Norberto

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, though it is considered an autoimmune disease. HLA-B27 is the risk factor most often associated with AS, and although the mechanism of involvement is unclear, the subtypes and other features of the relationship between HLA-B27 and AS have been studied for years. Additionally, the key role of IL-17 and Th17 cells in autoimmunity and inflammation suggests that the latter and the cytokines involved in their generation could play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Recent studies have described the sources of IL-17 and IL-23, as well as the characterization of Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases. Other cells, such as NK and regulatory T cells, have been implicated in autoimmunity and have been evaluated to ascertain their possible role in AS. Moreover, several polymorphisms, mutations and deletions in the regulatory proteins, protein-coding regions, and promoter regions of different genes involved in immune responses have been discovered and evaluated for possible genetic linkages to AS. In this review, we analyze the features of HLA-B27 and the suggested mechanisms of its involvement in AS while also focusing on the characterization of the immune response and the identification of genes associated with AS. PMID:23970995

  3. Treatment of spinal fractures in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Michael; Bolesta, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory spondyloarthropathy with the potential for progressive spinal stiffness that ultimately makes patients susceptible to spinal fractures with traumatic spinal cord injury from even low-energy trauma. Treatment of patients with AS and spinal fractures (AS+FX) is controversial because, although these patients need especially rigorous stabilization, surgery has been associated with an increased risk of complications and persistent neurological deficits. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to profile patients with AS+FX from a 19-year period within the authors' county hospital system, including differences of neurological status in patients treated operatively vs nonoperatively. The study group comprised 11 patients with AS+FX (9 men and 2 women; mean age, 63 years [range, 38-91 years]). The authors reviewed available clinical notes and imaging reports. Six patients had posterior operative fixation, and 5 were stabilized nonoperatively. By the time of either discharge or final follow-up, 3 of the patients treated operatively deteriorated neurologically (2 of them preoperatively) and 3 remained stable. Of the patients treated nonoperatively, 3 remained neurologically intact, 1 deteriorated, and 1 recovered completely. The most common complications in all patients were pneumonia and urinary tract infection. Operative and nonoperative management produced acceptable outcomes in most patients. The authors recommend individualized treatment, accounting for patient preferences and comorbidities.

  4. The relationship between C-reactive protein rs3091244 polymorphism and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Akbal, Ayla; Reşorlu, Hatice; Gökmen, Ferhat; Savaş, Yılmaz; Zateri, Çoşkun; Sargin, Betül; Bozkurt, Emre; Sılan, Fatma; Özdemir, Öztürk

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphism can be related to inflammatory changes. The present study aimed to examine the association between CRP gene polymorphism and clinical and laboratory findings in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. A total of 80 patients, 40 with AS and 40 controls, were included in the study. Diagnosis of AS was made according to Assessment in AS International Working Group criteria. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index scores were evaluated. CRP gene C, A and T alleles were evaluated and were determined using the analysis of melting curves after real time polymerase chain reaction. The odds ratios were calculated for all alleles and haploids of the CRP gene. We investigated the relationship between the CRP polymorphism and clinical and laboratory findings. A, C, T allele frequencies in the control group were 15%, 57.5% and 27.5%. The allele frequencies in the AS group were 38%, 68.8% and 26.2%. While C and T allele frequencies were shown to be similar in the two groups, A allele frequency was higher in the AS group compared to the control group. The CC wild allele was 42.5% in the control group and 47.5% in the AS group (P = 1.0). Odds ratios for the C allele were 1.6, for the CC haploid 1.2 and for the CT haploid 3.7. Chest expansion and finger-to-ground distance was better in the CRP gene polymorphism group compared to the no polymorphism group. The presence of the CRP gene CC wild haploid and C allele in patients may indicate an increased risk for AS. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Efficacy and safety of switching from reference infliximab to CT-P13 compared with maintenance of CT-P13 in ankylosing spondylitis: 102-week data from the PLANETAS extension study.

    PubMed

    Park, Won; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Miranda, Pedro; Brzosko, Marek; Wiland, Piotr; Gutierrez-Ureña, Sergio; Mikazane, Helena; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Smiyan, Svitlana; Lim, Mie-Jin; Kadinov, Vladimir; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Kim, HoUng; Lee, Sang Joon; Bae, YunJu; Kim, SuYeon; Braun, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of switching from infliximab reference product (RP) to its biosimilar or maintaining biosimilar treatment in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This open-label extension study recruited patients with AS who completed a 54-week, randomised controlled study comparing CT-P13 with RP (PLANETAS). CT-P13 (5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously every 8 weeks from week 62 to week 102. Efficacy end points included the proportion of patients achieving Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS)20. Antidrug antibodies (ADAs) were measured using an electrochemiluminescent method. Data were analysed for patients treated with CT-P13 in the main PLANETAS study and the extension (maintenance group) and those who were switched to CT-P13 during the extension study (switch group). Overall, 174 (82.9%) of 210 patients who completed the first 54 weeks of PLANETAS and agreed to participate in the extension were enrolled. Among these, 88 were maintained on CT-P13 and 86 were switched to CT-P13 from RP. In these maintenance and switch groups, respectively, ASAS20 response rates at week 102 were 80.7% and 76.9%. ASAS40 and ASAS partial remission were also similar between groups. ADA positivity rates were comparable (week 102: 23.3% vs 27.4%). Adverse events led to treatment discontinuation during the extension study in 3 (3.3%) and 4 (4.8%) patients, respectively. This is the first study to show that switching from RP to its biosimilar CT-P13 is possible without negative effects on safety or efficacy in patients with AS. In the maintenance group, CT-P13 was effective and well tolerated over 2 years of treatment. NCT01571206; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Evaluation of the T helper 17 axis in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Taylan, Ali; Sari, Ismail; Kozaci, Didem L; Yuksel, Arif; Bilge, Safak; Yildiz, Yasar; Sop, Gulten; Coker, Isil; Gunay, Necati; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the T helper 17 (Th17) axis and its relation to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blockage and disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The study included 127 AS patients (100M/27F) and 38 (27M/11F) controls. Spinal mobility was assessed by the bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI). Patients were also evaluated with the bath ankylosing spondylitis functional (BASFI) and bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index. Cytokines including IL-6, IL-12, TGF-β, IL-17A, and IL-23 were measured in serum sample using commercially available ELISA kits. Cytokines including IL-6, IL-12, TGF-β, IL-17, and IL-23 were significantly higher in the AS patients than the controls (P < 0.05). The Th-17-related cytokines were not different between patients treated with anti-TNF and conventional therapies (P > 0.05). Cytokines were also similar between patients with active and inactive disease (P > 0.05). On correlation analysis, IL-17 was correlated with IL-23 and IL-12 (P < 0.05) and IL-23 showed correlations with IL-12 and BASMI (P < 0.05). We found serum levels of Th-17-related cytokines to be significantly increased in the sera of AS patients. Disease activity and treatment type did not affect the level of these cytokines.

  7. Aerobic capacity and its correlates in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Chuang, Chih-Cheng; Jiang, Jiunn-Song; Chang, Kae-Chwen

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate aerobic capacity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and determine possible relationships between aerobic capacity, pulmonary function, and disease-related variables. Forty-two patients with AS and 42 healthy controls were recruited in the study. Descriptive data, disease-related variables (grip strength, lumbosacral mobility, occiput-to-wall distance, chest expansion, finger-to-floor distance, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) and hemoglobin), and chest and thoracic spine x-rays were collected in each patient with AS. All subjects took standard pulmonary function and exercise tolerance tests, and forced vital capacity (FVC) and aerobic capacity were recorded. Both aerobic capacity and FVC in patients with AS were significantly lower than those in normal subjects (P < 0.05). AS patients with BASFI scores of < 3 or BASDI scores of < 4 had a higher aerobic capacity. There was significant correlation between aerobic capacity, vital capacity, chest expansion, Schober's test, cervical range of motion, and BASFI in patients with AS. Neither aerobic capacity nor vital capacity correlated with disease duration, ESR, CRP, and hemoglobin. Significantly reduced aerobic capacity and FVC were observed in patients with AS, and there was significant correlation between aerobic capacity, vital capacity, chest expansion, and BASFI. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. TNF-alpha inhibitors for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Lara J; Zochling, Jane; Boonen, Annelies; Singh, Jasvinder A; Veras, Mirella M S; Tanjong Ghogomu, Elizabeth; Benkhalti Jandu, Maria; Tugwell, Peter; Wells, George A

    2015-04-18

    TNF (tumor necrosis factor)-alpha inhibitors block a key protein in the inflammatory chain reaction responsible for joint inflammation, pain, and damage in ankylosing spondylitis. To assess the benefit and harms of adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab (TNF-alpha inhibitors) in people with ankylosing spondylitis. We searched the following databases to January 26, 2009: MEDLINE (from 1966); EMBASE (from 1980); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2008, Issue 4); ACP Journal Club; CINAHL (from 1982); and ISI Web of Knowledge (from 1900). We ran updated searches in May 2012, October 2013, and in June 2014 for McMaster PLUS. We searched major regulatory agencies for safety warnings and clinicaltrials.gov for registered trials. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab and infliximab to placebo, other drugs or usual care in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, reported in abstract or full-text. Two authors independently assessed search results, risk of bias, and extracted data. We conducted Bayesian mixed treatment comparison (MTC) meta-analyses using WinBUGS software. To investigate a class-effect of harms across biologics, we pooled harms data using Review Manager 5. We included twenty-one, short-term (24 weeks or less) RCTs with a total of 3308 participants; 18 contributed data to the MTC analysis: adalimumab (4 studies), etanercept (8 studies), golimumab (2 studies), infliximab (3 studies), and one head-to-head study (etanercept versus infliximab) which was unblinded and considered at a higher risk of bias. The risk of selection and detection bias was low or unclear for most of the studies. The risk of selective outcome reporting was low for most studies as they reported on outcomes recommended by the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society. We found little heterogeneity and no significant inconsistency in the MTC analyses. The majority of the studies were funded by

  9. Osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Vosse, D; de Vlam, K

    2009-01-01

    Bone is a target in many inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The generalized effect of inflammation on bone may result in a decreased quality of bone and is associated with an increased risk of fractures and deformities, both in RA and AS. RA is characterized by periarticular osteopenia, systemic osteoporosis and bone erosions. Periarticular osteopenia and bone erosions are mainly correlated with disease activity. Unlike postmenopausal osteoporosis, osteoporosis in RA is more characterised by marked loss of bone in the hip and the radius, while the axial bone is relatively preserved. In general, several cross-sectional studies documented a lower bone mineral density in patients with RA, with a two-fold increase in osteoporosis compared to age- and sex-matched controls and relates to an increased fracture risk. Several factors contribute to the increased risk: older age, little exercise, long-term use of corticosteroids, and high disability index. AS is characterized by an increase in bone fragility due to reduced bone mineral density. The reported prevalence of osteoporosis in AS patients varies largely. The large variation reflects the difficulties in assessing BMD in AS due to new bone formation. Bone fragility is also due to changes in structural properties resulting from inflammation-induced bone failure in the spine in combination with reduced capacity of shock absorption leading to vertebral fractures. Different types of spinal fractures in patients with AS are described, including wedging. Wedging vertebral fractures contribute to hyperkyphosis and impaired physical function. In contrast to RA , bone loss in AS is accompanied by new bone formation. The pathophysiology of osteoporosis in RA and AS probably is fundamentally similar, but with different clinical phenotypes. The implications for therapeutically intervening in its occurrence and progression might be fundamentally different.

  10. Early diagnosis crucial in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Anshuman P; Ostor, Andrew J K

    2011-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder that predominantly affects the spine. If untreated it may cause significant morbidity. Early diagnosis is particularly important as newer therapies are able to contain this condition and even induce remission. AS affects about 0.2-0.5% of the population. It is at least twice as common in men and most often manifests in the third to fifth decades. It is estimated that up to 5% of patients with chronic lower back pain in primary care have inflammatory disease. Although only 1% of patients with HLA-B27 develop AS, 90-95% of patients with AS are positive for HLA-B27. Immune dysfunction is the hallmark of this condition and it may be triggered by infection. The primary site of inflammation in AS is the entheses, the sites of insertion of tendons and ligaments into bone. If the inflammation remains untreated, there is resultant fibrosis and ultimately ossification at the entheseal sites. AS should be suspected in patients who report back pain and stiffness with rest, especially in the morning, which improves with exercise. Although the condition affects both the sacroiliac joints, a proportion of patients report pain radiating into the buttocks which may be unilateral or alternate, particularly in the early stages. In addition to the spine, large joint synovitis may develop as well as features of entheseal involvement. New classification criteria take into account early sacroiliitis evident on MRI scan and allow a diagnosis to be made far earlier than was previously possible. A proportion of patients respond well to NSAIDs coupled with a structured physiotherapy and exercise programme. However, about half these patients need escalation to biologic therapy. Patients with a suspected diagnosis should be referred to secondary care in order to confirm the diagnosis and commence treatment.

  11. Gender and disease features in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ibn Yacoub, Yousra; Amine, Bouchra; Laatiris, Assia; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine differences in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) between men and women in terms of clinical characteristics, biological features, structural severity and quality of life (QoL). A total of 130 consecutive AS patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria were included. Sociodemographic data were collected. The activity of disease was assessed by the Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) and the functional disability by the Bath Ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI). Spinal mobility was measured using the occiput-to-wall distance, chest expansion, Schober index and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI). The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiologic Index (BASRI) was used to evaluate structural damage. Fatigue was evaluated using a visual analogue scale and the QoL was measured by using the generic instrument SF-36. Laboratory tests included the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the C-reactive protein (CRP). In our sample, there were 87 (66.9%) men and 43 (33.1%) women. Women had significantly lower educational levels but there were no differences in socioeconomic status, age at onset, diagnosis delay, disease duration or treatments. Also, women had higher clinical disease activity (morning stiffness and BASDAI score), higher number of tender joints, more severe enthesitis and higher scores of fatigue (for all p ≤ 0.05). Moreover, hip involvement was more prevalent in men and the impairment of spinal mobility was significantly worse compared to women (for all p ≤ 0.001). Men had worse radiographic damage and lower scores in physical and social domains of QoL, but there were no differences in functional impairment scores. In this study, we noticed that AS presents differently according to gender in our patients. More longitudinal studies seem to be necessary to identify gender-related parameters of disease, thing that may help in diagnosis and therapeutic management of

  12. Effect of Pilates training on people with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Altan, L; Korkmaz, N; Dizdar, M; Yurtkuran, M

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Pilates on pain, functional status, and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The study was performed as a randomized, prospective, controlled, and single-blind trial. Fifty-five participants (30 men, 25 women) who were under a regular follow-up protocol in our Rheumatology Clinic with the diagnosis of AS according to the modified New York criteria were included in the study. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups: in group I, Pilates exercise program of 1 h was given by a certified trainer to 30 participants 3 times a week for 12 weeks, and in group II, designed as the control group, 25 participants continued previous standard treatment programs. In groups, pre-(week 0) and post treatment (week 12 and week 24) evaluation was performed by one of the authors who was blind to the group allocation. Primary outcome measure was functional capacity. Evaluation was done using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). Exploratory outcome measures were Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Chest expansion, and ankylosing spondylitis quality of life (ASQOL) questionnaire. In group I, BASFI showed significant improvement at week 12 (P = 0.031) and week 24 (P = 0.007). In group II, this parameter was not found to have significantly changed at week 12 and week 24. Comparison of the groups showed significantly superior results for group I at week 24 (P = 0.023). We suggest Pilates exercises as an effective and safe method to improve physical capacity in AS patients. Our study is the first clinical study designed to investigate the role of Pilates method in AS treatment. We believe that further research with more participants and longer follow-up periods could help assess the therapeutic value of this popular physical exercise method in AS.

  13. The effect of infliximab on depressive symptoms in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ersözlü-Bozkırlı, E D; Keşkek, S O; Bozkırlı, E; Yücel, A E

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disease which physically, psychologically, and socially affects the patient's life. Previous studies have reported a correlation between ankylosing spondylitis and depression. In this study we investigated the effect of infliximab on depression in ankylosing spondylitis patients. A total of 29 patients with ankylosing spondylitis were enrolled in this prospective study. Infliximab was administered intravenously at a dose of 5 mg/kg at baseline, weeks 2 and 6. The measurements of morning stiffness, modified Schober's test, chest expansion, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index and Beck depression inventory scores were compared with baseline and 12th week. The modified Schober's test and chest expansion increased, the morning stiffness duration, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels decreased after infliximab treatment (p < 0.001, respectively). There was statistically significant decrease in Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index and Beck depression invantory scores of patients after 12 weeks (p < 0.001, respectively). Infliximab can improve depression and its symptoms in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    .

  14. Therapy for ankylosing spondylitis: new treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Breban, Maxime; Maksymowych, Walter P

    2002-09-01

    The therapeutic options for patients suffering from the more severe forms of spondyloarthritis (SpA) have been rather limited in recent decades. There is now accumulating evidence that anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is highly effective in SpA, especially in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Based on the data recently published on more than 200 AS patients, and more than 100 PsA patients, this treatment seems to be even more effective than it is in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The two major anti-TNF-alpha agents currently available, infliximab (Remicade) and etanercept (Enbrel), are approved for the treatment of RA in Europe and in the USA. The situation in SpA is different from RA because there is an unmet medical need, especially in AS, because disease-modifying anti-rheumatic therapy is not available for severely affected patients. Thus, TNF blockers might even be considered first-line immunosuppressive treatment in patients with active AS who are not sufficiently treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). For infliximab, a dose of 5mg/kg was required, and intervals between 6 and 12 weeks were necessary for constant suppression of disease activity - a major aim also for long-term treatment. However, it remains to be shown whether patients benefit from long-term therapy and whether radiological progression and ankylosis can be stopped. The optimal doses of infliximab might well be determined individually. Allergic reactions and increased susceptibility to tuberculosis are rare side-effects which need to be recognized early. As it stands now, the benefits of anti-TNF therapy in AS seem to outweigh these shortcomings. The efficacy of etanercept was first demonstrated in PsA. A double-blind study has now been performed in AS - with similar results. There is preliminary evidence that both agents also work in other SpA such as undifferentiated SpA. Hopefully, both agents will be approved soon for the short

  15. Risk factors of uveitis in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Feng; Lu, Peirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Uveitis is the most common extra-articular manifestation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The prevalence and characteristics of uveitis in AS have been studied in previous literatures, whereas its associated risk factors have not been clarified. Therefore, this study analyzed the risk factors of uveitis in patients with AS. Methods: A total of 390 patients with AS who fulfilled the modified New York criteria were enrolled from January to December in 2015. The history of uveitis was accepted only if diagnosed by ophthalmologists. The medical records of the patients were retrospectively reviewed and associated information was collected, such as disease duration, HLA-B27, and the number of peripheral arthritis. Hip-joint lesion was identified by imaging examination. Meanwhile, biochemical examinations were performed to determine the patient's physical function. Results: Of 390 patients with AS (80.5% male, mean age 33.3 years), 38 (9.7%) had experienced 1 or more episodes of uveitis. The incidence rate for hip-joint lesion was obviously higher for patients with uveitis than the nonuveitis group (44.7% vs 22.2%; P < 0.01). The number of peripheral arthritis was also larger for the uveitis group than nonuveitis group (2.18 ± 0.23 vs 0.55 ± 0.04; P < 0.001). Meanwhile, patients with uveitis had a significantly higher level of antistreptolysin O (ASO) and circulating immune complex (CIC) than those without (P < 0.05 and P < 0.0001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in disease duration, HLA-B27, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) between the 2 groups. Binary logistic regression results showed that ASO (OR = 12.2, 95% CI:3.6–41.3, P < 0.01) and the number of peripheral arthritis (OR = 4.1, 95%CI:2.6–6.3, P < 0.01) are significantly associated with uveitis in AS. Conclustion: This study provides some evidence that hip-joint lesion, the number of

  16. Imaging of axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Baraliakos, X

    2011-03-01

    New bone formation of the vertebral column is pathognomonic for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), while acute and/or chronic changes in the sacroiliac joints are relevant for diagnosis. The 'gold standard' for assessment of structural changes in AS are conventional radiographs, while MRI is useful to assess inflammation. Recent MRI studies have shown that the lower half of the thoracic spine is most commonly affected in AS. Scoring tools for spinal inflammation such as the ASspiMRI-a have been proposed, successfully used in large clinical trials and compared in a multireader experiment; none was finally preferred by OMERACT. Quantification of structural spinal AS changes is performed by the modified Stokes AS Spine Score (mSASSS), which evaluates lateral cervical and lumbar radiographs. Two years was identified as the shortest possible follow-up time based on the reliability and sensitivity to change of the mSASSS. A potential disadvantage of the mSASSS is that the thoracic spine is not included. Recent data based on the mSASSS have suggested that tumour necrosis factor blockers do not inhibit radiographic progression in AS. Since the mean radiographic change is reported to be less than 1 syndesmophyte over 2 years, the sensitivity to change of the mSASSS has been questioned. However, in one study where continuous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use was compared with on-demand use, a difference between these two methods of drug intake was reported. The face and construct validity of the mSASSS has been criticised because a score of ´1´ contains a mixture of osteodestructive (erosions) and osteoproliferative changes (squaring and sclerosis). A new scoring system, the RASSS, which concentrates only on bone formation and which includes the lower part of the thoracic spine is currently being evaluated. The relationship between inflammation and new bone formation in AS has recently been investigated. Low sclerostin and DKK-1 serum levels, both inhibitors of bone

  17. Treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Marina Amaral de Ávila; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; Ferré, Felipe; Bernatsky, Sasha; Rahme, Elham; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis who started therapies with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and tumor necrosis factor blockers (anti-TNF drugs). METHODS This retrospective cohort study from July 2008 to September 2013 evaluated therapy persistence, which is defined as the period between the start of treatment until it is discontinued, allowing for an interval of up to 30 days between the prescription end and the start of the next prescription. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated by logistic regression models to estimate the patients’ chances of persisting in their therapies after the first and after the two first years of follow-up. RESULTS The study included 11,642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis – 2,241 of these started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 9,401 patients started on DMARD – and 1,251 patients with ankylosing spondylitis – 976 of them were started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 275 were started on DMARD. In the first year of follow-up, 63.5% of the patients persisted in their therapies with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 54.1% remained using DMARD in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. In regards to ankylosing spondylitis, 79.0% of the subjects in anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group and 41.1% of the subjects in the DMARD group persisted with their treatments. The OR (95%CI) for therapy persistence was 1.50 (1.34-1.67) for the anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group as compared with the DMARD group in the first year for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 2.33 (1.74-3.11) for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A similar trend was observed at the end of the second year. CONCLUSIONS A general trend of higher rates of therapy persistence with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) was observed as compared to DMARD in the study period. We observed higher persistence rates for anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) in patients with ankylosing

  18. Pleural Tuberculosis following Infliximab Therapy for Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, V. S. Gokul; Madhyastha, Sharath; Ramamoorthi, Kusugodlu; Acharya, Raviraj V.; Gopalaswamy, Vinaya

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of pleural tuberculosis (TB) in a patient on infliximab for ankylosing spondylitis. A 36-year-old male presented to our hospital with low back ache of inflammatory type along with multiple symmetric inflammatory type of joint pain. Further clinical examination, laboratory and radiological investigations were suggestive of ankylosing spondylitis. He was initially treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but citing poor response it was decided to initiate biologic therapy using infliximab (antitumor necrosis factor-alpha). Mantoux test and chest radiograph were done before the therapy to rule out TB. Following three doses of infliximab, patient came with complaints of fever and cough for 1 week. On investigation, it was found to be a case of pulmonary TB. This shows the importance of close monitoring of patient for TB among patients on infliximab even though the screening test has come out to be negative. PMID:28405137

  19. Rare association of insulin autoimmune syndrome with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Nishant; Rahaman, S H; Kandasamy, D

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a rare cause of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia, which is known to occur in association with the use of sulfhydryl-containing drugs and autoimmune disorders. We describe a patient with hitherto an unreported association of IAS with ankylosing spondylitis. We have also performed and described a simplified method of polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation of an insulin bound antibody in the serum. Learning points IAS should be considered in differential diagnosis of endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia. Ankylosing spondylitis can be associated with IAS apart from several other autoimmune diseases. Very high serum insulin levels (100–10 000 μU/ml) are frequently seen in IAS. When faced with very high serum insulin before suspecting insulinoma, it is advisable that PEG precipitation of serum be done to identify antibody bound insulin. A clinical suspicion of IAS can avoid expensive imaging and unnecessary surgery in affected patients. PMID:26527431

  20. Differences in pathophysiology between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lories, R J; Baeten, D L P

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis are common and severe chronic inflammatory skeletal diseases. Recognizing the differences rather than emphasizing similarities is important for a better understanding of the disease processes, the identification of specific therapeutic targets and in the long-term better treatment options for the individual patients. We discuss a number of pathophysiological differences between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis by looking at the anatomical characteristics, differences and similarities in the autoimmune and autoinflammatory reactions, association with other immune mediated inflammatory diseases, structural outcome, and their potential significance for further therapeutic developments. Further research into the differences between these diseases should focus on the specific nature of the immune/inflammatory components, the role of resident cells in the joint and joint-associated tissues, the types and mechanisms of tissue remodeling and the characteristics of the articular cartilage. Better insights into their individual characteristics may lead to better therapeutic strategies, specific targets and useful biomarkers.

  1. The ongoing quest for biomarkers in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Danve, Abhijeet; O'Dell, James

    2015-11-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis poses significant challenges in terms of early diagnosis, assessment of disease activity, predicting response to the treatment and monitoring radiographic progression. With better understanding of underlying immunopathogenesis, effective targeted therapies are available which improve symptoms, quality of life and possibly slow the radiographic progression. There has been a growing interest in the discovery of biomarkers for defining various aspects of disease assessment and management in Ankylosing Spondylitis. The C-reactive protein and HLA-B27 are most commonly used biomarkers. This review describes many other newer biomarkers which have potential clinical applications in this chronic inflammatory disease. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Coexistence of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Gundogdu, Baris; Yolbas, Servet; Yildirim, Ahmet; Gonen, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a systemic disease primarily characterized by the inflammation of sacroiliac joints and axial skeleton. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a multisystem genetic disease which is characterized by cutaneous findings, most importantly café-au-lait spots and axillary freckling, by skeletal dysplasia, and by the growth of both benign and malignant nervous system neoplasms, most notably benign neurofibromas. In this case report, we present a 43-year-old male with AS and NF1. PMID:27597922

  3. Sexual function in male patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ozkorumak, E; Karkucak, M; Civil, F; Tiryaki, A; Ozden, G

    2011-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of healthy life. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) may be vulnerable to sexual problems because of disease activity and comorbid emotional problems. However, sexuality is a scarcely studied subject in AS. The aim of this study is to compare patients with AS with healthy control. A total of 43 male patients, who referred to the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of the Karadeniz Technical University Farabi Hospital between May 2010 and July 2010, and were diagnosed as AS according to modified New York criteria, were included in the study. Control group consisted of healthy 43 age- and sex-matched male individuals with normal inflammatory levels. The AS patients were compared in means of sociodemographic variables and sexual function with Glombok-Rust Sexual Satisfaction Scale (GRSSS) and clinical interview. Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to determine anxiety and depression levels, respectively. The disease activity and functional conditions were evaluated with the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDI). A total of 43 patients with AS and 43 healthy heterosexual male were included in the study. The total GRSSS score was significantly higher in patients with AS, whereas they also had significantly higher sexual complaint than healthy control. The diagnosis of sexual dysfunction according to DSM-IV was significantly higher in the patients with AS as well as depression and anxiety. In study group, GRSSS total score was modestly correlated with disease activity. The psychological status had close relation with sexual functions in AS. Overall assessment is required for complete evaluation in patients with AS.

  4. Ankylosing spondylitis in two Zaïrian brothers.

    PubMed

    Mbuyi-Muamba, J M; Malonda, N; Yuma, O

    1993-06-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis has never been described in Zaïre and is considered to be rare in black African populations. We report two cases observed in the University Hospital of Kinshasa. The two patients are brothers. The diagnosis is based on anaemnestic, clinical and radiological findings. We therefore demonstrate the existence of this disease in Zaïre and presume that other similar cases may be diagnosed.

  5. Serum tissue factor levels correlate with inflammation in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Daniel; Racadot, Evelyne

    2006-07-01

    Tissue factor, the main initiator of blood coagulation, is released into the bloodstream when vessel damage occurs. Vessel damage may occur in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). To measure tissue factor levels in patients with AS and to look for correlations between tissue factor levels and established clinical and laboratory markers for disease activity. We compared patients who met modified New York criteria for AS to healthy untreated controls. Serum tissue factor was assayed using an ELISA. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G) were recorded, as well as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) level, and IgA level. ANOVA and t-tests were performed. P values<0.05 were considered significant. We included 28 patients with AS (mean age, 42 years; and mean disease duration, 14 years), who had never received immunomodulating or vascular medications, and 22 same-age healthy controls. In the patients, tissue factor levels were significantly higher (32.6+/-33.6 vs. 9.5+/-11.5 pg/ml, P=0.003); they correlated with the ESR (P=0.018), CRP (P<0.0001), and IgA (P=0.023), but not with the clinical variables (BASDAI, BASFI, and BAS-G; P>0.05). In this preliminary study in patients with AS, tissue factor levels were high and correlated with laboratory tests for inflammation. Tissue factor elevation may be a cause or a consequence of AS inflammation that promotes the occurrence of vascular events.

  6. [Ankylosing spondylitis is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality].

    PubMed

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2011-05-23

    Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the axial skeleton. The disease is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Structural changes in the heart, and arteriosclerosis secondary to inflammation may be of importance. The role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and of anti-inflammatory treatment is unclear. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors seem to increase cholesterol levels. Evaluation of the cardiovascular risk in these patients should be considered. Cardiovascular risk factors should be managed according to ordinary guidelines.

  7. Ankylosing spondylitis in an athlete with chronic sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy L; Cass, Nathan; Siegel, Courtney

    2014-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease in which inflammation of joints, most often in the axial skeleton, can lead to reactive fibrosis and eventual joint fusion with associated immobility and kyphosis. The disease often involves extra-articular features, such as uveitis and aortic regurgitation, as well as associated inflammatory conditions of the intestines. Its etiology is unknown. Ankylosing spondylitis most commonly presents in young males (15-30 years old) as persistent low back pain and stiffness that is worse in the morning and at night and improves with activity. The authors report the case of a young male athlete whose symptoms were initially incorrectly diagnosed as sacroiliac joint instability and dysfunction and later as a sacroiliac stress fracture before further workup revealed a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. The patient was prescribed oral indomethacin daily by the attending rheumatologist and started on a slow progression of return to running, jumping, and weight lifting. Within 4 weeks of beginning this treatment, the patient had complete cessation of pain with the medication. At follow-up 1 year after graduation from his university, the patient was nearly symptom free and working in a non-heavy labor job. The purpose of this case report is to remind sports medicine physicians of the prevalence of rheumatologic diseases in general and ankylosing spondylitis in particular and of the various ways in which spondyloarthropathies may present in athletes. Increased suspicion may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment, potentially reducing illness severity and duration and improving the performance of athletes with this condition.

  8. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS. The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G). Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0–0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters. AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  9. Assessment of fatigue in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Turan, Yasemin; Duruöz, Mehmet Tuncay; Bal, Serpil; Guvenc, Anil; Cerrahoglu, Lale; Gurgan, Alev

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated fatigue by using the multidimensional assessment of fatigue (MAF) index in 68 ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. To determine the disease activity, functional status and quality of life, bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) and Short Form 36 (SF36) were used respectively. Mander enthesis index (MEI) was used for evaluation of enthesitis. The mean age of the patients was 37.7 (11.1) years. The prevalence of fatigue was 76.5%. There were significant correlations between MAF and BASDAI (P < 0.001), BASFI (P < 0.001), MEI (P = 0.048), pain (P = 0.001), hemoglobin (P = 0.001), ESR (P = 0.035), dorsal Schober's (P = 0.009), occiput-wall distance (P = 0.048). Also MAF was correlated with all dimensions of SF36 except for social function and emotional role. BASFI was found to be the most significant correlated (P = 0.002) parameter with MAF. This study suggests that fatigue is an important symptom in AS and it seemed to occur in severe AS patients. It should appropriately be measured with respect to its intensity with appropriate measures, such as MAF. Moreover, fatigue may increase functional disability, which is already present as a feature of the disease.

  10. Nursing and safety of silver needle diathermy treating ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ning, Huaxiu; Wang, Yun; Yuan, Yiwen; Ning, Huaying

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to discuss the nursing and safety of silver needle diathermy in the treatment for ankylosing spondylitis. We nursed 46 patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated with silver needle diathermy. Specific nursing was focused on physical condition evaluation and mental nursing before treatment, observation during and after treatment, diet nursing, needle eye nursing, functional training and propaganda and education when discharged. The result suggested that all the patients received mental nursing, diet guide, skin care, health education, functional training and follow-up visit from the nurse and all of them could endure silver needle diathermy as discomfort or drug allergy was barely found, so were slight scald and skin infection nearby the needle eye caused by fainting during acupuncture, accidental puncture or overheat. Follow-up visit showed that no patient suffered obvious untoward effect and the pain, joint range of motion and living condition were distinctly improved a week after discharging. In conclusion, during the treatment for ankylosing spondylitis applying silver needle diathermy, the nursing before, during and after the treatment can obviously reduce the complication, accelerate the recovery, which is highly safe.

  11. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p < 0.001). There was no correlation between the clinical and laboratory findings and VEMP findings in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.

  12. Clinical characteristics of patients with ankylosing spondylitis in India.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Malaviya, Anand N

    2009-10-01

    This study focuses on describing full spectrum of clinical, laboratory, and radiological characterization of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients in India. Data on 70 consecutive AS patients, seen at the rheumatology clinic in India, was prospectively obtained using investigator-administered questionnaires. Diagnosis was made according to the modified New York criteria. The core set of variables selected by Assessment in AS International society were obtained. The differences in clinical characteristics based on presence or absence of peripheral arthritis, gender, and juvenile (JOAS) vs. adult onset AS (AOAS) were evaluated. The male/female ratio was 5:1. The mean age of onset of symptoms and diagnosis were 23.6 and 32.5 years, respectively. Females had similar spinal indices and radiological damage as male counterpart. However, they had more common extra-articular manifestations and root joint involvement. The majority of patients consisted of AOAS (78.5%) and was clinically similar to JOAS. One or more peripheral joints were involved in 65.7% of patients, affecting predominantly the lower extremity (90.6%, knee 47.1%, and ankle 35.7%) in asymmetrical pattern (78%). Patients with peripheral arthritis had higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate, more frequent enthesitis, root joint, and whole spine involvement, suggesting more aggressive disease. Most common site of enthesitis was chondro-sternal junction (30%) and Achilles tendonitis (24.3%). The root joints frequently involved extra-axial joints. Uveitis was the most common extra-articular manifestation (25.7%). The predominant initial symptom was typical inflammatory low back pain (87.1%). Assessment in ankylosing spondylitis indices showed a moderately severe disease activity and damage with following values: mean Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, 3.2 (+/-1.8); mean Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, 2.3 (+/-2.0); and mean Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, 3.15 (+/-2

  13. Cauda equina syndrome associated with multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts in ankylosing spondylitis: improvement following surgical therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, P J; Allcutt, D A; Bates, D; Crawford, P J

    1990-01-01

    A case of cauda equina syndrome with multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is described. The value of computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive means of establishing the diagnosis is emphasised. In contrast to previously reported cases the patient showed neurological improvement following surgical therapy. Surgery may be indicated in some patients, particularly when there is nerve root compression by the arachnoid cysts and when the patient is seen early before irreversible damage to the cauda equina has occurred. Images PMID:2292702

  14. Affective temperament profile in ankylosing spondylitis patients using TEMPS-A.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Tulay; Solmaz, Dilek; Emul, Murat; Akgol, Gurkan; Yalvac, Dilek; Ersoy, Yuksel

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare the most common dominant affective temperaments in Ankylosing Spondylitis patients and investigate the relationship between the dominant affective temperaments and pain levels, disease activity, quality of life, current depression, and anxiety level in Ankylosing Spondylitis patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-one patients diagnosed with axial spondiloartropathy and forty-two age- and gender-matched control subjects were included in this study. Disease duration, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein, pain by the Visual Analog Scale, disease activity by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, functional status by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index; psychological status by the Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory and overall health assessment by the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Scale were assessed in patients. The Turkish version of the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego Auto Questionnaire was used to determine the dominant affective temperament. [Results] There was no statistical difference in the distribution of temperament subtypes between patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis and the controls. Depressive, anxious, and cyclothymic temperament scores were higher in patients with high values on the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index and Visual Analog Scale. There was a correlation between anxious subtypes of affective temperament scores and the value of Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Scale. Correlation analysis also found depressive, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious temperament and psychiatric symptoms to be significantly related. [Conclusion] Affective temperament may contribute to symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis and may increase disease activity and may reduce their quality of life.

  15. Affective temperament profile in ankylosing spondylitis patients using TEMPS-A

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Tulay; Solmaz, Dilek; Emul, Murat; Akgol, Gurkan; Yalvac, Dilek; Ersoy, Yuksel

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare the most common dominant affective temperaments in Ankylosing Spondylitis patients and investigate the relationship between the dominant affective temperaments and pain levels, disease activity, quality of life, current depression, and anxiety level in Ankylosing Spondylitis patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-one patients diagnosed with axial spondiloartropathy and forty-two age- and gender-matched control subjects were included in this study. Disease duration, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein, pain by the Visual Analog Scale, disease activity by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, functional status by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index; psychological status by the Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory and overall health assessment by the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Scale were assessed in patients. The Turkish version of the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego Auto Questionnaire was used to determine the dominant affective temperament. [Results] There was no statistical difference in the distribution of temperament subtypes between patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis and the controls. Depressive, anxious, and cyclothymic temperament scores were higher in patients with high values on the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index and Visual Analog Scale. There was a correlation between anxious subtypes of affective temperament scores and the value of Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Scale. Correlation analysis also found depressive, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious temperament and psychiatric symptoms to be significantly related. [Conclusion] Affective temperament may contribute to symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis and may increase disease activity and may reduce their quality of life. PMID:28356618

  16. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte motility in men with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fennell, M; Brewerton, D A

    1989-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) response to a chemotactic or chemokinetic stimulus is enhanced in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This effect does not parallel the severity of disease activity or the size of the acute phase response, and it is independent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment. Polymorph function is normal in HLA-B27 positive brothers of probands with AS and in other HLA-B27 positive individuals in the absence of disease. Polymorph motility is also normal in patients with psoriasis vulgaris or Crohn's disease, indicating that enhanced PMN motility is not a non-specific consequence of all inflammatory disorders. PMID:2784306

  17. Study of Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hatinder Jeet; Nimarpreet, Kaur; Ashima; Das, Sibadatta; Kumar, Ashok; Prakash, Shesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by spine and sacroiliac joint involvement that mainly affects young male subjects. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) loss occurs in AS disease course. Bone loss in AS appears to be multifactorial and perhaps involves different mechanisms at different stages of disease. The disease typically affects young males and is associated with progressive functional impairment, increased work disability and decreased quality of life. Osteoporosis is frequent in AS and there is a close association of bone mineral density, bone metabolism and inflammatory activity. Osteoporosis is frequently associated with AS and BMD decreased predominantly in patients with active disease. Aims & Objectives: The aim of the present study was to study bone mineral density in cases of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) in comparison to age and sex matched controls. Material and Methods: The present study was conducted on 100 established cases of AS based on modified New York criteria and 150 controls healthy, age, race, socio-economic matched controls patients. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Hundred cases of AS were subjected to undergo BMD by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA) scan of different age groups in cases 35.19± 8.23(min age 23- max age 67years) and controls 33.27±5.22(min age 22years - max age 44years) with height observed in cases is 169.67±6-87 and controls 170.99±7.16 with weight varied in cases 65.63±10.27 and controls 70.14±10.67. Conclusion: Osteoporosis is a significant complication in ankylosing spondylitis and needs to be monitored and managed at the earliest. Significant osteoporosis can occur even in early disease. Osteoporosis of spine is much more prevalent than femur.BMD spine is still the most important site to define osteoporosis in ankylosing spondylitis. Rise in BMD in LS spine with duration, is not exclusive for subjects with radiologically evident syndesmophytes

  18. Adherence to treatment in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Arturi, Pablo; Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Sommerfleck, Fernando; Buschiazzo, Emilio; Ledesma, César; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Citera, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    This study aims to determine the level of adherence to treatment in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and to identify possible factors associated to lack of adherence. We included consecutive AS patients (NY modified criteria). Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected. Patients answered auto-reported questionnaires: Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life, and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (ACR'87 criteria) were assessed as the control group. The adherence of the studied groups to medical treatment and exercises was measured by means of two questionnaires: Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology (CQR) and Exercise Attitude Questionnaire-18 (EAQ-18). The study included 59 patients with AS and 53 patients with RA. Of the AS patients, 43 (72.9%) were male, median age 47 years (interquartile range (IQR) 33-57) and median disease duration of 120 months (IQR 33-57). Of the RA patients, 37 (69.8%) were female, had a median age of 56 years (IQR 43.5-60) and a median disease duration of 156 months (IQR 96-288). There were no significant differences in the results of the adherence questionnaires between both groups, with a total median of 68.42 for the CQR in both groups and of 40.7 in AS vs. 42.6 in RA for the EAQ. When dichotomizing patients as adherent and non-adherent, taking as good adherence a cut value in the CQR and EAQ higher than 60, adherence to pharmacological treatment was significantly higher in RA vs. AS (92.5 vs. 74.6%, p = 0.01) and there were no differences in the EAQ. On the uni- and multivariate analysis, lack of adherence to treatment was not associated to sex, age, disease duration, education, health insurance, depressive status, and disease activity parameters in neither group of patients. AS have an acceptable adherence to pharmacological treatment, although it is lower than RA

  19. Posterior wedge osteotomy and debridement for Andersson lesion with severe kyphosis in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Tang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yongfei; Wang, Zheng

    2017-03-31

    Andersson lesion is a well-known complication in ankylosing spondylitis. Recently, owing to the worry about the healing of fracture, some scholars advocated additional anterior surgery or other procedures were necessary, which increase the risk of the nerve injury. The purpose of this study is to introduce our experience and to explore the efficacy and feasibility of posterior wedge osteotomy and debridement through Andersson Lesion for surgical treatment of severe kyphosis in ankylosing spondylitis. From January 2012 to January 2014, a retrospective study of 14 Andersson lesion patients with severe kyphosis in ankylosing spondylitis treated with surgery was completed with an at least 2-year follow-up. The debridement procedure, before posterior wedge osteotomy in posterior approach, must scrape all sclerosis bone until healthy cancellous bone appears. Radiographic and clinical results and complications were assessed with an average follow-up of 24 months. The CT scan was obtained preoperatively and at the final follow-up to assess the displacement of the fracture preoperatively, the safety of screw insertion, the healing of the fracture at the final follow-up. The Bridwell interbody fusion grading system was used to assess the healing of the fracture. Local kyphosis was substantially corrected from 51.7 ± 15.6 to 7.1 ± 19.5, with a mean correction of 44°. The global kyphosis (GK) changed from 60.6 ± 28.3 to 20.3 ± 10.3 (P = 0.000). The mean VAS back pain scores decreased from 6.7 ± 0.8 preoperatively to 0.75 ± 0.6 after a 2-year follow-up (P = 0.000). The ODI score improved from 60.56 ± 15.1% preoperatively to 23.46 ± 8.2% after a 2-year follow-up (P = 0.000). The CT scan showed solid fusion at the level of the AL, and no internal fixation loose. All patients achieved grade 1 fusion. No major complication occurred. The posterior wedge osteotomy and debridement through AL can be used to correct the severe

  20. [Development of spondylodiscopathies in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, M; Tebib, J; Colson, F

    1987-03-01

    This multicentric study concerns 43 cases of spondylodiscopathies considered, as far as evolution is concerned, according to their radiological aspect. Late erosive forms (33 cases) occur on a rigid spine, sometimes after a trauma (6 cases). The initial radiological sign may be the fracture of a syndesmophyte or of the posterior arch. The evolution of the signs (pinching, erosions, density) is variable: slow or rapid aggravation leading sometimes to an osteosynthesis, extended stabilization over several years, cure by presence of a syndesmophyte or a bony block which, beside an obvious mechanical etiology in most cases, predicts the intervention of an inflammatory factor, isolated or concomitant. Early erosive forms (3 cases) occur in a context of inflammation, on a healthy spine, and sometimes are multifocal and lead rapidly to the formation of bony blocks: they join directly in the evolution of ankylosing spondylarthritis. Pseudo-Pott and pseudo-dystrophic forms (7 cases) present a variable evolution and their interpretation remains debatable.

  1. Ankylosing Spondylitis and Posture Control: The Role of Visual Input

    PubMed Central

    De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Iervolino, Salvatore; Zincarelli, Carmela; Di Gioia, Luisa; Rengo, Giuseppe; Multari, Vincenzo; Peluso, Rosario; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Pappone, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the motor control during quiet stance in patients with established ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to evaluate the effect of visual input on the maintenance of a quiet posture. Methods. 12 male AS patients (mean age 50.1 ± 13.2 years) and 12 matched healthy subjects performed 2 sessions of 3 trials in quiet stance, with eyes open (EO) and with eyes closed (EC) on a baropodometric platform. The oscillation of the centre of feet pressure (CoP) was acquired. Indices of stability and balance control were assessed by the sway path (SP) of the CoP, the frequency bandwidth (FB1) that includes the 80% of the area under the amplitude spectrum, the mean amplitude of the peaks (MP) of the sway density curve (SDC), and the mean distance (MD) between 2 peaks of the SDC. Results. In severe AS patients, the MD between two peaks of the SDC and the SP of the center of feet pressure were significantly higher than controls during both EO and EC conditions. The MP was significantly reduced just on EC. Conclusions. Ankylosing spondylitis exerts negative effect on postural stability, not compensable by visual inputs. Our findings may be useful in the rehabilitative management of the increased risk of falling in AS. PMID:25821831

  2. [Genetic aspects of osteopenia/osteoporosis in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Lange, U; Teichmann, J; Obermayer-Pietsch, B

    2009-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis with subsequent fractures are well-known symptoms in ankylosing spondylitis. As a possible genetic component of osteoporosis, an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene has been reported. In the present study, we investigated relationships between these polymorphisms, BMD, biochemical markers of bone metabolism and markers of disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis. AS patients showed osteoporosis more frequently than healthy controls. A mapping of activity indices and BMD showed an association of lumbar and peripheral BMD as well as of the current and median C-reactive protein over the last 3 years with the used FokI-genotypes of the VDR in male patients with AS. Female AS patients showed no significant association. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this association are unclear, especially with respect to the inflammatory activity. An early assessment of the risk for osteopenia/osteoporosis in AS patients using molecular biological tests could make possible timely preventive measures or therapy.

  3. The classification and diagnostic criteria of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Deodhar, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is the prototype of immune-mediated inflammatory rheumatic diseases grouped under the term spondyloarthritis (SpA). An early diagnosis has now become increasingly important because effective therapies are available and anti-TNF drugs are even more effective if used in early stages of the disease. In ankylosing spondylitis, the 1984 modified New York criteria have been used widely in clinical studies and daily practice but are not applicable in early disease when the characteristic radiographic signs of sacroiliitis are not visible but active sacroiliitis is readily detectable by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thus there has been a need for new classification or diagnostic criteria to identify inflammatory spondyloarthritis at early stage of the disease. This led to the concept of axial SpA to include the entire spectrum of patients with axial disease both, with and without radiographic damage. New classification criteria for the wider group of SpA have been proposed by ASAS (Assessment of Spondylo Arthritis International Society); and the patients are sub-grouped into (1) a predominantly axial disease, termed axial SpA including AS and non-radiographic axial SpA; (2) peripheral SpA. The clinical course and disease process of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis remains unclear. However the development of the SpA criteria by ASAS particularly for axial SpA, is an important step for early diagnosis and better management of these patients.

  4. Alexithymia and Self-Esteem in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    SOLMAZ, Mustafa; BİNBAY, Zerrin; CİDEM, Muharrem; SAĞIR, Selim; KARACAN, İlhan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing spondylitis (AS), which has an unknown etiology, inflammatory disorder, characterized by inflammation of the spinal joints and adjacent structures. It has a negatif effect on all aspects of a patients’s life: Physcally, psychologically and socially. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of AS on self-esteem and alexithymia. Method In this study, 50 patients from the department of physical therapy and rehabilitation with the diaognosis of AS who were under traetment and follow-up and 50 healty volunteers who matched for age and gender were taken. Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) were performed to both patients and control group. Results Compared to the control group, the anxiety and depression scores were higher in the patient group and the alexithymic characteristics were significantly higher, self-esteem scores were significantly lower in the patient group (p<.05). Conclusion Like all the other inflammatory chronic diseases, depression and anxiety are commonly seen in AS patients. Alexithymai and self-esteem of these patients should be considered carefully. More studies are needed on this regard. PMID:28360653

  5. Comparison of group-based exercise versus home-based exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: effects on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Indices, quality of life and depression.

    PubMed

    Karapolat, Hale; Akkoc, Yeşim; Sari, Ismail; Eyigor, Sibel; Akar, Servet; Kirazli, Yeşim; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this non-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the impact of group-based exercise programme and a home-based exercise programme on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Indices, depression and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Approximately 41 patients in a rehabilitation unit were divided into two groups, either group- or home-based exercise programme. Exercise sessions were performed three times a week for a period of 6 weeks. The patients were compared before and after the rehabilitation programme, with respect to Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Assessment Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). A statistically significant improvement was observed on BASDAI, BASMI and energy, pain, reaction of emotional and sleep subscores of NHP in both exercise groups after the exercise programme (p < 0.05). No statistically significant changes were detected in BASFI, BDI and social and mobility subscores of NHP in both exercise groups (p > 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between the two exercise programmes (p > 0.05). Group and home-based exercise programmes are efficient in improving symptoms and mobility and had an important effect on quality of life in patients with AS. Home-based exercise programme, as it is cheaper, more easily performed and efficient, may be preferable for the management programme in AS.

  6. Coexisting ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis: a case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying-Ying; Yang, Li-Li; Cui, Hua-Dong; Zhao, Shuai; Zhang, Ning

    2011-10-01

    A 30-year-old female patient with coexisting ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis was diagnosed and treated. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a predisposing factor of ankylosing spondylitis and HLA-DR4 is a predisposing factor of rheumatoid arthritis. This patient was HLA-B27 and HLA-DR4 positive, and ankylosing spondylitis manifested before rheumatoid arthritis. After disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs successfully arrested ankylosing spondylitis activity the patient conceived and delivered a healthy baby. One year later, she developed peripheral polyarthritis and was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. We hypothesized that pregnancy may be one of the environmental factors that can activate rheumatoid arthritis, and that disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs play an important role in keeping the disease under control.

  7. Arachnoid ossificans of thoracolumbosacral spine in the advanced ankylosing spondylitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Seunghun; Kang, Chang-Nam; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2013-06-01

    Arachnoid ossificans is a rare type of chronic arachnoiditis characterised by the presence of calcification or ossification of the dura and arachnoid. There are a few reports of these findings in relation to various disease entities, but only one case has been reported in relation to ankylosing spondylitis. We describe a 76-year-old man of ankylosing spondylitis with arachnoiditis ossificans, who has suffered from low back pain and neuropathic leg pain.

  8. Pustular eruption induced by etanercept in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis: a rare side effect

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Asude; Alatas, Emine Tugba; Celebi, Hilal Semra; Dogan, Gursoy; Dere, Yelda

    2015-01-01

    Etanercept is a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) antagonist with anti-inflammatory effects. It is used in the treatment of dermatologic and rheumatologic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. However, etanercept has various cutaneous and systemic side effects. Herein, we report a case of generalized pustular eruption due to etanercept therapy in an ankylosing spondylitis patient and review pustular diseases. PMID:28058373

  9. [Fracture of the cervical spine in ankylosing spondylitis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takahisa; Koyanagi, Izumi; Murakami, Tomohiro; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old man with ankylosing spondylitis who showed cervical spine fracture. The patient had fallen down on the floor and presented with severe neck pain. He was treated conservatively with a hard neck collar in an emergency hospital because of C7 body fracture without dislocation. However, the follow-up radiographs demonstrated a progressive C6-7 anterior dislocation. He was referred to our hospital 6 weeks after the trauma. The 3D-CT reconstruction imaging revealed that the fracture extended from the C7 vertebral body to the C6 lamina via the bilateral C6/7 facet joints. The patient underwent C2-Th3 posterior fixation using pedicle and lateral mass screw techniques. The postoperative course was uneventful. He was discharged without any complication at 1 month postoperatively. The radiograph 3 months after surgery showed good bone fusion. Spine fracture with ankylosing spondylitis usually shows significant instability because of the long lever-arm of the fused vertebrae at the fracture level. Solid spinal fusions such as long posterior fusion or anterior-posterior simultaneous fusion are needed in such cases.

  10. [Quality of life in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Younes, Mohamed; Jalled, Anis; Aydi, Zohra; Younes, Kaouthar; Jguirim, Mahbouba; Zrour, Saoussen; Ben Salah, Zohra; Bejia, Ismail; Touzi, Mongi; Bergaoui, Naceur

    2011-04-01

    Ankylosing Spondylarthritis (AS) involves by its frequency and its repercussion on the functional capacity an important handicap and deterioration of the patients quality of life. To evaluate the handicap and the quality of life during the AS and to seek the predictive factors of the deterioration of this quality of life. A prospective study relating to 50 patients recruited in the Department of Rheumatology of F. B. Hospital of Monastir during 6 months period (Mars to September 2008). The studied parameters were the quality of life evaluated by a specific sore (ASQOL) and a generic score (SF-12). Also the physical, social and economic felt handicap was evaluated using a qualitative scale. Predictive factors (clinical, biological and radiological) of the quality of life were carried out. Our patients are divided in 42 men and 8 women with an average age of 38.9 ± 10.7 years. The average duration of AS is of 11.9 ± 7.6 years. The average of ASQOL is of 11.9 ± 4 (extremes: 0- 17). The average of physical SF12 is of 29.8 ± 6 (21.7-53.2) and of mental SF-12 of 35.3 ± 6.6 (22.5-55.8). The physical, social and economic felt handicap was considered to be average or important in respectively 88%, 72% and 86% of the cases. The predictive factors of a high ASQOL (faded quality of life) are absence of occupation, high BASMI, a high number of painful articulations and high BASFI, BASDAI, BASG, BASRI and EVA total pain. The factors associated to the alteration of the quality of life according to SF-12'S are male sex, professional statute, high number of painful articulations and high BASDAI, BASFI and BASRI. Our study shows the important deterioration of the quality of life in AS patients. The existence of the predictive factors of quality of life primarily related to the functional capacity of the patients and to the disease activity implicates an early and adequate disease management in order to decrease this repercussion.

