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Sample records for annuloplasty rings experience

  1. Rationale and initial experience with the Tri-Ad Adams tricuspid annuloplasty ring.

    PubMed

    Milla, Federico; Castillo, Javier G; Varghese, Robin; Chikwe, Joanna; Anyanwu, Anelechi C; Adams, David H

    2012-04-01

    Controversy exists regarding the indication and method of repair of functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery. Whereas the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend tricuspid repair in the setting of severe TR, tricuspid repair is advised for less than severe TR in the setting of annular dilation or pulmonary hypertension. Although multiple repair strategies exist, the use of a ring annuloplasty (semirigid remodeling rings vs flexible bands) is the preferred method of therapy to avoid short- and long-term recurrence of TR. The new Tri-Ad Adams annuloplasty ring combines elements of semirigid and flexible bands that will not only allow for annular remodeling in the region of the right ventricular free wall but also potentially reduce injury to the conduction system with its flexible and "open" ends. In this article, we discuss the rational for an aggressive approach to functional tricuspid regurgitation, and show our initial clinical experience with the Tri-Ad Adams annuloplasty ring.

  2. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annuloplasty ring. 870.3800 Section 870.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Annuloplasty ring. 870.3800 Section 870.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Annuloplasty ring. 870.3800 Section 870.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Annuloplasty ring. 870.3800 Section 870.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Annuloplasty ring. 870.3800 Section 870.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3800 Annuloplasty ring....

  7. Saddle-shaped mitral valve annuloplasty rings improve leaflet coaptation geometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten O.; Jensen, Henrik; Levine, Robert A.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J. Michael; Nielsen, Sten L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mitral valve annulus naturally conforms to a saddle shape in systole. This configuration is believed to put the leaflets into a lower-energy equilibrium with the annulus and subvalvular apparatus. Conventional flat annuloplasty rings restrict posterior leaflet motion, which may result in a “monocusp” valve, affecting valvular stress distribution. It is hypothesized that saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings cause less distortion of the physiologic leaflet geometry than do flat rings. Methods Twelve pigs were studied in an acute setting with 3-dimensional echocardiography and sonomicrometry before and after implantation of rigid flat (n = 5) and saddle-shaped (n = 7) annuloplasty rings. The rings were true sized to the annulus with equal anterior–posterior and commissure–commissure circumferential dimensions. The saddle-shaped rings had an annular height to commissural width ratio of 15%. Results Saddle-shaped rings maintained both leaflets operational (P <.01). Flat rings made the posterior leaflet immobile and the anterior leaflet aligned flat along the annulus in systole, effectively resulting in monoleaflet function. The average distance from the papillary muscle tips to the posterior annulus decreased by 2.4 ± 0.4 mm after flat ring implantation (P <.01). Conclusions Saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings provide better leaflet coaptation geometry than do flat rings by not hoisting the papillary muscles toward the posterior annulus through the commissural chordae, allowing greater leaflet mobility. This entails a potentially beneficial impact on valvular stress distribution that could affect durability of the repaired valve. PMID:21329946

  8. Mitral annuloplasty with biodegradable ring for infective endocarditis: a new tool for the surgeon for valve repair in childhood.

    PubMed

    Kazaz, Hakki; Celkan, Mehmet Adnan; Ustunsoy, Hasim; Baspinar, Osman

    2005-08-01

    The incidence of bacterial endocarditis and valvular involvement is rare in the childhood period. If the patient is unresponsive to medical treatment and some complications occur, early surgical treatment is indicated. Debridement of vegetation combined with valve repair techniques sparing the native valve is the ideal surgical procedure instead of replacement, especially for children. Annuloplasty is the key step during valve repair procedures. On the other hand, absence of appropriate sized annuloplasty rings on the market for this group of patients is the main problem. Nondegradable annuloplasty rings might lead to stenosis as the child grows. Thus, biodegradable tissue engineered materials are new solutions for such patients since the fibrous tissue induced by implanted ring grows with time. We describe a pediatric patient with Brucella endocarditis at the mitral position who was treated successfully with valve repair using a biodegradable annuloplasty ring (Kalangos Biodegradable Ring).

  9. Development of personalized annuloplasty rings: combination of CT images and CAD-CAM tools.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Valle-Fernández, Raquel Del; Morgado, Pilar Lafont; Muñoz-García, Julio; Muñoz Sanz, José Luis; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan Manuel; Otero, Javier Echávarri

    2010-02-01

    Although the use of personalized annuloplasty rings manufactured for each patient according to the size and morphology of their valve complex could be beneficial for the treatment of mitral insufficiency, this possibility has been limited for reasons of time-lines and costs as well as for design and manufacturing difficulties, as has been the case with other personalized implant and prosthetic developments. However, the present quality of medical image capture equipment together with the benefits to be had from computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies (CAD-CAM) and the capabilities furnished by rapid prototyping technologies, present new opportunities for a personalized response to the development of implants and prostheses, the social impact of which could turn out to be highly positive. This paper sets out a personalized development of an annuloplasty ring based on the combined use of information from medical imaging, from CAD-CAM design programs and prototype manufacture using rapid prototyping technologies.

  10. Development and experimental evaluation of a novel annuloplasty ring with a shape memory alloy core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purser, Molly Ferris

    A novel annuloplasty ring with a shape memory alloy core has been developed to facilitate minimally invasive mitral valve repair. In its activated (austenitic) phase, this prototype ring provides comparable mechanical properties as commercial semi-rigid rings. In its pre-activated (martensitic) phase, this ring is flexible enough to be introduced through an 8 mm trocar and easily manipulated with robotic instruments within the confines of a left atrial model. The core is constructed of 0.508 mm diameter NiTi, which is maintained below its M s temperature (24°C) during deployment and suturing. After suturing, the stiffener is heated to its Af temperature (37°C, normal human body temperature) enabling the NiTi to retain its optimal geometry and stiffness characteristics indefinitely. The NiTi core is shape set in a furnace to the appropriate size and optimal geometry during fabrication. The ring is cooled in a saline bath prior to surgery, making it compliant and easy to manipulate. Evaluation of the ring included mechanical testing, robotic evaluation, static pressure testing, dynamic flow testing and fatigue testing. Experimental results suggest that the NiTi core ring could be a viable alternative to flexible bands in robot-assisted mitral valve repair.

  11. A Novel Shape Memory Alloy Annuloplasty Ring for Minimally Invasive Surgery: Design, Fabrication, and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Purser, Molly F.; Richards, Andrew L.; Cook, Richard C.; Osborne, Jason A.; Cormier, Denis R.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    A novel annuloplasty ring with a shape memory alloy core has been developed to facilitate minimally invasive mitral valve repair. In its activated (austenitic) phase, this prototype ring has comparable mechanical properties to commercial semi-rigid rings. In its pre-activated (martensitic) phase, this ring is flexible enough to be introduced through an 8-mm trocar and easily manipulated with robotic instruments within the confines of a left atrial model. The core is constructed of 0.50 mm diameter NiTi, which is maintained below its martensitic transition temperature (24 °C) during deployment and suturing. After suturing, the ring is heated above its austenitic transition temperature (37 °C, normal human body temperature) enabling the NiTi core to attain its optimal geometry and stiffness characteristics indefinitely. This article summarizes the design, fabrication, and evaluation of this prototype ring. Experimental results suggest that the NiTi core ring could be a viable alternative to flexible bands in robot-assisted minimally invasive mitral valve repair. PMID:20652747

  12. Safety and feasibility of a novel adjustable mitral annuloplasty ring: a multicentre European experience†

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Martin; Doll, Nicolas; Livesey, Steve; Castella, Manuel; Kocher, Alfred; Casselman, Filip; Voth, Vladimir; Bannister, Christina; Encalada Palacios, Juan F.; Pereda, Daniel; Laufer, Guenther; Czesla, Markus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recurrent mitral regurgitation is a significant problem after mitral valve repair in patients with functional valve disease. We report the safety and feasibility of a novel adjustable mitral annuloplasty device that permits downsizing of the anterior–posterior diameter late after initial surgery. METHODS In this multicentre, non-randomized, observational register, patients with moderate or severe mitral regurgitation undergoing surgical mitral valve repair with the MiCardia EnCorSQ™ Mitral Valve Repair system were evaluated. Patient characteristics, operative specifications and results as well as postoperative follow-up were collected for all five centres. RESULTS Ninety-four patients with a median age of 71 (64–75) years (EuroSCORE II 6.7 ± 6.3; 66% male, 48% ischaemic MR, 37% dilated cardiomyopathy and 15% degenerative disease) were included. Operative mortality was 1% and the 1-year survival was 93%. Ring adjustment was attempted in 12 patients at a mean interval of 9 ± 6 months after surgery. In three of these attempts, a technical failure occurred. In 1 patient, mitral regurgitation was reduced two grades, in 2 patients mitral regurgitation was reduced one grade and in 6 patients, mitral regurgitation did not change significantly. The mean grade of mitral regurgitation changed from 2.9 ± 0.9 to 2.1 ± 0.7 (P = 0.02). Five patients were reoperated after 11 ± 9 months (Ring dehiscence: 2; failed adjustment: 3). CONCLUSION We conclude that this device may provide an additional treatment option in patients with functional mitral regurgitation, who are at risk for reoperation due to recurrent mitral regurgitation. Clinical results in this complex disease were ambiguous and patient selection seems to be a crucial step for this device. Further trials are required to estimate the clinical value of this therapeutic concept. PMID:25694471

  13. Comparison of outcomes of tricuspid annuloplasty with 3D-rigid versus flexible prosthetic ring for functional tricuspid regurgitation secondary to rheumatic mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Lv, Zhenqian; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Background Annuloplasty bands and rings are widely used for repairing functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR). However, the question regarding which is the ideal annuloplasty device remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and mid-term durability of tricuspid ring annuloplasty for FTR secondary to rheumatic mitral valve disease using flexible Cosgrove-Edwards band and the rigid Edwards MC3 ring (Edwards Lifesciences, LLC, Irvine, CA, USA). Methods We retrospectively collected the clinical data of those who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) in concomitant with tricuspid ring annuloplasty from 2009 to 2013. The flexible band was used in 46 patients (flexible group), and the 3D rigid ring was used in 60 patients (rigid group). Echocardiographic evaluation of tricuspid function was performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Results The grade of TR was significantly improved compared to preoperative values in two groups. There was no significant difference regarding postoperative TR grade between the two groups at 1 week and 2–3 months but there was statistical significant difference at postoperative 6–12 months, and 2–3 years. During the follow up period, 25 of 46 patients (54.3%) in flexible group and 22 of 60 patients (30.3%) in rigid group developed recurrent TR. Freedom from recurrent TR in flexible group is significant lower than rigid group in each postoperative follow up period. Conclusions These findings suggest that 3D rigid ring annuloplasty might be more effective for tricuspid ring annuloplasty in FTR in mid-term postoperative periods when compared to flexible band. PMID:28066587

  14. Downsizing annuloplasty in ischemic mitral regurgitation: double row overlapping suture to avoid ring disinsertion in valve repair.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Francesco; Spadaccio, Cristiano; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Chello, Massimo; Lusini, Mario; Barbato, Raffaele; Acar, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    The long-term outcomes of undersizing annuloplasty for the treatment of ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is affected by the progressive dilation of the annulus, which carries increased risk for ring disinsertion. Reasons underlying this phenomenon might be found in the excess of physical stress on the annuloplasty sutures during the ventricular remodeling process. We report a technique based on the placement of a double row of overlapping sutures aiming at reducing the potential for ring disinsertion. Eleven patients with IMR undergoing mitral valve repair associated with coronary bypass grafting were treated with this technique and echocardiographically followed up at 6 and 12 months. The overall annular dimension decreased significantly with a significant reduction of the tenting area and no recurrence of mitral regurgitation at 1 year. A double row of overlapping sutures allowed firm attachment of the prosthetic ring while downsizing the annulus in IMR, limiting the consequences of changes in subannular ventricular geometry. This technique might therefore be considered a useful aid during mitral valve repair.

  15. Mitral Valve Annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Manuel K.; Bothe, Wolfgang; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Swanson, Julia C.; Miller, D. Craig; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Mitral valve annuloplasty is a common surgical technique used in the repair of a leaking valve by implanting an annuloplasty device. To enhance repair durability, these devices are designed to increase leaflet coaptation, while preserving the native annular shape and motion; however, the precise impact of device implantation on annular deformation, strain, and curvature is unknown. Here we quantify how three frequently used devices significantly impair native annular dynamics. In controlled in vivo experiments, we surgically implanted eleven flexible-incomplete, eleven semi-rigid-complete, and twelve rigid-complete devices around the mitral annuli of 34 sheep, each tagged with 16 equally-spaced tantalum markers. We recorded four-dimensional marker coordinates using biplane videofluoroscopy, first with device and then without, which were used to create mathematical models using piecewise cubic splines. Clinical metrics (characteristic anatomical distances) revealed significant global reduction in annular dynamics upon device implantation. Mechanical metrics (strain and curvature fields) explained this reduction via a local loss of anterior dilation and posterior contraction. Overall, all three devices unfavorably reduced annular dynamics. The flexible-incomplete device, however, preserved native annular dynamics to a larger extent than the complete devices. Heterogeneous strain and curvature profiles suggest the need for heterogeneous support, which may spawn more rational design of annuloplasty devices using design concepts of functionally graded materials. PMID:22037916

  16. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  17. Mitral valve repair: is there still a place for suture annuloplasty?

    PubMed

    Fundarò, Pino; Tartara, Paolo M; Villa, Emmanuel; Fratto, Pasquale; Campisi, Salvatore; Vitali, Ettore O

    2007-08-01

    Prosthetic ring annuloplasty is considered the gold standard technique for mitral valve repair, but it has been associated with some drawbacks. Suture annuloplasty is less expensive and may have some physiopathologic advantages. We reviewed the literature to assess clinical results of mitral suture annuloplasty. Thirteen series, each reporting more than 50 patients and published in the last 10 years, were included in the analysis. They comprised 1,648 patients with cumulative follow-up of 5,607 patient-years. Our review suggests that suture annuloplasty is a safe procedure, but a trend toward recurrence of annular dilatation with time was reported. In selected cases, suture annuloplasty is effective, and its mid-term clinical results are encouraging and compare well with those of prosthetic ring repair series. The quality of the results varies according to the particular annuloplasty technique used and to the mitral valve pathology treated. Recent technical modifications have been found to decrease the incidence of repair failure and promise to improve the reproducibility of the procedure. Further investigations are warranted to better assess the long-term results of suture annuloplasty, and to determine whether its theoretical functional advantages translate into a real clinical benefit.

  18. Sizing for mitral annuloplasty: where does science stop and voodoo begin?

    PubMed

    Bothe, Wolfgang; Miller, D Craig; Doenst, Torsten

    2013-04-01

    The implantation of an improperly sized annuloplasty ring may result in an incompetent valve after surgical mitral valve repair. Consequently, the procedure of ring size selection is considered critical. Although a plethora of sizing strategies are described, the opinions on how to select the appropriate ring size differ widely and often appear arbitrary (ie, without scientific justification). These inconsistencies raise the question where, with respect to ring sizing, science stops and voodoo begins.

  19. The Mariner Jupiter/Saturn ring occultation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, V. R.

    1974-01-01

    Radio occultation measurements of Saturn's rings as measured by the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn radio science experiment are reported. These signal measurements provide information on size, distribution, and density of particle material found in the rings.

  20. [Mitral valve repair with the MitraClip following surgical mitral annuloplasty failure].

    PubMed

    Picard, F; Tadros, V-X; Millán, X; Asgar, A W

    2016-10-28

    Mitral repair using the MitraClip device is on ongoing expansion and has been evaluated in different patterns of mitral regurgitation. Nevertheless, surgical approaches to mitral regurgitation remain the standard of care, at least in absence of contraindication. We report the first Canadian experience of mitral valve repair with the MitraClip following surgical mitral annuloplasty failure. Therapeutic considerations and potential challenges are discussed.

  1. A Safe and Effective Modification of Thomson's Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waschke, Felix; Strunz, Andreas; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The electrical circuit of the jumping ring experiment based on discharging a capacitor is optimized. The setup is scoop proof at 46 V and yet the ring jumps more than 9 m high. The setup is suitable for both lectures and student laboratory work in higher education. (Contains 1 table, 8 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  2. Slip ring experience in long duration space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, Damon D.

    1986-01-01

    Ball Aerospace experience with slip rings in space extends back to 1962. Over 40 multi-ring assemblies have been flown and continuous operating lifetimes greater than 8 years at up to 60 rpm have been demonstrated. Slip rings provide multi-channel transfer of electrical power and signals in assemblies that are small in size and weight, and low in cost. By use of multiple brushes and sufficient copper within the assembly, power transfer efficiency better than 99.95 percent for high voltage circuits can be achieved. A low slip ring failure rate based on actual space operation totalling billions of ring revolutions has been established. Well qualified suppliers who have been making slip rings for space use for over 25 years are available. It is hoped that the suspected problem in SEASAT will not be allowed to prejudice space system designer against these very useful mechanisms.

  3. Revascularization alone or combined with suture annuloplasty for ischemic mitral regurgitation. Evaluation by color Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Czer, L S; Maurer, G; Bolger, A F; DeRobertis, M; Chaux, A; Matloff, J M

    1996-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of revascularization alone or combined with mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation, we performed color Doppler echocardiography intraoperatively before and after cardiopulmonary bypass in 49 patients (mean age, 70 +/- 9 years) with concomitant mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease (triple vessel or left main in 88%; prior infarction in 90%). After revascularization alone (n = 25), the mitral annulus diameter (2.88 +/- 0.44 cm vs 2.88 +/- 0.44 cm), leaflet-to-annulus ratio (1.44 +/- 0.30 vs 1.44 +/- 0.29), and mitral regurgitation grade (1.7 +/- 0.9 vs 1.8 +/- 0.7) remained unchanged (p = NS, postpump vs prepump); mitral regurgitation decreased by 2 grades in only 1 patient (4%). After combined revascularization and mitral valve suture annuloplasty (Kay-Zubiate; n = 24), the annulus diameter decreased (to 2.57 +/- 0.45 cm from 3.11 +/- 0.43 cm), the leaflet-to-annulus ratio increased (to 1.46 +/- 0.25 from 1.20 +/- 0.21), and the mitral regurgitation grade decreased significantly (to 0.9 +/- 0.9 from 2.8 +/- 1.0) (p < 0.01); mitral regurgitation decreased by 2 grades or more (successful repair) in 75%. The origin of the jet correlated with the site of prior infarction (p < 0.05), being inferior in cases of posterior or inferior infarction (67%), and central or broad in cases of combined anterior and inferior infarction (70%). Despite a slightly higher 30-day mortality in the repair group (p = 0.10), there was no significant difference in survival between the 2 surgical groups at 5 years or 8 years. Therefore, in this study of patients with mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease, reduction in regurgitation grade with revascularization alone was infrequent. Concomitant suture annuloplasty significantly reduced regurgitation by reestablishing a more normal relationship between the leaflet and annulus sizes. The failure rate after suture annuloplasty was 25%; alternative repair techniques such as ring

  4. Technology and experiments of 42CrMo bearing ring forming based on casting ring blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongtang; Ju, Li; Qi, Huiping; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Guozhen; Wang, Mingli

    2014-03-01

    Bearing ring is the crucial component of bearing. With regard to such problems as material waste, low efficiency and high energy consumption in current process of producing large bearing ring, a new process named "casting-rolling compound forming technology" is researched by taking the typical 42CrMo slew bearing as object. Through theoretical analysis, the design criteria of the main casting-rolling forming parameters are put forward at first. Then the constitutive relationship model of as-cast 42CrMo steel and its mathematical model of dynamic recrystallization are obtained according to the results of the hot compression experiment. By a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element model for radial-axial rolling of bearing ring, the fraction of dynamic recrystallization is calculated and recrystallized grains size are predicated. Meanwhile, the effects of the initial rolling temperature and feed rate of idle roll on material microstructure evolution are analyzed. Finally, the industrial rolling experiment is designed and performed, based on the simulation results. In addition, mechanical and metallographic tests are conducted on rolled bearing ring to get the mechanical parameters and metallographic structure. The experimental data and results show that the mechanical properties of bearing ring produced by casting-rolling compound forming technology are up to industrial standard, and a qualified bearing ring can be successfully formed by employing this new technology. Through the study, a process of forming large bearing ring directly by using casting ring blank is obtained, which could provide an effective theoretical guidance for manufacturing large ring parts. It also has an edge in saving material, lowering energy and improving efficiency.

  5. Preoperative Three-Dimensional Valve Analysis Predicts Recurrent Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation after Mitral Annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, Wobbe; Lai, Eric K.; Levack, Melissa M.; Shang, Eric K.; Pouch, Alison M.; Eperjesi, Thomas J.; Plappert, Theodore J.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Mariani, Massimo A.; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Gleason, Thomas G.; Mahmood, Feroze; Acker, Michael A.; Woo, Y. Joseph; Cheung, Albert T.; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) with undersized annuloplasty rings is characterized by high IMR recurrence rates. Patient-specific preoperative imaging-based risk stratification for recurrent IMR would optimize results. We sought to determine if pre-repair three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography combined with a novel valve modeling algorithm would be predictive of IMR recurrence 6 months after repair. Methods Intraoperative transesophageal real-time 3D echocardiography was performed in 50 patients undergoing undersized ring annuloplasty for IMR (and in 21 patients with normal mitral valves). A customized image analysis protocol was used to assess 3D annular geometry and regional leaflet tethering. IMR recurrence (≥grade 2) was assessed with two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography 6 months after repair. Results Preoperative annular geometry was similar in all IMR patients; and preoperative leaflet tethering was significantly higher in patients with recurrent IMR (n=13) as compared with patients in whom IMR did not recur IMR (n=37) (tethering index 3.91±1.01 vs. 2.90±1.17, P=0.008; tethering angles of A3 (23.5±8.9° vs. 14.4± 11.4°, P=0.012), P2 (44.4±8.8° vs. 28.2±17.0°, P=0.002), and P3 (35.2±6.0° vs. 18.6±12.7°, P<0.001)). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed preoperative P3 tethering angle as an independent predictor of IMR recurrence with an optimal cut-off value of 29.9° (AUC 0.92, 95%CI 0.84–1.00, P<0.001). Conclusions 3D echocardiography combined with valve modeling is predictive of recurrent IMR. Preoperative regional leaflet tethering of segment P3 is a strong independent predictor of IMR recurrence after undersized ring annuloplasty. In patients with a preoperative P3 tethering angle ≥29.9° chordal-sparing valve replacement rather than valve repair should be strongly considered. PMID:26688087

  6. Is an adjunctive subvalvular repair during mitral annuloplasty for secondary mitral regurgitation effective in preventing recurrent regurgitation?

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Santana, Orlando

    2016-02-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Is an adjunctive subvalvular repair during mitral annuloplasty for secondary mitral regurgitation effective in preventing recurrent regurgitation? Altogether, 353 studies were found using the reported search, of which 9 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. The best evidence regarding adjunctive subvalvular repair during mitral annuloplasty for secondary mitral regurgitation was from retrospective analyses. The studies reported outcomes of mitral valve repair (MVr) with annuloplasty alone (ring MVr) versus adjunctive papillary muscle approximation (PMA; n = 3), papillary muscle relocation (PMR; n = 3), secondary chordal cutting (n = 2) and PMA + PMR (n = 1). All but one study included concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, whereas additional ventriculoplasty was performed in three studies. Follow-up ranged from 1 month to 5 years. The performance of PMA was associated with a lower mitral regurgitation (MR) grade when combined with ventriculoplasty in one study, whereas a greater improvement in left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and left ventricular ejection fraction at follow-up was observed with PMA alone in a separate study. Three studies of ring + PMR reported a reduction in ≥ 2+ recurrent MR, whereas two studies also observed a greater reduction in left ventricular end-diastolic diameter. The two studies on secondary chordal cutting reported a lower MR grade, lower recurrence of ≥ 2+ MR and a greater left ventricular ejection fraction at follow-up. Combining PMA + PMR + ventriculoplasty significantly reduced left ventricular end-systolic volume index at short-term follow-up in one study. Finally, none of the studies reported a significant difference in

  7. Evaluation of a Shape Memory Alloy Reinforced Annuloplasty Band for Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Purser, Molly F.; Richards, Andrew L.; Cook, Richard C.; Osborne, Jason A.; Cormier, Denis R.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose An in vitro study using explanted porcine hearts was conducted to evaluate a novel annuloplasty band, reinforced with a two-phase, shape memory alloy, designed specifically for minimally invasive mitral valve repair. Description In its rigid (austenitic) phase, this band provides the same mechanical properties as the commercial semi-rigid bands. In its compliant (martensitic) phase, this band is flexible enough to be introduced through an 8-mm trocar and is easily manipulated within the heart. Evaluation In its rigid phase, the prototype band displayed similar mechanical properties to commercially available semi-rigid rings. Dynamic flow testing demonstrated no statistical differences in the reduction of mitral valve regurgitation. In its flexible phase, the band was easily deployed through an 8-mm trocar, robotically manipulated and sutured into place. Conclusions Experimental results suggest that the shape memory alloy reinforced band could be a viable alternative to flexible and semi-rigid bands in minimally invasive mitral valve repair. PMID:19766827

  8. The liquid metal slip ring experiment for the communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The experiment is designed to demonstrate liquid metal slip ring (LMSR) performance in a space environment. An evaluation was made of the features of the LMSR where improvement in performance over conventional slip rings was expected. The primary measurements to be made in the experiment will allow a determination of the slip ring electrical resistance, between ring insulation and ring cleanliness.

  9. Cavity Ring down Spectroscopy Experiment for an Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacewicz, T.; Wasylczyk, P.; Kowalczyk, P.; Semczuk, M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple experiment is described that permits advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of the cavity ring down spectroscopy technique. The apparatus is used for measurements of low concentrations of NO[subscript 2] produced in air by an electric discharge. We present the setup, experimental procedure, data analysis and some…

  10. Experiments on Diffusion Flame Structure of a Laminar Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The study of flame-vortex interactions provides one of the means to better understand turbulent combustion, and allows for canonical configurations that contain the fundamental elements found in turbulent flames, These include concentrated vorticity, entrainment and mixing, strain and nonequilibrium phenomena, diffusion and differential diffusion, partial premixing and diluent effects, and heat release effects. In flame- vortex configurations, these fundamental elements can be studied under more controlled conditions than is possible in direct investigations of turbulent flames. Since the paper of Marble, the problem of the flame-vortex interaction has received considerable attention theoretically, numerically and experimentally. Several configurations exist for study of the premixed flame/vortex ring interaction but more limited results have been obtained to date for the diffusion flame/vortex ring case. The setup of Chen and Dahm, which is conceptually similar to that of Karagozian and Manda and Karagozian, Suganuma and Strom where the ring is composed of fuel and air and combustion begins during the ring formation process, is used in the current study. However, it is essential to conduct the experiments in microgravity to remove the asymmetries caused by buoyancy and thus obtain highly symmetric and repeatable interactions. In previous studies it was found that the flame structure of the vortex ring was similar to that obtained analytically by Karagozian and Manda. Dilution of propane with nitrogen led mainly to a reduction in flame luminosities, flame burnout times were affected by both fuel volumes and amount of dilution, and a simple model of the burnout times was developed. In this paper, a discussion on reacting ring displacement and flame burnout time will be given, and the flame structures of vortex rings containing ethane and air will be compared to those of propane reacting in air.

  11. Thomson’s ring experiment with resonant LC circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Thomson’s jumping ring experiment is conducted using a low voltage (24 V) electronic circuit. A coil (L) is connected with a capacitor (C) in parallel and is driven at its resonant frequency to obtain a high current in the coil. A circuit sends current pulses to the LC tank circuit at around its resonant frequency. The oscillating current in the coil induces a voltage in a copper-loop on top of it. The induced current interacts with the radial part of the coil-magnetic field; the resulting force levitates the loop. In a separate coil, a ferrite core and a copper ring are used to demonstrate the jumping-ring effect. The levitation and the jumping effect can be controlled by changing the duty cycle and frequency. In this report simple formulae and approximations are used to calculate the levitating force on the loop.

  12. Ion ring experiments with applications to the compact toroid program

    SciTech Connect

    Schamiloglu, E.; Greenly, J.B.; Hammer, D.A.; Pedrow, P.D.; Sudan, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    We report here the status of the ion ring experimental program at Cornell. Ion rings having 3 x 10/sup 15/. 430 keV protons have been trapped in the Ion Ring Experiment (IREX) in a 0.8 T magnetic field. Trapping was achieved using a static downstream mirror and a fast (1.7 ..mu..sec rise time) gated upstream mirror. Ring protons were detectable for up to 4 ..mu..sec (about 50 times both the ion cyclotron period and the injection pulse duration). On LONGSHOT II, up to 1 kJ of less than or equal to 150 keV ions has been produced in 0.4 to 0.9 ..mu..sec pulses using an active anode plasma source as well as the standard surface flashover source. The LONGSHOT II beam will shortly be formed into a rotating proton layer and injected into a preformed (0.3 m diameter and 2.5 m long) Z-discharge plasma to study axial energy dissipation processes. This proton layer ultimately is to be combined with a compact toroid plasma.

  13. The VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment (VORTEX) GAS project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Langenderfer, Lynn S.; Jardon, Rebecca D.; Cutlip, Hansford H.; Kazerooni, Alexander C.; Thweatt, Amber L.; Lester, Joseph L.; Bernal, Luis P.

    1995-01-01

    Get Away Special (GAS) payload G-093, also called VORTEX (VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment), is an investigation of the propagation of a vortex ring through a liquid-gas interface in microgravity. This process results in the formation of one or more liquid droplets similar to earth based liquid atomization systems. In the absence of gravity, surface tension effects dominate the drop formation process. The Shuttle's microgravity environment allows the study of the same fluid atomization processes as using a larger drop size than is possible on Earth. This enables detailed experimental studies of the complex flow processes encountered in liquid atomization systems. With VORTEX, deformations in both the vortex ring and the fluid surface will be measured closely for the first time in a parameters range that accurately resembles liquid atomization. The experimental apparatus will record images of the interactions for analysis after the payload has been returned to earth. The current design of the VORTEX payload consists of a fluid test cell with a vortex ring generator, digital imaging system, laser illumination system, computer based controller, batteries for payload power, and an array of housekeeping and payload monitoring sensors. It is a self-contained experiment and will be flown on board the Space Shuttle in a 5 cubic feet GAS canister. The VORTEX Project is entirely run by students at the University of Michigan but is overseen by a faculty advisor acting as the payload customer and the contact person with NASA. This paper summarizes both the technical and programmatic aspects of the VORTEX Project.

  14. Initial Plasma Experiment in the Levitated Ring Trap RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Ogawa, Y.; Morikawa, J.; Watanabe, S.; Yano, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-10-01

    Studies on toroidal flowing plasma have started in a superconductor levitated coil device, Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) [1]. RT-1 generates a magnetosphere-like dipole magnetic field configuration that enables various kinds of experiments related to flowing plasmas. The main purpose of the Ring Trap Experiment is to explore a new high-b relaxation state of plasmas predicted by two-fluid relaxation theory of flowing plasmas [2]. Magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 also enables stable pure-magnetic trap of non-neutral plasmas [3], which is potentially suitable for the confinement of charged particles including anti-matters. As an initial experiment, hydrogen plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating using 8.2GHz microwave generated by a klystron with the maximum power of 100kW for 1s pulse operation. The high-Tc superconductor (Bi-2223) ring with a total coil current of 250kAT is magnetically levitated in a vacuum chamber using a PID feedback control system. The field strength in the trap region is 0.03T to 0.3T. Diagnostics for the RT-1 experiment includes spectroscopy, soft X-ray pulse-height analysis with Si (Li) detector, magnetic probes, and Langmuir probes for edge plasma measurement. The initial experimental results and basic plasma parameters of RT-1 will be presented in the meeting. 1. Z. Yoshida et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 1, 008 (2006). 2. Z. Yoshida and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 095001 (2002). 3. Z. Yoshida, et al., in Nonneutral Plasma Physics III, IV.

  15. Experiments on cauldron formation: A polygonal cauldron and ring fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komuro, Hiroaki

    1987-03-01

    The sequence of formation of the Motojuku-type cauldron (Fujita et al., 1970) is summarized as follows: (1) doming due to ascent of a magma body; (2) development of normal faults which produce a polygonal cauldron; and (3) eruption of acidic to intermediate pyroclastic material. Model experiments on a scale of 1/200,000 reveal that ascent of the magma body, which was imitated by a ball of hardened putty, produced a polygonal cauldron composed of radial and concentrically arranged short fractures on the roof of a dome. No ring fractures were formed. This type of cauldron develops near the surface. On the other hand, emission of magma which was imitated by evaporation of a ball of dry ice in brittle powdered material, caused ring faults dipping outward and a circular cauldron without up- or downwarping. This type of cauldron develops upward from the magma body. The former model is equated to the Motojuku-type cauldron, and the latter model to the other types of cauldrons with ring fractures.