  11. Serum hyaluronic acid levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Duruöz, Mehmet Tuncay; Turan, Yasemin; Cerrahoglu, Lale; Isbilen, Banu

    2008-05-01

    Our aim in this study was to investigate serum hyaluronic acid (HA) levels and the relationship between clinical parameters in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Approximately 30 patients with AS and 30 healthy individuals were recruited in this study consecutively. Cross-sectional study was planned, and demographic, clinical, functional, radiological, and laboratory data of patients were evaluated. Disease activity, functional status, and quality of life were assessed, respectively, with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Short-Form 36 (SF-36). Mander Enthesis Index (MEI) was used for evaluation of enthesis involvement. We examined serum concentrations of HA (ng/ml) in patients with AS and controls. The mean ages of patients and control group were 38.3 (SD=10.8) and 42.7 (SD=10.6) years, respectively. The mean of serum HA levels in AS patients was 40.4 (SD=34.8) ng/ml and in controls was 24.9 (SD=20.2). There was significant difference of HA levels between two groups (p=0.04). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between HA level and distance of hand-floor (r=0.444, p=0.014), modified lumbar Schober's (r= -0.413, p=0.023), distance of chin to chest (r=0.436, p=0.016), right sacroiliit grade (r=0.601, p<0.001), left sacroiliit grade (r=0.610, p<0.001), C reactive protein level (r=0.404, p=0.027), albumin (r= -0.464, p=0.010), C3 (p=0.449, p=0.013), and IgA levels (r=0.369, p=0.045). However, there was no significant correlation between HA levels with MEI, BASFI, BASDAI, and SF-36 (p >or= 0.05). Serum HA level was significantly higher in AS patients than controls. However, there was no significant correlation between serum HA level and disease-specific measures as BASFI and BASDAI; it had significant relation with spinal mobility limitation, sacroiliitis, and laboratory parameters related with acute inflammation. The serum HA level may be a potential biomarker of axial

  12. Short-term total hip replacement outcomes in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Susan M; Zhu, Rebecca; Figgie, Mark P; Huang, Wei-Ti; Mandl, Lisa A

    2014-10-01

    While rates of total hip replacement (THR) in spondyloarthritis are increasing, contemporary outcomes are not well described. This study analyzes 2-year outcomes in a contemporary cohort of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients undergoing THR. A case-control study was performed using data from an institutional arthroplasty registry. Validated AS cases were matched 4:1 by age and procedure to patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Data were obtained prior to surgery and at 2 years. Multiple imputation techniques were performed to avoid systematic bias due to missing data. Thirty eligible AS cases were identified between May 2007 and February 2010. Ankylosing spondylitis cases had worse American Society of Anesthesia class (P < 0.001) and more comorbidities (P = 0.02) compared with OA. Ankylosing spondylitis had worse preoperative lower-extremity Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index pain (46.8 vs 55.4; P = 0.03), function (43.0 vs 55.1; P = 0.04), and general health status measured as SF-12 (Short-Form Health Survey) physical component scale (PCS) score (29.6 vs 36.0; P < 0.001), however, there was no difference at two years in pain (89.4 vs 92.5; P = 0.23) or function (83.9 vs 90.1; P = 0.04). Physical component scale score remained significantly worse (41.2 vs 50.1; P < 0.001). Better preoperative SF-12 PCS score significantly decreased the risk of a poor pain outcome (odds ratio, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.40). Overall satisfaction was high. Although patients with AS in a contemporary cohort have more comorbidities and worse physical function prior to THR, they achieve similar gains as OA. In a multivariate regression controlling for multiple potential confounders including back pain, only preoperative health status measured as SF-12 PCS score was a significant risk factor for a poor 2-year pain. Among contemporary patients, AS is not an independent risk factor for poor THR outcomes.Take-Home Message Patients with AS have significant

  13. Leading a Patient of Ankylosing Spondylitis to Death by Iatrogenic Spinal Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Fractures in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are often difficult to identify and treat. If combined with osteoporosis, the spine becomes weaker and vulnerable to minor trauma. An 83-year-old woman with a history of chronic AS and severe osteoporosis developed paraparesis and voiding difficulty for 4 days prior. She had been placed in the lateral decubitus position in a bedridden state in a convalescent hospital due to the progressive paraparesis. The laboratory findings showed CO2 retention in the arterial blood gas analysis. After the patient was transferred to the computed tomography (CT) room, a CT was taken in the supine position. Approximately half an hour later, the resident in our neurosurgical department checked on her, and the neurological examination showed a complete paraplegic state. She was treated conservatively and finally expired 20 days later. PMID:27437020

  14. Neck movements in ankylosing spondylitis and their responses to physiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, S L; Jayson, M I; Baddeley, H

    1978-01-01

    Cervical spine movements were compared in 35 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and matched controls. In AS there were limitations of all movements and particularly of lateral flexion. These limitations could not be correlated with any particular features of AS except radiological involvement of the lower apophyseal joints. In 25 patients there were significant improvements in all measurements after 3 weeks of intensive inpatient physiotherapy. After discharge the patients were encouraged to perform unsupervised physiotherapy and in 11 patients seen at 3 months the improvements in neck movements were either maintained or increased further. In contrast no changes in movements were found in 9 patients assessed 3 weeks and immediately before starting physiotherapy. PMID:629606

  15. Ankylosing spondylitis: A state of the art factual backbone

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-rad, Mohammad; Attaya, Hosam; Lesha, Emal; Vegh, Andrea; Maleki-Miandoab, Tooraj; Nosair, Emad; Sepehrvand, Nariman; Davarian, Ali; Rajebi, Hamid; Pakniat, Abdolghader; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Mohammadi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the general population. As one of the most severe types of spondyloarthropathy, AS affects the spinal vertebrae and sacroiliac joints, causing debilitating pain and loss of mobility. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of AS, from the pathophysiological changes that occur as the disease progresses, to genetic factors that are involved with its onset. Considering the high prevalence in the population, and the debilitating life changes that occur as a result of the disease, a strong emphasis is placed on the diagnostic imaging methods that are used to detect this condition, as well as several treatment methods that could improve the health of individuals diagnosed with AS. PMID:26435775

  16. Ankylosing spondylitis and secretor status: a re-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Smith, G W; James, V; Mackenzie, D A; Stewart, J; Blackwell, C C; Elton, R A; Nuki, G

    1997-07-01

    Non-secretion of ABO blood group substances in body fluids is associated with susceptibility to some bacterial infections. Non-secretors were previously found to be over-represented in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (49%) compared to controls (27%). Re-evaluation of secretor status in a population of 92 AS patients and 103 controls revealed identical proportions of non-secretors (28%). Of 43 patients studied in both surveys, 6/22 typed initially as non-secretors proved to be secretors using both haemagglutination inhibition assay (HAI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Loss of secreted blood group antigens in the saliva is the cause of this mis-typing. Careful attention to the method of collection, handling and preservation of saliva specimens is essential for accurate assessment of secretor status. Therefore, there is no link between secretor status and AS.

  17. Pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis - recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Vidya; Gracey, Eric; Brown, Matthew A; Inman, Robert D; Haroon, Nigil

    2017-06-01

    Over the past 5 years, advances in high-throughput techniques and studies involving large cohorts of patients have led to considerable advances in the identification of novel genetic associations and immune pathways involved in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). These discoveries include genes encoding cytokine receptors, transcription factors, signalling molecules and transport proteins. Although progress has been made in understanding the functions and potential pathogenic roles of some of these molecules, much work remains to be done to comprehend their complex interactions and therapeutic potential in AS. In this Review, we outline the current knowledge of AS pathogenesis, including genetic risk associations, HLA-B27-mediated pathology, perturbations in antigen-presentation pathways and the contribution of the type 3 immune response.

  18. Normal anti-Klebsiella lymphocytotoxicity in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.D.; Fritzler, M.J.; Lewkonia, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    We compared in vitro lymphocytotoxicity (LCT) of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), obtained from patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and normal controls (NC). Assays were performed with antibacterial antisera prepared from AS- and NC-derived Klebsiella and coliforms Escherichia coli. LCT assessed by eosin staining was not significantly different in PBL of 12 AS patients and 28 controls when reacted with 3 Klebsiella and 1 E coli antisera. LCT assessed by /sup 51/Cr release was not significantly different for PBL of 20 age- and sex-matched pairs of AS patients and NC when reacted with 3 Klebsiella and 1 E coli antisera. Similarly, LCT-/sup 51/Cr of PBL of 15 matched AS and NC pairs was not significantly different for anti-K21, a serotype putatively implicated in Klebsiella-HLA-B27 antigenic cross-reactivity. Our results do not support the notion of molecular mimicry between Klebsiella and B27 in the pathogenesis of primary AS.

  19. Polymorphonuclear cell motility, ankylosing spondylitis, and HLA B27.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fordham, J N; Currey, H L

    1984-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function was studied in 29 subjects with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Of these, 20 were HLA B27+ve and 9 B27-ve. There were 30 controls and, of these, 15 were B27+ve. Random and directed cell migration was measured by 2 techniques: migration through a micropore filter and migration under an agar film. The chemo-attractant was either case in-activated serum or zymosan-activated serum. By both techniques directed motility was increased in subjects with B27 or with AS when compared to the B27-ve controls. This suggests that the disease AS and the possession of B27 are both associated with increased PMN motility. PMID:6608924

  20. HLA-B27, ankylosing spondylitis and polymorph motility.

    PubMed

    Pease, C T; Currey, H L

    1983-11-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte functions were tested in 29 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Twenty of these were HLA-B27 positive and 9 B27 negative. Thirty matched controls were also studied and of these, 15 were B27 negative. Random and directed cell migration were measured both by migration through a micropore filter and also by migration under an agar film. The attractant was serum activated either by casein or by zymosan. By both techniques, directed motility (chemotaxis) was increased in subjects with B27 and/or AS when compared with the B27 negative controls. This suggests that the disease AS and the possession of B27 are both associated with increased chemotaxis.

  1. Polymorphonuclear cell motility, ankylosing spondylitis, and HLA B27.

    PubMed

    Pease, C T; Fordham, J N; Currey, H L

    1984-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function was studied in 29 subjects with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Of these, 20 were HLA B27+ve and 9 B27-ve. There were 30 controls and, of these, 15 were B27+ve. Random and directed cell migration was measured by 2 techniques: migration through a micropore filter and migration under an agar film. The chemo-attractant was either case in-activated serum or zymosan-activated serum. By both techniques directed motility was increased in subjects with B27 or with AS when compared to the B27-ve controls. This suggests that the disease AS and the possession of B27 are both associated with increased PMN motility.

  2. The epidemiology of osteoporosis and fractures in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Philip N; Geusens, Piet

    2012-08-01

    Bone is a target in many inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Inflammation leads to a wide range of changes in bone, and especially bone remodeling. In ankylosing spondylitis (AS) bone loss has been documented, but measuring bone density in the spine is hampered by new bone formation in syndesmophytes, periost and within the vertebrae. The risk of vertebral fractures is increased in AS. The diagnosis of vertebral fractures requires imaging and adequate evaluation of vertebral heights. In addition, in the ankysosed spine segments, additional imaging is often needed to diagnose spinal fractures at unusual locations (cervical spine) or in the posterior arch structures. Risk factors for vertebral fractures are helpful for case finding. Fracture prevention is indicated in high risk patients with AS, especially when they have already a vertebral fracture or in the presence of osteoporosis.

  3. Do sex hormones play a role in ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed

    Masi, A T

    1992-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has a striking disease marker, i.e., HLA-B27, indicating the major genetic predisposition; however, expression of disease is also strongly influenced by age- and sex-related factors. Sex steroids studies suggest greater androgenicity in AS than normal control persons. Therapeutic interventions that normalize such sex steroid status have shown clinical improvements in males and females. Muscle histopathology in AS shows frequent changes early in disease consistent with neuropathic and myopathic mechanisms of a noninflammatory nature. Accepting the available, aggregate data, one may infer that sex steroid imbalance in persons susceptible to AS may target axial and proximal muscle tissues, resulting in relative functional hypertonicity. Such phenomenon, developing in preteen and younger adult ages, may contribute to peripheral and axial manifestations of enthesopathy in this disease by complex and currently unknown mechanisms.

  4. Efficacy and safety of adalimumab in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Mounach, Aziza; El Maghraoui, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is the most common and most severe subtype of spondyloarthritis. It also may be an outcome of any of the other spondyloarthritis subtypes. AS preferentially affects the sacroiliac joints and the tip of the column, with a tendency to later ankylosis. Peripheral joints, enthesis, and other extra-articular involvement may be observed. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are now well-established, effective drugs in the treatment of AS symptoms. Adalimumab, which is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds to and neutralizes TNF, has demonstrated efficacy in treating AS symptoms, including axial involvement, peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, uveitis, gut involvement, and psoriasis. Furthermore, adalimumab has showed an overall acceptable safety profile. In this paper, we review the efficacy and safety profile of adalimumab in the treatment of AS, and discuss its differences from the other anti-TNF drugs reported in the literature. PMID:27790037

  5. Fluoroscopy guided transforaminal epidural anesthesia in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Channabasappa, S M; Dharmappa, S; Pandurangi, R

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old male patient with a long-standing history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) presented for ureteroscopic stone removal. On preoperative assessment, tracheal intubation was likely to be difficult due to decreased cervical spine mobility. Traditional neuraxial block was impossible due to the fusion of vertebral bodies. AS patients present the most serious array of intubation, which is secondary to decrease in cervical spine mobility and possible temporomandibular joint disease. Management of a case of AS can be very challenging when the airway and the central neuraxial blockade, both are difficult. Fluoroscopic assisted central neuraxial blockade may lead to predictable success in AS. We present a case report with severe AS where conventional techniques failed and C-arm assisted helped in successful epidural anesthesia for ureteroscopic stone removal.

  6. The genetics of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip C; Brown, Matthew A

    2012-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and spondyloarthritis are strongly genetically determined. The long-standing association with HLA-B27 is well described, although the mechanism by which that association induces AS remains uncertain. Recent developments include the description of HLA-B27 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in European and Asian populations. An increasing number of non-MHC genetic associations have been reported, which provided amongst other things the first evidence of the involvement of the IL-23 pathway in AS. The association with ERAP1 is now known to be restricted to HLA-B27 positive disease. Preliminary studies on the genetics of axial spondyloarthritis demonstrate a lower HLA-B27 carriage rate compared with AS. Studies with larger samples and including non-European ethnic groups are likely to further advance the understanding of the genetics of AS and spondyloarthritis.

  7. [Ankylosing spondylitis--the current situation and new therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Zlnay, D; Zlnay, M; Rovenský, J

    2006-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, immunologically mediated rheumatic disease whose progression largely depends on the extent of inflammatory activity. In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), therapeutic control of AS is very limited. Therapy of ankylosing spondylitis should not only control inflammatory processes, but also prevent structural damages and maintain the functions. Until recently, physiotherapy and non-steroidal antiphlogistics (NSA) therapy was a gold standard of AS treatment. NSA therapy alleviates inflammatory pain of spine in 60 to 80% of patients. According to the most recent findings, long-term administration of NSA can affect also X-ray progression. DMARD therapy, which is efficient in RA, has insignificant effect on axial form of AS. Sulfasalazine proved to be efficacious against peripheral form of AS; administration of MTX and leflunomide is not supported by controlled studies. Peripheral arthritis and enthesitis is usually treated by short-term application of corticoids. The fact remains that an important role in AS immunopathogenesis is played by TNF alpha whose increased levels were found in patients with AS in serum, synovial fluid and SI joints. Anti-TNF therapy with infliximab and etanercept proved to be highly efficacious in patients with AS resistant to conventional therapy. Infliximab and etanercept reduced the disease activity (50% improvement in more than half of patients), improved the function and slowed down the structural damage. MRI studies of anti-TNF therapy proved reduction of inflammatory activity in SI joints and spine. Other studies verified the efficacy of adalimumab in AS therapy and showed that adalimumab is a promising drug. Also, several randomized clinical studies proved efficacy of thalidomide whose administration, however, is limited by its severe adverse effects. Until now, the results of studies focused on pamidronate therapy appear to be rather controversial. Better understanding of AS pathogenesis led

  8. Treatment trials in ankylosing spondylitis: current and future considerations

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijde, D; Braun, J; McGonagle, D; Siegel, J

    2002-01-01

    Emerging treatment options in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are giving new hope to patients with this chronic and potentially disabling disease. Clinical development of new treatments requires that rigorous and well controlled trials be conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. A number of classification systems have been developed in recent years as a result of enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis of AS. Although new outcome measures have been developed and a consensus has been reached on the use of assessment instruments in clinical trials, there is still need for improvement and implementation. The ASsessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) Working Group has addressed some of these dilemmas by establishing a core set of domains for the evaluation of AS and by selecting specific assessment methods for each domain. They have also published improvement criteria for assessing short term improvement with symptom modifying antirheumatic drugs and are presently in the process of developing response criteria for disease controlling antirheumatic treatment. Various experts are also currently examining discrepancies and inadequacies of classification systems for AS. Imaging studies, magnetic resonance imaging, in particular, may provide better classification criteria in the near future. In addition to consensus on outcome assessment and classification of AS, lessons learnt from clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may serve as a template for AS. Guidance provided by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical trials in RA may be of particular use. The FDA has defined the claims that sponsors can receive for RA products and the clinical trial data that would be expected to be submitted to support such claims. PMID:12381508

  9. Vitamin D in ankylosing spondylitis: review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guoqi; Wang, Li; Fan, Dazhi; Xin, Lihong; Liu, Li; Hu, Yanting; Ding, Ning; Xu, Shengqian; Xia, Guo; Jin, Xingzhong; Xu, Jianhua; Zou, Yanfeng; Pan, Faming

    2015-01-01

    The role of vitamin D in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is largely unknown. This paper aims to examine the association between serum vitamin D levels and susceptibility and disease activity of AS. We searched the relevant literatures in PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wanfang (Chinese) Database published before June 2014. Eight independent case-control studies with a total of 533 AS patients and 478 matching controls were selected into this meta-analysis. Standard mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the levels of serum vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in cases and controls, respectively. Correlation coefficients (CORs) have been performed to value the correlationship between vitamin D and disease activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI)) of AS patients. Meta-analysis results suggested that vitamin D may play a protective role in AS (for total vitamin D: SMD=-0.71, P<0.001; for 25OHD: SMD=-0.66, P=0.002; for 1,25OHD: SMD=-0.72, P=0.19). Differences in PTH and serum calcium levels were not significant in AS (SMD=-0.10, P=0.67; SMD=0.12, P=0.17 respectively), while ALP was associated with AS susceptibility (SMD=0.20, P=0.04). The relationship between serum vitamin D levels and disease activity was statistically significant except for 25OHD versus (vs.) CRP or BASDAI (for CRP vs. 25OHD: COR=-0.22, P=0.08; for BASDAI vs. 25OHD: COR=-0.20, P=0.06, respectively). The higher levels of serum vitamin D were associated with a decreased risk of AS, and showed an inverse relationship with AS activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marina Amaral de Ávila; Moura, Cristiano Soares de; Ferré, Felipe; Bernatsky, Sasha; Rahme, Elham; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2016-08-22

    To evaluate treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis who started therapies with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and tumor necrosis factor blockers (anti-TNF drugs). This retrospective cohort study from July 2008 to September 2013 evaluated therapy persistence, which is defined as the period between the start of treatment until it is discontinued, allowing for an interval of up to 30 days between the prescription end and the start of the next prescription. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated by logistic regression models to estimate the patients' chances of persisting in their therapies after the first and after the two first years of follow-up. The study included 11,642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis - 2,241 of these started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 9,401 patients started on DMARD - and 1,251 patients with ankylosing spondylitis - 976 of them were started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 275 were started on DMARD. In the first year of follow-up, 63.5% of the patients persisted in their therapies with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 54.1% remained using DMARD in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. In regards to ankylosing spondylitis, 79.0% of the subjects in anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group and 41.1% of the subjects in the DMARD group persisted with their treatments. The OR (95%CI) for therapy persistence was 1.50 (1.34-1.67) for the anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group as compared with the DMARD group in the first year for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 2.33 (1.74-3.11) for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A similar trend was observed at the end of the second year. A general trend of higher rates of therapy persistence with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) was observed as compared to DMARD in the study period. We observed higher persistence rates for anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis as compared to rheumatoid arthritis; and a higher

  11. The prevalence of clinically diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis and its clinical manifestations: a nationwide register study.

    PubMed

    Exarchou, Sofia; Lindström, Ulf; Askling, Johan; Eriksson, Jonas K; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena; Neovius, Martin; Turesson, Carl; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Jacobsson, Lennart T H

    2015-05-09

    Prevalence estimates of ankylosing spondylitis vary considerably, and there are few nationwide estimates. The present study aimed to describe the national prevalence of clinically diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis in Sweden, stratified according to age, sex, geographical, and socio-economic factors, and according to subgroups with ankylosing spondylitis-related clinical manifestations and pharmacological treatment. All individuals diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis according to the World Health Organization International Classification of Disease codes, between 1967 and 2009, were identified from the National Patient Register. Data regarding disease manifestations, patient demographics, level of education, pharmacological treatment, and geographical region were retrieved from the National Patient Register and other national registers. A total of 11,030 cases with an ankylosing spondylitis diagnosis (alive, living in Sweden, and 16 to 64 years old in December 2009) were identified in the National Patient Register, giving a point prevalence of 0.18% in 2009. The prevalence was higher in northern Sweden, and lower in those with a higher level of education. Men had a higher prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (0.23% versus 0.14%, P < 0.001), a higher frequency of anterior uveitis (25.5% versus 20.0%, P < 0.001) and were more likely to receive tumor necrosis factor inhibitors than women (15.6% versus 11.8% in 2009, P < 0.001). Women were more likely than men to have peripheral arthritis (21.7% versus 15.3%, P < 0.001), psoriasis (8.0% versus 6.9%, P = 0.03), and treatment with oral corticosteroids (14.0% versus 10.4% in 2009, P < 0.001). This nationwide, register-based study demonstrated a prevalence of clinically diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis of 0.18%. It revealed phenotypical and treatment differences between the sexes, as well as geographical and socio-economic differences in disease prevalence.

  12. Measuring disability in ankylosing spondylitis: comparison of bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index with revised Leeds Disability Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eyres, Sophie; Tennant, Alan; Kay, Lesley; Waxman, Robin; Helliwell, Philip S

    2002-05-01

    Disability has been identified as a core outcome measure in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The Dougados Functional Index (DFI) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) have been selected as core measures of function in this disease. However, neither of these instruments has undergone rigorous psychometric testing. The psychometric properties of 2 measures of disability, the BASFI and the revised Leeds Disability Questionnaire (RLDQ), were compared in a cohort of 208 outpatients with AS. Rasch analysis was used to examine the properties of each measure and to compare them on a common scale. Test-retest was assessed in a cohort of 149 subjects who completed each instrument twice over an interval of 2 weeks. Both instruments gave an even spread of scores across the study group, but BASFI responses were positively skewed and RLDQ responses negatively skewed. There was a highly significant difference between perceived severity groups for both instruments (Kruskal-Wallis chi-squared: RLDQ, 75.1; BASFI, 80.4; both p < 0.0001). Both instruments gave acceptable test-retest scores (RLDQ ICC = 0.95, 95% CI 0.93-0.97; BASFI ICC = 0.94, 95% CI 0.92-0.96). Both instruments were found to be unidimensional according to the Rasch model, but the BASFI had more items displaying differential item functioning. Category disordering was apparent with the BASFI but not the RLDQ. However, both instruments displayed disordered item thresholds. Neither instrument can be used as an interval measure. Both measures had "towers" of thresholds whereby several thresholds were marking the same point on the underlying disability construct. This was particularly notable in the case of the BASFI. Both the BASFI and RLDQ provide a unidimensional measure of function in AS that is in accord with patient perception of disease severity. Neither instrument can be used as an interval measure. Changing the way that the instruments are scored, for example by collapsing categories, may improve

  13. Cauda equina syndrome and dural ectasia: rare manifestations in chronic ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C-C; Lin, Y-C; Lo, C-P; Chang, T-P

    2011-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is a rare manifestation in patients with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We report a 57-year-old male patient with a 30-year history of AS who developed CES in the past 4 years. The CT and MRI examinations showed unique appearances of dural ectasia, multiple dorsal dural diverticula, erosion of the vertebral posterior elements, tethering of the conus medullaris to the dorsal aspect of the spinal canal and adhesion of the nerve roots of the cauda equina to the wall of the dural sac. A large dural defect was found at surgery. De-adhesion of the tethered conus medullaris was performed but without significant clinical improvement. The possible aetiologies of CES and dural ectasia in patients with chronic AS are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:21606066

  14. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis-associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis-associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression.

  15. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hong-xia; Fu, Wen-yi; Cui, Hua-dong; Yang, Li-li; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Li-juan

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ≥ 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide. PMID:26109960

  16. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hong-Xia; Fu, Wen-Yi; Cui, Hua-Dong; Yang, Li-Li; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Li-Juan

    2015-05-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ≥ 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide.

  17. Disease-modifying effect of etanercept versus sulphasalazine on spinal mobility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Suzanne; Koenig, Andrew; Li, Wenzhi; Singh, Amitabh

    2013-10-01

    To model the estimated disease-modifying effect of etanercept over sulphasalazine in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A post hoc analysis of data from the Ankylosing Spondylitis Study Comparing ENbrel and Sulfasalazine Dosed Weekly (ASCEND) study was performed using the Natural History Staggered Start (NHSS) method. A mixed model with a linear effect over time was fitted to the ASCEND data and resampling was performed to generate confidence intervals. At week 16, the total additional improvement in Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index of the etanercept arm over the sulphasalazine arm was 0.62 points, of which 31% (0.19 points) was estimated to be due to disease-modifying effect. The analysis of ASCEND data suggests that etanercept may have a larger disease-modifying effect than sulphasalazine. Further research is needed with more objective measures such as magnetic resonance imaging or X-radiography to confirm these results.

  18. Is there a common pathogenesis in aggressive periodontitis & ankylosing spondylitis in HLA-B27 patient?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neeraj; Agarwal, Kavita; Varshney, Atul; Agrawal, Navneet; Dubey, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    HLA-B27 is having strong association to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other inflammatory diseases collectively known as seronegative spondyloarthropathy. In literature, although the evidence for association between AS and periodontitis as well as AS and HLA-B27 are there but the association of aggressive periodontitis in HLA-B27 positive patient with AS are not there. We hypothesize that there may be a common pathogenesis in aggressive periodontitis and ankylosing spondylitis in HLA-B27 patient. A 27-years-old female presented with the features of generalized aggressive periodontitis and difficulty in walking. On complete medical examination, ankylosing spondylitis was diagnosed with further positive HLA-B27 phenotype and negative rheumatic factor. This report may open up a new link to explore in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term safety and efficacy of etanercept in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Senabre-Gallego, José Miguel; Santos-Ramírez, Carlos; Santos-Soler, Gregorio; Salas-Heredia, Esteban; Sánchez-Barrioluengo, Mabel; Barber, Xavier; Rosas, José

    2013-01-01

    To date, anti-tumor necrosis factor alfa (anti-TNF-α) therapy is the only alternative to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. Etanercept is a soluble TNF receptor, with a mode of action and pharmacokinetics different to those of antibodies and distinctive efficacy and safety. Etanercept has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis, with or without radiographic sacroiliitis, and other manifestations of the disease, including peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, and psoriasis. Etanercept is not efficacious in inflammatory bowel disease, and its efficacy in the treatment of uveitis appears to be lower than that of other anti-TNF drugs. Studies of etanercept confirmed regression of bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging of the spine and sacroiliac joint, but failed to reduce radiographic progression, as do the other anti-TNF drugs. It seems that a proportion of patients remain in disease remission when the etanercept dose is reduced or administration intervals are extended. Etanercept is generally well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. The most common adverse effect of etanercept treatment is injection site reactions, which are generally self-limiting. Reactivation of tuberculosis, reactivation of hepatitis B virus infection, congestive heart failure, demyelinating neurologic disorders, hematologic disorders like aplastic anemia and pancytopenia, vasculitis, immunogenicity, and exacerbation or induction of psoriasis are class effects of all the anti-TNF drugs, and have been seen in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. However, etanercept is less likely to induce reactivation of tuberculosis than the other anti-TNF drugs and it has been suggested that etanercept might be less immunogenic, especially in ankylosing spondylitis. Acute uveitis, Crohn’s disease, and sarcoidosis are other adverse events that have been rarely associated with etanercept

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-B27 alleles in Xinjiang Uygur patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zou, H-Y; Yu, W-Z; Wang, Z; He, J; Jiao, M

    2015-05-25

    We investigated the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang. B27-positive patients with ankylosing spondylitis were subtyped by using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing. The HLA-B27 subtype frequencies of Uygur patients were compared with those in Han patients in Xinjiang and the other areas of China. B*2705 was the predominant subtype in Uygur patients with a frequency of 58.95%, which was much higher than that in Han patients in Xinjiang (31.58%, P < 0.05) and the other areas of China (excluding the Shandong region, which was 63.89%). The frequency of B*2704 (27.37%) in Uygur patients was the lowest and significantly lower than that in Han patients (61.18%, P < 0.05) and in 8 other areas of China. B*2710 has not been previously reported in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients; B*2704 was the main (61.18%) subtype in Han patients in Xinjiang, followed by B*2705 (31.58%) and was similar to the characteristics of Han patients in the other areas of China. B*2724 in Han ankylosing spondylitis patients has not been previously reported. Additionally, the B*2702/B*2705 homozygote was identified in Uygur patients. B*2702/B*2704, B*2704/B*2705, and B*2705/B*2705 homozygotes were identified in 3 Han patients. The distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang significantly differed from that in Han patients. Understanding the distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in ethnic minority populations of Xinjiang is important for anthropological genetic studies and for analyzing the impact of genetic background on ankylosing spondylitis susceptibility.

  1. Quality of life and related variables in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Bodur, Hatice; Ataman, Sebnem; Rezvani, Aylin; Buğdaycı, Derya Soy; Cevik, Remzi; Birtane, Murat; Akıncı, Ayşen; Altay, Zuhal; Günaydın, Rezzan; Yener, Mahmut; Koçyiğit, Hikmet; Duruöz, Tuncay; Yazgan, Pelin; Cakar, Engin; Aydın, Gülümser; Hepgüler, Simin; Altan, Lale; Kırnap, Mehmet; Olmez, Neşe; Soydemir, Raikan; Kozanoğlu, Erkan; Bal, Ajda; Sivrioğlu, Konçuy; Karkucak, Murat; Günendi, Zafer

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate quality of life (QoL) and related variables in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a chronic inflammatory disease of the spine. Nine-hundred and sixty-two patients with AS from the Turkish League Against Rheumatism AS Registry, who fulfilled the modified New York criteria, were enrolled. The patients were evaluated using the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society core outcome domains including Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), fatigue (BASDAI-question 1), pain (last week/spine/due to AS), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index (BASRI), Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score (MASES) and two QoL questionnaires (the disease-specific ASQoL and generic the Short Form-36 [SF-36]). The mean ASQoL score was 7.1 ± 5.7. SF-36 subscales of general health, physical role and bodily pain had the poorest scores. ASQoL was strongly correlated with disease duration, BASDAI, fatigue, BASFI, BASMI, BASRI, MASES, pain and SF-36 subscales (P < 0.001). SF-36 subscales were also strongly correlated with BASDAI and BASFI. Advanced educational status and regular exercise habits positively affected QoL, while smoking negatively affected QoL. In patients with AS, the most significant variables associated with QoL were BASDAI, BASFI, fatigue and pain. ASQoL was noted to be a short, rapid and simple patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument and strongly correlated with SF-36 subscales.

  2. Spinal Fracture in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: Cohort Definition, Distribution of Injuries, and Hospital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Bohl, Daniel D; Varthi, Arya G; Basques, Bryce A; Webb, Matthew L; Samuel, Andre M; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2016-02-01

    A retrospective cohort. The aim of this study was to characterize spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis are susceptible to fractures of the spinal column, even from minor trauma. However, the literature describing patients with ankylosing spondylitis and spinal fractures consists largely of case reports and small case series. The purpose of this study is to better characterize fractures of the ankylosed spine, including the patient population, locations of fracture, and outcomes in a large, nationally representative sample. All patients with diagnoses of both fracture of the spinal column and ankylosing spondylitis admitted between 2005 and 2011 were identified in the National Inpatient Sample (NIS). Patient demographics, fracture regions, and complications were characterized with descriptive statistics. The associations between injury characteristics and outcomes were assessed using Poisson regression. A total of 939 patients with ankylosing spondylitis admitted with a spinal fracture were identified in NIS. The average age was 68.4 ± 14.7 years, and 85% of patients were male. Cervical fractures were the most common (53.0%), followed by thoracic (41.9%), lumbar (18.2%), and sacral (1.5%). Spinal cord injury was present in 27.5% of cervical fractures, 16.0% of thoracic fractures, and 21.1% of cases overall. Fractures involving more than 1 region of the spine occurred in 13.1% of patients. Patients were treated with fusion in 49.9% of cases. In-hospital adverse events occurred in 29.4% of patients, and 6.6% of patients died during their admission. More than 10% of patients had fractures in more than 1 region of the spine. There is a high risk of adverse events in this population, and 6.6% of patients died during their inpatient stay. These results provide clinicians with a better understanding of the distribution and the high morbidity and mortality of fractures in the ankylosed spine. 3.

  3. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  4. Fibrobullous disease of the upper lobes: an extraskeletal manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Rumancik, W M; Firooznia, H; Davis, M S; Leitman, B S; Golimbu, C; Rafii, M; McCauley, D I

    1984-07-01

    Fibrobullous disease of the upper lobes of the lungs is a rare extraskeletal manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis, occurring in 1.3% of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. We present a patient with this disease, and discuss this pulmonary manifestation. Because the radiographic appearance of the chest in this disease resembles that in tuberculosis, many patients are misdiagnosed and treated for tuberculosis despite negative bacteriology. Computed tomography is useful in delineating the extent of pleural thickening, bullous changes, volume loss, parenchymal fibrosis, and bronchiectasis, as well as identifying or excluding an intracavitary pulmonary mycetoma.

  5. Discovertebral (Andersson) lesion of the Ankylosing Spondylitis, a cause of autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barman, Apurba; Sinha, Mithilesh K; Rao, P Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a medical emergency in spinal cord injury. Majority of cases of autonomic dysreflexia are known to be induced by either bladder or bowel distension. Very few cases of recurrent postural autonomic dysreflexia, due to secondary spinal pathology, have been reported. Discovertebral or Andersson lesion, a recognized complication in Ankylosing Spondylitis, can give rise to similar kind of recurrent postural dysreflexic symptoms. Here, we report a case of Ankylosing Spondylitis with high level, complete spinal cord injury, where the patient was developing recurrent postural autonomic dysreflexia and its successful management. Andersson lesion in the lumbar spine below the level of injury was demonstrated in this case report.

  6. Uveitis in spondyloarthritis including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T

    2015-06-01

    Uveitis is a common complication of spondyloarthritis. The "phenotype" of the uveitis characteristic of ankylosing spondylitis (sudden onset, anterior, unilateral, recurrent, more often male) may differ from the phenotype often seen with either psoriatic arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease (insidious onset, anterior and intermediate, bilateral, chronic, and/or more often female). The frequency of uveitis is also much greater in association with ankylosing spondylitis than with either inflammatory bowel disease or psoriasis. Uveitis may affect the choice of therapy and can rarely be a complication of therapy. Uveitis and arthritis also co-exist in several animal models.

  7. Delayed Traumatic Diaphragm Hernia after Thoracolumbar Fracture in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoun-Ho; Kim, Sang Woo; Jung, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragm hernia can occur in rare cases and generally accompanies thoracic or abdominal injuries. When suffering from ankylosing spondylitis, a small force can develop into vertebral fracture and an adjacent structural injury, and lead to diaphragm hernia without accompanying concomitant thoracoabdominal injury. A high level of suspicion may be a most reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of a diaphragm injury, and we need to keep in mind a possibility in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis and a thoracolumbar fracture, even in the case of minor trauma. PMID:25733996

  8. Biomechanical assessment of balance and posture in subjects with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis is a major chronic rheumatic disease that predominantly affects axial joints, determining a rigid spine from the occiput to the sacrum. The dorsal hyperkyphosis may induce the patients to stand in a stooped position with consequent restriction in patients’ daily living activities. The aim of this study was to develop a method for quantitatively and objectively assessing both balance and posture and their mutual relationship in ankylosing spondylitis subjects. Methods The data of 12 healthy and 12 ankylosing spondylitis subjects (treated with anti-TNF-α stabilized), with a mean age of 51.42 and 49.42 years; mean BMI of 23.08 and 25.44 kg/m2 were collected. Subjects underwent a morphological examination of the spinal mobility by means of a pocket compass needle goniometer, together with an evaluation of both spinal and hip mobility (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index), and disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index). Quantitative evaluation of kinematics and balance were performed through a six cameras stereophotogrammetric system and a force plate. Kinematic models together with a test for evaluating balance in different eye level conditions were developed. Head protrusion, trunk flexion-extension, pelvic tilt, hip-knee-ankle flexion-extension were evaluated during Romberg Test, together with centre of pressure parameters. Results Each subject was able to accomplish the required task. Subjects’ were comparable for demographic parameters. A significant increment was observed in ankylosing spondylitis subjects for knee joint angle with the target placed at each eye level on both sides (p < 0.042). When considering the pelvic tilt angle a statistically significant reduction was found with the target placed respectively at 10° (p = 0.034) and at 30° (p = 0.019) less than eye level. Furthermore in ankylosing spondylitis subjects both hip (p = 0.048) and ankle (p = 0

  9. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  10. ASKyphoplan: a program for deformity planning in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Scheerder, Famke J.; Jansen, Eric; Smit, Theo H.

    2007-01-01

    A closing wedge osteotomy of the lumbar spine may be considered to correct posture and spinal balance in progressive thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity caused by ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Adequate deformity planning is essential for reliable prediction of the effect of surgical correction of the spine on the sagittal balance and horizontal gaze of the patient. The effect of a spinal osteotomy on the horizontal gaze is equal to the osteotomy angle. However, the effect of a spinal osteotomy on the sagittal balance depends on both the correction angle and the level of osteotomy simultaneously. The relation between the correction angle, the level of osteotomy and the sagittal balance of the spine can be expressed by a mathematical equation. However, this mathematical equation is not easily used in daily practice. We present the computer program ASKyphoplan that analyses and visualizes the planning procedure for sagittal plane corrective osteotomies of the spine in AS. The relationship between the planned correction angle, level of osteotomy and sagittal balance are coupled into the program. The steps taken during an ASKyphoplan run are outlined, and the clinical application is discussed. The application of the program is illustrated by the analysis of the data from a patient recently treated by a lumbar osteotomy in AS. The software can be used free of charge on the internet at http://www.stega.nl under the heading “research” in the menu. PMID:17440752

  11. Tuberculous bursitis of the greater trochanter mimicking ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Tayfur, Öykü; Kılıç, Levent; Karadağ, Ömer; Akdoğan, Ali; Kerimoğlu, Ülkü; Uzun, Ömrüm

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculous trochanteric bursitis (TTB) is a rare condition that accounts for 1% of musculoskeletal tuberculosis cases. Extrapulmonary TB is usually diagnosed late because of reduced diagnostic suspicion, particularly in the absence of signs of systemic infection. Herein, we report a case of right hip pain that was misdiagnosed as ankylosing spondylitis. The patient had a history of inflammatory back pain with morning stiffness. However, HLA-B27 was negative. Sacroiliac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a giant multiloculated collection (27×16×10 cm). Percutaneous drainage was performed and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in fluid culture. The patient was treated by drainage along with antituberculosis therapy. After 1 year of antituberculosis therapy, control MRI revealed total resolution of the large fluid collection. It is important to emphasize that fever or general symptoms are absent in patients with TTB, as observed in the present case. In endemic countries, TTB should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chronic hip pain without fever, weight loss, and constitutional symptoms.

  12. Effects of Glossopharyngeal Insufflation in Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Nina; Lindholm, Peter; Lennartsson, Claudia; Nygren-Bonnier, Malin

    2014-01-01

    In Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), thoracic range of motion is often greatly limited. The objective of the study was to describe the effects of 12 weeks of Glossopharyngeal Insufflation (GI) training in patients with AS. Dynamic spirometry included vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, and peak expiratory flow. Thoracic and lumbar range of motion was assessed by tragus-to-wall distance, modified Schober test, and tape measure. Disease activity, activity limitation, and health perception were assessed using the BAS-Indices, and tension in the thoracic region during GI was assessed using the Borg CR-10 scale. Adherence to training was recorded in an activity log, along with any remarks on the training. Ten patients were recruited and six male patients fulfilled the study protocol. Three patients were able to learn GI by exceeding their maximal vital capacity with 5% using GI. A significant increase in thoracic range of motion both on costae IV (P = 0.04) and at the level of the xiphoid process (P = 0.04) was seen. Thus, patients with AS can practice GI, it is safe if maximal exertion is avoided, and patients with some mobility in the chest can increase their lung function substantially by performing GI during 12 weeks. PMID:25506364

  13. Economic considerations of the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Reveille, John D; Ximenes, Antonio; Ward, Michael M

    2012-05-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with both significant direct and indirect costs, which vary by country, and have generally increased dramatically since the introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy. The cost-effectiveness of biologic agents is controversial, although cost-effectiveness studies need to consider the potential impact of anti-tumor necrosis factor treatments on work ability. Alternatives to reduce costs associated with biologics have been examined, including on-demand dosing and lower dose alternatives. Other treatment measures, such as total hip arthroplasty and physical therapy, are also effective in reducing pain and improving function in patients with AS, although the optimal type or combination of physical therapy treatment modalities, the optimal frequency and duration of treatment and whether therapy is equally effective in stable disease and uncontrolled AS need to be determined. No studies have examined differences in patient outcomes based on subspecialty care. Establishing an evidence base for these questions would help inform policy decisions to design the most cost-effective measures to treat AS.

  14. Rehabilitation in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis: differences and similarities.

    PubMed

    Vliet Vlieland, T P M; Li, L C

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to summarize and compare the best available evidence concerning the effectiveness of rehabilitative interventions and provide an overview of recommendations or international guidelines on non-pharmacological treatments in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS).It was found that, compared to RA, there are relatively fewer non-pharmacological intervention studies in AS. Overall, the literature on the effectiveness of non-pharmacological treatment modalities in RA and AS supports the use of exercise and educational interventions with a cognitive behavioural component. The evidence on electro-physical modalities, balneotherapy, and dietary interventions and alternative or complementary interventions for managing RA and AS is generally weak or inconclusive.International practice guidelines on RA and AS management recommend non-pharmacological interventions as adjunctive interventions to medications.Areas for future research include non-pharmacological interventions in AS, studies on the effectiveness and costs of various health care delivery models, and the usage of alternative or complementary treatments.

  15. Ayurvedic approach for management of ankylosing spondylitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a rheumatic disease with various skeletal and extra skeletal manifestations. No satisfactory treatment is available in modern medicine for this disorder. Various Panchakarma procedures and Ayurvedic drugs have been proved useful for these manifestations. We present a case of AS, which was treated for two months with a combination of Panchakarma procedures and Ayurvedic drugs. Ayurvedic treatments, in this case, were directed toward alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability. The patient was considered suffering from Asthimajja gata vata (∼Vata disorder involving bone and bone marrow) and was treated with Shalishastika Pinda Svedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) for one month and Mustadi Yapana Basti (enema with medicated milk) with Anuvasana (enema with Asvagandha oil) in 30 days schedule along with oral Ayurvedic drugs for two months. Pratimarsha nasya (nasal drops) with Anu Taila (oil) for one month was given after completion of Basti procedure. Patient's condition was assessed for symptoms of Asthimajja gata vata and core sets of Assessment of Spondylo Arthritis International Society showed substantial improvement. This study shows the cases of AS may be successfully managed with Ayurvedic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Strongyloides stercoralis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Yanık, Keramettin; Karadağ, Adil; Odabaşı, Hakan; Unal, Nevzat; Altıntop, Levent; Hökelek, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a nematode-borne disease caused by several Strongyloides species. This case was presented in order to indicate Strongyloidosis in immunocompromised patients with several clinical findings. A fifty-five year old male patient on corticosteroid medication for a long time because of ankylosing spondylitis was on infliximab medication for 5 years. He presented with swelling of his right foot for ten days, right shoulder stiffness and low back pain. The presence of anaemia was remarkable. S. stercoralis was reported in histological examination of endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimen. Peripheral blood smear showed 68.4% neutrophils, 17% lymphocytes, 7.5% monocytes, and 6.7% (normal range 2%-6.2) eosinophils. The level of IgE was raised: 285IU/mL (normal range 5-120IU/mL). A large number of S. stercoralis larvae were detected upon stool examination with saline and iodine mounts and the formaldehyde ether concentration method. After treatment with two cure albendazole 400 mg/day for 7 days, S. stercoralis larvae were not detected in stool examination. It is interesting that response to treatment was not observed on the first cure and the recovery was seen on the second cure. We suggest that hyperinfections should be taken into consideration in the diagnosis and treatment of immunocompromised patients with several complaints so that life-threatening effects of the nematode may be prevented.

  17. Work disability in patients with ankylosing spondylitis in Norway.

    PubMed

    Bakland, Gunnstein; Gran, Jan T; Becker-Merok, Andrea; Nordvåg, Bjørn Y; Nossent, Johannes C

    2011-03-01

    To report the prevalence of work disability (WD) in a cross-sectional study of a large population of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and the associated demographic and clinical characteristics, including extraspinal features, that contribute to WD. Patients with AS registered in a hospital database were invited to participate. A total of 360 patients took part. The survey period was 1998 to 2002. During an extended outpatient visit, data were collected according to a predefined data form. Demographic data were collected and a physical examination performed. After 22.6 years of disease duration, the cumulative prevalence of WD reached 43.6%, and an additional 8.9% of patients were nonparticipants in the labor force. Significant odds ratios indicating an independent association with WD were found for history of polyarthritis (9.6), coronary heart disease (CHD; 7.8), female sex (3.4), having children with spondyloarthritis (2.9), changing profession (2.8), lower level of education (1.4), mean score of the Bath AS Functional Index (1.2), increasing age (1.05), and increasing finger-to-floor distance (1.02). The longterm prevalence of WD among Norwegian patients with AS is considerably higher than in reports from other countries. Earlier polyarthritis and CHD were the strongest independent risk factors for WD.

  18. Clinical measures in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Fendler, C; Braun, J

    2009-01-01

    Except for morning stiffness, the clinical symptoms and the history of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) usually differ: the location in RA is mostly the hands and feet, and in AS rather the back. Patients with RA tend to be older (>50 years) and female, while in AS there are somewhat more often male and younger (<30 years) at onset of inflammatory back pain, the leading clinical symptom. The clinical examination of patients in the early phase of the disease is usually easier in RA, although arthralgia and arthritis may be difficult to differentiate. Joint counts are useful in states of high disease activity with polyarticular flares and more established disease. In comparison, in AS, young patients with back pain frequently show normal physical examens, a reduction of lateral spinal flexion and chest expansion are often the earliest signs which are also sensitive to change on therapy with biologics. The cervical spine may be affected in RA and AS - more frequently in advanced disease stages but rather early cases have been reported.

  19. Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Kobak, Senol; Yilmaz, Hatice; Karaarslan, Ahmet; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male patient presented to our rheumatology clinic with pain, swelling and limitation of movement in his right ankle, and also purpuric skin lesions in the lower extremity pretibial region. He was asked questions, and he said that he had been having chronic low back pain and morning stiffness for the last few years. His physical examination revealed that he had arthritis in his right ankle, purpuric skin lesions in pretibial regions of both legs, and bilateral FABERE/FADIR positivity. The sacroiliac joint imaging and MRI revealed bilateral sacroiliitis findings, and the lateral heel imaging revealed enthesitis. HLA-B27 was positive. Skin biopsy from lower skin lesions was reported to be consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Based on clinical, laboratory, radiological, and pathological examinations, the patient was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Administration of corticosteroid, salazopyrin, and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory medications was started. Notable clinical and laboratory regression was observed during his checks 3 months later. PMID:24653851

  20. Detection of novel diagnostic antibodies in ankylosing spondylitis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Quaden, Dana H F; De Winter, Liesbeth M; Somers, Veerle

    2016-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a debilitating, chronic, rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation and new bone formation resulting in fusion of the spine and sacroiliac joints. Since early treatment is impeded by a delayed diagnosis, it is highly important to find new biomarkers that improve early diagnosis and may also contribute to a better assessment of disease activity, prognosis and therapy response in AS. Because of the absence of rheumatoid factor, AS was long assumed to have a seronegative character and antibodies are thus not considered a hallmark of the disease. However, emerging evidence suggests plasma cells and autoantibodies to be involved in the disease course. In this review, the role of B cells and antibodies in AS is discussed. Furthermore, an overview is provided of antibodies identified in AS up till now, and their diagnostic potential. Many of these antibody responses were based on small study populations and further validation is lacking. Moreover, most were identified by a hypothesis-driven approach and thus limited to antibodies against targets that are already known to be involved in AS pathogenesis. Hence, we propose an unbiased approach to identify novel diagnostic antibodies. The already successfully applied techniques cDNA phage display and serological antigen selection will be used to identify antibodies against both known and new antigen targets in AS plasma. These newly identified antibodies will enhance early diagnosis of AS and provide more insight into the underlying disease pathology, resulting in a more effective treatment strategy and eventually an improved disease outcome.

  1. Physical Activity and Exercise: Perspectives of Adults With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Tom; McGowan, Emer; O'Shea, Finbar; Wilson, Fiona

    2016-05-01

    Exercise is a key component of the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Despite numerous benefits, compliance with exercise programs is low. Little attention has been accorded to the experiences of individuals with AS toward physical activity (PA). This study aimed to explore the attitudes toward PA and exercise of adults with AS. A qualitative descriptive design using thematic analysis was used. Seventeen adults with AS participated in individual, semistructured interviews. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded and analyzed for themes and subthemes. Four themes emerged from the analysis: (1) benefits, (2) barriers, (3) motivation, and (4) strategies and enablers. Benefits included amelioration of symptoms, improvements in general health, and enhancement of quality of life. Subthemes of barriers to PA included lack of resources, negative attitudes to exercise, misinformation, and condition-related factors. Motivation to exercise was influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Participants proposed strategies to enhance PA participation and exercise engagement. Awareness of the benefits of PA appears insufficient to motivate individuals with AS to exercise; a number of factors influence individual motivation to exercise. Many perceived barriers to PA may be considered modifiable. Individually-tailored interventions, collaboratively developed by the individual and the healthcare professionals, were proposed as strategies for effective PA and exercise prescription.

  2. Pulmonary function in ankylosing spondylitis: association with clinical variables.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, A J L; Rocha-Muñoz, A D; Gonzalez-Lopez, L; Vázquez-Del-Mercado, M; Salazar-Páramo, M; Dávalos-Rodríguez, I P; De la Cerda-Trujillo, L; Diaz-Toscano, M L; Hernandez-Cuervo, P; Diaz-Rizo, V; Sanchez-Mosco, D; Vazquez-Jimenez, J C; Cardona-Muñoz, E G; Gamez-Nava, J I

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the association between pulmonary function and clinical variables in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to compare the pulmonary function of patients with AS with that of healthy controls, 61 AS patients and 74 healthy controls were included. In AS, we assessed clinical disease indices (BASDAI, BASFI, BASG), morning stiffness, number of hypersensitive entheses, metrology measures, 6-min walking test, acute phase reactants, radiological presence of "bamboo spine," and severity of radiological involvement in sacroiliac and vertebral joints. AS and healthy controls had similar age and gender. All the parameters of pulmonary function were significantly diminished in AS than in healthy controls (p < 0.001), with a higher proportion of restrictive pattern (57.4 vs. 5.4 %). In AS, pulmonary function correlated negatively with BASDAI, BASFI, BASG, morning stiffness, number of hypersensitive entheses, occiput-wall distance, and ESR, and positively with 6-min walking test. There was no association between pulmonary function with radiological stage of vertebral joints and sacroiliac joints, "bamboo spine," disease duration, or chest expansion. A higher frequency of AS patients had a decreased pulmonary function and results of the 6-min walking test. These abnormalities in AS were more related with disease activity than with mobility limitation.