  16. Experimental techniques for in-ring reaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutterer, M.; Egelhof, P.; Eremin, V.; Ilieva, S.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiselev, O.; Kollmus, H.; Kröll, T.; Kuilman, M.; Chung, L. X.; Najafi, M. A.; Popp, U.; Rigollet, C.; Roy, S.; von Schmid, M.; Streicher, B.; Träger, M.; Yue, K.; Zamora, J. C.; the EXL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    As a first step of the EXL project scheduled for the New Experimental Storage Ring at FAIR a precursor experiment (E105) was performed at the ESR at GSI. For this experiment, an innovative differential pumping concept, originally proposed for the EXL recoil detector ESPA, was successfully applied. The implementation and essential features of this novel technical concept will be discussed, as well as details on the detectors and the infrastructure around the internal gas-jet target. With 56Ni(p, p)56Ni elastic scattering at 400 MeV u-1, a nuclear reaction experiment with stored radioactive beams was realized for the first time. Finally, perspectives for a next-generation EXL-type setup are briefly discussed.

  17. Temperature Distributions of the Lumbar Intervertebral Disc during Laser Annuloplasty : A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Hyung; Hong, Jae Taek; Sung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low back pain, caused intervertebral disc degeneration has been treated by thermal annuloplasty procedure, which is a non-surgical treatement. The theoretical backgrounds of the annuloplasty are thermal destruct of nociceptor and denaturization of collagen fiber to induce contraction, to shrink annulus and thus enhancing stability. This study is about temperature and its distribution during thermal annuloplasty using 1414 nm Nd : YAG laser. Methods Thermal annuloplasty was performed on fresh human cadaveric lumbar spine with 20 intact intervertebral discs in a 37℃ circulating water bath using newly developed 1414 nm Nd : YAG laser. Five thermocouples were attached to different locations on the disc, and at the same time, temperature during annuloplasty was measured and analyzed. Results Thermal probe's temperature was higher in locations closer to laser fiber tip and on lateral locations, rather than the in depth locations. In accordance with the laser fiber tip and the depth, temperatures above 45.0℃ was measured in 3.0 mm depth which trigger nociceptive ablation in 16 levels (80%), in accordance with the laser fiber end tip and laterality, every measurement had above 45.0℃, and also was measured temperature over 60.0℃, which can trigger collagen denaturation at 16 levels (80%). Conclusion When thermal annuloplasty is needed in a selective lesion, annuloplasty using a 1414 nm Nd : YAG laser can be one of the treatment options. PMID:27847567

  18. SNS Ring Operational Experience and Power Ramp Up Status

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The SNS Ring has now been operating for about 3.5 years, and our march continues to increase the beam power to the full design value of 1.4 MW. The Ring is a loss-limited machine, and in general the radioactivation levels are good, but there are some unanticipated hot spots that we are working to improve. High intensity collective effects such as space-charge and beam instability have had minimal impact on beam operations to date. The cross plane coupling issue in the ring to target beam transport line has been solved. We will also discuss the status of equipment upgrades in the high-energy beam transport beam line, the injection-dump beam transport line, the ring, and the ring-to-target beam transport line.

  19. Gulfcasting: Dynamical Forecast Experiments for Gulf Stream Rings and Meanders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    36.2N 66.8W. Due to equipment failure , very important AXBTs were missed near 39.5N 68.5W at the location of the ring-stream interaction. May 29...slightly to the north of the IR data. A warm ring was located at 39.8N 66.7W and a cold ring at 36.ON 66.8W. Equipment failure caused the position of a...problems and equipment failure made it impossible to determine the status of the possible cold ring at 35.5N 70.5W. 2.5.3.3 Model run Central forecast C3

  20. Numerical experiments in ringing of offshore systems under viscous loads

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, K.R.; Kareem, A.

    1996-12-31

    A phenomenon which has recently received much attention in offshore engineering is the ringing response of structures. This high frequency transient type response has been observed in nature, particularly in tension leg platforms (TLPs). Given the implications of this behavior on the fatigue life of tendons, it is important that it be considered for response analysis. Significant progress has been made in recent years in identifying the nonlinear mechanisms that induce ringing in complex offshore structural systems. This introductory study-uses a simple model to numerically demonstrates several of the more salient features that are commonly cited in current literature, and shows that viscous loads may result in inducing ringing type response of members under certain conditions. Ringing response in pitch due to viscous loading is simulated on a column piercing the surface, and the significant contributing force mechanisms are identified. System characteristics are altered to ameliorate the performance of these systems.

  1. The liquid metal slip ring experiment for the Communications Technology Satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an experiment designed to demonstrate liquid metal slip ring (LMSR) performance in a space environment. The experiment, based on currently developed LMSR technology, is to make possible an evaluation of those features of a LMSR where improvement in performance over conventional slip rings might be feasible. The experiment-prompting, potential LMSR advantages include: lower electrical noise, higher current capability, higher voltage capability, longer life, and small variation in friction torque.

  2. A safe and effective modification of Thomson’s jumping ring experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waschke, Felix; Strunz, Andreas; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2012-11-01

    The electrical circuit of the jumping ring experiment based on discharging a capacitor is optimized. The setup is scoop proof at 46 V and yet the ring jumps more than 9 m high. The setup is suitable for both lectures and student laboratory work in higher education.

  3. Experience with technical diagnostics of generator shroud rings at thermal plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubov, A. A.

    2009-02-01

    Experience with the application of the method of magnetic memory of metal while controlling the state of the generator shroud rings for in-time recognition of damage that develops in the zones of stress concentration is considered.

  4. Exploring multistability in semiconductor ring lasers: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Gelens, L; Beri, S; Van der Sande, G; Mezosi, G; Sorel, M; Danckaert, J; Verschaffelt, G

    2009-05-15

    We report the first experimental observation of multistable states in a single-longitudinal mode semiconductor ring laser. We show how the operation of the device can be steered to either monostable, bistable, or multistable dynamical regimes in a controlled way. We observe that the dynamical regimes are organized in well-reproducible sequences that match the bifurcation diagrams of a two-dimensional model. By analyzing the phase space in this model, we predict how the stochastic transitions between multistable states take place and confirm it experimentally.

  5. Operational experience with SLC damping ring kicker magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Mattison, T.; Cassel, R.; Donaldson, A.; Gross, G.; Harvey, A.

    1991-05-01

    The damping ring kickers for the SLAC Linear Collider must provide 7 mrad kicks to 1.2 GeV beams with 60 nsec rise and fall times and fit in a 50 cm length around a 21 mm diameter ceramic beam pipe. This requires that they operate at up to 40 KV. The construction and operation of two types of quasi-coaxial ferrite magnet potted with RTV silicone rubber is discussed. Production yield has been improved by changes in RTV degassing, transfer, and cure. Operation lifetime is dominated by voltage, radiation, and thermal cycling. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Modeling Extraction of VLF Energy from Localized Ion Ring Beams for Space Based Active Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scales, Wayne; Ganguli, Gurudas; Crabtree, Chris; Rudakov, Leonid; Mithaiwala, Manish

    2012-07-01

    Waves in the VLF range are of considerable interest in the magnetosphere since they are responsible for transporting energy and momentum and therefore impacting space weather. Ion ring beams can efficiently generate waves in the VLF frequency range between the electron and ion gyro-frequency (Mithaiwala et al., 2010). Generation of VLF waves by infinite extent ion ring beams have been extensively treated for a broad range of space plasma applications. However, ion ring distributions created by chemical release experiments in the ionosphere (Koons and Pongratz, 1981) and those that occur naturally during storms/substorms or solar-wind comet interactions are localized over a spatial extent. This presentation will consider a new computational model for the nonlinear evolution of VLF waves generated by a spatially localized ion ring beam. The model, though quite general, will have application to generation of VLF waves in the radiation belts by localized creation of an ion ring beam. The model includes the convective loss of energy through phenomenological electron-ion collisions, which models nonlinear scattering of electrostatic lower hybrid waves into large group velocity electromagnetic whistler/magnetosonic waves (Ganguli et al., 2010). Therefore the model, though electrostatic, includes critical electromagnetic effects in a computationally efficient fashion. An emphasis is placed on the determining the efficiency of extraction of VLF energy from the ion ring beam due to the spatial localization of the ion ring beam. It is shown that due to the convection of the VLF waves out of the source region, the efficiency of wave energy extraction is greatly enhanced. This is accompanied by a reduction in background and ion ring beam heating. The results will be used to highlight the importance of non-linear scattering to future active experiments in space. Mithaiwala et al. Phys. Plasma, doi.org/10.1063/1.3372842, 2010 Koons and Pongratz, JGR, 1981. Ganguli et al., Phys

  7. Ring-Closing Metathesis: An Advanced Guided-Inquiry Experiment for the Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepmann, Hala G.; Mynderse, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The design and implementation of an advanced guided-inquiry experiment for the organic laboratory is described. Grubbs's second-generation catalyst is used to effect the ring-closing metathesis of diethyl diallylmalonate. The reaction is carried out under an inert atmosphere at room temperature and monitored by argentic TLC. The crude reaction is…

  8. The double electrostatic ion ring experiment: a unique cryogenic electrostatic storage ring for merged ion-beams studies.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R D; Schmidt, H T; Andler, G; Björkhage, M; Blom, M; Brännholm, L; Bäckström, E; Danared, H; Das, S; Haag, N; Halldén, P; Hellberg, F; Holm, A I S; Johansson, H A B; Källberg, A; Källersjö, G; Larsson, M; Leontein, S; Liljeby, L; Löfgren, P; Malm, B; Mannervik, S; Masuda, M; Misra, D; Orbán, A; Paál, A; Reinhed, P; Rensfelt, K-G; Rosén, S; Schmidt, K; Seitz, F; Simonsson, A; Weimer, J; Zettergren, H; Cederquist, H

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of a novel type of storage device currently under construction at Stockholm University, Sweden, using purely electrostatic focussing and deflection elements, in which ion beams of opposite charges are confined under extreme high vacuum cryogenic conditions in separate "rings" and merged over a common straight section. The construction of this double electrostatic ion ring experiment uniquely allows for studies of interactions between cations and anions at low and well-defined internal temperatures and centre-of-mass collision energies down to about 10 K and 10 meV, respectively. Position sensitive multi-hit detector systems have been extensively tested and proven to work in cryogenic environments and these will be used to measure correlations between reaction products in, for example, electron-transfer processes. The technical advantages of using purely electrostatic ion storage devices over magnetic ones are many, but the most relevant are: electrostatic elements which are more compact and easier to construct; remanent fields, hysteresis, and eddy-currents, which are of concern in magnetic devices, are no longer relevant; and electrical fields required to control the orbit of the ions are not only much easier to create and control than the corresponding magnetic fields, they also set no upper mass limit on the ions that can be stored. These technical differences are a boon to new areas of fundamental experimental research, not only in atomic and molecular physics but also in the boundaries of these fields with chemistry and biology. For examples, studies of interactions with internally cold molecular ions will be particular useful for applications in astrophysics, while studies of solvated ionic clusters will be of relevance to aeronomy and biology.

  9. Global DC closed orbit correction experiment on the NSLS x-ray ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Decker, G.; Evans, K.

    1992-09-15

    In this note are described the global DC closed orbit correction experiments conducted on the X-ray ring at National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The beam response matrix, defined as beam motion at BPM locations per unit kick by corrector magnets, was measured and then inverted using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD). The product of the inverted matrix and the difference orbit gives the incremental kick strengths necessary to correct the orbit. As a result, the r.m.s. orbit error around the ring was reduced from 208 {mu}m to 61 {mu}m.

  10. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment

    DOE PAGES

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Andrianov, S.; Baartman, R.; ...

    2016-11-29

    We describe a new experiment to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10$-$29e cm by using polarized “magic” momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  11. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Andrianov, S.; Baartman, R.; Baessler, S.; Bai, M.; Benante, J.; Berz, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bowcock, T.; Brown, K.; Casey, B.; Conte, M.; Crnkovic, J. D.; D'Imperio, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Fedotov, A.; Fierlinger, P.; Fischer, W.; Gaisser, M. O.; Giomataris, Y.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Guidoboni, G.; Hacıömeroǧlu, S.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Huang, H.; Incagli, M.; Ivanov, A.; Kawall, D.; Kim, Y. I.; King, B.; Koop, I. A.; Lazarus, D. M.; Lebedev, V.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, Y. H.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Luccio, A. U.; Lyapin, A.; MacKay, W.; Maier, R.; Makino, K.; Malitsky, N.; Marciano, W. J.; Meng, W.; Meot, F.; Metodiev, E. M.; Miceli, L.; Moricciani, D.; Morse, W. M.; Nagaitsev, S.; Nayak, S. K.; Orlov, Y. F.; Ozben, C. S.; Park, S. T.; Pesce, A.; Petrakou, E.; Pile, P.; Podobedov, B.; Polychronakos, V.; Pretz, J.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ramberg, E.; Raparia, D.; Rathmann, F.; Rescia, S.; Roser, T.; Kamal Sayed, H.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Senichev, Y.; Sidorin, A.; Silenko, A.; Simos, N.; Stahl, A.; Stephenson, E. J.; Ströher, H.; Syphers, M. J.; Talman, J.; Talman, R. M.; Tishchenko, V.; Touramanis, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Venanzoni, G.; Vetter, K.; Vlassis, S.; Won, E.; Zavattini, G.; Zelenski, A.; Zioutas, K.

    2016-11-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10-29 e ṡ cm by using polarized "magic" momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  12. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Anastassopoulos, V; Andrianov, S; Baartman, R; Baessler, S; Bai, M; Benante, J; Berz, M; Blaskiewicz, M; Bowcock, T; Brown, K; Casey, B; Conte, M; Crnkovic, J D; D'Imperio, N; Fanourakis, G; Fedotov, A; Fierlinger, P; Fischer, W; Gaisser, M O; Giomataris, Y; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guidoboni, G; Hacıömeroğlu, S; Hoffstaetter, G; Huang, H; Incagli, M; Ivanov, A; Kawall, D; Kim, Y I; King, B; Koop, I A; Lazarus, D M; Lebedev, V; Lee, M J; Lee, S; Lee, Y H; Lehrach, A; Lenisa, P; Levi Sandri, P; Luccio, A U; Lyapin, A; MacKay, W; Maier, R; Makino, K; Malitsky, N; Marciano, W J; Meng, W; Meot, F; Metodiev, E M; Miceli, L; Moricciani, D; Morse, W M; Nagaitsev, S; Nayak, S K; Orlov, Y F; Ozben, C S; Park, S T; Pesce, A; Petrakou, E; Pile, P; Podobedov, B; Polychronakos, V; Pretz, J; Ptitsyn, V; Ramberg, E; Raparia, D; Rathmann, F; Rescia, S; Roser, T; Kamal Sayed, H; Semertzidis, Y K; Senichev, Y; Sidorin, A; Silenko, A; Simos, N; Stahl, A; Stephenson, E J; Ströher, H; Syphers, M J; Talman, J; Talman, R M; Tishchenko, V; Touramanis, C; Tsoupas, N; Venanzoni, G; Vetter, K; Vlassis, S; Won, E; Zavattini, G; Zelenski, A; Zioutas, K

    2016-11-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10(-29) e ⋅ cm by using polarized "magic" momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  13. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Andrianov, S.; Baartman, R.; Baessler, S.; Bai, M.; Benante, J.; Berz, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bowcock, T.; Brown, K.; Casey, B.; Conte, M.; Crnkovic, J. D.; D’Imperio, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Fedotov, A.; Fierlinger, P.; Fischer, W.; Gaisser, M. O.; Giomataris, Y.; Guidoboni, G.; Hacıömeroğlu, S.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Huang, H.; Incagli, M.; Ivanov, A.; Kawall, D.; Kim, Y. I.; King, B.; Koop, I. A.; Lazarus, D. M.; Lebedev, V.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, Y. H.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Luccio, A. U.; Lyapin, A.; MacKay, W.; Maier, R.; Makino, K.; Malitsky, N.; Marciano, W. J.; Meng, W.; Meot, F.; Metodiev, E. M.; Miceli, L.; Moricciani, D.; Morse, W. M.; Nagaitsev, S.; Nayak, S. K.; Orlov, Y. F.; Ozben, C. S.; Park, S. T.; Pesce, A.; Petrakou, E.; Pile, P.; Podobedov, B.; Polychronakos, V.; Pretz, J.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ramberg, E.; Raparia, D.; Rathmann, F.; Rescia, S.; Roser, T.; Kamal Sayed, H.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Senichev, Y.; Sidorin, A.; Silenko, A.; Simos, N.; Stahl, A.; Stephenson, E. J.; Ströher, H.; Syphers, M. J.; Talman, J.; Talman, R. M.; Tishchenko, V.; Touramanis, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Venanzoni, G.; Vetter, K.; Vlassis, S.; Won, E.; Zavattini, G.; Zelenski, A.; Zioutas, K.

    2016-11-29

    We describe a new experiment to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10$-$29e cm by using polarized “magic” momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  14. The Ring-Barking Experiment: Analysis of Forest Vitality Using Multi-Temporal Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmuth, Anne; Bachmann, Martin; Heiden, Uta; Pinnel, Nicole; Holzwarth, Stefanie; Muller, Andreas; Henning, Lea; Einzmann, Kathrin; Immitzer, Markus; Seitz, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    Through new operational optical spaceborne sensors (En- MAP and Sentinel-2) the impact analysis of climate change on forest ecosystems will be fostered. This analysis examines the potential of high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution data for detecting forest vegetation parameters, in particular Chlorophyll and Canopy Water content. The study site is a temperate spruce forest in Germany where in 2013 several trees were Ring-barked for a controlled die-off. During this experiment Ring- barked and Control trees were observed. Twelve airborne hyperspectral HySpex VNIR (Visible/Near Infrared) and SWIR (Shortwave Infrared) data with 1m spatial and 416 bands spectral resolution were acquired during the vegetation periods of 2013 and 2014. Additional laboratory spectral measurements of collected needle samples from Ring-barked and Control trees are available for needle level analysis. Index analysis of the laboratory measurements and image data are presented in this study.

  15. On the Absorber Thickness of Microcalorimetric Detectors in Experiments at Nuclear Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, V. A.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Scholz, P.

    2016-07-01

    Low-temperature calorimetric detectors are now successfully used in experiments on Lamb-Shift measurements at experimental storage rings. Strong Doppler broadening of the detected X-ray lines is a prominent feature of these experiments. Accordingly, an optimization procedure for the absorber thickness is proposed that considers the self-width of the X-ray detector line, the Doppler broadening, and the absorption efficiency, taking into account the possibility of the escape of secondary radiation. The optimum thickness for Sn-absorbers in this type of experiments is determined as 0.17 mm.

  16. A New Version of an Old Demonstration Experiment Using the Elihu Thomson Jumping Ring Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Theodore; Cary, Arthur; Mottmann, John; van Wyngaarden, Willem

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to make more widely known an eye-catching demonstration experiment in which a hanging conducting can is made to spin when placed near the iron core of an Elihu Thomson "jumping ring" apparatus. An explanation is given based on Faraday's law of induced voltages and the magnetic forces due to the core's fields interacting with the induced currents.

  17. High Ringxiety: Attachment Anxiety Predicts Experiences of Phantom Cell Phone Ringing.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Daniel J; Djerf, Jaikob M

    2016-01-01

    Mobile cell phone users have reported experiencing ringing and/or vibrations associated with incoming calls and messages, only to find that no call or message had actually registered. We believe this phenomenon can be understood as a human signal detection issue, with potentially important influences from psychological attributes. We hypothesized that individuals higher in attachment anxiety would report more frequent phantom cell phone experiences, whereas individuals higher in attachment avoidance would report less frequent experiences. If these experiences are primarily psychologically related to attributes of interpersonal relationships, associations with attachment style should be stronger than for general sensation seeking. We also predicted that certain contexts would interact with attachment style to increase or decrease the likelihood of experiencing phantom cell phone calls and messages. Attachment anxiety directly predicted the frequency of phantom ringing and notification experiences, whereas attachment avoidance and sensation seeking did not directly predict frequency. Attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance interacted with contextual factors (expectations for a call or message and concerned about an issue that one may be contacted about) in the expected directions for predicting phantom cell phone experiences.

  18. Rheumatic mitral regurgitation. The case for annuloplasty in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J G; Kawabori, I; Morgan, B C; Dillard, D H; Merendino, K A; Guntheroth, W G

    1975-08-01

    Eight youngsters (five female, three male, ages 10 to 19 years, mean 15 years) with isolated severe rheumatic mitral regurgitation have been subjected to mitral annuloplasty because of limiting symptoms and prominent ECG and X-ray changes. They have been followed for up to 11 years (mean 3.7 years), and 7 have had excellent results. An early (1961) patient had a small annulus and was not a favorable candidate; he had only transient improvement. Seven are greatly improved, have decreased cardiac size (often dramatic), and have improved ECG's. One has undergone successful pregnancy, and none has been limited in activities. The extent and duration of improvement, lack of mortality, and resumption of normal activities by these youngsters indicate surgical success. The essence of childhood and youth is activity and the future life span hopefully long; hence, annuloplasty would appear to be the procedure of choice for severe rheumatic mitral regurgitation in the pediatric age group, avoiding the usual need for anticoagulation and uncertain long-term results associated with mitral valve replacement.

  19. Growth of mitral annulus in the pediatric patient after suture annuloplasty of the entire posterior mitral annulus.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Takeshi; Huebler, Michael; Berger, Felix; Hetzer, Roland

    2009-08-01

    When mitral annuloplasty is performed in small children, room for annular growth should be allowed. However, it has not been reported how the valve develops after mitral annuloplasty of the entire posterior annulus. We report a case showing traces of annular growth at redo surgery. A female patient suffering from mitral valve insufficiency due to annular dilatation underwent modified Paneth plasty with Kay-Wooler commissural plication annuloplasty at the age of two years one month. In redo surgery 8.4 years after initial repair, enlargement of the commissural portion of the posterior annulus in addition to enlargement of the anterior leaflet and anterior annulus was observed. Modified Paneth plasty reinforced with a pericardial strip and Kay-Wooler annuloplasty of the posteromedial commissure were performed. Mitral orifice size measured with the Hegar dilator was 18 mm after the re-repair, increasing from 16 mm after the initial repair. Taking into account the normal mitral annulus diameter related to body surface area (BSA) of 16 mm at initial operation and 20 mm at redo surgery, the increase in mitral orifice size from 16 mm to 18 mm in this patient may be regarded as the annular growth in 8.4 years.

  20. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  1. Upgrades to OEDGE/DIVIMP for modeling the DIII-D W-rings experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, J. D.; Stangeby, P. C.; Ding, R.; Guterl, J.

    2016-10-01

    Several upgrades have recently been made to the OEDGE/DIVIMP interpretive code package to facilitate modeling of the tungsten rings experiments on DIII-D. OEDGE/DIVIMP can now import charge state resolved impurity fluxes and impact energies of an impurity from a previous run in order to more accurately simulate the source of a second impurity (e.g., C sputtering W). In addition, OEDGE now calculates the plasma potential based on integrating the parallel electric field calculated from Ohm's law. The radial and poloidal electric fields are calculated along with the resulting ExB drifts which are applied to the impurity transport. Finally, a new model for prompt redeposition has been implemented in OEDGE/DIVIMP and in addition, OEDGE/DIVIMP has been coupled to the 3D ERO code to model near target impurity losses due to the sheath electric field. Initial results applying these features to modeling measurements from the tungsten rings experiment are presented. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-04ER54578, DE-AC04-94AL85000, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Clinical and echocardiographic results of the Kalangos biodegradable tricuspid ring for moderate and severe functional tricuspid regurgitation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Goncu, Tugrul; Alur, Ihsan; Gucu, Arif; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Toktas, Faruk; Kahraman, Nail; Vural, Hakan; Yavuz, Senol

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Kalangos Biodegradable Tricuspid Ring (Kalangos Biodegradable Tricuspid Ring®, Bioring SA, Lonay, Switzerland) is a biodegradable prothesis in the treatment of functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR). In this study, we aimed to determine the clinical and echocardiographic results of this prosthesis for moderate and severe FTR treatment and compare this technique with the results of semicircular DeVega annuloplasty. Materials and methods: From January 2005 through January 2010 we retrospectively studied the data on 64 consecutive patients underwent annuloplasty procedures for FTR treatment. The patients were assigned to 2 groups: (1) Kalangos BTR annuloplasty was performed in 32 patients, and (2) Semicircular DeVega annuloplasty was performed in the 32 patients. All patients were evaluated clinically and by echocardiography preoperatively, at the end of the 1st week, 3rd and 6th month following surgery. Results: No complications related to the prosthesis or the procedures within the follow-up period were recorded. At the follow-up period, systolic pulmonary arterial pressure and tricuspid valve area diameter were found to be significantly lower than the preoperative values in both groups (p < 0.0001). At the follow-up period residual tricuspid regurgitation and the Tei index (Myocardial performance index) was significantly lower in group 1 compared to group 2 (p < 0.05). Three-quarters of the annuloplasty ring had degraded in the postoperative 6-months period. Discussion: We conclude that Kalangos BTR is an efficient and safe prosthesis with easy implantation technique for FTR treatment, with encouraging midterm results. PMID:25932243

  3. Aortic annuloplasty with aortic root reconstruction to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Richard A

    2006-07-01

    Part of the ongoing argument concerning patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) following aortic valve replacement (AVR) is due to the perception that aortic annulus enlargement procedures increase the risk and technical difficulty of aortic valve surgery. Here, an aortic root reconstruction that involves enlargement of the annulus and tailoring of the aortic root to accommodate larger stented prostheses is presented that has been personally performed in 196 patients with no technique-related surgical deaths or complications, and thus can be carried out without additional risk. This aortic root enlargement aortoplasty and annuloplasty method can be calibrated to all AVRs involving stented manufactured prostheses when these are deemed the prosthesis of choice for the patient with a relatively small annulus and/or aortic root, severe left ventricular hypertrophy, compromised LV function or a very active lifestyle, to achieve predicted EOA values > or = 1.00 cm2/m2.

  4. Recent results of the forward ring imaging Cherenkov detector of the DELPHI experiment at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Albrecht, E. ); Augustinus, A. )

    1994-08-01

    The Forward Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector covers both end-cap regions of the DELPHI experiment at LEP in the polar angel 15[degree] < [theta] < 35[degree] and 145[degree] < [theta] < 165[degree]. The detector combines a layer of liquid C[sub 6]F[sub 14] and a volume of gaseous C[sub 4]F[sub 10] into a single assembly. Ultraviolet photons from both radiators are converted in a single plane of photosensitive Time Projection Chambers. Identification of charged particles is provided for momenta up to 40 GeV/c. The design of the detector is briefly described. The detector is now fully installed in DELPHI and has participated in the 1993 data taking. The overall performance will be presented together with the expectations from Monte Carlo simulations. Results close to design values are obtained.

  5. The trigger system for the external target experiment in the HIRFL cooling storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jin-Xin; Lu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered over a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079003), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  6. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  7. De Vega annuloplasty for functional tricupsid regurgitation: concept of tricuspid valve orifice index to optimize tricuspid valve annular reduction.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ho Young; Chang, Hyoung Woo; Jeong, Dong Seop; Ahn, Hyuk

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated long-term results of De Vega annuloplasty measured by cylindrical sizers for functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) and analyzed the impact of measured annular size on the late recurrence of tricuspid valve regurgitation. Between 2001 and 2011, 177 patients (57.9±10.5 yr) underwent De Vega annuloplasty for FTR. Three cylindrical sizers (actual diameters of 29.5, 31.5, and 33.5 mm) were used to reproducibly reduce the tricuspid annulus. Long-term outcomes were evaluated and risk factor analyses for the recurrence of FTR ≥3+ were performed. Measured annular diameter indexed by patient's body surface area was included in the analyses as a possible risk factor. Operative mortality occurred in 8 patients (4.5%). Ten-year overall and cardiac death-free survivals were 80.5% and 90.8%, respectively. Five and 10-yr freedom rates from recurrent FTR were 96.5% and 93.1%, respectively. Cox proportional hazard model revealed that higher indexed annular size was the only risk factor for the recurrence of FTR (P=0.006). A minimal P value approach demonstrated that indexed annular diameter of 22.5 mm/m(2) was a cut-off value predicting the recurrence of FTR. De Vega annuloplasty for FTR results in low rates of recurrent FTR in the long-term. Tricuspid annulus should be reduced appropriately considering patients' body size to prevent recurrent FTR.

  8. Effects of soil aggregates on debris-flow mobilization: Results from ring-shear experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Neal R.; Mann, Janet E.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Rates and styles of landslide motion are sensitive to pore-water pressure changes caused by changes in soil porosity accompanying shear deformation. Soil may either contract or dilate upon shearing, depending upon whether its initial porosity is greater or less, respectively, than a critical-state porosity attained after sufficiently high strain. We observed complications in this behavior, however, during rate-controlled (0.02 m s−1) ring-shear experiments conducted on naturally aggregated dense loamy sand at low confining stresses (10.6 and 40 kPa). The aggregated soil first dilated and then contracted to porosities less than initial values, whereas the same soil with its aggregates destroyed monotonically dilated. We infer that aggregates persisted initially during shear and caused dilation before their eventual breakdown enabled net contraction. An implication of this contraction, demonstrated in experiments in which initial soil porosity was varied, is that the value of porosity distinguishing initially contractive from dilative behavior can be significantly larger than the critical-state porosity, which develops only after disaggregation ceases at high strains. In addition, post-dilative contraction may produce excess pore pressures, thereby reducing frictional strength and facilitating debris-flow mobilization. We infer that results of triaxial tests, which generally produce strains at least a factor of ∼ 4 smaller than those we observed at the inception of post-dilative contraction, do not allow soil contraction to be ruled out as a mechanism for debris-flow mobilization in dense soils containing aggregates.

  9. Vibration and aerodynamic buckling experiments for blunt truncated conical shells with ring-supported edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miserentino, R.; Dixon, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The vibration and buckling characteristics of a series of 140 deg ring-supported conical shells have been investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental results were obtained from 14 conical shells, each attached to a solid nose cap at the small end. The large (base) end was either free or attached to a solid ring of rectangular cross section. The size of the solid base rings of rectangular cross section was systematically varied to provide a wide range of edge restraint. Shell buckling was induced by aerodynamic loading at a Mach number of 3; the vibration data were obtained prior to the wind tunnel tests. The experimental vibration data indicated that the size of the base rings had a pronounced effect on the magnitude of the frequencies and on the frequency spectrum. For vibration modes having less than two circumferential waves, the frequencies descreased with increasing ring size; whereas, for modes with several circumferential waves, the frequencies initially increased rapidly with ring size and then became relatively insensitive to further increases in ring size. This latter behavior was similar to the trend exhibited by the variation of buckling pressure with ring size. The experimental results were in excellent qualitative agreement with theoretical results and indicated that current shell-of-revolution analyses are adequate for predicting the vibration and buckling behavior of ring-supported shells, at least for the simple isotropic shells considered in this investigation.

  10. Testing a new automated single ring infiltrometer for Beerkan infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Prima, Simone; Lassabatère, Laurent; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    The Beerkan method along with BEST algorithms is an alternative technique to conventional laboratory or field measurements for rapid and low-cost estimation of soil hydraulic properties. The Beerkan method is simple to conduct but requires an operator to pour known volumes of water through the ring and can be time-consuming. To alleviate this need, a new cheap infiltrometer equipped with a data acquisition system, allowing automation of Beerkan infiltration experiments, was recently designed and is presented in a companion paper. Yet, it has never been tested against a wide range of experimental conditions (soils, initial water saturation, etc.). In this paper, we tested the automated infiltrometer with the aim to validate its applicability to the Beerkan infiltration experiment under several experimental circumstances. In addition, we assessed the accuracy of BEST methods on the data obtained with the infiltrometer for the estimation of saturated soil hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity. For this purpose, we used both analytically generated and real experimental data. The analytically generated data simulate infiltration experiments carried out with the infiltrometer on five contrasting soils from UNSODA database and different initial water contents. The total volume of water to be infiltrated and the volume increments are fixed by the infiltrometer characteristics. Then, inverse analysis of the analytically generated data was performed using the three available BEST algorithms to derive saturated soil hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity that were compared to the reference values. The results of the analytical assessment showed that the infiltrometer along with BEST methods could lead to accurate estimates in most cases thus validating the design of the studied infiltrometer and its combination with BEST algorithms. Some soils (mostly loam) and some hydric conditions (high initial water contents) may lead to misestimate soil properties or failure of BEST

  11. Characterizing the DIII-D divertor conditions during the tungsten ring experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, J. L.; Watkins, J. G.; Wang, H. Q.; Nygren, R. E.; McLean, A.; Makowski, M.; Unterberg, E.; Thomas, D. M.; Guo, H. Y.; Guterl, J.; Buchenauer, B.

    2016-10-01

    Tungsten (W) is the leading divertor material in tokamaks, but the core W impurity fraction must be kept below 5 ×10-5 in a reactor. The DIII-D tokamak, having all graphite PFCs, has done a series of experiments with two W-coated molybdenum rings in the lower divertor to track W migration after plasma exposure. We characterize the divertor plasma conditions at the DIII-D target plate in L- and ELMing H-mode, and ELM suppressed plasmas. We will present data from an array of Langmuir probes in the divertor and divertor Thomson-scattering. We also compare the heat flux from fast thermocouples (7.5 mm below the surface of the metal tile inserts) and IRTV heat flux profiles from graphite tiles. The plasma conditions will be used to benchmark ERO modeling to aid in understanding the migration of sputtered W onto other plasma facing surfaces and will be compared to post exposure W distribution measured on the graphite tiles. Supported by US DOE under DE-AC04-94AL85000, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-000R22725, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Characterization and modeling of tungsten source during DIII-D tungsten ring experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterl, J.; Abrams, T.; Elder, D.; Guo, H. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Two tungsten toroidal rings in the DIII-D divertor region were recently exposed to H-mode plasmas. During these experiments, the gross erosion rate of tungsten was spectroscopically monitored for various ELMy H-mode conditions to characterize the tungsten source in the divertor region (see e.g.). However, only a small fraction of tungsten eroded particles eventually exits the divertor region because of the large tungsten local redeposition. Tungsten local redeposition and migration in the vicinity of the tungsten tiles are simulated using the ERO-OEDGE code package to link the effective tungsten source to the measured gross erosion rates between and during ELMs. It is shown that the energy and angular distributions of sputtered tungsten particles strongly affect the ratio of locally redeposited particles and thus the effective tungsten source. Effects of carbon deposition on tungsten tiles between ELMs on the tungsten erosion rate are also discussed. Preliminary studies of divertor screening on long-range tungsten transport in the SOL between ELMs are also presented. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-06OR23100 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  13. Two-dimensional finite-element analyses of simulated rotor-fragment impacts against rings and beams compared with experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stagliano, T. R.; Witmer, E. A.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Finite element modeling alternatives as well as the utility and limitations of the two dimensional structural response computer code CIVM-JET 4B for predicting the transient, large deflection, elastic plastic, structural responses of two dimensional beam and/or ring structures which are subjected to rigid fragment impact were investigated. The applicability of the CIVM-JET 4B analysis and code for the prediction of steel containment ring response to impact by complex deformable fragments from a trihub burst of a T58 turbine rotor was studied. Dimensional analysis considerations were used in a parametric examination of data from engine rotor burst containment experiments and data from sphere beam impact experiments. The use of the CIVM-JET 4B computer code for making parametric structural response studies on both fragment-containment structure and fragment-deflector structure was illustrated. Modifications to the analysis/computation procedure were developed to alleviate restrictions.

  14. Generation of ultrashort coherent vacuum ultraviolet pulses using electron storage rings: a new bright light source for experiments.

    PubMed

    De Ninno, G; Allaria, E; Coreno, M; Curbis, F; Danailov, M B; Karantzoulis, E; Locatelli, A; Menteş, T O; Nino, M A; Spezzani, C; Trovò, M

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seeded harmonic generation on electron storage rings can produce coherent optical pulses in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range. The experiment is performed at Elettra, where coherent pulses are generated at 132 nm, with a duration of about 100 fs. The light source has a repetition rate of 1 kHz and adjustable polarization; it is very bright, with a peak power several orders of magnitude above that of spontaneous synchrotron radiation. Owing to high stability, the source is used in a test photoemission electron microscopy experiment. We anticipate that seeded harmonic generation on storage rings can lead to unprecedented developments in time-resolved femtosecond spectroscopy and microscopy.

  15. Comparison of DNS Determination of the Dynamics of Vortex Rings in Viscous Fluids and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Hershberger, Robert

    2009-11-01

    We have been studying vortex rings in water for some time [1] and recently became aware of an important paper studying vortex rings by direct numerical simulation (DNS) from Coleman's group at Southampton [2]. There is clearly much to be learned from a comparison of the results in [1] and [2]. The first insight is a comparison of slowing vortex rings, where we find quite similar decay rates at comparable Reynolds numbers. A second insight is gained by noting that they find a time t* needs to elapse before the core adjusts to its vorticity distribution. We find photographically that the ring needs to propagate at least one gun diameter before it adjusts its vorticity. A third insight is that the rings in Fig. 5(b) of [2] do not change much in radius, consistent with the results in Table 2 of our paper [1]. The talk will cover more recent comparisons of the two works including observations of the growth of vortex waves.[4pt] [1] I. S. Sullivan, J. J. Niemela, R. Hershberger, D. Bolster and R. J. Donnelly, J. Fluid Mech. 609 319 (2008).[0pt] [2] P. J. Archer, T. G. Thomas and G. N. Coleman, J. Fluid Mech.598 201 (2008).

  16. Should Tricuspid Annuloplasty be Performed With Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Pulmonary Regurgitation in Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot?

    PubMed

    Kurkluoglu, Mustafa; John, Anitha S; Cross, Russell; Chung, David; Yerebakan, Can; Zurakowski, David; Jonas, Richard A; Sinha, Pranava

    2015-01-01

    Indications for prophylactic tricuspid annuloplasty in patients with pulmonary regurgitation (PR) after tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair are unclear and often extrapolated from acquired functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) data in adults, where despite correction of primary left heart pathology, progressive tricuspid annular dilation is noted beyond a threshold diameter >4 cm (21 mm/m(2)). We hypothesized that unlike in adult functional TR, in pure volume-overload conditions such as patients with PR after TOF, the tricuspid valve size is likely to regress after pulmonary valve replacement (PVR). A total of 43 consecutive patients who underwent PVR from 2005 until 2012 at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Absolute and indexed tricuspid annulus diameters (TADs), tricuspid annulus Z-scores, grade of TR along with right ventricular size, and function indices were recorded before and after PVR. Preoperative and postoperative echocardiographic data were available in all patients. A higher tricuspid valve Z-score correlated with greater TR both preoperatively (P = 0.005) and postoperatively (P = 0.02). Overall reductions in the absolute and indexed TAD and tricuspid valve Z-scores were seen postoperatively, with greater absolute as well as percentage reduction seen with larger preoperative TAD index (P = 0.007) and higher tricuspid annulus Z-scores (P = 0.06). In pure volume-overload conditions such as patients with PR after TOF, reduction in the tricuspid valve size is seen after PVR. Concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty should not be considered based on tricuspid annular dilation alone.

  17. First atomic physics experiments with cooled stored ion beams at the Heidelberg heavy-ion ring TSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Balykin, V.; Baumann, W.; Berger, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Blatt, P.; Blum, M.; Faulstich, A.; Friedrich, A.; Gerhard, M.; Geyer, C.; Grieser, M.; Grieser, R.; Habs, D.; Heyng, H.W.; Hochadel, B.; Holzer, B.; Huber, G.; Jaeschke, E.; Jung, M.; Karafillidis, A.; Kilgus, G.; Klein, R.; Kraemer, D.; Krause, P.; Krieg, M.; Kuehl, T.; Matl, K.; Mueller, A.; Music, M.; Neumann, R.; Neureither, G.; Ott, W.; Petrich, W.; Povh, B.; Repnow, R.; Schroeder, S.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Sigray, P.; Steck, M.; Stokstad, R.; Szmola, E.; Wagner, M.; Wanner, B.; Welti, K.; Zwickler, S. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg Manne Siegbahn Institute , Stockholm Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung , Darmstadt (Fed

    1990-06-01

    An overview of atomic physics experiments at the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) is given. Highly charged ions up to fully stripped silicon have been stored at energies between 4 and 12 MeV/u. The enhancement of the beam intensity by stacking, the beam lifetime, and electron cooling of these ion beams are discussed. Radiative and state-selective dielectronic recombination rates of hydrogen-like oxygen ions with free electrons from the electron cooler were measured. Beam noise spectra are being investigated with regard to collective effects caused by the Coulomb interaction in the cold ion beams. Resonance fluorescence from stored single-charged ions was observed using tunable narrow-band lasers. First indications of laser cooling in a storage ring were seen.

  18. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  19. Inguinal hernia: preperitoneal placement of a memory-ring patch by anterior approach. Preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Pélissier, E P

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to set up and evaluate a technique allowing, by the mean of a memory ring, easy placement of the patch in the preperitoneal space (PPS), directly via the hernia orifice, so as to associate the advantages of the preperitoneal patch, anterior approach and minimally invasive surgery. The memory-ring patch was made by basting a PDS cord around a 14 x 7.5 cm oval shaped polypropylene mesh. The hernia sac was dissected, blunt dissection of the PPS was carried out through the hernia orifice and the patch was introduced in the PPS via the orifice. Spreading of the patch in the PPS was facilitated by the memory-ring. One hundred and twenty nine hernias, classified as Nyhus Type IIIa, IIIb and IV, were operated on 126 patients; 11 were big pantaloon or sliding hernias. The anesthesia was spinal in 116 cases and local in 10 cases. There were three benign postoperative complications (2.3%) related to the hernia repair. Ninety six percent of the patients were evaluated with a mean follow up of 24.5 months (12-42). Two recurrences (1.6%) occurred, 7 patients (5.6%) felt some degree of light pain, but not any case of disabling pain was observed. This technique offers many advantages. It is tension-free and almost sutureless. The patch is placed in the PPS through the hernia orifice without any remote opening in the abdominal wall. The patch applied directly to the deep surface of the fascia reinforces the weak inguinal area by restoring the normal anatomic disposition. The good preliminary results are encouraging and justify further randomized evaluation.

  20. Operating experience with high beam currents and transient beam loading in the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.G.; Akre, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    During the 1994 SLC run the nominal operating intensity in the damping rings was raised from 3.5 {times} 10{sup 10} to greater than 4 {times} 10{sup 10} particles per bunch (ppb). Stricter regulation of rf system parameters was required to maintain stability of the rf system and particle beam. Improvements were made in the feedback loops which control the cavity amplitude and loading angles. Compensation for beam loading was also required to prevent klystron saturation during repetition rate changes. To minimize the effects of transient loading on the rf system, the gain of the direct rf feedback loop and the loading angles were optimized.

  1. Experiments with Longitudinally Polarized Electrons in a Storage Ring Using a Siberian Snake

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. Poolman; D. J. Boersma; M. Harvey; Douglas W. Higinbotham; I. Passchier; E. Six; Ricardo Alarcon; P. W. van Amersfoort; Th. S. Bauer; H. Boer Rookhuizen; J. F. J. van den Brand; L. D. van Buuren; H. J. Bulten; Rolf Ent; M. Ferro-Luzzi; D. G. Geurts; Peter Heimberg; Kees de Jager; P. Klimin; I. Koop; F. Kroes; J. van der Laan; G. Luijckx; A. Lysenko; B. Militsyn; I. Nesterenko; J. Noomen; Blaine Norum; M. J. J. van den Putte; Yu. Shatunov; J. J. M. Steijger; D. Szczerba; H. de Vries

    2000-04-24

    We report on first measurements with polarized electrons stored in a medium-energy ring and with a polarized internal target. Polarized electrons were injected at 442 MeV (653 MeV), and a partial (full) Siberian snake was employed to preserve the polarization. Longitudinal polarization at the interaction point and polarization lifetime of the stored electrons were determined with laser backscattering. Spin observables were measured for electrodisintegration of polarized {sup 3}He, with simultaneous detection of scattered electrons, protons, neutrons, deuterons, and {sup 3}He nuclei, over a large phase space.

  2. Measurement of Ring Strain Using Butanols: A Physical Chemistry Lab Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William R.; Davidson, Ada S.; Ball, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a bomb calorimeter experiment and subsequent calculations aimed at determining the strain energy of the cyclobutane backbone are described. Students use several butanol isomers instead of the parent hydrocarbons, and they manipulate liquids instead of gases, which makes the experiment much easier to perform. Experiments show that…

  3. Recent experience with inductive insert at the proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.-Y; Griffin, J. E.; Wildman, D.; Popovic, M.; Browman, A. A.; Fitzgerald, D. H.; Macek, R. J.; Plum, M. A.; Spickermann, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    In a Fermilab-Los Alamos collaboration, inductances constructed of ferrite cores sufficient to cancel a large fraction of the space charge potential-well distortion were installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) as one means of raising the threshold for the two-stream e-p instability. When operating at higher intensities and with sufficient inductance added for full space-charge compensation, an unacceptable longitudinal self-bunching, microwavelike, instability was encountered. Heating the cores to N 130 C proved to be an effective cure, and was found to be a means for tuning the inductance over a limited but useful range. The heated inductors were an essential ingredient in achieving a record accumulation of 9.7 pC/pulse. An engineered version of the inductors is now installed for routine operation of the PSR. A summary of the inductor characteristics, theory of operation, experimental results, and interpretation will be presented.

  4. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in children using the percutaneous internal ring suturing technique – own experience

    PubMed Central

    Patkowski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Percutaneous internal ring suturing (PIRS) is a method of laparoscopic herniorrhaphy, i.e. percutaneous closure of the internal inguinal ring under the control of a telescope placed in the umbilicus. Aim To evaluate the usefulness of the PIRS technique. Material and methods Fifty-five children (39 girls and 16 boys) underwent surgery using this method in our institution between 2008 and 2010. Results In 10 cases the presence of an open inguinal canal on the opposite side was also noted during surgery, and umbilical hernia was recognized in 2 patients. In 5 cases it was necessary to convert to the open surgery because of the inability to continue the laparoscopic procedure. In 1 case, male pseudohermaphroditism was diagnosed during surgery. Recurrent inguinal hernia required a conventional method of surgery in 1 child. Other children did not exhibit the characteristics of hernia recurrence. The inguinal canals were followed up with postoperative ultrasound examination in 29 children. In 23 children, the ultrasound examination showed no dilatation of the inguinal canal. In the other 6 children dilatation of the inguinal canal or the presence of fluid within the inguinal canal was observed during ultrasound. In 6 children symptoms such as swelling and soreness around the inguinal canal developed within 3 to 6 months after surgery. Conclusions Inguinal hernia surgery using the PIRS procedure is an alternative, effective, minimally invasive method of surgery. Visualization of the peritoneal cavity allows for detection of other abnormalities, as well as for performing other procedures during the same session (such as closing the contralateral inguinal canal or umbilical hernia surgery). PMID:24729810

  5. News and Views: The brightest thing for 7.4 billion light years; Experiment starts; MAGIC accident; Last service for HST; Cassini collects rings, ring arcs and moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    March this year saw a gamma-ray burst 100 times brighter than any observed. Its unusual brightness, enough to make it a naked-eye object, arose because the beam of radiation was directed towards Earth, making it magnitude 5.3 at its peak - not bad for something halfway across the universe! Cassini continues to explore Saturn and its satellites by looking more closely at the moons and confirming that some of them have partial rings: clumps of ring material moving with them in orbit.

  6. Beam experiments in the extreme space-charge limit on the University of Maryland Electron Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Li, H.; Godlove, T.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Walter, M.; Zou, Y.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2004-05-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), designed for transport studies of space-charge dominated beams in a strong focusing lattice, is nearing completion. UMER models, for example, the recirculator accelerator envisioned as a possible driver for heavy-ion inertial fusion. The UMER lattice will consist of 36 alternating-focusing (FODO) periods over an 11.5 m circumference. The main diagnostics are phosphor screens and capacitive beam position monitors placed at the center of each 20° bending section. In addition, pepper-pot and slit-wire emittance meters are in operation. We present experimental results for three cases of strong space-charge dominated transport (7.2, 24, and 85 mA, at 10 keV) and contrast them with one case in the emittance-dominated regime (0.6 mA at 10 keV). With focusing given by σ0=76°, the zero-current betatron phase advance per period, the range of currents corresponds to a space-charge tune depression of 0.2 to 0.8. This range is unprecedented for a circular machine. The beam physics over three transport distances is considered: at or near the source, over the length of the matching section (about 1 m), and single turn (10 m). Issues associated with beam characterization, scaling of various parameters, alignment, and envelope matching are discussed.

  7. Ring of Silence: African American Women's Experiences Related to Their Breasts and Breast Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore women's memories and feelings concerning their breasts and breast cancer screening experiences in relation to their current breast cancer screening behaviors. Twelve African American women shared stories that were generated in written narratives and individual interviews. Two core themes emerged from the…

  8. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness.

  9. Simulations and Experiments of Beam-Beam Effects in e+e- Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Seeman, J.; Kozanecki, W.; Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-05-16

    Over the past decade, extensive simulations of beam-beam effects in e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, based on the particle-in-cell method, were developed to explain many complex experimental observations. Recently, such simulations were used to predict the future luminosity performance of e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Some predictions have been proven to be correct in the existing accelerators. In this paper, many effects such as the beam-beam limit, crossing angle, parasitic collisions, betatron spectrum, and the beam-beam lifetime, will be directly compared between simulations and experiments.

  10. Nobel Chemistry in the Laboratory: Synthesis of a Ruthenium Catalyst for Ring-Closing Olefin Metathesis--An Experiment for the Advanced Inorganic or Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greco, George E.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment for the upper-level undergraduate laboratory is described in which students synthesize a ruthenium olefin metathesis catalyst, then use the catalyst to carry out the ring-closing metathesis of diethyl diallylmalonate. The olefin metathesis reaction was the subject of the 2005 Nobel Prize in chemistry. The catalyst chosen for this…

  11. Beam Experiments in the Extreme Space-Charge Limit on the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Santiago

    2003-10-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), designed for transport studies of space-charge dominated beams in a strong focusing lattice, is nearing completion. UMER models, for example, the recirculator machine envisioned as a possible driver for heavy-ion inertial fusion. The UMER lattice consists of 36 FODO periods over an 11.5 m circumference. The main diagnostics are phosphor screens and capacitive beam position monitors placed at the center of each bending section. In addition, pepper-pot and slit-wire emittance meters are in operation. We describe experiments for two cases of extreme space-charge dominated transport (24 and 85 mA, at 10 keV.) and compare the results with studies in the emittance-dominated regime (0.6 mA at 10 keV.) With focusing given by σ_0=76^0, the zero-current betatron phase advance per period, the range of currents corresponds to tune depressions of 0.2 to 0.8. This range is unprecedented for a circular machine. The beam physics over three transport distances is considered: at or near the source, over the length of the matching section (about one-meter) and single-turn (10 m.) Issues associated with beam characterization, scaling of various parameters, alignment and envelope matching are discussed.

  12. A new data acquisition system for Schottky signals in atomic physics experiments at GSI's and FAIR's storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trageser, C.; Brandau, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Müller, A.; Nolden, F.; Sanjari, S.; Stöhlker, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new continuous and broadband data acquisition system for measurements of Schottky-signals of ions revolving in a storage ring has been implemented. This set-up is capable of recording the radio frequency (RF) signal of the ions that circulate in the storage ring with a sustained acquisition rate of more than 3.5× {10}7 IQ-samples per second. This allows several harmonics of the full momentum acceptance of a storage ring to be measured at the same time. The RF signal analyzer modules are complemented by further electronic modules such as counters, precision clocks and synchronization modules that facilitate a seamless integration with main experimental data acquisitions for atomic and nuclear physics. In this contribution, the setup and first results from a test run at the experimental storage ring at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, are presented.

  13. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  14. Design, fabrication and characterization of multi-guard-ring furnished p+n-n+ silicon strip detectors for future HEP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalwani, Kavita; Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Si detectors, in various configurations (strips and pixels), have been playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their excellent vertexing and high precision tracking information. In future HEP experiments like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN and the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), the Si tracking detectors will be operated in a very harsh radiation environment, which leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors which in turn changes their electrical properties, i.e. change in the full depletion voltage, increase in the leakage current and decrease in the charge collection efficiency. In order to achieve the long term durability of Si-detectors in future HEP experiments, it is required to operate these detectors at very high reverse biases, beyond the full depletion voltage, thus requiring higher detector breakdown voltage. Delhi University (DU) is involved in the design, fabrication and characterization of multi-guard-ring furnished ac-coupled, single sided, p+n-n+ Si strip detectors for future HEP experiments. The design has been optimized using a two-dimensional numerical device simulation program (TCAD-Silvaco). The Si strip detectors are fabricated with eight-layers mask process using the planar fabrication technology by Bharat Electronic Lab (BEL), India. Further an electrical characterization set-up is established at DU to ensure the quality performance of fabricated Si strip detectors and test structures. In this work measurement results on non irradiated Si Strip detectors and test structures with multi-guard-rings using Current Voltage (IV) and Capacitance Voltage (CV) characterization set-ups are discussed. The effect of various design parameters, for example guard-ring spacing, number of guard-rings and metal overhang on breakdown voltage of test structures have been studied.

  15. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  16. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  17. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  18. GPU-based low-level trigger system for the standalone reconstruction of the ring-shaped hit patterns in the RICH Cherenkov detector of NA62 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cretaro, P.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-03-01

    This project aims to exploit the parallel computing power of a commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to implement fast pattern matching in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for the level 0 (L0) trigger of the NA62 experiment. In this approach, the ring-fitting algorithm is seedless, being fed with raw RICH data, with no previous information on the ring position from other detectors. Moreover, since the L0 trigger is provided with a more elaborated information than a simple multiplicity number, it results in a higher selection power. Two methods have been studied in order to reduce the data transfer latency from the readout boards of the detector to the GPU, i.e., the use of a dedicated NIC device driver with very low latency and a direct data transfer protocol from a custom FPGA-based NIC to the GPU. The performance of the system, developed through the FPGA approach, for multi-ring Cherenkov online reconstruction obtained during the NA62 physics runs is presented.

  19. Ring closure in actin polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  20. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  1. Aromatic Ring Currents Illustrated--NMR Spectra of Tin(IV) Porphyrin Complexes. An Advanced Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Dennis P.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts to show that in the closed loops of cyclic structures the protons situated in conic regions above and below the ring will be shielded. Uses the diamagnetic and air stable octahedral tin(IV) complexes of porphyrins for study. Notes complexes crystallize easily and offer spectacular purple colors. (MVL)

  2. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  3. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  4. Study of Mn dissolution from LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel electrodes using rotating ring-disk collection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li-Fang; Ou, Chin-Ching; Striebel, Kathryn A.; Chen, Jenn-Shing

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this research was to measure Mn dissolution from a thin porous spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode by rotating ring-disk collection experiments. The amount of Mn dissolution from the spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode under various conditions was detected by potential step chronoamperometry. The concentration of dissolved Mn was found to increase with increasing cycle numbers and elevated temperature. The dissolved Mn was not dependent on disk rotation speed, which indicated that the Mn dissolution from the disk was under reaction control. The in situ monitoring of Mn dissolution from the spinel was carried out under various conditions. The ring currents exhibited maxima corresponding to the end-of-charge (EOC) and end-of-discharge (EOD), with the largest peak at EOC. The results suggest that the dissolution of Mn from spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} occurs during charge/discharge cycling, especially in a charged state (at >4.1 V) and in a discharged state (at <3.1 V). The largest peak at EOC demonstrated that Mn dissolution took place mainly at the top of charge. At elevated temperatures, the ring cathodic currents were larger due to the increase of Mn dissolution rate.

  5. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  6. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks: Free shrinkage tests, restrained ring tests, construction experience, and crack survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiqiu

    2011-12-01

    The development, construction, and evaluation of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks are described based on laboratory test results and experiences gained during the construction of 13 LC-HPC bridge decks in Kansas, along with another deck bid under the LC-HPC specifications but for which the owner did not enforce the specification. This study is divided into four parts covering (1) an evaluation of the free shrinkage properties of LC-HPC candidate mixtures, (2) an investigation of the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete, (3) a study of the restrained shrinkage performance of concrete using restrained ring tests, and (4) a description of the construction and preliminary evaluation of LC-HPC and control bridge decks constructed in Kansas. The first portion of the study involves evaluating the effects of the duration of curing, fly ash, and a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) on the free-shrinkage characteristics of concrete mixtures. The results indicate that an increase of curing period reduces free shrinkage. With 7 days of curing, concretes containing fly ash as a partial replacement for cement exhibit higher free shrinkage than concretes with 100% portland cement. When the curing period is increased to 14, 28, and 56 days, the adverse effect of adding fly ash on free shrinkage is minimized and finally reversed. The addition of an SRA significantly reduces free shrinkage for both the 100% portland cement mixture and the mixture containing fly ash. The second portion of the study investigates the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete. A linear relationship between free shrinkage and evaporable water content in the cement paste is observed. For a given mixture, specimens cured for a longer period contain less evaporable water and exhibit lower free shrinkage and less weight loss in the free shrinkage

  7. Meaning-making matters in product design: Users’ sensory perceptions and experience evaluations of long-acting vaginal gels and intravaginal rings

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rochelle K.; van den Berg, Jacob J.; Vargas, Sara E.; Senocak, Natali; Shaw, Julia G.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Smith, Kelley Alison; Guthrie, Kate Morrow

    2015-01-01

    Objective Users’ sensory perceptions and experiences (USPEs) of intravaginal products can inform acceptability and adherence. Focusing on the meanings women derive from formulation/device characteristics facilitates developers’ design iterations toward optimizing user experience. We investigated how users of long acting gels and intravaginal rings (IVRs) impute meaning to characteristics that may affect future product use. Study Design Focus groups were conducted with contraceptive IVR and vaginal lubricant users. Current perceptibility science and historical theory on the cultural acceptability of fertility regulating methods informed the analysis. Results 21 IVR users and 29 lubricant users attended focus groups in which they manipulated products in their hands and discussed reactions to product characteristics. Participants used prior product experiences, and sensory perceptions of prototype manipulations, to inform meanings about product properties and performance for pregnancy, disease prevention, comfort, and perceived efficacy. The meanings derived from product characteristics depended on why the product would be used; a characteristic deemed problematic in one risk context may be considered preferable in another. Conclusions Intravaginal product users create narratives that ascribe influence or causality to product characteristics. These meanings, whether correct or incorrect biologically, will shape vaginal product acceptability, use, and effectiveness. Implications Long-acting, and sustained-release, drug delivery systems will be part of the multipurpose prevention continuum. Developers must consider how sensory experiences and culturally salient assumptions shape the meanings users make of product design characteristics. Those meanings will ultimately impact use and effectiveness. PMID:26276246

  8. A DFT investigation of base-catalyzed β-elimination reactions in water solution for systems activated by the pyridine ring: Theory vs. experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosconi, Edoardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Alunni, Sergio; Sgamellotti, Antonio

    2008-07-01

    We report a theoretical investigation of β-elimination reactions in systems activated by the pyridine ring. The investigated reaction, the acetohydroxamate-induced β-elimination in protonated N-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]quinuclidinium, offers a unique opportunity to test computational methodologies since detailed kinetic experimental data are available. We calculated the p Kas of the acetohydroxamic acid and the substrate and thoroughly characterized the reactive free-energy profile. The reaction proceeds via a stable carbanion intermediate. Except a discrepancy in the reproduction of the p Ka of the acetohydroxamic acid, the calculated free-energy profile is in excellent agreement with the experiment, showing the general reliability of the present approach.

  9. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  10. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  11. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  12. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  13. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  14. Extending the applicability of an open-ring trap to perform experiments with a single laser-cooled ion

    SciTech Connect

    Cornejo, J. M.; Colombano, M.; Doménech, J.; Rodríguez, D.; Block, M.; Delahaye, P.

    2015-10-15

    A special ion trap was initially built up to perform β-ν correlation experiments with radioactive ions. The trap geometry is also well suited to perform experiments with laser-cooled ions, serving for the development of a new type of Penning trap, in the framework of the project TRAPSENSOR at the University of Granada. The goal of this project is to use a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion as detector for single-ion mass spectrometry. Within this project and without any modification to the initial electrode configuration, it was possible to perform Doppler cooling on {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions, starting from large clouds and reaching single ion sensitivity. This new feature of the trap might be important also for other experiments with ions produced at radioactive ion beam facilities. In this publication, the trap and the laser system will be described, together with their performance with respect to laser cooling applied to large ion clouds down to a single ion.

  15. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  16. The Phase Shift in the Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2008-01-01

    The popular physics demonstration experiment known as Thomson's Jumping Ring (JR) has been variously explained as a simple example of Lenz's law, or as the result of a phase shift of the ring current relative to the induced emf. The failure of the first-quadrant Lenz's law explanation is shown by the time the ring takes to jump and by levitation.…

  17. Kayser-Fleischer Rings

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know about Wilson Disease Kayser-Fleischer Rings Definition Kayser-Fleischer Ring: Clinical sign. Brownish-yellow ring ... Diet & Nutrition Kayser-Fleischer Rings Wilson Disease FAQs Definitions Transplantation For Patients & Families Resources Membership Events Centers ...

  18. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~<500m in size) have been indirectly identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring. In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We show evidence that B ring seems to harbor two distinct populations of propellers: "big" propellers covering tens of degrees in azimuth situated in the densest part of B ring, and "small" propellers in less dense inner B ring that are similar in size and shape to known A ring propellers. The population of "big" propellers is exemplified with a single object which is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe this feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at r=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B

  19. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  20. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  1. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  2. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  3. Water-rock interactions at >100°C in Enceladus inferred from hydrothermal experiments and silica particles in E-ring grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.; Postberg, F.; Hsu, S.; Suzuki, K.; Kuwatani, T.; Masaki, Y.; Tachibana, S.

    2013-12-01

    A plume of vapour and water ice particles rich in sodium salts erupting from warm fractures near the south pole of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus suggest the presence of a liquid-water reservoir in the interior (Porco et al., 2005; Postberg et al., 2009; 2011). Cassini's findings of silica nanoparticles in the E-ring originating from the plumes imply active geochemistry involving hydrothermal water-rock interactions in Enceladus' interior (Hsu et al., 2013). However, the particular conditions of temperature and mineral compositions that can sustain the formation of silica inside Enceladus are yet unconstrained. In the present study, we conducted laboratory experiments and numerical calculations of hydrothermal reactions to understand the conditions of water-rock interactions occurring in Enceladus. In the experiments, we used aqueous solution of NH3 and NaHCO3 as starting solution to simulate Enceladus' ocean (Waite et al., 2009; Postberg et al., 2009; 2011). Olivine and orthopyroxene were used as starting minerals. The temperature and pressure conditions were 200-400°C and 400 bar, respectively. Our experimental results suggest that to achieve silica concentrations in the fluids sufficient for the formation of colloidal silica nanoparticles, hydrous silicates of Enceladus' core would be composed mainly of serpentine and saponite/talc, consistent with a chondritic composition of its rocky core. Fluid temperature needs to reach ≥ ~100°C. Our experimental results also suggest that decomposition of primordial NH3 to N2 would have been kinetically inhibited even at high temperatures. These results support the idea that deep hydrothermal circulation in a warm core drives hotspots in the ice mantle, possibly causing large tidal dissipation and melting beneath the south-pole region (Collins et al., 2007; Tobie et al., 2008). Furthermore, to achieve such high temperatures in Enceladus in geologically recent past, Enceladus might have formed in ~3-5 Myrs after the CAIs

  4. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  5. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a

  6. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  7. Future plans for the small isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev

    2005-05-01

    The Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) has been operational at Michigan State University since December 2003. It has been used for experimental studies of the beam dynamics in high-intensity isochronous cyclotrons and synchrotrons at the transition energy. Operational experience with SIR has demonstrated that the ring can be successfully used to study space charge effects in accelerators. The low velocity of beam particles in the ring allowed longitudinal profile measurements with an accuracy that would be difficult to achieve in full-size accelerators. The experimental data obtained in the ring was used for validation of the multi-particle, space-charge codes CYCO and WARP3D. Encouraged by the success of SIR in the isochronous regime, we consider options for expanding the scope of the beam physics studied in the ring. In this paper, we outline possible future experiments and discuss required modifications of the ring optics and hardware.

  8. Researches on the Piston Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehihara, Keikiti

    1944-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, steam engines, air compressors, and so forth, the piston ring plays an important role. Especially, the recent development of Diesel engines which require a high compression pressure for their working, makes, nowadays, the packing action of the piston ring far more important than ever. Though a number of papers have been published in regard to researches on the problem of the piston ring, none has yet dealt with an exact measurement of pressure exerted on the cylinder wall at any given point of the ring. The only paper that can be traced on this subject so far is Mr. Nakagawa's report on the determination of the relative distribution of pressure on the cylinder wall, but the measuring method adopted therein appears to need further consideration. No exact idea has yet been obtained as to how the obturation of gas between the piston and cylinder, the frictional resistance of the piston, and the wear of the cylinder wall are affected by the intensity and the distribution of the radial pressure of the piston ring. Consequently, the author has endeavored, by employing an apparatus of his own invention, to get an exact determination of the pressure distribution of the piston ring. By means of a newly devised ring tester, to which piezoelectricity of quartz was applied, the distribution of the radial pressure of many sample rings on the market was accurately determined. Since many famous piston rings show very irregular pressure distribution, the author investigated and achieved a manufacturing process of the piston ring which will exert uniform pressure on the cylinder wall. Temperature effects on the configuration and on the mean spring power have also been studied. Further, the tests were performed to ascertain how the gas tightness of the piston ring may be affected by the number or spring power. The researches as to the frictional resistance between the piston ring and the cylinder wall were carried out, too. The procedure of study, and

  9. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  10. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  11. Storage rings, internal targets and PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1986-11-01

    Storage rings with internal targets are described, using PEP as an example. The difference between electrons and heavier particles such as protons, antiprotons, and heavy ions is also discussed because it raises possibilities of bypass insertions for more exotic experiments. PEP is compared to other rings in various contexts to verify the assertion that it is an ideal ring for many fundamental and practical applications that can be carried on simultaneously. (LEW)

  12. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  13. Design and experiment of 4H-SiC JBS diodes achieving a near-theoretical breakdown voltage with non-uniform floating limiting rings terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hao; Song, Qingwen; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yimeng; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a 4H-SiC Junction Barrier Schottky diode (JBS) with non-uniform floating limiting rings (FLRs) has been investigated and fabricated using n type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer with thickness of 31 μm and doping concentration of 3.3 × 1015 cm-3. According to the simulated results, the key parameters of a FLRs design to achieve a high voltage are the minimum space between two adjacent doped rings, spacing growth step and number of rings. The experimental results also show a great agreement with simulated results. Meanwhile, a near-ideal breakdown voltage of 3.7 kV was achieved, which yield around 95% of the parallel-plane breakdown voltage. The forward characteristics show that the fabricated JBS diodes have a forward current density of 210 A/cm2 at 3 V and a specific on-resistance (Rsp-on) of 7.58 mΩ cm2. Different FLRs parameters have no effect on the forward device performance.