  3. Economic Considerations of the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Reveille, John D.; Ximenes, Antonio; Ward, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS)is associated with both significant direct and indirect costs,which vary by country, and have generally increased dramatically since the introduction of anti-TNF therapy. The cost-effectiveness of biologic agents is controversial, although cost-effectiveness studies need to consider the potential impact of anti-TNF treatments on work ability. Alternatives to reduce costs associated with biologics have been examined, including on-demand dosing and lower dose alternatives. Other treatment measures, such as total hip arthroplasty and physical therapy, are also effective in reducing pain and improving function in patients with AS, although the optimal type or combination of physical therapy treatment modalities, the optimal frequency and duration of treatment, and whether therapy is equally effective in stable disease and uncontrolled AS needs to be determined. No studies have examined differences in patient outcomes based on subspecialty care. Establishing an evidence base for these questions would help inform policy decisions to design the most cost-effective measures to treat AS. PMID:22543541

  4. Men's experiences of living with ankylosing spondylitis: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mette; Jensen, Kim Vilbek; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2015-03-01

    The majority of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are male, although potential gender differences have not been investigated in relation to disease management. Moreover, men's perceptions of experiencing AS have not been reported in the literature. This study sought to develop an understanding of how men experience AS and the challenges related to living with AS as a chronic disease. A purposive sample of 13 men diagnosed with AS, with a median age of 44 years (range 32-58) was recruited from a rheumatology outpatient clinic. The median duration of disease was 12 years (range 0.3-28 years), and the median time from the first symptom to final diagnosis was seven years (range 2-20 years). Semi-structured interviews were conducted using an interview guide, and the interviews were analysed using content analysis inspired by Graneheim qualitative methodology. The analysis revealed four categories: (1) 'Approaching a diagnosis'; (2) 'Ill in a social context'; (3) 'Challenged as a man'; and (4) 'The importance of remaining physically well'. Based on these categories, the overall category of 'An invisible companion for life' emerged, which captures the experience of living with an invisible, life-long disease. These findings demonstrate that AS impacts men's perceptions of themselves as men, relationships as a partner and father, social lives, and masculine identity. Physical activity was highlighted as an important part of being a man, and not being able to exercise challenged the men's masculine identity. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Ankylosing spondylitis in monozygotic twins: studies on immunological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hohler, T.; Hug, R.; Schneider, P.; Krummenauer, F.; Gripenberg-Lerche, C.; Granfors, K.; Marker-Hermann, E.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine immunological parameters that might explain disease discordance in monozygotic twin pairs with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).
METHODS—11 monozygotic twin pairs (nine with AS, two with undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy) were investigated. The peripheral T cell receptor Vβ repertoire was investigated using FACS analysis and 14 different Vβ antibodies. In addition serum samples were tested for antibodies to Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Candida albicans, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. Peripheral blood lymphocyte reactivity against a number of bacteria was investigated by interferon γ ELISPOT assays.
RESULTS—Twins suffering from AS showed cellular hyporeactivity against K pneumoniae, S pyogenes, C albicans in the ELISPOT assays compared with healthy twins. In contrast with the antibody data, where no significant differences were observed between the two groups, AS concordant twins showed the most pronounced differences in their Vβ repertoire on CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes.
CONCLUSIONS—Cellular hyporeactivity of peripheral blood cells to bacterial antigens might reflect defective T cell responses allowing bacterial antigens to persist in diseased patients. There are probably other environmental factors that influence disease concordance.

 PMID:10381488

  6. Serum prolidase activity in ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Demet; Em, Serda; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Oktayoglu, Pelin; Yüksel, Hatice Kurt; Caglayan, Mehmet; Gezer, Orhan; Nas, Kemal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to emphasize the collagen turnover in 2 of the most common chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases by evaluating serum prolidase activity (SPA) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 30 patients who met the modified New York Criteria for the classification of AS, 29 patients who met the 2010 Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria for the classification of RA, and 31 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Serum samples of the patients and the controls were collected and SPA was measured by a spectrophotometric method. The comparison of the SPA in these 3 groups was statistically examined. In both patient groups, the SPA was lower than in the control group. SPA in patients with AS was statistically significantly lower than in the control and RA groups (P < 0.001/P = 0.002). No statistically significant difference was found between the RA and the control groups (P = 0.891). In conclusion, lower SPA is presumably associated with decreased collagen turnover and fibrosis, leading to decreased physical functions in both chronic inflammatory musculoskeletal diseases.

  7. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Song, G G

    2015-05-18

    The purpose of this study was to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes and biological processes associated with changes in gene expression in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We performed a meta-analysis using the integrative meta-analysis of expression data program on publicly available microarray AS Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets. We performed Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses and pathway analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Four GEO datasets, including 31 patients with AS and 39 controls, were available for the meta-analysis. We identified 65 genes across the studies that were consistently DE in patients with AS vs controls (23 upregulated and 42 downregulated). The upregulated gene with the largest effect size (ES; -1.2628, P = 0.020951) was integral membrane protein 2A (ITM2A), which is expressed by CD4+ T cells and plays a role in activation of T cells. The downregulated gene with the largest ES (1.2299, P = 0.040075) was mitochondrial ribosomal protein S11 (MRPS11). The most significant GO enrichment was in the respiratory electron transport chain category (P = 1.67 x 10-9). Therefore, our meta-analysis identified genes that were consistently DE as well as biological pathways associated with gene expression changes in AS.

  8. Diet and Spondylitis

    MedlinePlus

    Login/Register Site Feedback About Spondylitis Overview Types of Spondylitis For The Newly Diagnosed Could I Have Spondylitis? Treatment ... Vehicle Purchase from our Store Shop Cart Login Register About Spondylitis Overview Types of Spondylitis Ankylosing Spondylitis ...

  9. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  10. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  11. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Rossini, M; Viapiana, O; Orsolini, G; Fracassi, E; Idolazzi, L; Gatti, D; Adami, S; Govoni, M

    2015-03-31

    Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Infusion of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells alleviates symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ai; Tao, Yuan; Kong, Dexiao; Zhang, Ni; Wang, Yongjing; Wang, Zhilun; Wang, Yingxue; Wang, Juandong; Xiao, Juan; Jiang, Yang; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Chengyun

    2017-01-01

    The current study evaluated 5 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Patients received intravenous transfusions of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (uMSCs). All therapeutic and adverse responses were assessed and recorded during uMSC therapy. No severe adverse reactions were observed in any of the patients, although a slight transient fever was observed in 3 patients within 2–6 h of intravenous administration of uMSCs. Following treatment, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Indices decreased, however the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index increased. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate in 3 patients was reduced and C-reactive protein levels in 1 patient were markedly reduced. The symptoms of AS were alleviated in all patients. The present study indicates that intravenous transfusion of uMSCs is safe and well tolerated by patients and that it effectively alleviates disease activity and clinical symptoms. In the future, a larger cohort of patients with AS should be recruited to enable the systemic evaluation of uMSC therapy. PMID:28781629

  13. Differential diagnosis and management of ankylosing spondylitis masked as adhesive capsulitis: a resident's case problem.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Chelsea L; Rhon, Daniel I

    2012-10-01

    Resident's case problem. Ankylosing spondylitis is a potentially debilitating seronegative spondyloarthropathy, with inflammatory low back pain as the most commonly reported symptom. In the absence of low back pain, identification of other diagnostic criteria or associated impairments and joint involvement, such as involvement of the hip or shoulder, may be beneficial. A 32-year-old man with right shoulder pain and decreased range of motion was referred with a diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis. He had been managed by multiple healthcare providers for 3 years before being referred to a physical therapist. Glenoid labral pathology was evident on prior magnetic resonance imaging, which had led to a persistent focus on the shoulder. The evaluation by the physical therapist revealed significant mobility deficits in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Radiographs and laboratory tests were ordered and a referral was made to rheumatology after the initial physical therapy assessment. The diagnostic work-up confirmed the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis and led to multidisciplinary management of the disease. Low back pain is often the primary symptom of ankylosing spondylitis later in the disease process. Earlier indicators of ankylosing spondylitis, such as severely impaired mobility and spine stiffness, may help guide detection in the absence of spinal pain. In this case, an appropriate diagnosis led to improvement in the management strategy of what might have appeared to be unrelated shoulder pain. Early differential diagnosis is important, as emerging interventions show promise when used earlier in the disease process.

  14. Enthesitis and its relationships with disease parameters in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Laatiris, Assia; Amine, Bouchra; Ibn Yacoub, Yousra; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the relationship between enthesitis and clinical, laboratory and quality-of-life parameters in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Moroccan patients. Seventy-six patients were included in this cross-sectional study according to the modified New York criteria for AS. All patients had enthesitis involvement. Clinical and biological parameters were evaluated. Enthesitis were assessed by two indices: Mander Enthesis Index (MEI) and Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score (MASES). Disease activity was evaluated by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Functional impact was assessed by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). The quality of life was measured by the Short form-36 (SF-36). Severity of enthesitis was significantly correlated with disease activity, functional disability and degradation of quality of life. There was no relation between enthesitis indices and disease duration or laboratory parameters. The clinical assessment of enthesitis in AS is an important outcome measure, and enthesitis indices could be used to evaluate disease activity in patients with AS.

  15. Genome-wide association study of ankylosing spondylitis identifies non-MHC susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Reveille, John D; Sims, Anne-Marie; Danoy, Patrick; Evans, David M; Leo, Paul; Pointon, Jennifer J; Jin, Rui; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bradbury, Linda A; Appleton, Louise H; Davis, John C; Diekman, Laura; Doan, Tracey; Dowling, Alison; Duan, Ran; Duncan, Emma L; Farrar, Claire; Hadler, Johanna; Harvey, David; Karaderi, Tugce; Mogg, Rebecca; Pomeroy, Emma; Pryce, Karena; Taylor, Jacqueline; Savage, Laurie; Deloukas, Panos; Kumanduri, Vasudev; Peltonen, Leena; Ring, Sue M; Whittaker, Pamela; Glazov, Evgeny; Thomas, Gethin P; Maksymowych, Walter P; Inman, Robert D; Ward, Michael M; Stone, Millicent A; Weisman, Michael H; Wordsworth, B Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2011-01-01

    To identify susceptibility loci for ankylosing spondylitis, we undertook a genome-wide association study in 2,053 unrelated ankylosing spondylitis cases among people of European descent and 5,140 ethnically matched controls, with replication in an independent cohort of 898 ankylosing spondylitis cases and 1,518 controls. Cases were genotyped with Illumina HumHap370 genotyping chips. In addition to strong association with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC; P < 10−800), we found association with SNPs in two gene deserts at 2p15 (rs10865331; combined P = 1.9 × 10−19) and 21q22 (rs2242944; P = 8.3 × 10−20), as well as in the genes ANTXR2 (rs4333130; P = 9.3 × 10−8) and IL1R2 (rs2310173; P = 4.8 × 10−7). We also replicated previously reported associations at IL23R (rs11209026; P = 9.1 × 10−14) and ERAP1 (rs27434; P = 5.3 × 10−12). This study reports four genetic loci associated with ankylosing spondylitis risk and identifies a major role for the interleukin (IL)-23 and IL-1 cytokine pathways in disease susceptibility. PMID:20062062

  16. The Effectiveness of Exergames in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Ali Yavuz; Tok, Fatih; Yildirim, Pelin; Ordahan, Banu; Turkoglu, Gozde; Sahin, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    Exergames are a well-known type of game based on a virtual avatar's body movements. This hightech approach promotes an active lifestyle. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of exergames on pain, disease activity, functional capacity and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The study involved 60 patients, who were randomized into either the exergame group (EG) or the control group (CG). The EG patients engaged in exergaming, and CG patients did not engage in any exercises. The exergaming sessions were performed five times a week for eight weeks (40 sessions in total). The patients were assessed before and after the eight-week program on a visual analog scale (VAS), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQOL) questionnaire. A statistically significant improvement was observed in VAS, BASFI, BASDAI and ASQoL scores in the EG group after completion of the exercise program (p < 0.05). This study is a first step in investigating the possibilities of using an exergame platform to help patients with spondyloarthropathies to adopt a more physically active lifestyle. The results of this study suggest that exergames increase physical activity and decrease the pain scores in AS patients and also could, therefore, be feasible and safe.

  17. Respiratory muscle performance as a possible determinant of exercise capacity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    van der Esch, Martin; van 't Hul, Alex J; Heijmans, Monique; Dekker, Joost

    2004-01-01

    Reduction of exercise capacity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis is associated with skeletal muscle performance. The contribution of respiratory muscle performance is questionable. This pilot study was designed to investigate the relationship between respiratory muscle performance and exercise capacity in ankylosing spondylitis. Subjects were 12 patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Measurements of maximal respiratory pressures and inspiratory muscle endurance were performed and correlated with maximal exercise capacity. Lung function and chest wall expansion were reduced on average. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures were reduced to 82 +/- 20% of predicted values and 75 +/- 22% of predicted values respectively. On average there was no reduction in inspiratory muscle endurance which remained at 103 +/- 36% of predicted values. No overall reduction was found in maximal exercise capacity, either expressed as maximal workload or as peak oxygen uptake; however, a wide range was found. Maximal workload and peak oxygen uptake correlated significantly with maximal respiratory pressures and respiratory muscle endurance. The best regression model for explaining the total variation of maximal workload and peak oxygen uptake selected maximal inspiratory pressures as the independent variable (r(2) = 59.6%, p = 0.003 and r(2) = 62.5%, p = 0.05 respectively.) These data suggest respiratory pressure and respiratory muscle endurance, in particular maximal inspiratory pressure, may be determinants of exercise capacity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  18. Optimizing physical therapy for ankylosing spondylitis: a case study in a young football player.

    PubMed

    Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel; Lucha-López, María Orosia; Lucha-López, Ana Carmen; Salavera-Bordás, Carlos; Vidal-Peracho, Concepción

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Ankylosing spondylitis is prevalent in men. Modern and expert consensus documents include physical therapy among the strategies for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. This study aimed to describe the physical therapy approach in an athlete with ankylosing spondylitis. [Subject and Methods] The patient, refractory to treatment with anti-inflammatory medication, showed pelvic and lumbar pain and joint, muscle, and functional disorders, which were treated with orthopedic joint mobilization, dry needling, exercise, and whole-body hyperthermia. [Results] After the treatment, pain relief, normal joint mobility, improved muscle function, and return to activities of daily living and competitive sporting activities were recorded. [Conclusion] The literature provides evidence for the use of joint mobilization techniques; however, no previous studies have used the same techniques and methods. There is no previous evidence for the use of dry needling in this pathology. Exercise therapy has a higher level of evidence, and guidelines with scientific support were followed. This research confirms the effectiveness of hyperthermia for arthritis. The early stage of ankylosing spondylitis, and the young age, good overall condition, and cooperative attitude of the patient led to positive outcomes. In conclusion, a favorable response that promoted the remission of the disease was observed.

  19. Optimizing physical therapy for ankylosing spondylitis: a case study in a young football player

    PubMed Central

    Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel; Lucha-López, María Orosia; Lucha-López, Ana Carmen; Salavera-Bordás, Carlos; Vidal-Peracho, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Ankylosing spondylitis is prevalent in men. Modern and expert consensus documents include physical therapy among the strategies for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. This study aimed to describe the physical therapy approach in an athlete with ankylosing spondylitis. [Subject and Methods] The patient, refractory to treatment with anti-inflammatory medication, showed pelvic and lumbar pain and joint, muscle, and functional disorders, which were treated with orthopedic joint mobilization, dry needling, exercise, and whole-body hyperthermia. [Results] After the treatment, pain relief, normal joint mobility, improved muscle function, and return to activities of daily living and competitive sporting activities were recorded. [Conclusion] The literature provides evidence for the use of joint mobilization techniques; however, no previous studies have used the same techniques and methods. There is no previous evidence for the use of dry needling in this pathology. Exercise therapy has a higher level of evidence, and guidelines with scientific support were followed. This research confirms the effectiveness of hyperthermia for arthritis. The early stage of ankylosing spondylitis, and the young age, good overall condition, and cooperative attitude of the patient led to positive outcomes. In conclusion, a favorable response that promoted the remission of the disease was observed. PMID:27190490

  20. ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zochling, J; van der Heijde, D; Burgos-Vargas, R; Collantes, E; Davis, J C; Dijkmans, B; Dougados, M; Géher, P; Inman, R D; Khan, M A; Kvien, T K; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Sieper, J; Stucki, G; Sturrock, R D; van der Linden, S; Wendling, D; Böhm, H; van Royen, B J; Braun, J

    2006-04-01

    To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as a combined effort of the 'ASsessment in AS' international working group and the European League Against Rheumatism. Each of the 22 participants was asked to contribute up to 15 propositions describing key clinical aspects of AS management. A Delphi process was used to select 10 final propositions. A systematic literature search was then performed to obtain scientific evidence for each proposition. Outcome data for efficacy, adverse effects, and cost effectiveness were abstracted. The effect size, relative risk, number needed to treat, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio were calculated. On the basis of the search results, 10 major recommendations for the management of AS were constructed. The strength of recommendation was assessed based on the strength of the literature evidence, risk-benefit trade-off, and clinical expertise. The final recommendations considered the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (conventional NSAIDs, coxibs, and co-prescription of gastroprotective agents), disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, treatments with biological agents, simple analgesics, local and systemic steroids, non-pharmacological treatment (including education, exercise, and physiotherapy), and surgical interventions. Three general recommendations were also included. Research evidence (categories I-IV) supported 11 interventions in the treatment of AS. Strength of recommendation varied, depending on the category of evidence and expert opinion. Ten key recommendations for the treatment of AS were developed and assessed using a combination of research based evidence and expert consensus. Regular updating will be carried out to keep abreast of new developments in the management of AS.

  1. The Cochrane review of physiotherapy interventions for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dagfinrud, Hanne; Kvien, Tore K; Hagen, Kåre B

    2005-10-01

    To update the Cochrane review on the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). All randomized studies available in systematic searches (electronic databases, contact with authors, reference lists) up to February 2004 were included. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed the validity of included trials, and extracted data. Investigators were contacted to obtain missing information. Six trials with a total of 561 participants were included. Two trials compared individualized home exercise programs with no intervention. Low quality evidence for effects in favor of the home exercise program was found in physical function and spinal mobility [absolute benefit 10.3 cm on fingertip to floor distance; relative percentage difference (RPD) 37%)]. Further, the trials showed low quality evidence for no group differences in pain. Three trials compared supervised group physiotherapy with an individualized home exercise program. Moderate quality evidence for effectiveness was found in patient global assessment and spinal mobility in favor of the supervised group. The trials showed moderate quality evidence for no differences in pain intensity between the groups. One trial compared a 3-week inpatient spa-exercise therapy followed by weekly outpatient group physiotherapy with weekly outpatient group physiotherapy alone. Moderate quality evidence was found for effects in pain (absolute benefit 0.9 cm on visual analog scale; RPD 19%), physical function (absolute benefit 1 cm; RPD 24%), and patient global assessment (absolute benefit 1.3 cm; RPD 27%), in favor of the combined spa-exercise therapy. The current best available evidence suggests that physiotherapy is beneficial for people with AS. However, it is still not clear which treatment protocol should be recommended in the management of AS.

  2. Importance of posture assessment in ankylosing spondylitis. Preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Roşu, Mihaela Oana; Ancuţa, Codrina; Iordache, Cristina; Chirieac, Rodica

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to perform a screening of patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in order to evaluate the static spinal disorders and correlate the results with the main clinical and functional parameters that characterize this disease. Ninety-five patients diagnosed with AS according to the 1994 New York criteria were screened, and 68 of them (all males) presenting static spinal disorders and on physical therapy programs in different outpatient physical therapy units throughout 2011 entered the study. The distribution of the patients according to static spinal disorders was almost even. There were no statistically significant differences in mean age and disease duration (p>0.05). The assessment oflumbosacral pain in the morning (VAS1) and daytime lumbosacral pain (VAS2) showed a higher scores in patients suffering from kyphoscoliosis than in those with scoliosis (p=0.020), (p=0.000), or kyphosis. Ott and modified Schöber index, and chest expansion, had higher mean values in patients with scoliosis compared with the other postural disorders (p<0.001). Statistically higher mean BASFI values were recorded in patients with kyphoscoliosis (p=0.038), while the mean BASMI values were lower in scoliosis patients (p<0.001). As to the quality of life of AS patients, HAQ-DI index recorded significantly lower mean values for kyphoscoliosis compared with other postural disorders (p<0.001). Our study suggests that posture assessment and implicitly the correction of possible misalignments should be part of the kinetic physical therapy program. Rigorous observing of postural recommendations can prevent the respiratory system complications.

  3. ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Zochling, J; van der Heijde, D; Burgos‐Vargas, R; Collantes, E; Davis, J C; Dijkmans, B; Dougados, M; Géher, P; Inman, R D; Khan, M A; Kvien, T K; Leirisalo‐Repo, M; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Sieper, J; Stucki, G; Sturrock, R D; van der Linden, S; Wendling, D; Böhm, H; van Royen, B J; Braun, J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as a combined effort of the ‘ASsessment in AS' international working group and the European League Against Rheumatism. Methods Each of the 22 participants was asked to contribute up to 15 propositions describing key clinical aspects of AS management. A Delphi process was used to select 10 final propositions. A systematic literature search was then performed to obtain scientific evidence for each proposition. Outcome data for efficacy, adverse effects, and cost effectiveness were abstracted. The effect size, relative risk, number needed to treat, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio were calculated. On the basis of the search results, 10 major recommendations for the management of AS were constructed. The strength of recommendation was assessed based on the strength of the literature evidence, risk‐benefit trade‐off, and clinical expertise. Results The final recommendations considered the use of non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (conventional NSAIDs, coxibs, and co‐prescription of gastroprotective agents), disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, treatments with biological agents, simple analgesics, local and systemic steroids, non‐pharmacological treatment (including education, exercise, and physiotherapy), and surgical interventions. Three general recommendations were also included. Research evidence (categories I–IV) supported 11 interventions in the treatment of AS. Strength of recommendation varied, depending on the category of evidence and expert opinion. Conclusion Ten key recommendations for the treatment of AS were developed and assessed using a combination of research based evidence and expert consensus. Regular updating will be carried out to keep abreast of new developments in the management of AS. PMID:16126791

  4. Ankylosing spondylitis: recent breakthroughs in diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Saeed A.

    2007-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is generally easy to diagnose when the characteristic findings of the “bamboo” spine and fused sacroiliac joints are present on radiographs. Unfortunately, these changes are usually seen late in the disease after tremendous suffering has been incurred by the patient. Diagnostic delay averages seven to ten years. Historically, once the diagnosis was made, the treatment options were often inadequate or poorly tolerated in many individuals. This condition most often starts in early adulthood when people are typically in the earlier stages of their careers, resulting in diminished workforce participation and decreased quality of life. If an individual has a family physician, this might be the first encounter with a healthcare provider. Quite often, the initial practitioner is sought at a public walk-in clinic or chiropractic office. In recent years, there have been two major developments in the management of AS that make earlier diagnosis possible and offer the hope of alleviating pain and preventing structural changes that result in loss of function. These developments include the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the inflammatory changes in the sacroiliac joint and the axial spine, and the demonstration that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocking agents are highly efficacious in reducing spinal inflammation and possibly in slowing radiographic progression. This review outlines diagnostic strategies that can help identify AS in its earlier stages. Special attention is focused on treatment advances, including the use of anti-TNF agents, and how these medications have been incorporated into clinical recommendations for daily use. PMID:18060011

  5. Ankylosing Spondylitis: Patterns of Spinal Injury and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Kasım Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose We retrospectively reviewed our patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to identify their patterns of spinal fractures to help clarify management strategies and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with this group of patients. Overview of Literature Because of the brittleness of bone and long autofused spinal segments in AS, spinal fractures are common even after minor trauma and often associated with overt instability. Methods Between January 1, 1998 and March 2011, 30 patients (23 males, 7 females; mean age, 70.43 years; range, 45 to 95 years) with the radiographic diagnosis of AS of the spinal column had 42 fractures. Eight patients presented with significant trauma, 17 after falls, and 5 after minor falls or no recorded trauma. Eleven patients presented with a neurological injury, ranging from mild sensory loss to quadriplegia. Results There were 16 compression and 10 transverse fractures, two Jefferson's fractures, one type II and two type III odontoid process fractures, and five fractures of the posterior spinal elements (including lamina and/or facet, three spinous process fractures, three transverse process fractures). Twenty-four fractures affected the craniocervical junction and/or cervical vertebrae, 17 were thoracic, and one involved the lumbar spine. The most affected vertebrae were C6 and T10. The mean follow-up was 29.9 months. One patient was lost to follow-up. Eighteen patients were treated conservatively with bed rest and bracing. Twelve patients underwent surgery for spinal stabilization either with an anterior, posterior or combined approach. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment can be considered especially in the elderly patients with AS and spinal trauma but without instability or major neurological deficits. The nonfusion rate in conservatively treated patients is low. When treatment is selected for patients with spinal fractures and AS, the pattern of injury must be considered and the need

  6. Analysis of sagittal balance of ankylosing spondylitis using spinopelvic parameters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Sub; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Jeung Il; Goh, Tae Sik

    2014-05-01

    Prospective study. To analyze sagittal spinopelvic parameters in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. There are little data on the relationship between the sagittal spinopelvic parameters and AS. The study and control groups comprised 90 AS patients and 40 controls. Participants were classified into 3 groups: normal (n=40), sagittal balance (n=58), and sagittal imbalance (n=32) groups. All underwent lateral radiograph of the whole spine including hip joints. The radiographic parameters were sacral slope, pelvic tilting, pelvic incidence, overhang of S1, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and C7 plumbline. Statistical analysis was performed to identify significant differences between the 2 groups. Correlations between radiological parameters and symptoms were sought. AS patients and controls were found to be significantly different in terms of sagittal balance, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, S1 overhang, and lumbar lordosis. However, no significant difference was observed between these 2 groups for thoracic kyphosis (P>0.05). Of the 90 AS patients, 32 patients (5 women and 27 men) were assigned to the sagittal imbalance group and 58 (12 women and 46 men) to the sagittal balance group. There was a significant difference in all sagittal parameters and visual analogue scale (VAS) score between these 2 groups. Correlation analysis revealed significant relationships between sagittal parameters in AS. However, there was no association between sacral slope and S1 overhang, and between pelvic incidence and VAS score. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that pelvic tilt contributed significantly to sagittal balance. AS patients and normal controls were found to be significantly different in terms of sagittal spinopelvic parameters. Significant relationships were found between sagittal spinopelvic parameters in AS patients. Pelvic tilt was a significant parameter in determination of sagittal balance in AS patient. Furthermore, VAS scores were

  7. Increase risk of allergic diseases in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Pin; Kuo, Chun-Nan; Kuo, Li-Na; Wang, Yao-Tung; Perng, Wuu-Tsun; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Th2 and Th17 cells are both associated with developing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and asthma. Th2 cells are also associated with allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis (AD). The prevalence of such allergic diseases in AS patients is unknown. In this study, we intended to study the risk of allergic diseases in a 10-year follow-up population of newly diagnosed patients with AS. We used a nationwide 10-year population-based database retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID2005) in Taiwan. The study cohort comprised 857 patients with AS who had at least 1 claim of inpatient admission or at least 2 claims of ambulatory visit. The comparison cohort consisted of 4285 randomly selected subjects matched with AS group at a ratio of 5:1. We used Cox proportional-hazards regression to determine the 10-year disease-free survival rates after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. The AS patients had a 1.31 times greater risk of developing asthma within 10 years of diagnosis when compared with non-AS age- and sex-matched subjects, after adjusting for other risk factors (95% confidence interval = 1.00–1.75). But the difference was not significantly different. The AS patients also had a 1.46 times and a 1.22 times greater risk of developing allergic rhinitis and AD significantly. AS patients also had a lower allergic disease-free survival rate compared to non-AS group. Our results showed that patients with AS had a higher risk of developing allergic diseases later in life. PMID:27828843

  8. Logistic transmission modeling of HLA and ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, R.H.; Neas, B.R.; Harley, J.B.

    1994-09-01

    A nonparametric and general method of linkage analysis has been developed and used to evaluate histocompatibility (HLA) linkage to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) from the data of Berg & Moller. The conditional logistic function has been used to establish linkage by stepwise modelling of transmission from parent to progeny. Logistic transmission models have been explored to better understand the relationship of HLA to AS. The alleles at HLA-A and -B were determined in 38 families (32 monoplex and 6 multiplex). We have found that linkage is supported in this data over the random transmission of alleles at only HLA-B. Models constructed at HLA-B are powerful with, for example, coefficients for B27 of 1.9 (S.E. = 0.4) and B40 of 1.6 (S.E. = 0.8) contributing to a model with {chi}{sup 2} = 30 with 2 df and p < 3x10{sup -7}. No models are found supporting linkage at HLA-A and, therefore, the data at HLA-A does not add support for linkage beyond that present at HLA-B (e.g., {chi}{sup 2} for improvement < 1). These results establish that HLA-B is linked to AS. They further provide evidence that the gene responsible for AS is located nearer to HLA-B than it is to HLA-A. Also, the analysis shows that a number of HLA-B alleles may contribute to the risk of AS, beyond the B27 allele which has repeatedly been associated with AS.

  9. Periodontitis Response to Anti-TNF Therapy in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Fabri, Gisele Maria C; Pereira, Rosa Maria R; Savioli, Cynthia; Saad, Carla G S; de Moraes, Júlio Cesar B; Siqueira, José Tadeu T; Bonfa, Eloisa

    2015-10-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a higher risk of periodontitis; however, the effect of anti-TNF therapy in periodontal status of patients with AS and particularly in dental attachment is not known. To evaluate longitudinally the local periodontal effect of TNF-antagonist in AS and compare to patients with RA. Fifteen patients with AS and 15 RA control patients were prospectively evaluated at baseline and after 6 months (6 M) of anti-TNF therapy. Periodontal assessment included: probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Rheumatologic clinical and laboratory evaluations were the following: Bath AS Disease Activity Index, Bath AS Metrology Index, Bath AS Functional Index, C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate for AS and Disease Activity Score 28 joints, and C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate for patients with RA. At baseline, periodontal parameters were alike in AS and RA (P > 0.05). After 6 M of anti-TNF therapy, clinical and laboratory parameters of rheumatic diseases decreased significantly in the patients with AS and RA (P < 0.05). A significant improvement in periodontal attachment measurements were observed in the patients with AS (PPD, 2.18 vs 1.94 mm; P = 0.02; CAL, 2.29 vs.2.02 mm; P = 0.03), but not in RA (PPD, 1.92 vs 2.06 mm; P = 0.06; CAL, 2.14 vs 2.28 mm; P = 0.27). Oral hygiene and gingival inflammation remained unchanged from baseline to 6-M evaluation in AS and RA (P > 0.05). Patients with AS under anti-TNF improved periodontal attachment. The mechanism for this effect needs further studies.

  10. Sexual dysfunctions and lower urinary tract symptoms in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dhakad, Urmila; Singh, Bhupendra Pal; Das, Siddharth Kumar; Wakhlu, Anupam; Kumar, Puneet; Srivastava, Durgesh; Dhoan, Pooja; Nolkha, Nilesh

    2015-11-01

    To determine sexual dysfunctions and urinary symptoms in male ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and their association with various disease and patient factors. In this prospective case control study conducted at a tertiary care teaching institution, 100 males with AS were compared to 100 controls using International Index of Erectile Function-15 (IIEF), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and a global question for overall relationship with their partners. Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), visual analogue scale pain scores, patient global assessment scale and Bath AS Disease Activity Index were also assessed in the AS group. Chi-square test, unpaired t-test and univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the data. Anxiety, depression, erectile dysfunction (ED), orgasmic dysfunction, intercourse dissatisfaction, overall sexual dissatisfaction, altered overall relationship with partner and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the AS group as compared to controls. Sexual desire, severe LUTS and bothersome LUTS (quality of life score > 2) were not different (P = 0.76, 0.82 and 0.30 respectively) between the two groups. ED was associated with anxiety, depression, longer disease duration, higher BASFI and higher age in AS patients (P = 0.02, 0.001, 0.02, 0.003 and 0.001 respectively). AS is associated with higher incidence of sexual dysfunction in male patients. ED is associated with anxiety, depression, longer duration of disease, higher BASFI score and higher age in AS patients. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Effects of Aerobic Training in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Fábio; Oliveira, Hilda Alcântara; de Souza, Marcelo Cardoso; Cruz, Vaneska da Graça; Natour, Jamil

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Seventy patients classified with AS by the modified New York criteria were included. The patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups. The intervention group (IG) performed 50 min of walking followed by stretching exercises 3 times a week for 12 weeks. The control group (CG) performed only stretching exercises. The outcome measurements were the Bath indexes [Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI)], Health Assessment Questionnaire for the Spondyloarthropathies (HAQ-S), AS Disease Activity Score (ASDAS), the 6-min walk test (6MWT), chest expansion, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36. Aerobic capacity was assessed by ergospirometry on a treadmill. Routine laboratory techniques were used in determining lipid levels. Assessments were performed immediately before randomization and after 6, 12, and 24 weeks. Thirty-five patients were randomized to the IG and 35 to the CG. There was significant improvement in the BASFI, HAQ-S, BASMI, BASDAI, and ASDAS in both groups (p < 0.05), but did not differ between groups. There was a significant increase in the walking distance in the 6MWT in the IG compared with CG (p < 0.001). The IG showed significant improvement in cardiopulmonary capacity compared with CG. Cholesterol and triglyceride levels did not change in either group. In patients with AS, aerobic training improved walking distance and aerobic capacity. Aerobic training did not provide additional benefits in functional capacity, mobility, disease activity, quality of life, and lipid levels when compared with stretching exercises alone.

  12. Exercise in ankylosing spondylitis: discrepancies between recommendations and reality.

    PubMed

    Passalent, Laura A; Soever, Leslie J; O'Shea, Finbar D; Inman, Robert D

    2010-04-01

    To determine the type and extent of exercise used by an ankylosing spondylitis (AS) cohort and to examine patients' perceptions of exercise. Recommendations for the management of AS identify exercise as the cornerstone of comprehensive management. An exercise inventory questionnaire and the Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale (EBBS) were administered to patients attending the AS clinic of a large teaching hospital. Benefits and barriers subscales of the EBBS were analyzed to identify the perceived benefits of, and barriers to, exercise. Higher benefits scores (range 29-116) indicate a more positive perception of exercise. Higher barriers scores (range 14-56) indicate a greater perception of barriers to exercise. Sixty-one patients with AS completed the questionnaires. Mean age was 38.0 years, and mean disease duration was 14.7 years. Walking (3 times/week) and stretching (3 times/week) were the most commonly reported types of exercise and were reported in 35.0% and 32.8%, respectively. The mean benefits EBBS score was 87.1 +/- 12.5. The most frequently reported benefits of exercise were that it "increases my level of physical fitness" (96.4%) and "improves functioning of my cardiovascular system" (96.4%). The mean barriers EBBS score was 29.2 +/- 5.3, and the most frequently reported barrier to exercise was that it "tires me" (71.4%). Patients with AS perceive the benefits of exercise, with average EBBS benefits scores comparable to historical controls with similar conditions. Despite positive perceptions, the majority of patients with AS did not report participating in exercise on a frequent basis.

  13. Exercise for ankylosing spondylitis: An evidence-based consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Millner, Janet R; Barron, John S; Beinke, Kirsty M; Butterworth, Rachael H; Chasle, Briony E; Dutton, Lindsay J; Lewington, Margaret A; Lim, Errol G S; Morley, Tony B; O'Reilly, Jennie E; Pickering, Kathryn A; Winzenberg, Tania; Zochling, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Despite Level 1b evidence and international consensus that exercise is beneficial in ankylosing spondylitis (AS), there is a paucity of detailed information to guide exercise prescription, including the type and dosage of exercise required for the most benefit. This collaborative project, combining evidence with clinical expertise, was established to develop practical recommendations to guide sustainable exercise prescription for individuals with AS. Using a modified Delphi technique, 10 clinical questions were generated and a systematic literature review was conducted for each. Draft recommendations were developed at a 2-day meeting, based on the integration of evidence summaries and expert opinion. Feedback was obtained from patient and health professional groups prior to finalisation. Recommendations and practice points were developed for the following areas: assessment; monitoring; safety; disease management; AS-specific exercise; physical activity; dosage, adherence and setting. A framework was developed that could also be adapted for exercise in other chronic musculoskeletal conditions. Feedback suggests that the final consensus statement provides useful information for those seeking to provide best practice exercise prescription for people with AS. The recommendations provide an up-to-date, evidence-based approach to the full range of issues related to the use of exercise in AS, as well as identifying evidence gaps for further research. Most importantly, this includes investigation of aspects of exercise programme design required to produce the largest effect, long-term adherence with exercise programs and the specific exercise requirements of sub-groups of people with AS. Widespread dissemination and implementation of the guidelines will be required to optimise exercise outcomes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Abnormal heart rate recovery on exercise in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet G; Akpek, Mahmut; Lam, Yat-Yin; Dogdu, Orhan; Ardic, Idris; Akgul, Ozgur; Ozgocmen, Salih

    2013-11-05

    This study evaluated the heart rate recovery response in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and control subjects. Delayed heart rate recovery after exercise reflects AD and independently predicts adverse cardiac outcome. Fifty-one patients with AS and 50 age- and matched controls received electrocardiography, echocardiography, and treadmill exercise testing. The heart rate recovery (HRR) index was calculated as the reduction in heart rate from the rate at peak exercise to the rate at the 1st (HRR1), 2nd (HRR2), 3rd (HRR3) and 5th (HRR5) minute after the cessation of exercise stress testing. There were significant differences in HRR1 and HRR2 indices between patients and controls (24.8 ± 12.1 vs 34.9 ± 11.0; p<0.001 and 41.2 ± 14.2 vs 54.3 ± 11.8; p<0.001, beats/min, respectively). Similarly, HRR3 and HRR5 indices were lower in patients than controls (51.3 ± 15.1 vs 65.2 ± 14.0; p<0.001 and 61.0 ± 14.2 vs 76.1 ± 14.8; p<0.001). In addition, exercise capacity was markedly lower (8.1 ± 2.0 vs 10.5 ± 2.5 METs; p<0.001) in AS than controls. The HRR index is impaired in AS patients, implying the occurrence of autonomic dysfunction even without active joint disease or frank cardiac involvement. © 2013.

  15. Fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis: treatment should focus on pain management.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Sinead; Davies, Helen; Dennis, Michael S; Cooksey, Roxanne; Husain, Muhammad J; Irvine, Elizabeth; Siebert, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Fatigue is an important symptom associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study examines patients' perspectives and clinical associations of fatigue to help inform potential strategies to alleviate fatigue in AS. A mixed methods approach was taken to examine fatigue in a cohort of people with AS. Fatigue levels were evaluated from 3 consecutive monthly questionnaires. Open-ended questions on fatigue were analyzed using thematic analysis and logistic regression was used to examine quantitative data. In addition, fatigue levels were examined before and after treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) compared to nontreated controls. Three hundred forty-eight of 385 participants completed a fatigue questionnaire. Fatigue was reported to have significant physical, social, and psychological effects. A third of the participants reported that there was nothing they could do to reduce their fatigue, whereas other participants reported that medication, exercise, and resting helped. The main factor associated with fatigue was pain [β-coefficient: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.66 to 0.81)], whereas depression was much less strongly associated. However, these factors only explained 40% of the variation in fatigue levels. Starting anti-TNF therapy reduced fatigue and pain levels compared to the period of time before taking anti-TNF [difference: 14.4 (95% CI: 5.3 to 23.5) on a scale of 0-100] and this reduction was not seen in controls over the same period. Fatigue is not strongly associated with anxiety, motivation, and depression; instead the factor most associated with fatigue is pain. This suggests that in addition to treatments to reduce disease activity, strategies for alleviating fatigue in AS should focus on pain management techniques and actively treating inflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Favorable effect of rehabilitation on balance in ankylosing spondylitis: a quasi-randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Demontis, Alessandra; Trainito, Sabina; Del Felice, Alessandra; Masiero, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Balance impairment is a frequent and undertreated manifestation in ankylosing spondylitis, leading to increased risk of falls and lower quality of life. Our aim was to assess supervised training and home-based rehabilitation efficacy on balance improvement in ankylosing spondylitis subjects on biologic agents. This was a single-blinded, quasi-randomized parallel study in a single outpatient Rehabilitation Clinic of a tertiary referral center. Subjects with ankylosing spondylitis on biologic agents were assigned either to supervised training and home-based rehabilitation program (rehabilitation group) plus educational-behavioral therapy, or to educational-behavioral therapy alone (educational groups). The same therapist provided therapy. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline (T0), end of treatment (T1) and at 7-month follow-up (T2). Rheumatologic outcomes were Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index. Balance parameters (anterior-posterior oscillation, latero-lateral oscillation, sway area, sway density and sway path) were evaluated by stabilometry in a condition of open and closed eyes. Forty-six subjects (36 M, 10 F) were enrolled. Demographic data and clinical status at baseline were comparable between the two groups (22 rehabilitation group, 20 educational group). Primary outcome was sway density that improved both at T1 (SDy: open eyes p = 0.003, closed eyes p = 0.004) and at T2 (SDx: open eyes p = 0.0015, closed eyes p = 0.032). A trend toward improvement in the rehabilitation group rather than in the educational group emerged for balance parameters, especially those measured with closed eyes (0.004 < p < 0.048 at T1 and 0.004 < p < 0.036 at T2). Supervised training and home exercise lead to balance improvement in people with ankylosing spondylitis. Eyes-closed trials show a more marked trend toward improvement, and this may suggest a

  17. Temporomandibular joint osseous morphology in a consecutive sample of ankylosing spondylitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Remus, C.; Major, P.; Gomez-Vargas, A.; Petrikowski, G.; Hernandez-Chavez, A.; Gonzalez-Marin, E.; Russell, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osseous morphology in a consecutive sample of Mexican patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
METHODS—Consecutive patients with a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis who attended two secondary care outpatient rheumatology clinics were included in the study. Patients had a rheumatological assessment using a structured questionnaire and examination. Recorded variables included demographic data, disease characteristics, TMJ symptoms, and axial mobility measurements. Hypocycloidal tomography of the TMJ was obtained on all subjects. Radiographic variables included condyle position, superior joint space, range of movement, condylar osseous changes, and temporal osseous changes. Patients also underwent standard cervical spine radiography. A control group of normal people without either TMJ symptoms or systemic rheumatic disease was obtained.
RESULTS—65 subjects were studied (65 right sided and 63 left sided tomograms). The control group consisted of 22 individuals. Both groups were similar in age [33 (SD 11) v 34 (9) years, P = 0.8]. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis had more variability in TMJ mobility than controls (P < 0.05) and showed increased frequency of condylar erosions (P < 0.01), flattening (P < 0.01), sclerosis (P < 0.01), and temporal flattening (P < 0.01). Condylar erosions were associated with longer duration of ankylosing spondylitis (P < 0.05), neck complaints (P < 0.05), and atlantoaxial subluxation (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—TMJ involvement is frequent in this population of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and is associated with variables that suggest more severe disease.

 PMID:9068282

  18. [Muscular disorders associated with ankylosing spondylitis and their correction with the help of whole body cryotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kulikov, A G; Tabiev, V I; Rassulova, M A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the possibilities for the correction of muscular disorders associated with ankylosing spondylitis and their correction with the help of whole body cryotherapy. The study included 55 patients randomly allocated to two groups. Group 1 was comprised of the patients treated with the use of the common mineral baths, physiotherapy, therapeutic physical exercises, spinal massage, and whole body air-cryotherapy. Group 2 contained the patients who were treated in a similar way with the exception of whole body cryotherapy; they served as controls. Muscular disorders were diagnosed by means of functional muscular testing. The study has demonstrated the high prevalence of muscular disorders in the patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis. Moreover, it revealed the profile of such disorders associated with ankylosing spondylitis and showed significant correlation between the results of functional muscular testing, BASMI and BASFI indices as well as characteristics of chest excursions (p<0.01). The analysis of the results of the treatment gave evidence of the higher effectiveness of the combined treatment including whole body cryotherapy in comparison with the alternative therapeutic modalities employed in the present study. This therapeutic modality ensured the statistically more pronounced improvement of functional muscular testing parameters (p<0.05), muscle strength and extensibility, as well as certain other clinical and functional characteristics. The groups of muscles most susceptible to cryogenic therapy have been identified. The data obtained in the present study shed light on some specific features of the action of whole body cryotherapy accounting for its corrective influence on the muscular disorders in the patients presenting with ankylosing spondylitis. It is concluded that the proposed approach can be recommended for the introduction in the combined therapeutic and rehabilitative treatment of muscular

  19. Insights into cardiac involvement in ankylosing spondylitis from cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Biesbroek, P Stefan; Heslinga, Sjoerd C; Konings, Thelma C; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Hofman, Mark B M; van de Ven, Peter M; Kamp, Otto; van Halm, Vokko P; Peters, Mike J L; Smulders, Yvo M; van Rossum, Albert C; Nurmohamed, Mike T; Nijveldt, Robin

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate cardiac involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Patients with ankylosing spondylitis without cardiovascular symptoms or known cardiovascular disease were screened by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for participation in this exploratory CMR study. We prospectively enrolled 15 ankylosing spondylitis patients with an abnormal TTE for further tissue characterisation using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and T1 mapping. T1 mapping was used to calculate myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). Disease activity was assessed by C reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) measurements. In the total of 15 included patients, 14 had a complete CMR exam (mean age 62 years, 93% male and mean disease duration 21 years). Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction was the most common finding on TTE (79%), followed by aortic root dilatation (14%), right ventricular (RV) dilatation (7%) and RV dysfunction (7%). CMR revealed focal hyperenhancement in three patients (21%), all with a particular pattern of enhancement. LV dysfunction, as defined by a LV ejection fraction below 55%, was observed in five patients (36%). Myocardial ECV was correlated with the CRP concentration (R=0.78, p<0.01) and ESR level (RS=0.73, p<0.01). In patients with ankylosing spondylitis, CMR with cine imaging and LGE identified global LV dysfunction and focal areas of hyperenhancement. Myocardial ECV, quantified by CMR T1 mapping, was associated with the degree of disease activity. These results may suggest the presence of cardiac involvement in ankylosing spondylitis and may show the potential of ECV as a marker for disease monitoring. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Association of cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase profiles with disease activity and function in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The pathology of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) suggests that certain cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) might provide useful markers of disease activity. Serum levels of some cytokines and MMPs have been found to be elevated in active disease, but there is a general lack of information about biomarker profiles in AS and how these are related to disease activity and function. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether clinical measures of disease activity and function in AS are associated with particular profiles of circulating cytokines and MMPs. Methods Measurement of 30 cytokines, five MMPs and four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases was carried out using Luminex® technology on a well-characterised population of AS patients (n = 157). The relationship between biomarker levels and measures of disease activity (Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI)), function (Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index) and global health (Bath ankylosing spondylitis global health) was investigated. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the large number of biomarkers to a smaller set of independent components, which were investigated for their association with clinical measures. Further analyses were carried out using hierarchical clustering, multiple regression or multivariate logistic regression. Results Principal component analysis identified eight clusters consisting of various combinations of cytokines and MMPs. The strongest association with the BASDAI was found with a component consisting of MMP-8, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor and CXCL8, and was independent of C-reactive protein levels. This component was also associated with current smoking. Hierarchical clustering revealed two distinct patient clusters that could be separated on the basis of MMP levels. The high MMP cluster was associated with increased C-reactive protein, the BASDAI and the Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index. Conclusions

  1. Efficiency of adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab in ankylosing spondylitis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Vilaplana, Vicente; Ramírez-Herráiz, Esther; Alañón-Plaza, Estefanía; Trovato-López, Nicolás; García-Vicuña, Rosario; Carreño-Pérez, Luis; Morell-Baladrón, Alberto; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María

    2015-10-01

    Information on the use of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) therapies in clinical practice is a key factor in decision making, as more efficient treatments may involve substantial savings while maintaining the clinical benefits for the patient. To assess the mean annual doses and associated costs of the three main anti-tumour necrosis factor agents used in Spanish daily clinical practice in ankylosing spondylitis patients and to correlate these costs with disease activity. This retrospective, observational study included adult ankylosing spondylitis patients over a 4-year period that had been treated for at least 6 months with adalimumab, etanercept or infliximab at two University Hospitals in Spain. Disease activity was estimated with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) scores at the start of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy and in the last visit or whenever the drug was switched. Mean costs were estimated for a 52-week horizon from the delivered doses registered by pharmacy records. Outcomes were the doses and costs of anti TNFs administered to each patient, and the BASDAI score. A total of 119 patients (137 cases) were included (28 cases treated with adalimumab, 48 cases with etanercept and 61 with infliximab). Mean doses of adalimumab and etanercept were 92.8 and 88.8% of the initially prescribed doses, respectively, while the mean dose of infliximab administered was 102%. There were no statistical differences among treatments in terms of clinical effectiveness. Associated mean patient-year costs were significantly higher in the infliximab group (€14,235), compared to the other treatments [adalimumab €11,934; etanercept €10,516; (P < 0.05)]. In certain ankylosing spondylitis patients, doses and associated costs of biological therapies can be reduced while controlling disease activity. Mean doses used in our clinical practice vary from the recommended doses and are significantly lower for adalimumab and etanercept than for

  2. Indirect and direct costs of treating patients with ankylosing spondylitis in the Brazilian public health system.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó; Rossetto, Chayanne N; Lorencetti, Pedro G; Tramontin, Mariana Y; Fornazari, Bruna; Araújo, Denizar V

    2016-01-01

    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis require a team approach from multiple professionals, various treatment modalities for continuous periods of time, and can lead to the loss of labour capacity in a young population. So, it is necessary to measure its socio-economic impact. To describe the use of public resources to treat AS in a tertiary hospital after the use of biological medications was approved for treating spondyloarthritis in the Health Public System, establishing approximate values for the direct and indirect costs of treating this illness in Brazil. 93 patients selected from the ambulatory spondyloarthritis clinic at the Hospital de Clínicas of the Federal University of Paraná between September 2011 and September 2012 had their direct costs indirect treatment costs estimation. 70 patients (75.28%) were male and 23 (24.72%) female. The mean age was 43.95 years. The disease duration was calculated based on the age of diagnosis and the mean was 8.92 years (standard deviation: 7.32); 63.44% were using anti-tumour necrotic factor drugs. Comparing male and female patients the mean Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index was 4.64 and 5.49 while the mean Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index was 5.03 and 6.35 respectively. The Brazilian public health system's spending related to ankylosing spondylitis has increased in recent years. An important part of these costs is due to the introduction of new, more expensive health technologies, as in the case of nuclear magnetic resonance and, mainly, the incorporation of anti-tumour necrotic factor therapy into the therapeutic arsenal. The mean annual direct and indirect cost to the Brazilian public health system to treat a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, according to our findings, is US$ 23,183.56. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Self- and manual mobilization improves spine mobility in men with ankylosing spondylitis--a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Widberg, Kyllikki; Karimi, Hossein; Hafström, Ingiäld

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate effects of physiotherapeutic intervention in terms of self- and manual mobilization on chest expansion, vital capacity, posture, spine mobility and experienced consequences of the disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A prospective, randomized controlled study. Thirty-two men, aged between 23 and 60 years, with ankylosing spondylitis were randomized to active or no treatment for eight weeks. Physiotherapeutic intervention included individualized self- and manual mobilization for 1 hour twice a week and individually adjusted home exercises. Two blinded investigators made the assessments of chest expansion, posture and spinal mobility before and after the treatment period. The patient filled in three and the physiotherapist one of the four Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis scales (BAS scales). In the treatment group chest expansion increased at the level of processus xiphoideus (P<0.01), with no difference in vital capacity compared with the control group. The posture improved in the cervical (C7-wall distance) (P<0.001) and in the thoracic spine (P<0.05). Thoracic and lumbar spine flexion improved (P<0.01) as did sagittal range of motion P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index total scoring improved (P<0.001) in the treatment group compared with the control group. The other three BAS scales showed no differences between groups. At four months follow-up of the treatment group, cervical spine posture, lumbar flexion and range of motion as well as BAS Metrology Index were still improved. This study shows that eight weeks of self- and manual mobilization treatment improved chest expansion, posture and spine mobility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  4. Geographic Variation in Diagnostic Ability and Quality of Care Metrics: A Case Study of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Shafrin, Jason; Griffith, Jenny; Shim, Jin Joo; Huber, Caroline; Ganguli, Arijit; Aubry, Wade

    2017-01-01

    Studies examining geographic variation in care for low back pain often focus on process and outcome measures conditional on patient diagnosis but generally do not take into account a physician's ability to diagnose the root cause of low back pain. In our case study, we used increased detection of ankylosing spondylitis-a relatively rare inflammatory back disease-as a proxy for diagnostic ability and measured the relationship between ankylosing spondylitis detection, potentially inappropriate low back pain care, and cost. Using 5 years of health insurance claims data, we found significant variation in ankylosing spondylitis detection across metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), with 8.1% of the variation in detection explained by a region's racial composition. Furthermore, low back pain patients in MSAs with higher ankylosing spondylitis detection had 7.9% lower use of corticosteroids, 9.0% lower use of opioids, and 8.2% lower pharmacy cost, compared with patients living in low-detection MSAs.

  5. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis–associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis–associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression. PMID:23749187

  6. Unilateral bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in a case of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Freitas Oliveira, Luciana Soares; de Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; de Melo, Daniela Pita; Gomes Torres, Marianna Guanaes; Flores Campos, Paulo Sérgio

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease with multiple articular and para-articular involvement that has a predilection for the axial skeleton. In spite of its high prevalence, ankylosis secondary to AS is a rare condition. A 31-year-old male diagnosed with AS was referred for computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) due to severe mouth opening limitation. The patient had a 16-year medical history of AS and sought assistance due to TMJ pain and incapacity to open his mouth. Previous bony scintigraphy revealed involvement of the spine, sacroiliac joints, right knee, and left TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed erosion of the left condyle and posterior slope of the articular eminence, and a mass of heterogeneous signal intensity between these structures. The left condyle also presented sclerosis/edema of the bone marrow and the disk could not be identified. Sagittal and coronal CT images showed moderate alterations of the TMJ on the right side. On the left side, the images displayed markedly eroded condyle and mandibular fossa, and a bony mass resulting in ankylosis of the osseous components of the joint. TMJ ankylosis in AS patients is rare and very few reports have presented imaging features of the condition through advanced diagnostic techniques.

  7. Diagnostic Prevalence of Ankylosing Spondylitis Using Computerized Health Care Data, 1996 to 2009: Underrecognition in a US Health Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Harrold, Leslie R; Asgari, Maryam M; Deodhar, Atul; Salman, Craig; Gelfand, Joel M; Wu, Jashin J; Herrinton, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Few studies have assessed the prevalence and features of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and ankylosing spondylitis in diverse, population-based, community settings. Objectives We used computerized diagnoses to estimate the prevalence of axSpA and ankylosing spondylitis in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC). Methods We identified persons aged 18 years or older with 1 or more International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis Code 720.X (ankylosing spondylitis and other inflammatory spondylopathies) in clinical encounter data from 1996 through 2009 to estimate the prevalence of axSpA and ankylosing spondylitis. We reviewed medical records to confirm the diagnosis in a random sample and estimated the positive predictive value of computerized data to identify confirmed cases using various case definitions. Results In the computerized data, 5568 adults had diagnostic codes indicating axSpA. On the basis of our case-finding approach using a single physician diagnosis code for ICD-9 720.X, the point prevalence of these conditions, standardized to the 2000 US Census, was 2.26 per 1000 persons for axSpA and 1.07 per 1000 for ankylosing spondylitis. Less than half of suspected cases saw a rheumatologist. The most specific algorithm for confirmed ankylosing spondylitis required 2 or more computerized diagnoses assigned by a rheumatologist, with 67% sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 64%–69%) and 81% positive predictive value (95% confidence interval, 79%–83%). Conclusions Observed prevalence in the KPNC population, compared with national estimates for axSpA and ankylosing spondylitis, suggests there is substantial underrecognition of these conditions in routine clinical practice. However, use of computerized data is able to identify true cases of ankylosing spondylitis, facilitating population-based research. PMID:27479952

  8. Diagnostic Prevalence of Ankylosing Spondylitis Using Computerized Health Care Data, 1996 to 2009: Underrecognition in a US Health Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Harrold, Leslie R; Asgari, Maryam M; Deodhar, Atul; Salman, Craig; Gelfand, Joel M; Wu, Jashin J; Herrinton, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the prevalence and features of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and ankylosing spondylitis in diverse, population-based, community settings. We used computerized diagnoses to estimate the prevalence of axSpA and ankylosing spondylitis in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC). We identified persons aged 18 years or older with 1 or more International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis Code 720.X (ankylosing spondylitis and other inflammatory spondylopathies) in clinical encounter data from 1996 through 2009 to estimate the prevalence of axSpA and ankylosing spondylitis. We reviewed medical records to confirm the diagnosis in a random sample and estimated the positive predictive value of computerized data to identify confirmed cases using various case definitions. In the computerized data, 5568 adults had diagnostic codes indicating axSpA. On the basis of our case-finding approach using a single physician diagnosis code for ICD-9 720.X, the point prevalence of these conditions, standardized to the 2000 US Census, was 2.26 per 1000 persons for axSpA and 1.07 per 1000 for ankylosing spondylitis. Less than half of suspected cases saw a rheumatologist. The most specific algorithm for confirmed ankylosing spondylitis required 2 or more computerized diagnoses assigned by a rheumatologist, with 67% sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 64%-69%) and 81% positive predictive value (95% confidence interval, 79%-83%). Observed prevalence in the KPNC population, compared with national estimates for axSpA and ankylosing spondylitis, suggests there is substantial underrecognition of these conditions in routine clinical practice. However, use of computerized data is able to identify true cases of ankylosing spondylitis, facilitating population-based research.

  9. Anxiety and depression correlate with disease and quality-of-life parameters in Chinese patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xujuan; Shen, Biyu; Zhang, Aixian; Liu, Jingwei; Da, Zhanyun; Liu, Hong; Gu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the relationship between mental and physical health in Chinese patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to identify the predictors of psychological status. Methods Patients with AS (n=103) and healthy controls (n=121) were surveyed between 2010 and 2011 (cross-sectional study). The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, pain visual analog scale, Health Assessment Questionnaire, revised Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, revised Self-Rating Depression Scale, and Short-Form 36 questionnaire were administered. Results The frequency of anxiety and depression in patients with AS was higher than that in healthy controls (P<0.001). Severe disease status and reduced quality of life (QoL) were associated with anxiety and depression. Disease activity and somatic pain were more severe in the anxious and depressed subgroups. Impaired physical functioning (assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index) was higher in the anxious and depressed subgroups, while measures of spinal mobility (assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index) were not associated with depression. Lower QoL was observed in the depressed subgroup. Conclusion Low socioeconomic status, lack of health insurance, and fatigue contributed to depression in Chinese patients with AS. These patients may require a psychological care approach that is different from those of other countries. PMID:27284241

  10. Symptomatic improvement in function and disease activity in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis utilizing a course of chiropractic therapy: a prospective case study

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Susan M; Nicolson, Cameron F; Crowther, Edward R

    2005-01-01

    Background There is limited outcome measure support for chiropractic manipulative therapy in the management of ankylosing spondylitis. An improvement in specific indices for both function and disease activity during chiropractic therapy for ankylosing spondylitis has not previously been reported. Objective To measure changes in function and disease activity in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis during a course of chiropractic therapy. The clinical management of ankylosing spondylitis, including chiropractic manipulative therapy and the implications of this case study are discussed. Clinical Features A 34-year-old male with a 10 year diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis sought chiropractic treatment for spinal pain and stiffness. His advanced radiographic signs included an increased atlantodental interspace and cervical vertebral ankylosis. Intervention and outcome The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), finger-tip-to-floor distance and chest expansion were assessed during an 18 week course of chiropractic spinal manipulation and mobilization therapy. There was a 90% improvement in the disease activity index and an 85% improvement in the functional index from the pre-treatment baseline, as measured by the BASDAI and BASFI respectively. Spinal flexibility and chest expansion also improved. Conclusion To the authors knowledge this is the first study to incorporate ankylosing spondylitis specific indices, for both disease activity and function, to objectively support the use of chiropractic manipulative therapy in the management of ankylosing spondylitis. More intensive research is suggested. PMID:17549197

  11. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zeng, Min; Xie, Jie; Wen, Ting; Hu, Yihe

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Controversies on the surgical protocols and efficacies of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) still exist. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the perioperative managements and their outcomes related to performing THA on patients with AS. Data of 54 AS patients who underwent 81 THAs between 2008 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and imaging data were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and during the follow-up period for surgical efficacy. Using posterolateral approach, cementless prostheses were selected in all cases. Mean follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 2–8 years). Inclinations and anteversions of acetabular cups were 36.3°±4.5° (range, 30°–50°) and 12.3°±4.9° (range, 0°–25°) respectively. Mean visual analog scale (VAS) score decreased from 6.7 ± 2.1 (range, 4–10) preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.0 (range, 0–4) at final follow-up, and mean Harris hip score (HHS) improved from 31.2 ± 11.6 (range, 15–45) to 86.1 ± 4.3 (range, 80–95) (P < 0.05). Postoperative range of motion (ROM) in flexion was improved from 6.7°±13.5° (range, 0°–50°) preoperatively to 82.5°±6.4° (range, 70°–100°) at final follow-up, and ROM in extension was improved from 1.8°±5.7°(range, 0°–15°) to 15.4°±2.6° (range, 10°–20°) (P < 0.05). Heterotopic ossification (HO) was documented in 9 hips (11.1%). Signs of stable fibrous ingrowth and bone ingrowth were detected in 52 and 29 hips, respectively. Sciatic never injury was occurred in 3 cases, and treated conservatively. There were no signs of periprosthetic fractures, dislocation, or prosthesis loosening. Surgical efficacies of THA for AS patients with severe hip involvement are satisfactory. PMID:28121928

  12. Surgery in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Law, W. Alexander

    1948-01-01

    The pain, deformities and disabilities resulting from rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis must be treated by a team composed of physician, physical medicine expert, orthopædic surgeon, and, in certain cases, deep X-ray therapist working simultaneously. The principle of “rest” in order to relieve pain has to be combined with methods designed to preserve and restore function. The multiple joint deformities in these cases may necessitate a long programme of reconstructive or functional treatment, which entails whole-hearted co-operation on the part of the patient in intensive post-operative exercise regime. Procedures advocated for the upper limb include excision of the acromion process together with the subacromial bursa to allow free movement between the central tendon of the deltoid and the tendinous shoulder cuff: arthrodesis of the shoulder in cases where there is more severe joint destruction: in certain cases of elbow-joint arthritis, excision of the radial head and sub-total synovectomy may preserve joint function and avoid or delay the necessity for arthroplasty which can be carried out in two ways: (a) similar to the formal joint excision, or (b) re-shaping the lower end of the humerus and upper end of the ulna lining these surfaces with fascia. The former method is preferable in cases of rheumatoid arthritis. To overcome wrist-joint deformity and restore pronation and supination excision of the lower end of the ulna together with radiocarpal fusion in position for optimum function is advocated. Finger and toe joints may be corrected by resection of the bone ends and capsulectomy. In the lower limbs bilateral involvement of the hip-joint is best treated by vitallium mould arthroplasty which may be carried out in four ways: (1) Routine arthroplasty; (2) Modified Whitman procedure; (3) Modified Colonna operation; and (4) The proximal shaft or intertrochanteric arthroplasty. It is essential in these operations to have knowledge of the operative

  13. MR imaging features of foot involvement in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, C Zuhal; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L Oktay; Ozdolap, Senay; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-01-01

    To determine alterations of the soft tissue, tendon, cartilage, joint space, and bone of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 23 AS patients (46 feet). Ten asymptomatic volunteers (20 feet) were studied on MR imaging, as a control group. MR imaging protocol included; T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted fast-field echo (FFE) and fat-suppressed short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in sagittal, sagittal oblique, and coronal planes using a head coil. Specifically, we examined: bone erosions, tendinitis (acute and chronic), para-articular enthesophyte, joint effusion, plantar fasciitis, joint space narrowing, soft tissue edema, bone marrow edema, enthesopathy in the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia attachment, subchondral signal intensity abnormalities (edema and sclerosis), tenosynovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, subchondral cysts, subchondral fissures, and bony ankylosis. Midfoot, hindfoot, and ankle were included in examined anatomic regions. Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in 3 (13%) of the patients while frequency of involvement was 21 (91%) with MR imaging assessment. The MR imaging findings were bone erosions (65%), Achilles tendinitis (acute and chronic) (61%), para-articular enthesophyte (48%), joint effusion (43%), plantar fasciitis (40%), joint space narrowing (40%), subchondral sclerosis (35%), soft tissue edema (30%), bone marrow edema (30%), enthesopathy of the Achilles attachment (30%), subchondral edema (26%), enthesopathy in the plantar fascia attachment (22%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (22%), subchondral cysts (17%), subchondral fissures (17%), tendinitis and enthesopathy of the plantar ligament (13%), and bony ankylosis (9%). The most common involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (83%) following by midfoot (69% ) and ankle (22%). In our experience, MR imaging may detect

  14. Mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Buschiazzo, Emilio Andres; Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Sommerfleck, Fernando Andres; Ledesma, Cesar; Citera, Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    Some reports describe an increased mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared to the general population. The aims of this study were to evaluate the cumulative survival in patients with AS and to establish possible factors associated with mortality. In cross-sectional retrospective study, AS patients were included according to 1984 modified NY criteria, in the 2000-2010 period, the prevalence of mortality was determined by review of medical records, telephone contact, family reports, and death certificates, and it was compared with mortality in Argentina's general population. One hundred twenty-seven patients were studied, 96 (75.6 %) were male, median age 49 years (interquartile range (IQR) 34-60) and median disease duration 8 years (IQR 4-17). During the follow-up period, 9 patients died (7.1 %). The median estimated survival from diagnosis of AS was 39 years (IQR 34-50) and median cumulative survival was 76 years (IQR 74-85). Cardiovascular disease was the most frequent cause of death (5/9 patients). Deceased patients had a mean age and a mean AS disease duration significantly higher than living patients (68.1 ± 12.4 years vs 46.4 ± 15.09 years, p = 0.0001 and 33 ± 13.7 years vs 12 ± 10.7 years, p = 0.001, respectively), higher frequency of total surgeries [3/5 (60 %) vs 5/105 (4.76 %), p = 0.002] and cauda equina syndrome [3/6 (50 %) vs 2/116 (1.72 %), p = 0.001], respectively. Frequency of mortality in AS patients was higher than the crude mortality rate of Argentina's general population in the same period, with cardiovascular cause being the most frequent one.

  15. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS. We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison. Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (−) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73–0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = −0.73 to −0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = −0.81 to −0.91, P < 0.05). Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  16. Radiographic measurement reliability of lumbar lordosis in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Sub; Goh, Tae Sik; Park, Shi Hwan; Lee, Hong Seok; Suh, Kuen Tak

    2013-04-01

    Intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities of the several different methods to measure lumbar lordosis have been reported. However, it has not been studied sofar in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We evaluated the inter and intraobserver reliabilities of six specific measures of global lumbar lordosis in patients with AS. Ninety-one consecutive patients with AS who met the most recently modified New York criteria were enrolled and underwent anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of whole spine. The radiographs were divided into non-ankylosis (no bony bridge in the lumbar spine), incomplete ankylosis (lumbar spines were partially connected by bony bridge) and complete ankylosis groups to evaluate the reliability of the Cobb L1-S1, Cobb L1-L5, centroid, posterior tangent L1-S1, posterior tangent L1-L5, and TRALL methods. The radiographs were composed of 39 non-ankylosis, 27 incomplete ankylosis and 25 complete ankylosis. Intra- and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of all six methods were generally high. The ICCs were all ≥0.77 (excellent) for the six radiographic methods in the combined group. However, a comparison of the ICCs, 95 % confidence intervals and mean absolute difference (MAD) between groups with varying degrees of ankylosis showed that the reliability of the lordosis measurements decreased in proportion to the severity of ankylosis. The Cobb L1-S1, Cobb L1-L5 and posterior tangent L1-S1 method demonstrated higher ICCs for both inter and intraobserver comparisons and the other methods showed lower ICCs in all groups. The intraobserver MAD was similar in the Cobb L1-S1 and Cobb L1-L5 (2.7°-4.3°), but the other methods showed higher intraobserver MAD. Interobserver MAD of Cobb L1-L5 only showed low in all group. These results are the first to provide a reliability analysis of different global lumbar lordosis measurement methods in AS. The findings in this study demonstrated that the Cobb L1-L5 method is reliable for measuring

  17. Serum procalcitonin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Mustafa; Oktay, Esin; Tarhan, Emine F; Aslan, Ozgur; Oflazoglu, Utku; Koseoglu, Mehmet H

    2016-05-01

    Procalcitonin is a marker of bacterial and fungal infection and sepsis. The present study evaluated the relationship between serum procalcitonin levels and disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 61 patients who met the 1984 New York criteria for AS were studied. Twenty-four age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were recruited to this study as a control group. Disease activity was assessed by the Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). The functional status of patients was evaluated by the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI). Spinal mobility was measured by the Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum procalcitonin levels were measured. Thirty patients were on anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment and 31 patients were on conventional treatment. Seventeen (28%) of the AS patients were active (BASDAI > 4) and 44 (72%) of the AS patients were in remission. The median ESR was 14 (34-6) mm/h and 4 (7-2) mm/h (P < 0.001) for the patient and control groups, respectively. The median CRP level was 0.91 (2.72-0.37) mg/dL and 0.15 (0.25-0.07) mg/dL in the patient and control groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Median BASDAI, BASFI and BASMI scores for all AS patients were 3.6 (5.25-2.29), 2.5 (4.22-0.91) and 3 (5-1), respectively. Serum procalcitonin levels were normal (< 0.05 ng/mL) for all patients and controls. Serum procalcitonin levels were not high in AS patients and controls, and the levels were independent of disease activity and medications. If bacterial or fungal infection is suspected in an AS patient, serum procalcitonin level may be useful for diagnosis. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Risk of falls in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Nigar; Sarkaya, Selda; Ozdolap, Senay; Dursun, Erbil; Zateri, Coskun; Altan, Lale; Birtane, Murat; Akgun, Kenan; Revzani, Aylin; Aktas, İlknur; Tastekin, Nurettin; Celiker, Reyhan

    2015-03-01

    Risk of vertebral fractures is increased in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The underlying mechanisms for the elevated fracture risk might be associated with bone and fall-related risks. The aims of this study were to evaluate the risk of falls and to determine the factors that increase the risk of falls in AS patients. Eighty-nine women, 217 men, a total of 306 AS patients with a mean age of 40.1 ± 11.5 years from 9 different centers in Turkey were included in the study. Patients were questioned regarding history of falls within the last 1 year. Their demographics, disease characteristics including Bath AS Disease Activity Index, Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI), Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), and risk factors for falls were recorded. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) test was used for evaluation of static and dynamic balance. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured. Forty of 306 patients reported at least 1 fall in the recent 1 year. The patients with history of falls had higher mean age and longer disease duration than did nonfallers (P = 0.001). In addition, these patients' BASMI and BASFI values were higher than those of nonfallers (P = 0.002; P = 0.000, respectively). We found that the patients with history of falls had lower SPPB scores (P = 0.000). We also found that the number of falls increased with longer disease duration and older age (R = 0.117 [P = 0.041] and R = 0.160 [P = 0.005]). Our results show that decreased SPPB scores were associated with increased number of falls (R = 0.183, P = 0.006). Statistically significant correlations were found between number of falls and AS-related lost job (R = 0.140, P = 0.014), fear of falling (R = 0.316, P = 0.000), hip involvement (R = 0.112, P = 0.05), BASMI (R =0.234, P = 0.000), and BASFI (R = 0.244, P = 0.000). Assessment of pain, stiffness, fatigue, and lower-extremity involvement as well as asking for a history of falls will

  19. Non-Invasive Imaging Demonstrates Clinical Features of Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Rat Adjuvant Model: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, J.; Kolbinger, F.; Kramer, I.; Beckmann, N.

    2016-01-01

    Main features of ankylosing spondylitis like inflammatory erosive osteopenia and bony overgrowth are recapitulated in rats challenged with complete Freund’s adjuvant. In vivo changes induced in the rat spine were followed longitudinally by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and assessed terminally by micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) and histology. Signals reflecting inflammation were detected by MRI at levels L5-L6 throughout the experiment, peaking at day 27 after adjuvant. Bone erosion and formation occurred from this time point onward, as confirmed by micro-CT. Histology confirmed the inflammation and bone remodeling. The present study demonstrates the potential of imaging for longitudinal assessments of spinal changes in this animal model and the excellent correlation between in vivo images and histology underlines its fundamental role in the validation of non-invasive imaging. PMID:28076929

  20. [Differential diagnosis of back pain in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: instable cervical spine fracture].

    PubMed

    van Werde, M; Ruetten, S; Baraliakos, X; Godolias, G; Braun, J

    2012-09-01

    A 65-year-old patient with longstanding ankylosing spondylitis (AS) complained of persistent pain in the right shoulder and the neck; elevation of the shoulder was impaired. The symptoms had started a week before admission after a fall. Physical examination revealed generally decreased mobility of an already hyperkyphotic cervical spine (CS) and decreased thoracic excursion. The paravertebral muscles were stiff . Because of the trauma extensive imaging procedures with conventional radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the CS were performed. These showed a compression fracture of C5, detachment of the dorsal and ventral ligaments and a ventral dislocation of C4 with dislocation (Type C fracture). After immediate consultation of the cooperating center for spinal surgery corpectomy of C5 and ventral fusion of C3-7 were performed on the same day, together with a dorsal transpedicular fusion. During the imaging procedures symptoms of a beginning paraplegia occurred. After successful surgery and early postoperative rehabilitation, the patient was discharged to an in-patient rehabiltation unit. At discharge, there was but a slight paresis of the right arm. Patients with AS and advanced spinal ankylosis are at increased risk of vertebral fracture after minor accidents. Regardless of the initial report of clinical symptoms it is mandatory to perform appropriate imaging procedures usually including MRI. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury in a Trauma Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Maarouf, Ahmad; McQuown, Colleen M; Frey, Jennifer A; Ahmed, Rami A; Derrick, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The recommended practice for over 30 years has been to routinely immobilize patients with unstable cervical spinal injuries using cervical spinal collars. It is shown that patients with Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are four times more likely to suffer a spinal fracture compared to the general population and have an eleven-fold greater risk of spinal cord injury. Current protocols of spinal immobilization were responsible for secondary neurologic deterioration in some of these patients. To describe an iatrogenic injury resulting from the use of a rigid spinal board and advocate for the use of alternative immobilization methods or no immobilization at all. We present our case here of a 68-year-old male with a history of AS. The patient was ambulatory on scene after a low speed car accident, but immobilized with a rigid backboard by paramedics. He developed back pain and paraplegia suddenly when the backboard was lifted for transport to the hospital. A CT scan revealed an extension fraction of T10 to T11 with involvement of the posterior column. Emergency spinal fusion was performed. Patient died of complications in the hospital. This case shows that spinal immobilization should be avoided in cases of ambulatory patients without a clear indication. Alternative transport methods such as vacuum mattresses should be considered when spinal immobilization is indicated, especially for patients with predispositions to spinal injury, particularly AS, to maintain the natural alignment of the spinal curvature.

  2. Level set based vertebra segmentation for the evaluation of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Ward, Michael M.; Yao, Lawrence; Summers, Ronald M.

    2006-03-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis is a disease of the vertebra where abnormal bone structures (syndesmophytes) grow at intervertebral disk spaces. Because this growth is so slow as to be undetectable on plain radiographs taken over years, it is necessary to resort to computerized techniques to complement qualitative human judgment with precise quantitative measures on 3-D CT images. Very fine segmentation of the vertebral body is required to capture the small structures caused by the pathology. We propose a segmentation algorithm based on a cascade of three level set stages and requiring no training or prior knowledge. First, the noise inside the vertebral body that often blocks the proper evolution of level set surfaces is attenuated by a sigmoid function whose parameters are determined automatically. The 1st level set (geodesic active contour) is designed to roughly segment the interior of the vertebra despite often highly inhomogeneous and even discontinuous boundaries. The result is used as an initial contour for the 2nd level set (Laplacian level set) that closely captures the inner boundary of the cortical bone. The last level set (reversed Laplacian level set) segments the outer boundary of the cortical bone and also corrects small flaws of the previous stage. We carried out extensive tests on 30 vertebrae (5 from each of 6 patients). Two medical experts scored the results at intervertebral disk spaces focusing on end plates and syndesmophytes. Only two minor segmentation errors at vertebral end plates were reported and two syndesmophytes were considered slightly under-segmented.

  3. Discriminant validity of the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) in patients with non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Erkan; Kilic, Gamze; Akgul, Ozgur; Ozgocmen, Salih

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess discriminant validity of Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS)-C-reactive protein (-CRP) and ASDAS-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (-ESR) and to compare with The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) as clinical tools for the measurement of disease activity in patients with non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Also, the cut-off values for ASDAS-CRP in nr-axSpA and AS is revisited. Patients with axSpA were recruited from Erciyes Spondyloarthritis Cohort (ESPAC) and were assessed for disease activity, quality of life and functional measures. The discriminatory ability of ASDAS-CRP and ASDAS-ESR was assessed using standardized mean differences and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves analysis. Optimal cut-off values for disease activity scores were calculated. Two hundred and eighty-seven patients with axSpA (nr-axSpA:132, AS:155) were included in this study. Two ASDAS versions and BASDAI had good correlations with patient's and physician's global assessment in both groups. Discriminatory ability of ASDAS-CRP, ASDAS-ESR and BASDAI were similar in patients with nr-axSpA and AS when the patients were assigned into low and high disease activity according to the ASAS partial remission, patient's and physician's global assessment scores (based on the comparison of ROC curves). ASDAS cut-off values are quite similar between groups indicating that ASDAS-CRP works similarly well in nr-axSpA and AS. The performance of ASDAS to discriminate low and high disease activity and cut-off values are quite similar in patients with AS and non-radiographic axial SpA.

  4. Predictive factors for partial remission according to the Ankylosing Spondylitis Assessment Study working group in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated with anti-TNFα drugs.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, F M; Addimanda, O; Ramonda, R; D'Angelo, S; Lubrano, E; Marchesoni, A; Olivieri, I; Punzi, L; Salvarani, C; Spadaro, A

    2014-11-06

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive factors for achieving partial remission (PR) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) treated with anti-TNFα. We longitudinally enrolled in a multi-center study 214 AS patients, classified according to New York criteria, treated with anti-TNFα drugs adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETA) and infliximab (INF) with at least 12 months of follow up. PR was reached when the score was <20 mm (on a visual analogue scale of 0-100 mm) in each of the following 4 domains: 1) patient global assessment (in the last week); 2) pain (spinal pain); 3) function [measured by the bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI)]; 4) inflammation [mean of intensity and duration of morning stiffness, from the bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI)]. Two hundred fourteen AS patients (M/F=160/54; median age/range=43.2/19-78 years; median disease duration/ range=96/36-189 months) were treated with ADA (15.8%), ETA (28.9%) and INF (55.1%). At 12 and 24 months, high serum level of C reactive protein (CRP) (≥2 vs ≤0.8 mg/dL) were associated with higher rate of PR in AS patients treated with anti-TNFα drugs. At 24 months, PR was associated with shorter disease duration (≤36 vs ≥189 months) and higher erythrosedimentation rate (ESR) values (≥45 vs ≤17 mm/h). In male patients lower bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI) (≤2 vs ≥6) and absence of psoriasis were associated with higher PR rate only at 12 months. Other parameters assessed before treatment, such as BASDAI, BASFI, peripheral arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and uveitis were not associated with PR. Our long-term longitudinal study in a setting of clinical practice showed that inflammatory parameters (i.e. CRP, ESR) and disease duration represent the most important predictive variables to achieve PR with an anti-TNFα treatment.

  5. Interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-5: a potential therapeutic target for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2012-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common inflammatory rheumatic disease that affects the axial skeleton, causing characteristic inflammatory back pain, which can lead to structural and functional impairments and a decrease in quality of life. New imaging techniques and therapies have substantially changed the management of this disease in the past decade. Whether inhibition of radiographic progression and structural damage can be reached with available drugs is as yet unclear. Furthermore, treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and physiotherapy remains an important approach to long-term management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The new treatment options with IRF-5 seem to be a breakthrough for patients' refractory to conventional and feasible treatment.

  6. Monitoring ankylosing spondylitis: clinically useful markers and prediction of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Juergen; Kiltz, Uta; Sarholz, Michael; Heldmann, Frank; Regel, Andrea; Baraliakos, Xenofon

    2015-01-01

    Patient assessment in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is multidimensional, and monitoring of disease activity, function and radiographic progression is complex. There is no simple 'gold standard' for measuring disease activity in all individual patients, as disease activity in axSpA is the sum of many different aspects and a complexity that cannot be represented by a single variable. Limited spinal mobility is a cardinal sign of ankylosing spondylitis and loss of spinal mobility has been reported to be a prognostic factor and most often evaluated with the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index. Imaging of the spine and assessment of safety aspects plays an important role in the monitoring of patients with axSpA. The timeframe for collecting information regarding disease activity, function and radiographic progression are recommended on an individual basis.

  7. Pattern of rheumatic diseases in south India. V. Ankylosing spondylitis. A clinical and radiological study.

    PubMed

    Achuthan, K; Porkodi, R; Ramakrishnan, S; Krishnamurthy, V; Madhavan, R; Parthiban, M; Chandrasekaran, A N

    1990-10-01

    One hundred and two patients from South India with primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were analysed clinically and radiologically. The mean age of onset was 26 years, with a male to female ratio of 16:1. Eleven patients presented as juvenile ankylosing spondylitis. The mode of presentation of AS included axial involvement in 59, peripheral arthritis in 38, heel pain in 18 and acute anterior uveitis (AAU) in 11. The overall incidence of extra axial features was high (90 patients). These included subjects with peripheral arthritis (49), heel pain (35), AAU (14), rib pain (11), aortic regurgitation (8), apical pulmonary fibrosis (5), mitral regurgitation (2) and conduction defects (2). Peripheral arthritis was characteristically asymmetrical and oligo articular, and involved lower limb joints. No renal involvement was noticed. Radiologically, bilateral sacroilitis was seen in 80% of cases.

  8. The indirect costs of ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Krzysztof Piotr; Kawalec, Paweł

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to collect and summarize all current data on the indirect costs related to absenteeism and presenteeism associated with ankylosing spondylitis. The search was conducted using Medline, Embase and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases. All collected costs were recalculated to average annual cost per patient, expressed in 2013 prices USD using the consumer price index and purchasing power parity. Identified studies were then analyzed to assess their possible inclusion in the meta-analysis. We identified 32 records. The average annual indirect cost per patient varies among all the identified results from US$660.95 to 45,953.87. The mean annual indirect per patient equals US$6454.76. This systematic review summarizes current data related to indirect costs generated by ankylosing spondylitis; it revealed the great economic burden of the disease for society. We observed a great variety of the considered components of indirect costs and their definitions.

  9. Danger of injudicious use of tui-na therapy in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Gen; Wang, Guyi; Li, Jinxiu; Wu, Guobao; Huang, Jia; Huang, Siyang

    2017-05-01

    Tui-na is a very important component of Chinese medicine. It is a well-respected treatment modality known to be helpful and safe for a wide range of conditions. It can be considered as a certain kind of massage which is performed at acupoints, meridians, and collaterals by pushing, finger twisting, grasping thumb waving pressing, patting, palm twisting, and other manipulation techniques. At present, it is extensively used for relieving pain and stiffness associated with ankylosing spondylitis in China, even though there is a lack of evidence to support its validation and feasibility. The patient in this case was treated by tui-na massage at acute flare-up of ankylosing spondylitis and ended up with catastrophic results.

  10. Management of cervical fractures in ankylosing spondylitis: anterior, posterior or combined approach?

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Petrillo, Stefano; Berton, Alessandra; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) can lead to an increased risk of cervical fractures. A systematic review was undertaken using the keywords 'ankylosing spondylitis', 'spine fractures', 'cervical fractures', 'surgery' and 'postoperative outcomes' on Medline, Pubmed, Google Scholar, Ovid and Embase, and the quality of the studies included was evaluated according to the Coleman Methodology Score. Surgery ameliorates neurological function in patients with unstable AS-related cervical fractures. The combined anterior/posterior and the posterior approaches are more effective than the anterior approach. The optimal approach, anterior, posterior or combined anterior/posterior, for the management of AS related cervical fractures has not been defined. Open reduction and internal fixation allows avoiding worsening and enhances neurological function in AS patients with cervical fractures. Adequately powered randomized trials with appropriate subjective and objective outcome measures are necessary to reach definitive conclusions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The role of biomechanical factors in ankylosing spondylitis: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ansell, R C; Shuto, T; Busquets-Perez, N; Hensor, E M A; Marzo-Ortega, H; McGonagle, D

    2015-12-30

    Biomechanical factors including occupational joint physical stressing and joint injury have been linked to spondyloarthritis. We explored such factors in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A retrospective, online survey was developed alongside the UK National Ankylosing Spondylitis Society (NASS). Questions on early entheseal symptoms, potential precipitating trauma, sporting activity, and physiotherapy were asked. A total of 1026 patients responded with 44% recalling an instance of injury or trauma as a potential trigger for their AS. After symptom onset, 55% modified sporting activities and 28% reported that the initial AS recommended exercises exacerbated symptoms. Patients report physical trauma, exercise and physiotherapy as potential triggers for AS symptoms. These findings further support the experimental evidence for the role of biomechanical factors in disease.

  12. Tramadol/acetaminophen combination as add-on therapy in the treatment of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jhi-Kai; Yu, Chen-Tung; Lee, Ming-Yung; Yeo, Kj; Chang, I-Chang; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the safety and efficacy of tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg combination tablets (Ultracet®) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This was a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Sixty patients with active AS according to the Modified New York Criteria were enrolled. Active disease was defined by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) for more than 3 at randomization. Subjects were randomized equally into two groups: the treatment group received aceclofenac plus Ultracet® one tablet twice a day, and the control group received aceclofenac plus placebo for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was a difference of Assessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS20) response criteria between two groups at week 12. At week 12, ASAS20 was achieved by 53.3 % of the aceclofenac plus Ultracet group and 31 % of the aceclofenac alone group (p = 0.047). For the pain visual analogue scale at week 12, there was a reduction of 45.6 % in aceclofenac plus Ultracet group and 25.7 % in the aceclofenac alone group (p = 0.087). There was no statistically significant difference between two groups in BASDAI, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Index, Physician Global Assessment, spinal mobility, ESR, hs-CRP, and Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Questionnaire. A slight increase in total adverse events was noted with dizziness (7.5 vs 1.5 %), vertigo (4.5 vs 1.5 %), and nausea/vomiting (6 vs 0 %) in the Ultracet arm compared to placebo. The tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg combination tablet (Ultracet®) might has additional effect to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. It showed marginal benefit in pain and disease activity. However, a slight increase in minor adverse events was noted.

  13. Exercise and ankylosing spondylitis with New York modified criteria: a systematic review of controlled trials with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Martins, N A; Furtado, Guilherme Eustáquio; Campos, Maria João; Leitão, José Carlos; Filaire, Edith; Ferreira, José Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic rheumatic disease that affects the axial skeleton, causing inflammatory back pain, structural and functional changes which decrease quality of life. Several treatments for ankylosing spondylitis have been proposed and among them the use of exercise. The present study aims to synthesize information from the literature and identify the results of controlled clinical trials on exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis with the New York modified diagnostic criteria and to assess whether exercise is more effective than physical activity to reduce functional impairment. The sources of studies used were: LILACS, Pubmed, EBSCOhost, B-on, personal communication, manual research and lists of references. The criteria used for the studies selection was controlled clinical trials, participants with New York modified diagnostic criteria for ankylosing spondylitis, and with interventions through exercise. The variables studied were related to primary outcomes such as BASFI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index) as a functional index, BASDAI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index) as an index of intensity of disease activity and BASMI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index) as a metrological index assessing patient's limitation on movement. From the 603 studies identified after screening only 37 articles were selected for eligibility, from which 18 studies were included. The methodological quality was assessed to select those with an high methodological expressiveness using the PEDro scale. A cumulative meta-analysis was subsequently performed to compare exercise versus usual level of physical activity. Exercise shows significant statistical outcomes for the BASFI, BASDAI and BASMI, higher than those found for usual level of physical activity.

  14. Fetuin-A is related to syndesmophytes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Tuylu, Tugba; Sari, Ismail; Solmaz, Dilek; Kozaci, Didem Leyla; Akar, Servet; Gunay, Necati; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2014-12-01

    New bone formation is one of the hallmark characteristics of ankylosing spondylitis, which is thereby associated with syndesmophytes. Fetuin-A is a molecule that is abundantly found in calcified tissues and it shows high affinity for calcium phosphate minerals and related compounds. Considering the role of fetuin-A in the regulation of calcified matrix metabolism, we compared the fetuin-A levels in ankylosing spondylitis patients with syndesmophytes with those in patients without syndesmophytes and in healthy controls. We also studied other biomarkers that are thought to be related to syndesmophytes. Ninety-four patients (49 patients without syndesmophytes, 67.3% male, 40.7±8.7 years; 45 patients with syndesmophytes, 71.1% M, 43.9±9.9 years) and 68 healthy controls (44.2±10.6 years and 70.6% male) were included in this study. Syndesmophytes were assessed on the lateral radiographs of the cervical and lumbar spine. The serum levels of fetuin-A, dickkopf-1, sclerostin, IL-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and bone morphogenetic protein-7 were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with syndesmophytes had significantly higher levels of fetuin-A compared with patients without syndesmophytes and controls (1.16±0.13, 1.05±0.09 and 1.08±0.13 mg/ml, respectively). However, fetuin-A was not different between the patients without syndesmophytes and controls. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 was significantly lower; dickkopf-1 was significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis compared with controls. The sclerostin concentrations were not different between the groups. In regression analysis, fetuin-A was an independent, significant predictor of syndesmophytes. Our results suggest that fetuin-A may a role in the pathogenesis of bony proliferation in ankylosing spondylitis.

  15. Results of closing wedge osteotomy in the treatment of sagittal imbalance due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Fatih; Akgül, Turgut; Ekinci, Mehmet; Dikici, Fatih; Şar, Cüneyt; Domaniç, Ünsal

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease which affects the axial skeleton and may cause rigid spinal deformities in advanced cases. Clinical and radiological results of patients with ankylosing spondylitis who underwent pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) were evaluated. Twelve (3 female, 9 male) patients who were treated for rigid spinal deformities due to ankylosing spondylitis were evaluated. All patients were treated with the same surgical technique, which included PSO and pedicle screw-rod combination. For radiological results, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic parameters (pelvic incidence, sacral inclination, pelvic tilt), and the distance between the central sagittal line (CSVL) and the sacrum were measured from pre- and postoperative radiograms. For functional results, SF-36 and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used. Mean age of the patients was 39.8±8.4 years, and mean follow-up was 85.6±39.1 months. Mean angle of lordosis was improved from 6.6°±13.7° preoperatively to 43.8°±8.4° postoperatively (p<0.0001). Mean CSVL was improved from 19.7±9.7 cm preoperatively to 7.45±3.8 cm postoperatively (p=0.0005). Mean local angular change around the osteotomy site was 30.2°±6.2°. The pelvic parameters were not significantly changed after the surgeries. Mean ODI, SF-36 mental, and SF-36 physical scores were 30.16±9.7, 41.2±9.9 and 35.3±7.1, respectively. In patients with rigid sagittal spinal deformities due to ankylosing spondylitis, lumbar lordosis and sagittal balance can be obtained using PSO.

  16. Assessment of serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels and left ventricular diastolic function in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Inci, Umit; Yildiz, Abdulkadir; Batmaz, Ibrahim; Tekbas, Ebru

    2017-02-01

    To assess left ventricular diastolic functions and serum dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentrations, as well as the effect of different treatment strategies on ADMA concentrations and diastolic function parameters, in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Sixty AS patients and 40 control subjects without classical cardiovascular (CV) risk factors were included in the study. Baseline clinical and echocardiographic variables were obtained. C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and ADMA levels were measured. Spinal mobility, disease activity and functional status were assessed using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index. CRP, ESR and ADMA levels were significantly higher in the AS group as compared to the control group. Two (5%) control subjects and six (10%) AS patients met the criteria for left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DD) on conventional Doppler echocardiography, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.36). However, using tissue Doppler imaging, 12 (20%) patients in the AS group and three (8%) subjects in the control group were diagnosed with left ventricular DD (P = 0.08). The anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α group, conventional therapy group and control group were compared in terms of ADMA, CRP, ESR levels and echocardiographic parameters. ADMA levels were significantly lower in anti-TNF-α group as compared to the conventional therapy group (P < 0.001). In the control group, ADMA levels were significantly lower than both treatment groups (P < 0.001). Increased ADMA levels reveal impaired nitric oxide metabolism in a relatively young group of patients with AS, who have no classical CV risk factors. Anti-TNF-α may have beneficial effect on endothelial function in AS patients by reducing ADMA levels. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Low vaspin levels are related to endothelial dysfunction in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H.H.; Wang, Q.F.

    2016-01-01

    Vaspin is a novel adipocytokine associated with glucose tolerance and chronic inflammation. Some studies reveal that vaspin may be involved in cardiovascular diseases. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between serum vaspin levels and endothelial function in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. One hundred and twenty patients with newly diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis and 100 healthy subjects were studied. Serum vaspin levels were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. High resolution ultrasound was used to measure brachial artery diameter at rest, after reactive hyperemia (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and after sublingual glyceryltrinitrate. Serum vaspin level in patients was 1.92±1.03 ng/mL, which was significantly lower than that in healthy subjects (2.88±0.81 ng/mL). By dividing the distribution of serum vaspin levels into quartiles, FMD levels increased gradually with the increase of serum vaspin levels in patients (P<0.01). Univariate analysis showed a correlation between vaspin and FMD (r=0.73, P=0.003), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=-0.45, P=0.033), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.63, P=0.025), fasting blood glucose (r=-0.79, P=0.006), triglycerides (TG) (r=-0.68, P=0.036), systolic blood pressure (r=-0.35, P=0.021), C-reactive protein (r=-0.67, P=0.011), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (r=-0.77, P=0.023) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=-0.88, P=0.039) in patients. Multivariate analysis indicated that serum vaspin levels were independently associated with FMD, HOMA-IR and TG in patients. Our study found that serum vaspin levels were decreased in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and were associated with FMD levels. Vaspin may serve as an independent marker for detecting early stage atherosclerosis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:27383120

  18. Splenic tuberculosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, V F; Paiva, E; Tosin, T; Ferreira, A; Ferreira, A M; Fernandes, M

    2011-11-09

    We present a rare case of splenic tuberculosis in a 42-year old man with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis treated with adalimumab. We review the association between antitumor necrosis factor therapy and splenic tuberculosis. Our case, like many other reported cases, illustrates that the index of suspicion of tuberculosis in patients treated with anti TNF therapies must be high and emphasizes that this rare infection may occur even with negative tuberculosis screening before the initiation of therapy.

  19. Tuberculous myositis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Valdeŕilio Feijó; Parchen, C; Coelho, S A; Lacerda, D C; Hirth, C G

    2009-09-01

    We present a rare case of tuberculous myositis in a 36-year-old man with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis treated with adalimumab. We review the association between antitumor necrosis factor therapy and tuberculous myositis. Our case illustrates that the index of suspicion of tuberculosis in these patients, even with atypical clinical features, must be very high and emphasizes that this rare infection may occur even with negative tuberculosis screening before therapy was started.

  20. Odontoid pannus formation in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis causing atlanto-axial instability.

    PubMed

    Rajak, Rizwan; Wardle, Phil; Rhys-Dillon, Ceril; Martin, James C

    2012-02-25

    Ankylosing spondylitis is one of the commonest inflammatory diseases of the axial skeleton and can be complicated by atlanto-axial instability. This serious and likely underestimated complication can be easily overlooked. However, there are clear features which can help alert suspicion to initiate the appropriate investigations with imaging that is very effective at diagnosing and assessing this complication. The authors report an unusual case where odontoid pannus formation, akin to that seen in rheumatoid arthritis, was the underlying cause.

  1. Treatment of ankylosing spondylitis with TNF blockers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marina Amaral de Ávila; Barbosa, Mariana Michel; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; de Araújo, Vânia Eloisa; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2013-09-01

    Biological agents directed against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) represent therapeutic options for patients with ankylosing spondylitis with high disease activity despite use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the anti-TNF agents infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis, we performed a systematic review of randomized clinical trials on adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis using articles culled from the EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and LILACS databases (September/2012), manual literature search, and the gray literature. Study selections and data collection were performed by two independent reviewers, with disagreements solved by a third reviewer. The following outcomes were evaluated: ASAS 20 response, disease activity, physical function, vertebral mobility, adverse events, and withdraws. The meta-analysis was performed using the Review Manager(®) 5.1 software by applying the random effects model. Eighteen studies were included in this review. No study of certolizumab was included. Patients treated with anti-TNF agents were more likely to display an ASAS 20 response after 12/14 weeks (RR 2.21; 95 % CI 1.91; 2.56) and 24 weeks (RR 2.68; 95 % CI 2.06; 3.48) compared with controls, which was also true for several other efficacy outcomes. Meta-analysis of safety outcomes and withdraws did not indicate statistically significant differences between treatment and control groups after 12 or 30 weeks. Adalimumab, infliximab, etanercept, and golimumab can effectively reduce the signs and symptoms of the axial component of ankylosing spondylitis. Safety outcomes deserve further study, especially with respect to long-term follow-ups.

  2. Aortic Regurgitation Is Common in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Time for Routine Echocardiography Evaluation?

    PubMed

    Klingberg, Eva; Sveälv, Bente Grüner; Täng, Margareta Scharin; Bech-Hanssen, Odd; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena; Bergfeldt, Lennart

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of aortic regurgitation and any relation to disease activity and specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 187 patients (105 men), mean age (SD) 50 (13) years, and mean disease duration 24 (13) years, and was related to demographic, clinical, radiographic, electrocardiographic, and laboratory data. Aortic regurgitation was found in 34 patients (18%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12%-24%): mild in 24, moderate in 9, and severe in one. The prevalence was significantly higher than expected from population data. Conduction system abnormalities were documented in 25 patients (13%; 95% CI, 8%-18%), and significantly more likely in the presence of aortic regurgitation (P = .005), which was related to increasing age and longstanding disease, and increased from ~20% in the 50s to 55% in the 70s. It was also independently associated with disease duration, with higher modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score, and with a history of anterior uveitis. HLA-B27 was present in similar proportions in the presence vs absence of aortic regurgitation. For comparison, clinically significant coronary artery disease was present in 9 patients (5%; 95% CI, 2%-8%). Patients with ankylosing spondylitis frequently have cardiac abnormalities, but they more often consist of disease-related aortic regurgitation or conduction system abnormalities than manifestations of atherosclerotic heart disease. Because aortic regurgitation or conduction abnormalities might cause insidious symptoms not easily interpreted as of cardiac origin, we suggest that both electrocardiography and echocardiography evaluation should be part of the routine management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional limitation and associated factors in outpatients with ankylosing spondylitis in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuqing; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Functional limitation is often complained by patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). With a rising number of patients suffering from AS, there are a limited number of reports focusing on functional limitation of AS in Chinese patients. This study was conducted to investigate the level of functional limitation and explore its associations with demographic, disease-related factors. A total of 303 AS outpatients were recruited in this cross-sectional study from a tertiary general hospital in Southwest China. Functional limitation was measured by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). Other data were collected by the following questionnaires: the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Patient Global Score (BAS-G), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Questionnaire (PSQI). Finally, 295 outpatients with AS completed this survey. The median BASFI was 0.80. Worse function limitation was found in outpatients with extra-spinal manifestation, older age, lower household income, more back pain, higher disease activity and morning stiffness, poorer sleep, and worse patient's well-being (all P < 0.05). Multivariate regression analysis indicated that patient's well-being (P < 0.001), disease activity (P < 0.001), and disease duration (P < 0.05) were the positive predictors of functional limitation. AS outpatients in Southwest China had a mild level of functional limitation. The factors associated with functional limitation included disease duration, disease activity, and patients' well-being, which should be taken into consideration when assessing functional limitation of AS outpatients. Besides, more comprehensive and targeted interventions should be conducted for AS patients as early as possible, which will be effective to improve functional outcome.

  4. Ankylosing Spondylitis patients with Type D personality have worse clinical status.

    PubMed

    Erkol İnal, Esra; Demirci, Kadir; Doğru, Atalay; Şahin, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Type D personality was identified as an important factor that can explain the differences in clinical outcomes in various diseases. The aim of this study is to clarify the relationships between Type D personality and clinical status of patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). The scores of the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS)-C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and 14-item Type D Scale (DS-14) were noted. We found significantly higher levels of the BASDAI, the BASFI, and the SF-36 mental subscale scores in patients with Type D personalities compared to those who were Non-Type D (p < 0.05). The total DS-14 scores were found to be correlated with the scores of physical and mental subscales of SF-36, the BASDAI, the BASFI, ASDAS-CRP, and ESR (p < 0.05). In logistic regression analysis, the occurrence of Type D personality was found to be an independent predictor for disease activity of AS due to BASDAI and ASDAS-ESR (p = 0.016, OR, 95% CI = 2.98,1.23-7.22; p = 0.022, OR, 95% CI = 2.78,1.16-6.63 respectively). Patients may over-rate self-reported measurements such as the BASDAI, BASFI, and SF-36 related to their interpersonal characteristics. Therefore, including the Type D personality, which is a stable construct in evaluating AS patients with brief and valid DS-14, may be noteworthy.

  5. Low vaspin levels are related to endothelial dysfunction in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, H H; Wang, Q F

    2016-07-04

    Vaspin is a novel adipocytokine associated with glucose tolerance and chronic inflammation. Some studies reveal that vaspin may be involved in cardiovascular diseases. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between serum vaspin levels and endothelial function in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. One hundred and twenty patients with newly diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis and 100 healthy subjects were studied. Serum vaspin levels were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. High resolution ultrasound was used to measure brachial artery diameter at rest, after reactive hyperemia (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and after sublingual glyceryltrinitrate. Serum vaspin level in patients was 1.92±1.03 ng/mL, which was significantly lower than that in healthy subjects (2.88±0.81 ng/mL). By dividing the distribution of serum vaspin levels into quartiles, FMD levels increased gradually with the increase of serum vaspin levels in patients (P<0.01). Univariate analysis showed a correlation between vaspin and FMD (r=0.73, P=0.003), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=-0.45, P=0.033), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.63, P=0.025), fasting blood glucose (r=-0.79, P=0.006), triglycerides (TG) (r=-0.68, P=0.036), systolic blood pressure (r=-0.35, P=0.021), C-reactive protein (r=-0.67, P=0.011), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (r=-0.77, P=0.023) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=-0.88, P=0.039) in patients. Multivariate analysis indicated that serum vaspin levels were independently associated with FMD, HOMA-IR and TG in patients. Our study found that serum vaspin levels were decreased in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and were associated with FMD levels. Vaspin may serve as an independent marker for detecting early stage atherosclerosis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  6. Andersson lesions of whole spine magnetic resonance imaging compared with plain radiography in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Kyu; Shin, Kichul; Song, Yoonah; Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of Andersson lesions using whole spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with plain radiography in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 62 patients with AS who had undergone whole spine MRI and plain radiography were retrospectively enrolled in this study. We compared the number of discovertebral units (DVUs) with Andersson lesions with clinical and radiographic indices such as erythrocyte sediment rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Fifty-three patients (85.5 %) by whole spine MRI and 23 patients (37.1 %) by plain radiography had at least one Andersson lesion. We found 129 DVUs with Andersson lesions (11.1 %) by MRI and 35 DVUs by plain radiography over all the spine levels. Andersson lesions by MRI were most commonly detected at the lower thoracic spine (from T7-8 to T12-L1). Among the 151 total Andersson lesions by whole spine MRI, 41 were identified as central disc type, 26 as anterior peripheral disc type, 44 as posterior peripheral disc type, and 40 as diffuse disc type. However, the number of Andersson lesions did not correlate with ESR, CRP, BASDAI, BASFI, or mSASSS (p > 0.05 for all). Our study indicates that the presence of Andersson lesions in patients with AS is clearly underestimated. MRI is a superior technique for detecting early Andersson lesions compared with plain radiography.

  7. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-05-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS.The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G).Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0-0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters.AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients.

  8. Progression rate of ankylosing spondylitis in patients with undifferentiated spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qing; Fan, Dazhi; Yang, Xiao; Li, Xiaona; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Mengmeng; Xu, Shengqian; Pan, Faming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The idea that undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (uSpA) represents the early undifferentiated stage of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other well-defined SpA subtypes is well known. The gist of this study is to assess the rate estimate of patients with uSpA evolved to AS during long-term follow-up. Methods: A systematic search was implemented to identify pertinent articles. The primary outcome was the rate estimate that patients with uSpA fulfilling the diagnosis of AS according to the modified New York criteria during follow-up. The rate estimate and corresponding 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were pooled by the random-effects model in STATA 11.0 software. Meta-regression analyses were adopted to explore the sources of heterogeneity. The quality assessment was conducted by the National Institutes of Health Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies and the Begg test and the Egger test were applied to assess publication bias. Results: Sixteen papers were finally included in this study after screening 1299 citations. The pooled rate of patients with uSpA progression to AS synthesized from the 16 papers was 0.323 (95%CI 0.257–0.389). Subgroup analysis based on the length of follow-up showed that the rate at the time-point of 5, 8, and 10 years follow-up was 0.220 (95%CI 0.110–0.330), 0.291 (95%CI 0.257–0.325), and 0.399 (95%CI 0.190–0.608), respectively; while the rate in Asia, Europe, and Latin America was 0.367 (95%CI 0.282–0.452), 0.228 (95%CI 0.066–0.390), and 0.269 (95%CI 0.209–0.329), respectively. Meta-regression analysis indicated that the length of follow-up alone accounts for 45.23% of the total heterogeneity. Nearly half of the papers scored fair quality and none publication bias was identified based on the Begg test and the Egger test. Further, line chart describes an obviously increased trend for the patients with uSpA fulfilling the diagnosis of AS over time. Conclusion: The

  9. Quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Turan, Yasemin; Duruöz, Mehmet Tuncay; Cerrahoglu, Lale

    2007-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate quality of life (QOL) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to determine the relationship between QOL and clinical condition/functional status. Forty-six AS patients (37 males) were included in the study. The demographic data of the patients were recorded. Disease activity Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), enthesitis involvement Mander Ehthesis Index (MEI), functional evaluation Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and quality of life Short-Form 36 (SF-36) were assessed. The mean age of the patients was 39.2 (SD: 11. 46) years. Most MEI was found related to physical function (P = 0.014), physical role (P = 0. 01), pain (P = 0.002) and vitality (P = 0.004) in SF-36 subgroups. Among the subgroups, the best correlations with the general health was found in BASDAI (P = 0.014) and secondly in MEI (P = 0.038). None of the mental health and social function subgroups had any significant correlation with any of the parameters (P > 0.05). A significant relationship was found between the emotional role and BASFI, and chest expansion (P = 0.004). Clinical and functional state were affecting QOL of patients with AS. It has been found out that in patients with AS, the QOL subgroups are mostly related with enthesis involvement.

  10. Clinical research for curing ankylosing spondylitis through combining etanercept, thalidomide and sulfasalazine.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Pang, Changhe; Zhu, Xu; Wu, Xuejian

    2015-01-01

    This article is to explore the curative effect of treating ankylosing spondylitis (AS) through combining etanercept, thalidomide and sulfasalazine. Sixty-two patients with AS were divided into 3 groups: experimental group Ais treated by etanercept+ thalidomide + sulfasalazine for 1 year (n=22); control group B was treated with etanercept; control group C was treated with thalidomide + sulfasalazine for 1 year (n=20). In 1st, 3rd, 6th, 12th month after the treatment, ASAS20 and ASAS50 were obtained through Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C react protein (CRP) and then curative effect was analyzed. In 1 and 3 months after the treatment, each indicator had downtrend, and ASAS20 of experimental group and etanercept control group reached 100%; ASAS50 increased compared with the first months' treatment; although ASAS20 and ASAS50 in thalidomide control group was smaller, they increased; in 6 and 12 months after the treatment, ASAS20 improvement ratio in group A still remained on 100%, ASA50 improvement ratio increased; recurrence rate of group B increased; ASA20 and ASA50 had a continuous and significant increase, but its their was less than group A. This study proved that, the effect of curing AS combiningetanercept, thalidomide and sulfasalazine is better, therefore, it is a high-feasible treatment approach.