  14. Status of the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.M.; Davies-White, W.A.; Delahaye, J.P.; Fieguth, T.H.; Hofmann, A.; Jager, J.; Kloeppel, P.K.; Lee, M.J.; Linebarger, W.A.; Rivkin, L.

    1985-06-01

    Electron beams of full design energy 1.21 GeV and nearly full design intensity 4 x 10/sup 10/ particles/pulse (design 5 x 10/sup 10/) have been extracted from the Stanford Linac and successfully stored in the electron damping ring. Beams of less intensity have been extracted from the ring and reinjected into the Linac. The present intensity limits are not thought to be fundamental. The operating experience with the electron ring and the status of the construction of the positron ring will be discussed. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Present and future of scientific bird ringing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spina, F.; Tautin, J.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    In 1999 scientific bird ringing will celebrate its first century of existence. Started mainly to investigate bird movements, bird ringing has become a much more flexible method to study different aspects of bird biology. Bird ringing can only be properly organised if an effective international co-operation exists. In Europe, this co-ordination is ensured by EURING, made of 35 national ringing centres; sister organisations exist in other parts of the world (like Africa, Australia, U.S. and Canada), sharing the same aims and problems. This RTD is mainly targeted to ornithologists involved with the co-ordination of bird ringing stations and national centres world-wide. Common aspects of the organisation of ringing activities, as well as of the potential ringing has and will have in the future in addressing major scientific questions in Ornithology will be taken into account. The advisability of setting up a standing committee on bird ringing within the IOC will be discussed, and the project of creating a world-wide organisation of ringing schemes in order to further improve communication and exchange of experiences will also be addressed. This new organisation would be formally founded in 1999, when an international conference organised by EURING to celebrate the first 100 years of bird ringing will be held in Denmark.

  16. Present and future of scientific bird ringing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spina, F.; Tautin, J.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    In 1999 scientific bird ringing will celebrate its first century of existence. Started mainly to investigate bird movements, bird ringing has become a much more flexible method to study different aspects of bird biology. Bird ringing can only be properly organised if an effective international co-operation exists. In Europe, this co-ordination is ensured by EURING, made of 35 national ringing centres; sister organisations exist in other parts of the world (like Africa, Australia, U.S. and Canada), sharing the same aims and problems. This RTD is mainly targeted to ornithologists involved with the co-ordination of bird ringing stations and national centres world-wide. Common aspects of the organisation of ringing activities, as well as of the potential ringing has and will have in the future in addressing major scientific questions in Ornithology will be taken into account. The advisability of setting up a standing committee on bird ringing within the IOC will be discussed, and the project of creating a world-wide organisation of ringing schemes in order to further improve communication and exchange of experiences will also be addressed. This new organisation would be formally founded in 1999, when an international conference organised by EURING to celebrate the first 100 years of bird ringing will be held in Denmark.

  17. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  18. Moonlets wandering on a leash-ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, O. C.; Mourão, D. C.; Giuliatti Winter, S. M.; Spahn, F.; da Cruz, C.

    2007-09-01

    Since the Voyager flybys, embedded moonlets have been proposed to explain some of the surprising structures observed in Saturn's narrow F ring. Experiments conducted with the Cassini spacecraft support this suggestion. Images of the F ring show bright compact spots, and seven occultations of stars by the F ring, monitored by ultraviolet and infrared experiments, revealed nine events of high optical depth. These results point to a large number of such objects, but it is not clear whether they are solid moonlets or rather loose particle aggregates. Subsequent images suggested an irregular motion of these objects so that a determination of their orbits consistent with the F ring failed. Some of these features seem to cross the whole ring. Here we show that these observations are explained by chaos in the F ring driven mainly by the `shepherd' moons Prometheus and Pandora. It is characterized by a rather short Lyapunov time of about a few hundred orbital periods. Despite this chaotic diffusion, more than 93 per cent of the F-ring bodies remain confined within the F ring because of the shepherding, but also because of a weak radial mobility contrasted by an effective longitudinal diffusion. This chaotic stirring of all bodies involved prevents the formation of `propellers' typical of moonlets, but their frequent ring crossings explain the multiple radial `streaks' seen in the F ring. The related `thermal' motion causes more frequent collisions between all bodies which steadily replenish F-ring dust and allow for ongoing fragmentation and re-accretion processes (ring recycling).

  19. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  20. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-07

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  1. Storage ring working group report

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, S.

    1997-01-01

    Over the last two decades great progress has been made in the development of storage rings with small transverse emittance. It is now a good time to consider the possibility of achieving very short bunches m storage rings. From the perspective of synchrotron radiation source development, there are at least two motivations for obtaining short electron bunches: (1) the generation of sub- picosecond x-ray pulses and (2) the coherent emission of sub- picosecond pulses of far infrared radiation. A useful short-term goal is the experimental study of bunches with 1 ps rms length both at high ({approx_gt} 1 GeV) and low ({approx_lt} 150 MeV) electron energies. Experiments on 1 ps bunches are now feasible and can yield new insight into the high frequency impedance of storage rings and the associated phenomena which can result in bunch lengthening. Achievement of 1 ps bunches can also be expected to allow the first observation of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring, in the millimeter wavelength regime. A longer-term objective is the realization of 100 fs bunches. Achievement of this goal not only will advance understanding of storage rings but will open up new opportunities in synchrotron radiation based research at both x-ray and far infrared wavelengths. It is now an appropriate time to carry forward theoretical investigations clarifying the fundamental limitations on bunch length, and to devise schemes to minimize it.

  2. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  3. On certain Hecke rings

    PubMed Central

    Evens, Sam; Bressler, Paul

    1987-01-01

    We examine rings that embed into the smash product of the group algebra of the Weyl group with the field of meromorphic functions on the Cartan subalgebra and are generated by elements that satisfy braid relations. We prove that every such ring is isomorphic to either the Hecke algebra, the nil Hecke ring, or the group algebra of the Weyl group. PMID:16593804

  4. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  5. Soft normed rings.

    PubMed

    Uluçay, Vakkas; Şahin, Mehmet; Olgun, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft normed rings by soft set theory. The notions of soft normed rings, soft normed ideals, soft complete normed rings are introduced and also several related properties and examples are given.

  6. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  7. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  8. On the solar dust ring(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.

    Based on a mechanism to form the solar dust ring, it is proved that the observed peak in infrared F-corona cannot be explained by silicate type grains alone. Preliminary analysis on the recent infrared data of the F-corona by Maihara et al. (1984) has suggested that the ring particles have different physical properties compared with the dust grains, which produce the background F-corona.

  9. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  10. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  11. Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties During the Asian Dust Above Monterey Experiment and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, K.; Strawa, A. W.; Provencal, R.; Castaneda, R.; Bucholtz, A.; Schmid, B.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300/Mm with an estimated precision of 0.1/Mm for 1550 nm light and 0.2/Mm for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects. We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those from a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  12. Slowing of Vortex Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the slowing of vortex rings in water which are created with very thin cores. We find that these rings propagate with no measurable change in diameter or core size. The drag appears to be the result of viscous forces on the core. A simple model for this drag describes experimental data in terms of a drag coefficient, which depends only on Reynolds number. Barenghi's group at Newcastle found that the translational velocity of a ring in an inviscid fluid perturbed by Kelvin waves decreases with increasing amplitude of Kelvin waves. This suggests that the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid may well depend on the amplitude of Kelvin waves at the time of formation. Rings with substantial amplitude of Kelvin waves will be expected to move more slowly than rings with little or no Kelvin wave amplitude. We present experimental data confirming this suggestion.

  13. On the vortex ring state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Richard; Gillies, E.; Giuni, M.; Hislop, J.; Savas, Omer

    2014-11-01

    The investigation considers the vortex ring state, a phenomenon normally associated with the collapse of a trailing, helical vortex wake into a unstable vortex ring, and is a problem encountered when a helicopter rotor descends into its own wake. A series of wind tunnel and towing tank experiments on rotor systems have been performed, and a comparison is then made with the behaviour of a specially designed open core, annular jet system that generates a mean flow velocity profile similar to that observed below a rotor. In experimentally simulated descents the jet system forms flow patterns that are topologically similar to the vortex ring state of a rotor system. Furthermore the dynamic behaviour of the flow shares many of the important characteristics of the rotor flow. This result suggests that the phenomenon of the vortex ring state of a rotor wake is decoupled from the detailed vortex dynamics of the helical vortex filaments themselves. The presentation will describe the principle behind the investigation, the details of the annular jet system and the results gained using PIV and flow visualisation of the wake and jet systems.

  14. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  15. Saturn's E ring revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Klinglesmith, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    Images of the E ring of Saturn obtained by the image processing of photographs of the 1966 edge-on presentation of the planet's ring plane are presented. Two methods of image enhancement were used: scanning with an image quantizer operated in the derivative mode to enhance contrast and computerized subtraction of a circularly symmetric image of the overexposed Saturn disk. Further photographic and CCD observation confirming the existence of the ring extending to twice the diameter of the A ring, which was not detected by the Pioneer 11 imaging photopolarimeter, is indicated.

  16. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  17. Modified spiral wound retaining ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, A. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A spiral wound retaining ring with angled ends is described. The ring is crimped at the same angle as the ring ends to maintain a constant thickness dimension. The angling of the ends of the ring and crimp allow the ends to be positioned closer together while maintaining enough clearance to enable insertion and removal of the ring. By reducing the separation distance between the ends a stronger ring results since the double layer area of the ring is maximized.

  18. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  19. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  20. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in diameter. It is inserted into the vagina, where it slowly releases hormones — the chemicals the body makes to control organ function — through the vaginal wall into the ...

  1. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  2. Smoke Ring Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampère's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features.

  3. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  4. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  5. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  6. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  7. An Nbody Integrator for Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Joseph M.; Porco, C.; Spitale, J.

    2010-10-01

    An Nbody integrator has been developed to simulate large-scale phenomena in planetary rings, such as the confinement of the outer edge of Saturn's B ring by Mimas' m=2 Lindblad resonance, and the propagation of spiral density waves in the A ring. The code tracks N particles whose motions trace the perturbed ring's streamlines. Accelerations on those particles due to ring gravity, pressure, and viscosity are then simple functions of the particles' positions and velocities relative to those streamlines. A second-order kick-drift scheme (Wisdom & Holman 1991, Saha & Tremaine 1992) is used to advance the particles' epicyclic orbit elements over time, with the kicks given by the rate equations of Longaretti and Borderies (1991). Simulating a narrow but well-resolved annulus in the ring typically requires execution times of 10 minutes on a desktop PC using only N 1000 particles. A simulation of the B ring's sharp outer edge, as well as the propagation of nonlinear spiral density waves, will be shown in the conference poster. We also plan to extend this 2D model to 3D, so as to simulate spiral bending waves. Another goal of this program is to study resonant perturbations in a dense and incompressible ring, which can experience vertical displacements due to a satellite's horizontal forcing. Such rings are suspected to be unstable (Borderies et al 1985), which can account for the B ring-edge's m<ɮ modes (Spitale & Porco 2009, 2010). We also hope to have preliminary results from a study of this scenario at conference time.

  8. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  9. Ring chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, A; Voyce, M A; Romain, D

    1977-01-01

    A mentally and physically retarded boy with a 46,XY,ring (4) (p16q35) chromosome complement is described. Chromosome banding showed that the amount of chromosome material deleted from the ring chromosome 4 was minimal, apparently no more than the telomeres. Chromosomal aberrations appear to be restricted to the production of double-sized dicentric rings, and aneuploidy. The mosiacism resulting from the behavioural peculiarities of ring chromosomes is described as dynamic mosaicism. It is suggested that the clinical features associated with this ring chromosome are more likely to be the result of the effects of a diploid/monosomy 4/polysomy 4 mosaicism than to the deficiency of the telomeric regions of the chromosome. Images PMID:881718

  10. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  11. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  12. Bacterial cell division and the septal ring.

    PubMed

    Weiss, David S

    2004-11-01

    Cell division in bacteria is mediated by the septal ring, a collection of about a dozen (known) proteins that localize to the division site, where they direct assembly of the division septum. The foundation of the septal ring is a polymer of the tubulin-like protein FtsZ. Recently, experiments using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching have revealed that the Z ring is extremely dynamic. FtsZ subunits exchange in and out of the ring on a time scale of seconds even while the overall morphology of the ring appears static. These findings, together with in vitro studies of purified FtsZ, suggest that the rate-limiting step in turnover of FtsZ polymers is GTP hydrolysis. Another component of the septal ring, FtsK, is involved in coordinating chromosome segregation with cell division. Recent studies have revealed that FtsK is a DNA translocase that facilitates decatenation of sister chromosomes by TopIV and resolution of chromosome dimers by the XerCD recombinase. Finally, two murein hydrolases, AmiC and EnvC, have been shown to localize to the septal ring of Escherichia coli, where they play an important role in separation of daughter cells.

  13. Irregular Wavelike Structure in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, Benjamin J.

    2005-01-01

    We have searched Saturn's A, B, and C rings for irregular wavelike structure using Voyager Photopolarimeter (PPS), Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS), and Radio Science (RSS) occultation datasets, as well as ring reflectivity profiles derived from Voyager images. A maximum entropy technique for conducting spectral analysis was used to estimate wave frequency power in relation to radial location for each dataset. Using this method we have found irregular structure in the PPS and UVS inner B Ring occultation datasets previously identified in Voyager imaging data. Both finer structure, with a wavelength of around 20 km, and large structure with wavelengths of 200 to 1000 km, are visible in the occultation data and appear similar to that seen in the imaging data. After removing ringlets from the C-Ring data, we have identified what appears to be a 1000-km wave sustained throughout the ring. The large dominant wavelength appears in all datasets; however, tests are currently being conducted in an attempt to verify its existence. Irregular structure with a wavelength of approximately 20 km has been observed in the C Ring reflectivity profiles, but not within the occultation datasets. This leads us to doubt it is caused by ring surface mass density fluctuations detectable by the occultation experiments.

  14. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  15. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  16. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  17. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  18. Supernumerary small ring chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Kaffe, S; Kim, H J; Hsu, L Y; Brill, C B; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    A supernumerary small ring chromosome was found in 30% of cultured peripheral leucocytes and 50% of skin fibroblasts in a 6-year-old boy with mild mental retardation and midline cleft palate. The extra chromosome appeared to carry a densely staining region on Giemsa banding. The banding patterns of the remaining 46 chromosomes were normal. C banding indicated that the ring chromosome contained mainly centromeric constitutive heterochromatin. Chromosome analysis of both parents showed normal karyotypes by both conventional and banding techniques; thus the origin of the ring chromosome could not be determined. Images PMID:604496

  19. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  20. Experiment and Simulations with Nearly Equal Horizontal and Vertical Focusing Functions: Single and Colliding Beam Results from the Cornell Electron Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, Peter Paul

    1995-01-01

    For colliding beam particle accelerators, the dynamics of the beam beam interaction are one limit on the luminosity or event rate. Simulations of the beam beam interaction have suggested that round beams (equal horizontal and vertical emittances and beta ^{*}) could produce saturated tune shifts of about 0.100, much larger than those predicted for flat beams (horizontal emittance and beta ^{*} much larger than the vertical). This experiment was designed to test round beams and had a single interaction point at the North Interaction Region or NIP, with nearly zero horizontal dispersion and about 25 cm beta^{*} 's. In early 1990 we used about 140 hours of machine time. Beginning with flat beams (horizontal emittance much larger than the vertical emittance), we achieved saturated vertical tune shift parameters of about 0.045, very high for CESR at the time, but much smaller than the 0.080 predicted by the simulations for this case. During this flat beam work, we realized we had several experimental problems and halted the experiment without attempting the round beam work. Our separation scheme for the South Interaction Region or SIP produced different horizontal emittances and damping times for the electrons and positrons and so we reduced the separation in the SIP until we were concerned about the near miss beam crossing there. Also later analysis of orbit measurements showed small, but important, horizontal separations at the NIP. We've used a beam beam simulation to understand the effects that each of these problems has on the beam beam dynamics. Also using both an analytic formalism for the effects of resonances on single particles and several diagnostics to look at the simulation results for single particles, we've developed some understanding of why the simulations give the results they do and which resonances are important. We believe "dirt" effects, rather than fundamental limitations, set our experimental tune shift limit and that the nearly equal beta

  1. Dedicated storage rings for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of internal targets in circulating beams of electron storage and stretcher rings has been widely discussed recently as a method of achieving high luminosity under conditions of low background, and good energy resolution, with minimal demands for beam from an injecting accelerator. In the two critical areas of the technology, ring design and target development, research is very active, and the prospects for major advances are very bright. Reasonable extrapolations of the current state of the art suggest for many problems in nuclear physics, particularly polarization physics of the nucleon and few body nuclei, internal target measurement may be the optimum experimental technique. This paper, discusses the comparative merit of internal target rings and external beam experiments, reviews briefly current research efforts in the critical areas of the technology, and establishes one goal for the discussions at the workshop. It appears that storage rings dedicated to internal target physics may offer a powerful option for future advances in nuclear physics.

  2. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  3. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasonic Newton's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K. ); Dayal, V. )

    1992-03-09

    Interference fringes due to bondline thickness variation were observed in ultrasonic scans of the reflected echo amplitude from the bondline of adhesively joined aluminum skins. To demonstrate that full-field interference patterns are observable in point-by-point ultrasonic scans, an optical setup for Newton's rings was scanned ultrasonically in a water immersion tank. The ultrasonic scan showed distinct Newton's rings whose radii were in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  5. Bending the Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Saturn's rings appear strangely warped in this view of the rings seen through the upper Saturn atmosphere.

    The atmosphere acts like a lens in refracting (bending) the light reflected from the rings. As the rings pass behind the overexposed limb (edge) of Saturn as seen from Cassini, the ring structure appears to curve downward due to the bending of the light as it passes through the upper atmosphere.

    This image was obtained using a near-infrared filter. The filter samples a wavelength where methane gas does not absorb light, thus making the far-off rings visible through the upper atmosphere.

    By comparing this image to similar ones taken using filters where methane gas does absorb, scientists can estimate the vertical profile of haze and the abundance of methane in Saturn's high atmosphere.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 14, 2005, through a filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 938 nanometers and at a distance of approximately 197,000 kilometers (123,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 820 meters (2,680 feet) per pixel.

  6. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  7. Saturn's Ring: Pre-Cassini Status and Mission Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeff N.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In November 1980, and again in August 1981, identical Voyager spacecraft flew through the Saturn system, changing forever the way we think about planetary rings. Although Saturn's rings had been the only known ring system for three centuries, a ring system around Uranus had been discovered by stellar occultations from Earth in 1977, and the nearly transparent ring of Jupiter was imaged by Voyager in 1979 (the presence of material there had been inferred from charged particle experiments on Pioneer 10 and 11 several years earlier). While Saturn had thus temporarily lost its uniqueness as having the only ring system, with Voyager it handily recaptured the role of having the most fascinating one. The Voyager breakthroughs included spiral density and bending waves such as cause galactic structure; ubiquitous fine-scale radial 'irregular' structure, with the appearance of record-grooves; regional and local variations in particle color; complex, azimuthally variable ring structure; empty gaps in the rings, some containing very regular, sharp-edged, elliptical rings and one containing both a small moonlet and incomplete arcs of dusty material; and shadowy 'spokes' that flicker across the main rings. One of the paradigm shifts of this period was the realization that many aspects of planetary rings, and even the ring systems themselves, could be 'recent' on geological timescales. These early results are reviewed and summarized in the Arizona Space Science series volumes 'Saturn'. (An excellent review of ring dynamics at a formative stage is by Goldreich and Tremaine.) From the mid 1980's to the time of this writing, progress has been steady, while at a less heady pace, and some of the novel ring properties revealed by Voyager 1 and 2 are beginning to be better understood. It is clearly impossible to cite, much less review, every advance over the last decade; however, below we summarize the main advances in understanding of Saturn's rings since the mid 1980's, in the context

  8. PREFACE: Special section on vortex rings Special section on vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2009-10-01

    This special section of Fluid Dynamics Research includes five articles on vortex rings in both classical and quantum fluids. The leading scientists of the field describe the trends in and the state-of-the-art development of experiments, theories and numerical simulations of vortex rings. The year 2008 was the 150th anniversary of 'vortex motion' since Hermann von Helmholtz opened up this field. In 1858, Helmholtz published a paper in Crelle's Journal which put forward the concept of 'vorticity' and made the first analysis of vortex motion. Fluid mechanics before that was limited to irrotational motion. In the absence of vorticity, the motion of an incompressible homogeneous fluid is virtually equivalent to a rigid-body motion in the sense that the fluid motion is determined once the boundary configuration is specified. Helmholtz proved, among other things, that, without viscosity, a vortex line is frozen into the fluid. This Helmholtz's law immediately implies the preservation of knots and links of vortex lines and its implication is enormous. One of the major trends of fluid mechanics since the latter half of the 20th century is to clarify the topological meaning of Helmholtz's law and to exploit it to develop theoretical and numerical methods to find the solutions of the Euler equations and to develop experimental techniques to gain an insight into fluid motion. Vortex rings are prominent coherent structures in a variety of fluid motions from the microscopic scale, through human and mesoscale to astrophysical scales, and have attracted people's interest. The late professor Philip G Saffman (1981) emphasized the significance of studies on vortex rings. One particular motion exemplifies the whole range of problems of vortex motion and is also a commonly known phenomenon, namely the vortex ring or smoke ring. Vortex rings are easily produced by dropping drops of one liquid into another, or by puffing fluid out of a hole, or by exhaling smoke if one has the skill

  9. Ring correlations in random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the correlations between rings in random network glasses in two dimensions as a function of their separation. Initially, we use the topological separation (measured by the number of intervening rings), but this leads to pseudo-long-range correlations due to a lack of topological charge neutrality in the shells surrounding a central ring. This effect is associated with the noncircular nature of the shells. It is, therefore, necessary to use the geometrical distance between ring centers. Hence we find a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law out to larger distances, with the correlations between rings decaying away when two rings are more than about three rings apart.

  10. Direct numerical simulations of vortex ring collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilla Monico, Rodolfo; Pumir, Alain; Brenner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We numerically simulate the ring vortex collision experiment of Lim and Nickels in an attempt to understand the rapid formation of very fine scale turbulence (or 'smoke') from relatively smooth initial conditions. Reynolds numbers of up to Re = Γ / ν = 7500 , where Γ is the vortex ring circulation and ν the kinematic viscosity of the fluid are reached, which coincide with the highest Reynolds number case of the experiments. Different perturbations to the ring vortex are added, and their effect on the generation and amplification of turbulence is quantified. The underlying dynamics of the vortex core is analyzed, and compared to the dynamics arising from a simple Biot-Savart filament model for the core.

  11. Dust Sources of Saturn's E Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, F.; Schmidt, J.; Albers, N.; Kempf, S.; Krivov, A. V.; Sremcevic, M.

    The recent detection of a dust plume at Enceladus' south pole sheds new light on the origin of the E ring of Saturn. The particles probably condense from gas vents escaping from a system of cracks covering the south pole that appears unusually hot in the Cassini infrared experiments. The main fraction of the E ring dust is created in these gas vents. Still, significant amounts of dust should originate from grains ejected by hypervelocity impacts of E ring particles (ERPs), or alternatively, of interplanetary dust grains (IDPs) on the Saturnian moons embedded in the E ring. We estimate the contributions of impactor -ejecta created dust at these various satellites in the ring, relative to the production rate of grains in the plume at Enceladus. Furthermore, we compare the amount of dust created by both projectile families - ERPs and IDPs - and predict that one can clearly discriminate between the ejecta raised by either projectile families in the data of the Cassini dust detector (CDA) collected at close flybys with the moons embedded in the E ring.

  12. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  13. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  14. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  15. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  16. Crystallization experiments with the dinuclear chelate ring complex di-μ-chlorido-bis[(η(2)-2-allyl-4-methoxy-5-{[(propan-2-yloxy)carbonyl]methoxy}phenyl-κC(1))platinum(II)].

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi Thanh, Chi; Pham Van, Thong; Le Thi Hong, Hai; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Crystallization experiments with the dinuclear chelate ring complex di-μ-chlorido-bis[(η(2)-2-allyl-4-methoxy-5-{[(propan-2-yloxy)carbonyl]methoxy}phenyl-κC(1))platinum(II)], [Pt2(C15H19O4)2Cl2], containing a derivative of the natural compound eugenol as ligand, have been performed. Using five different sets of crystallization conditions resulted in four different complexes which can be further used as starting compounds for the synthesis of Pt complexes with promising anticancer activities. In the case of vapour diffusion with the binary chloroform-diethyl ether or methylene chloride-diethyl ether systems, no change of the molecular structure was observed. Using evaporation from acetonitrile (at room temperature), dimethylformamide (DMF, at 313 K) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, at 313 K), however, resulted in the displacement of a chloride ligand by the solvent, giving, respectively, the mononuclear complexes (acetonitrile-κN)(η(2)-2-allyl-4-methoxy-5-{[(propan-2-yloxy)carbonyl]methoxy}phenyl-κC(1))chloridoplatinum(II) monohydrate, [Pt(C15H19O4)Cl(CH3CN)]·H2O, (η(2)-2-allyl-4-methoxy-5-{[(propan-2-yloxy)carbonyl]methoxy}phenyl-κC(1))chlorido(dimethylformamide-κO)platinum(II), [Pt(C15H19O4)Cl(C2H7NO)], and (η(2)-2-allyl-4-methoxy-5-{[(propan-2-yloxy)carbonyl]methoxy}phenyl-κC(1))chlorido(dimethyl sulfoxide-κS)platinum(II), determined as the analogue {η(2)-2-allyl-4-methoxy-5-[(ethoxycarbonyl)methoxy]phenyl-κC(1)}chlorido(dimethyl sulfoxide-κS)platinum(II), [Pt(C14H17O4)Cl(C2H6OS)]. The crystal structures confirm that acetonitrile interacts with the Pt(II) atom via its N atom, while for DMSO, the S atom is the coordinating atom. For the replacement, the longest of the two Pt-Cl bonds is cleaved, leading to a cis position of the solvent ligand with respect to the allyl group. The crystal packing of the complexes is characterized by dimer formation via C-H...O and C-H...π interactions, but no π-π interactions are observed despite the presence of

  17. Stable CSR in storage rings: A model

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge; Holldack, Karsten; Kuske, Peter; Wustefeld, Godehart; Hubers, Heinz-Willerm; Warnock, Robert

    2005-01-03

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  18. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  19. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  20. Motion of deformable ring made of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzeh, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ozmaeian, Masoumeh

    2012-04-01

    In this paper application of Ionic Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) as actuator in a deformable ring capable of locomotion is studied. Such a deformable ring moves as a result of gravitational force acting on its body when its shape changes. It can be used in exploration, search and rescue missions in future, where using conventional robots with rigid bodies and actuators is impossible. Large deformation induced by small stimulating voltage, low stiffness the sensing characteristics that in future work can be used in feedback control make IPMC a good choice for such an application. In this work first a model for IPMC is introduce that can be used in simulating deformation of IPMC in different arrangements of actuators. Since in this research we used our own fabricated IPMC, next we present characterization tests and identification results for model's parameters. Then using this model in simulation possibility of generating locomotion using body deformation in a ring made of IPMC is confirmed. Finally result of experiment on deformable ring is presented and possibility of implementation of the proposed design is confirmed. Based on this work, more accurate models can be developed to get better compatibility between experiment and simulation results. Also by modifying fabrication techniques, a deformable ring with faster and steadier movement can be made in future.

  1. Motion of deformable ring made of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzeh, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ozmaeian, Masoumeh

    2011-11-01

    In this paper application of Ionic Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) as actuator in a deformable ring capable of locomotion is studied. Such a deformable ring moves as a result of gravitational force acting on its body when its shape changes. It can be used in exploration, search and rescue missions in future, where using conventional robots with rigid bodies and actuators is impossible. Large deformation induced by small stimulating voltage, low stiffness the sensing characteristics that in future work can be used in feedback control make IPMC a good choice for such an application. In this work first a model for IPMC is introduce that can be used in simulating deformation of IPMC in different arrangements of actuators. Since in this research we used our own fabricated IPMC, next we present characterization tests and identification results for model's parameters. Then using this model in simulation possibility of generating locomotion using body deformation in a ring made of IPMC is confirmed. Finally result of experiment on deformable ring is presented and possibility of implementation of the proposed design is confirmed. Based on this work, more accurate models can be developed to get better compatibility between experiment and simulation results. Also by modifying fabrication techniques, a deformable ring with faster and steadier movement can be made in future.

  2. Ring laser gyroscope anode

    SciTech Connect

    Ljung, B.H.

    1981-03-17

    An anode for a ring laser gyroscope which provides improved current stability in the glow discharge path is disclosed. The anode of this invention permits operation at lower currents thereby allowing a reduction of heat dissipation in the ring laser gyroscope. The anode of one embodiment of this invention is characterized by a thumbtack appearance with a spherical end where the normal sharp end of the thumbtack would be located. The stem of the anode extends from the outside of the gyroscope structure to the interior of the structure such that the spherical end is substantially adjacent to the laser beam.

  3. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  4. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  5. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  6. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  7. Storage ring mass spectrometry for nuclear structure and astrophysics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Uesaka, T.; Xu, H. S.

    2016-07-01

    In the last two and a half decades ion storage rings have proven to be powerful tools for precision experiments with unstable nuclides in the realm of nuclear structure and astrophysics. There are presently three storage ring facilities in the world at which experiments with stored radioactive ions are possible. These are the ESR in GSI, Darmstadt/Germany, the CSRe in IMP, Lanzhou/China, and the R3 storage ring in RIKEN, Saitama/Japan. In this work, an introduction to the facilities is given. Selected characteristic experimental results and their impact in nuclear physics and astrophysics are presented. Planned technical developments and the envisioned future experiments are outlined.

  8. Storage rings for investigation of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-08-01

    In this survey, we give a brief description of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, and examples for their use in ion-atom collision physics. The compression of the phase space distribution of the ions by electron cooling, and the gain factors of in-ring experiments compared to single-pass experiments are explained. Some examples of a new generation of ion-atom collision experiments which may become feasible with storage rings are given. These include the studies of angular differential single- and double-electron capture cross sections, the production of slow highly charged recoil ions, and atomic collision processes using decelerated and crossed beam. 30 refs.

  9. On the evolution of vortex rings with swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Naitoh, Takashi; Okura, Nobuyuki; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Yusuke

    2014-06-15

    A laminar vortex ring with swirl, which has the meridional velocity component inside the vortex core, was experimentally generated by the brief fluid ejection from a rotating outlet. The evolution of the vortex ring was investigated with flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in order to find the influence of swirling flow in particular upon the transition to turbulence. Immediately after the formation of a vortex ring with swirl, a columnar strong vortex along the symmetric axis is observed in all cases of the present experiment. Then the characteristic fluid discharging from a vortex ring with swirl referred to as “peeling off” appears. The amount of discharging fluid due to the “peeling off” increases with the angular velocity of the rotating outlet. We conjectured that the mechanism generating the “peeling off” is related to the columnar strong vortex by close observations of the spatio-temporal development of the vorticity distribution and the cutting 3D images constructed from the successive cross sections of a vortex ring. While a laminar vortex ring without swirl may develop azimuthal waves around its circumference at some later time and the ring structure subsequently breaks, the swirling flow in a vortex ring core reduces the amplification rate of the azimuthal wavy deformation and preserved its ring structure. Then the traveling distance of a vortex ring can be extended using the swirl flow under certain conditions.

  10. Design Considerations for High Energy Electron -- Positron Storage Rings

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Richter, B.

    1966-11-01

    High energy electron-positron storage rings give a way of making a new attack on the most important problems of elementary particle physics. All of us who have worked in the storage ring field designing, building, or using storage rings know this. The importance of that part of storage ring work concerning tests of quantum electrodynamics and mu meson physics is also generally appreciated by the larger physics community. However, I do not think that most of the physicists working tin the elementary particle physics field realize the importance of the contribution that storage ring experiments can make to our understanding of the strongly interacting particles. I would therefore like to spend the next few minutes discussing the sort of things that one can do with storage rings in the strongly interacting particle field.