  11. Preliminary study of high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1(HMGB1) in ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Sun, Wei; Li, Shouxin; Ni, Juan; Su, Yuying; Wang, Chenqiong; Luo, Xiaofang; Tu, Wei; Shen, Guifen; Gong, Feili; Zheng, Fang; Dong, Lingli

    2015-01-01

    To compare the serum levels of high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) between patients with AS and healthy controls, and evaluate its association with disease activities and functional abilities; to investigate the cell surface receptors related to HMGB1 in AS patients. The HMGB1 serum levels from71 previously untreated AS patients and 40 healthy controls were detected by ELISA method. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), erythrocytesedimentationrate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were assessed on these participants. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and its relevant cell surface receptors RAGE, TLR2, TLR4, and IL-1Racp complex were analysed by RT-PCR. The HMGB1 serum levels from AS patients were significantly higher than those from healthy controls and remarkably positive correlated with BASDAI, ASDAS, BASFI, CRP, and ESR. ASDAS showed more correlated to HMGB1 serum levels than BASDAI. Besides, the expression of TLR2, TLR4, and IL-1Racp from PBMCs revealed significant correlations with the expression of HMGB1. HMGB1 might be a good laboratory index for the evaluation of disease activities and disease severity in AS patients. Further, extracellular HMGB1 play its inflammatory role mainly via the expression of cell surface receptors TLR2, TLR4 and IL-1RAcP complex.

  12. [Effects of balneotherapy on the reactants of acute inflammation phase in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects sacroiliac joints, spinal column and peripheral joints. Beside medication therapy, physical and balneotherapy play an important role in its complex treatment. The aim of the research was to establish serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (alpha 1-AGP), ceruloplasmine (CP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (SE) before and after the balneotherapy in ankylosing spondylitis. The research included 50 AS patients according to the revised New York criteria, of mean age 43 years, who were treated for 14 days on the average at the Clinic for Rheumatology of the Institute "Niska Banja". All the patients received medications and balneotherapy (radioactive oligomineral baths, peloid, massage, kinesitherapy); the serum concentrations of CRP, al-AGP, CP and SE were measured before and after balneotherapy. Serum proteins were determined using original Nor Partigen plates Boehringer. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured by Westergreen method. Balneotherapy was applied individually, intensively or mildly, depending on the AS stage and activity phase. After dosed balneotherapy, a significant decrease in the concentrations of CP (p < 0.05), alpha1-AGP (p < 0.01) and CRP (p < 0.05) was registered in the serums of AS patients. ESR was not significantly reduced. The research proved that alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, ceruloplasmine and C-reactive protein represent more sensitive inflammation markers as compared to erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The identification of acute phase reactants is important in the evaluation of dosed balneotherapy efficiency in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

  13. Outcomes of a multicentre randomised clinical trial of etanercept to treat ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Calin, A; Dijkmans, B; Emery, P; Hakala, M; Kalden, J; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Mola, E; Salvarani, C; Sanmarti, R; Sany, J; Sibilia, J; Sieper, J; van der Linden, S; Veys, E; Appel, A; Fatenejad, S

    2004-01-01

    Objective: A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of etanercept to treat adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Adult patients with AS at 14 European sites were randomly assigned to 25 mg injections of etanercept or placebo twice weekly for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was an improvement of at least 20% in patient reported symptoms, based on the multicomponent Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) response criteria (ASAS 20). Secondary end points included ASAS 50 and ASAS 70 responses and improved scores on individual components of ASAS, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), acute phase reactants, and spinal mobility tests. Safety was evaluated during scheduled visits. Results: Of 84 patients enrolled, 45 received etanercept and 39 received placebo. Significantly more etanercept patients than placebo patients responded at the ASAS 20 level as early as week 2, and sustained differences were evident up to week 12. Significantly more etanercept patients reported ASAS 50 responses at all times and ASAS 70 responses at weeks 2, 4, and 8; reported lower composite and fatigue BASDAI scores; had lower acute phase reactant levels; and had improved spinal flexion. Etanercept was well tolerated. Most adverse events were mild to moderate; the only between-group difference was injection site reactions, which occurred significantly more often in etanercept patients. Conclusions: Etanercept is a well tolerated and effective treatment for reducing clinical symptoms and signs of AS. PMID:15345498

  14. [Flexibilization of infliximab dose interval in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Filipe; Santos, Maria José; Silva, J Canas da

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to access the maintenance of therapeutic response in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) receiving infliximab, after prolongation of the interval between infusions. In AS patients with sustained therapeutic response to infliximab administered every six weeks, a prolongation of the interval between infusions was proposed. The therapeutic response was evaluated using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), pain, stiffness, patient's global evaluation and acute phase reactants (ESR and CPR). Twenty patients participated in the study. Sixteen were male, with a mean age of 40.3 +- 10.9 years and mean disease duration of 12 +- 9.4 years. The initial BASDAI was 59.5 +- 22.8 and initial BASFI 50.7 +- 27. The interval between infusions was lengthened to 8 +- 1 weeks (minimum 7; maximum 10) and this change occurred between 12 and 142 weeks (median 21) of treatment. The mean followup after changing the therapeutic regimen was 86 +- 45 weeks. Sixty-five percent (13/20) of the patients maintained an adequate response. Two thirds of AS patients with sustained therapeutic response to infliximab administrated every six weeks maintained an adequate response with prolongation of interval between infusions. Therefore the increase of the interval between infusions seems to be an adequate option in selected patients.

  15. Celecoxib versus diclofenac for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: 12-week randomized study in Norwegian patients.

    PubMed

    Walker, Chris; Essex, Margaret N; Li, Chunming; Park, Peter W

    2016-06-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of two different doses of celecoxib and diclofenac in the treatment of Norwegian patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In this 12-week, double-blind, non-inferiority trial patients were randomized to 200 mg once daily (qd) celecoxib, 400 mg qd celecoxib, or 50 mg three times daily (tid) diclofenac. The primary objective compared patients' assessments of Global Pain Intensity, measured on a visual analogue scale. A total of 330 patients were randomized (200 mg celecoxib, n = 107; 400 mg celecoxib, n = 108; diclofenac, n = 115). Least squares mean changes in Global Pain Intensity at 12 weeks were -25.8 mm, -30.6 mm and -28.2 mm, respectively. Both celecoxib treatment groups were non-inferior to diclofenac. More patients in the 400 mg celecoxib group met the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis 20 responder criteria at Week 12 (60.2%) than in the celecoxib 200 mg (51.4%) and the diclofenac 50 mg (57.4%) groups. Adverse events were mild-to-moderate in severity, with dyspepsia and diarrhoea the most commonly reported. Celecoxib and diclofenac both provided pain reduction, in addition to improvements in disease activity and functional capacity, in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Efficacy of golimumab on recurrent uveitis in HLA-B27-positive ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Yazgan, Serpil; Celik, Ugur; Işık, Metin; Yeşil, Nesibe Karahan; Baki, Ali Erdem; Şahin, Hatice; Gencer, Ercan; Doğan, İsmail

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of golimumab on severe and frequent recurrent anterior uveitis in patients with HLA-B27-positive ankylosing spondylitis. In this study, 15 eyes of 12 HLA-B27-positive AS patients with resistant anterior uveitis who received 50 mg of subcutaneous golimumab (Gol) per month due to frequent uveitis recurrences were analyzed retrospectively between May 2013 and October 2015. Assessment criteria were uveitis activity, the number of recurrence of uveitis, visual acuity, systemic corticosteroid, or other drug requirement for maintenance of remission of AU. Twelve patients (15 eyes) with HLA-B27-positive ankylosing spondylitis and anterior uveitis have been treated with golimumab 50 mg/month. Remission of uveitis was observed in 12 eyes out of 15. Malign hypertension developed in one subject after the second dose of golimumab therefore the treatment was stopped and this subject was excluded from the study. Median follow-up time was 11 months (interquartile range: 8-18). No uveitic reaction was seen except in the patient who stopped treatment. No topical or systemic steroid necessity was needed except in two cases with oral 4 mg systemic maintenance. Visual acuity was significantly increased (p = 0.002). Golimumab may be a new and effective choice for maintaining remission and the prevention of recurrences of severe, resistant anterior uveitis in patients with HLA-B27-positive ankylosing spondylitis.

  17. Relationship of environmental exposures and ankylosing spondylitis and spinal mobility: US NHAENS, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to study the relationships of different sets of urinary environmental chemical concentrations and ankylosing spondylitis in a national and population-based setting. Data were extracted from United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2009-2010. Information on demographics was obtained by household interview and ankylosing spondylitis clinical measures and urines were taken at examination. People with abnormal occiput-to-wall distance were found to have higher urinary cadmium (OR 2.17, 95 % CI 1.34-3.52, p = 0.004), antimony (OR 1.74, 95 % CI 1.15-2.62, p = 0.012), tungsten (OR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.39-2.64, p = 0.001), uranium (OR 1.49, 95 % CI 1.03-2.15, p = 0.036), and trimethylarsine oxide (OR 5.01, 95 % CI 2.34-10.71, p < 0.001) concentrations. Moreover, people who resided in older households tended to have abnormal ankylosing spondylitis clinical measures, compared to those who resided in households that were built in 1990 or after. The odds were 1.74 for households built in 1978-1989 and 1.81 for those built in 1940 or earlier.

  18. Effects of two exercise interventions on pulmonary functions in the patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Durmuş, Dilek; Alayli, Gamze; Uzun, Oğuz; Tander, Berna; Cantürk, Ferhan; Bek, Yüksel; Erkan, Levent

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of two different home-based daily exercise programs on pulmonary functions in the patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Fifty-one patients with AS were distributed into three groups. Group 1 (n=19) was given a conventional exercise regimen. Group 2 (n=19) received exercises based on the Global Posture Reeducation (GPR) method. Group 3 (n=13) was accepted as the control group. Patients were assessed according to pain, functional capacity (The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index - BASFI), disease activity (The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index - BASDAI), chest expansion, pulmonary function parameters, and 6-min walk distance (6MWD) test. Although there were significant improvements for BASDAI and BASFI scores in all groups, significant improvements in the VAS pain, chest expansion, pulmonary function parameters and 6MWD test were observed in the exercise groups. The improvements in pain, functional capacity, disease activity, chest expansion, pulmonary function parameters and 6MWD test were better in the exercise groups than in the control group. The GPR method resulted in greater improvements than the conventional exercise program in specific pulmonary function parameters like forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1s, and peak expiratory flow parameters. Both exercises are efficient in improving pulmonary functions. Since the improvements in pulmonary function tests were greater in the patients who performed the exercise according to GPR method, motivated patients should be encouraged to perform this exercise program.

  19. Autonomic functions and their relations with disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Gunay, Tuba; Yilmaz, Ozlem; Bodur, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the autonomic functions in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) by means of clinical and electrophysiological tests, to compare the data with those of healthy individuals and to investigate the relationship with the disease activity. 32 asymptomatic AS patients and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Parasympathetic functions were evaluated clinically with heart rate variability (HRV) and electrophysiologically with R-R interval variation (RRIV). Sympathetic functions were evaluated clinically with diastolic blood pressure response to isometric exercise (DBP) and electrophysiologically with sympathetic skin response (SSR). Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score -C (ASDAS-C) were used to estimate the disease activity. HRV and RRIV was significantly lower in patients with AS when compared to controls, and in patients with BASDAI greater or equal to 4 when compared to the patients with BASDAI less than 4. There was no difference between the AS and the control groups and between the groups with BASDAI greater or equal to 4 and BASDAI less than 4 for DBP. Although there was no difference for SSR between AS and the control groups, SSR latency was significantly longer and SSR amplitude was significantly smaller in the group with BASDAI greater or equal to 4 when compared to the group with BASDAI less than 4. Our results indicate a parasympathetic dysfunction in AS patients, however the sympathetic system seems to be affected when the disease activity is increased. Patients with AS even they are asymptomatic must be investigated for autonomic dysfunction.

  20. Celecoxib versus diclofenac for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: 12-week randomized study in Norwegian patients*

    PubMed Central

    Essex, Margaret N; Li, Chunming; Park, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of two different doses of celecoxib and diclofenac in the treatment of Norwegian patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Methods In this 12-week, double-blind, non-inferiority trial patients were randomized to 200 mg once daily (qd) celecoxib, 400 mg qd celecoxib, or 50 mg three times daily (tid) diclofenac. The primary objective compared patients’ assessments of Global Pain Intensity, measured on a visual analogue scale. Results A total of 330 patients were randomized (200 mg celecoxib, n = 107; 400 mg celecoxib, n = 108; diclofenac, n = 115). Least squares mean changes in Global Pain Intensity at 12 weeks were −25.8 mm, −30.6 mm and −28.2 mm, respectively. Both celecoxib treatment groups were non-inferior to diclofenac. More patients in the 400 mg celecoxib group met the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis 20 responder criteria at Week 12 (60.2%) than in the celecoxib 200 mg (51.4%) and the diclofenac 50 mg (57.4%) groups. Adverse events were mild-to-moderate in severity, with dyspepsia and diarrhoea the most commonly reported. Conclusions Celecoxib and diclofenac both provided pain reduction, in addition to improvements in disease activity and functional capacity, in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:26980340

  1. The role of land and aquatic exercise in ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zão, Ana; Cantista, Pedro

    2017-10-05

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic and inflammatory rheumatic disease, characterized by pain and structural and functional impairments, such as reduced mobility and axial deformity, which lead to diminished quality of life. Its treatment includes not only drugs, but also nonpharmacological therapy. Exercise appears to be a promising modality. The aim of this study is to review the current evidence and evaluate the role of exercise either on land or in water for the management of patients with AS in the biological era. Systematic review of the literature published until November 2016 in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Scopus databases. Thirty-five studies were included for further analysis (30 concerning land exercise and 5 concerning water exercise; combined or not with biological drugs), comprising a total of 2515 patients. Most studies showed a positive effect of exercise on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, pain, mobility, function and quality of life. The benefit was statistically significant in randomized controlled trials. Results support a multimodal approach, including educational sessions and maintaining home-based program. This study highlights the important role of exercise in management of AS, therefore it should be encouraged and individually prescribed. More studies with good methodological quality are needed to strengthen the results and to define the specific characteristics of exercise programs that determine better results.

  2. Does physical therapy still have a place in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed

    Elyan, Mazen; Khan, Muhammad Asim

    2008-05-01

    To review studies of various physical therapy programs in ankylosing spondylitis and identify their benefits and potential indications in the treatment of this disease. Various exercise and physical therapy programs have been evaluated in clinical studies. Home exercise programs have been shown to improve symptoms, mobility, function and overall quality of life. Formal physical therapy under the supervision of a physical therapist has been shown to improve posture, fitness, mobility, function and mood. Water therapy may improve symptoms, function and overall sense of health. Inpatient rehabilitation may provide rapid short-term improvement in pain and stiffness, mobility, function and quality of life for patients with severe active disease. Despite the advances in the pharmacological therapy of ankylosing spondylitis, physical therapy remains an essential part of the management plan. Even though data are not sufficient to determine which specific physical therapy program should be recommended, physicians should implement such nonpharmacological therapy as part of a comprehensive management strategy for this disease. All patients should receive instructions on proper posture and home exercises and be encouraged to perform water exercises if they can. Formal physical therapy and, in most severe cases, inpatient rehabilitation may be of benefit to select patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  3. Controlled cervical extension osteotomy for ankylosing spondylitis utilizing the Jackson operating table: technical note.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kingsley R; Ahn, Jaimo

    2007-08-01

    Technical note. To demonstrate a controlled extension osteotomy technique of the cervical spine in a prone position and using the head elevator mechanism on the Jackson operating table to correct a chin-on-chest deformity in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis. Catastrophic cord injury causing quadriplegia and death has been associated with correction of chin-on-chest deformity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Manual control of spinal column motion during and after osteoclasis or osteotomy can be difficult, inexact, and anxiety inducing. A 45-year-old woman with ankylosing spondylitis and severe chin-on-chest deformity underwent a posterior C7 pedicle subtraction osteotomy, deformity correction, and instrumented fusion in a prone position on the Jackson operating table. By using the elevator mechanism attached to the head of the operating table and Mayfield tongs, the patient's cervicothoracic junction was placed into extension by over 30 degrees in controlled increments. We present a technique for controlled extension osteotomy correction of chin-on-chest deformity in a prone position. Use of the operating table mechanism in conjunction with a closing-wedge osteotomy diminishes the risk of translation, decreases risk of air embolus associated with a sitting position, and promotes greater opportunity for fusion through the osteotomy, and the stability allows for placement of modern instrumentation.

  4. Protracted febrile myalgia in a patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ekşioğlu, Emel; Kesikburun, Bilge; Çakçı, Aytül

    2016-06-03

    Protracted Febrile Myalgia is a rare form of vasculitis that is diagnosed in patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever. To present a case with Familial Mediterranean and Anklosing Spondylitis on anti-TNF therapy for three years, who developed protracted febrile myalgia syndrome. Case report. A 35-year-old woman with known Familial Mediterranean Fever and Anklosing Spondylitis for 3 years presented with fever, diarrhea, intermittent abdominal pain and severe diffuse muscular pain lasting for two weeks. The patient was investigated for any infection focus. The patient was diagnosed as having Protracted Febrile Myalgia four weeks after the onset of the symptoms. Prednisolone 1 mg/kg per day was applied. Her fever and muscle pain resolved within 48 hours. The coexisting Ankylosing Spondylitis disease and the use of anti-TNF treatment in patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever could be a confounding factor for the investigation of fever. Steroid therapy has a dramatic response.

  5. Zygapophyseal Joint Fusion in Ankylosing Spondylitis Assessed by Computed Tomography: Associations with Syndesmophytes and Spinal Motion.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Flynn, John A; Yao, Lawrence; Ward, Michael M

    2017-07-01

    Because zygapophyseal joints (ZJ) are difficult to visualize on radiographs, little is known about the relationship of ZJ fusion to other features of spinal damage in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We used computed tomography (CT) to investigate the concordance of ZJ fusion and syndesmophytes, and examined the contribution of both features to spinal motion. We performed thoracolumbar CT scans (T10-T11 to L3-L4) on 55 patients. Two readers scored scans for ZJ fusion, which were compared to syndesmophyte height and extent of bridging, measured by computer algorithm at the same levels. We used multiple regression analysis to evaluate the relative contributions of ZJ fusion and syndesmophytes to spinal mobility. Fifty-one percent of patients had ZJ fusion in at least 1 vertebral level. Fusion was present in 129 of 652 individual ZJ. Syndesmophytes and bridging were often present in vertebral levels without ZJ fusion, suggesting that syndesmophytes most often develop first. ZJ fusion was present in 34% of vertebral levels with syndesmophytes and 55.9% of levels with bridging, suggesting a closer association with bridging. Syndesmophytes and ZJ fusion had similar associations with the modified Schober test, but syndesmophytes were more strongly associated with limitations in lateral thoracolumbar flexion. ZJ rarely showed new fusion over 4 years. Thoracolumbar ZJ fusion in AS is rarely present at vertebral levels without syndesmophytes. Syndesmophytes, therefore, likely appear before ZJ fusion at a given vertebral level. Both syndesmophytes and ZJ fusion contribute to limited forward lumbar flexion, but syndesmophytes contribute more to limited lateral flexion.

  6. Study of programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1) gene polymorphims in Iranian patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Soleimanifar, Narjes; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Azizi, Esfandiar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Rezaei, Nima; Tahoori, Mohammad Taher; Bidad, Katayoon; Nikbin, Behrouz; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by axial arthritis in which the genetic-environmental factors seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. This study was performed to investigate the role of polymorphisms of the programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1) gene on susceptibility to AS. In this study, 161 Iranian patients with AS and 208 normal controls were enrolled; two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the PDCD1 gene PD-1.3 (G, A) in nucleotide position +7146 of intron 4 and PD-1.9 (C, T) in nucleotide +7625 of exon 5 were studied. Analysis of PD-1.3 revealed that 82% of patients and 79% of controls had GG genotype, while GA and AA genotypes were detected in 17% and 0.6% of patients, respectively, and 20% and 1.4% of controls, respectively. Moreover, the genotype CC (PD-1.9) was present in 92% of patients and 97% of controls. Although these differences were not statistically significant between patients and controls, comparisons of genotypes frequencies in the AS patients, based on human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27, revealed that all patients who had CT genotype (PD-1.9) were HLA-B27 positive, whereas 30% of patients with CC genotype were HLA-B27 negative. There was no evidence of association for PDCD1 SNPs with AS in our study, but CT genotype (PD-1.9) seems to be associated with HLA-B27 positivity in the patients with AS.

  7. Identification of Potential Transcriptomic Markers in Developing Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Jian; Xu, Lixiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE) genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DE genes identified in the meta-analysis. Three microarray datasets (26 cases and 29 controls in total) were collected for meta-analysis. 905 consistently DE genes were identified in ankylosing spondylitis, among which 482 genes were upregulated and 423 genes were downregulated. The upregulated gene with the smallest combined rank product (RP) was GNG11 (combined RP = 299.64). The downregulated gene with the smallest combined RP was S100P (combined RP = 335.94). In the gene ontology (GO) analysis, the most significantly enriched GO term was “immune system process” (P = 3.46 × 10−26). The most significant pathway identified in the pathway analysis was antigen processing and presentation (P = 8.40 × 10−5). The consistently DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and biological pathways associated with those DE genes identified provide valuable information for studying the pathophysiology of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25688367

  8. Biomarkers and cytokines of bone turnover: extensive evaluation in a cohort of patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of spine and sacroiliac joints; it is characterized by new bone formation, and the disease processes can be accompanied by osteoporosis. In the present study, we investigated changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and in the levels of various bone turnover-related biomarkers and cytokines in a cohort of AS patients, with regard to clinical parameters, disease activity, and treatment regimen. Methods 55 AS patients and 33 healthy controls included in the study. Spinal mobility was assessed by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and radiologic changes were scored by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiologic Index (BASRI). Patients were also evaluated with the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Various biomarkers and cytokines of bone turnover including osteoprotegerin (OPG), serum band 5 tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-5), soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (sRANKL), secreted frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP-1), Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK-1), and sclerostin were studied. Results The levels of TRAP-5, NTX, sRANKL, sclerostin, sFRP-1, DKK-1, and IFNγ, were similar between the patients and controls (p > 0.05), while BMD of femoral neck, and OPG levels were significantly lower in AS patients (p < 0.05). In a subgroup analysis, patients with active disease had significantly higher concentrations of OPG compared with the inactive group. Rest of the biomarkers and cytokines of bone turnover were similar between the active and inactive disease groups. Subgroup analysis of patients receiving anti-TNFα agents and conventional therapy revealed that OPG concentrations were significantly lower in the patients receiving biological drugs, while BAP and DKK-1 were significantly higher

  9. Biomarkers of bone metabolism in ankylosing spondylitis in relation to osteoproliferation and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Klingberg, Eva; Nurkkala, Merja; Carlsten, Hans; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena

    2014-07-01

    To identify biomarkers for bone metabolism in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to determine the relationship between these biomarkers and disease activity, back mobility, osteoproliferation, and bone mineral density (BMD). Serum levels of Wingless protein (Wnt-3a), Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), sclerostin, soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (sRANKL), and osteoprotegerin were assessed using ELISA. Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score-C reactive protein, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis patient global score, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were used as disease activity measures, and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) as a measure of spinal mobility. Lateral spine radiographs were scored for chronic AS-related changes (mSASSS). BMD was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Two hundred four patients with AS (NY criteria; 57% men), with a mean age of 50 ± 13 years and disease duration 15 ± 11 years, and 80 age and sex-matched controls were included. The patients with AS had significantly higher serum levels of Wnt-3a (p < 0.001) and lower levels of sclerostin (p = 0.014) and sRANKL (p = 0.047) compared with the controls. High CRP was associated with low sclerostin (r(S) = -0.21, p = 0.003) and DKK-1 (r(S) = -0.14, p = 0.045). In multiple linear regression analyses, increasing BASMI and mSASSS were independently associated with older age, male sex, high CRP, and elevated serum levels of Wnt-3a. In addition, mSASSS remained associated with a high number of smoking pack-years after adjusting for age. Low BMD of femoral neck was associated with high mSASSS after adjusting for age. Serum levels of Wnt-3a are elevated in AS and associated with increased BASMI and mSASSS, independent of age, indicating that Wnt-3a could be a biomarker for the osteoproliferative process.

  10. Effects of a home-based exercise program on quality of life, fatigue, and depression in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Dilek; Alayli, Gamze; Cil, Erhan; Canturk, Ferhan

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this trial was to investigate the effects of a 12-week home-based exercise program (HEP) on quality of life (QOL) and fatigue in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). Forty-three patients with AS were included in this study. Group 1 was given a HEP; Group 2 served as the control group. The functional capacity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index), disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Assessment Index), fatigue (Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue Scale), depression (Beck Depression Inventory scores), and QOL (Short Form 36) of all participants were evaluated. There were significant improvements for all the parameters in two groups after the treatment. The improvements for all the parameters were better in the exercise group than in the control group. Home-based exercise programs are very effective in improving QOL and reducing fatigue. Because of these advantages, HEP should be advised for the management program in AS in addition to medical treatments.

  11. Fatigue in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: prevalence and relationships with disease-specific variables, psychological status, and sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, N; Rostom, S; Hakkou, J; Berrada Ghziouel, K; Bahiri, R; Abouqal, R; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the frequency of fatigue in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and its relationships with disease-specific variables, psychological status, and sleep disturbance. A cross-sectional study included patients fulfilled the modified New York classification criteria for ankylosing spondylitis. To assess fatigue, the first item of Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) and the multidimensional assessment of fatigue (MAF) was used. The evaluation included the activity of the disease (BASDAI), global well-being (Bath ankylosing spondylitis global index), functional status (Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index), metrologic measurements (Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrological index), and visual analog scale of axial or joint pain. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were measured. To assess psychological status, the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was used. Sleep disturbance was assessed by the fourth item of Hamilton anxiety scale. One hundred and ten patients were included, of average age 38.0 years ± 12.6. In our data, 66.4% experienced severe fatigue (BASDAI fatigue ≥ 5). The mean total score of MAF was 26 ± 12.77. The disease-specific variables contributed significantly with both BASDAI fatigue and MAF as dependent variables, accounting for 71.3 and 65.6% of the variance, respectively. The contribution of the depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance were 24.9, 18.4 and 15.4%, respectively. This study state the importance of fatigue in AS patients. Even though disease activity was the most powerful predictor of fatigue, the effects of psychogenic factors and sleep disturbance, should be taken into consideration in the management of AS.

  12. Association between arterial stiffness, disease activity and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Avram, Claudiu; Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel; Popoviciu, Horațiu; Drăgoi, Mihai; Avram, Adina; Amaricăi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk is an important factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The aim of this study is to assess arterial stiffness in relation to the disease activity and functional limitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Twenty-four patients (mean age 45.8 ± 11.7 years) suffering of ankylosing spondylitis (disease duration 11.1 ± 5.1 years) and 24 gender and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical, biological, and functional status of ankylosing spondylitis patients was recorded. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA) was performed using applanation tonometry. We found significant differences between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls in regard to PWV (p = 0.047), aortic augmentation pressure-AP (p = 0.028), augmentation index-AIx (p = 0.038) and aortic augmentation index adjusted for heart rate-AIx75 (p = 0.011). PWV and AIx75 were significantly associated with the disease functioning score-BASFI (p = 0.012, r = 0.504; p = 0.041, r = 0.421). Aortic AP and augmentation indexes (AIx and AIx75) were all associated to ASDAS score (p = 0.028, r = 0.448; p = 0.005, r = 0.549; p = 0.025, r = 0.455). Our study showed that ankylosing spondylitis patients have a higher arterial stiffness than the age-matched controls, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk. We found that arterial stiffness is positively associated with disease activity and functional impairment. Chronic spondiloarthropaties should be screened for arterial stiffness, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to benefit from primary prevention measures.

  13. Left ventricular wall function abnormalities in patients with ankylosing spondylitis evaluated by gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, H; Guler, H; Gunay, E; Yeral, N; Turhanoglu, A; Bolaç, E; Yalcin, F

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondilitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease with prominent inflammation in joints and extraarticular organs. AS patients have approximately two times more risk of mortality than the normal population. One reason for this increase in mortality is increased cardiovascular risk. In this study, we have aimed to evaluate myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function using (99m)Tc-MIBI gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The study group consisted of 28 AS patients (19 men, 9 women), and mean age 39.46±10.98 years. All patients underwent (99m)Tc-MIBI gated myocardial perfusion SPECT with the same day protocol. We detected various risk factors including smoking habits in 12, family history of cardiovascular disease in 12, hypertension in 3, hyperlipidemia in 9 patients. We performed a myocardial perfusion SPECT for each patient and found normal perfusion pattern in SPECT images. Out of 28 patients, eight patients had normal perfusion but wall motion abnormalities. We detected that myocardial perfusion is preserved in the patients with AS. However, left ventricular wall motion abnormalities are seen. We concluded that ankylosing spondylitis may be associated with microvascular dysfunction and gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy could be valuable in AS patients for the evaluation of LV function even if the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) score are low and the disease duration shorter. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  14. Single anterior approach for cervical spine fractures at C5-T1 complicating ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qunfeng; Cui, Yidong; Wang, Liang; Lu, Xuhua; Ni, Bin

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of anterior approach for cervical spine fractures at C5-T1 in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and study the problems encountered in diagnosis and treatment. Ten patients with AS (all males; mean age 43.7±9.4 years) underwent anterior surgeries to treat fractures at C5-T1. Skull tractions were performed on patients with fracture dislocation preoperatively. After operation, all the patients wore a cervical collar for 3 months. Plain radiographs at follow-up were reviewed. If bone fusion could not be confirmed on plain radiograph, CT scan was employed. The pre- and postoperative neurological statuses were evaluated according to the Frankel grading system. Problems encountered in diagnosis and treatments were analyzed. The mean follow-up was 41.2±22.7months. After operation, the displacements of fractures were significantly reduced(P<0.05). Bone fusions were observed in 9 patients at final follow-up. Frankel grades improved by 1.0±0.7 grade (P>0.05). Posterior complications occurred in four patients, including implants failure (n=1), subsidence of cage (n=1), hoarse voice (n=1) and pneumonias (n=2). The patient with implants failure required revision surgery and anterior-posterior fixation. Patient with subsidence of the titanium cage achieved bone fusion with prolonged cervical collar immobilization. The diagnosis and treatment of cervical spine fractures at C5-T1 in AS patients are challenging, with high risk of neurological compromise and postoperative complications. The single anterior approach followed by postoperative immobilization with a cervical collar can yield acceptable results if the cases are properly selected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Coexistence of multiple sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis: Report of four cases from Russia and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fominykh, Vera; Shevtsova, Tatyana; Arzumanian, Narine; Brylev, Lev

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system. There are many cases of multiple sclerosis - like syndrome and demyelinating disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren disease, Behcet disease and other autoimmune conditions. Coexistence of ankylosing spondylitis and multiple sclerosis usually is rare but in this article we report 4 Russian patients with concomitant multiple sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis diseases. None of these patients received anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy prior to diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment challenges are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The direct healthcare costs associated with ankylosing spondylitis patients attending a UK secondary care rheumatology unit.

    PubMed

    Ara, R M; Packham, J C; Haywood, K L

    2008-01-01

    To explore the direct healthcare resources associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the UK. A secondary objective was to establish if resources, and thus healthcare costs, vary by disease severity. Medical records of 147 sequential AS patients attending a UK secondary care rheumatology unit were examined to assess the direct healthcare resources used over the previous 12 months. Starting with a detailed inventory and measurement of resources consumed, unit cost multipliers were applied to the quantity of each type of resource consumed. The mean cost per patient was estimated using the total cost divided by the number of patients included. The mean (median) annual cost per patient was 1852 pounds sterling (892 pounds sterling). The distribution of cost data was skewed, with 11% of patients incurring 50% of the total costs. The three most relevant cost domains were physiotherapy, hospitalization and medication costs at 32, 21 and 20% of the total costs, respectively. Twenty percent of the patients received physiotherapy, 13% received inpatient care and almost all incurred medication costs. Thirty-four percent of patients were prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and 85% non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Over 50% of patients had at least one comorbidity. Direct costs accelerate steeply with disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index >6.0) and increasing loss of function (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index >6.0) in patients with AS. The most severely affected patients incur 50% of the total costs, and physiotherapy accounts for 32% of the total healthcare costs in the UK.

  17. Development of a prognostic score for work disability in Romanian patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Oancea, Corina; Mihai, Carina; Gherman, Despina; Milicescu, Mihaela; Ancuta, Ioan; Martin, Andrei; Bojinca, Mihai; Stoica, Victor; Ciuvica, Maria Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    To develop a prognostic score for predicting work disability (WD) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as strong indicator for poor vocational rehabilitation. A cross-sectional study was performed in a group of 170 patients with AS, 120 work disabled and 50 still employed. The variables strongly associated with WD were quantified (scored 0-30) - abnormalities of: anterior-posterior radiograph of pelvis, lateral cervical spine radiograph and lung function tests, certain work factors (occupation, physical strain and microclimate), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Mobility Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index tests. The eight-item score identifies WD with sensitivity of 91.7% and specificity of 85.7%. The scaling properties were fulfilled: internal consistency - Chronbach's alpha 0.73; reliability - intraclass correlation coefficient 0.73; redundancy weak-moderate, with coefficients ranging from 0.032 to 0.797; the discriminative capacity by the significant variations of the score according to the statute (employed or work disabled) and the degree of WD. The score is a reliable method for assessing the WD risk in patients with AS. It allows a complex evaluation by performing minimal investigations and it is easy to perform. Work disability is an important outcome in AS, determined by numerous variables but highly dependent on the national characteristics of economy, social security and healthcare system. The prognostic score for work disability in AS not only contains medical but also socio-demographic and work-related factors and is expected to be a useful tool for specialists to guide the tertiary prevention-oriented rehabilitation measures. Our study suggests the prognostic score to be comprehensive, useful and a reliable method to assess the risk of work disability in AS.

  18. Regulatory T cells in ankylosing spondylitis and the response after adalimumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chou, Chung-Tei

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We included 69 AS patients (15 of them received anti-tumor necrosis factor-apha agent-adalimumab) in the study and used a questionnaire to record the demographic data, disease activity index, functional index, human leukocyte antigen-B27, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Thirty healthy subjects were used as controls. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) were stained with anti-CD4, anti-CD25 and anti-Forkhead/winged helix transcription factor P3 (anti-FoxP3) antibodies and flow-cytometry was used to determine cell populations. The percentages of Tregs in PMBCs were significantly higher in AS patients than in healthy controls. In AS patients who had poor disease functional index with higher levels of ESR and CRP were positively and significantly correlated with Tregs percentages in PMBCs. After adalimumab treatment in 15 patients, the percentages of Tregs, the ESR/CRP levels and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index/Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index were significantly and gradually decreased over time. The high expression of FoxP3 and CD25 on CD4(+) T cells in PBMCs in AS patients was noted, and could be reversed by adalimumab therapy. These findings suggest that Tregs may play a role in modulating the inflammatory process in AS. Whether Tregs can be taken as a predictor for disease activity or treatment outcome is unclear and requires further study. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Association study of ankylosing spondylitis and polymorphisms in ERAP1 gene in Zhejiang Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangbo; Li, Liangda; Shi, Shanfen; Chen, Xin; Gao, Jianqing; Zhu, Minyu; Yuan, Jiandong

    2016-02-01

    The susceptibility loci of ERAP1 polymorphisms have been found to be strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The researches in multiple ethnic cohorts suggested that the population attributable risk in ERAP1 polymorphisms is at a high significance level. This study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence and incidence of subsets of AS and investigate the specific variants of ERAP1 polymorphisms in AS susceptibility, in the Han ethnic Chinese population in Zhejiang Province. AS patients were selected, diagnosed, and confirmed by a qualified rheumatologist. The basal clinical and demographic characteristics were compared with all subjects. Genotypes for eight selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ERAP1 gene (rs27038, rs27037, rs27434, rs27980, rs7711564, rs30187, rs10050860, and rs17482078) were determined by using the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX platform in Zhejiang Han Chinese population. Association analyses were performed on the whole genotyped data set in 707 unrelated ankylosing spondylitis cases and 837 ethnically matched controls. We observed the strongest association between AS and HLA-B27, which confers over 90 % of ankylosing spondylitis cases. Moreover, we found three loci of ERAP1 polymorphisms were at a high significance level (rs27037 P = 0.00451; rs27434 P = 0.00012; rs27980 P = 0.00682) with AS in Zhejiang population. We also confirmed polymorphism locus of ERAP1 previously reported association with AS (rs27434; P = 5.3 × 10(-12)). Our results indicated a difference in the mechanism of susceptibility loci in subsets of Zhejiang Han Chinese population and provided further evidence that rs27434 is the key polymorphism associated with AS in ERAP1 gene.

  20. Effectiveness of adalimumab in treating patients with ankylosing spondylitis associated with enthesitis and peripheral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of adalimumab in enthesitis and peripheral arthritis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods Adults with active AS (Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index [BASDAI] ≥ 4) received adalimumab 40 mg every other week with standard antirheumatic therapies in a 12-week, open-label study. Effectiveness in enthesitis was assessed using the Maastricht ankylosing spondylitis enthesitis score (MASES, 0-13) and by examining the plantar fascia in patients with enthesitis (≥ 1 inflamed enthesis) at baseline; effectiveness in peripheral arthritis was evaluated using tender and swollen joint counts (TJC, 0-46; SJC, 0-44) in patients with peripheral arthritis (≥ 1 swollen joint) at baseline. Overall effectiveness measures included Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society 20% response (ASAS20). Results Of 1,250 patients enrolled, 686 had enthesitis and 281 had peripheral arthritis. In 667 patients with MASES ≥ 1 at baseline, the median MASES was reduced from 5 at baseline to 1 at week 12. At week 12, inflammation of the plantar fascia ceased in 122 of 173 patients with inflammation at baseline. The median TJC in 281 patients with SJC ≥ 1 at baseline was reduced from 5 at baseline to 1 at week 12; the median SJC improved from 2 to 0. ASAS20 responses were achieved by 70.5% of 457 patients with no enthesitis and no arthritis; 71.0% of 512 patients with only enthesitis; 68.0% of 107 patients with only arthritis; and 66.7% of 174 patients with both. Conclusions Treatment with adalimumab improved enthesitis and peripheral arthritis in patients with active AS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00478660. PMID:20230622

  1. Results of Corrective Osteotomy and Treatment Strategy for Ankylosing Spondylitis with Kyphotic Deformity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Tack; Park, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2015-09-01

    To report the radiological and clinical results after corrective osteotomy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. Furthermore, this study intended to classify the types of deformity and to suggest appropriate surgical treatment options. We retrospectively analyzed ankylosing spondylitis patients who underwent corrective osteotomy between 1996 and 2009. The radiographic assessments included the sagittal vertical axis (SVA), spinopelvic alignment parameters, correction angle, correction loss, type of deformity related to the location of the apex, and the craniocervical range of motion (CCROM). The clinical outcomes were assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. A total of 292 corrective osteotomies were performed in 248 patients with a mean follow-up of 40.1 months (range, 24 to 78 months). There were 183 cases of single pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO), 19 cases of multiple Smith-Petersen osteotomy (SPO), 17 cases of PSO + SPO, 14 cases of single SPO, six cases of posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR), five cases of PSO + partial pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PPSO), and four cases of PPSO. The mean correction angles were 31.9° ± 11.7° with PSO, 14.3° ± 8.4° with SPO, 38.3° ± 12.7° with PVCR, and 19.3° ± 7.1° with PPSO. The thoracolumbar type was the most common. The outcome analysis showed a significant improvement in the ODI score (p < 0.05). Statistical analysis revealed that the ODI score improvements correlated significantly with the postoperative SVA and CCROM (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between the clinical outcomes and spinopelvic parameters. There were 38 surgery-related complications in 25 patients (10.1%). Corrective osteotomy is an effective method for treating a fixed kyphotic deformity occurring in ankylosing spondylitis, resulting in satisfactory outcomes with acceptable complications. The CCROM and postoperative SVA were important factors in determining the outcome.

  2. Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio Connected to Treatment Options and Inflammation Markers of Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Gökmen, Ferhat; Akbal, Ayla; Reşorlu, Hatice; Gökmen, Esra; Güven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Erbağ, Gökhan; Kömürcü, Erkam; Akbal, Erdem; Coşar, Murat

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, white blood cells (WBCs) and their subtypes have been studied in relation to inflammation. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We enrolled a total of 177 patients, 96 AS and 81 healthy controls. Complete blood count, WBC, neutrophil and lymphocyte levels were measured, and the NLR was calculated. In the assessment of AS, we used the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein (CRP), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index. In the present study, 96 AS and 81 healthy individuals were enrolled. The mean age was 43.8 ± 12.9 and 46.5 ± 11.2 years, respectively. Mean disease duration of AS patients was 6.9 ± 5.6 years (median = 5, min-max = 1-25). The patients with AS had a higher NLR than the control individuals (mean NLR, 2.24 ± 1.23 and 1.73 ± 0.70, respectively, P < 0.001). A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between NLR and CRP (r = 0.322, P = 0.01). The patients receiving antitumor necrosis factor α therapy had a lower NLR than the patients receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy (mean NLR, 1.71 ± 0.62 and 2.41 ± 1.33, respectively, P = 0.02). NLR may be seen as a useful marker for demonstrating inflammation together with acute phase reactants such as CRP and in evaluating the effectiveness of anti-TNF-α therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Performance characteristics of the simplified version of ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (SASDAS).

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Dilek; Yildirim, Tulay; Avci, Okan; Tomas, Nazmiye; Akar, Servet

    2016-07-01

    Various types of disease activity measures are available for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), and there is no gold standard for all individual patients. The ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (ASDAS) is highly discriminatory, sensitive to change, and associated with structural progression. A simplified version of the ASDAS (SASDAS) was proposed and found to be a simple and practical tool to assess disease activity. Our aim was to test the performance characteristics of the SASDAS and compare it with validated tools. In total, 97 consecutive ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients were included in the study. Disease activity was assessed by the ASDAS-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP), bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), and SASDAS. The relationship among these activity indices and the level of agreement of various activity categories were tested. There was a strong correlation between the SASDAS and other activity indices, including the BASDAI (r = 0.916, p < 0.001), ASDAS-CRP (r = 0.847, p < 0.001), and ASDAS-ESR (r = 0.942, p < 0.001). Although the agreement between the ASDAS-ESR and SASDAS was good (weighted kappa of 0.744 and total agreement of 77 %), there was moderate agreement between the ASDAS-CRP and SASDAS (weighted kappa of 0.579 and total agreement of 66 %). The disagreement was particularly striking in "moderate" and "high disease activity" states. Approximately 40 % of patients classified as moderate activity according to the ASDAS-ESR and 45 % according to the ASDAS-CRP were differentially categorized by the SASDAS. The results of the present analysis suggest that the simplified version of the ASDAS-ESR should be further validated in various settings and populations due to a questionable level of agreement between the ASDAS-CRP and SASDAS.

  4. Evaluation of the effects of Global Postural Reeducation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eliane Maria; Andrade, Sandra C; Vilar, Maria J

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and compare GPR with group conventional segmental self-stretching and breathing exercises. This is a controlled interventional study of 38 patients divided into 2 groups: a GPR group (n = 22) and a control group (n = 16). Both groups were treated for more than 4 months. With the GPR group patients, positions that stretched the shortened muscle chains were used. With the control group patients, conventional segmental self-stretching and breathing exercises were performed. The variables analyzed were pain intensity, morning stiffness, spine mobility, chest expansion, functional capacity (Health Assessment Questionnaire-Spondyloarthropathies-HAQ-S), quality of life (Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 Healthy Survey-SF-36), and disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index-BASDAI). Statistical analysis was used with a significance level of P < 0.05. There was a statistically significant improvement for all the parameters analyzed between pre-and post-treatment in both groups. In the intergroup comparison, the GPR group showed a significantly greater improvement in morning stiffness (P = 0.013), spine mobility parameters, except finger-floor distance (P = 0.118), in chest expansion (P = 0.028), and in the physical aspect component of the SF-36 (P = 0.001). The results of this study showed that individual treatment with GPR (overall stretching) seems to have better clinical outcomes than group treatment with conventional segmental self-stretching and breathing exercises for patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  5. Effectiveness of exercise programs in ankylosing spondylitis: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Pécourneau, Virginie; Degboé, Yannick; Barnetche, Thomas; Cantagrel, Alain; Constantin, Arnaud; Ruyssen-Witrand, Adeline

    2017-08-28

    To assess the effectiveness of exercise programs on disease activity and function in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) by a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Medline via PubMed and Cochrane Library. Reports of RCTs examining the effectiveness of exercise programs for AS published up to May 2017. Outcomes were evolution of the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) after the completion of exercise programs. Modalities of exercise were compared and the use of biologic therapy was reported. After screening 190 abstracts, we selected 26 reports for detailed evaluation and finally investigated 8 trials that assessed a home-based exercise program (2/8), swimming (1/8), Pilates training (1/8) or supervised exercises (4/8), for 331 AS patients. Four trials included patients receiving anti-TNF therapy. All trials except one showed a decrease in BASDAI and BASFI, with exercise. The weighted mean difference (95% confidence interval) was -0.90 (-1.52, -0.27) (I(2)=69%, p=0.005) for the BASDAI and -0.72 (-1.03, -0.40) (I(2)= 0%, p<0.00001) for the BASFI in favor of exercise programs. Despite the small number of patients and the heterogeneity of exercise programs in the RCTs included in this meta-analysis, its results support the potential of exercise programs to improve disease activity and body function in AS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Coping with Stress and Body Image in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    SARISOY, Gökhan; DURMUŞ, Dilek; BÖKE, Ömer; CANTÜRK, Ferhan; ŞAHİN, Ahmet Rıfat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine coping with stress and body image in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to investigate the correlation between these two characteristics together and also between them and disease activity/functional capacity. Method Fourty healthy controls and 40 patients with AS who were diagnosed on the basis of Modified New York Criteria were included in the study. The exclusion criteria were another medical disease or comorbid psychiatric disorder. All participants were administered the Coping Orientations to Problems Experienced (COPE) questionnaire in order to evaluate attitudes to coping with stress and the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ) to evaluate body image. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) were used to evaluate AS patients’ disease activities and functional capacities. Results There was no difference between the two groups in terms of COPE scores. The MBSRQ ‘health evaluation’ subscale scores were lower and the ‘fitness orientation’ scores higher in the AS group. The COPE active coping subscale had a weak, positive correlation with MBSRQ total score and a weak, negative correlation with BASFI score. MBRSQ total score had a moderate, negative correlation with BASFI score, and a weak, negative correlation with BASDAI score. Conclusion The attitudes to coping with stress in AS patients with no accompanying medical disease or psychiatric disorder may not differ from that in healthy controls. Negative health evaluation and fitness orientation must be characteristics considered in psychotherapeutic interventions applied to these patients. In addition, psychotherapeutic interventions directed toward coping with stress and body image may be especially useful in active stages of the disease and in patients with limited functional capacity. PMID:28360609

  7. The impact of ankylosing spondylitis/axial spondyloarthritis on work productivity.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Jane; Shukla, Rudresh; Goodacre, John

    2015-06-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory condition that has a significant impact on the quality of life and work productivity. New classification criteria have enabled earlier diagnosis of this condition. However, work productivity is an important issue that is still often overlooked during clinical assessments and consultations. This article focusses on the relationship between axial spondyloarthritis (axial SpA) and work productivity. It summarises the impact of this condition on work productivity, and it highlights the tools available to assess this. It also highlights the increasing role and potential of employers, health professionals and new treatments for enhancing work productivity for people with this condition.

  8. Orthotic correction of postural unleveling in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lipton, James A; Mitchell, Lisa J

    2014-02-01

    The authors describe the case of a patient with ankylosing spondylitis who was treated with orthotic devices for postural unleveling. The patient described specific pre-existing postural problems, both static and dynamic, that had been present for many years. A unilateral 9-mm gel heel lift was used, followed by custom-molded orthotic devices that incorporated the heel lift. The patient reported immediate resolution of these symptoms after orthotic treatment, as well as increased functionality and satisfaction in activities of daily living, which coincided with the leveling of his posture. The orthotic devices were used until the patient underwent total hip arthroplasty, at which point the orthotic treatment was discontinued.

  9. [Polysegmental andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (roentgenological-histological synopsis) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dihlmann, W; Lindenfelser, R

    1979-04-01

    Basing on roentgenological observation of the course of the disease, and on postmortem examination, of a patient with polysegmental Andersson lesions (known as spondylodiscitis) in ankylosing spondylitis, the article reports on the histological and often also clinico-roentgenological possibility of differentiating between an inflammatory and non-inflammatory type of this destructive lesion. The non-inflammatory type of Andersson lesion reflects a fracture due to fatigue, or its sequel, eg pseudarthrosis, in the stiffened axial skeleton. In this particular patient, renal osteopathy had favoured the genesis of the disease.

  10. Multiple organ tuberculosis of lung, pleura, and peritoneum in ankylosing spondylitis during adalimumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Wan-Hee

    2012-03-01

    A case of multiple organ tuberculosis (TBc) involving lung, pleura, and peritoneum in a 39-year-old man with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) treated with adalimumab was presented. The relationship between antitumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) therapy and TBc was also reviewed. This case illustrates that TBc can develop in multiple organs during adalimumab therapy, and thus, the awareness of serious complications of multiple organs and atypical extrapulmonary pattern of TBc during anti-TNF-α therapy needs to be increased.

  11. [Mandibular osteomyelitis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis with severe axial and peripheral involvement].

    PubMed

    Tomotani, Daniere Yurie Vieira; Miranda, Aryádine Allinne Machado de; Almeida, Lorena Penha; Mubarac, Rebecca Souza; Neves, Anne Christine Garcia; Ribeiro, Sandra Lúcia Euzébio

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects mainly the axial skeletal system, causing pain and functional incapacity. The peripheral joint involvement occurs in 30 to 40% of cases. Osteomyelitis of the mandible was relatively common before the advent of preventive antibiotic therapy and restorative dentistry. Currently, the infection of the facial bones is a rare condition, being the odontogenic infection the most responsible for cases with mandibular involvement. The authors report the case of a EA patient, with severe peripheral involvement, which progressed to osteomyelitis of the jaw, secondary to the odontogenic infection due to delay in diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Axial spondyloarthritis: a new disease entity, not necessarily early ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip Cameron; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-02-01

    New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis have been developed with the goal of increasing sensitivity of criteria for early inflammatory spondyloarthritis. However these criteria substantially increase heterogeneity of the resulting disease group, reducing their value in both research and clinical settings. Further research to establish criteria based on better knowledge of the natural history of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis, its aetiopathogenesis and response to treatment is required. In the meantime the modified New York criteria for ankylosing spondylitis remain a very useful classification criteria set, defining a relatively homogenous group of cases for clinical use and research studies.

  13. Determining the relationship of kinesiophobia with respiratory functions and functional capacity in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Er, Göktuğ; AngIn, Ender

    2017-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common inflammatory rheumatic disease that affects the axial skeleton, causes inflammatory lower back pain, and structural and functional disorders, which affect quality of life negatively.The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of kinesiophobia in AS on pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and functional performance.Thirty-one individuals with AS (n = 19 male, n = 12 female) who were suitable on the basis of the Modified New York (MNY) criteria were included in the study. The participants were given the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), in addition to the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TKS), PFTs, respiratory muscle strength, pain evaluation, and 6-minute walking test (6MWT).The mean values were found as the following: TKS, 41.65 ± 7.59; pain visual analog scale (VAS) score, 6.23 ± 2.86; forced vital capacity (%) (FVC), 75.35% ± 17.92%; forced expiratory volume in first second (%) (FEV1), 73.45% ± 17.20%; FEV1/FVC (%), 75.58% ± 15.99%; peak expiratory flow (%) (PEF), 54,90% ± 20.21%; forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% (FEF25-75), 77.71% ± 27.05%; maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), 62.06 ± 31.68; maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), 95.94 ± 36.60; 6MWT, 445.88 ± 99.48. The scores obtained in TKS were found related to the values of FVC (%), FEV1 (%), chest expansion, BASFI, modified Schober test, lumbar lateral flexion, cervical rotation, and total BASMI score (r = -0.43, -0.36, -0.41, 0.42, -0.49, -0.56, -0.52, 0.56, respectively; P < .05).Kinesiophobia is a condition that may arise in individuals with AS, which has negative effects. Physiotherapists have a responsibility to eliminate kinesiophobia beliefs and prefer therapy method in line with this responsibility.

  14. Bilaterally Primary Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty for Severe Hip Ankylosis with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong-Xu; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yu-Min; Nian, Yue-Wen; Zhang, Jun; Kang, Xiao-Min; Wu, Shu-Fang; Zhu, Yang-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a reliable therapeutic intervention in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, in whom the aims of surgery are to reduce pain, restore hip function and improve quality of life. The current study is a retrospective analysis of the clinical and radiographic findings in a consecutive series of patients with hip ankylosis associated with severe ankylosing spondylitis who underwent bilateral primary total hip arthroplasty using non-cemented components. From June 2008 to May 2012, total hip arthroplasty was performed on 34 hips in 17 patients with bilateral ankylosis caused by ankylosing spondylitis. The study patients included 13 men and 4 women with a mean age of 24.2 years. The mean duration of disease was 8.3 years and the average duration of hip involvement was 7.6 years. All patients had severe hip pain and dysfunction with bilateral bony ankylosis and no range of motion preoperatively and all underwent bilateral cementless total hip arthroplasty performed by a single surgeon. Joint pain, range of motion (ROM), and Harris hip scores were assessed to evaluate the postoperative results. At a mean follow-up of 31.7 months, all patients had experienced significant clinical improvement in function, ROM, posture and ambulation. At the final follow-up, the mean postoperative flexion ROM was 134.4° compared with 0° preoperatively. Similar improvements were seen in hip abduction, adduction, internal rotation and external rotation. Postoperatively, 23 hips were completely pain-free, six had only occasional discomfort, three mild to moderate pain and two severe pain. The average Harris Hip Score improved from 23.7 preoperatively to 65.8 postoperatively. No stems had loosened at the final follow-up in any patient, nor had any revision surgery been required. Bilateral severe hip ankylosis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis can be treated with cementless bilateral synchronous total hip arthroplasty, which can greatly improve hip joint function and

  15. Fatigue assessment and its impact in the quality of life of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Marengo, María Florencia; Dal Pra, Fernando; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Citera, Gustavo

    2015-03-01

    The most frequently reported symptoms by patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are pain, stiffness, and fatigue. Previous studies have estimated a 63% prevalence of fatigue in AS, with a low correlation of fatigue with pain and functional capacity. The objective of this study is to assess fatigue prevalence in AS patients and establish the main associated factors. A case-control study including AS patients according to New York modified criteria was carried out. The control group included individuals of the general population without rheumatic conditions, matched by gender, age, and socioeconomic level. Disease-related variables were recorded. Functional capacity, disease activity, and quality of life were assessed using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Funcional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and ankylosing spondylitis quality of life (ASQoL). CES-D questionnaire was used to evaluate depression and fatigue severity scale (FSS) to evaluate fatigue. Sixty-four consecutive AS patients and 95 controls were included. Patients' median age was 44 years (interquartile range (IQR), 33.25-53), 89.1% were male, and had a median disease duration of 17 years (IQR, 10.3-25). Fatigue prevalence in AS was 73.4% compared to 30.5% in the control group (p < 0.001; OR, 2.08 (95% CI, 1.53-2.83)). Furthermore, fatigue in AS correlated with ASQoL (r = 0.65), BASFI (r = 0.52), BASDAI (r = 0.52), and depression (r = 0.51), whereas no correlation with age or disease duration was found. In the linear regression analysis using fatigue as the dependent variable, depression was the only associated variable (p = 0.01). No association with age, gender, disease duration, BASDAI, BASFI, or presence of comorbidities was found. Finally, BASDAI fatigue question correlated with the FSS (r = 0.55). Fatigue was significantly more prevalent in AS than in healthy controls. The main determinant factor of fatigue was the presence of

  16. Determining the relationship of kinesiophobia with respiratory functions and functional capacity in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Er, Göktuğ; AngIn, Ender

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common inflammatory rheumatic disease that affects the axial skeleton, causes inflammatory lower back pain, and structural and functional disorders, which affect quality of life negatively. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of kinesiophobia in AS on pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and functional performance. Thirty-one individuals with AS (n = 19 male, n = 12 female) who were suitable on the basis of the Modified New York (MNY) criteria were included in the study. The participants were given the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), in addition to the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TKS), PFTs, respiratory muscle strength, pain evaluation, and 6-minute walking test (6MWT). The mean values were found as the following: TKS, 41.65 ± 7.59; pain visual analog scale (VAS) score, 6.23 ± 2.86; forced vital capacity (%) (FVC), 75.35% ± 17.92%; forced expiratory volume in first second (%) (FEV1), 73.45% ± 17.20%; FEV1/FVC (%), 75.58% ± 15.99%; peak expiratory flow (%) (PEF), 54,90% ± 20.21%; forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% (FEF25–75), 77.71% ± 27.05%; maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), 62.06 ± 31.68; maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), 95.94 ± 36.60; 6MWT, 445.88 ± 99.48. The scores obtained in TKS were found related to the values of FVC (%), FEV1 (%), chest expansion, BASFI, modified Schober test, lumbar lateral flexion, cervical rotation, and total BASMI score (r = −0.43, −0.36, −0.41, 0.42, −0.49, −0.56, −0.52, 0.56, respectively; P < .05). Kinesiophobia is a condition that may arise in individuals with AS, which has negative effects. Physiotherapists have a responsibility to eliminate kinesiophobia beliefs and prefer therapy method in line with this responsibility. PMID:28723759

  17. The role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and exercise in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Elyan, Mazen; Khan, Muhammad Asim

    2006-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic rheumatic disease that primarily affects the sacroiliac joints and spine. Even with the development of tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors, which have revolutionized the treatment of this disease, the combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physical therapy, and a life-long exercise program still form the first step in its management. Multiple clinical trials have addressed the efficacy and safety of both nonselective and selective NSAIDs. Gastrointestinal toxicity remains their major side effect, with increased concern about the potential of cardiovascular toxicity, especially with the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. A specific set of recommendations has been proposed for the management of AS.

  18. LLLT for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Stasinopoulos, D; Papadopoulos, K; Lamnisos, D; Stergioulas, A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of the combined low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and passive stretching with combined placebo LLLT laser and the same passive stretching exercises in patients suffering from Αnkylosing spondylitis. Forty-eight patients suffering from Αnkylosing spondylitis participated in the study and were randomized into two groups. Group A (n = 24) was treated with a λ = 820 Ga-Al-As laser CW, with power intensity = 60 mW/cm(2), energy per point in each session = 4.5 J, total energy per session = 27.0 J, in contact with specific points technique, plus passive stretching exercises. Group B (n = 24), received placebo laser plus the same passive stretching exercises. Both groups received 12 sessions of laser or placebo within 8 weeks; two sessions per week (weeks 1-4) and one session per week (weeks 5-8). Pain and function scales were completed before the treatment, at the end of the fourth and eighth week of treatment, and 8 weeks after the end of treatment (follow-up). Group A revealed a significant improvement after 8 weeks of treatment in all pain and function scales. At 8-week follow-up, the improvement remained only for the pain, while for all other function outcomes the differences were not statistically significant. The results suggested that after an 8-week treatment and after a follow-up, the combination of LLLT and passive stretching exercises decreased pain more effectively than placebo LLLT along with the same passive stretching exercises in patients with Αnkylosing spondylitis. Future studies are needed to establish the relative and absolute effectiveness of the above protocol.

  19. Ankylosing spondylitis without axial progression: analysis of associated factors.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Carlos; Díaz-Alvarez, Agustín; Calero-Paniagua, Ismael; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo; Font, Pilar; Almodovar, Raquel; Zarco, Pedro; Queiro-Silva, Ruben; Cañete, Juan D; Juanola, Xavier; Mulero, Juan; de Miguel, Eugenio; Gratacós, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate clinical factors associated with the absence of radiographic progression in patients with spondylitis. The cross-sectional study included 672 patients. All patients presented a disease evolution of more than 15 years. Patients were classified as with radiographic spinal involvement versus without radiographic spinal involvement. We included clinical variables potentially related to null radiological progression. Seventy-five patients had no radiographic involvement. These patients were predominantly female, had a lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and a lower C-reactive protein level. Multivariate analysis showed an association with the female sex and low ESR. Clinical factors associated with this lack of progression were female sex and low ESR.

  20. If three of my brothers have ankylosing spondylitis, why does the doctor say it is not necessarily hereditary? The meaning of risk in multiplex case families with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Romero-Mendoza, Martha; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén

    2016-03-01

    To investigate how patients with ankylosing spondylitis and their relatives in multiplex case families understand concepts of familial aggregation, heredity and risk perceptions, and its impact on decision-making. This is a multimethod clinical investigation using field research style in 34 individuals from 10 families with ≥2 members with ankylosing spondylitis covering a wide spectrum of disease severity, educational level, and economical status. The narratives of patients and their relatives were obtained using clinical information, unstructured observation, and personal interviews, which were then transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed by three investigators. The interpretation of the textual data was based on two analysis styles, immersion/crystallization and interpretative grounded theory. We identified four broad interrelated interpretive units in patient and relatives narratives: (1) familial interpretation of the disease, (2) genetic risk, (3) decision-making based on risk, and (4) patient-family/physician discourse contradiction on the meaning of heredity. Patient's and their relatives interpretation of familial aggregation, HLAB27, heredity, and risk perception in relation with ankylosing spondylitis involves four broad interpretive units spanning from clinical symptoms to heredity and decisions made accordingly. Their thoughts and consequent decisions are often in contradiction with the medical knowledge on the role of genetic factors in ankylosing spondylitis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. [Spinal fractures in ankylosing spondylarthritis. Apropos of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    André, V; Le Dreff, P; Colin, D; André, M; Garcia, J F

    1999-11-01

    Fractures of the spine in patients with ankylosing spondylitis may be the result of minor trauma. They may lead to severe neurological deficits. They are difficult to detect on plain radiographs and CT or MRI often are required for diagnosis.

  2. Correlation of serum MMP3 and other biomarkers with clinical outcomes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: A pilot study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The studies aimed to assess a set of biomarkers for their correlations with disease activity/severity of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 24 AS patients were treated with etanercept and prospectively followed for 12 weeks. Serum levels of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, IL6, IL1...

  3. Validation of a new objective index to measure spinal mobility: the University of Cordoba Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (UCOASMI).

    PubMed

    Garrido-Castro, Juan L; Escudero, Alejandro; Medina-Carnicer, Rafael; Galisteo, Alfonso M; Gonzalez-Navas, Cristina; Carmona, Loreto; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    Spinal mobility measures are subject to high variability and subjectivity. Automated motion capture allows an objective and quantitative measure of mobility with high levels of precision. To validate the University of Cordoba Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (UCOASMI), an index measure of spinal mobility, based on automated motion capture, validation studies included the following: (1) validity, tested by correlation--Pearson's r--between the UCOASMI and the mobility index Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and a measure of structural damage, the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spinal Score (mSASSS); (2) reliability, with internal consistency tested by Cronbach's alpha, test-retest by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) after 2 weeks, and error measurement, by variation coefficient (VC) and smallest detectable difference (SDD); and (3) responsiveness, by effect size (ES) in a clinical trial of anti-TNF. Patients for the different studies all had ankylosing spondylitis. Validity studies show correlation between the BASMI (r = 0.881) and the mSASSS (r = 0.780). Reliability studies show an internal consistency of Cronbach's α = 0.894, intra-observer ICC = 0.996, test-retest ICC = 0.996, and a measurement error of VC = 2.80% and SDD = 0.25 points. Responsiveness showed an ES after 24 weeks of treatment of 0.48. In all studies, the UCOASMI's performance was better than that of the BASMI. The UCOASMI is a validated index to measure spinal mobility with better metric properties than previous indices.

  4. The use of low-dose etanercept as an alternative therapy for treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Jamileh; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Semnani, Vahid

    2012-08-01

    During recent decades, biological medications play a crucial role for treating rheumatologic disorders and thus are strongly recommended for initial treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. However, because of high cost of biological drugs, the use of these drugs has been limited. In current series, we tried to assess safety of low-dose etanercept as a common usable biological drug in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In a case-series study, 4 men with ankylosing spondylitis were treated with low-dose etanercept (25 mg/2 weeks) plus methotrexate (10 mg/week). Safety was assessed by measuring rate of differences in severity of clinical manifestations and level of C-reactive protein (CRP). After the completion of treatment with low-dose etanercept, inflammatory low back pain and morning stiffness was reduced lower than 30 min in all patients. Only one patient had baseline high serum ESR and positive CRP that was changed to negative following treatment protocol. At one-year follow-up, all participants continued their regular treatment regimen with the etanercept survival rate 100%. Neither side effects related to drug nor clinical complications were observed within the follow-up period. Our findings suggest that low-dose etanercept (25 mg/2 weeks) has an acceptable safety and effectiveness profile in individuals with ankylosing spondylitis and can be good alternative instead of conventional therapy with etanercept (25 mg two times per week).

  5. The effects of pre-obesity on quality of life, disease activity, and functional status in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Seyma; Ozbag, Davut; Altay, Zuhal

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was an investigation of effects of pre-obesity on clinical characteristics and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). METHODS: Total of 28 AS patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Patients and controls with any systemic inflammatory disease and/or cognitive and mental problems were excluded. Disease activity and functional capacity were measured using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index. For quality of life assessment, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey was used in both groups, and AS group also responded to Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life questionnaire. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in sociodemographic characteristics between AS patients and healthy controls (p>0.05). Mean quality of life scores were significantly lower in the pre-obese AS patients compared with controls (p<0.05). Functional capacity was positively and significantly associated with body mass index (BMI) (p=0.024) and disease activity was significantly associated with female gender (p=0.011). CONCLUSION: Increased BMI in patients with AS is factor that affects quality of life, disease activity, and functional capacity. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs will support improved quality of life for pre-obese patients with AS. PMID:28752143

  6. Fractura and dislocation of the thoracic spine without spinal cord injury in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Glinkowski, W

    2000-12-30

    This article presents a rare case of a fracture of the thoracic spine accompanied by significant dislocation but without spinal cord injury in a 74-year-old male patient with ankylosing spondylitis. A literature search failed to reveal a similar case. Conservative treatment produced a good outcome.

  7. Costs and quality of life of patients with ankylosing spondylitis in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Zhu, T Y; Tam, L-S; Lee, V W-Y; Hwang, W W; Li, T K; Lee, K K; Li, E K

    2008-09-01

    To assess the annual direct, indirect and total societal costs, quality of life (QoL) of AS in a Chinese population in Hong Kong and determine the cost determinants. A retrospective, non-randomized, cross-sectional study was performed in a cohort of 145 patients with AS in Hong Kong. Participants completed questionnaires on sociodemographics, work status and out-of-pocket expenses. Health resources consumption was recorded by chart review. Functional impairment and disease activity were measured using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), respectively. Patients' QoL was assessed using the Short Form-36 (SF-36). The mean age of the patients was 40 yrs with mean disease duration of 10 yrs. The mean BASDAI score was 4.7 and BASFI score was 3.3. Annual total costs averaged USD 9120. Direct costs accounted for 38% of the total costs while indirect costs accounted for 62%. Costs of technical examinations represented the largest proportion of total cost. Patients with AS reported significantly impaired QoL. Functional impairment became the major cost driver of direct costs and total costs. There is a substantial societal cost related to the treatment of AS in Hong Kong. Functional impairment is the most important cost driver. Treatments that reduce functional impairment may be effective to decrease the costs of AS and improve the patient's QoL, and ease the pressure on the healthcare system.

  8. Effectiveness of rehabilitation in active ankylosing spondylitis assessed by the ASAS response criteria.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, E; D'Angelo, S; Parsons, W J; Corbi, G; Ferrara, N; Rengo, F; Olivieri, I

    2007-11-01

    To assess the effectiveness of rehabilitation in a group of patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) by the Assessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) Working Group response criteria. Fifty-two active AS patients consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation inpatient clinic were enrolled. Patients underwent a 3-week intensive rehabilitation programme and were then discharged with home exercises. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients achieving a response based on ASAS 20 at discharge, and at 6 and 12 weeks after. Secondary outcome measures included an improvement in the Revised Leeds Disability Questionnaire (RLDQ) and function expressed as anthropometric measures. The ASAS 20 was achieved in 46 patients (88.5%) at the end of the rehabilitation, in 31 (59.6%) and in 17 (32.7%) patients at 6 and 12 weeks follow-up, respectively. The percentage of ASAS 20 responders statistically declined over time measured from the end of rehabilitation compared with 6 (P < 0.001) and 12 weeks follow-up (P < 0.001). The present study shows the effectiveness of rehabilitation as assessed by the ASAS 20, a validated instrument for treatment response, suggesting its usage in rehabilitation settings. Moreover, the results obtained show that the effectiveness of the intensive inpatient rehabilitation declined over time.

  9. Protective effect of naringin against ankylosing spondylitis via ossification, inflammation and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Wu, Lianguo; Shi, Xiaolin; Wu, Fengqing

    2016-08-01

    Naringin is an abundant flavanone in pomelo, grapefruit as well as lime and its variants, has been shown to exhibit certain antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and hypoglycemic effects. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the protective effects of naringin against ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to elucidate the potential underlying mechanism. Firstly, a mouse model of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) was established. Next, osteocalcin (OC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and triglyceride (TG) activity values, inflammatory factor and oxidative stress were evaluated in the AS mice. Then, the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein expression levels in the AS mice were investigated using western blot analysis. The results showed that naringin increased OC, ALP and TG activity values in the AS mouse model. Furthermore, inflammatory factor and oxidative stress levels in the AS mice were restrained by treatment with naringin. Furthermore, JAK2 and STAT3 protein expression levels were reduced by treatment with naringin. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the protective effects of naringin against AS are exerted via the induction of ossification, suppression of inflammation and oxidative stress and the downregulation of JAK2/STAT3 in mice.

  10. Evaluation of the temperament and character properties of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Gokmen, F; Altinbas, K; Akbal, A; Celik, M; Savas, Y; Gökmen, E; Reşorlu, H; Karaca, A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate temperament and character of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and to examine the association between these specific temperament and character properties and clinical variables. This study involved 73 AS patients. Temperament properties of patients were evaluated using Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Association between clinical variables and specific temperament features were evaluated using correlation and regression analyses. Forty eight (65.8 %) of the study participants were men and the mean age was 42 ± 11.4 years. There was slight negative correlations between self directedness (S) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) scores (p = 0.01, r = - 0.30), and between the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and reward dependence (RD) scores (p = 0.03, r = - 0.26). Regression analysis showed that correlations between BASDAI and S, and between VAS and RD scores were statistically significant. Our study showed that the dimensions temperament and character are related to disease activation, and disease course is more severe in patients who have low scores in these TCI dimensions. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating temperament and character properties of AS patients will help clinicians to predict treatment compliance and motivation of patients during disease course.

  11. Protective effect of naringin against ankylosing spondylitis via ossification, inflammation and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kang; Wu, Lianguo; Shi, Xiaolin; Wu, Fengqing

    2016-01-01

    Naringin is an abundant flavanone in pomelo, grapefruit as well as lime and its variants, has been shown to exhibit certain antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and hypoglycemic effects. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the protective effects of naringin against ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to elucidate the potential underlying mechanism. Firstly, a mouse model of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) was established. Next, osteocalcin (OC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and triglyceride (TG) activity values, inflammatory factor and oxidative stress were evaluated in the AS mice. Then, the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein expression levels in the AS mice were investigated using western blot analysis. The results showed that naringin increased OC, ALP and TG activity values in the AS mouse model. Furthermore, inflammatory factor and oxidative stress levels in the AS mice were restrained by treatment with naringin. Furthermore, JAK2 and STAT3 protein expression levels were reduced by treatment with naringin. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the protective effects of naringin against AS are exerted via the induction of ossification, suppression of inflammation and oxidative stress and the downregulation of JAK2/STAT3 in mice. PMID:27446336

  12. Cardiac conduction system abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac conduction disturbances are common in spondyloarthropathies such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Whether their occurrence can be linked to signs and symptoms of rheumatic disease activity is an unsettled issue addressed in this study. Methods In this cross-sectional study patients with AS according to modified New York criteria but without psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, dementia, pregnancy, other severe diseases such as malignancy and difficulties in answering questionnaires were invited; and 210 participated (120 men), mean age 49 years (SD 13; range: 16–77). Questionnaires, physical examination, ECG, and laboratory tests were performed at the same visit. Results Cardiac conduction disturbances were common and diagnosed in 10-33%, depending on if conservative or less conservative predefined criteria were applied. They consisted mostly of 1st degree atrio-ventricular block and prolonged QRS duration, but one patient had a pacemaker and 7 more had complete bundle branch blocks. Conduction abnormalities were associated mainly with age, male gender and body weight, and not with laboratory measures of inflammation or with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index. Neither were they associated with the presence of HLA B27, which was found in 87% of all patients; the subtype B270502 dominated in all patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities are common in AS, but not associated with markers of disease activity or specific B27 subtypes. Even relatively mild conduction system abnormalities might, however, indirectly affect morbidity and mortality. PMID:23937715

  13. Partitioning of the contributions of rib cage and abdomen to ventilation in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Grimby, Gunnar; Fugl-Meyer, Axel R.; Blomstrand, Ann

    1974-01-01

    Grimby, G., Fugl-Meyer, A. R., and Blomstrand, A. (1974).Thorax,29, 179-184. Partitioning of the contributions of rib cage and abdomen to ventilation in ankylosing spondylitis. The relative contributions of the rib cage and abdomen to ventilation were studied in the sitting position in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, using measurements of changes in the anteroposterior diameters. The functional impairment of the spine and adjacent joints was also evaluated. In most patients vital capacity and total lung capacity were reduced, but functional residual capacity was normal. The relative contribution of the rib cage to ventilation was reduced at rest compared to normal subjects, and decreased further during hyperventilation induced by rebreathing. The end-expiratory level of the abdomen decreased more markedly during hyperventilation than in normal subjects and even the end-inspiratory level of the abdomen increased somewhat. The findings are consistent with a reduced mobility of the ribs and a greater than normal excursion of the diaphragm during breathing. PMID:4831523

  14. The Association Between Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio and Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Mercan, Ridvan; Bitik, Berivan; Tufan, Abdurrahman; Bozbulut, Utku Burak; Atas, Nuh; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Haznedaroglu, Seminur; Goker, Berna

    2016-09-01

    Elevated neutrophil count is associated with poor prognosis and increased mortality in many conditions. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has emerged as a marker of inflammation in neoplastic and cardiovascular disorders. Herein, we investigated utility of this simple tool in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The study consisted of 136 RA and 140 AS patients, along with 117 healthy control subjects. RA and AS activities were determined with Disease Activity Score (DAS) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity indices (BASDAI), respectively. The association between NLR and disease activity was analyzed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and neutrophil counts were significantly higher in RA and AS patients compared to healthy controls. Similarly, NLR was higher compared to control subjects, both in RA (2.53 ± 1.4 vs. 2.16 ± 1.0, P = 0.019) and AS (2.43 ± 1.4 vs. 2.16 ± 1.0, P = 0.077). NLR correlated well with ESR and CRP, both in RA and AS. Moreover, NLR increased across worsening DAS28 activity groups (2.1 ± 1.0 in patients with remission, 2.5 ± 1.0 in low-moderate, 3.8 ± 2.5 in high disease activity). However, no association was found between NLR and BASDAI. NLR is a cheap and readily available marker for the assessment of disease activity in RA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Disability motivates patients with ankylosing spondylitis for more frequent physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Falkenbach, Albrecht

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate whether patients with ankylosing spondylitis who perform disease-specific exercises more frequently have fewer functional limitations and disability than those who exercise more often. Cross-sectional; retrospective chart review. Rehabilitation center in Austria. A sample of 1,500 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (1,163 men, 337 women; mean age +/- standard deviation, 50+/-12 y; disease duration, 21+/-11 y) grouped by how many times per week they performed disease-specific exercises for at least 5 minutes: group A (n=542), less than 1 time; group B (n=691), 1 to 3 times; and group C (n=267), more than 3 times. Not applicable. Self-report of exercise frequency and a German version of the Health Assessment Questionnaire for the spondyloarthropathies (HAQ-S). The HAQ-S showed significant differences among the groups (analysis of variance on ranks, P<.001). In pairwise multiple comparison, group A showed significantly less disability (median, 0.5; interquartile range [IQR], 0.2-0.8) than group B (median, 0.6; IQR, 0.3-0.9) or group C (median, 0.7; IQR, 0.3-1.0). Patients with less disability exercised less than their more disabled counterparts. The reasons for this difference, particularly the issue of motivation, deserve more attention. Copyright 2003 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  16. Evaluation of the incidence of haemorrhoidal disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Caglayan, Mehmet; Türkoğlu, Ahmet; Oktayoglu, Pelin; Yıldız, Mehmet; Dağlı, Abdullah Zübeyir; Böyük, Abdullah; Em, Serda; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Nas, Kemal

    2015-03-01

    Haemorrhoidal disease (HD) is one of the most common diseases encountered by the clinicians of general surgery. Chronic constipation, pushing during defecation and increased abdominal pressure play an important role in development of haemorrhoidal disease. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) frequently use the Valsalva manoeuvre in their daily lives, which may increase the abdominal pressure, leading to formation of haemorrhoids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of haemorrhoidal disease in patients with AS. A total of 221 individuals were included in this study in three groups as follows: 72 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 75 patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) and 74 healthy control subjects. Patients were examined both physically and anoscopically, and their histories were taken. The incidence of HD was 45.8% in patients with AS, 16% in patients with chronic LBP and 9.5% in healthy control subjects. The incidence of HD was significantly higher in patients with AS compared to the other groups. Patients with AS have a high incidence of HD, which should be taken into consideration by clinicians during routine examination of these patients.

  17. Performance of ultrasound to monitor Achilles enthesitis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis during TNF-a antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong-hua; Feng, Yuan; Ren, Zhen; Yang, Xichao; Jia, Jun-feng; Rong, Meng-yao; Li, Xue-yi; Wu, Zhen-biao

    2015-06-01

    Enthesitis is considered as the primary anatomical lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We aimed to investigate the potential of ultrasound to detect early changes after TNF-a antagonist therapy of Achilles enthesitis of AS patients. One hundred AS patients with active disease, requiring TNF-a antagonist therapy, were included (etanercept n = 25, infliximab n = 25, adalimumab n = 25, non-biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) n = 25). Physical examination was performed to evaluate disease activity and detect Achilles enthesitis and/or retrocalcaneal bursitis. Ultrasound of the Achilles enthesitis was performed bilaterally. Follow-up examinations were performed 3 months after the initiation of therapy. Gray scale (GS) scores, Power Doppler (PD) scores, and total additive scores (TS) decreased significantly during TNF-a antagonist therapy but not in traditional non-biologic traditional DMARDs group. The bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI), bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI), and Maastricht ankylosing spondylitis enthesitis score (MASES) all showed significant improvements. When three different TNF-a antagonists were analyzed separately, no significant difference was observed in GS, PD, and total scores. Subclinical Achilles enthesitis, detected only with GS ultrasound, is present in a subset of AS patients and a significant improvement can be demonstrated after 3 months of TNF-a antagonist therapy. Doppler ultrasound provides a reliable estimation to monitor the therapeutic response to TNF antagonists in AS patients with Achilles enthesitis. TNF-a antagonists have been shown to be effective in decreasing ultrasound signs of enthesitis after 3 months of therapy in AS patients.

  18. Is magnetotherapy applied to bilateral hips effective in ankylosing spondylitis patients? A randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Turan, Yasemin; Bayraktar, Kevser; Kahvecioglu, Fatih; Tastaban, Engin; Aydin, Elif; Kurt Omurlu, Imran; Berkit, Isil Karatas

    2014-03-01

    This double-blind, randomized controlled study was conducted with the aim to investigate the effect of magnetic field therapy applied to the hip region on clinical and functional status in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Patients with AS (n = 66) who were diagnosed according to modified New York criteria were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly divided in two groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive magnetic field therapy (2 Hz) (n = 35), or placebo magnetic field therapy (n = 31) each hip region for 20 min. Patients in each group were given heat pack and short-wave treatments applied to bilateral hip regions. Both groups had articular range of motion and stretching exercises and strengthening exercises for surrounding muscles for the hip region as well as breathing and postural exercises by the same physical therapist. These treatment protocols were continued for a total of 15 sessions (1 session per day), and patients were examined by the same physician at months 1, 3 and 6. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain, VAS fatigue, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrologic Index (BASMI), DFI, Harris hip assessment index and Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life scale (ASQOL) were obtained at the beginning of therapy and at month 1, month 3 and month 6 for each patient. There were no significant differences between groups in the VAS pain, VAS fatigue, morning stiffness, BASDAI, BASFI, BASMI, DFI, Harris hip assessment index and ASQoL at baseline, month 1, month 3 or month 6 (p > 0.05). Further randomized, double-blind controlled studies are needed in order to establish the evidence level for the efficacy of modalities with known analgesic and anti-inflammatory action such as magnetotherapy, particularly in rheumatic disorders associated with chronic pain.

  19. Treatment efficacy of etanercept and MTX combination therapy for ankylosing spondylitis hip joint lesion in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lian, Fan; Yang, Xiuyan; Liang, Liuqin; Xu, Hanshi; Zhan, Zhongping; Qiu, Qian; Ye, Yujin

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of etanercept and MTX (methotrexate) combination therapy in Chinese patients with ankylosing spondylitis hip joint lesion, the possible courses and maintenance protocol, altogether 97 ankylosing spondylitis patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria with hip joint lesion were enrolled in a 12-month trial treated with combined etanercept and MTX. All these patients were required to be poor responders to SSZ (Sulfasalazine) or MTX therapy for 6 consecutive months or the longer. Etanercept was administered subcutaneously twice a week at a fixed dosage of 25 mg for the first six months, followed by 25 mg once a week in patients with good control of both symptoms and radiological progression, or twice a week for another six months in patients with BASDAI > or = 4. Combined MTX was administered intravenously once a week at the dosage of 15 mg. Demographics, clinical and laboratory features, physical function and quality of life using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Harris hip score, and radiological assessment using the BASRI-hip index were recorded. Most patients achieved pain release at the end point of assessment. Significant improvement in Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) (P < 0.05), Bath AS Functional Activity Index (BASFI) (P < 0.05), and Harris hip score (P < 0.05) was demonstrated. Radiographic progression was recorded as no exacerbation or alleviated. Larger interval between two etanercept administrations would provide similar advantages to standard method and possibly less adverse events if MTX was combined. Etanercept and MTX combination therapy was beneficial to ankylosing spondylitis patients with hip joint lesion, and staged dosage deduction in the long term proved to be effective as well as adverse event preventing.

  20. Physical function in ankylosing spondylitis is independently determined by both disease activity and radiographic damage of the spine.

    PubMed

    Landewé, R; Dougados, M; Mielants, H; van der Tempel, H; van der Heijde, D

    2009-06-01

    To study the relationship between disease activity, radiographic damage and physical function in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) PATIENTS AND METHODS: Baseline and 2-year data of the Outcome in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Study (OASIS)(217 patients) were used. Physical function was expressed by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and the Dougados Functional Index (DFI); disease activity by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein; and structural damage by the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Syndesmophyte- and non-syndesmophyte sum cores, and numbers of affected (bridged) vertebral units were derived from the mSASSS. Univariate correlations were calculated on baseline values using the Spearman rank correlation. Multivariate associations were investigated by generalised estimating equations (GEE) on baseline and 2-year data. mSASSS correlated moderately well with BASFI (Spearman's r = 0.45) and DFI (r = 0.38). BASDAI correlated well with BASFI (r = 0.66) and DFI (r = 0.59). Correlation coefficients for mSASSS versus BASFI and DFI decreased by increasing levels of BASDAI, being zero at the highest quintile of BASDAI. GEE showed that both BASDAI and mSASSS independently and significantly helped to explain either BASFI or DFI. Results were similar for syndesmophyte sum score, non-syndesmophyte sum score, number of affected VUs or number of VUs with bridging. The lumbar part of the mSASSS contributed similarly to the cervical part in explaining BASFI/DFI. Physical function impairment in AS is independently caused by patient-reported disease activity and the level of structural damage of the lumbar and cervical spine. Syndesmophytes and other radiographic abnormalities contribute to physical function impairment.

  1. Comparison of Deep Tissue Massage and Therapeutic Massage for Lower Back Pain, Disease Activity, and Functional Capacity of Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Špiritović, Maja; Dudek, Adrian; Samborski, Włodzimierz; Straburzyńska-Lupa, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to compare the effectiveness of deep tissue massage (DTM) and therapeutic massage (TM) in the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Materials and Methods This was a small, randomized clinical pilot study. Subjects were 27 men with diagnosed AS, randomly assigned to DTM group or TM group. Subjects in each group had 10 sessions of massage. Outcomes included the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Modified Schober Test, Finger to Floor Test, chest expansion, and pain intensity of lower back. Results There are no statistical significant differences between groups, except for BASDAI and pain intensity of lower back. Conclusions This study suggests that massage may have clinical benefits for treating ankylosing spondylitis patients. Additional scientific research in this area is warranted. PMID:28845185

  2. Serum from patients with ankylosing spondylitis can increase PPARD, fra-1, MMP7, OPG and RANKL expression in MG63 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zaiying; Lin, Dongfang; Qi, Jun; Qiu, Minli; Lv, Qing; Li, Qiuxia; Lin, Zhiming; Liao, Zetao; Pan, Yunfeng; Jin, Ou; Wu, Yuqiong; Gu, Jieruo

    2015-11-01

    To explore the effects of serum from patients with ankylosing spondylitis on the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway and to assess whether the serum has an osteogenic effect in MG63 cells. MG63 cells were cultured with serum from 45 ankylosing spondylitis patients, 30 healthy controls, or 45 rheumatoid arthritis patients. The relative PPARD, fra-1, MMP7, OPG and RANKL mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Associations between gene expression and patient demographics and clinical assessments were then analyzed. MG63 cells treated with serum from ankylosing spondylitis patients had higher PPARD, fra-1, MMP7 and OPG gene expression than did cells treated with serum from controls or rheumatoid arthritis patients (all p<0.05). RANKL expression was higher in MG63 cells treated with serum from patients with ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis than in those treated with serum from controls (both p<0.05). The OPG/RANKL ratio was also higher in MG63 cells treated with serum from ankylosing spondylitis patients than in those treated with serum from controls (p<0.05). No associations were found between the expression of the five genes and the patient demographics and clinical assessments (all p>0.05). Serum from ankylosing spondylitis patients increases PPARD, fra-1, MMP7, OPG and RANKL expression and the OPG/RANKL ratio in MG63 cells; these effects may be due to the stimulatory effect of the serum on the Wnt pathway.

  3. The Effect of Comprehensive Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation on Clinical Status of Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna; Pacholec, Anna; Bugajska, Joanna; Sadura-Sieklucka, Teresa; Kowalik, Katarzyna; Pawłowska-Cyprysiak, Karolina; Łastowiecka-Moras, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of conventional and cryotherapy-based rehabilitation with respect to its impact on selected clinical parameters in AS patients. Fifty working males aged 22-66 years were included in this study. Twenty-five of them underwent cryotherapy-based rehabilitation (cryogenic chamber, local cryotherapy; individual, instrumental, and nonweight-bearing exercises) for 3 weeks. The others received 3 weeks of conventional rehabilitation (magnetic field therapy; electrotherapy; individual and instrumental exercises). The patients were examined at three time points: before rehabilitation, immediately after its completion and at a three-month follow-up visit. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) was used to assess disease severity, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) was used to assess musculoskeletal function and a visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess pain. A global health index was also employed to assess patients' overall well-being. Cryotherapy-based rehabilitation improved the following parameters: BASDAI (P<0.001, P<0.001), BASFI (P<0.001, P=0.007), VAS (P<0.007, P=0.001) and global health index (P<0.001, P<0.001) at the second and third assessment, respectively. Conventional rehabilitation improved the BASDAI (P<0.001), VAS (P=0.029), and overall well-being (P<0.030) at the second assessment. Cryotherapy-based rehabilitation was more effective than conventional rehabilitation with respect to BASFI [F(2, 82)=6.571; P=0.004; eta2=0.120] and overall well-being [F(2, 96) =5.018; P=0.008; eta2=0.095)]. 1. Comprehensive rehabilitation in ankylosing spondylitis has a positive effect on patients' clinical status. 2. Rehabilitation involving cryotherapy is more effective in improving musculoskeletal function and overall well-being compared to conventional rehabilitation. 3. Cryotherapy-based rehabilitation significantly reduces the intensity of pain experienced by AS patients and

  4. Physical fitness in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: comparison with population controls.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Silje; Vøllestad, Nina K; Fongen, Camilla; Provan, Sella A; Semb, Anne G; Hagen, Kåre B; Dagfinrud, Hanne

    2012-02-01

    Although flexibility traditionally has been the main focus for physical therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), there is now evidence for an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in this group. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular capacity, flexibility, and balance) in patients with AS and controls and (2) to explore associations between physical fitness and disease activity in the patient group. This was a cross-sectional study. The physical fitness variables were cardiorespiratory fitness (treadmill test for estimation of peak oxygen uptake [V(O(2))peak]), muscular capacity (push-ups test), balance (30-second single-leg stand and walking in a figure-of-eight pattern), and flexibility (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index [BASMI]). The Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) was used to assess disease activity. Group differences and associations were tested with the chi-square test for categorical variables, the Mann-Whitney U test for ordinal variables, and analysis of covariance for continuous variables. One hundred forty-nine of 250 of the invited patients with AS and 133 of 329 of the invited controls were included in the study. The mean ASDAS score of the patient group was 2.3 (range=0.5-4.7), and the median disease duration was 23 years (range=7-55). The patient group had significantly lower V(O(2)) peak values, with a mean difference of -2.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% confidence interval=-4.3, -1.1), and higher BASMI scores, with a mean difference of 1.6 (95% confidence interval=1.5, 1.8), compared with the control group. No group differences were found in balance or muscular capacity. In the patient group, significant inverse associations were found between ASDAS scores and V(O(2))peak and muscular capacity. The response rate was lower in the control group (40.4%) than in the patient group (59.6%). The lower cardiorespiratory fitness and reduced

  5. Two exercise interventions for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Morales-Cabezas, Matilde; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the impact of a 4-month comprehensive protocol of strengthening and flexibility exercises developed by our research group versus conventional exercises for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) on functional and mobility outcomes. Randomized controlled trial. Forty-five patients diagnosed with AS according to the modified criteria of New York were allocated to control or experimental groups using a random numbers table. The control group was treated with a conventional protocol of physical therapy in AS, whereas the experimental group was treated with the protocol suggested by our research group. The conventional intervention consisted of 20 exercises: motion and flexibility exercises of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine; stretching of the shortened muscles; and chest expansion exercises. The experimental protocol is based on the postural affectation of the AS and the treatment of the shortened muscle chains in these patients according to the Global Posture Reeducation (GPR) method. This intervention employs specific strengthening and flexibility exercises in which the shortened muscle chains are stretched and strengthened. The study lasted 4 mos. During this period, patients received a weekly group session managed by an experienced physiotherapist. Each session lasted an hour, and there were 15 total sessions. Changes in activity, mobility, and functional capacity were evaluated by an assessor blinded to the intervention, using the following previously validated scores from the Bath group: BASMI (tragus to wall distance, modified Schober test, cervical rotation, lumbar side flexion, and intermalleolar distance), BASDAI (The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index), and BASFI (The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index). Both groups showed an improvement (prepost scores) in all the outcome measures, mobility measures of the BASMI index, as well as in BASFI and BASDAI indexes. In the

  6. Early anti-inflammatory intervention ameliorates axial disease in the proteoglycan-induced spondylitis mouse model of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsu-Wen; Glant, Tibor T; Brown, Matthew A; Kenna, Tony J; Thomas, Gethin P; Pettit, Allison R

    2017-05-30

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is characterised by immune-mediated arthritis and osteoproliferation, ultimately leading to joint ankylosis. Whether inflammation is necessary for osteoproliferation is controversial, fuelled by the unclear efficacy of anti-inflammatory treatments on radiographic progression. In proteoglycan-induced spondylitis (PGISp), a mouse model of AS, inflammation is the prerequisite for osteoproliferation as osteoproliferation was only observed following inflammation-driven intervertebral disc (IVD) destruction. We hypothesised that early intervention with a potent anti-inflammatory therapy would protect IVD integrity and consequently alter disease progression. PGISp mice received vehicle or a combination of etanercept (ETN) plus prednisolone (PRD) therapy for 2 or 6 weeks initiated at an early disease stage. Peripheral arthritis was scored longitudinally. Spinal disease was assessed using a semi-quantitative histological scoring regimen including inflammation, joint destruction and excessive tissue formation. ETN + PRD therapy significantly delayed the onset of peripheral arthritis. IVD integrity was significantly protected when treatment was commenced in early disease. Six-weeks of treatment resulted in trends towards reductions in intervertebral joint damage and excessive tissue formation. IVD score distribution was dichotomized, likely reflecting the extent of axial disease at initiation of therapy. In the sub-group of mice with high IVD destruction scores, ETN + PRD treatment significantly reduced IVD destruction severity, inflammation and bone erosion and reduced cartilage damage and excessive tissue formation. Early intervention with anti-inflammatory treatment not only improved inflammatory symptoms but also ameliorated structural damage of spine in PGISp mice. This preclinical observation suggests that early anti-inflammatory intervention may slow radiographic progression in AS patients.

  7. Current evidence for the management of ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic literature review for the ASAS/EULAR management recommendations in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Zochling, J; van der Heijde, D; Dougados, M; Braun, J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess available management strategies in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using a systematic approach, as a part of the development of evidence based recommendations for the management of AS. Methods A systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PEDro, and the Cochrane Library was performed to identify relevant interventions for the management of AS. Evidence for each intervention was categorised by study type, and outcome data for efficacy, adverse effects, and cost effectiveness were abstracted. The effect size, rate ratio, number needed to treat, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio were calculated for each intervention where possible. Results from randomised controlled trials were pooled where appropriate. Results Both pharmacological and non‐pharmacological interventions considered to be of interest to clinicians involved in the management of AS were identified. Good evidence (level Ib) exists supporting the use of non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and coxibs for symptomatic treatment. Non‐pharmacological treatments are also supported for maintaining function in AS. The use of conventional antirheumatoid arthritis drugs is not well supported by high level research evidence. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (infliximab and etanercept) have level Ib evidence supporting large treatment effects for spinal pain and function in AS over at least 6 months. Level IV evidence supports surgical interventions in specific patients. Conclusion This extensive literature review forms the evidence base considered in the development of the new ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of AS. PMID:16126792

  8. Exercise, pain, perceived family support, and quality of life in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Myeong Soo; Lim, Hyun-Suk

    2005-02-01

    Relations of habitual exercise and pain, perceived family support, and the quality of life in patients with functional class II for ankylosing spondylitis were explored. In a cross-sectional study perceived pain, family support, and quality of life were compared for 30 patients (23 women and 7 men whose mean age was 28.3 yr.+/-8.6 yr.) practicing exercise regularly and for 38 sedentary patients (31 women and 7 men whose mean age was 27.2+/-6.7 yr.). Exercising patients reported significantly lower pain, greater perceived family support, and increased quality of life than their sedentary peers. Pain ratings were significantly negatively correlated with the quality of life in both groups (r = -.26 in exercisers and r = -.50 in sedentary patients) and control group's perceived family support was significantly correlated .44 with quality of life. These results encourage further study of the associations of habitual exercise with perceived pain, family support, and quality of life.

  9. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes against disease-associated determinant(s) in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes, induced by stimulating the PBMC of an HLA-B27+ normal individual (B27+, AS-) with the PBMC of an HLA-identical sibling suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (B27+, AS+), specifically lyse B27+, AS+ PBMC but not PBMC from HLA-27+ or B27-, AS- normal controls, or from HLA-B27- AS patients (B27-,AS+). CTL of similar specificity can also be raised by immunizing in vitro B27+,AS- cells with autologous cells modified by cross-reactive bacterial antigens. These results suggest that CTL can recognize certain bacterial antigens in association with HLA-B27 and that this interaction may lead to an inflammatory episode during the initial stages of the disease. PMID:3528379

  10. Vitamin D-deficient rickets mimicking ankylosing spondylitis in an adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Aydoğdu, Didem; Ozön, Alev

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D-deficient rickets (VDDR) remains an important health problem especially in developing countries. Insufficient dietary intake of vitamin D and inadequate sun exposure increase the risk of vitamin D deficiency. Since their vitamin D requirement is increased, children and adolescents are potentially at higher risk for vitamin D deficiency. In adolescents, vitamin D deficiency causes osteomalacia, osteoporosis and muscle weakness. While osteoporosis is not associated with bone pain, osteomalacia has been associated with isolated or generalized bone pain. The present case suffered from generalized bone pain for three years. She was misdiagnosed as ankylosing spondylitis, which is a seronegative arthropathy, and was treated with corticosteroids and methotrexate, which have potential side effects. Hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, elevated alkaline phosphatase level, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and extremely low vitamin D level were consistent with the diagnosis of severe vitamin D deficiency. Complete clinical and biochemical resolution was achieved with vitamin D replacement.

  11. Retrograde intubation in a case of ankylosing spondylitis posted for correction of deformity of spine

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Chetankumar; Patel, Heena; Patel, Pranoti; Kharod, Utpala

    2010-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients are most challenging. These patient present the most serious array of intubation and difficult airway imaginable, secondary to decrease or no cervical spine mobility, fixed flexion deformity of thoracolumbar spine and possible temporomandibular joint disease. Sound clinical judgment is critical for timing and selecting the method for airway intervention. The retrograde intubation technique is an important option when fiberoptic bronchoscope is not available, and other method is not applicable for gaining airway access for surgery in prone position. We report a case of AS with fixed flexion deformity of thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, fusion of posterior elements of cervical spine posted for lumbar spinal osteotomy with anticipated difficult intubation. An awake retrograde oral intubation with light sedation and local block is performed. PMID:20668567

  12. A Possible Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Pathogenesis of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lianjun; Wang, Liping; Wang, Xin; Xian, Cory J.; Lu, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily affecting the sacroiliac joints and the spine, for which the pathogenesis is thought to be a result of the combination of host genetic factors and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one’s susceptibility to AS remain to be unraveled. With 100 trillion bacteria residing in the mammalian gut having established a symbiotic relation with their host influencing many aspects of host metabolism, physiology, and immunity, a growing body of evidence suggests that intestinal microbiota may play an important role in AS. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain the potential role of the microbiome in the etiology of AS, such as alterations of intestinal permeability, stimulation of immune responses, and molecular mimicry. In this review, the existing evidence for the involvement of the microbiome in AS pathogenesis was discussed and the potential of intestinal microbiome-targeting strategies in the prevention and treatment of AS was evaluated. PMID:27999312

  13. A double-blind cross-over trial of fenoprofen and phenylbutazone in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wordsworth, B P; Ebringer, R W; Coggins, E; Smith, S

    1980-11-01

    Fenoprofen, 600 mg, three times daily, was compared with phenylbutazone, 100 mg, three times daily, in 30 patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis in a double-blind cross-over study. Assessments were made after an initial washout period and after each month-long treatment period. Phenylbutazone significantly improved morning stiffness, finger-to-floor distance, chest expansion, overall joint pain, spinal pain, the physician's assessment of disease activity and ESR. Only chest expansion was significantly improved by fenoprofen, and phenylbutazone was significantly better than fenoprofen in its effects on finger-to-floor distance, morning stiffness, overall joint pain, spinal pain and the physician's assessment of disease activity. Side-effects were of a minor nature apart from one patient who developed rectal bleeding on phenylbutazone which recurred on rechallenging.

  14. Deaths Associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis in France from 1969 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Prati, Clément; Puyraveau, Marc; Guillot, Xavier; Verhoeven, Franck; Wendling, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    To describe deaths for which ankylosing spondylitis (AS) was on death certificates in France. Death certificates in which AS was indicated were evaluated. Standard mortality ratio (SMR) was assessed. AS appeared in 2940 death certificates. The mortality rate of AS seemed stable. The most frequent initial causes were diseases of the circulatory system [28.3% in the International Classification of Diseases, 10th ed (ICD-10)]. SMR adjusted for age and sex were 2.1 (95% CI 1.45-2.91) for infections and 0.43 (0.36-0.5) for cancers (ICD-10 period). This study found an increase in mortality from infectious and external causes of death; conversely, patients with AS appear to die less frequently from cancer.

  15. [Diagnosis and therapy of axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis (Bechterew's disease)].

    PubMed

    Poddubnyy, D; Sieper, J

    2012-07-01

    The term axial spondyloarthritis covers patients with established structural changes visible on x-ray in sacroiliac joints and/or in the spine (classical ankylosing spondylitis) but also patients with non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis in whom early inflammatory signs of the disease can only be visualized with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI technique plays an important role in the diagnosis of this disease and an early diagnosis is normally based on a combination of clinical, laboratory and imaging parameters. Only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TNF-α blockers are effective in the treatment of axial spondyloarthritis. Patients with short disease duration and elevated acute phase reactant levels demonstrate best therapy response and, therefore, should be closely followed-up and consistently treated.

  16. The Link Between Klebsiella and Ankylosing Spondylitis in Worldwide Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Taha; Ebringer, Alan; Wilson, Clyde

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a world-wide chronic inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton most likely caused by a microbial factor in genetically susceptible individuals. Over the last 40 years extensive data has been produced which shows that the majority of patients with AS possess the HLA-B27 genetic marker. Significantly elevated levels of Klebsiella antibodies have been demonstrated in 1556 AS patients in 16 different countries with various geographical locations. Other evidence for the link between Klebsiella and AS include increased fecal isolation rates of Klebsiella microbes in AS patients together with shared molecular and immunological cross-reactivity features existing between Klebsiella antigens and HLA-B27 and collagens I, III and IV. Anti-Klebsiella measures could possibly be included with the currently used medical treatment in the management of patients with AS.

  17. The immunology of ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis: a tale of similarities and dissimilarities.

    PubMed

    Inman, R D; El-Gabalawy, H S

    2009-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are immune-mediated inflammatory joint diseases with the potential for significant target organ damage. Genetic factors play an important role in defining disease susceptibility. Both diseases are mediated in part by TNF, since anti-TNF therapies have proved effective in both AS and RA. Despite their similarities, the genetic elements associated with the respective diseases differ, most notably in HLA associations, with AS being associated with class I HLA alleles and RA associated with class II HLA alleles. AS has a predilection for axial joints whereas RA targets peripheral joints, but the immunological basis of that distinction is unknown. Autoantibody formation is the immunological hallmark of RA, whereas AS is notable for being a "seronegative" disease. Growing knowledge of new aspects of the host immune response (such as innate immune responses and Th17 cells) is adding to new insights into shared mechanisms of pathogenesis between these two diseases.

  18. Health-related quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Konstantinos; Voulgari, Paraskevi V; Drosos, Alexandros A; Carvalho, André F; Hyphantis, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a complex systemic rheumatological disease which often causes severe disability and impaired quality of life (QoL). We searched the PubMed/MEDLINE electronic database for available literature on QoL and its predictors in patients with AS. Recent evidence indicates that AS patients have poorer QoL compared to the general population, but similar to that of patients with other rheumatological disorders. Disease activity is one of the most powerful predictors of QoL, however latest advances in pharmacological treatment (namely, anti-TNF-α) along with physical exercise can minimize the effects of AS on QoL. Psychological distress symptoms contribute to impaired QoL both directly and indirectly by influencing disease activity. The impact of other psychosocial variables, however, is less studied and more prospective investigations are necessary, which could eventually lead to the development of psychosocial interventions that are personalized to this patient population.

  19. A Possible Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Pathogenesis of Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lianjun; Wang, Liping; Wang, Xin; Xian, Cory J; Lu, Hai

    2016-12-17

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily affecting the sacroiliac joints and the spine, for which the pathogenesis is thought to be a result of the combination of host genetic factors and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one's susceptibility to AS remain to be unraveled. With 100 trillion bacteria residing in the mammalian gut having established a symbiotic relation with their host influencing many aspects of host metabolism, physiology, and immunity, a growing body of evidence suggests that intestinal microbiota may play an important role in AS. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain the potential role of the microbiome in the etiology of AS, such as alterations of intestinal permeability, stimulation of immune responses, and molecular mimicry. In this review, the existing evidence for the involvement of the microbiome in AS pathogenesis was discussed and the potential of intestinal microbiome-targeting strategies in the prevention and treatment of AS was evaluated.

  20. The United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the epidemiology of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Charles F; Hirsch, Rosemarie

    2011-04-01

    Currently available U.S. population-based data for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), spondyloarthritis and inflammatory back pain (IBP) from the nationally representative U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) include both NHANES I (1971-1975) and NHANES II (1976-1980) surveys. The pelvic radiographs obtained in NHANES I provided U.S. prevalence estimates for radiographic sacroiliitis, an important component of the AS case definition. AS and spondyloarthritis prevalences cannot readily be calculated from NHANES I survey data; however, IBP prevalence (Rudwaleit et al Criteria 7b) can be estimated from NHANES II. The NHANES II estimate for IBP is 0.8% of the adult population ages 25 to 49 years. The prevalence of IBP in the subset of persons with a history of a back pain episode lasting 2 or more weeks was 6.7%. The 2009-2010 NHANES U.S. Inflammatory Back Pain/Spondyloarthritis survey is currently fielded.

  1. Improvement of overlapping hidradenitis suppurativa and ankylosing spondylitis after the introduction of adalimumab

    PubMed Central

    Bosnić, Dubravka; Žarković, Branimir; Zarkovic, Maja; Anić, Branimir

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by occlusion of the follicular pilosebaceous units of the skin. The treatment options are sometimes very limited and unpleasant odor and abundant drainage complicate the disease. Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of seronegative spondyloarthritis with predominantly axial but also peripheral joint involvement. Both of the conditions lower the patient’s quality of life and affect everyday activities. We describe a 39-year-old male patient with both diseases treated with different medications with only a modest result. After the initiation of a tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitor (adalimumab) the patient experienced first the musculoskeletal and later on the skin improvement. The introduction of TNF-α inhibitors should be considered early in the treatment of overlapping hidradenitis suppurativa and the spondyloarthritis spectrum of conditions. Available medical data confirm the positive results and beneficial effect on disease course, activity and, most importantly, quality of life. PMID:28115784

  2. Improvement of overlapping hidradenitis suppurativa and ankylosing spondylitis after the introduction of adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Bosnić, Dubravka; Žarković, Branimir; Barešić, Marko; Zarkovic, Maja; Anić, Branimir

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by occlusion of the follicular pilosebaceous units of the skin. The treatment options are sometimes very limited and unpleasant odor and abundant drainage complicate the disease. Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of seronegative spondyloarthritis with predominantly axial but also peripheral joint involvement. Both of the conditions lower the patient's quality of life and affect everyday activities. We describe a 39-year-old male patient with both diseases treated with different medications with only a modest result. After the initiation of a tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitor (adalimumab) the patient experienced first the musculoskeletal and later on the skin improvement. The introduction of TNF-α inhibitors should be considered early in the treatment of overlapping hidradenitis suppurativa and the spondyloarthritis spectrum of conditions. Available medical data confirm the positive results and beneficial effect on disease course, activity and, most importantly, quality of life.