  11. Ring Flame Stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Ring Flame Stabilizer has been developed in conjunction with Lewis Research Center. This device can lower pollutant emissions (which contribute to smog and air pollution) from natural-gas appliances such as furnaces and water heaters by 90 percent while improving energy efficiency by 2 percent.

  12. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  13. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  14. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  15. Reading, Writing, and Rings!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela; Li, Erika; Hammon, Art

    2008-01-01

    "Reading, Writing, and Rings!" was created by a team of elementary teachers, literacy experts, and scientists in order to integrate science and literacy. These free units bring students inside NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. The authors--a science teacher and education outreach specialist and two evaluators of educational programs--have…

  16. Wall reflection of a viscous vortex ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sa, J. Y.; Chang, K. S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of a viscous axisymmetric vortex ring being reflected from a wall is investigated. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations formulated in terms of the vorticity function and vector potential are numerically integrated by implicit finite difference methods. To specify the vector potential at a far boundary from the wall, the existing integral method used so far only for an unbounded domain is modified by a kind of image method. The trajectory of the vortex ring calcualted as a result closely resembles that observable from the experiment.

  17. Status of the Mini-Ring project: a compact electrostatic storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, J.; Montagne, G.; Ales, J.; Bredy, R.; Chen, L.; Martin, S.; Cederquist, H.; Schmidt, H.

    2008-12-08

    The idea of building a small, cheap and transportable electrostatic storage ring emerged in the Lyon and Stockholm groups as a collaborative work in the framework of the ITS-LEIF European network. Such a ring could be devoted to experiments where the ring needs to be transported to different facilities that can deliver exotic particles or means of excitation (e.-g. highly charged ions, X--ray synchrotron...). The design of the so-called Mini-Ring and ion trajectory simulations will be presented. First preliminary results have demonstrated the storage of stable Ar{sup +} ion beams in the millisecond time range. The storage time is presently limited by the poor vacuum conditions (P = 2x10{sup -7} mbar) in the chamber, a feature that is going to be improved in the future.

  18. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  19. Dynamic changes in the ischemic mitral annulus: Implications for ring sizing

    PubMed Central

    Owais, Khurram; Montealegre-Gallegos, Mario; Jeganathan, Jelliffe; Matyal, Robina; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Mahmood, Feroze

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Contrary to the rest of the mitral annulus, inter-trigonal distance is known to be relatively less dynamic during the cardiac cycle. Therefore, intertrigonal distance is considered a suitable benchmark for annuloplasty ring sizing during mitral valve (MV) surgery. The entire mitral annulus dilates and flattens in patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR). It is assumed that the fibrous trigone of the heart and the intertrigonal distance does not dilate. In this study, we sought to demonstrate the changes in mitral annular geometry in patients with IMR and specifically analyze the changes in intertrigonal distance during the cardiac cycle. Methods: Intraoperative three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic data obtained from 26 patients with normal MVs undergoing nonvalvular cardiac surgery and 36 patients with IMR undergoing valve repair were dynamically analyzed using Philips Qlab® software. Results: Overall, regurgitant valves were larger in area and less dynamic than normal valves. Both normal and regurgitant groups displayed a significant change in annular area (AA) during the cardiac cycle (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Anteroposterior and anterolateral-posteromedial diameters and inter-trigonal distance increased through systole (P < 0.05 for all) in accordance with the AAs in both groups. However, inter-trigonal distance showed the least percentage change across the cardiac cycle and its reduced dynamism was validated in both cohorts (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Annular dimensions in regurgitant valves are dynamic and can be measured feasibly and accurately using echocardiography. The echocardiographically identified inter-trigonal distance does not change significantly during the cardiac cycle. PMID:26750668

  20. Noncircular features in Saturn's rings II: The C ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; French, Richard G.; McGhee-French, Colleen A.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Marouf, Essam A.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Lonergan, Katherine; Sepersky, Talia

    2014-10-01

    We present a comprehensive survey of sharp-edged features in Saturn's C ring, using data from radio and stellar occultation experiments carried out by the Cassini spacecraft over a period of more than five years. Over 100 occultations are included in the combined data set, enabling us to identify systematic radial perturbations as small as 200 m on the edges of ringlets and gaps. We systematically examine all of the noncircular features in the C ring, refine the eccentricities, precession rates and width variations of the known eccentric ringlets, identify connections between several noncircular gap and ringlet edges and nearby satellite resonances, and report the discovery of a host of free normal modes on ring and gap edges. We confirm a close association between the Titan (or Colombo) ringlet (a = 77878.7 km) and the Titan 1:0 apsidal resonance: the apoapse of the ringlet is nearly aligned with Titan's mean longitude, and the pattern speed closely matches Titan's mean motion. Similar forced perturbations associated with the Titan resonance are detectable in more than two dozen other features located throughout the inner C ring as far as 3500 km from the Titan resonance. The inner edge of the Titan ringlet exhibits several strong outer Lindblad resonance (OLR-type) normal modes, and scans of the outer edge reveal inner Lindblad resonance (ILR-type) normal modes. The Maxwell ringlet (a = 87,510 km), in contrast, appears to be a freely-precessing eccentric ringlet, with post-fit RMS residuals for the inner and outer edges of only 0.23 and 0.16 km, respectively. The best-fitting edge precession rates differ by over 10 times the estimated uncertainty in the rate of the inner edge, consistent with a slow libration about an equilibrium configuration on a decadal timescale. Using self-gravity models for ringlet apse alignment, we estimate the masses and surface densities of the Titan and Maxwell ringlets. The Bond ringlet (a = 88,710 km), about 17 km wide, shows no free

  1. Cassini First Diametric Radio Occultation of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.; Kliore, A.; Flasar, M.; Nagy, A.; Ambrosini, R.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Barbinis, E.; Goltz, G.; Thomson, F.; Wong, K.

    2005-05-01

    We present preliminary results expected from the first planned Cassini radio occultation observation of Saturn's rings, to be conducted on May 3rd, 2005. The path of Cassini as seen from Earth (the occultation track) has been designed to cross the rings from the west to the east ansa almost diametrically, allowing for occultation of all major ring features at two widely separated longitudes (about 180 deg apart). The duration of the geometric occultation is about 1.5 hours on each side. During the occultation, Cassini transmits through the rings three coherent monochromatic radio signals of wavelength 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm (Ka-, X-, and S-band respectively), a capability unique to Cassini. The perturbed signals received at the Earth are recorded at the NASA DSN complexes at Goldstone and Canberra. Both direct and forward-scattered components of the signal may be identified in spectrograms of the received signals. The time history of the extinction of the direct signal is expected to yield high-spatial-resolution optical depth and phase shift profiles of ring structure. The timing of the occultation was optimized to allow probing the rings when the ring-opening-angle B (the angle between the line-of-sight and the ring plane) is relatively large (B = 23 deg), hence maximizing chances of measuring for the first time the structure of the relatively optically thick Ring B. In a similar experiment by Voyager in 1980, excessive signal attenuation along the long path within the nearly closed rings (B = 5.9 deg) limited the utility of the observations in relatively thick ring regions, in particular the main Ring B. For the Cassini optimized occultation geometry, a large B, slow radial velocity along the occultation track, and much improved phase stability of the reference ultrastable oscillator (USO) on board Cassini combine to promise achievable radial resolution approaching 100 m over a good fraction of the rings. Measurement of the amplitude and phase of the diffracted

  2. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  3. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    PubMed

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  4. Oscillating pendulum decay by emission of vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert E.; Donnelly, Russell J.

    2010-04-01

    We have studied oscillation of a pendulum in water using spherical bobs. By measuring the loss in potential energy, we estimate the drag coefficient on the sphere and compare to data from liquid-helium experiments. The drag coefficients compare very favorably illustrating the true scaling behavior of this phenomenon. We also studied the decay of amplitude of the pendulum over time. As observed previously, at small amplitudes, the drag on the bob is given by the linear Stokes drag and the decay is exponential. For larger amplitudes, the pendulum bob sheds vortex rings as it reverses direction. The momentum imparted to these vortex rings results in an additional discrete drag on the bob. We present experiments and a theoretical estimate of this vortex-ring-induced drag. We analytically derive an estimate for a critical amplitude beyond which vortex ring shedding will occur as well as an estimate of the radius of the ring as a function of amplitude.

  5. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  6. Saturn's ring "propellers": gravitational or granular?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Lawney, B. P.; Jenkins, J. T.

    2010-05-01

    Propeller-shaped brightness features observed in Saturn's A ring are density disturbances, usually thought to be induced by gravity. Embedded masses larger than tens of meters disturb the smooth Keplerian shear of typical small ring particles (cm to m in radius) sufficiently to be visible in Cassini images. Instead we investigate whether propeller formation could be solely a collisional phenomenon involving the collisional energy dissipation, moon-to-particle size ratio, and the initial areal fractional coverage. Our two-dimensional, event-driven molecular dynamics simulation, which is carried out within Hill's equations and ignores gravity between the moon and the particles, develops "propeller-like” structures. We argue that the relatively low agitation and density of ring material is responsible for a low sound speed, resulting in predominantly supersonic flow of ring particles relative to the moon. In this framework, "propellers” are viewed as the locus of a granular shock, analogous to shocks in compressible gases, across which the ring material experiences significant changes in density, velocity, pressure, and the analog of temperature. We model these changes analytically and through numerical simulations to determine the propeller's size. We anticipate that inferences about the embedded objects will change with this different model.

  7. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  8. Uranus: the rings are black.

    PubMed

    Sinton, W M

    1977-11-04

    An upper limit of 0.05 is established for the geometric albedo of the newly discovered rings of Uranus. In view of this very low albedo, the particles of the rings cannot be ice-covered as are those of rings A and B of Saturn.

  9. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  10. Saturn Ring Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Answering fundamental questions about ring particle characteristics, and individual and group behavior, appears to require close-proximity (a few km) observations. Saturn's magnificent example of a ring system offers a full range of particle sizes, densities, and behaviors for study, so it is a natural choice for such detailed investigation. Missions implementing these observations require post-approach Delta(V) of approximately 10 km/s or more, so past mission concepts called upon Nuclear Electric Propulsion. The concept described here reduces the propulsive Delta(V) requirement to as little as 3.5 km/s, difficult but not impossible for high-performance chemical propulsion systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Delivery Ring Lattice Modifications for Transitionless Deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, J. A.; Syphers, M. J.

    2016-10-09

    A portion of the remnant Tevatron program infrastruc- ture at Fermilab is being reconfigured to be used for the generation and delivery of proton and muon beams for new high-precision particle physics experiments. With the 8 GeV Booster as its primary source, the Mu2e exper- iment will receive 8.9 GeV/c bunched beam on target, after being stored and slow spilled from the Delivery Ring (DR) -- a refurbished debuncher ring from Tevatron anti- proton production. For the Muon g-2 experiment, the DR will be tuned for 3.1 GeV/c to capture muons off of a target before sending them to this experiment's Storage Ring. The apertures in the beam transport systems are optimized for the large muon beams of this lower-energy experiment. In order to provide further flexibility in the operation of the DR for future possible low-energy, high- intensity particle physics experiments (REDTOP[1], for example) and detector development, investigations are underway into the feasibility of decelerating beams from its maximum kinetic energy of 8 GeV level to lower en- ergies, down to 1-2 GeV. In this paper we look at possi- ble lattice modifications to the DR to avoid a transition crossing during the deceleration process. Hardware re- quirements and other operational implications of this scheme will also be discussed.

  12. Strained Ring Energetic Binders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-27

    polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ). PHBV was not found to have the mechanical instability problems of PBV, but was still thermally unstable (Tonset - 660C, Tmax - 1090C...DISCUSSION 4 Polybenzvalene (PBV) 4 Polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ) 6 Chain-Transfer Studies 11 CONCLUSIONS 15 EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES 16 .F 4E 19 APPENDICES A...strained ring polymers similar to PBV are known. The investigation of one of these polymers, polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ), is also described in this report

  13. Spin Filtering in Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, N. N.; Pavlov, F. F.

    The spin filtering in storage rings is based on a multiple passage of a stored beam through a polarized internal gas target. Apart from the polarization by the spin-dependent transmission, a unique geometrical feature of interaction with the target in such a filtering process, pointed out by H.O. Meyer,1 is a scattering of stored particles within the beam. A rotation of the spin in the scattering process affects the polarization buildup. We derive here a quantum-mechanical evolution equation for the spin-density matrix of a stored beam which incorporates the scattering within the beam. We show how the interplay of the transmission and scattering within the beam changes from polarized electrons to polarized protons in the atomic target. After discussions of the FILTEX results on the filtering of stored protons,2 we comment on the strategy of spin filtering of antiprotons for the PAX experiment at GSI FAIR.3.

  14. Which Ringed Planet...!?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Don't worry - you are not the only one who thought this was a nice amateur photo of planet Saturn, Lord of the Rings in our Solar System! But then the relative brightness and positions of the moons may appear somewhat unfamiliar... and the ring system does look unusually bright when compared to the planetary disk...?? Well, it is not Saturn, but Uranus , the next giant planet further out, located at a distance of about 3,000 million km, or 20 times the distance between the Sun and the Earth. The photo shows Uranus surrounded by its rings and some of the moons, as they appear on a near-infrared image that was obtained in the K s -band (at wavelength 2.2 µm) with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument on the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile) . The exposure was made on November 19, 2002 (03:00 hrs UT) during a planetary research programme. The observing conditions were excellent (seeing 0.5 arcsec) and the exposure lasted 5 min. The angular diameter of Uranus is about 3.5 arcsec. The observers at ISAAC were Emmanuel Lellouch and Thérése Encrenaz of the Observatoire de Paris (France) and Jean-Gabriel Cuby and Andreas Jaunsen (both ESO-Chile). The rings The rings of Uranus were discovered in 1977, from observations during a stellar occultation event by astronomer teams at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) and the Perth Observatory (Australia). Just before and after the planet moved in front of the (occulted) star, the surrounding rings caused the starlight to dim for short intervals of time. Photos obtained from the Voyager-2 spacecraft in 1986 showed a multitude of very tenuous rings. These rings are almost undetectable from the Earth in visible light. However, on the present VLT near-infrared picture, the contrast between the rings and the planet is strongly enhanced. At the particular wavelength at which this observation was made, the infalling sunlight is almost completely absorbed by gaseous methane present in the planetary atmosphere

  15. Precooler Ring Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Moenich, J.

    1980-10-02

    The precooler vacuum system, as proposed by FNAL, is based on a suitable modification of the existing Electron Cooling Ring System. Because of the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets, distributed ion pumping, as exists in the Electron Cooling Ring, is not applicable. Instead, the proposed pumping will be done with commercial appendage ion pumps mounted approximately every two meters around the circumference of the ring. The loss of effective pumping speed and non-uniformity of system pressure with appendage pumps may not be major considerations but the large number required does effect experimental and analytical equipment placement considerations. There is a distributed pumping technique available which: (1) is not affected by the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets; (2) will provide a minimum of four times the hydrogen pumping speed of the proposed appendage ion pumps; (3) will require no power during pumping after the strip is activated; (4) will provide the heat source for bakeout; (5) is easily replaceable; and (6) can be purchased, installed, and operated at a generous economic advantage over the presently proposed ion pumped system. The pumping technique referred to is non-evaporable gettering with ST101 Zr/Al pumping strip. A technical description of this pumping strip is given on Data Sheet 1 and 2 attached to this report.

  16. Saturn's ``Gossamer'' Ring: The F Ring's Inner Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    Recent Galileo and Earth-based images have revealed for the first time that Jupiter's ``gossamer'' ring is actually composed of two rings, one bounded at the outer edge by Amalthea and the other bounded by Thebe. Dynamical models suggest that these rings are composed of dust grains ejected off the surfaces of the two moons, which then evolve inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. A very faint sheet of material filling the region between Saturn's A and F Rings reported by Burns et al. (BAAS 15, 1013--1014, 1983) may be a dynamically analogous system, in which dust escapes from the F Ring and evolves inward to the A Ring. Unlike Jupiter's gossamer rings, however, the inner sheet of Saturn's F Ring has been well observed from a large range of phase angles and visual wavelengths by Voyager. Voyager images reveal that this faint ring shows a tenfold increase in brightness between phase angles of 125(deg) and 165(deg) , indicating that it is composed of fine dust microns in size. Preliminary estimates of the normal optical depth fall in the range 1--2*E(-4) , depending on the dust size distribution assumed. Initial spectrophotometry reveals that the ring is neutral in color. The ring is uniform in brightness over the entire region between the two rings, with no evidence for internal structure associated with Prometheus and Atlas, suggesting that neither of these embedded moons acts as either a source or a sink. We will refine the aforementioned measurements and develop photometric models to better constrain the properties of the dust in this ring. This will enable us to relate the dust population to that in the F Ring proper, and to better explore the dynamical processes at work.

  17. Performance of Oil Pumping Rings: An Analytical and Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eusepi, M. W.; Walowit, J. A.; Pinkus, O.; Holmes, P.

    1986-01-01

    A steady-state design computer program was developed to predict the performance of pumping rings as functions of geometry, applied loading, speed, ring modulus, and fluid viscosity. Additional analyses were developed to predict transient behavior of the ring and the effects of temperature rises occurring in the hydrodynamic film between the ring and shaft. The analysis was initially compared with previous experimental data and then used to design additional rings for further testing. Tests were performed with Rulon, carbon-graphite, and babbit rings. The design analysis was used to size all of the rings and to select the ranges of clearances, thickness, and loading. Although full quantitative agreement was lacking, relative agreement existed in that rings that were predicted to perform well theoretically, generally performed well experimentally. Some causes for discrepanices between theory and experiment are believed to be due to starvation, leakage past the secondary seal at high pressures, and uncertainties in the small clearances and local inlet temperatures to the pumping ring. A separate preliminary analysis was performed for a pumping Leningrader seal. This anlaysis can be used to predict the film thickness and flow rate thr ough the seal as a function of pressure, speed, loading, and geometry.

  18. Helmet latching and attaching ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, E. W.; Viikinsalo, S. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A neck ring releasably secured to a pressurized garment carries an open-ended ring normally in the engagement position fitted into an annular groove and adapted to fit into a complementary annular groove formed in a helmet. Camming means formed on the inner surface at the end of the helmet engages the open-ended ring to retract the same and allow for one motion donning even when the garment is pressurized. A projection on the end of the split ring is engageable to physically retract the split ring.

  19. Cassini RSS occultation observations of density waves in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGhee, C. A.; French, R. G.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schinder, P. J.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Goltz, G.; Johnston, D.; Rochblatt, D.

    2005-08-01

    On May 3, 2005, the first of a series of eight nearly diametric occultations by Saturn's rings and atmosphere took place, observed by the Cassini Radio Science (RSS) team. Simultaneous high SNR measurements at the Deep Space Network (DSN) at S, X, and Ka bands (λ = 13, 3.6, and 0.9 cm) have provided a remarkably detailed look at the radial structure and particle scattering behavior of the rings. By virtue of the relatively large ring opening angle (B=-23.6o), the slant path optical depth of the rings was much lower than during the Voyager epoch (B=5.9o), making it possible to detect many density waves and other ring features in the Cassini RSS data that were lost in the noise in the Voyager RSS experiment. Ultimately, diffraction correction of the ring optical depth profiles will yield radial resolution as small as tens of meters for the highest SNR data. At Ka band, the Fresnel scale is only 1--1.5 km, and thus even without diffraction correction, the ring profiles show a stunning array of density waves. The A ring is replete with dozens of Pandora and Prometheus inner Lindblad resonance features, and the Janus 2:1 density wave in the B ring is revealed with exceptional clarity for the first time at radio wavelengths. Weaker waves are abundant as well, and multiple occultation chords sample a variety of wave phases. We estimate the surface mass density of the rings from linear density wave models of the weaker waves. For stronger waves, non-linear models are required, providing more accurate estimates of the wave dispersion relation, the ring surface mass density, and the angular momentum exchange between the rings and satellite. We thank the DSN staff for their superb support of these complex observations.

  20. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  1. Mass of Saturn's A ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The mass of Saturn's A ring is reestimated using the behavior of spiral density waves embedded in the ring. The Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) observed the star delta-Scorpii as it was occulted by Saturn's rings during the Voyager 2 flyby of Saturn in 1981 producing a radial profile of the rings. We examined forty spiral density waves in the Voyager PPS data of the A ring including 10 weaker waves that have not been previously analyzed by means of an autoregressive power spectral technique called Burg. The strengths of this new method for ring studies are that weaker, less extended waves are easily detected and characterized. This method is also the first one which does not require precise knowledge of the resonance location and phase of the wave in order to calculate the surface mass density. Uncertainties of up to 3 km are present in the currently available radial scales for Saturn's rings.

  2. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  3. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  4. Ring currents in azulene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, A. T.; Todorov, T. N.; Elena, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    We propose a self consistent polarisable ion tight binding theory for the study of push-pull processes in aromatic molecules. We find that the method quantitatively reproduces ab initio calculations of dipole moments and polarisability. We apply the scheme in a simulation which solves the time dependent Schrödinger equation to follow the relaxation of azulene from the second excited to the ground states. We observe rather spectacular oscillating ring currents which we explain in terms of interference between the HOMO and LUMO states.

  5. Wave structure in planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Linda Joyce

    1992-01-01

    Planetary rings contain a wealth of wavelike structure that is driven by gravitational resonance interactions with nearby satellites. Wave behavior is a powerful tool for estimating physical ring parameters that are key to our understanding of ring origin and evolution. A new technique, utilizing the Burg autoregressive power spectral algorithm, was developed for probing the physical characteristics of rings and for detecting waves that are not otherwise visible. Data from the Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune and the Voyager radio science (RSS) occultation by Saturn's rings were used. Local surface mass density estimates are obtained from the dispersion of 40 spiral density waves in Saturn's A ring, including 10 weaker waves not previously analyzed. Surface mass densities vary from 20 to 60 gm sq cm. Increasing optical depth is not correlated with increasing surface mass density, especially after the Keeler gap, suggesting that ring particle size and composition are not uniform throughout the A ring. Saturn's A ring mass is reestimated using the surface mass densities and is 5.2 +/- 1.3 x 1021 gm. The wakes of Saturn's satellite Pan are not short timescale phenomena because the effects of Pan's gravitational perturbations persist for more than one Pan encounter. Four additional Pan wakes were discovered at longitudes greater than 360 deg. Collective effects such as collisions modify the wake dispersion more extensively at greater longitudes. Pan is the dominant mass in the Encke gap. A spiral density wave was detected inside the Uranian delta ring. Upper and lower bounds were estimated for the surface mass density of the delta ring 5 less than or equal to sigma less than or equal to 10 gm/sq cm, the viscosity 10 less than or equal to nu less than or equal to 40 sq cm/sec, and the local ring height 7 less than or equal to h less than or equal to 20 m. These values are comparable to the corresponding

  6. Achieving an ultra-uniform diffraction pattern of stray light with metallic meshes by using ring and sub-ring arrays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengang; Wang, Heyan; Tan, Jiubin; Ma, Limin; Lin, Shen

    2016-05-01

    We provide theoretical and experimental evidence that introducing metallic rings and sub-rings in mesh unit cells significantly decreases the high-order diffraction energy. Moreover, rotating the sub-rings results in increased uniformity in the diffraction distribution without affecting the transmittance. Experiments show that the triangular ring mesh with rotated sub-rings exhibits a normalized visible transmittance greater than 95% as well as an ultra-uniform diffraction pattern of stray light, whose maximal normalized high-order diffraction energy is lower than 0.0167%. This kind of metallic mesh will be favorable in transparent electromagnetic interference shielding devices and touch screens.

  7. The Charging of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graps, Amara L.; Horanyi, M.; Havnes, O.; Gruen, E.

    2008-09-01

    Planetary rings have an undeniable aesthetic appeal, resulting in media icons of ringed planets as descriptive of the planetary sciences field as a whole. Such far-reaching symbolism might not be misplaced, however, because planetary rings represent a fundamental class of planetary structure that invites interdisciplinary investigations from specialists in dust, gravitational, plasma, collisional, and radiative transfer physics, due to: its sub-micron to meters-sized particles, its immersion in the planet's magnetic field, its embedded moonlets and its close proximity to the ringed planet's ionosphere and innermost moons. As such, planetary rings are a metaphoric bridge through a wide range of planetary physical processes. Processes to charge ring particles have different relative dynamical effects, dependent upon the rings' particle sizes, and the ring's plasma, magnetic and gravitational environments. This presentation will review what is known about the charging parameters and processes of planetary rings, in particular the sum of the individual currents from the time-varying charge dQ/dt, of the planetary ring particle. The individual currents depend on the environmental plasma conditions: number density, flow speed, temperature, and mass for the currents: electron and ion capture from the plasma, ion currents to a moving grain, photoelectron emission, secondary electron emission, thermionic effects, with stochastic charging influencing all of the above. Since rings are an ensemble of particles, ("cloud" Ring), we will define an ensemble, and consider the above currents, including those for the smallest ring particles, the dust particles, to arrive at a table giving charge potential and other relevant parameters.

  8. Kinematics and dynamics of vortex rings in a tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Kinematic theory and flow visualization experiments were combined to examine the dynamic processes which control the evolution of vortex rings from very low to very high Reynolds numbers, and to assess the effects of the wall as a vortex ring travels up a tube. The kinematic relationships among the size, shape, speed, and strength of vortex rings in a tube were computed from the theory. Relatively simple flow visualization measurements were used to calculate the total circulation of a vortex rings at a given time. Using this method, the strength was computated and plotted as a function of time for experimentally produced vortex rings. Reynolds number relationships are established and quantitative differences among the three Reynolds number groups are discussed.

  9. Storage ring injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some basic issues involved in injecting the beam into storage rings with the principal parameters of those studied at the workshop have been considered. The main conclusion is that straightforward adjustments of the storage ring parameters makes injection easy. The largest number of injected turns is fourteen, and the phase space dilution allowance seems adequate to ensure very small beam loss during injection. The adjustments also result in lower bending magnet fields, and high field superconducting magnets (e.g., 5 Tesla) are not necessary. The design changes do not necessarily affect the Keil-Schnell criterion for stability of the longitudinal microwave instability, although that criterion appears to be irrelevant. Because the beams are expected to be unstable, but with slow growth rates, the vacuum chamber impedances required to give equal risetimes for the various designs are compared for systems posing various degrees of difficulty for injection. Finally, the impact of the parameters on cost is noted, and a system is considered that cuts the length of the linac in half by using doubly charged ions.

  10. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  11. A storage ring for the JULIC cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. A.; Prasuhn, D.; Schott, W.; Wiedner, C. A.

    1985-05-01

    The storage ring COSY is planned to provide higher intensity and resolution for nuclear structure experiments using the light heavy ion beams (p, d, τ, α) of the JULIC cyclotron and the magnet spectrograph BIG KARL. The ring contains the measuring target of BIG KARL as an internal target, two rf cavities for compensating the mean energy loss in the target and providing additional acceleration of the stored beam and an e --cooling section. In the recirculator mode, i.e., without e --cooling, a luminosity of L = 3.64 × 10 30 particles/(cm 2 s) is obtained for an experiment with 41 MeV protons and a 50 μg/cm 212C target at a spectrograph resolution p/d p = 10 4 and 100% duty factor. This corresponds to a gain in L of 546.5 in comparison with the same experiment without a storage ring. In the recirculator mode with acceleration L = 1.17 × 10 32 p/(cm 2 s) and 98.8% duty factor results for 1500 MeV protons on the same target at the same resolution. Using e --cooling L and the feasible p/d p can be enhanced, however, at a reduced duty factor.

  12. Ring current and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  13. Reversible Rings with Involutions and Some Minimalities

    PubMed Central

    Fakieh, W. M.; Nauman, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    In continuation of the recent developments on extended reversibilities on rings, we initiate here a study on reversible rings with involutions, or, in short, ∗-reversible rings. These rings are symmetric, reversible, reflexive, and semicommutative. In this note we will study some properties and examples of ∗-reversible rings. It is proved here that the polynomial rings of ∗-reversible rings may not be ∗-reversible. A criterion for rings which cannot adhere to any involution is developed and it is observed that a minimal noninvolutary ring is of order 4 and that a minimal noncommutative ∗-reversible ring is of order 16. PMID:24489510

  14. Experimental results from the small isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev

    2005-05-01

    The Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) is a compact, low-energy storage ring designed to investigate the beam dynamics of high-intensity isochronous cyclotrons and synchrotrons at the transition energy. The ring was developed at Michigan State University (MSU) and has been operational since December 2003. It stores 20 keV hydrogen beams with a peak current of 10-20 microamps for up to 200 turns. The transverse and longitudinal profiles of extracted bunches are measured with an accuracy of approximately 1 mm. The high accuracy of the measurements makes the experimental data attractive for validation of multi-particle space charge codes. The results obtained in the ring show a fast growth of the energy spread induced by the space charge forces. The energy spread growth is accompanied by a breakup of the beam bunches into separated clusters that are involved in the vortex motion specific to the isochronous regime. The experimental results presented in the paper show a remarkable agreement with simulations performed with the code CYCO. In this paper, we discuss specifics of space charge effects in the isochronous regime, present results of experiments in SIR, and conduct a detailed comparison of the experimental data with results of simulations.

  15. Performance Characterization of Ion Thruster with Isolated Magnet Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    Many ion sources use magnetic multipole confinement to increase the primary electron containment length. The magnetic circuit increases ion source efficiency and plasma density. A multipole source consists of rings or rows of magnets of alternating polarity. In multipole sources, the bulk of the discharge current is collected at the magnet surface, through the relatively narrow leak width. Ion engines for space propulsion are one application of multipole ion sources. Here we characterize a four ring, broad beam ion source under simulated beam extraction using typical performance metrics for ion engines while biasing the magnetic rings individually. By biasing the magnetic cusps, through isolated, conformal electrodes placed on the magnet rings, the current distribution to each individual cusp can be modified. The effect of ring bias on ion beam current, propellant utilization efficiency, and discharge losses is measured over a broad range of ring bias. Previous experiments have shown that the current distribution to the rings can be controlled, and this current distribution has tangible effects on the plasma properties and ion source operation. The goal is to gain insight into which magnetic ring current distributions will yield enhancements in engine performance.

  16. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  17. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  18. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  19. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  20. Black ring deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gimon, Eric; Gimon, Eric G.; Levi, Thomas S.

    2007-06-22

    We present a sample microstate for a black ring in four and five dimensional language. The microstate consists of a black string microstate with an additional D6-brane. We show that with an appropriate choice of parameters the piece involving the black string microstate falls down a long AdS throat, whose M-theory lift is AdS_3 x S2. We wrap a spinning dipole M2-brane on the S2 in the probe approximation. In IIA, this corresponds to a dielectric D2-brane carrying only D0-charge. We conjecture this is the firstapproximation to a cloud of D0-branes blowing up due to their non-abelian degrees of freedom and the Myers effect.

  1. The Saturn Ring Observer: In situ studies of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Spilker, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey recently undertaken by the NRC's Space Studies Board for the National Academy of Sciences, studies were commissioned for a number of potential missions to outer planet targets. One of these studies examined the technological feasibility of a mission to carry out in situ studies of Saturn's rings, from a spacecraft placed in a circular orbit above the ring plane: the Saturn Ring Observer. The technical findings and background are discussed in a companion poster by T. R. Spilker et al. Here we outline the science goals of such a mission. Most of the fundamental interactions in planetary rings occur on spatial scales that are unresolved by flyby or orbiter spacecraft. Typical particle sizes in the rings of Saturn are in the 1 cm - 10 m range, and average interparticle spacings are a few meters. Indirect evidence indicates that the vertical thickness of the rings is as little as 5 - 10 m, which implies a velocity dispersion of only a few mm/sec. Theories of ring structure and evolution depend on the unknown characteristics of interparticle collisions and on the size distribution of the ring particles. The SRO could provide direct measurements of both the coefficient of restitution -- by monitoring individual collisions -- and the particles’ velocity dispersion. High-resolution observations of individual ring particles should also permit estimates of their spin states. Numerical simulations of Saturn’s rings incorporating both collisions and self-gravity predict that the ring particles are not uniformly distributed, but are instead clustered into elongated structures referred to as “self-gravity wakes”, which are continually created and destroyed on an orbital timescale. Theory indicates that the average separation between wakes in the A ring is of order 30-100 m. Direct imaging of self-gravity wakes, including their formation and subsequent dissolution, would provide critical validation of these models. Other

  2. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  3. Contraceptive vaginal rings: a review.

    PubMed

    Brache, Vivian; Faundes, Anibal

    2010-11-01

    Development efforts on contraceptive vaginal rings were initiated over 40 years ago based on two principles: the capacity of the vaginal epithelium to absorb steroids and the capacity of elastomers to release these hormones at a nearly constant rate. Numerous models of contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) have been studied, but only two have reached the market: NuvaRing, a combined ring that releases etonogestrel (ENG) and ethinylestradiol (EE), and Progering, a progesterone-releasing ring for use in lactating women. The main advantages of CVRs are their effectiveness (similar to or slightly better than the pill), ease of use without the need of remembering a daily routine, user's ability to control initiation and discontinuation, nearly constant release rate allowing for lower doses, greater bioavailability and good cycle control with the combined ring. The main disadvantages are related to the mode of delivery; CVRs may cause vaginal discharge and complaints, ring expulsion is not uncommon, the ring may be felt during coitus and vaginal insertion may be unpleasant for some women. The studies reviewed in this article provide evidence that CVRs are safe, effective and highly acceptable to women. There is no doubt that CVRs offer a new, effective contraceptive option to women, expanding their available choices of hormonal contraception.

  4. Ring Infiltrate in Staphylococcal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Wallang, Batriti S.; Sharma, Savitri; Sahu, Srikant K.; Mittal, Ruchi

    2013-01-01

    Smear and culture tests of corneal scrapings from a patient with a ring infiltrate confirmed significant growth of a Staphylococcus species resistant to fluoroquinolones. Because of nonresponse to medical management, the patient underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. Staphylococcal infection of the cornea may appear as a ring-like infiltrate that is recalcitrant to medical management. PMID:23100354

  5. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  6. How Jupiter's Ring Was Discovered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, James; Kerr, Richard

    1985-01-01

    "Rings" (by astronomer James Elliot and science writer Richard Kerr) is a nontechnical book about the discovery and exploration of ring systems from the time of Galileo to the era of the Voyager spacecraft. One of this book's chapters is presented. (JN)

  7. Rings Full of Waves (zoom)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows a close-up view of a density wave in Saturn's A ring. It was taken by the narrow angle camera on the Cassini spacecraft after successful entry into Saturn's orbit. The view shows the dark, or unlit, side of the rings.

  8. Simulating the Smallest Ring World of Chariklo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    A ring system consisting of two dense narrow rings has been discovered around Centaur Chariklo. The existence of these rings around a small object poses various questions about their origin, stability, and lifetime. In order to understand the nature of Chariklo’s rings, we perform global N-body simulations of the self-gravitating collisional particle rings for the first time. We find that Chariklo should be denser than the ring material in order to avoid the rapid diffusion of the rings. If Chariklo is denser than the ring material, fine spiral structures called self-gravity wakes occur in the inner ring. These wakes accelerate the viscous spreading of the ring significantly and typically occur on timescales of about 100 {years} for m-sized ring particles, which is considerably shorter than the timescales suggested in previous studies. The existence of these narrow rings implies smaller ring particles or the existence of shepherding satellites.

  9. Discovery Of B Ring Propellers In Cassini UVIS, And ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    We present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We identify two propeller populations: (1) tens of degrees wide propellers in the dense B ring core, and (2) smaller, more A ring like, propellers populating the inner B ring. The prototype of the first population is an object observed at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. The ubiquitous propeller "S" shape is seen both in UVIS occultations as an optical depth depletion and in ISS as a 40 degrees wide bright stripe in unlit geometries and dark in lit geometries. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap embedded in the high optical depth region of the B ring. The gap moves at orbital speed consistent with its radial location. From the radial separation of the propeller wings we estimate that the embedded body, which causes the propeller structure, is about 1.5km in size located at a=112,921km. The UVIS occultations indicate an asymmetric propeller "S" shape. Since the object is located at an edge between high and relatively low optical depth, this asymmetry is most likely a consequence of the strong surface mass density gradient. We estimate that there are possibly dozen up to 100 other propeller objects in Saturn's B ring. The location of the discovered body, at an edge of a dense ringlet within the B ring, suggests a novel mechanism for the up to now illusive B ring irregular large-scale structure of alternating high and low optical depth ringlets. We propose that this B ring irregular structure may have its cause in the presence of many embedded bodies that shepherd the individual B ring ringlets.

  10. Luminescence Rings in Quantum Well Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denev, S.; Liu, Y.; Snoke, D.; Rapaport, R.; Chen, Gang; Simon, S.; Pfeiffer, L.; West, K.

    2004-03-01

    An unique ring-shaped luminescence pattern with size of hundreds of microns to millimeters has been observed in GaAs-based quantum well structures excited by weak laser light [1]. The ring persists up to high temperatures, and its size can be manipulated by the laser power, electric field, external stress or magnetic field. We give a detailed description of the effect and discuss various proposed explanations including an optical effect, diffusion and excitonic superfluidity. A realistic explanation based on a simple, nonlinear model of charge separation is proposed, and numerical results from the model are compared to the experiment. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation under grant No. DMR-0102457 and by the Department of Energy under grant No. DE-FG0299ER45780 [1] D. Snoke, S. Denev, Y. Liu, L. Pfeiffer, and K. West, "Long-range Transport in Excitonic Dark States in Coupled Quantum Wells," Nature 418, 754 (2002).

  11. The CERN intersecting storage rings (ISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) was the first facility ever built providing colliding hadron beams. It mainly operated with protons with beam energies of 15 to 31 GeV. The ISR was conceived in the years 1960 to 1964 and was approved in 1965. It came into operation at the beginning of 1971 and was decommissioned as a collider in 1983. A number of accelerator technologies have been either much improved or developed at the ISR which subsequently have become enabling technologies for a number of hadron storage rings and large colliders. Prominent examples of such technologies are ultra-high vacuum technology, beam diagnostics based on Schottky signals and stochastic cooling. The experiences obtained with the ISR were later exploited at the proton-antiproton facility in the CERN SPS, the Tevatron at Fermilab, the RHIC at Brookhaven and, finally, by the LHC at CERN.

  12. Drift due to viscous vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, Thomas; Spagnolie, Saverio; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2016-11-01

    Biomixing is the study of fluid mixing due to swimming organisms. While large organisms typically produce turbulent flows in their wake, small organisms produce less turbulent wakes; the main mechanism of mixing is the induced net particle displacement (drift). Several experiments have examined this drift for small jellyfish, which produce vortex rings that trap and transport a fair amount of fluid. Inviscid theory implies infinite particle displacements for the trapped fluid, so the effect of viscosity must be included to understand the damping of real vortex motion. We use a model viscous vortex ring to compute particle displacements and other relevant quantities, such as the integrated moments of the displacement. Fluid entrainment at the tail end of a growing vortex 'envelope' is found to play an important role in the total fluid transport and drift. Partially supported by NSF Grant DMS-1109315.

  13. ELASR - An electrostatic storage ring for atomic and molecular physics at KACST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, Mohamed O. A.

    A new ELectrostAtic Storage Ring (ELASR) has been designed and built at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It was developed to be the core of a new storage ring laboratory for atomic and molecular physics at KACST. ELASR follows the standard design of the pioneering storage ring ELISA and it thereby features a racetrack single-bend shaped ring. Complementary simulation code packages were used to work out the design under the requirements of the projected experiments. This paper reports a short description of the ELASR storage ring through an overview of its design and construction.

  14. Characterization of Macroscopic Ordering in Exciton Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen; Levitov, L. S.; Simons, B. D.; Gossard, A. C.

    2005-03-01

    Recently observed complex PL patterns in 2D QW structures exhibit the inner [1,3] and the outer [1-4] exciton rings, localized bright spots [1,3], and the macroscopically ordered exciton state (MOES) [1,3]. The latter appears at the outer ring via its fragmentation into a periodic array of aggregates. While the gross features have been explained within classical framework, attributing the inner rings to nonradiative exciton transport and cooling [1], and the outermost rings and the bright spots to macroscopic charge separation [3,4], the origin of the MOES remains unidentified [5]. Here, for the first time, we report experiments demonstrating the exciton energy modulation over the MOES as well as the phase diagram of MOES in exciton density and temperature coordinates. The experiments shed new light on the dynamical origin of MOES. Besides, we present the studies of dynamical processes within MOES including the observation of aggregate instabilities and bifurcations that point to the spontaneous character of the instability.[1] L.V. Butov, A.C. Gossard, D.S. Chemla, Nature 418, 751 (2002). [2] D. Snoke, S. Denev, Y. Liu, L. Pfeiffer, K. West, Nature 418, 754 (2002). [3] L.V. Butov, L.S. Levitov, A.V. Mintsev, B.D. Simons, A.C. Gossard, D.S. Chemla PRL 92, 117404 (2004). [4] R. Rapaport, G. Chen, D. Snoke, S.H. Simon, L. Pfeiffer, K. West, Y. Liu, S. Denev PRL 92, 117405 (2004). [5] L.S. Levitov, B.D. Simons, L.V. Butov, cond-mat/0403377.

  15. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.

  16. DETECTION OF LOW-VELOCITY COLLISIONS IN SATURN'S F RING

    SciTech Connect

    Attree, N. O.; Murray, C. D.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-08-20

    Jets of material extending several hundred kilometers from Saturn's F ring are thought to be caused by collisions at speeds of several tens of ms{sup -1} between {approx}10 km diameter objects such as S/2004 S 6 and the core of the ring. The subsequent effects of Keplerian shear give rise to the multi-stranded nature of the F ring. Observations of the ring by the Imaging Science Subsystem experiment on the Cassini spacecraft have provided evidence that some smaller protrusions from the ring's core are the result of low-velocity collisions with nearby objects. We refer to these protrusions as 'mini-jets' and one such feature has been observed for {approx}7.5 hr as its length changed from {approx}75 km to {approx}250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse into the core. Orbit determinations suggest that such mini-jets consist of ring material displaced by a {approx}1 ms{sup -1} collision with a nearby moonlet, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of Keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. Detections of mini-jets in the Cassini images suggest that it may now be possible to understand most small-scale F ring structure as the result of such collisions. A study of these mini-jets will therefore put constraints on the properties of the colliding population as well as improve our understanding of low-velocity collisions between icy objects.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions ring chromosome 20 syndrome ring chromosome 20 syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ring chromosome 20 syndrome is a condition that affects the ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions ring chromosome 14 syndrome ring chromosome 14 syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ring chromosome 14 syndrome is a condition characterized by seizures ...

  19. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Mark A.

    1985-01-01

    A laser pulse is injected into an unstable ring resonator-amplifier structure. Inside this resonator the laser pulse is amplified, spatially filtered and magnified. The laser pulse is recirculated in the resonator, being amplified, filtered and magnified on each pass. The magnification is chosen so that the beam passes through the amplifier in concentric non-overlapping regions similar to a single pass MOPA. After a number of passes around the ring resonator the laser pulse is spatially large enough to exit the ring resonator system by passing around an output mirror.

  20. On the buckling of elastic rings by external confinement.

    PubMed

    Hazel, Andrew L; Mullin, Tom

    2017-05-13

    We report the results of an experimental and numerical investigation into the buckling of thin elastic rings confined within containers of circular or regular polygonal cross section. The rings float on the surface of water held in the container and controlled removal of the fluid increases the confinement of the ring. The increased compressive forces can cause the ring to buckle into a variety of shapes. For the circular container, finite perturbations are required to induce buckling, whereas in polygonal containers the buckling occurs through a linear instability that is closely related to the canonical Euler column buckling. A model based on Kirchhoff-Love beam theory is developed and solved numerically, showing good agreement with the experiments and revealing that in polygons increasing the number of sides means that buckling occurs at reduced levels of confinement.This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications.'

  1. Progress Report on the g-2 Storage Ring Magnet System

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.A.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.; Green, M.A.; Jackson, J.; Jia, L.; Krienen, F.; Meier, R.; Meng, W.; Morse, W.; Pai, C.; Polk, I.; Prodell, A.; Shutt, R.; Snydstrup, L.; Yamamoto, A.

    1995-06-01

    The 3.1 GeV muon storage ring for the g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory has three large solenoid magnets that form a continuous 1.451 tesla storage ring dipole with an average beam bend radius of 7.1 meters. In addition to the three storage ring solenoids, there is an inflector dipole with nested dipole coils that create very little stray magnetic field. A superconducting shield on the inflector gets rid of most of the remaining stray flux. This paper reports on the progress made on the storage ring solenoid magnet system and the inflector as of June 1995. The results of cryogenic system tests are briefly reported.

  2. An objective reference system for studying rings in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelão, Guilherme P.; Irber, Luiz C.; Villas Boas, Ana B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Rings are marine vortices with a scale of hundreds of kilometers that can last for months, whose associated transport and mixing play an important role in the ocean dynamics. Such features are traditionally treated as a geostrophic flow, but since the centrifugal acceleration is not negligible in the inner core, the cyclo-geostrophic balance is a better approximation for the rings. In the present work, we describe a novel objective technique to identify the ring center, which is used as the origin of a convenient framework to handle rings under the cyclo-geostrophic balance. Furthermore, we correct the velocity field by the translation to isolate the swirl movement, a procedure ignored by other methodologies. We show that the lack of such correction would lead to an error of 30 km on the center definition of a ship surveyed North Brazil Current Ring with 160 km of radius. Another distinct characteristic of our approach is the flexibility in the spatio-temporal structure of the data, because it allows for ungridded data, an important ability for in situ observations. That also enables the use of a hybrid dataset composed from different instruments. The error on the Monte Carlo experiments to identify the center of the propagating ring is less than 10 km, and depends on the level of noise, sampling strategy, and strength of the ring, among other factors. This technique was fully implemented in PyRings, an open Python library with a collection of procedures to handle oceanic rings and mesoscale eddies in general.

  3. Molecular ring rotation in solid ferrocene revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard; Spehr, Tinka Luise; Stühn, Bernd

    2015-03-21

    We report on quasielastic neutron spectroscopy experiments on ferrocene (bis(η{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl)iron) in its three different crystalline phases: the disordered monoclinic crystalline phase (T > 164 K), the metastable triclinic phase (T < 164 K), and the stable orthorhombic phase (T < 250 K). The cyclopentadienyl rings in ferrocene are known to undergo rotational reorientations for which the analysis of our large data set suggests partially a revision of the known picture of the dynamics and allows for an extension and completion of previous studies. In the monoclinic phase, guided by structural information, we propose a model for rotational jumps among non-equivalent sites in contrast to the established 5-fold jump rotation model. The new model takes the dynamical disorder into account and allows the cyclopentadienyl rings to reside in two different configurations which are found to be twisted by an angle of approximately 30°. In the triclinic phase, our analysis demands the use of a 2-ring model accounting for crystallographically independent sites with different barriers to rotation. For the orthorhombic phase of ferrocene, we confirm a significantly increased barrier of rotation using neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Our data analysis includes multiple scattering corrections and presents a novel approach of simultaneous analysis of different neutron scattering data by combining elastic and inelastic fixed window temperature scans with energy spectra, providing a very robust and reliable mean of extracting the individual activation energies of overlapping processes.

  4. Stability of Moonlets Embedded in Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mark C.; Burdon, C.

    2011-04-01

    Previous work on moonlets assumed that they were just a single indestructible spherical particle and focused primarily on the effects such a body would have on the surrounding ring material (Lewis and Stewart 2009, Icarus 199:387-412; Sremcevic et al. 2007, Nature 449:1019-1021). Both observations and numerical simulations of Saturn's small inner moons show them as very low density rubble piles (Porco et al. 2007, Science 318:1602). Unlike the small moons, moonlets embedded in the ring material will experience regular collisions with self gravity wakes tens of meters across. Even with a single spherical core, these collisions can lead to the shedding of significant amounts of accreted material. We describe numerical simulations in which we explore the parameters required for stability of moonlets embedded in the ring material. Because of their location well inside the Roche limit, these bodies require either higher densities or some internal strength in order to stay together. We explore how much strength is required for these moonlets to be stable against the regular impacts they sustain in that environment. This work was funded by NSF AAG award number 0907972.

  5. Black rings at large D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    We study the effective theory of slowly rotating black holes at the infinite limit of the spacetime dimension D. This large D effective theory is obtained by integrating the Einstein equation with respect to the radial direction. The effective theory gives equations for non-linear dynamical deformations of a slowly rotating black hole by effective equations. The effective equations contain the slowly rotating Myers-Perry black hole, slowly boosted black string, non-uniform black string and black ring as stationary solutions. We obtain the analytic solution of the black ring by solving effective equations. Furthermore, by perturbation analysis of effective equations, we find a quasinormal mode condition of the black ring in analytic way. As a result we confirm that thin black ring is unstable against non-axisymmetric perturbations. We also include 1 /D corrections to the effective equations and discuss the effects by 1 /D corrections.

  6. Dissipative ring solitons with vorticity.

    PubMed

    Soto-Crespo, J M; Akhmediev, N; Mejia-Cortés, C; Devine, N

    2009-03-16

    We study dissipative ring solitons with vorticity in the frame of the (2+1)-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. In dissipative media, radially symmetric ring structures with any vorticity m can be stable in a finite range of parameters. Beyond the region of stability, the solitons lose the radial symmetry but may remain stable, keeping the same value of the topological charge. We have found bifurcations into solitons with n-fold bending symmetry, with n independent on m. Solitons without circular symmetry can also display (m + 1)-fold modulation behaviour. A sequence of bifurcations can transform the ring soliton into a pulsating or chaotic state which keeps the same value of the topological charge as the original ring.

  7. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  8. Analysis of Ring Wake Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. C.; Stewart, G. R.

    1999-09-01

    indent=20pt Collisional N-body simulations at the edge of a perturbed planetary ring are used to model the edges of the Encke gap in Saturn's rings. A small satellite, Pan, orbits inside the Encke gap and excites forced eccentricities and density wakes on both edges of the gap. The simulations use a local cell method to model a narrow ring using particles of the appropriate size for the A-ring at the proper optical depth. In the simulations we see evidence for shear reversal at the wake peaks. Our results imply that the most significant factor in the damping of the wakes is the reduction of the forced eccentricity and not randomization of the phase angles of the particles. The reduction of the forced eccentricity occurs in an orderly fashion with steep drops at each successive wake maximum following the highest density wake peak. indent=20pt At the inner edge (that nearer the perturber) we see phase shifts visible as bending of the line wake maxima. Because the simulations are actually of narrow rings, we also see a number of interesting phenomena at the outer edge. A strong boundary layer forms at that edge, which becomes partially detached from the rest of the ring. The wake patterns persist much further downstream in this boundary layer than they do in the rest of the ring. We also observe that in the less dense region between the main section of the ring and the boundary layer the magnitude of the forced eccentricities reverse their behavior in the main part and increase at each wake maxima. indent=20pt At the talk we will compare our results to the various analytic theories of Borderies, Goldreich, and Tremaine.

  9. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  11. Classifying Saturn's F Ring Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Sremcevic, M.; Esposito, L. W.; Colwell, J. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) has recorded more than 113 stellar occultations by Saturn's F ring providing measurements with ring plane resolutions of a few dozen meters and better. Inner and outer F ring strands have been seen throughout the Cassini mission where they revealed themselves as non-continuous, azimuthally and temporally highly variable structures. In the light of a more accurate orbit description of the F ring core we find evidence for a ring that becomes dynamically more active as the system approaches anti-apse alignment with Prometheus. This is consistent with the observed increased strand activity. A recent strand that morphologically resembles the core is the strongest seen to date and points to the intricate relation between core and strands indicating the strands' violent creation. Using more than 150 identifications of various strands, we trace their kinematics and infer dynamical timescales and photometric properties. Implications for the dynamical evolution of the F ring will be discussed. This research was supported by the Cassini Project.

  12. Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Krueger, H.

    2007-10-01

    Thebe's gossamer ring, the outermost and faintest of Jupiter's rings, has an outward extension that we have previously argued is due to a shadow resonance (Hamilton 2003, DPS meeting #35, #11.09). A shadow resonance arises from the abrupt shutoff of photoelectric charging when a dust particle enters Jupiter's shadow which, in turn, affects the strength of the electromagnetic perturbation from the planet's intense magnetic field. The result is a coupled oscillation between a particle's orbital eccentricity and its semimajor axis. Ring material spreads outward from Thebe while maintaining its vertical thickness just as observed by Galileo imaging. In addition to cameras, the Galileo spacecraft was also equipped with dust and plasma detectors. The spacecraft made two passes through the ring and its dust detector found that 1) dust fluxes drop immediately interior to Thebe's orbit, 2) some grains have inclinations in excess of 20 degrees and 3) submicron particles are present in the Amalthea ring in much greater numbers than in the Thebe ring. These findings can all be explained in the context of our shadow resonance model: the inner boundary is a direct consequence of the conservation of the Electromagnetic Jacobi Constant, the high inclinations are forced by a vertical resonance, and the excess submicron particles are a consequence of the weakening of electromagnetic forces in the vicinity of synchronous orbit. In this talk, we will present the data sets as well as detailed numerical simulations that back up these claims.

  13. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  14. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) , Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) and the DESPA and DASGAL laboratories of the Observatoire de Paris in France, in collaboration with ESO. The CONICA infra-red camera was built, under an ESO contract, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) (Heidelberg) and the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) (Garching) in Germany, in collaboration with ESO. Saturn - Lord of the rings ESO PR Photo 04a/02 ESO PR Photo 04a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 54k] [Normal - JPEG: 1034 x 800 pix - 200k] Caption : PR Photo 04a/02 shows the giant planet Saturn, as observed with the VLT NAOS-CONICA Adaptive Optics instrument on December 8, 2001; the distance was 1209 million km. It is a composite of exposures in two near-infrared wavebands (H and K) and displays well the intricate, banded structure of the planetary atmosphere and the rings. Note also the dark spot at the south pole at the bottom of the image. One of the moons, Tethys, is visible as a small point of light below the planet. It was used to guide the telescope and to perform the adaptive optics "refocussing" for this observation. More details in the text. Technical information about this photo is available below. This NAOS/CONICA image of Saturn ( PR Photo 04a/02 ), the second-largest planet in the solar system, was obtained at a time when Saturn was close to summer solstice in the southern hemisphere. At this moment, the tilt of the rings was about as large as it can be, allowing the best possible view of the planet's South Pole. That area was on Saturn's night side in 1982 and could therefore not be photographed during the Voyager encounter. The dark spot close to the South Pole is a remarkable structure that measures approximately 300 km across. It was only recently observed in visible light from the ground with a telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in the Pyrenees (France) - this is the first infrared image to

  15. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, G.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. The ring resides in the Roche zone, where tidal disruption competes with self-gravity, which allows us to observe the lifecycle of moonlets. Just as nearby moons create structure at the B ring edge (Esposito et al. 2012) and the Keeler gap (Murray 2007), the F ring "shepherding" moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In fact, Beurle et al (2010) show that Prometheus makes it possible for "distended, yet gravitationally coherent clumps" to form in the F ring, and Barbara and Esposito (2002) predicted a population of ~1 km bodies in the ring. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Seventeen of those 27 features are associated with clumps of ring material. Two features are opaque in occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects, which we refer to as Moonlets. The 15 other features partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. Upon visual inspection of the occultation profile, these features resemble Icicles, thus we will refer to them as such here. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, while Moonlets are possible solid objects. Optical depth is an indicator of clumping because more-densely aggregated material blocks more light; therefore, it is natural to imagine moonlets as later evolutionary stage of icicle, when looser clumps of material compact to form a feature that appears

  17. Competing length scales for the electronic structure of rings of C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jerry; Bryant, Garnett

    Recently, rings of C60 have been fabricated. This opens up the possibility of studying the electronic structure of complex nanosystems with competing length scales: here the length scale defined by individual C60 molecules, the length scale defined by moving along the inner edge of the ring of C60s, and the length scale for the outer edge. The effects of such competing length scales could be probed with a magnetic field B. We use a tight-binding model to study these effects theoretically. Noninteracting electrons are considered. B is included with a Peierls transformation. Calculated electronic spectrum for an isolated ring of carbons, here used as a simple model for C60, is compared with spectra for rings of carbon rings. Changes in spectra due to inter-ring hopping are identified. New structure in the density of states is correlated with the spatial distribution of states in rings of rings. A magnetic field is applied to access and couple different length scales. Calculated spectra for rings of full C60 molecules are compared with the model results to highlight the effects of competing length scales in C60 rings. Results are used to suggest possible experiments for rings of C60 molecules.

  18. Characteristic Time of the Magnetospheric Ring Current Decay FROM EXPIREMENT AND THEORY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash(Sizova), L. Z.; Korotova, G. I.

    2006-12-01

    The magnetospheric ring current particles are the most dynamic part of the Earth's radiation belts especially during geomagnetic storms. The processes of the magnetospheric ring current decay are studied as a function of the solar wind electric field. It is shown that the ring current dissipation rate is different during the main and recovery phase of geomagnetic storms. The characteristic time of the ring current decay in the main phase is independent of storm intensity and equals 4 hours. The characteristic time of the ring current decay in a recovery phase increases with storm intensity. We examine the ring current ion lifetimes for the possible mechanisms of its decay. Coulomb scattering, charge exchange and plasma instability mechanisms are used for estimation of lifetime of electrons, protons, helium, and oxygen ions. The values of the characteristic lifetime of ring current dissipation obtained from experiment and theory are compared. It is shown that during main and recovery phase of magnetic storm the different mechanisms can play main role in dissipation of the ring current. Very short characteristic decay time during main phase of geomagnetic storms is associated with plasma instabilities. The available ion composition data of the ring current make possible to assume that the ring current decay is accounted for by ion composition variations with changing the intensity (and hence position) of the ring current and/or by a rise of energetic ion fraction on low L-shells.

  19. Interaction of multiple co-axial co-rotating vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Suyang; Liu, Hong; Liu, Xiaoyu; Xiang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Fish and birds gain hydrodynamic force from a wake of discrete or linked vortex chain, which is the existence form of vortex rings in nature. Vortex rings with the same formation time are generated successively with different time interval by a piston-cylinder arrangement, and the velocity fields are measured using DPIV. The motion of multiple interacting vortex rings is first reported in laboratorial experiments. Besides the most attracting leapfrogging phenomenon, two other phenomena, suction and weak influence, are also clearly presented using the method of Lagrangian coherent structures. Due to the induced effect of wake vortex rings, the formation process of the forming vortex rings is different from that of a single isolated vortex ring, indicating that another distinct timescale exists, together with formation number proposed by Gharib (1998 JFM), determining the mechanisms of vortex rings. When the rear vortex ring leapfrogs, the limiting case is that the rear contracting ring is axis-touching. If an axis-touching ring is further squeezed by the wake vortex, the vortex structure will collapse, which can be explained by Kelvin-Benjamin variational principle. According to this principle, it is impossible for two optimal formed vortex rings to leapfrog. Financial support from the State Key Development Program of Basic Research of China (2014CB744802) is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  2. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.

  3. Double acting stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  4. Plasma deposited rider rings for hot displacer

    DOEpatents

    Kroebig, Helmut L.

    1976-01-01

    A hot cylinder for a cryogenic refrigerator having two plasma spray deposited rider rings of a corrosion and abrasion resistant material provided in the rider ring grooves, wherein the rider rings are machined to the desired diameter and width after deposition. The rider rings have gas flow flats machined on their outer surface.

  5. Optimizing ring-based CSR sources

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; De Santis, S.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Munson, D.V.; Li, D.; Nis himura, H.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.D.; Schoenlein, R.; Jung, J.Y.; Venturini, M.; Wan, W.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-01-01

    produce colossal intensities even with fairly low beam currents. Until recently CSR has not typically been observed in electron storage rings because the electron bunch lengths are longer than the waveguide cutoff imposed by the dimensions of the vacuum chamber, so full-bunch coherent emission is suppressed. The first observations of CSR from storage rings were of quasi-chaotic bursts of intensity caused by density modulations in unstable electron bunches, similar to the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) used in the design of several proposed free electron lasers. While studies of this ''bursting'' phenomenon have provided glimpses into the powers available with CSR, the unstable nature of the emission makes this a problematic THz source for scientific measurements. We have experimentally verified a model predicting where this unstable bursting regime will occur and have used this experience to design a new source where the bursting instability can be avoided. Stable CSR has been produced during machine experiments at the BESSY-II storage ring and the first scientific measurements using this CSR source were recently reported. This stable CSR emission is not driven by any instability, yet it extends to higher frequencies than predicted by a simple full-bunch coherence model. This model is described in these proceedings and elsewhere. The combination of the experimentally verified models for stable CSR as well as the threshold of which current levels will produce bursting instabilities allows us to fully design and optimize a new CSR source that will produce copious amounts of stable far-IR, THz and sub-THz, synchrotron radiation. CSR has also been recently observed in storage rings as a result of laser slicing of the beams. In this process, interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse co-propagating through a wiggler modulates the electron energies within a short slice of the electron bunch comparable with the duration of the laser pulse

  6. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion.

  7. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-08-24

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion. 3 figs.

  8. TSR: A storage and cooling ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.; Blaum, K.; Davinson, T.; Flanagan, K.; Freeman, S. J.; Grieser, M.; Lazarus, I. H.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Lotay, G.; Page, R. D.; Raabe, R.; Siesling, E.; Wenander, F.; Woods, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  9. Magnetic response measurements of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hendrik

    The main part of this thesis reports three experiments on the magnetic response of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings using a scanning SQUID microscope. The first experiment explores the magnetic response and fluxoid transitions of superconducting, mesoscopic bilayer aluminum rings in the presence of two coupled order parameters arising from the layered structure. For intermediate couplings, metastable states that have different phase winding numbers around the ring in each of the two order parameters were observed. Larger coupling locks the relative phase, so that the two order parameters are only manifest in the temperature dependence of the response. With increasing proximitization, this signature gradually disappears. The data can be described with a two-order-parameter Ginzburg-Landau theory. The second experiment concentrates on fluxoid transitions in similar, but single-layer rings. Near the critical temperature, the transitions, which are induced by applying a flux to the ring, only admit a single fluxoid at a time. At lower temperatures, several fluxoids enter or leave at once, and the final state approaches the ground state. Currently available theoretical frameworks cannot quantitatively explain the data. Heating and quasiparticle diffusion are likely important for a quantitative understanding of this experiment, which could provide a model system for studying the nonlinear dynamics of superconductors far from equilibrium. The third and most important scanning SQUID study concerns 33 individual mesoscopic gold rings. All measured rings show a paramagnetic linear susceptibility and a poorly understood anomaly around zero field, both of which are likely due to unpaired defect spins. The response of sufficiently small rings also has a component that is periodic in the flux through the ring, with a period close to h/e. Its amplitude varies in sign and magnitude from ring to ring, and its typical value and temperature dependence agree with

  10. Topology Matters: Structure and dynamics of ring polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Dieter

    In this talk I present recent experimental advances addressing the structure and dynamics of rings. I focus mainly on neutron scattering results that reveal experimental insight on a molecular scale. Structural investigations characterizing rings as compact objects in the melts are put into theoretical context. In contrast to the plateau regime common for all other high molecular weight polymer systems, the dynamic modulus of pure ring systems is characterized by a power law decay, while the viscosity displays a much weaker molecular weight dependence as a corresponding linear melt. The dynamics of ring melts is uniquely addressed by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy. The sub-diffusive center of mass motion at short times agrees well with simulation as well as theoretical concepts. In the internal dynamics the basic length scale of the ring molecule, the loop size, manifests itself clearly. The experiments reveal strong evidence for loop motions and call for further theoretical work describing them. Finally, small fractions of ring molecules in linear melts turn out to be very sensitive probes in order to scrutinize the dynamics of the host with the potential to reveal fundamental aspects of the dynamics of branched polymer systems. ∖pard Review Letters 131, 168302 (2014)Review Letters 115, 148302 (2015)Matter 11, DOI: 10.1039/C5SM01994J (2015)

  11. Evolution of a Ring around the Pluto-Charon Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2015-08-01

    We consider the formation of satellites around the Pluto-Charon binary. An early collision between the two partners likely produced the binary and a narrow ring of debris, out of which arose the moons Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra. How the satellites emerged from the compact ring is uncertain. Here we show that a particle ring spreads from physical collisions and collective gravitational scattering, similar to migration. Around a binary, these processes take place in the reference frames of “most circular” orbits, akin to circular ones in a Keplerian potential. Ring particles damp to these orbits and avoid destructive collisions. Damping and diffusion also help particles survive dynamical instabilities driven by resonances with the binary. In some situations, particles become trapped near resonances that sweep outward with the tidal evolution of the Pluto-Charon binary. With simple models and numerical experiments, we show how the Pluto-Charon impact ring may have expanded into a broad disk, out of which grew the circumbinary moons. In some scenarios, the ring can spread well beyond the orbit of Hydra, the most distant moon, to form a handful of smaller satellites. If these small moons exist, New Horizons will find them.

  12. EVOLUTION OF A RING AROUND THE PLUTO–CHARON BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-08-10

    We consider the formation of satellites around the Pluto–Charon binary. An early collision between the two partners likely produced the binary and a narrow ring of debris, out of which arose the moons Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra. How the satellites emerged from the compact ring is uncertain. Here we show that a particle ring spreads from physical collisions and collective gravitational scattering, similar to migration. Around a binary, these processes take place in the reference frames of “most circular” orbits, akin to circular ones in a Keplerian potential. Ring particles damp to these orbits and avoid destructive collisions. Damping and diffusion also help particles survive dynamical instabilities driven by resonances with the binary. In some situations, particles become trapped near resonances that sweep outward with the tidal evolution of the Pluto–Charon binary. With simple models and numerical experiments, we show how the Pluto–Charon impact ring may have expanded into a broad disk, out of which grew the circumbinary moons. In some scenarios, the ring can spread well beyond the orbit of Hydra, the most distant moon, to form a handful of smaller satellites. If these small moons exist, New Horizons will find them.