  3. Non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis: what are the similarities and differences?

    PubMed Central

    Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2015-01-01

    The development of the axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis (ASAS) classification criteria has had several implications for our understanding of the entire spectrum of spondyloarthritides (SpA). Going beyond the modified New York criteria, which concentrate on conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) for the classification of ankylosing spondylitis, the ASAS criteria add active inflammation of the SIJ as obtained by MRI and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 to classify patients with chronic back pain starting at a young age as axial SpA (axSpA). AxSpA should be considered as one disease that includes AS, the radiographic form, as well as the non-radiographic (nr-axSpA) form. Similarities and differences between these subgroups have been described in 3 studies: 1 local study, 1 national study (German SpA Inception Cohort) and 1 international study mainly conducted to test the efficacy of a tumour necrosis factor α blocker. Most clinical features and assessments of axSpA showed the same prevalence in patients with and without radiographic changes. However, some differences have been observed: the male:female ratio, the proportion of patients with objective signs of inflammation such as bone marrow oedema as detected by MRI, and the proportion of patients with increased levels of C reactive protein were higher in patients with AS. Importantly, these factors have also been identified as prognostic factors for more severe disease in terms of new bone formation. Thus, nr-axSpA may represent an early stage of AS but may also just be an abortive form of a disease which does cause much pain but which may also never lead to structural changes of the axial skeleton. Since the cut-off between nr-axSpA and AS is artificial and unreliable, we think that the term nr-axSpA should not be used for diagnosis but only for classification for historical reasons. PMID:26557375

  4. Predictive Factors for the Evolution of Reactive Arthritis to Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    BANICIOIU-COVEI, S.; VREJU, FA.; CIUREA, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study is to identify the predictive factors involved in the evolution of the reactive arthritis to ankylosing spondylitis by following the presence and degree of sacroiliitis and also the appeareance of acute anterior uveitis.Material and Methods: The study was performed between 01.01.2011- 31.12.2014 on 112 patients, aged between 17 and 47 years old, in evidence of the Rheumatology Clinic of the Clinical Hospital Emergency Craiova. The patients were divided in 2 lots according to the radiological criteria: the first lot included 52 patients diagnosed with reactive arthritis, with the determination of the pathogen agent involved and the demonstration of sacroiliitis first degree by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (IRM). The second lot included a number of 60 patients diagnosed with reactive arthritis, without presenting significant changes in the sacroiliac joints and at the cervico-dorsal- lumbar spine. Results: In the first batch, the performance of the IRM and monitoring the patients every 6 months over 3 years revealed the progression of sacroiliitis from first degree in which it was at the moment of diagnosing at second degree in a 6 month period. Three years after initiation of therapy for reactive arthritis, the patients from the second batch responded favorably to treatment, the performance of imaging not revealing signs of sacroiliitis.Conclusion: Association of sacroiliitis at baseline proved to be a negative prognostic factor in reactive arthritis, which can suggest the evolution to ankylosing spondylitis, monitoring these patients being necessary for at least 3 years from the point of diagnosing.

  5. Adalimumab in ankylosing spondylitis: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hennigan, Stephanie; Ackermann, Christoph; Kavanaugh, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an idiopathic chronic inflammatory disease that has prominent effects on the spine and peripheral joints. In addition, extraarticular manifestations such as enthesitis and acute anterior uveitis may be clinically important. In recent years, the therapy of AS has changed, largely due to the introduction of inhibitors of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Adalimumab, a human monoclonal antibody specifically for TNF, is the most recent of the TNF blocking agents that have been approved for the treatment of active, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID)-refractory patients with AS. Aims: To evaluate the evidence for the therapeutic value of adalimumab in ankylosing spondylitis. Evidence review: There is clear evidence that adalimumab, administered 40 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks, substantially improves the signs and symptoms of NSAID-refractory, active AS when compared with placebo treatment. There is ample evidence that adalimumab causes significant improvements in physical health status and overall AS-specific, health-related quality of life and physical functioning, which consequently leads to better work productivity. There is substantial evidence that adalimumab improves spinal and sacroiliac joint inflammation in AS patients. Initial results from clinical trials suggest that there is no increased risk of serious infections or malignancies in adalimumab-treated patients with AS. The most common adverse events were injection-site reactions. Limited economic evidence suggests that adalimumab 40 mg may be cost effective when used according to current valid treatment guidelines. Place in therapy: Adalimumab is an effective treatment for patients with active AS. PMID:21221193

  6. The relationship between enthesitis indices and disease activity parameters in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Sivas, Filiz; Mermerci Başkan, Bedriye; Erkol Inal, Esra; Akbulut Aktekin, Lale; Barça, Nurdan; Ozoran, Kürşat; Bodur, Hatice

    2009-03-01

    In this study, patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were assessed both by patient and physician using two enthesitis indices and the relationship between these indices and disease activity parameters was investigated. The study involved 100 AS patients. The patients were evaluated with 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) for spinal pain (VAS-S), peripheral joint pain (VAS-P), global assessment of patient, and global assessment of doctor. In the laboratory evaluations, the erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR) and serum C-reactive protein levels of the patients were determined. Bath AS disease activity index (BASDAI), Bath AS functional index (BASFI), Bath AS metrology index, and Bath AS radiology index were calculated. The severity of enthesitis was evaluated according to Mander enthesitis index (MEI) and Maastricht ankylosing spondylitis enthesitis score applied by both the patient (MASES-P) him/herself and the physician (MASES-D). There was a correlation between BASDAI and BASFI as well as MEI, MASES-D, and MASES-P indices (r = 0.447, r = 0.342, r = 0.663, r = 0.530, r = 0.464, and r = 0.435, respectively). No correlation between the laboratory parameters and enthesitis indices were detected. In multiple linear regression analysis, BASFI, VAS-S, and female gender (41.3%) were the best predictors of MEI-D, whereas BASFI, VAS-S, female gender, and ESR (32.5%) were the best predictors for MASES-D and BASFI (18.9%) was the best predictor of MASES-P. The assessment of simple and easily applicable MASES score by a patient may be expected to help the physician in clinical practice. When the disease activity of the patients with AS are evaluated, both BASDAI, the clinical importance of which has been confirmed in numerous studies and which is recommended by ASAS, and BASFI, which is valued by patients, should be considered.

  7. Translation and validation of the Turkish version of the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQOL) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Duruöz, M T; Doward, L; Turan, Y; Cerrahoglu, L; Yurtkuran, M; Calis, M; Tas, N; Ozgocmen, S; Yoleri, O; Durmaz, B; Oncel, S; Tuncer, T; Sendur, O; Birtane, M; Tuzun, F; Bingol, U; Kirnap, M; Celik Erturk, G; Ardicoglu, O; Memis, A; Atamaz, F; Kizil, R; Kacar, C; Gurer, G; Uzunca, K; Sari, H

    2013-11-01

    The Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific measure of needs-based quality of life developed in the UK and the Netherlands. This study describes translation, validation, and reliability of the scale into Turkish population. The ASQoL was translated into Turkish using the dual-panel process. Content validity was assessed via cognitive debriefing interviews with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Patients with AS according to modified New York criteria were recruited into the study from 12 hospitals of all part of Turkey. Psychometric and scaling properties were assessed via a two administration survey involving the ASQoL, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Classical psychometrics assessed reliability, convergent validity (correlation of ASQoL with NHP, BASFI, and BASDAI) and discriminative validity (correlation of ASQoL with perceived AS-severity and general health). Cognitive debriefing showed the new Turkish ASQoL to be clear, relevant, and comprehensive. Completed survey questionnaires were received from 277 AS patients (80% Male, mean age 42.2/SD 11.6, mean AS duration 9.4 years/SD 9.4). Test-retest reliability was excellent (0.96), indicating low random measurement error for the scale. Correlations of ASQoL with NHP sections were low to moderate (NHP Sleep 0.34; NHP Emotional Reactions 0.83) suggesting the measures assess related but distinct constructs. The measure was able to discriminate between patients based on their perceived disease severity (p < 0.0001) and self-reported general health (p < 0.0001). The Turkish version of ASQoL has good reliability and validity properties. It is practical and useful scale to assess the quality of life in AS patients in Turkish population.

  8. [Vitamin D levels in ankylosing spondylitis: does deficiency correspond to disease activity?].

    PubMed

    Pokhai, Gabriel G; Bandagi, Sabiha; Abrudescu, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory disorder that presents with arthritis of the axial skeleton, including sacroiliac joints. Vitamin D is a secosteroid hormone with a long-established role in calcium and phosphate homeostasis, and in the regulation of bone formation and resorption. It is now known that vitamin D plays an immunosuppressive role in the body, and there is interest of late in the role of vitamin D in autoimmune diseases. Inflammation may be responsible for some of the loss of bone mineral density seen in AS. We reviewed the literature for studies assessing vitamin D level as a marker of AS disease activity and those examining vitamin D levels in AS in comparison to healthy controls. Four of 7 studies found a significant negative correlation between vitamin D levels and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Index (BASDAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). In a review of 8 case-control studies, the mean level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was 22.8 ± 14.1 ng/mL in 555 AS patients versus 26.6 ± 12.5 ng/mL in 557 healthy controls. When compared with a 2-sample t test, vitamin D levels were significantly higher in healthy controls (p < 0.01). We conclude that patients with AS appear to have lower vitamin D levels versus healthy controls; however, the cause is unclear. Existing studies do not demonstrate a consistent link between vitamin D levels and disease activity in AS. Further studies are in need to determine if a causative link exists between vitamin D deficiency and AS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring Achilles enthesitis in ankylosing spondylitis during TNF-alpha antagonist therapy: an ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Karadag, Omer; Filippucci, Emilio; Atagunduz, Pamir; Akdogan, Ali; Kalyoncu, Umut; Grassi, Walter; Direskeneli, Haner

    2010-03-01

    Enthesitis is considered as the primary anatomical lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Therapeutic effects of TNF-alpha antagonist treatments for enthesitis on imaging changes are still limited to case reports or small sample-sized trials. We aimed to investigate the potential of ultrasonography (US) to detect early changes after TNF-alpha antagonist therapy of Achilles enthesis of AS patients. Forty-three AS patients with active disease, requiring TNF-alpha antagonist therapy, were included. Physical examination was performed to detect Achilles enthesitis and/or retrocalcaneal bursitis. US of the Achilles tendon was performed bilaterally. Grey-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) scores on a 0-2 semi-quantitative scale and total additive scores (TS) were calculated. Follow-up US examinations were performed 2 months after the initiation of therapy. At baseline, 11 patients (26.2%) were symptomatic in physical examination for either Achilles enthesitis or retrocalcaneal bursitis, whereas 36 (83%) had GS US pathological findings and 10 (23.3%) had PD signal. GS score and TS decreased significantly [3.6 (3.0) vs 2.3 (2.2), P < 0.001 and 4.7 (4.9) vs 2.7 (3.3), P < 0.001, respectively], whereas the decrease in PD score was not significant after 2 months of follow-up. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), ESR and CRP levels also showed significant improvements. Subclinical Achilles enthesitis, detected only with GS US, is present in a subset of AS patients and a significant improvement can be demonstrated after 2 months of TNF-alpha antagonist therapy. In addition to standard outcome measures, US might be an additional useful tool to monitor therapy in SpA patients with Achilles enthesitis.

  10. Characteristics of hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyemin; Eun, Yeong Hee; Kim, In Young; Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Jaejoon; Koh, Eun-Mi; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical course of hip arthritis and the risk factors for hip joint replacement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In this retrospective analysis, we evaluated 488 AS patients at a single tertiary hospital. At baseline and the most recent visit to the outpatient clinic from the patients with hip arthritis in AS, radiographic hip arthritis was evaluated using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Hip Index (BASRI-h). Also the average of the hip joint space width (interbone distance) at three distinct sites between the acetabulum and femoral head was recorded. Among 488 patients with AS, 60 patients (12.3%) had hip arthritis. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate were associated with hip involvement (odds ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.02; p = 0.004). Long disease duration and advanced axial disease were associated with severe hip arthritis (3 ≥ BASRI-h) at baseline. BASRI-h and interbone distance did not significantly change in patients with hip involvement during the follow-up period of 81.4 ± 35.7 months. Five patients had hip joint replacement surgery during follow-up period. The body mass index (BMI) and BASRI-h at baseline were associated with joint replacement surgery (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.67; p = 0.049 and HR, 20.64; 95% CI, 2.39 to 178.11; p = 0.006, respectively). Most of the patients with hip arthritis in AS showed no significant radiographic progression during the follow-up period. High BMI and advanced hip arthritis at baseline were associated with hip joint replacement surgery in patients with AS.

  11. Non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis: what are the similarities and differences?

    PubMed

    Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2015-01-01

    The development of the axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis (ASAS) classification criteria has had several implications for our understanding of the entire spectrum of spondyloarthritides (SpA). Going beyond the modified New York criteria, which concentrate on conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) for the classification of ankylosing spondylitis, the ASAS criteria add active inflammation of the SIJ as obtained by MRI and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 to classify patients with chronic back pain starting at a young age as axial SpA (axSpA). AxSpA should be considered as one disease that includes AS, the radiographic form, as well as the non-radiographic (nr-axSpA) form. Similarities and differences between these subgroups have been described in 3 studies: 1 local study, 1 national study (German SpA Inception Cohort) and 1 international study mainly conducted to test the efficacy of a tumour necrosis factor α blocker. Most clinical features and assessments of axSpA showed the same prevalence in patients with and without radiographic changes. However, some differences have been observed: the male:female ratio, the proportion of patients with objective signs of inflammation such as bone marrow oedema as detected by MRI, and the proportion of patients with increased levels of C reactive protein were higher in patients with AS. Importantly, these factors have also been identified as prognostic factors for more severe disease in terms of new bone formation. Thus, nr-axSpA may represent an early stage of AS but may also just be an abortive form of a disease which does cause much pain but which may also never lead to structural changes of the axial skeleton. Since the cut-off between nr-axSpA and AS is artificial and unreliable, we think that the term nr-axSpA should not be used for diagnosis but only for classification for historical reasons.

  12. Circulating levels of Th1 and Th2 chemokines in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianing; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Gaoya; Yang, Chunshu; Xu, Yong; Li, Yujia; Yang, Pingting

    2016-05-01

    Although chemokines are critical elements for the selective attraction and activation of various leukocyte subsets in the inflammatory process, there are few findings concerning T helper (Th) 1 or Th2 chemokines in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study was designed to determine whether serum levels of chemokines that are preferentially chemotactic for Th1 (IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10, IP-10/CXCL10) and Th2 (thymus and activation regulated chemokine, TARC/CCL17) and (macrophage derived chemokine, MDC/CCL22) cells were elevated and whether they correlated with the clinical features in patients with AS. Forty-two patients with axial AS and 25 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. Serum levels of chemokines (IP-10, TARC and MDC) and cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-4) were examined using ELISA. The disease activity was evaluated by Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS). Serum levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Serum chemokine levels of IP-10, TARC and MDC were significantly higher in patients with AS than those in healthy controls. Serum cytokine levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α were also significantly increased, but the levels of IL-4 were not. Furthermore, IP-10 levels in AS patients correlated with ESP, CRP and ASDAS, while the levels of TARC and MDC did not correlate with these clinic indexes. Correlation analysis between the levels of chemokines and cytokines revealed a positive correlation between IP-10 and TNF-α. The levels of both Th1 and Th2 chemokines decreased under blockade of TNF-α. Our results suggest that both a Th1 chemoattractant IP-10 and Th2 chemoattractants, TARC and MDC, cooperatively play a role in the development of AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Osteoporosis in ankylosing spondylitis - prevalence, risk factors and methods of assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporosis can be a complication of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), but diagnosing spinal osteoporosis can be difficult since pathologic new bone formation interferes with the assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD). The aims of the current study were to investigate prevalence and risk factors for reduced BMD in a Swedish cohort of AS patients, and to examine how progressive ankylosis influences BMD with the use of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine in different projections. Methods Methods of assessment were questionnaires, back mobility tests, blood samples, lateral spine radiographs for syndesmophyte grading (mSASSS), DXA of the hip, radius and lumbar spine in anteroposterior (AP) and lateral projections with estimation of volumetric BMD (vBMD). Results AS patients (modified New York criteria), 87 women and 117 men, mean age 50 ± 13 years and disease duration 15 ± 11 years were included. According to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria 21% osteoporosis and 44% osteopenia was diagnosed in patients > = 50 years. Under age 50 BMD below expected range for age was found in 5%. Interestingly lateral lumbar DXA showed significantly lower BMD and revealed significantly more cases with osteoporosis as compared with AP DXA. Lumbar vBMD was not different between sexes, but women had significantly more lumbar osteoporosis measured with AP DXA (P < 0.001). Men had significantly higher mSASSS (P < 0.001). Low BMD was associated with high age, disease duration, mSASSS, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), inflammatory parameters and low body mass index (BMI). Increasing mSASSS correlated significantly with decreasing lateral and volumetric lumbar BMD, while AP lumbar BMD showed tendency to increase. Conclusions Osteoporosis and osteopenia is common in AS and associated with high disease burden. Lateral and volumetric lumbar DXA are more sensitive than AP DXA in detecting osteoporosis and are less affected by

  14. Radiologic Changes in the Symphysis Pubis of Male Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon San; Song, Yoonah; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the involvement of the symphysis pubis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and to assess the correlations between symphysis pubis changes and clinical findings. We retrospectively evaluated a total of 222 male patients with AS who underwent pelvic and cervical/lumbar spine radiography at the Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases from August 2004 to February 2014. Radiographs were examined by 2 experienced radiologists, and radiographic damage was scored as follows: 0 (no damage), 1 (subtle irregularity and/or subchondral sclerosis), 2 (erosion), 3 (partial ankylosis), and 4 (total ankylosis). We evaluated the patients' clinical characteristics and analyzed their correlations with radiographic symphysis pubis changes. The mean patient age was 30.5 ± 8.3 years and mean disease duration was 7.1 ± 4.6 years; 105 patients (47.3%) exhibited radiologic damage in the symphysis pubis. Moreover, 75, 28, 0, and 2 patients had scores of 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. When comparing the normal (score 0) and abnormal (score 1-4) symphysis pubis groups, the latter had a longer symptom duration (10.1 ± 7.0 vs 7.6 ± 5.8 yrs, p = 0.004) and higher modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS; 18.6 ± 17.0 vs. 14.3 ± 13.4, p = 0.038). Moreover, a significant correlation was noted between the radiographic symphysis pubis damage score and mSASSS (r(2) = 0.147, p = 0.029). Among male patients with AS, 47.3% exhibited symphysis pubis involvement. Moreover, a correlation was observed between the radiographic symphysis pubis and spine changes.

  15. Loss of anterior concavity of the first sacrum can predict spinal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Song, Yoonah; Joo, Young Bin; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the frequency of squaring of the first sacrum (S1), defined as the loss of anterior concavity, in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We also determined the interobserver reliability in the assessment of S1 squaring and the relationships of S1 squaring with MRI findings and the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spinal Score (mSASSS). To this end, we performed a retrospective study of 100 patients with AS (mean age 33.2 years; range 19-57 years) and 100 control patients (mean age 35.6 years; range 19-50 years). Four experienced radiologists independently assessed the presence of S1 squaring in the AS and control groups. The frequencies of S1 squaring as scored by the four observers were 47, 48, 46, and 42 in the AS group and 3, 6, 4, and 6 in the control group. The interobserver agreement among the four observers with respect to S1 squaring was excellent (κ value 0.80) in the AS group and fair to good (κ value 0.61) in the control group. In patients with AS, the presence of S1 squaring showed fair to good agreement with the MRI changes (κ value 0.74). Moreover, the mSASSSs of patients with versus without S1 squaring were significantly different (mean 23.9 vs 7.0, p < 0.001). In conclusion, S1 squaring is relatively common in patients with AS. Moreover, S1 squaring is closely correlated with MRI changes and significantly associated with the mSASSS. Assessment of S1 squaring could be a simple method that is potentially useful for predicting early spinal structural involvement in patients with AS.

  16. Relationship between cervical sagittal alignment and quality of life in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Sub; Youn, Myung Soo; Shin, Jong Ki; Goh, Tae Sik; Kang, Sung Shik

    2015-06-01

    Little information is available on the relationship between cervical sagittal alignment and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. The aim of this study was to identify relationships between cervical sagittal alignment and HRQOL in AS. The study and control groups comprised 102 AS patients (15 women and 87 men) and age- and sex-matched 50 controls, respectively. All underwent anteroposterior and lateral radiographs and completed clinical questionnaires. The radiographic parameters examined were C2-C7 lordosis, C2-C7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), T1 slope and T1 slope minus C2-C7 lordosis (TS-CL). A visual analogue scale (VAS 0-10) score for neck pain, the neck disability index (NDI), neck pain and disability (NPAD) scale and bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) were administered to evaluate QOL. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significances of differences between the study and control groups. In addition, correlations between radiological parameters and clinical questionnaires were sought. AS patients and controls were found to be different significantly in terms of C2-C7 SVA, T1 slope, and TS-CL. However, no significant intergroup difference was observed for C2-C7 lordosis (P > 0.05). Correlation analysis revealed significant relationships between radiographic parameters and QOL. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of QOL, and the results obtained revealed that C2-C7 SVA significantly predicted VAS, NDI, and NPAD scores and that age predicted NPAD score. Cervical sagittal parameters were found to be significantly different in AS patients and normal controls. Correlation analysis revealed significant relationships between radiographic parameters and QOL. In particular, C2-C7 SVA was found to be a significant predictor of QOL in AS patient.

  17. Patient perspectives of managing fatigue in Ankylosing Spondylitis, and views on potential interventions: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Davies, Helen; Brophy, Sinead; Dennis, Michael; Cooksey, Roxanne; Irvine, Elizabeth; Siebert, Stefan

    2013-05-09

    Fatigue is a major component of living with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), though it has been largely over-looked, and currently there are no specific agreed management strategies. This qualitative exploratory study involved participants who are members of an existing population-based ankylosing spondylitis (PAS) cohort. Participants residing in South West Wales were invited to participate in a focus group to discuss; (1) effects of fatigue, (2) self-management strategies and (3) potential future interventions. The focus groups were audio-recorded and the transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Participants consisted of 3 males/4 females (group 1) and 4 males/3 females (group 2), aged between 35 and 73 years (mean age 53 years). Three main themes were identified: (1) The effects of fatigue were multi-dimensional with participants expressing feelings of being 'drained' (physical), 'upset' (emotional) and experiencing 'low-mood' (psychological); (2) The most commonly reported self-management strategy for fatigue was a balanced combination of activity (exercise) and rest. Medication was reluctantly taken due to side-effects and worries over dependency; (3) Participants expressed a preference for psychological therapies rather than pharmacological for managing fatigue. Information on Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) was received with interest, with recommendations for delivery in a group format with the option of distance-based delivery for people who were not able to attend a group course. Patients frequently try and manage their fatigue without any formal guidance or support. Our research indicates there is a need for future research to focus on psychological interventions to address the multi-faceted aspects of fatigue in AS.

  18. Postural deformities: potential morbidities to cause balance problems in patients with ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed

    Çınar, Ece; Akkoç, Yeşim; Karapolat, Hale; Durusoy, Raika; Keser, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of postural deformities caused by ankylosing spondylitis (AS) on balance problems. This study included 29 patients with AS and 21 healthy controls. For assessing exercise capacity and dynamic balance, timed up and go test, five times sit-to-stand test, gait speed, and 6-min walk test were performed. Romberg tests were used to evaluate static balance and proprioception, whereas Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), Functional Gait Assessment (FGA), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Activity Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), and functional reach test were used to assess dynamic balance and the risk of falling. Using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) scores, patients with AS were divided into two groups: those with scores 0-4 were assigned to subgroup AS1, and those with scores 5-10 were assigned to subgroup AS2. In the whole group of patients with AS, five times sit-to-stand test, tandem Romberg test with eyes closed, and BBS and ABC scores were significantly worse than the healthy controls (p<0.05). In the AS2 subgroup having more severe and advanced disease, five additional parameters, including timed up and go test, 6-min walk test, functional reach test, FGA, and DHI scores were also significantly worse than the healthy controls (p<0.05). Comparing the two subgroups with each other, only BBS scores were significantly worse in the AS2 subgroup than in the AS1 subgroup. Although in clinical practice, poor balance is not a common problem in AS, possibly because of compensatory mechanisms, patients with AS have poorer static and dynamic balance than healthy subjects. Significantly worse BBS scores in the AS2 subgroup than in the AS1 subgroup may suggest the presence of more dynamic balance problems in advanced disease; however, future studies comprising larger samples are necessary to confirm this assumption.

  19. [Advice for patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis: results of a representative patient survey in Germany].

    PubMed

    Feldtkeller, E; Hammel, L; Brenneis, C; Song, I-H; Rudwaleit, M

    2011-07-01

    Following the diagnosis of a chronic disease like ankylosing spondylitis (AS), patients need extensive information on what to expect, how to behave and what they need to be aware of in particular in order to contribute to a favourable disease outcome. A questionnaire consisting of 82 questions regarding demographics, diagnosis, information received with the diagnosis, disease activity, function, quality of life, treatment, ability to work, smoking etc. was distributed to AS patients by rheumatologists in 51 hospitals and/or private practices. In addition, the questionnaire was sent to 3400 randomly selected members out of the 14,000 patient members of the German Ankylosing Spondylitis Society (Deutsche Vereinigung Morbus Bechterew, DVMB). In all, 1068 DVMB members and 205 non-members responded to the survey. Almost all of these indicated that they had received at least one piece of information regarding what they should be particularly aware of, at the time of diagnosis. A total of 69% were informed about the need for daily exercise, 51% about the value of individual physiotherapy, 38% about the value of group physiotherapy, 37% about the need to maintain an upright posture, and 33% were recommended 3 weeks in a rehabilitation centre. Less than 30% were informed about appropriate sports, appropriate working conditions, suitable chairs, mattress, pillows etc., about the value of radon therapy or about joining a disease-specific patient organisation. To the question regarding what patients meanwhile consider as most important, daily exercise (50%) and sufficient movement at work and leisure (55%) were reported most frequently. Other aspects regarded as important to patients included a flat, firm mattress (53%), avoiding large pillows (42%), keeping an upright posture at work (38%), appropriate sports (36%), and an upright posture also when not at work (34%). Of the DVMB members, 46% had participated in disease-specific standardised patient education, compared with

  20. Effect of cardiovascular training on fitness and perceived disease activity in people with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Niedermann, Karin; Sidelnikov, Eduard; Muggli, Claudia; Dagfinrud, Hanne; Hermann, Matthias; Tamborrini, Giorgio; Ciurea, Adrian; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike

    2013-11-01

    Several studies suggest that patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a 12-week, individually monitored, with moderate heart rate level intensity cardiovascular training on cardiovascular fitness and perceived disease activity in AS patients. Patients diagnosed with AS according to the modified New York criteria were randomized to either cardiovascular training or attention control. The training group performed 3 cardiovascular training units per week. All participants attended 1 weekly usual care flexibility training session. Attention control contained regular discussion groups on coping strategies. Adherence was self-monitored. Assessments were performed at baseline and after the intervention period of 3 months. Physical fitness was the primary end point, measured in watts using a submaximal bicycle test following the physical work capacity 75% protocol. All analyses controlled for sex, age, body mass index,baseline fitness and physical activity levels, and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Of 106 AS patients enrolled, 40% were women and the mean ± SD age was 49 ± 12 years. A total of 74.6% of the training group reported exercising at least 3 times a week. At the 3-month followup, the fitness level in the training group was significantly higher than in the control group (mean ± SE 90.32W ± 4.52W versus 109.84W ± 4.72W; P = 0.001), independent of other covariates. The mean BASDAI total score was 0.31 points lower (P = 0.31) in the training group, reaching significance for the peripheral pain subscore (1.19; P = 0.01) but not for back pain or fatigue. Cardiovascular training, in addition to flexibility exercise, increased fitness in AS patients and reduced their peripheral pain.

  1. Postural deformities: potential morbidities to cause balance problems in patients with ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Ece; Akkoç, Yeşim; Karapolat, Hale; Durusoy, Raika; Keser, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of postural deformities caused by ankylosing spondylitis (AS) on balance problems. Material and Methods This study included 29 patients with AS and 21 healthy controls. For assessing exercise capacity and dynamic balance, timed up and go test, five times sit-to-stand test, gait speed, and 6-min walk test were performed. Romberg tests were used to evaluate static balance and proprioception, whereas Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), Functional Gait Assessment (FGA), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Activity Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), and functional reach test were used to assess dynamic balance and the risk of falling. Using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) scores, patients with AS were divided into two groups: those with scores 0–4 were assigned to subgroup AS1, and those with scores 5–10 were assigned to subgroup AS2. Results In the whole group of patients with AS, five times sit-to-stand test, tandem Romberg test with eyes closed, and BBS and ABC scores were significantly worse than the healthy controls (p<0.05). In the AS2 subgroup having more severe and advanced disease, five additional parameters, including timed up and go test, 6-min walk test, functional reach test, FGA, and DHI scores were also significantly worse than the healthy controls (p<0.05). Comparing the two subgroups with each other, only BBS scores were significantly worse in the AS2 subgroup than in the AS1 subgroup. Conclusion Although in clinical practice, poor balance is not a common problem in AS, possibly because of compensatory mechanisms, patients with AS have poorer static and dynamic balance than healthy subjects. Significantly worse BBS scores in the AS2 subgroup than in the AS1 subgroup may suggest the presence of more dynamic balance problems in advanced disease; however, future studies comprising larger samples are necessary to confirm this assumption. PMID:27708961

  2. Greek adaptation and validation of the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) measure

    PubMed Central

    Graham, J E; Rouse, M; Twiss, J; McKenna, S P; Vidalis, A A

    2015-01-01

    Background Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic disease that has a significant impact on patient’s quality of life (QoL). The Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific patient-reported outcome measure for assessing QoL in AS. While the ASQoL has been adapted for use in 46 countries worldwide, a Greek language version of the measure has not been available and was required for an international clinical trial. Aim The aim was to develop and assess the psychometric properties of a Greek language version of the ASQoL. Methods The adaptation of the ASQoL into Greek involved three procedures: translation, assessment of face and content validity, and formal validation. The measure was translated into Greek using two translation panels. Cognitive debriefing interviews were employed to determine face and content validity. Finally, the translation’s psychometric properties were examined by administering it on two occasions, with a 14-day interval. The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used as a comparator measure. Results The ASQoL proved straightforward to translate into Greek and interviewees found it relevant, comprehensible and easy to complete.  The measure had good internal consistency (α =0.92) and test-retest reliability (r =0.98). Predicted correlations with the NHP provided evidence of the convergent validity of the two measures. Construct validity was confirmed by the measure’s ability to distinguish groups of AS patients varying by perceived disease severity and general health. Conclusions The Greek ASQoL has been shown to be well-accepted, reliable and valid and can be recommended for use in clinical studies and routine clinical practice in AS. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):119-124. PMID:27418759

  3. The genetic basis of ankylosing spondylitis: new insights into disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Florence WL; Tsui, Hing Wo; Akram, Ali; Haroon, Nigil; Inman, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a complex disease involving multiple risk factors, both genetic and environmental. AS patients are predominantly young men, and the disease is characterized by inflammation and ankylosis, mainly at the cartilage–bone interface and enthesis. HLA-B27 has been known to be the major AS-susceptibility gene for more than 40 years. Despite advances made in the past few years, progress in the search for non-human leukocyte antigen susceptibility genes has been hampered by the heterogeneity of the disease. Compared to other complex diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), fewer susceptibility loci have been identified in AS. Furthermore, non-major histocompatibility-complex susceptibility loci discovered, such as ERAP1 and IL23R, are likely contributors to joint inflammation. Identification and confirmation of functional variants remains a significant challenge of investigations involving genome-wide association studies (GWAS). It remains unclear why none of the AS-susceptibility genes identified in GWAS appear to be directly involved in the ankylosing process. Numerous reviews have recently been published on the genetics of AS. Therefore, aside from a brief summary of what AS GWAS has successfully achieved thus far, this review will focus on directions that could address unanswered questions raised by GWAS. PMID:24971029

  4. Effectiveness of ultrasound treatment applied with exercise therapy on patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Şilte Karamanlioğlu, Duygu; Aktas, Ilknur; Ozkan, Feyza Unlu; Kaysin, Meryem; Girgin, Nuray

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate effectiveness of ultrasound treatment applied with exercise therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Fifty-two patients, who were diagnosed according to modified New York criteria, were aged 25-60, and have spine pain, were randomly assigned to two groups. Ultrasound (US) and exercise therapy were applied to treatment group (27); placebo US treatment and exercise therapy were applied to control group (25). Patients were evaluated before treatment, at the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after the treatment. Daily and night pain, morning stiffness, patient global assessment (PGA), doctor global assessment (DGA), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire, Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and ASDAS C-reactive protein (CRP) were used as clinical parameters. In US group, all parameters showed significant improvements at 2 and 6 weeks, in comparison with the baseline. In placebo US group, significant improvement was obtained for all parameters (except tragus-to-wall distance and modified Schober test at 2 weeks and lumbar side flexion and modified Schober test at 6 weeks). Comparison of the groups showed significantly superior results of US group for parameters of BASMI (p < 0.05), tragus-wall distance (p < 0.05), PGA (p < 0.01), and DGA (p < 0.05) at 2 weeks as well as for the parameters of daily pain (p < 0.01), PGA (p < 0.05), DGA (p < 0.01), BASDAI (p < 0.05), ASDAS-CRP (p < 0.05), ASDAS-ESR (p < 0.01), lumbar side flexion (p < 0.01), the modified Schober test (p < 0.01), and ASQoL (p < 0.05) at 6 weeks. Our study showed that ultrasound treatment increases the effect of exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  5. Supervised training and home-based rehabilitation in patients with stabilized ankylosing spondylitis on TNF inhibitor treatment: a controlled clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Stefano; Poli, Patrizia; Bonaldo, Lara; Pigatto, Maurizia; Ramonda, Roberta; Lubrano, Ennio; Punzi, Leonardo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-06-01

    To assess the 12-month's follow-up effects on pain, mobility, and physical function outcomes of a supervised training and home-based rehabilitation for ankylosing spondylitis patients stabilized with TNF-inhibitor therapy. Controlled clinical trial (sequentially determined allocation) with 12-months' follow-up. Patients' homes. A total of 69 subjects were allocated to either a rehabilitation programme (rehabilitation group, n = 22), an educational-behavioural programme (educational group, n = 24), and to neither programme (control group, n = 23). Rehabilitation programme included supervised training and home exercises (stretching, strengthening, aerobic, chest, and spine/hip joint flexibility exercises); educational-behavioural programme included information on ankylosing spondylitis, pain and stress mechanisms, and control. Spinal pain intensity, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, chest expansion, and cervical and lumbar spine active range of motion measured by a pocket goniometer. At baseline, the three groups exhibited comparable demographic characteristics and basal evaluations. Intra-group changes in the rehabilitation group from baseline to 12 months yielded statistically significant gains (p < 0.05) for all outcomes. At 12-months follow-up, compared with the control and educational-behavioural, the rehabilitation group exhibited significant differences in chest expansion (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (p = 0.012 and p = 0.050), and in some goniometric measurements as cervical rotation (p = 0.007 and p = 0.014), toraco-lumbar rotation (p = 0.009 and p = 0.050), and total cervical movements (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001). In comparison with the educational-behavioural programme or no intervention, supervised training and home exercises improved long-term outcome in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. © The

  6. Spinal cord injury in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a 10-year review.

    PubMed

    Thumbikat, Pradeep; Hariharan, Ramaswamy P; Ravichandran, Ganapathiraju; McClelland, Martin R; Mathew, Kidangalil M

    2007-12-15

    Retrospective study. To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and preexisting ankylosing spondylitis (AS). AS alters the strength and biomechanical properties of the spine that renders it susceptible to fracture with minimal trauma. Neurologic involvement is common and outcomes largely depend on the early recognition and appropriate management. A 10-year review (1996-2005) was carried out to identify all patients admitted with SCI associated with AS. The cause of injury, prehospital and emergency management, definitive treatment of fracture, final neurology, and functional outcomes were ascertained. Reasons for neurologic deterioration were determined. Eighteen patients were identified. In 15 patients, the injury resulted from trauma (fall 14, road accident 1) and in 3 the SCI followed spinal surgical interventions. Twelve of the 15 patients with traumatic injuries were able to walk immediately after the fall but subsequently deteriorated for various reasons. Spinal epidural hematomas developed in 3 patients (2 traumatic, 1 spinal intervention). The fractures were managed surgically in 3 patients, halo jacket was used in 2, and the remainder were managed expectantly on traction. Four patients died before discharge, 4 were able to walk with an aid at discharge, and the others were wheel chair dependent. Neurologic deficits were often subtle on initial presentation, resulting in many injuries being missed because of a low index of suspicion and poor visualization of lower cervical fractures on conventional radiographs. Extension of the ankylosed kyphotic cervical spine during conventional immobilization or for radiologic procedures resulted in neurologic deficits. Patients with an ankylosed cervical spine are normally unable to see the ceiling lying supine because of cervicothoracic kyphosis and use pillows to support their head. Cervical spine alignment in a similar flexed position is essential during immobilization

  7. Total hip arthroplasty in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: Midterm radiologic and functional results.

    PubMed

    Saglam, Yavuz; Ozturk, Irfan; Cakmak, Mehmet Fevzi; Ozdemir, Mustafa; Yazicioglu, Onder

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). One hundred five hips of 61 AS patients (mean age: 41.3 ± 10.2 years) who underwent THA between 1997 and 2012 were included into the study. Dorr's classification of proximal femoral geometry, acetabular protrusio, bone ankylosis, acetabular protrusion, Brooker classification of heterotopic ossification (HO), Gruen and Charnley classifications of implant loosening were used in radiographic assessments. Patients were called back to return for an additional long-term follow-up for functional assessment. Cementless total hip arthroplasty was used in 83 hips (79%) and cemented TKA was used in 22 hips (21%). The overall rate of aseptic loosening was 7.6% at a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. Femoral loosening was statistically similar in cemented and cementless femoral components (14% vs. 8%, p = 0.089). Acetabular component loosening was statistically higher in patients with any degree of HO (p = 0.04). Regardless of the type of femoral implant (cemented or cementless), femoral component loosening was higher in Dorr's type C patients (p = 0.005). The average pre-operative HSS was 46.6 ± 16.3, and it improved to 80.7 ± 18.7 at last follow-up (p < 0.01). Revision incidence was similar in between ankylosed and non-ankylosed hips. While complication rates are high, significant functional improvement can be achieved after THA in patients with AS. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Golimumab administered subcutaneously every 4 weeks in ankylosing spondylitis: 104-week results of the GO-RAISE study

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Jürgen; Deodhar, Atul; Inman, Robert D; van der Heijde, Désirée; Mack, Michael; Xu, Stephen; Hsu, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of golimumab over 104 weeks in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis. Methods At baseline, patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (n=356) were randomly assigned (1:1.8:1.8) to subcutaneous injections of placebo (group 1), golimumab 50 mg (group 2) or golimumab 100 mg (group 3) every 4 weeks. At week 16, patients in groups 1 and 2 with <20% improvement in total back pain and morning stiffness entered early escape to 50 or 100 mg, respectively. At week 24, patients still receiving placebo crossed over to golimumab 50 mg. Findings through week 24 were previously reported; those through week 104 are presented herein. Results At week 104, 38.5%, 60.1% and 71.4% of patients in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively, had at least 20% improvement in the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society response criteria (ASAS20); 38.5%, 55.8% and 54.3% had an ASAS40 response and 21.8%, 31.9% and 30.7% were in ASAS partial remission. Mean Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index scores were <3 at week 104 for all the treatment regimens. Golimumab safety through week 104 was similar to that through week 24. Conclusion Clinical response that was achieved by patients receiving golimumab through 24 weeks was sustained through 52 and 104 weeks. The golimumab safety profile appeared to be consistent with the known safety profile of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors. PMID:22012970

  9. Work Outcome in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: Results From a 12-Year Followup of an International Study.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ortiz, J D; Ramiro, S; Landewé, R; van der Heijde, D; Dougados, M; van den Bosch, F; Boonen, A

    2016-04-01

    To understand the impact of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) on work disability (WD) over 12 years compared with the general population, and explore factors predicting adverse work outcome, defined as new partial WD or reduction in working hours. Source of data was the Outcome Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Study, which includes patients from The Netherlands, France, and Belgium. Standardized WD rates over time compared to the general population were calculated using indirect standardization (Dutch patients only). Cox survival analyses identified baseline predictors as well as time-varying factors influencing adverse work outcome over 12 years. Of 215 patients, 55 (26%) were full WD at baseline and 139 (65%) were at risk for adverse work outcome during followup. When compared to the general population, WD over 12 years continued to be increased in Dutch men (incidence rate [IR] 2.9 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.2, 4.6]), but less clearly for women (IR 1.2 [95% CI -0.4, 2.9]). Within the entire sample, baseline predictors of adverse work outcome over 12 years were residence in The Netherlands (versus France or Belgium) (hazard ratio [HR] 3.4 [95% CI 1.4, 8.4]) and worse Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) (HR 1.2 [95% CI 1.0, 1.4]). Time-varying predictors over 12 years were residence in The Netherlands, uveitis, and either BASFI or Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index with age and inflammatory bowel disease. Although WD was already prevalent at inclusion in the cohort, a substantial proportion of patients incurred further adverse work outcome over 12 years. In addition to country of residence, uveitis, age, and self-reported physical function or disease activity predicted long-term adverse work outcome. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Analysis of clinical indexes and RUNX3, TBKBP1, PPARGC1B polymorphisms in Chinese Han patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Lian, Zijian; Xiao, Yu; Shi, Lewis L; Chai, Wei; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a genetically determined disease. Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), tumor necrosis factor family member-associated NF-κB activator binding kinase 1 binding protein (TBKBP1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 beta (PPARGC1B) have recently been found to be associated with susceptibility to AS in patients of Western European descent. We hypothesize that these three genes may be related to clinical outcomes of Chinese Han AS patients. Blood samples were drawn from 396 HLA-B27-positive Chinese Han AS patients. Clinical indexes were scored for each patient, including the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS), which measure patients' function of daily life and severity of AS. Twelve tagSNPs were selected from these three genes and genotyped. We analyzed the clinical indexes in different genotyped patients to investigate the relationship between severity of AS and different genotypes. The rs11249215 SNP in RUNX3 and the rs7379457 and rs32579 SNPs in PPARGC1B significantly affect the BASFI score in patients. The rs11249215, rs7551188, and rs1395621 SNPs in RUNX3 significantly affect the BASDAI scores. The two selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TBKBP1 show no relationship with the clinical outcomes. None of the 12 SNPs is related to mSASSS. In conclusion, RUNX3 is related to both the severity of AS and the function of daily life. PPARGC1B is related to the function of daily life.

  11. Assessment of relation between neutrophil lympocyte, platelet lympocyte ratios and epicardial fat thickness in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Boyraz, Ismail; Onur Caglar, Sabri; Erdem, Fatma; Yazici, Mehmet; Yazici, Selma; Koc, Bunyamin; Gunduz, Ramazan; Karakoyun, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    To investigate whether there is a relation between neutrophillymphocyte (N/L) and platelet- lymphocyte (P/L) ratios and epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Thirty patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis and 25 healthy people (controls) were included in the study. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), height, hemogram, sedimentation, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, platelet/lymphocyte ratio, CRP, hepatic and renal function tests, lipid profile of the all patients were recorded. Data related to duration of the disease, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) values of the cases in the patient group were obtained. A cardiologist measured EAT thickness by ECHO in both patient and control groups. In the patient group, mean BASDAI and BASFI scores were 2.48±2.21 and 1.5±2.07, respectively. Age, gender, BMI values did not show statistically significant difference between the patient and the control groups. N/L and P/L ratios did not change significantly in the patient group having higher EAT, BASFI values and taking anti-TNF compared to the control group. In patients with AS, EAT measurements, which are related to inflammatory response increase, can be used for monitoring of the risk of development of cardiac disease. We could not find the relation between EAT and N/L, P/L ratios in terms of evaluation of inflammatory response. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  12. Construct validity of clinical spinal mobility tests in ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Castro, Marcelo P; Stebbings, Simon M; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bussey, Melanie D

    2016-07-01

    The study aimed to determine, using systematic review and meta-analysis, the level of evidence supporting the construct validity of spinal mobility tests for assessing patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Following the guidelines proposed in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses, three sets of keywords were used for data searching: (i) ankylosing spondylitis, spondyloarthritis, spondyloarthropathy, spondylarthritis; (ii) accuracy, association, construct, correlation, Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials, OMERACT, truth, validity; (iii) mobility, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index-BASMI, radiography, spinal measures, cervical rotation, Schober (a further 19 keywords were used). Initially, 2558 records were identified, and from these, 21 studies were retained. Fourteen of these studies were considered high level of evidence. Compound indexes of spinal mobility showed mostly substantial to excellent levels of agreement with global structural damage. Individual mobility tests for the cervico-thoracic spine showed only moderate agreements with cervical structural damage, and considering structural damage at the lumbar spine, the original Schober was the only test that presented consistently substantial levels of agreement. Three studies assessed the construct validity of mobility measures for inflammation and low to fair levels of agreement were observed. Two meta-analyses were conducted, with assessment of agreement between BASMI and two radiological indexes of global structural damage. The spinal mobility indexes and the original Schober test show acceptable construct validity for inferring the extent of structural damage when assessing patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Spinal mobility measures do not reflect levels of inflammation at either the sacroiliac joints and/or the spine.

  13. Relationship of serum osteoprotegerin with arterial stiffness, preclinical atherosclerosis, and disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Erdoğan, Turan; Türkyılmaz, Aysegül Kücükali; Devrimsel, Gül; Cüre, Medine Cumhur; Beyazal, Mehmet; Sahin, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) reportedly have a higher mortality and morbidity risk. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) was recently defined as an important cardiovascular (CV) marker in the general population. We aimed to assess the relationship of serum OPG levels with arterial stiffness, carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), and clinical and laboratory data in AS patients. We examined 60 AS patients without CV disease or risk factors and 50 healthy controls. Disease activity was evaluated using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS), whereas functional capacity was evaluated using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). Serum OPG levels were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was used as an indicator of arterial stiffness, whereas CIMT (examined via carotid ultrasonography) was used to evaluate preclinical atherosclerosis. The mean serum OPG level, PWV, and CIMT were significantly higher in AS patients than in controls (106.7 ± 50.9 vs. 58.1 ± 12.7 pg/mL; 7.4 ± 1.8 vs. 6.2 ± 1.2 m/s; 0.72 ± 0.13 vs. 0.57 ± 0.07 mm, respectively; P < 0.001 for all). In AS patients, the serum OPG levels were not significantly correlated with PWV and CIMT but were significantly correlated with erthrocyte sedimentation rate, BASFI, and ASDAS. AS patients without CV disease or risk exhibited high OPG levels and increased PWV and CIMT values. Although OPG levels were not significantly correlated with PWV or CIMT, future long-term follow-up studies will help define the predictive value of OPG in these patients.

  14. Association of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1-ILE105VAL and ACE I/D polymorphisms with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    İnal, Esra Erkol; Görükmez, Orhan; Eroğlu, Selma; Görükmez, Özlem; Solak, Özlem; Topak, Ali; Yakut, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown origin. The aim of this study is to clarify the relationships between susceptibility and severity of AS and GST-mu1 (GSTM1), GST-theta1 (GSTT1), GST-pi1 (GSTP1)-Ile105Val and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphisms in AS patients. One hundred thirty-eight AS patients and seventy-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of the AS patients were recorded. The scores of the numeric rating scale (NRS) pain, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Activity Index, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index were calculated. The genotypes distributions and allele frequencies of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1-Ile105Val and ACE I/D polymorphisms were compared between patients and healthy controls. The Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods were used to detect the polymorphisms of ACE I/D, the GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes and the GSTP1-Ile105Val polymorphism, respectively. There were significantly higher levels of the GSTT1 null and the ACE II genotypes in AS patients compared to those in healthy controls (p = 0.002 and 0.005, respectively). We found significantly higher levels of CRP and the NRS pain scores in the patients with ACE ID or DD genotypes compared to those in the patients with ACE II genotypes (p = 0.005 and 0.035, respectively). The present results showed that genes involved in protection from oxidative stress and ACE gene may influence disease development and course in AS.

  15. Are swimming or aerobic exercise better than conventional exercise in ankylosing spondylitis patients? A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Karapolat, H; Eyigor, S; Zoghi, M; Akkoc, Y; Kirazli, Y; Keser, G

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of conventional exercise (CE), swimming and walking on the pulmonary functions, aerobic capacity, quality of life, Bath indexes and psychological symptoms in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Forty-five patients were randomised into either swimming (group 1), walking (group 2), CE group (group 3). Patients in Group 1 performed CE and swimming, patients in Group 2 performed CE and walking and patients in Group 3 performed CE only. Exercise sessions were performed three times a week for a period of six weeks. Patients were assessed before and after the rehabilitation program, with respect to, pulmonary function test (forced vital capacity [FVC, mL], forced expiration volume in one second [FEV1, mL], FEV1/FVC (%) and vital capacity [VC, mL]), maximal oxygen uptake (pV.O2), 6-minute walking test (6MWT), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, Nottingham Health Profile and Beck Depression Inventory. There were significant increases in pVO2 and 6MWT after treatment in Groups 1 and 2 (P<0.05). FeV1, FVC and VC improved significantly with treatment in all three groups (P<0.05). A statistically significant improvement was observed in energy, emotional reaction and physical mobility sub-scores of NHP in three exercise groups after completion of the exercise program (P<0.05). Swimming, walking and CE had beneficial effects on the quality of life and pulmonary functions. Aerobic exercises such as swimming and walking in addition to CE increased functional capacities of patients.

  16. Outcome of an education and home-based exercise programme for patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a nationwide randomized study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Juanola, Xavier; Cruz-Martínez, Juan; Peña-Arrébola, Andrés; Mulero, Juan; Gratacós, Jordi; Collantes, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a structured education and home exercise programme in daily practice patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A total of 756 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (72% males, mean age 45 years) participated in a 6-month prospective multicentre controlled study, 381 of whom were randomised to an education intervention (a 2-hour informative session about the disease and the implementation of a non-supervised physical activity programme at home) and 375 to standard care (controls). Main outcome measures included Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity and Functional Index (BASDAI, BASFI). Secondary outcome measures were 0-10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) for total pain, nocturnal pain and global disease activity and quality of life (ASQoL), knowledge of disease (self-evaluation ordinal scale) and daily exercise (diary card). At 6 months, the adjusted mean difference between control and educational groups for BASDAI was 0.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10-0.54, p=0.005, and for BASFI 0.31, 95%CI 0.12-0.51, p=0.002. Significant differences were found also in VAS for total pain, patient´s global assessment and in ASQoL. Patients in the education group increased their knowledge about the disease and its treatments significantly (p<0.001) and practised more regular exercise than controls (p<0.001). A structured education and home exercise programme for patients with ankylosing spondylitis in daily practice was feasible and helped to increase knowledge and exercise. Although statistically significant, the magnitudes of the clinical benefits in terms of disease activity and physical function were poor.

  17. Rituximab Can Induce Remission in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis Who Failed Anti-TNF-α Agent

    PubMed Central

    AlDhaheri, Fahmi; Almteri, Talal; Dwid, Naji; Majdali, Ahd; Janoudi, Nahed; Almoallim, Hani

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 38 Final Diagnosis: Ankylosing spondylitis Symptoms: Back pain • morning stiffness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Not applicable Specialty: Rheuamatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that predominantly affects the axial skeleton. The ability of anti-TNF-α agents to reduce disease activity in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), including AS, has been demonstrated in multiple randomized trials and several meta-analyses. Reports on the efficacy of rituximab in treatment of AS have described good results. We report on a patient with AS who failed anti-TNF-α therapy but showed good clinical improvement with rituximab therapy. Case Report: A 38-year-old male patient was diagnosed with AS and showed poor response to sulfasalazine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Infliximab was initiated with marked improvement as per the Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI). Due to disease flare, the patient was switched to etanercept. He subsequently acquired papillary thyroid cancer and etanercept was discontinued. He underwent a total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine therapy. For his ongoing active disease, NSAIDs and sulfasalazine were resumed with a lack of response (BASDAI=7.1). Rituximab was started and resulted in significant improvement (BASDAI=2.3). Conclusions: Rituximab can be a potential target therapy for patients who start to lose response to TNF-inhibitors or for those who develop solid malignancies. Further placebo-controlled studies are required. PMID:28179619

  18. The impact of whole-body cryotherapy on parameters of spinal mobility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Agata; Sieroń, Aleksander; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Matyszkiewicz, Beata; Rozmus-Kuczia, Irena

    2005-10-30

    Background. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of whole-body cryotherapy with subsequent kinesitherapy on spinal mobility parameters in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Material and methods. We enrolled 32 men with ankylosing spondylitis in a clinical trial. The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups consisting of 16 persons, with no significant differences in age, duration, or stage of disease, treated with a cycle of 10 whole-body cryotherapy procedures with subsequent kinesitherapy or kinesitherapy alone, respectively. Routine spinal mobility parameters were determined for all patients before and after the end of the therapeutic cycle. Results. Significant improvement of spinal mobility was observed in both groups of patients, but in patients exposed to whole-body cryotherapy with subsequent kinesitherapy the percentage changes in the values of particular parameters were more distinct as compared to patients in whom kinesitherapy alone was used, mainly in respect to lumbar and thoracic spinal mobility. Conclusion. The use of whole-body cryotherapy as a component of comprehensive therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis produces significant improvements in spinal mobility parameters as compared to patients in whom kinesitherapy alone is used.

  19. Quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: relationships with spinal mobility, disease activity and functional status.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Oya

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quality of life (QOL) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to determine the relationships between QOL and clinical variables including spinal mobility, disease activity and functional status. Forty-eight adult patients who fulfilled the modified New York criteria for AS were included in the study. After detailed physical examination, disease-specific instruments: the Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) and the Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) were applied. QOL was assessed using short form-36 (SF-36). The mean age of the patients was 37.0 ± 9.7 years and the mean duration of symptoms was 11.7 ± 8.4 years. Most affected domains of SF-36 were bodily pain, vitality, and physical role, respectively. No significant correlations were found between SF-36 subgroup scores and chest expansion, wall-tragus distance, chin-sternum distance, and floor-finger tip distance. Only modified Schober correlated with two SF-36 domains: physical role and bodily pain. BASDAI and BASFI scores had significant negative correlations with all SF-36 domains except for general health. Identification of QOL in patients with AS is very important in evaluation of illness-related sufferings and development of new management strategies.

  20. Lack of association of the G22A polymorphism of the ADA gene in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Camargo, U; Toledo, R A; Cintra, J R; Nunes, D P T; Acayaba de Toledo, R; Brandão de Mattos, C C; Mattos, L C

    2012-05-07

    Genes located outside the HLA region (6p21) have been considered as candidates for susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis. We tested the hypothesis that the G22A polymorphism of the adenosine deaminase gene (ADA; 20q13.11) is associated with ankylosing spondylitis in 166 Brazilian subjects genotyped for the HLA*27 gene (47 patients and 119 controls matched for gender, age and geographic origin). The HLA-B*27 gene and the G22A ADA polymorphism were identified by PCR with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes and PCR-RFLP, respectively. There were no significant differences in frequencies of ADA genotypes [odds ratio (OR) = 1.200, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.3102-4.643, P > 0.8] and ADA*01 and ADA*02 alleles (OR = 1.192, 95%CI = 0.3155-4.505, P > 0.8) in patients versus controls. We conclude that the G22A polymorphism is not associated with ankylosing spondylitis.