  13. Stratified Vortex Rings: Visualization of the Density Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsthoorn, Jason; Dalziel, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    The study of vortex-ring induced stratified mixing has played a key role in understanding stratified turbulent mixing. In this study, we present an experimental investigation of the mechanical evolution and the stratification-modified three-dimensional instability of these vortex rings. Using a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup, we reconstruct a full, three-dimensional, time-resolved velocity field of the interaction of a vortex ring with a stratified interface. This reconstruction agrees with previous two-dimensional studies, while capturing the three-dimensional instabilities of the dynamical evolution. The stratified three-dimensional instability of a vortex ring is similar to the unstratified instability, but here the instability occurs much earlier. Through the use of numerical integration, we use the experimentally determined velocity field to simulate the kinematic evolution of the density stratification. This technique allows us to evaluate the vertical buoyancy flux throughout the vortex-ring interaction, providing a quantitative explanation for the interface sharpening observed within the experiments. Understanding the sharpening mechanism in the context of a vortex ring has direct relevance to understanding the layer formation found in stratified turbulence NSERC, EPSRC.

  14. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  15. Archiving of Planetary Ring Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Stellar occultation data provide our only Earth-based means of probing planetary rings at kilometer spatial resolution. The occultation data archive at MIT contains original data and analysis products of stellar occultations by the ring systems of the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune observed by members of the group (and other groups) from 1977 to the present. During this time period, several media have been used to record and store the original and processed data: (1) chart records; (2) printed output, (3) audio reel tape; (4) audio cassette tape; (5) 7-track, 1/2-inch computer tape; (6) 9-track, 1/2-inch computer tape at 800, 1600, and 6250 bpi; (7) NOVA disk platters (2.5 and 5.0 Mbyte); (8) write once optical disks; (9) punched cards; and (10) read-write optical disks. With the rapid change of computer technology over this time period, some of these media have become not only obsolete, but nearly extinct. In particular, it has become nearly impossible to find any facilities that can still read 800 bpi tapes, which contain the only copies of several important data sets for the ring system of Uranus. In particular, we have an extensive ring data collection that includes data sets for the following Uranian ring occultations: U0, U11, U12, U13, U14, U25, U17, and U36.

  16. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jacob; Stewart, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of rings have traditionally been done using N-body methods, granting insight into the interactions of individual ring particles on varying scales. However, due to the scale of a typical ring system and the sheer number of particles involved, a global N-body simulation is too computationally expensive, unless particle collisions are replaced by stochastic forces (Bromley & Kenyon, 2013). Rings are extraordinarily flat systems and therefore are well-suited to existing geophysical shallow-water hydrodynamics models with well-established non-linear advection methods. By adopting a general relationship between pressure and surface density such as a polytropic equation of state, we can modify the shallow-water formula to treat a thin, compressible, self-gravitating, shearing fluid. Previous hydrodynamic simulations of planetary rings have been restricted to axisymmetric flows and therefore have not treated the response to nonaxisymmetric perturbations by moons (Schmidt & Tscharnuter 1999, Latter & Ogilvie 2010). We seek to expand on existing hydrodynamic methods and, by comparing our work with complementary N-body simulations and Cassini observations, confirm the veracity of our results at small scales before eventually moving to a global domain size. We will use non-Newtonian, dynamically variable viscosity to model the viscous transport caused by unresolved self-gravity wakes. Self-gravity will be added to model the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as density waves and edge waves. Support from NASA Outer Planets and Planetary Geology and Geophysics programs is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Ring wormholes via duality rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2016-09-01

    We apply duality rotations and complex transformations to the Schwarzschild metric to obtain wormhole geometries with two asymptotically flat regions connected by a throat. In the simplest case these are the well-known wormholes supported by phantom scalar field. Further duality rotations remove the scalar field to yield less well known vacuum metrics of the oblate Zipoy-Voorhees-Weyl class, which describe ring wormholes. The ring encircles the wormhole throat and can have any radius, whereas its tension is always negative and should be less than -c4 / 4 G. If the tension reaches the maximal value, the geometry becomes exactly flat, but the topology remains non-trivial and corresponds to two copies of Minkowski space glued together along the disk encircled by the ring. The geodesics are straight lines, and those which traverse the ring get to the other universe. The ring therefore literally produces a hole in space. Such wormholes could perhaps be created by negative energies concentrated in toroidal volumes, for example by vacuum fluctuations.

  18. Ring Beholds a Delicate Flower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope finds a delicate flower in the Ring Nebula, as shown in this image. The outer shell of this planetary nebula looks surprisingly similar to the delicate petals of a camellia blossom. A planetary nebula is a shell of material ejected from a dying star. Located about 2,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra, the Ring Nebula is also known as Messier Object 57 and NGC 6720. It is one of the best examples of a planetary nebula and a favorite target of amateur astronomers.

    The 'ring' is a thick cylinder of glowing gas and dust around the doomed star. As the star begins to run out of fuel, its core becomes smaller and hotter, boiling off its outer layers. The telescope's infrared array camera detected this material expelled from the withering star. Previous images of the Ring Nebula taken by visible-light telescopes usually showed just the inner glowing loop of gas around the star. The outer regions are especially prominent in this new image because Spitzer sees the infrared light from hydrogen molecules. The molecules emit infrared light because they have absorbed ultraviolet radiation from the star or have been heated by the wind from the star.

    Download the QuickTime movie for the animated version of this Ring Nebula image.

  19. Routes of Agulhas rings in the southeastern Cape Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dencausse, Guillaume; Arhan, Michel; Speich, Sabrina

    2010-11-01

    Using weekly sea surface height data, Agulhas rings from the period October 1992 to December 2006 are detected and tracked, from their formation dates and throughout the Cape Basin. While 102 of them formed at the Agulhas Current retroflection, their subsequent subdivisions and junctions led to 199 trajectories. The rings geographical probability of presence shows two maxima. One, related to numerous ring passages, lies in the submarine bight formed by the Erica seamount, the Schmitt-Ott seamount, and the northeastern tip of the Agulhas Ridge. The other one, to be ascribed to topographic blocking of the eddies, is southeast of the latter obstacle. On the basis of topographic effects three routes for Agulhas rings are distinguished, a Northern route for rings that enter the south-Atlantic northeast of the Erica seamount, a Central one for those passing westward between this seamount and the tip of the Agulhas Ridge, and a Southern one farther south. Despite its bathymetric obstacles, the central route is the dominant one, both in terms of percentage of eddy crossings at its definition segment, and in terms of conveyed volume transport. Specific behaviours of rings along each route are described, referring to observations in previous studies. Some rings from the Northern route interact with the flow regime of the South African continental slope. The southernmost trajectories of the Central route are thought to settle the location of the climatological Subtropical Front in that region. The rings of the Southern route experience important core property alteration as they transit through the subantarctic domain.

  20. Waveguide ring coupling design of MOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiang; Li, Zi-li; Chen, Yuan-you; Qin, Xiao-hu; Lv, Xin

    2010-10-01

    The key technology of micro optic gyroscopes (MOGs) is to fabricate low-loss waveguide and use coupling technology to form reciprocal structure. The main topic in this paper is to study the coupling structure of MOG's spiral-ring waveguide. Using for the reference of fiber's low-loss character, the fiber-preform project is chosen as optimization means. According to the singlemode conditions, the width and thickness of rectangle waveguide can be calculated. The bend loss waveguide can decrease by means of introducing an offset at the junction of two waveguides and etching groove at the outside of bend waveguide. In this article intersection waveguide is designed to reduce the difficulty of coupling processing. Light in-and-out port coupled at opposite side is choosen for machining easiness in experiment.What's more, the edge-coupling technology being put forward to keep light transmit along the same rotary direction. An efficient means is introduced, which uses angle 45°to reflect the light to couple two waveguide at inside-end or outside-end, and outside-end coupling is chosen for processing convenience in the design. In experiment, the waveguide be fabricated by thick photoresist AZ4620, etched by RIE, When the angle of wafer and ion is set 85°, the angle of one sidewall can be etched almost 45°. It's benefit to design the coupling structure of MOG's spiral-ring waveguide.

  1. Ring Vaccination and Smallpox Control

    PubMed Central

    van den Hof, Susan; Wallinga, Jacco; van Wijngaarden, Jan

    2004-01-01

    We present a stochastic model for the spread of smallpox after a small number of index cases are introduced into a susceptible population. The model describes a branching process for the spread of the infection and the effects of intervention measures. We discuss scenarios in which ring vaccination of direct contacts of infected persons is sufficient to contain an epidemic. Ring vaccination can be successful if infectious cases are rapidly diagnosed. However, because of the inherent stochastic nature of epidemic outbreaks, both the size and duration of contained outbreaks are highly variable. Intervention requirements depend on the basic reproduction number R0, for which different estimates exist. When faced with the decision of whether to rely on ring vaccination, the public health community should be aware that an epidemic might take time to subside even for an eventually successful intervention strategy. PMID:15200816

  2. Traversable wormholes: The Roman ring

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1997-04-01

    In this Brief Report I introduce yet another class of geometries for which semiclassical chronology protection theorems are of dubious physical reliability. I consider a {ital {open_quotes}Roman ring{close_quotes}} of traversable wormholes, wherein a number of wormholes are arranged in a ring in such a manner that no subset of wormholes is near chronology violation, though the combined system can be arbitrarily close to chronology violation. I show that (with enough wormholes in the ring) the gravitational vacuum polarization (the expectation value of the quantum stress-energy tensor) can be made arbitrarily small. In particular, the back reaction can be kept arbitrarily small all the way to the {open_quotes}reliability horizon,{close_quotes} so that semiclassical quantum gravity becomes unreliable before the gravitational back reaction becomes large. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. CMB lensing and giant rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  4. Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Krueger, H.

    2008-05-01

    Thebe's gossamer ring, the outermost and faintest of Jupiter's rings, extends outward by at least half a jovian radius from its source satellite while maintaining a constant vertical thickness. This structure is created by an electromagnetic perturbation known as a shadow resonance (Hamilton 2003, DPS meeting #35, #11.09). A shadow resonance arises from the abrupt shutoff of photoelectric charging when a dust particle enters Jupiter's shadow which, in turn, affects the strength of the electromagnetic perturbation from the planet's intense magnetic field. The result is a coupled oscillation between a particle's orbital eccentricity and its semimajor axis. Ring material spreads outward from Thebe while maintaining its vertical thickness just as observed by Galileo imaging. In addition to cameras, the Galileo spacecraft was also equipped with dust and plasma detectors. The spacecraft made two passes through the ring and its dust detector found that 1) dust fluxes drop immediately interior to Thebe's orbit, 2) some grains have inclinations in excess of 20 degrees and 3) submicron particles are present in the Amalthea ring in much greater numbers than in the Thebe ring. These findings can all be explained in the context of our shadow resonance model: the inner boundary is a direct consequence of the conservation of the Electromagnetic Jacobi Constant, the high inclinations are forced by a vertical version of the shadow resonance, and the excess submicron particles are a consequence of the weakening of electromagnetic forces in the vicinity of synchronous orbit. In this talk, we will present the data sets as well as detailed numerical simulations that back up these claims.

  5. Hawking radiation from black rings

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Umpei; Murata, Keiju

    2008-01-15

    We calculate the quantum radiation from the 5-dimensional charged rotating black rings by demanding the radiation eliminate the possible anomalies on the horizons. It is shown that the temperature, energy flux, and angular-momentum flux exactly coincide with those of the Hawking radiation. The black rings considered in this paper contain the Myers-Perry black hole as a limit, and the quantum radiation for this black hole, obtained in the literature, is recovered in the limit. The results support the picture that the Hawking radiation can be regarded as the anomaly eliminator on horizons and suggest its general applicability to the higher-dimensional black holes discovered recently.

  6. Rings Around the Sun and Moon: Coronae and Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Les; Laven, Philip; Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric optical effects can teach much about physics and especially optics. Coronae--coloured rings around the sun or moon--are large-scale consequences of diffraction, which is often thought of as only a small effect confined to the laboratory. We describe coronae, how they are formed and experiments that can be conducted on ones in the sky.…

  7. Recent transition crossing results from the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1997-03-01

    This paper outlines the known mechanisms for emittance dilution and beam loss during transition crossing. These include scraping, Johnsen`s nonlinear effect, bunch length mismatch, microwave and negative-mass instabilities, and beam loading. A recent experiment on transition crossing performed with 13 proton bunches injected into the Main Ring is discussed.

  8. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  9. Uranus' Rings: Leading up to RPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, I.; Showalter, M.; Hammel, H.; Gibbard, S.; Lissauer, J.

    We summarize recent HST and Keck observations of the uranian ring system, taken over the past years while the viewing geometry is changing. Some highlights of our campaign to date include: i) Detection of a ring system outside of Uranus main ring system by HST (Showalter and Lissauer, Science 311, p.973, 2006), followed by color information from Keck (de Pater et al, Science 312, p.92, 2006). This system consists of two rings. The inner ring, U2, is red and relatively narrow like Saturn's G ring, while the outer ring, U1, is much broader in extent and very blue, like Saturn's E ring. Just like Enceladus is located within the E ring, moon Mab is inside U1. Saturn's E ring is most likely produced by geyser activity on Enceladus. Mab, being over 20 times smaller, is unlikely to be geologically active. However, being this small, its size is optimal to produce a ring via meteorite sputtering. ii) Detection of a ring interior to the main ring system, which might be ring 1986U2R, discovered by Voyager, though its extent and location is different from the Voyager ring. iii) Dust sheets in between the main ring. These may be similar to the dust sheets seen by Voyager in forward scattered light, yet our observations indicate large changes from the Voyager era iv) New moons were detected by HST. The orbits of some of these moons appear to be somewhat erratic. The color of moon Mab appears to be more similar to that of the large outer moons than the small inner moons. Earth will cross Uranus' ring plane three times in 2007-2008 (2 May, 16 Aug. 2007, 20 Feb. 2008), and the Sun will cross it once (7 Dec. 2007). At these times optically thin dusty rings will brighten considerably, making this period an ideal time to study Uranus' outer ring system. Between the May and August crossings, as well as between December and February, the Earth and Sun are on opposite sides of the rings, so that any optically thick rings will essentially be invisible. This allows phenomena normally

  10. Saturn's rings through a microscope - Particle size constraints from the Voyager PPS scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    1990-01-01

    The Voyager-2 photopolarimeter PPS experiment obtained the highest resolution of any ring observation of Saturn, profiling the variation of optical depth in radial steps of about 100 meters. A detailed treatment of the PPS statistics is presented here, and it is shown how these statistics can be related to the particle size distribution. An expression for the excess noise in the scan due to large particles is obtained, and the observed noise is used to constrain the upper end of the size distribution through the rings. It is shown that the Cassini Division and the C Ring have the smallest proportion of large particles, while the A ring has the largest proportion.

  11. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, Jr., Gordon G.

    1984-01-01

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials which has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  12. Baroclinic Structure of Oceanic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sun, C.

    One of the most important analytical solutions to the two dimensional incompressible flow is circular Rankin vortex that has a solid-body core and an approximately irrotational far field. For an f-plane rotating flow, Ingersoll (1969) presented a closed-form ring solution superposed with a zonal flow. So far most studies have been concerned with two dimensional and barotropic situations.

  13. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, G.G. Jr.

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  14. Stirring properties of vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David

    1991-05-01

    Ring vortex evolution, from the initial roll-up phase through to the final turbulent phase, was experimentally studied to see the dependence of its stirring properties on both the initial (accelerating, constant, decelerating, slow, fast) piston motion as well as on the boundary (tube/hole geometry) conditions. Stirring between fluid initially upstream and that initially downstream of the nozzle plane is done more by convective entrainment at the beginning (roll-up and contraction phases), by diffusive entrainment during the laminar and wavy phases, and by mixed entrainment and ejection during the transition to turbulence and the turbulent phase itself. During vortex roll-up, it was found that tubes eject shorter streaklines than do holes, and that there is less Re dependence for this for tubes than for holes. During the contraction phase, entrainment ends, save for minimal entrainment due to axial inflow into the ring from along the cores of Goertler-type vortices. Generally, the rate of fluid ejected is largest during the transition from the wavy to the turbulent state. As far as the stability of the vortices is concerned, rings generated at holes are less stable than those generated at tubes. During the final turbulent phase, rings not only entrain fluid but eject it periodically into the wake: Between two and four hairpin vortices are generated and laid off in the wake during each ejection. The frequency at which such ejections takes place scales as a Strouhal number that takes on values of between 2 and 4.

  15. Looking for rings and things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    It's not often that an astronomical object gets its own dedicated observatory, but as the planet Beta Pictoris b moves in front of its host star, its every move will be watched by bRing, eager to discover more about the planet's Hill sphere, explains Matthew Kenworthy.

  16. Semiconductor ring lasers as optical neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomans, W.; Gelens, L.; Mashal, L.; Beri, S.; Van der Sande, G.; Danckaert, J.; Verschaffelt, G.

    2012-06-01

    Semiconductor Ring Lasers (SRLs) are a modern class of semiconductor lasers whose active cavity is characterized by a circular geometry. This enables the laser to support two counterpropagating modes, referred to as the clockwise (CW) and the counterclockwise (CCW) mode. Semiconductor ring lasers have been shown to have a regime of operation in which they are excitable, when the linear coupling between the counterpropagating modes is asymmetric. This can be achieved by increasing the reflection of, for example, the CW mode into the CCW mode. This will stabilize lasing in the CCW mode. In the excitable regime, the SRL will fire optical pulses (spikes) in the CW mode as a response to noise perturbations. In this contribution we experimentally and theoretically characterize these spikes. Our experiments reveal a statistical distribution of the characteristics of the optical pulses that is not observed in regular excitable systems. In particular, an inverse correlation exists between the pulse amplitude and duration. Numerical simulations and an interpretation in an asymptotic phase space confirm and explain these experimentally observed pulse characteristics [L. Gelens et al., Phys. Rev. A 82 063841, 2010]. We will also theoretically consider asymmetric SRLs coupled through a single bus waveguide. This is a first step towards an integrated optical neural network using semiconductor ring lasers as building blocks. We will show that for weak coupling, excitatory excursions still persist due to the similar phase space structure. Moreover, the coupled SRLs can excite pulses in each other and can thus function as communicating neurons [W. Coomans et al., Phys. Rev. E 84 036209, 2011]. This type of neural network can be fully integrated on chip and does not suffer from the drawback of needing extra-cavity measures, such as optical injection or saturable absorbers.

  17. SECONDARY ELECTRON PRODUCTION AT THE SNS STORAGE RING COLLIMATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    Secondary electron (SE) production is briefly reviewed. If the collimator of the SNS storage ring allows proton beam scraping to take place, the electron yield might be quite large. At the AGS Booster, by steering the Au{sup 31+} ion beam into the electrostatic inflector, beam scraping effect on SE production is studied. The results of this experiment can be translated into the situation of proton beam scraping at the SNS collimator. It seems sufficient to support a new look of the SNS ring collimator design.

  18. Gravito-electrodynamics and the structure of planetary ring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent spacecraft observations of the Saturnian and Jovian ring systems have highlighted a plethora of interesting new phenomena associated with those regions containing fine (micron and sub-micron sized) dust. Recognizing that these dust grains, by virtue of being immersed within the planetary magnetospheres, are electrostatically charged to the point that they experience comparable gravitational and electric forces, a new 'gravito-electrodynamic' theory has been developed to describe their dynamics. This theory has been successful in explaining all these phenomena in a systematic way. In this review, the basic model and its range of validity are outlined, and its application to the Saturnian and Jovian ring systems are discussed.

  19. Investigation of Drop Formation by a Vortex Ring in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, Luis P.; Maksimovic, Pepi

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of drop formation by a vortex ring propagating through one or more fluid interfaces in microgravity is described. The main goal of the research is to determine the dynamics of drop formation by vortical flows in the capillary limit with large density change across the intel-face. Dimensional analysis shows that in microgravity experiments the capillary limit can be studied using a relatively large vortex ring diameter to facilitate experimental characterization of the interaction. Results obtained in density matched systems are reviewed to illustrate the complex nature of these interactions.

  20. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  1. The formation of Jupiter's faint rings

    PubMed

    Burns; Showalter; Hamilton; Nicholson; de Pater I; Ockert-Bell; Thomas

    1999-05-14

    Observations by the Galileo spacecraft and the Keck telescope showed that Jupiter's outermost (gossamer) ring is actually two rings circumscribed by the orbits of the small satellites Amalthea and Thebe. The gossamer rings' unique morphology-especially the rectangular end profiles at the satellite's orbit and the enhanced intensities along the top and bottom edges of the rings-can be explained by collisional ejecta lost from the inclined satellites. The ejecta evolves inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. This mechanism may also explain the origin of Jupiter's main ring and suggests that faint rings may accompany all small inner satellites of the other jovian planets.

  2. High-Speed Ring Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  3. A new method for beam stacking in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Recently, I developed a new beam stacking scheme for synchrotron storage rings called 'longitudinal phase-space coating' (LPSC). This scheme has been convincingly validated by multi-particle beam dynamics simulations and has been demonstrated with beam experiments at the Fermilab Recycler. Here, I present the results from both simulations and experiments. The beam stacking scheme presented here is the first of its kind.

  4. F Ring Mini-Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attree, N.; Murray, C.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G.

    2012-12-01

    Mini-jets are small, (~50 km) linear features observed in Cassini images to be emanating from Saturn's F ring; they are believed to be produced by collisions with a local population of moonlets. An analysis of one such feature, observed over the course of a ~7.5 h sequence as its length changed from ~75 km to ~250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse back into the core, supports the collisional theory of their origin [1]. Orbit determination suggests that this mini-jet consisted of ring material displaced by a ~1 m/s collision with a nearby object, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. The colliding object itself is likely to be too small to resolve in these images but represents just one member of a population of F ring moonlets. Such a population has been investigated by UVIS occultations [2], and other methods, but generally remains unresolved in Cassini images. Collisional features such as this mini-jet therefore provide an additional tracer for the region's moonlet population. In this talk we will present the results of recent work in measuring and describing a subset of ~350 catalogued mini-jets, applying knowledge gained from the original mini-jet feature. Their distribution in space and time, proximity to Prometheus and evolution are all examined in an effort to place constraints on the properties of the underlying population of colliding objects. References [1] N. O. Attree, C. D. Murray, N. J. Cooper, and G. A. Williams. Detection of low velocity collisions in Saturn's F ring. Ap. J. Lett. (In press). [1] B. K. Meinke, L. W. Esposito, N. Albers, and M. Sremevi. Classification of F ring features observed in cassini UVIS occultations. Icarus, 218(1):545 - 554, 2012.

  5. A secure WDM ring access network employing silicon micro-ring based remote node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jiun-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Xu, Ke; Hsu, Chin-Wei; Su, Hong-Quan; Tsang, Hon-Ki

    2014-08-01

    A secure and scalable wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) ring-based access network is proposed and demonstrated using proof-of-concept experiments. In the remote node (RN), wavelength hopping for specific optical networking unit (ONU) is deployed by using silicon micro-ring resonators (SMR). Using silicon-based devices could be cost-effective for the cost-sensitive access network. Hence the optical physical layer security is introduced. The issues of denial of service (DOS) attacks, eavesdropping and masquerading can be made more difficult in the proposed WDM ring-based access network. Besides, the SMRs with different dropped wavelengths can be cascaded, such that the signals pass through the preceding SMRs can be dropped by a succeeding SMR. This can increase the scalability of the RN for supporting more ONUs for future upgrade. Here, error-free 10 Gb/s downlink and 1.25 Gb/s uplink transmission are demonstrated to show the feasibility of the proposed network.

  6. Discovery of B ring propellers in Cassini UVIS and ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    One of the successes of the planetary ring theory has been the theoretical prediction of gravitational signatures of bodies embedded in the rings, and their subsequent detection in Cassini data. Bodies within the rings perturb the nearby ring material, and the orbital shear forms a two-armed structure -- dubbed a ``propeller'' -- which is centered at the embedded body. Although direct evidence of the present body or moonlet is still lacking, the observations of their propeller signatures has proved as an indispensable method to extend our knowledge about ring structure and dynamics. So far, propellers have been successfully detected within Saturn's A ring in two populations: a group of small and numerous propellers interior to the Encke gap forming belts, and by far less numerous but larger propellers exterior to Pan's orbit. Although there have been hints of propellers present within the B ring, or even C ring, their detection is less certain (e.g. neither has a single propeller been seen twice, nor has the ubiquitous two armed structure been observed). In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. A single object is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe the feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at a=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B ring. The gap moves at Kepler speed appropriate for its radial location. Radial offsets of the gap locations in UVIS

  7. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  8. Aharonov-Casher effect in quantum ring ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joibari, Fateme K.; Blanter, Ya. M.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2013-09-01

    We study the transport of electrons through a single-mode quantum ring with electric-field induced Rashba spin-orbit interaction that is subject to an in-plane magnetic field and weakly coupled to electron reservoirs. Modeling a ring array by ensemble averaging over a Gaussian distribution of energy-level positions, we predict slow conductance oscillations as a function of the Rashba interaction and electron density due to spin-orbit interaction induced beating of the spacings between the levels crossed by the Fermi energy. Our results agree with experiments by Nitta c.s. [J. Nitta, J. Takagi, F. Nagasawa, and M. Kohda, J. Phys.: Conference Series1742-659610.1088/1742-6596/302/1/012002 302, 012002 (2011) and Nagasawa (unpublished)], thereby providing an interpretation that differs from the ordinary Aharonov-Casher effect in a single ring.

  9. Engineering interlocking DNA rings with weak physical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Zhifa; Tram, Kha; Li, Yingfu

    2014-06-01

    Catenanes are intriguing molecular assemblies for engineering unique molecular devices. The resident rings of a catenane are expected to execute unhindered rotation around each other, and to do so, they must have weak physical interactions with each other. Due to sequence programmability, DNA has become a popular material for nanoscale object engineering. However, current DNA catenanes, particularly in the single-stranded (ss) form, are synthesized through the formation of a linking duplex, which makes them less ideal as mobile elements for molecular machines. Herein we adopt a random library approach to engineer ssDNA [2] catenanes (two interlocked DNA rings) without a linking duplex. Results from DNA hybridization, double-stranded catenane synthesis and rolling circle amplification experiments signify that representative catenanes have weak physical interactions and are capable of operating as independent units. Our findings lay the foundation for exploring free-functioning interlocked DNA rings for the design of elaborate nanoscale machines based on DNA.

  10. Realization of Translational Symmetry in Trapped Cold Ion Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao-Kun; Urban, Erik; Noel, Crystal; Chuang, Alexander; Xia, Yang; Ransford, Anthony; Hemmerling, Boerge; Wang, Yuan; Li, Tongcang; Häffner, Hartmut; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    We crystallize up to 15 40Ca+ ions in a ring with a microfabricated silicon surface Paul trap. Delocalization of the Doppler laser-cooled ions shows that the translational symmetry of the ion ring is preserved at millikelvin temperatures. By characterizing the collective motion of the ion crystals, we identify homogeneous electric fields as the dominant symmetry-breaking mechanism at this energy scale. With increasing ion numbers, such detrimental effects are reduced. We predict that, with only a ten-ion ring, uncompensated homogeneous fields will not break the translational symmetry of the rotational ground state. This experiment opens a door towards studying quantum many-body physics with translational symmetry at the single-particle level.

  11. Experimental measurement of noncovalent interactions between halogens and aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Adams, Harry; Cockroft, Scott L; Guardigli, Claudio; Hunter, Christopher A; Lawson, Kevin R; Perkins, Julie; Spey, Sharon E; Urch, Christopher J; Ford, Rhonan

    2004-05-03

    Chemical double mutant cycles have been used to quantify the interactions of halogens with the faces of aromatic rings in chloroform. The halogens are forced over the face of an aromatic ring by an array of hydrogen-bonding interactions that lock the complexes in a single, well-defined conformation. These interactions can also be engineered into the crystal structures of simpler model compounds, but experiments in solution show that the halogen-aromatic interactions observed in the solid state are all unfavourable, regardless of whether the aromatic rings contain electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents. The halogen-aromatic interactions are repulsive by 1-3 kJ mol(-1). The interactions with fluorine are slightly less favourable than with chlorine and bromine.

  12. Mass production of shaped particles through vortex ring freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Duo; Warning, Alex; Yancey, Kenneth G.; Chang, Chun-Ti; Kern, Vanessa R.; Datta, Ashim K.; Steen, Paul H.; Luo, Dan; Ma, Minglin

    2016-08-01

    A vortex ring is a torus-shaped fluidic vortex. During its formation, the fluid experiences a rich variety of intriguing geometrical intermediates from spherical to toroidal. Here we show that these constantly changing intermediates can be `frozen' at controlled time points into particles with various unusual and unprecedented shapes. These novel vortex ring-derived particles, are mass-produced by employing a simple and inexpensive electrospraying technique, with their sizes well controlled from hundreds of microns to millimetres. Guided further by theoretical analyses and a laminar multiphase fluid flow simulation, we show that this freezing approach is applicable to a broad range of materials from organic polysaccharides to inorganic nanoparticles. We demonstrate the unique advantages of these vortex ring-derived particles in several applications including cell encapsulation, three-dimensional cell culture, and cell-free protein production. Moreover, compartmentalization and ordered-structures composed of these novel particles are all achieved, creating opportunities to engineer more sophisticated hierarchical materials.

  13. Cleft contribution to ring current formation

    SciTech Connect

    Delcourt, D.C. ); Sauvaud, J.A. ); Moore, T.E. )

    1990-12-01

    The storm time transport of ionospheric plasma from the cleft fountain to the plasma sheet and ring current is investigated by means of three-dimensional trajectory codes. Using observations to define the source location and flow rate. The authors trace test particles during a taillike to dipolelike reconfiguration of the geomagnetic field. Emphasis is placed on the behavior of heavy ions of low charge state (O{sup +}). As a result of their long periods of gyration, these ions are highly sensitive to rapid field variations and possible display transient nonadiabatic motions. It is demonstrated that O{sup +} which have originated in the high-latitude ionosphere but which find themselves in the vicinity of the equator at substorm onset can experience considerable erergization (from several keV up to several hundred keV) and pitch angle increase leading to trapping, as an effect of the induced electric field. These effects accompany a rapid earthward transport from midtail ({approximately}10-15 R{sub E}) to geosynchronous altitudes. The average particle energy and density involved suggest a substantial contribution of the cleft O{sup +} fountain to the ring current during substorms.

  14. Rings and boxes in dissipative environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horovitz, Baruch

    2012-02-01

    We study a particle on a ring in presence of a dissipative Caldeira-Leggett environment and derive its response to a DC field [1]. We find, through a 2-loop renormalization group analysis, that a large dissipation parameter η flows to a fixed point R̂=/2π. We also reexamine the mapping of this problem to that of the Coulomb box and show that the relaxation resistance, of recent interest, has a certain average that is quantized for η>R̂, leading to quantized noise. We propose a box experiment to detect this noise. When the particle carries a spin with spin-orbit interactions [2] we find that the spin correlations in the direction perpendicular to the ring are finite at long times, i.e. do not dephase, while the parallel components may decay as a power law at strong dissipation. [4pt] [1] Y. Etzioni, B. Horovitz and P. Le Doussal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 166803 (2011). [0pt] [2] G. Zar'and, G. T. Zim'anyi and F. Wilhelm, Phys. Rev. B62, 8137 (2000).

  15. The Canarias Einstein ring: a newly discovered optical Einstein ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettinelli, M.; Simioni, M.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Cassisi, S.; Walker, A. R.; Piotto, G.; Valdes, F.

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of an optical Einstein ring in the Sculptor constellation, IAC J010127-334319, in the vicinity of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. It is an almost complete ring (˜300°) with a diameter of ˜4.5 arcsec. The discovery was made serendipitously from inspecting Dark Energy Camera (DECam) archive imaging data. Confirmation of the object nature has been obtained by deriving spectroscopic redshifts for both components, lens and source, from observations at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) with the spectrograph OSIRIS. The lens, a massive early-type galaxy, has a redshift of z = 0.581, while the source is a starburst galaxy with redshift of z = 1.165. The total enclosed mass that produces the lensing effect has been estimated to be Mtot = (1.86 ± 0.23) × 1012 M⊙.

  16. Thermally activated phase slips from metastable states in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Ivana; Lollo, Anthony; Harris, Jack

    In equilibrium, a flux-biased superconducting ring at low temperature can occupy any of several metastable states. The particular state that the ring occupies depends on the history of the applied flux, as different states are separated from each other by flux-dependent energy barriers. There is a critical value of the applied flux at which a given barrier goes to zero, the state becomes unstable, and the system transition into another state. In recent experiments performed on arrays of rings we showed that this transition occurs close to the critical flux predicted by Ginzburg-Landau theory. Here, we will describe experiments in which we have extended these measurements to an individual ring in order to study the thermal activation of the ring over a barrier that has been tuned close to zero. We measure the statistics of transitions as function of temperature and ramp rate.

  17. Contact stresses calculated for miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, F. G.; Domerest, K. E.; Horton, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Using mathematical formulations to plot the graphs of the contact preload versus the Hertzian load, calculations of unit loading of the preloaded brushes on slip rings can be made. This optimizes the design of contact brushes and miniature slip rings.