  1. Investigating the effects of a multidimensional exercise program on symptoms and antiinflammatory status in female patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kisacik, Pinar; Unal, Edibe; Akman, Umit; Yapali, Gokmen; Karabulut, Erdem; Akdogan, Ali

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a multidimensional exercise program on symptoms and antiinflammatory status in female patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The BATH Indexes, Dougados Functional Index (DFI), Health Assessment Questionnaire in Spondyloarthopathies (HAQ-S), Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to evaluate twenty-four female AS patients. ESR, CRP, TNF-α and IL-6 were also analyzed. All patients were assessed at baseline and with 3 weeks intervals till 12 week. A multidimensional exercise program was applied for three times a week. There were significant differences in Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Index (BAS-G) and Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), HAQ-S, ASQoL and BDI scores (p < 0.05). The level of the ESR, CRP and IL-6 fluctuated slightly. There was only significant difference at 3 and 12 weeks as compared to baseline levels in TNF-α values (p = 0.048, p < 0.001). We concluded that multidimensional exercise program should be taken into consideration for AS patients due to its positive effects on symptoms and antiinflammatory effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of incentive spirometer exercise on pulmonary functions of patients with ankylosing spondylitis stabilized by tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    So, Min Wook; Heo, Hyun Mi; Koo, Bon San; Kim, Yong-Gil; Lee, Chang-Keun; Yoo, Bin

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of combining incentive spirometer exercise (ISE) with a conventional exercise (CE) on patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) stabilized by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy by comparing a combination group with a CE-alone group. Forty-six patients (44 men, 2 women) were randomized to the combination group (ISE plus CE; n=23) or the CE group (n=23). The CE regimen of both groups consisted of 20 exercises performed for 30 min once a day. The ISE was performed once a day for 30 min. The trial duration was 16 weeks. Patients were assessed before and at the end of treatment by measuring the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), chest expansion, finger to floor distance, pulmonary function measures, and 6-min walk distance. Both groups improved significantly in terms of chest expansion (p<0.01), finger to floor distance (p<0.01), and BASFI (p<0.05) after completing the exercise program. However, only the combination group showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity (p<0.05), total lung capacity (p<0.01), and vital capacity (p<0.05). Although this did not achieve statistical significance, the combination group was mildly superior to the CE-alone group in functional disability and pulmonary function measures. Combining ISE with a CE can provide positive results in patients whose AS has been clinically stabilized by TNF inhibitor therapy.

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire".

    PubMed

    da Rocha Lopes, Sofia Manuela; Duarte, José Alberto; Mesquita, Cristina Teresa Torrão Carvalho

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge is an important factor in patients with ankylosing spondylitis regarding the adoption of appropriate behaviours and education. The aim of this study was to culturally adapt and validate "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire" for the Portuguese population with ankylosing spondylitis. The Portuguese version of "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire" was administered to a sample of 180 subjects, from which 63 individuals responded. The adaptation process involved translation, back-translation and submission to a committee of experts in the area, culminating with a Portuguese version of the instrument. Next, the scale reliability and validity were assessed. There was a statistically significant decrease from test to retest, although the intra-class correlation coefficient between test and retest was 0.76 (95 % CI 0.61-0.86), which was considered good. From 180 individuals, 63 (35.0 %) subjects were available for the present study. The proportion of individuals that correctly answered each item ranged from 19 to 92 %, corresponding to items 8 and 13, respectively. The mean number of correct answers was 8.5 [mean (SD) = 2.4] in 12 questions. The proposed Portuguese version of the ankylosing spondylitis knowledge scale showed good reliability, reproducibility and construct validity.

  4. Combined Fascia Iliaca and Sciatic Nerve Block for Hip Surgery in the Presence of Severe Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case-Based Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingmin; Liu, Jin; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yanzi; Liu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Selecting an appropriate anesthetic technique for patients with ankylosing spondylitis undergoing hip surgery is challenging because of a potentially difficult airway, the risk of cardiovascular and respiratory complications, and the technical difficulty of performing central neuraxial blocks in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Our objective was to report a case in which combination neural blockade was used successfully in an elderly patient with ankylosing spondylitis undergoing hip fracture surgery. In addition, a literature review of the anesthetic techniques reported for these patients was conducted. A 70-year-old man with severe ankylosing spondylitis and respiratory dysfunction was scheduled for a closed intertrochanteric fracture reduction and internal fixation. Combined fascia iliaca block and parasacral sciatic nerve block were used successfully for the surgery. Postoperative analgesia was accomplished by continuous fascia iliaca block. According to the literature review, general anesthesia is the most commonly performed anesthetic technique for patients with ankylosing spondylitis undergoing hip surgeries. Special intubation techniques and cautious airway management were very important for these patients. Although both general anesthesia and central neuraxial blockade pose considerable risks to the patients, this case report suggests that combined fascia iliaca block and sciatic nerve block might be a promising option.

  5. Cartilage biomarkers in ankylosing spondylitis: relationship to clinical variables and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Stone, Millicent; Payne, Ursula; Zhang, Xiang; Ionescu, Mirela; Lobanok, Tatiana; King, Lindsay; Poole, A Robin; Inman, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a progressive disease in which chronic inflammation can lead to extensive new bone formation throughout the spine. At present, few measures of the activity or extent of the disease are available. In this study, we sought to determine whether markers of cartilage synthesis and degradation could provide such quantitative measures. Serum samples from 23 patients receiving infliximab treatment for AS were obtained at baseline and at weeks 2, 6, 14, and 22. Patients were stratified with respect to joint involvement and baseline levels of inflammatory markers, and responders were defined according to the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis 20% criteria. Serial measurements of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and IL-1 were done at each time point. The following biomarkers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: the proteoglycan aggrecan 846 epitope, a marker of cartilage turnover; C-propeptide of type II collagen (CPII), a biosynthesis marker; and the Col2-3/4(long mono) (C2C) and Col2-3/4(short) (C1-2C) neoepitopes, reflecting collagen cleavage of type II collagen and type I/type II collagen, respectively. At baseline, patients with AS demonstrated significant elevations in serum levels of CPII, the 846 epitope, and the CPII-to-C2C (CPII:C2C) ratio (but not C2C or C1-2C) compared with normal controls. Of the biomarkers examined, only CPII:C2C showed a correlation with the C-reactive protein (CRP) level. Among the biomarker-cytokine relationships, TGFbeta demonstrated a trend toward a positive correlation with the 846 epitope. In AS, elevated serum levels of CPII and the 846 epitope may be related to biosynthetic turnover of hyaline cartilage and the intervertebral discs but may also reflect progressive bone formation as a result of endochondral ossification. The correlation of the CPII:C2C ratio with CRP suggests that the CPII:C2C ratio might

  6. Ankylosing spondylitis confers substantially increased risk of clinical spine fractures: a nationwide case-control study.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Alhambra, D; Muñoz-Ortego, J; De Vries, F; Vosse, D; Arden, N K; Bowness, P; Cooper, C; Diez-Perez, A; Vestergaard, P

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) leads to osteopenia/osteoporosis and spine rigidity. We conducted a case-control study and found that AS-affected patients have a 5-fold and 50% increased risk of clinical spine and all clinical fractures, respectively. Excess risk of both is highest in the first years and warrants an early bone health assessment after diagnosis. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is related to spine rigidity and reduced bone mass, but data on its impact on fracture risk are scarce. We aimed to study the association between AS and clinical fractures using a case-control design. From the Danish Health Registries, we identified all subjects who sustained a fracture in the year 2000 (cases) and matched up to three controls by year of birth, gender and region. Clinically diagnosed AS was identified using International Classification of Diseases, 8th revision (ICD-8; 71249), and International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10; M45) codes. We also studied the impact of AS duration. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for non-traumatic fractures (any site, clinical spine and non-vertebral) according to AS status and time since AS diagnosis. Multivariate models were adjusted for fracture history, socio-economic status, previous medical consultations, alcoholism and use of oral glucocorticoids. We identified 139/124,655 (0.11%) AS fracture cases, compared to 271/373,962 (0.07%) AS controls. Unadjusted (age- and gender-matched) odds ratio (OR) were 1.54 [95% confidence interval (95%CI) 1.26-1.89] for any fracture, 5.42 [2.50-11.70] for spine and 1.39 [1.12-1.73] for non-vertebral fracture. The risk peaked in the first 2.5 years following AS diagnosis: OR 2.69 [1.84-3.92] for any fracture. Patients with AS have a 5-fold higher risk of clinical spine fracture and a 35% increased risk of non-vertebral fracture. This excess risk peaks early, in the first 2.5 years of AS disease. Patients should be assessed

  7. Are Indian patients with juvenile-onset ankylosing spondylitis taller than reference population?

    PubMed Central

    Sandhya, Pulukool; Danda, Debashish; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Paucity of growth retardation has been observed by us in patients with juvenile-onset ankylosing spondylitis (JAS) in a tertiary care health centre in south India. We, therefore, undertook this pilot study to assess and compare anthropometry of patients with JAS who were 15 yr and older with that of adult onset ankylosing spondylitis (AAS) and matching Indian reference population. Methods: Consecutive male patients (December 2009- October 2012) with JAS and AAS fulfilling Modified New York Criteria were selected after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Demography and anthropometry were noted. Height of both patient groups as well as their parents and siblings were compared with that of the reference population. Mid-parental height and delta height were derived. Those with delta height of >8.5 cm were compared with the remaining. Multivariate logistic regression was done for variables that were found to be significant by chi-square in bivariate analysis. Similar analysis was done for BMI also. Results: There was no significant difference in anthropometric variables between JAS and AAS groups. Twenty eight of the 30 (93.33%) JAS patients were taller as compared to the reference population. Twenty six (86.67%) AAS patients were taller than the reference population. The mean heights of JAS (170.67 ± 6.94 cm) and AAS (168.2 ± 5.94 cm) patients were significantly higher than the reference value of 163.11 cm; both P<0.001. Logistic regression revealed that tallness in JAS was associated positively with hypermobility (OR=23.46,95%CI 1.2-447.2, P=0.036). No significant association was detected for height in AAS and for BMI in both JAS and AAS groups. Interpretation & conclusions: No growth retardation was seen in patients with JAS in our study. Majority of patients with JAS and AAS were taller than reference population. The difference between mean height of JAS and AAS was not significant. Larger studies involving different populations are

  8. Physical Activity in Ankylosing Spondylitis: evaluation and analysis of an eHealth tool.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, Jess Shelagh; Redshaw, Clare Helen

    2016-07-04

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterised by spinal arthritis and exercise is often recommended to reduce the symptoms and improve mobility. However, very little evidence exists for the value of exercise in AS. Firstly, this pilot study aimed to evaluate an eHealth tool, the AS Observer, specifically designed to monitor symptoms, quality of life and physical activity in AS, in terms of patient experience and suitability in generating data for epidemiological studies. Secondly, it also investigated the collected data to determine if physical activity benefited individuals with AS. The AS Observer was designed to enable weekly monitoring of AS symptoms and exercise using a web based platform. Participants with AS (n = 223) were recruited to use the AS observer. They provided baseline data and completed online weekly data entry for 12 weeks (e.g. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Activity Index (BASDAI), howRu, International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)). Panel data analysis with fixed effects models investigated associations between variables. Activity type data and exit questionnaires were subjected to qualitative thematic analysis. In general, the AS Observer was well received and considered useful by participants, with 66% providing a positive response. The collected data suggested that IPAQ is inversely associated with total BASDAI, stiffness, tenderness and pain, but not fatigue. Stratified analysis demonstrated differential associations between BASDAI, IPAQ and howRU based on sex, HLA-B27 status and disease duration. Approximately half of the participants frequently did therapy and three-quarters undertook at least some vigorous activity ranging from formal exercise to recreation and (house) work. Despite some technical challenges, tool evaluation suggested that the AS Observer was a useful self-monitoring tool for participants. This pilot study demonstrated that increased exercise intensity and duration were associated

  9. [Clinical-functional evolution of patients with ankylosing spondylitis following physio-kinetotheraphy].

    PubMed

    Roşu, Mihaela Oana; Ancuţa, Codrina; Chirieac, Rodica

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis enigmatic from the etiologic point of view, appears with subjects who are still in school or involved in a productive activity. If detected in its early stages, under complex, constant and long-term treatment, patients have a good evolution. The objectives of the study are to describe the clinical and functional profile of patients with AS, sacroiliitis stage, and the evol ution of physical and functional parameters under traditional physio-kinetotherapy. This retrospective study was performed on 40 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), who were hospitalized in the Clinic of Rheumatology Iaşi, during 2008-1010, who satisfied the amended New York criteria for this. Subjects underwent an initial evaluation (first admission) and another one at the end of the study (second admission), after approximately 6 months. The demographic characteristics, the clinical and functional elements of the study sample have indicated: the average age of 24.83 +/- 3.948, predominantly male (82.5%) and 62.5% were from rural areas. Most cases occurred at the age of 19-25 (57.5%), beginning at 18-25 (77.5%), with an average of 19.60 +/- 2.318. Following the radiological changes in the various stages of sacroiliitis, stage II prevailed (40%), then stage III (32.5%) and IV (15%). The evaluation of ASAS (Assessment of Spondylo Arthritis International Society) parameters and the respiratory system showed significant improvements of: BASDAI score with 31.53%, BASFI with 37.62%, BASMI with 20.66%, DIE % with 27.53 and of CV with 5.08% as well as a decrease in pain perception measured by VAS scale (p = 0.017). In the early stages of the disease, as far as the sample involved in the study is concerned, when the spine and vertebrae joints were not blocked by the evolution of the disease, corrective gymnastics and respiratory exercises, stretching and a good posture are very important, along with other therapies used to prevent axial ankylosis.

  10. Costs and work limitation of patients with ankylosing spondylitis in China.

    PubMed

    Tu, Liudan; Rai, Jayanti Chamling; Cao, Shuangyan; Lin, Zhiming; Hu, Zaiying; Gu, Jieruo

    2014-01-01

    To access the annual direct, indirect costs and work limitation of AS patients in Chinese population and explore the determinants of cost. A retrospective, cross-sectional study was performed in 257 patients with AS in China. The participants completed questionnaires about disease characteristics, quality of life and direct and indirect costs. Only the patients with paid-work completed the Work Limitation Questionnaire (WLQ), a 25-item questionnaire that accesses the impact of chronic health conditions on job performance and productivity. Functional impairment and disease activity were assessed using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and the Bath Akylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Quality of life was measured by the Short Form-36. Of the 257 patients who completed the questionnaires, the mean age was 28.5 (SD=0.5) with mean disease duration of 6.52 years (SD=0.44). The mean BASDAI and BASFI score was 3.28 and 1.3, respectively. Among the 257 patients, 21.8% are students, 64.2% have a paid job and 10.5% without a job because of AS. 165 participants finished the WLQ with a mean WLQ index of 0.19 which corresponds to a 17% decrease in productivity. The annual estimated costs of each patient was $2714.18 while the indirect cost accounted for 64.7%. The annual direct cost significantly correlated with disease activity. Our research is the first to provide information about the burden of AS and the work status of AS patients in mainland China, which may help to establish the treatment strategy and a policy of support.

  11. Optimisation of rheumatology assessments - the actual situation in axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; van der Heijde, D

    2014-01-01

    The spondyloarthritides (SpA) are currently differentiated into axial and peripheral SpA. Patients with axial SpA (axSpA) may be further classified into the classical form ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and non-radiographic axSpA (nr-axSpA). The SpA are genetically linked, and the subtypes including psoriatic arthritis (PsA) share characteristic clinical symptoms such as inflammatory back pain (IBP) and enthesitis. IMP can be due to sacroiliitis and spondylitis, enthesitis may occur with or without arthritis, and anterior uveitis, as well as other extraarticular manifestations such as psoriasis and chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition to clinical findings, imaging, mainly conventional radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laboratory results such as HLA B27 and CRP are important tools for classification and diagnosis of SpA. The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS), an international group of experts in the field of SpA since 1995, has published on assessments and outcome parameters in SpA. The publication of classification criteria for axSpA has now largely replaced the 1984 criteria for AS. However, the established cut-off between AS and nr-axSpA, 'definite' structural changes in the sacroiliac joints, has been recently debated because of limited reliability. Since imaging plays an important role in all criteria sets, the ASAS group has recently published definitions for inflammatory changes in the SIJ and the spine. The most important domains in AS are disease activity, function, spinal mobility, structural damage, and quality of life, some of which are discussed in this manuscript. For axSpA there are two major tools to assess disease activity, the BASDAI and the ASDAS, one for function, the BASFI, and several mobility measures including the BASMI. The AS Health Index (AS-HI) is introduced elsewhere in this supplement.

  12. [Therapeutic effect of artificial total hip arthroplasty on flexion regidity of hip joint in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Song, Liming; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Tieliang

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the operative methods, clinical outcomes and complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in the treatment of patient with hip joint flexion rigidity due to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). From May 1992 to July 2004, 56 patients (32 left hips and 39 right hips) with AS received THA through a modified anterolateral approach, including 52 males (67 hips) and 4 females (4 hips) aged 17-48 years with an average of 35.5 years. All the hips were ankylosed in (43.1 +/- 7.2) degrees of flexion and 15 patients had bilaterally ankylosed hips. Preoperatively, Harris hip score was (42.6 +/- 5.3) points and all the hips were classified as stage IV according to the standard of American College of Rheumatology (ACR). And the course of disease was 3-11 years. Intraoperatively, 1 patient suffering from proximal femur fracture due to severe osteoporosis was treated with titanium wire fixation, and the fracture was healed 6 weeks later. All the patients were followed up for 3-15 years (average 5.3 years). Postoperatively, 1 patient (1 hip) got subcutaneous soft tissue infection at 8 days, 1 patient (1 hip) got wound disunion at 11 days, 2 patients (2 hips) got infection at 11 months and 3 years, respectively. All the infections were healed after symptomatic treatment. The wounds of the rest 52 patients were healed by first intention without joint infections. The postoperative X-rays demonstrated that 4 hips (5.6%) had loose acetabulum prosthesis, 3 hips (4.2%) had loose femoral prosthesis and 5 hips had loose acetabulum and femoral prosthesis (7.0%), and the total loosening rate was 16.8%. Among which, 8 hips received revision resulting in satisfactory therapeutic effects, and the rest 4 hips had no further treatment. Fifteen hips (21.1%) had heterotopic ossification, which was relieved after taking nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory drugs. Harris hip score at final follow-up was (82.7 +/- 4.1) points, indicating there was a significant difference between before and after

  13. Gender-attributable differences in outcome of ankylosing spondylitis: long-term results from the Outcome in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Study.

    PubMed

    Webers, Casper; Essers, Ivette; Ramiro, Sofia; Stolwijk, Carmen; Landewé, Robert; van der Heijde, Désirée; van den Bosch, Filip; Dougados, Maxime; van Tubergen, Astrid

    2016-03-01

    To investigate gender-attributable differences regarding clinical outcome [disease activity, physical function and quality of life (QoL)] and radiographic damage in patients with AS over time. Data from the Outcome in AS International Study were used. Disease activity was assessed by the BASDAI, ASDAS and CRP; physical function by BASFI; QoL by the Short Form-36, Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) score and European Quality Of Life scale; and radiographic damage by the modified Stoke AS Spine Score (mSASSS). Cross-sectional comparative analyses were done at baseline. Next, separate models were created to assess gender-attributable differences on each outcome measure over time using time-adjusted generalized estimating equations. A total of 216 patients [154 (72.3%) males, mean age 43.6 years (s.d. 12.7), symptom duration 20.5 years (s.d. 11.8), mean follow-up duration 8.3 years (s.d. 4.1)] were included. At baseline, male compared with female patients had lower self-reported disease activity (BASDAI 3.2 vs 3.9, P = 0.03) but more radiographic damage (mSASSS 13.8 vs 6.5, P = 0.02). No significant gender-attributable differences in other clinical parameters were found. In multivariable analysis, male gender was significantly associated with a better ASQoL (B = -1.18, 95% CI: -2.17, -0.20, P = 0.02), and in a separate model with a higher mSASSS over time (B = 8.24, 95% CI: 4.38, 12.09, P < 0.01). In this prospective cohort study, no gender-attributable differences in disease activity or physical function over time were found. However, radiographic damage was more severe in males. Furthermore, males had a better QoL over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Surgical technique and outcome of uncemented THR using HA coated stems in fused and deformed hips due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dabir, Sundaresh; Ramanath, Sharath; Shah, Harshad; Rudramurthy, Madhukesh; Patil, Sanjana S

    2015-01-01

    Uncemented Total Hip Replacement (THR) is at present an accepted treatment in patients with severe deformity of the hip caused by advanced ankylosing spondylitis. We studied 20 patients, 2 female and 18 male, who had 29 THRs, all through a posterior approach. The patient's age at index surgery ranged from 20 to 47 years (mean 35.1). No trochanteric osteotomy was performed in any patient. A double cut of the femoral neck was performed for hips which were ankylosed in external rotation and flexion. Follow-up ranged from 18 to 46 months (mean 22.2 months). The mean preoperative Harris Hip Score (HHS) was 34.6. At last follow-up all hips were considered excellent, with a mean HHS of 90. Radiographs revealed that the acetabular and femoral components were satisfactorily positioned with no radiographic evidence of loosening. No heterotrophic ossification was found. 1) Trochanteric Osteotomy was not found necessary to expose the hip through the posterior approach. 2) Uncemented THR using HA coated stem in the treatment of severe deformity of the hip caused by advanced ankylosing spondylitis allowed good lower limb function.

  15. Incidental Finding of Cor Triatriatum Sinister in an Asymptomatic Woman With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Bercem Aycicek; Sennaroglu, Engin; Dam, Gamze; Dogan, Nurettin Ozgur; Cicekcioglu, Hulya

    2011-01-01

    We present a 24-year-old woman with symptoms of backache, acute peripheral arthritis, joint swelling, and erythema, diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and determined to have cor triatriatum sinister (CTS) without cardiac symptoms. On physical examination, the patient had a rythmic S1 with a loud pulmonic component to her S2 and a grade 2/6 systolic murmur along the left sternal edge. Pulmonary examination was normal. Also her left knee and left metacarpophalangeal joints were swollen. Chest radiography revealed a slight prominence of the pulmonary arteries. Her echocardiogram showed a normal left ventricle and that the left atrium was divided into 2 distinct chambers by a membranous septum. In the left atrium, a moderately obstructive fibromuscular membrane was imaged, resulting in a transmembrane mean pressure gradient of 6 mm Hg. Pulmonary artery pressure was increased (peak systolic pulmonary pressure: 44 mm Hg). There was also mild mitral regurgitation and the atrial septum was intact. Cardiac MRI demonstrated CTS. Cardiovascular involvement is a common finding in patients with AS. Thus, careful cardiac evaluation appears to be mandatory in all cases of AS. Our case may be interesting in that to the best of our knowledge, AS with CTS has not been previously reported. Also a patient with CTS who has no cardiac symptoms is a very rare occurrence in the literature.

  16. Increased frequency of restless leg syndrome in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Tekatas, Aslan; Pamuk, Omer N

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of restless leg syndrome (RLS) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to investigate factors potentially associated with RLS. One hundred and thirty patients diagnosed with AS according to modified New York criteria and 91 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were included in this study. The diagnosis of RLS was made according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group. The factors associated with RLS were evaluated. Electrophysiological procedures were performed in a group of patients with RLS. RLS was significantly more common in patients with AS (30.8%) than in healthy controls (13.2%). When AS patients with RLS were compared with AS patients without RLS, it was seen that peripheral arthritis, uveitis, anemia, smoking and polyneuropathy were significantly higher in the former group. RLS is common in patients with AS and iron deficiency, smoking and small fiber neuropathy seem to be possible causes. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Arterial stiffness is not increased in patients with short duration rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dzieża-Grudnik, Anna; Sulicka, Joanna; Strach, Magdalena; Siga, Olga; Klimek, Ewa; Korkosz, Mariusz; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of CV events. The aim of the study was to assess arterial stiffness and inflammatory markers in patients with short duration chronic arthritis. We assessed carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), traditional CV risk factors and inflammatory and endothelial markers in 71 chronic arthritis patients (RA and AS) and in 29 healthy controls. We did not find differences in PWV (for RA, AS and controls, respectively: 10 [8.8-10.9] versus 10.7 [9.1-11.8] versus 9.2 [8.3-11.4] m/s; p = .14) and AIx (for RA, AS and controls, respectively: 24.3 ± 11.5 versus 5.7 ± 12.4 versus 10 ± 12.8%; p = .22). Both groups of arthritis patients had active disease with significantly elevated inflammatory markers compared to controls. There were no correlations between endothelial and inflammatory markers and parameters of arterial stiffness in arthritis patients. When analyzing arthritis patients according to median of PVW, there were no significant differences in inflammatory and endothelial markers. We found that in patients with short duration active RA and AS arterial stiffness was not increased and furthermore, there was no association between markers of systemic inflammation and arterial stiffness.

  18. rs657075 (CSF2) Is Associated with the Disease Phenotype (BAS-G) of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Chiao; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Lu, Hsing-Fang; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Woon, Peng Yeong; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Huang, Jin-Ding; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2017-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a systemic autoimmune disease mainly affecting the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joints, and exhibits peripheral inflammatory arthropathy. More than 25 loci have been identified as associated with AS. Because both AS and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are autoimmune diseases that may share some common genetic factors, we therefore examined if the newly identified RA genetic polymorphisms were associated with AS in a Taiwanese population. In this study, we enrolled 475 AS patients and 11,301 healthy subjects from a Taiwanese biobank as controls. Although none of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with the susceptibility to AS, the AS disease index Bath AS Global (BAS-G) clinical phenotype was observed as significantly correlated to the AA genotype of rs657075 (CSF2). The significance remains after gender/age/disease duration adjustment and after group categorization by human leukocyte antigen-B 27 (HLA-B27) genotype. We further investigated the possible functions of rs657075 through bioinformatics approaches. Results revealed that polymorphism of rs657075 is able to influence the expression of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 6 (ACSL6). In conclusion, our study indicated that rs657075 (CSF2) is strongly associated with the AS disease index Bath AS Global (BAS-G) clinical phenotype. PMID:28054948

  19. The Risk of Asthma in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between asthma and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is controversial. We examined the risk of asthma among AS patients in a nationwide population. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) system of Taiwan. The cohort included 5,974 patients newly diagnosed with AS from 2000 to 2010. The date of diagnosis was defined as the index date. A 4-fold of general population without AS was randomly selected frequency matched by age, gender and the index year. The occurrence and hazard ratio (HR) of asthma were estimated by the end of 2011. Results The overall incidence of asthma was 1.74 folds greater in the AS cohort than in the non-AS cohort (8.26 versus 4.74 per 1000 person-years) with a multivariable Cox method measured adjusted HR of 1.54 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.34–1.76). The adjusted HR of asthma associated with AS was higher in women (1.59; 95% CI, 1.33–1.90), those aged 50–64 years (1.66; 95% CI, 1.31–2.09), or those without comorbidities (1.82; 95% CI, 1.54–2.13). Conclusion Patients with AS are at a higher risk of developing asthma than the general population, regardless of gender and age. The pathophysiology needs further investigation. PMID:25658339

  20. No effect of physiotherapy on the serum levels of adipocytokines in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hulejová, Hana; Levitová, Andrea; Kuklová, Markéta; Stochl, Jan; Haluzík, Martin; Pavelka, Karel; Vencovský, Jiří; Senolt, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of intensive physiotherapy on disease activity and serum levels of adipocytokines in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Twenty-six patients with AS were included in this study. Intensive physiotherapy was performed twice a week for a period of 3 months. The Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI) were assessed at inclusion and after 3 months. Leptin, adiponectin, resistin and visfatin serum levels were analysed by ELISA assays. Patients had mild to moderate disease activity. Baseline levels of adipocytokines did not correlate with indicators of disease activity, functional status or acute-phase reactants. After the 3 months of intensive physiotherapy, BASDAI significantly decreased from 2.98 to 1.8 (p = 0.01) and BASFI improved from 2.31 to 1.37 (p = 0.05), while there were no changes in serum levels of CRP, ESR and adipocytokines. In addition, baseline levels of adipocytokines did not predict the change of disease activity or functional ability. Intensive physiotherapy effectively reduces all clinical measures of disease activity, but it is not associated with a significant change in acute-phase reactants or serum levels of adipocytokines.

  1. Adipokines, Biomarkers of Endothelial Activation, and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    López-Mejías, Raquel; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Ubilla, Begoña; Carnero-López, Beatriz; Blanco, Ricardo; Pina, Trinitario; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. AS patients also display a high prevalence of features clustered under the name of metabolic syndrome (MeS). Anti-TNF-α therapy was found to be effective to treat AS patients by suppressing inflammation and also improving endothelial function. Previously, it was demonstrated that a short infusion of anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibodyinfliximab induced a rapid and dramatic reduction in serum insulin levels and insulin resistance along with a rapid improvement of insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic AS patients. The role of adipokines, MeS-related biomarkers and biomarkers of endothelial cell activation and inflammation seem to be relevant in different chronic inflammatory diseases. However, its implication in AS has not been fully established. Therefore, in this review we summarize the recent advances in the study of the involvement of these molecules in CV disease or MeS in AS. The assessment of adipokines and biomarkers of endothelial cell activation and MeS may be of potential relevance in the stratification of the CV risk of patients with AS. PMID:24757680

  2. Anti-TNF Therapy in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Insights for the Clinician

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Laura C.; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Bennett, Alexander N.; Emery, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-blocking therapy has revolutionized the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) over the last decade. This review highlights the current evidence relating to the use of TNF-blocking therapy in AS. International guidelines for the use of TNF blockers in AS are summarized. An outline of the evidence for efficacy and safety of these drugs is included, highlighting recent data from registries and real-life observational studies. Such cohort data is also reviewed highlighting the evidence for ‘switching’ TNF blockers in AS in the case of non-response or adverse events. The potential new application of TNF blockers in preradiographic axial spondyloarthropathy (SpA) or ‘early AS’ is discussed with reviews of two recent studies in this area. Finally research into the possible additional impacts of TNF therapies is reviewed. The question of whether TNF blockers are truly disease modifying in AS remains unanswered with conflicting reports. The additional burden of AS in terms of cardiovascular disease is now becoming understood. Recent data from basic science studies highlights the potential impact of TNF blockers on this excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Future studies and registry data will be able to assess whether TNF blockers have an additional role in controlling systemic inflammation and its associated cardiovascular risk. PMID:22870436

  3. The relationship between plasma homocysteine level and different treatment modalities in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erhan; Karkucak, Murat; Akyüz, Ayşe; Alver, Ahmet; Turkyilmaz, Aysegul Kucukali; Zengin, Elif

    2012-08-01

    To determine plasma homocysteine levels in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and their correlation with disease activity measurements. To examine the effects of different treatment modalities on homocysteine levels. One hundred eight patients diagnosed with AS according to New York criteria and 65 healthy individuals matched in terms of age and gender were enrolled in the study. Patients were given detailed physical examinations. The Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) was used for disease activity, the Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI) for spinal mobility, the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI) to determine functional status and the Bath AS Radiological Index (BASRI) for radiological analysis. Sedimentation rate (ESR) and C reactive protein (CRP) levels, acute phase reactants, were measured. Plasma homocysteine levels, serum interleukin (IL) -6 and serum tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α) levels were investigated using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Plasma homocysteine levels in AS patients were statistically significantly lower compared with those in the healthy control group (P = 0.0001). There was no significant difference among sub-groups established on the basis of medical treatments and disease activity (BASDAI ≤4 and >4). No statistically significant correlation was determined between homocysteine level and disease activity parameters, radiological score and functional indices. A significant negative correlation was, however, established between age and homocysteine level in the AS group (P < 0.05, r = -0.426). Plasma homocysteine was lower in AS patients compared with the control group. This is not correlated with disease activation and medical treatment employed.

  4. The Protective Effect of Chrysanthemum indicum Extract against Ankylosing Spondylitis in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In traditional Chinese and Korean homeopathic medicine, Chrysanthemum indicum Linné (Asteraceae) is a time-honored herb, prescribed for the resolution of symptoms associated with inflammatory and hypertensive conditions as well as those affecting the lungs and its associated structures. The goal of this work is to investigate the defensive role of Chrysanthemum indicum extract in fighting ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using mouse models, through which the manifestation and extent of the disease progression were measured with quantitative analysis of the intervertebral joints. Markers of inflammation as well as oxidative stress were also analysed. Western blot was used to quantify the levels of Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), and sclerostin (SOST). Consequently, the findings of this experiment demonstrated that AS in mice that were given Chrysanthemum indicum extract had lower level of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 (P < 0.05) and increased level of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (P < 0.05). The results also revealed that Chrysanthemum indicum supplemented with diet contributed to a decrease in Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 protein expression (P < 0.05) and higher levels of DKK-1 and SOST proteins (P < 0.05). Therefore, we concluded that the beneficial role of Chrysanthemum indicum in AS is manifested through downregulating oxidative stress, inhibiting inflammatory mediators and NF-κB, and increasing DKK-1 and SOST levels. PMID:28261616

  5. Juvenile versus adult-onset ankylosing spondylitis -- clinical, radiographic, and social outcomes. a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Deepak R; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Sengupta, Raj

    2013-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has 2 main modes of onset: juvenile-onset AS (JoAS) and adult-onset AS (AoAS). It is not known whether JoAS is a subtype of AS, or AS modulated by early age of onset and longer disease duration. We performed a systematic review of the literature, identifying 12 articles and 1 abstract directly comparing JoAS and AoAS cohorts, with observational study design. Patients with JoAS appear to have more peripheral joint involvement both clinically and radiographically (especially knees and ankles) and more root joint involvement (hips and shoulders); they are more likely to proceed to hip arthroplasty and often initially present with peripheral rather than axial symptoms. Patients with AoAS appear to have more axial symptoms and radiographic disease, particularly in the lumbar spine, and worse axial metrology. In terms of other characteristics, more evidence is needed to confidently state whether JoAS and AoAS are different.

  6. Power Doppler ultrasonography in the evaluation of infliximab treatment for sacroiliitis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yeqing; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Jiaan; Xue, Qin; Wang, Niansong; Huang, Yunxia; Liu, Fang; Hu, Yizhou; Hu, Bing

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) to detect changes in the sacroiliac joint regions after infliximab (an anti-TNF-α blocker) treatment in active axial ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. A total of 110 sacroiliac joints in 55 patients with active AS were detected by PDUS before and after the infliximab treatment. The color flow signals inside the sacroiliac joints were observed, and the resistance index (RI) was measured. The clinical condition of the AS patients was improved compared with their condition before the infliximab treatment. Before the treatment, color flow signals were observed in 103 joints, and the mean RI value was 0.56 ± 0.06. Three months after the first infliximab treatment, color flow signals were observed in 50 joints, and the mean RI value was 0.87 ± 0.11. There were more blood flow signals in the sacroiliac joints before the infliximab treatment in patients with active AS (p < 0.01), and the mean RI value was higher after the infliximab treatment (p < 0.01). The blood flow signals in the sacroiliac joints became weaker or even disappeared and the RI values increased in patients with active sacroiliitis after infliximab treatment. This result shows that PDUS can be used in the follow-up of patients with axial AS.

  7. Ankylosing spondylitis in a patient referred to physical therapy with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Seif, Gretchen; Elliott, James

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly medical conditions in the United States; various studies have reported up to 80% of the adult population will experience a significant episode of LBP sometime within their lifetime. Although many cases of LBP are related to the musculoskeletal system and appropriate for the care of the physical therapist (PT), some episodes of LBP have a systemic cause. Thus, it is the role of the PT to ensure each patient is appropriate for physical therapy intervention throughout the episode of care. When the patient's condition is not appropriate for physical therapy intervention, it is the PT's responsibility to refer the patient to other medical professions to ensure optimal patient care. The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient referred to PT who was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis. The patient presented initially to physical therapy with a diagnosis of LBP. However, after several visits her symptoms were inconsistent with mechanical LBP and thus required further medical consultation.

  8. Evaluation of MIF -173 G/C Polymorphism in Turkish Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Gürel, Çevik; İnanır, Ahmet; Nursal, Ayşe Feyda; Tekcan, Akın; Rüstemoğlu, Aydın; Yigit, Serbülent

    2016-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease mainly affecting the spine and sacroiliac joints. Macrophage migration inhibitory (MIF) factor is a regulatory cytokine that inhibits random immune cell migration. MIF gene promoter polymorphisms play a role in the progression of several inflammatory disorders. Aims To investigate the relationship between the MIF gene -173 G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and AS. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Methods In this study, a total of 161 AS and 194 normal controls were recruited. The MIF gene -173 G/C SNP was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Results There was no significant difference between groups in terms of genotype distribution (p>0.05). When wild-type G/G and G/C+C/C genotypes are compared in terms of clinical characteristics, there is a significant difference between the average age and the duration of disease in AS patients (p<0.05). Conclusion No significant relationship between AS disease and MIF -173 G/C polymorphism was found. MIF -173 G/C polymorphism (C allele) may affect the time of onset and the duration of disease in AS patients. PMID:27994913

  9. No alterations of serum levels of adrenal and gonadal hormones in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Straub, R H; Struhárová, S; Schölmerich, J; Härle, P

    2002-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease with a marked preponderance of affected males compared to females of approximately 6 to 1. During the last two decades, this circumstance stimulated several research groups to investigate serum levels of gonadal and adrenal sex hormones. From available results of cross-sectional studies, there seems to be no particular defect in secretion or production of adrenal, gonadal, and pituitary hormones. This is in striking contrast to diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. In the latter diseases, low serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulphate (DHEAS), and testosterone have been described in an advanced chronic disease stage, whereas estrogen serum levels remain normal. Although AS is an inflammatory disease with signs of systemic inflammation such as elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate or increased circulating proinflammatory cytokines, serum levels of adrenal and gonadal androgens are normal. It is unclear whether this can be considered as unexpected. It may be that inflammation does not reach the pituitary, adrenal, and gonadal glands or does not alter the aromatase complex in peripheral tissue. Furthermore, the inflammation-induced changes may be subtle so that only specific endocrine examination of these axes may reveal signs of alterations. In conclusion, current data on sex steroid hormones provide no straightforward explanation for the male predominance in AS. At the moment, there is no rationale to treat AS patients with sex steroid hormones.

  10. Direct costs of ankylosing spondylitis and its determinants: an analysis among three European countries

    PubMed Central

    Boonen, A; van der Heijde, D; Landewe, R; Guillemin, F; Rutten-van, M; Dougados, M; Mielants, H; de Vlam, K; van der Tempel, H; Boesen, S; Spoorenberg, A; Schouten, H; van der Linden, S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess direct costs associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). To determine which variables, including country, predict costs. Methods: 216 patients with AS from the Netherlands, France, and Belgium participated in a two year observational study and filled in bimonthly economic questionnaires. Disease related healthcare resource use was measured and direct costs were calculated from a societal perspective (true cost estimates) and from a financial perspective (country-specific tariffs). Predictors of costs were assessed using Cox's regression analysis. Results: 209 patients provided sufficient data for cost analysis. Mean annual societal direct costs for each patient were €2640, of which 82% were direct healthcare costs. In univariate analysis costs were higher in the Netherlands than in Belgium, but this difference disappeared after adjusting for baseline differences in patients' characteristics among countries. Longer disease duration, lower education, worse physical function, and higher disease activity were predictors of costs. Mean annual direct costs from a financial perspective were €2122, €1402, and €941 per patient in the Netherlands, France, and Belgium, respectively. For each country, costs from a financial perspective were significantly lower than costs from a societal perspective. Conclusion: Direct costs for AS are substantial in three European countries but not significantly different after adjusting for baseline characteristics among countries. Worse physical function and higher disease activity are important determinants of costs, suggesting better disease control might reduce the costs of AS. The difference in costs from a societal and financial perspective emphasises the importance of an economic analysis. PMID:12860728

  11. The functional significance of sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis in Reiter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, L E; Hart, H H; Gow, P J; Kidd, B L; Grigor, R R; Moore, T E

    1985-01-01

    The frequent development of sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in patients suffering from Reiter's Syndrome (RS) has been stressed by a number of authors. This study was designed to ascertain the frequency of these problems in our RS patients, whether they were related to other clinical features of RS and what was the extent of the resulting disability. Fifty-five patients (50 men and 5 women) with RS with a mean duration of 9.3 years were assessed radiologically to determine the prevalence of sacroiliitis and thoracolumbar syndesmophyte formation. These radiological findings were correlated with HLA-B27, clinical features and functional status. Sacroiliitis was found in 22 patients (40%) but was mild in severity, frequently asymmetrical and very rarely associated with syndesmophyte formation. Sacroiliitis occurred significantly more commonly in patients with iritis and/or a prolonged disease duration (p less than 0.05) but although it was also found more frequently in HLA-B27 positive patients this was not significant (0.1 greater than p greater than 0.05). Some restriction in back movement was observed in 31 patients (56.3%) but only two patients satisfied New York criteria for AS and just one was functionally impaired by his back disease. Although the frequent finding of sacroiliitis in RS may provide an interesting insight into the interrelationship between RS and AS, our study shows that this sacroiliitis is commonly asymptomatic and does not provide a problem in management.

  12. New insights toward the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis; genetic variations and epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Aslani, Saeed; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza

    2017-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, characterized by typically an axial arthritis. AS is the prototype of a group of disorders called spondyloarthropathies, which is believed to have common clinical manifestations and genetic predisposition. To date, the exact etiology of AS remains unclear. Over the past few years, however, the role of genetic susceptibility and epigenetic modifications caused through environmental factors have been extensively surveyed with respect to the pathogenesis of AS, resulted in important advances. This review article focuses on the recent advances in the field of AS research, including HLA and non-HLA susceptibility genes identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and aberrant epigenetic modifications of gene loci associated with AS. HLA genes most significantly linked with AS susceptibility include HLA-B27 and its subtypes. Numerous non-HLA genes such as those in ubiquitination, aminopeptidases and MHC class I presentation molecules like ERAP-1 were also reported. Moreover, epigenetic modifications occurred in AS has been summarized. Taken together, the findings presented in this review attempt to explain the circumstance by which both genetic variations and epigenetic modifications are involved in triggering and development of AS. Nonetheless, several unanswered dark sides continue to clog our exhaustive understanding of AS. Future researches in the field of epigenetics should be carried out to extend our vision of AS etiopathogenesis.

  13. DWI and SPARCC scoring assess curative effect of early ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jian; Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background To investigate the magnetic diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) sequence and Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) scoring in assessing curative effect of combined treatment of Chinese and Western medicine for early ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods 48 cases diagnosed as early AS and treated with Chinese and Western medicine were included in the study. Magnetic routine and DWI sequence scanning image were performed to obtain the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of sub-articular surface bone marrow. Combined with SPARCC scoring, statistical analysis was conducted to compare the difference with the information obtained in the previous study. Results The mean ADC value in the sub-articular surface bone marrow of patients after clinical treatment: (4.34±0.55)×10-4mm2/s in ilium and (3.96±0.23)×10-4mm2/s in sacrum, which were both significantly lower than that before treatment (p< 0.05). There was highly positive correlation between mean ADC value and SPARCC scoring (P<0.05). The regression relationship could be demonstrated as Y=-64.420+21.262X(Y: SPARCC scoring value; X: mean ADC value). Conclusions Magnetic DWI and SPARCC scoring could be applied in accessing AS inflammation activity changes and in reflect of curative effect of early AS patients as well as in providing reliable radiologist evidence for clinical therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28352767

  14. ETS1 variants confer susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction ETS1 is a negative regulator of the Th17 differentiation gene and plays a central role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We aimed to investigate whether polymorphisms in ETS1 confer susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Han Chinese. Methods We selected seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within ETS1 based on HapMap data and previous genome-wide association study. Genotyping involved the TaqMan method in 1,015 patients with AS and 1,132 healthy controls from Shandong Province, and 352 AS patients and 400 healthy controls from Ningxia, a northwest region in China. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. Results The SNP rs1128334 was strongly associated with AS (odds ratio 1.204, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.37; P = 0.005). This association was confiexrmed in the Ningxia population (P = 0.015). Carriers of the haplotype TAT for rs12574073, rs1128334 and rs4937333 were associated with increased risk of AS and haplotype CGC with reduced risk as compared to controls. In addition, ETS1 expression was lower in AS patients than controls. The risk allele A of rs1128334 and haplotype A-T of rs1128334 and rs4937333 were associated with decreased expression of ETS1. Conclusions Common variants in ETS1 may contribute to AS susceptibility in Han Chinese people. PMID:24708692

  15. A systematic literature review of the economic impact of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Palla, Ilaria; Trieste, Leopoldo; Tani, Chiara; Talarico, Rosaria; Cortesi, Paolo A; Mosca, Marta; Turchetti, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the last decade studies on the economic impact of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Interestingly, a common observation is that in AS indirect costs are higher than the use of direct healthcare resources. Country, age, gender, and severity of the diseases impact on per patient annual costs AS related. Different payment and reimbursement regimes may impact on the amount and distribution of indirect costs. The differences observed among countries on absolute and relative (compared with direct costs) amounts of indirect costs can be explained with the capability of a country of actually measure productivity losses and indirect costs. Low indirect costs without other indicators should not be considered as a sign of efficiency in AS care, but may be due to an underestimation of AS-related costs; as a consequence, indirect costs may be a net loss for patients that nobody can repay. A private insurance reimbursement regime has the highest capability of inducing players to define, select and actually identify indirect costs better than in different reimbursement regimes. Therefore indirect costs may become very high in case of private insurance regimes because of their more detailed identification.

  16. Physiotherapy for ankylosing spondylitis: Systematic review and a proposed rehabilitation protocol.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Deepak; Rajkumar, Joshua Samuel

    2016-10-25

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of insidious onset, mostly affecting the axial skeleton. It leads to varying degrees of restricted spinal mobility, pain and loss of functional capacity. Rehabilitation, especially Physiotherapy and exercises, are considered integral components of its management. Various rehabilitation modalities are available for the benefit of individuals with AS, but a sequenced protocol has not been reported. A scientific review was performed using the following search engines: MEDLINE (Pubmed), COCHRANE Library and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Studies which had at least one of the group receiving rehabilitation and the major outcomes studied were pain, stiffness, mobility (spine and chest wall) and physical function (disease activity, ADL, QOL and global function) were selected. A total of 19 studies were shortlisted for the review which included a total of 1142 subjects with AS. The review of literature showed that individuals with AS had beneficial effects from exercise programmes compared to no exercise. Patient education, active involvement and motivation of individuals with AS played an important role in the overall treatment outcomes. Based on the review, a four phase sequenced rehabilitation protocol has been laid down for the benefit of individuals with AS.

  17. [The role of intestinal permeability in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Xu, B; Cai, X

    1995-02-01

    By use of low molecular weight polyethlene glycol (PEG400) as tracer, a revised Chedwick method with capillary gas chromatography was used to examine the intestinal permeability in 49 subjects including patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy controls. Recovery percentage, maximal recovery percentage [Rmax(%)] and Rmax(w) were used to find the effect of bowel permeability in the pathogenesis and disease flare up of AS, as well as the role of HLA-B27 for the bowel permeability. The results showed that in AS group, the recovery of first component (242D) was higher and the Rmax(%) was lower than those in the controls. No statistical difference was found with other indexes. The results indicated that bowel permeability is not elevated in AS. The passage of enteral bacteria antigen into the host may not result from the process of nonspecific penetration. We postulate that there may somehow be a process of "active transportation" in the pathogenesis of AS. More studies of the process are necessary to clarify its importance in the early stage of AS.

  18. Clinical efficacy of oral alendronate in ankylosing spondylitis: a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Coates, Lucy; Packham, Jonathan C; Creamer, Paul; Hailwood, Sarah; Bhalla, Ashley S; Chakravarty, Kuntal; Mulherin, Diamuid; Taylor, Gordon; Mattey, Derek L; Bhalla, Ashok K

    2017-01-01

    A prospective, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial over 2 years was performed to test the efficacy of alendronate, an oral aminobisphosphonate, in improving symptoms and arrest disease progression in patients with mild to severe ankylosing spondylitis (AS). 180 patients with AS were randomised to receive weekly alendronate 70 mg or placebo (1:1 randomisation). BAS-G was the primary outcome measure with Bath indices as secondary outcomes. Vertebral x-rays were performed at 0 and 24 months. Biomarkers (including CRP, IL-1beta, IL6, VEGF, MMP-1, and MMP-3) were collected during the first 12 months. There was no significant difference between the placebo and treatment groups in any of the recorded outcomes over the 2 years including clinical indices, biomarkers, and radiology. The change in BAS-G, the primary outcome measure, was -0.21 for the treatment group and -0.42 for the placebo group p=0.57. Change in all other clinical outcome measures were also non-significant; BASDAI p=0.86, BASFI p=0.37, BASMI p=0.021. Sub-group analysis of those subjects with a baseline BASDAI >4 were also non-significant. This prospective study demonstrates that alendronate 70mg weekly for 2 years was no more efficacious than placebo in improving clinical or laboratory measures of disease activity or measures of physical impact in subjects with mild to severe active AS. ID SRCTN12308164, registered on 15.12.2015.

  19. Associations between inflammation, nocturnal back pain and fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis and improvements with etanercept therapy.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Mohammed; Zack, Debra J; Li, Wenzhi; Stewart, V Michelle; Koenig, Andrew S

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the relationships between inflammation, nocturnal back pain and fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and the impact of 12 weeks' etanercept treatment versus sulfasalazine or placebo. Data were combined from four clinical trials for patients with AS who received at least one dose of etanercept, sulfasalazine or placebo and had at least one postbaseline assessment value. Linear regression was performed (controlling for site, protocol and demographics), to explore the relationship between inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP]), nocturnal back pain (visual analog scale [VAS] 0-100 mm) and fatigue (VAS 0-100 mm Bath AS Disease Activity Index fatigue item). Out of 1283 patients (etanercept, n = 867; sulfasalazine, n = 187; placebo, n = 229), improvement in nocturnal back pain was a significant predictor of improvement in fatigue. Significant correlations were found between nocturnal back pain and fatigue, but not CRP levels. Etanercept provided significantly greater pain/fatigue improvement than sulfasalazine or placebo. Improvements in nocturnal back pain and fatigue had weak relationships with improvement in inflammation (CRP level). AS patients treated with etanercept demonstrated superior improvement in nocturnal back pain and fatigue versus sulfasalazine or placebo. Decrease in nocturnal back pain can improve fatigue. Assessing treatment response using CRP levels alone may be misleading without also examining patient-reported outcomes such as back pain and fatigue.

  20. The effect of total hip replacement on employment in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    He, Chongru; He, Xiaokang; Tong, Wenwen; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Tianfang; Zhao, Jinzhu; Xu, Weidong

    2016-12-01

    Although total hip replacement (THR) has been proven to be effective, the effect of THR on employment in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Chinese population is still unknown. We aimed to demonstrate whether or not patients with AS returned to work following THR and factors associated with the work ability after THR. We performed a retrospective study including a total number of 128 AS patients undergoing THR between 2009 and 2013. Presurgery and postsurgery data including disease state, work status, type of job, and time of resuming work were collected. Factors associated with early return to work were assessed through ordinal regression. Eighty-seven of 128 patients (68 %) were employed within 1 year before THR and 98 returned to work after surgery. Among them, 21, 46, and 31 resumed work by 3, 6, and 12 months postoperation, respectively. Multivariate ordinal regression showed that patients with unilateral THR, younger age, lower BASFI score, employed presurgery, and low or moderate physical demand were more likely to resume work earlier. Most individuals working presurgery returned to work after THR. For young AS patients with hip involvement, THR is an effective treatment for improving and maintaining work ability.

  1. What factors determine patients' preference for tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed

    Fajri, Dessy W; Brand, Caroline A; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Martin, Belinda J; Buchanan, Russell R C; Schachna, Lionel

    2009-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy, either intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SQ), demonstrates similar efficacy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective of this study was to examine factors influencing patient preference of TNFi. Fifty-nine (79.7%) participants were male with mean age 43.9 years and disease duration of 22.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (79.7%) agreed with the statement 'My doctor gave me a choice and I made a decision based on my personal preference'. Patients commenced first on IV TNFi most commonly cited reduced frequency of injections (96.6%), administration by a trained professional (89.7%) and use of infusion time for leisure activities (86.2%). Patients commenced on SQ TNFi cited flexibility with timing of treatment (80%), shortened administration time (73.3%) and the convenience of home therapy (73.3%). Shared clinical decision-making between clinicians and patients may be desirable for AS patients commencing TNFi therapy.

  2. Male sexual dysfunction and ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dazhi; Liu, Li; Ding, Ning; Liu, Si; Hu, Yanting; Cai, Guoqi; Xia, Guo; Xin, Lihong; Wang, Li; Xu, Shengqian; Xu, Jianhua; Zou, Yanfeng; Pan, Faming

    2015-02-01

    No consensus has been reached on sexual dysfunction in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Our study aimed to derive a more precise estimation of the sexual function and its clinical correlations in men with AS. A metaanalysis was performed and the related literature were searched in PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and in reference lists of articles and systematic reviews. Score of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) was used as the outcome measurement, and standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% CI were calculated. Eleven studies were included, including 535 men with AS and 430 male controls. Each domain of the IIEF score (erectile function: SMD -0.52, 95% CI -0.68 - -0.37; orgasmic function: -0.72, -1.03 - -0.42; sexual drive: -0.40, -0.62 - -0.18; intercourse satisfaction: -0.86, -1.15 - -0.56; and overall satisfaction: -0.61, -0.91 - -0.32) were lower in men with AS than in controls. In the subgroup analysis, the results did not change except for the sexual drive in the Asians group (-0.15, -0.42-0.13). At metaregression, no study characteristics were significantly associated with effect size of the IIEF score. Sexual function is impaired in male patients with AS and further studies are necessary to better understand risk factors for sexual dysfunction in this population.

  3. Risk of malignancy in ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chuiwen; Li, Wenli; Fei, Yunyun; Li, Yongzhe; Zhang, Fengchun

    2016-08-18

    Current knowledge about the overall an