  18. Planetary science: Shepherds of Saturn's ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-09-01

    Saturn's F ring is chaperoned on both sides by the tiny moons Prometheus and Pandora. Numerical simulations show that this celestial ballet can result from the collision of two aggregates that evolved out of Saturn's main rings.

  19. How to Remove a Stuck Ring Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ...

  20. Wireless optics protection of fiber via SONET ring closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Ruth Ann; Celmer, Ken T.; Foster, Michael; Wooten, Jimmie; Miller, Jared; Kean, John C.; Carter, Doug; Kefauver, Michael; Singh, Bhupendra; Achour, Maha; Willebrand, Heinz A.

    2001-02-01

    12 A free-space laser link closes an otherwise all-fiber SONET ring, demonstrating for the first time the feasibility of using wireless optics as a back-up to fiber in an application demanding the highest levels of statistical availability and sub-50-ms protection-restoral times. This experiment demonstrates that protocol-transparent wireless optical links can be readily internetworked with industry- standard fiber-based protection protocols to achieve SONET restoral times in the event of a fiber cut. By using the wireless optics as a back-up to fiber rather than as the primary link, end-users are normally protected from the unavoidable burst errors and outages that can arise on a wireless optical link in the event of anomalously poor atmospheric visibility or unanticipated line-of-sight obstructions. While an all-fiber SONET ring operating over physically diverse paths is generally preferred, hybrid fiber/air rings operating over physically-diverse paths (fiber as one path and air as the other) will easily meet or exceed existing Bellcore availability standards for SONET rings. The hybrid part-fiber, part-air ring advantageously protects customers from fiber cuts (a.k.a. `backhoe fade') and may be preferable to over service via either an unprotected fiber spur or over a `collapsed' fiber ring made up of fiber segments sharing a common conduit. The experiment is performed at an OC-12 (622 Mbps) data rate in a point-to-consecutive point configuration which demonstrates the use of a relay site to work-around a line- of-sight obstruction.

  1. Shepherding model for Neptune's arc ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    A model to explain the confinement of the recently discovered incomplete arc ring around Neptune is developed. The ring may be azimuthally confined near a triangular (Trojan) point of an undiscovered satellite of Neptune. Radial diffusion of the ring particles can be prevented by shepherding torques of another moon. Two satellites with diameters of 100-200 km would be sufficient to confine the ring; such moons would be too small to have been photographed from earth.

  2. Random Implantation of Asymmetric Intracorneal Rings

    PubMed Central

    Peris-Martínez, Cristina; Gregori Gisbert, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Intracorneal ring employment for treating ectasia is widespread. Although the mechanism of action of intracorneal rings in the regularization of the corneal surface after its implantation is well known in most cases, there are still many doubts. We present a case of implanted intracorneal rings, where, despite the peculiar position of the rings, the patient gains lines of visual acuity and keratoconus remains stable. PMID:24711941

  3. Analysis of Alternative Ring Resonator Designs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    the ring strip of the antenna as in the case of the original design. Both the alternative dielectric laminate and the increased thickness laminate...adjustments to the geometry parameters. 2. Ring Resonator Antenna Design The ring resonator is a two port antenna consisting of a ring strip and two...differing thicknesses for resonator antennas of the same design suggests that the RF fields penetrate slightly more or that the resonator can “see” a

  4. Kinematics and dynamics of the Uranian rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Richard G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-gravity model of apse alignment was tested by comparing its predictions about structure within the epsilon ring with an extensive set of observed occultation profiles covering a wide range of ring longitudes. The self-gravity model as presently constructed is inconsistent with the observations. The Lindblad resonance survey and Shepherd satellite ring perturbation are discussed. The kinematic model of the Uranian ring orbit was enhanced to accommodate Voyager observations as well as ground-based occultation observations.

  5. Optical fiber having wave-guiding rings

    DOEpatents

    Messerly, Michael J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Beach, Raymond J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2011-03-15

    A waveguide includes a cladding region that has a refractive index that is substantially uniform and surrounds a wave-guiding region that has an average index that is close to the index of the cladding. The wave-guiding region also contains a thin ring or series of rings that have an index or indices that differ significantly from the index of the cladding. The ring or rings enable the structure to guide light.

  6. Charge and current neutralization in the formation of ion rings in a background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, B.V.; Ryutov, D.D.; Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-10-01

    For typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp and propagated into a solenoidal field downstream. The characteristic time [tau] satisfies 2[pi]/[Omega][sub [ital e

  7. Environmental study of miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnik, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Investigation studied the long term operation of miniature slip ring assembles in high vacuum of space and included the influence of ring, brush, and insulator materials on electrical noise and mechanical wear. Results show that soft metal vapor plating and niobium diselenide miniature slip rings are beneficial.

  8. O-ring gasket test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James Eric (Inventor); Mccluney, Donald Scott (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is presented for testing O-ring gaskets under a variety of temperature, pressure, and dynamic loading conditions. Specifically, this apparatus has the ability to simulate a dynamic loading condition where the sealing surface in contact with the O-ring moves both away from and axially along the face of the O-ring.

  9. A Ring Construction Using Finite Directed Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardzell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an interesting class of noncommutative rings which can be constructed using finite directed graphs. This construction also creates a vector space. These structures provide undergraduate students connections between ring theory and graph theory and, among other things, allow them to see a ring unity element that looks quite…

  10. Rings of uranus: invisible and impossible?

    PubMed

    VAN Flandern, T C

    1979-06-08

    Neither the dynamical nor the optical properties of the rings of Uranus are easily understood, unless it is assumed that they are not rings in the ordinary sense but simply volatile material in the orbits of several individual small satellites. It is possible that other natural satellites may also leave such rings in their wakes.

  11. The Promise of Intravaginal Rings for Prevention: User Perceptions of Biomechanical Properties and Implications for Prevention Product Development

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Patrick F.; Buckheit, Karen; Bregman, Dana; Thompson, Lara; Jensen, Kathleen; Johnson, Todd; Buckheit, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Intravaginal rings (IVRs) are currently under investigation as devices for the delivery of agents to protect against the sexual transmission of HIV and STIs, as well as pregnancy. To assist product developers in creating highly acceptable rings, we sought to identify characteristics that intravaginal ring users consider when making decisions about ring use or non-use. We conducted four semi-structured focus groups with 21 women (aged 18–45) who reported using an IVR in the past 12 months. Participants manipulated four prototype rings in their hands, discussed ring materials, dimensionality, and “behavior,” and shared perceptions and appraisals. Five salient ring characteristics were identified: 1) appearance of the rings’ surfaces, 2) tactile sensations of the cylinder material, 3) materials properties, 4) diameter of the cylinder, and 5) ring circumference. Pliability (or flexibility) was generally considered the most important mechanical property. Several ring properties (e.g., porousness, dimensionality) were associated with perceptions of efficacy. Women also revealed user behaviors that may impact the effectiveness of certain drugs, such as removing, rinsing and re-inserting the ring while bathing, and removing the ring during sexual encounters. As product developers explore IVRs as prevention delivery systems, it is critical to balance product materials and dimensions with use parameters to optimize drug delivery and the user experience. It is also critical to consider how user behaviors (e.g., removing the ring) might impact drug delivery. PMID:26695431

  12. APS storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Behavioral Mapless Navigation Using Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Randall P.; Miller, Samuel A.; Bradley, Arthur T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents work on the development and implementation of a novel approach to robotic navigation. In this system, map-building and localization for obstacle avoidance are discarded in favor of moment-by-moment behavioral processing of the sonar sensor data. To accomplish this, we developed a network of behaviors that communicate through the passing of rings, data structures that are similar in form to the sonar data itself and express the decisions of each behavior. Through the use of these rings, behaviors can moderate each other, conflicting impulses can be mediated, and designers can easily connect modules to create complex emergent navigational techniques. We discuss the development of a number of these modules and their successful use as a navigation system in the Trinity omnidirectional robot.

  14. Arrays of ultrasmall metal rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Deepak K.; Krotkov, Robert V.; Xiang, Hongqi; Xu, Ting; Russell, Thomas P.; Tuominen, Mark T.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method to fabricate ultra-high-density hexagonal arrays of ferromagnetic nanorings having 13 nm outer diameter, 5 nm inner diameter and 5 nm thickness. Cobalt magnetic nanorings were fabricated using a self-assembled diblock copolymer template with an angular evaporation of metal followed by an ion-beam etching. Magnetic measurements and theoretical calculations suggest that, at low fields, only the single domain and vortex states are important for rings of this size. The measured magnetization as a function of applied field shows a hysteresis that is consistent. These ultrasmall ferromagnetic rings have potential use in magnetic memory devices due to the simplicity of the preparation coupled with the ultra-high-density and geometry-controlled switching. This fabrication technique can be extended to other materials for applications in optics, sensing and nanoscale research.

  15. Drag of buoyant vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.126], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  16. Fiber Ring Optical Gyroscope (FROG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a one meter diameter fiber ring optical gyro, using 1.57 kilometers of single mode fiber, are described. The various noise components: electronic, thermal, mechanical, and optical, were evaluated. Both dc and ac methods were used. An attempt was made to measure the Earth rotation rate; however, the results were questionable because of the optical and electronic noise present. It was concluded that fiber ring optical gyroscopes using all discrete components have many serious problems that can only be overcome by discarding the discrete approach and adapting an all integrated optic technique that has the laser source, modulator, detector, beamsplitters, and bias element on a single chip.

  17. Fourth-generation storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J. N.

    1999-11-16

    It seems clear that a linac-driven free-electron laser is the accepted prototype of a fourth-generation facility. This raises two questions: can a storage ring-based light source join the fourth generation? Has the storage ring evolved to its highest level of performance as a synchrotrons light source? The answer to the second question is clearly no. The author thinks the answer to the first question is unimportant. While the concept of generations has been useful in motivating thought and effort towards new light source concepts, the variety of light sources and their performance characteristics can no longer be usefully summed up by assignment of a ''generation'' number.

  18. Centric rings, acentric rings and excess acentric fragments based on a random-walk interphase chromosome model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; Sachs, R. K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Excess acentric fragments, consisting of acentric rings and acentric linear fragments, are among the most frequent kinds of chromosome-type aberrations produced by radiation. The frequency of acentric rings cannot be obtained directly by experiment but is estimated here from the ratio of acentric to centric rings, evaluated using a random-walk model for the organization of chromatin during interphase and an assumption that the probability of an exchange formation is proportional to the rate of collision between two DSB. This ratio is calculated to be 2.5 in low-LET irradiated human fibroblasts, significantly greater than the ratio if proximity effects are not considered. The calculated frequency of acentric rings is insufficient to account for all the observed excess acentric fragments. Assuming that the rest of the excess acentric fragments are due to incomplete exchanges, all possible recombinations between two DSB that result in acentric rings and acentric linear fragments have been identified. From the chromosome aberration data, the incompleteness parameter has been estimated. Intra-arm chromosome exchanges, either complete or incomplete, were estimated to account for more than 50% of the excess acentric fragments in human fibroblasts.

  19. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  20. The Friction of Piston Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischbein, Hans W

    1945-01-01

    The coefficient of friction between piston ring and cylinder liner was measured in relation to gliding acceleration, pressure, temperature, quantity of oil and quality of oil. Comparing former lubrication-technical tests, conclusions were drawn as to the state of friction. The coefficients of friction as figured out according to the hydrodynamic theory were compared with those measured by tests. Special tests were made on "oiliness." The highest permissible pressure was measured and the ratio of pressure discussed.

  1. Lattice of the NICA Collider Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly; Kozlov, Oleg; Meshkov, Igor; Mikhaylov, Vladimir; Trubnikov, Grigoriy; Lebedev, Valeri Nagaitsev, Sergei; Senichev, Yurij; /Julich, Forschungszentrum

    2010-05-01

    The Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) is a new accelerator complex being constructed at JINR. It is designed for collider experiments with ions and protons and has to provide ion-ion (Au{sup 79+}) and ion-proton collisions in the energy range 1 {divided_by} 4.5 GeV/n and collisions of polarized proton-proton and deuteron-deuteron beams. Collider conceptions with constant {gamma}{sub tr} and with possibility of its variation are considered. The ring has the racetrack shape with two arcs and two long straight sections. Its circumference is about 450m. The straight sections are optimized to have {beta}* {approx} 35cm in two IPs and a possibility of final betatron tune adjustment.

  2. Gibbs Ringing in Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Veraart, Jelle; Fieremans, Els; Jelescu, Ileana O.; Knoll, Florian; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study and reduce the effect of Gibbs ringing artifact on computed diffusion parameters. Methods We reduce the ringing by extrapolating the k-space of each diffusion weighted image beyond the measured part by selecting an adequate regularization term. We evaluate several regularization terms and tune the regularization parameter to find the best compromise between anatomical accuracy of the reconstructed image and suppression of the Gibbs artifact. Results We demonstrate empirically and analytically that the Gibbs artifact, which is typically observed near sharp edges in magnetic resonance images, has a significant impact on the quantification of diffusion model parameters, even for infinitesimal diffusion weighting. We find the second order total generalized variation to be a good choice for the penalty term to regularize the extrapolation of the k-space, as it provides a parsimonious representation of images, a practically full suppression of Gibbs ringing, and the absence of staircasing artifacts typical for total variation methods. Conclusions Regularized extrapolation of the k-space data significantly reduces truncation artifacts without compromising spatial resolution in comparison to the default option of window filtering. In particular, accuracy of estimating diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging parameters improves so much that unconstrained fits become possible. PMID:26257388

  3. Stellar occultation observations of Neptune's rings: 1984-1988.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Mosqueira, Ignacio; Matthews, Keith

    1995-02-01

    -based detection of the Le Verrier Ring, with an overall radial width of 135 km and an equivalent width of 520 ± 55 m at λ2.2 μm which are similar to results obtained by the Voyager Photopolarimeter occultation experiment at λ0.27 μm (Horn et al. 1991, Geophys. Res. Lett. 17, 1745-1748). The ratio EPPS / E2.2μm = 1.3 ± 0.3. The mean radii of both occultation profiles—53055 and 53125 km, respectively, projected into the ring plane determined by Porco et al. ( Neptune and Triton Conference, Tucson, AZ, 1992) and Showalter and Cuzzi (1992), Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 24, 1029)—are significantly less than the image-derived radius of 53200 ± 20 km (Porco et al. 1992). It is conceivable that this discrepancy could be due to an unrecognized inclination and/or eccentricity. A comparison of our putative detection of the Le Verrier Ring with upper limits set by Sicady et al. (1991) suggests that this ring must be azimuthally inhomogeneous on scales of ˜10°, if our detection is real. A feature in the vicinity of the Adams Ring at the predicted longitude of the Liberté arc was seen in data obtained on 9 July 1988, but a discrepancy of 270 km between the calculated radius and the known semi-major axis of the ring seems to rule out an identification with the arc. Attempts to fit a precessing ellipse model to all available occultation data for the Adams Ring which will also accommodate this observation are in vain. The remaining occultation-derived radii for this ring are found to be consistent with the resonant-perturbation model of Porco (1991, Science 253, 995-1001), and suggest strongly that the Adams Ring lies in, or very close to, Neptune's equatorial plane.

  4. The Rings of Chariklo under Close Encounters with the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, R. A. N.; Sfair, R.; Winter, O. C.

    2016-06-01

    The Centaur population is composed of minor bodies wandering between the giant planets that frequently perform close gravitational encounters with these planets, leading to a chaotic orbital evolution. Recently, the discovery of two well-defined narrow rings was announced around the Centaur 10199 Chariklo. The rings are assumed to be in the equatorial plane of Chariklo and to have circular orbits. The existence of a well-defined system of rings around a body in such a perturbed orbital region poses an interesting new problem. Are the rings of Chariklo stable when perturbed by close gravitational encounters with the giant planets? Our approach to address this question consisted of forward and backward numerical simulations of 729 clones of Chariklo, with similar initial orbits, for a period of 100 Myr. We found, on average, that each clone experiences during its lifetime more than 150 close encounters with the giant planets within one Hill radius of the planet in question. We identified some extreme close encounters that were able to significantly disrupt or disturb the rings of Chariklo. About 3% of the clones lose their rings and about 4% of the clones have their rings significantly disturbed. Therefore, our results show that in most cases (more than 90%), the close encounters with the giant planets do not affect the stability of the rings in Chariklo-like systems. Thus, if there is an efficient mechanism that creates the rings, then these structures may be common among these kinds of Centaurs.

  5. Six Centuries Old Spiral of Vertical Corrugations in Saturn's C-Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E. A.; French, R. G.; Rappaport, N. J.; Wong, K.; McGhee, C.; Anabtawi, A.

    2011-12-01

    Likely evidence of nearly six centuries old collision of captured cometary material with Saturn's Ring C is uncovered in recent Cassini Radio Science ring observations. Three Cassini ring occultation experiments were especially designed so that radio signals transmitted by Cassini to the Earth pass through the rings when the rings are nearly closed as viewed by the ground receiving stations of the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). In this special geometry, the long path of the radio signals through the rings enhances sensitivity to detection of very tenuous ring material and allows ~400 meters resolution profiling of its radial structure. The observations uncover previously undetectable quasi-periodic optical depth undulations in 4 sub-regions of the innermost ~4000 km of Ring C (~74,480-77,740 km). The structure modulates a tenuous background optical depth of ~0.05 and has peak-to-peak fluctuations < ~0.01, making detection possible only in the case of these 3 special occultations (ring opening angle of 4.8, 4.8, and 1.9 degrees; Cassini Revs 123, 125, and 133, respectively). The structure is detectable at two observation wavelengths (0.94 and 3.6 cm), at multiple observing DSN ground stations, and in data from all 3 occultations. It's characterized by two interfering "tones" of spatial wavelength ~1.3 and ~1.2 km. The wavelength increases slowly with ring radius. The behavior appears consistent with presence of vertical corrugations 4-10 meters in height likely caused by a past ring tilting event (collision with cometary debris) and subsequent differential nodal regression of particle orbits. Time evolution of the perturbations creates a tightly wound spiral pattern of ring height variations which when probed by the radio signals yield the observed tenuous quasi-periodic optical depth fluctuations. The corrugations model was proposed by Hedman et al. [Science 332, 2011] to explain intriguing 30-50 km wavelength structure observed in Cassini images (ISS) across Ring

  6. Vaginal rings for delivery of HIV microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, R Karl; Fetherston, Susan M; McCoy, Clare F; Boyd, Peter; Major, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Following the successful development of long-acting steroid-releasing vaginal ring devices for the treatment of menopausal symptoms and contraception, there is now considerable interest in applying similar devices to the controlled release of microbicides against HIV. In this review article, the vaginal ring concept is first considered within the wider context of the early advances in controlled-release technology, before describing the various types of ring device available today. The remainder of the article highlights the key developments in HIV microbicide-releasing vaginal rings, with a particular focus on the dapivirine ring that is presently in late-stage clinical testing. PMID:23204872

  7. Oxygen ions observed near Saturn's A ring.

    PubMed

    Waite, J H; Cravens, T E; Ip, W-H; Kasprzak, W T; Luhmann, J G; McNutt, R L; Niemann, H B; Yelle, R V; Mueller-Wodarg, I; Ledvina, S A; Scherer, S

    2005-02-25

    Ions were detected in the vicinity of Saturn's A ring by the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) instrument onboard the Cassini Orbiter during the spacecraft's passage over the rings. The INMS saw signatures of molecular and atomic oxygen ions and of protons, thus demonstrating the existence of an ionosphere associated with the A ring. A likely explanation for these ions is photoionization by solar ultraviolet radiation of neutral O2 molecules associated with a tenuous ring atmosphere. INMS neutral measurements made during the ring encounter are dominated by a background signal.

  8. Signal and power roll ring testing update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the roll ring as a long-life, low-torque alternative to the slip ring is discussed. A roll ring consists of one or more circular flexures captured by their own spring force in the annular space between two concentric conductors or contact rings. The advantages of roll rings over other types of electrical transfer devices are: extremely low drag torque, high transfer efficiencies in high-power configurations, extremely low wear debris generation, long life, and low weight for high-power applications.

  9. Wavelength-tunable optical ring resonators

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.; Trotter, Douglas C.; Young, Ralph W.; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2009-11-10

    Optical ring resonator devices are disclosed that can be used for optical filtering, modulation or switching, or for use as photodetectors or sensors. These devices can be formed as microdisk ring resonators, or as open-ring resonators with an optical waveguide having a width that varies adiabatically. Electrical and mechanical connections to the open-ring resonators are made near a maximum width of the optical waveguide to minimize losses and thereby provide a high resonator Q. The ring resonators can be tuned using an integral electrical heater, or an integral semiconductor junction.

  10. Wavelength-tunable optical ring resonators

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.; Trotter, Douglas C.; Young, Ralph W.; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2011-07-19

    Optical ring resonator devices are disclosed that can be used for optical filtering, modulation or switching, or for use as photodetectors or sensors. These devices can be formed as microdisk ring resonators, or as open-ring resonators with an optical waveguide having a width that varies adiabatically. Electrical and mechanical connections to the open-ring resonators are made near a maximum width of the optical waveguide to minimize losses and thereby provide a high resonator Q. The ring resonators can be tuned using an integral electrical heater, or an integral semiconductor junction.

  11. Experimenatal analysis of the effect of cartilaginous rings on human tracheobronchial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya Segnini, Jose; Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Castillo, Luciano

    2016-11-01

    We present a set of high-resolution PIV experiments carried out in a refractive index-matched model of a trachea with cartilage rings at Re 2800. Results show a higher vorticity along the walls of the trachea in the model with cartilaginous rings as well as small recirculation areas on the upstream side of the wall cavities created by the rings. Furthermore, the ringed model experiences higher shear stress in the trachea due to the sudden change in the wall position created by the rings. Additionally, small recirculation areas are identified in the cavities between rings. For the smooth model, a stronger separation bubble is observed at the bronchi entrance, generating a stronger shear layer and increasing the wall shear stress on the bottom bronchi wall. The differences observed go against the notion that the main airway, i.e. trachea and main bronchi, may be modeled as smooth. Our results suggest that cartilage rings will have an impact on the wall shear stress and may affect particle deposition, which is of importance in inhaled drug delivery and pollutant deposition in the airway. Additionally, the effects introduced by the rings may change the flow characteristics in further generations.

  12. More on five dimensional EVH black rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, Ahmad; Golchin, Hanif; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we continue our analysis of arXiv:1308.1478 and study in detail the parameter space of three families of doubly spinning black ring solutions: balanced black ring, unbalanced ring and dipole-charged balanced black rings. In all these three families the Extremal Vanishing Horizon (EVH) ring appears in the vanishing limit of the dimensionful parameter of the solution which measures the ring size. We study the near horizon limit of the EVH black rings and for all three cases we find a (pinching orbifold) AdS3 throat with the AdS3 radius ℓ 2 = 8 G 5 M/(3 π) where M is the ring mass and G 5 is the 5d Newton constant. We also discuss the near horizon limit of near-EVH black rings and show that the AdS3 factor is replaced with a generic BTZ black hole. We use these results to extend the EVH/CFT correspondence for black rings, a 2d CFT dual to near-EVH black rings.

  13. Nuclear Rings in Galaxies - A Kinematic Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzuca, Lisa M.; Swaters, Robert A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We combine DensePak integral field unit and TAURUS Fabry-Perot observations of 13 nuclear rings to show an interconnection between the kinematic properties of the rings and their resonant origin. The nuclear rings have regular and symmetric kinematics, and lack strong non-circular motions. This symmetry, coupled with a direct relationship between the position angles and ellipticities of the rings and those of their host galaxies, indicate the rings are in the same plane as the disc and are circular. From the rotation curves derived, we have estimated the compactness (v(sup 2)/r) up to the turnover radius, which is where the nuclear rings reside. We find that there is evidence of a correlation between compactness and ring width and size. Radially wide rings are less compact, and thus have lower mass concentration. The compactness increases as the ring width decreases. We also find that the nuclear ring size is dependent on the bar strength, with weaker bars allowing rings of any size to form.

  14. Leapfrogging of multiple coaxial viscous vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2015-03-01

    A recent theoretical study [Borisov, Kilin, and Mamaev, "The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging, choreographies and the stability problem," Regular Chaotic Dyn. 18, 33 (2013); Borisov et al., "The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging in an ideal and viscous fluid," Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 031415 (2014)] shows that when three coaxial vortex rings travel in the same direction in an incompressible ideal fluid, each of the vortex rings alternately slips through (or leapfrogs) the other two ahead. Here, we use a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscous vortex rings with an identical initial circulation, radius, and separation distance with the aim of studying how viscous effect influences the outcomes of the leapfrogging process. For the case of two identical vortex rings, our computation shows that leapfrogging can be achieved only under certain favorable conditions, which depend on Reynolds number, vortex core size, and initial separation distance between the two rings. For the case of three coaxial vortex rings, the result differs from the inviscid model and shows that the second vortex ring always slips through the leading ring first, followed by the third ring slipping through the other two ahead. A simple physical model is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  15. Leapfrogging of multiple coaxial viscous vortex rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M. Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2015-03-15

    A recent theoretical study [Borisov, Kilin, and Mamaev, “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging, choreographies and the stability problem,” Regular Chaotic Dyn. 18, 33 (2013); Borisov et al., “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging in an ideal and viscous fluid,” Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 031415 (2014)] shows that when three coaxial vortex rings travel in the same direction in an incompressible ideal fluid, each of the vortex rings alternately slips through (or leapfrogs) the other two ahead. Here, we use a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscous vortex rings with an identical initial circulation, radius, and separation distance with the aim of studying how viscous effect influences the outcomes of the leapfrogging process. For the case of two identical vortex rings, our computation shows that leapfrogging can be achieved only under certain favorable conditions, which depend on Reynolds number, vortex core size, and initial separation distance between the two rings. For the case of three coaxial vortex rings, the result differs from the inviscid model and shows that the second vortex ring always slips through the leading ring first, followed by the third ring slipping through the other two ahead. A simple physical model is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  16. Small Satellites Embedded in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    A small satellite that inhabits a narrow gap in an dense planetary ring, such as Pan, will excite wakes at the gap edges, as well as spiral waves deeper in the ring. As the satellite disturbs the ring, it also draws angular momentum from the ring matter that orbits just interior to the satellite, while depositing that angular momentum among the ring particles that orbit just exterior. This outward transport of angular momentum causes the orbits of the nearby ring particles to slowly shrink, dragging along with them the satellite in its gap. This inward motion is of course type II migration that is familiar from planet formation theory. The significance of type II migration, if any, will also be assessed for the small satellites that orbit within Saturn's rings.

  17. Apse Alignment of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, Ignacio; Estrada, Paul R.

    2002-08-01

    An explanation of the dynamical mechanism for apse alignment of the eccentric uranian rings is necessary before observations can be used to determine properties such as ring masses, particle sizes, and elasticities. The leading model (P. Goldreich and S. Tremaine 1979, Astron J.84, 1638-1641) relies on the ring self-gravity to accomplish this task, yet it yields equilibrium masses which are not in accord with Voyager radio measurements. We explore possible solutions such that the self-gravity and the collisional terms are both involved in the process of apse alignment. We consider limits that correspond to a hot and a cold ring, and we show that pressure terms may play a significant role in the equilibrium conditions for the narrow uranian rings. In the cold ring case, where the scale height of the ring near periapse is comparable to the ring particle size, we introduce a new pressure correction pertaining to a region of the ring where the particles are locked in their relative positions and jammed against their neighbors and the velocity dispersion is so low that the collisions are nearly elastic. In this case, we find a solution such that the ring self-gravity maintains apse alignment against both differential precession ( m=1 mode) and the fluid pressure. We apply this model to the uranian α ring and show that, compared to the previous self-gravity model, the mass estimate for this ring increases by an order of magnitude. In the case of a hot ring, where the scale height can reach a value as much as 50 times the particle size, we find velocity dispersion profiles that result in pressure forces which act in such a way as to alter the ring equilibrium conditions, again leading to a ring mass increase of an order of magnitude. We find that such a velocity dispersion profile would require a different mechanism than is currently envisioned for establishing a heating/cooling balance in a finite-sized, inelastic particle ring. Finally, we introduce an important

  18. A search for cold water rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    SAR imagery obtained by Seasat in the Sargasso Sea during 1978 is examined for cold ring signatures. One orbit on August 26 is thought to have imaged the edge of a cold ring, although the ring's position was not well known at the time. During another orbit on September 23, drifting buoy and expendable bathythermography data furnished conclusive evidence that the ring was centered directly in the SAR swath. Although some suggestive patterns are visible in the images, it is not clear that cold rings can be identified by SAR, even though dynamically similar features, such as the Gulf Stream and warm rings, can be accurately detected. The suggestion is made that cold rings may be imaged inadequately because of their lack of surface temperature gradient.

  19. On the Janus-Epimetheus Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Othon; Souza, Alexandre; Sfait, Rafael; Giuliatti Winter, Silvia; Mourão, Decio; Foryta, Dietmar

    2016-10-01

    Cassini spacecraft found a new and unique ring to share a trajectory with Janus and Epimetheus, co-orbital satellites of Saturn. Analyzing Cassini images, we found that the Janus-Epimetheus ring is a continuous and smooth ring, which can only be seen by Cassini's camera at very high phase angles, not being observed at other geometries, as a `firefly' behavior. We also found a very short mean lifetime for the ring particles, less than a couple of decades. Consequently, the ring needs to be constantly replenished. Using a collisional model of micrometeoroids on the satellites' surfaces we found that it produces a faint ring that is fully compatible with the Janus-Epimitheus ring. We also verified that the steady state of the generated particles distribution corresponds to that of the light scattering regime responsible for the `firefly' behavior.

  20. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, I.

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500-1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  1. The F ring: Saturn's crooked halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; French, R. G.; Bosh, A. S.

    1999-09-01

    HST observations of the ring--plane crossings in May, August and November 1995 showed that the edge-on brightness of Saturn's rings is dominated not by the classical A and B rings, but by the narrow, irregular F Ring (Nicholson et al., [1996] Science 272, 509; Bosh & Rivkin [1996] Ibid 272, 518). Located 3500 km exterior to the outer edge of the A ring, and bounded by the small satellites Prometheus and Pandora, the F ring is ~ 50 km wide, optically thin at normal incidence angles, and exhibits a multi-stranded appearance in high resolution Voyager images (Murray et al. [1997] Icarus 129, 304). Occultation observations in 1980/81 and 1989 show a single strand which is well-fitted by a precessing keplerian ellipse with semimajor axis 140209 km and e = 0.0029. A stellar occultation observed by HST on 22 November 1995, just after the solar ring plane crossing and at a terrestrial incidence angle of only 2.7 deg, revealed that the F ring is inclined at an angle of 0.0062 deg to the plane of the main rings (Olkin & Bosh [1996] BAAS, 28, 1125). This non-zero inclination, which corresponds to a vertical amplitude a sin i = 15 km, also manifests itself in the partial eclipse of the F ring by the A ring in the November HST images. By precessing the ring back to the Earth ring plane crossing of 10 August, we find that the curious east-west asymmetry in the brightness of the main rings noted at this time - which is the principal source of uncertainty in the crossing time (Nicholson & French [1997] BAAS 29, 1097) - is apparently due to partial obscuration of the A and B rings by the inclined F ring. By chance, the Earth crossing of 22 May occurred when the line of nodes pointed to the Earth, and no such asymmetry was seen. Photometric models of the edge-on ring brightness should permit us to determine both the thickness and radial optical depth of the F ring, and eventually to refine the ring plane crossing time to within an uncertainty of a few minutes .

  2. Einstein Ring in Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, Rémi Cabanac and his European colleagues have discovered an amazing cosmic mirage, known to scientists as an Einstein Ring. This cosmic mirage, dubbed FOR J0332-3557, is seen towards the southern constellation Fornax (the Furnace), and is remarkable on at least two counts. First, it is a bright, almost complete Einstein ring. Second, it is the farthest ever found. ESO PR Photo 20a/05 ESO PR Photo 20a/05 Deep Image of a Region in Fornax (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 434 pix - 60k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 867 pix - 276k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1859 x 2015 pix - 3.8M] ESO PR Photo 20b/05 ESO PR Photo 20b/05 Zoom-in on the Newly Found Einstein Ring (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 575 pix - 168k] [Normal - JPEG: 630 x 906 pix - 880k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 20a/05 is a composite image taken in two bands (B and R) with VLT/FORS1 of a small portion of the sky (field-of-view 7x7' or 1/15th of the area of the full moon). The faintest object seen in the image has a magnitude 26, that is, it is 100 million times fainter than what can be observed with the unaided eye. The bright elliptical galaxy on the lower-left quadrant is a dwarf galaxy part of a large nearby cluster in the Fornax constellation. As for all deep images of the sky, this field shows a variety of objects, the brightest ponctual sources being stars from our Galaxy. By far the field is dominated by thousands of faint background galaxies the colours of which are related to the age of their dominant stellar population, their dust content and their distance. The newly found Einstein ring is visible in the top right part of the image. ESO PR Photo 20b/05 zooms-in on the position of the newly found cosmic mirage. ESO PR Photo 20c/05 ESO PR Photo 20c/05 Einstein Ring in Distant Universe (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 584 pix - 104k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1168 pix - 292k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1502 x 2192 pix - 684k] Caption of ESO PR Photo 20c/05: The left image is magnified and centred

  3. DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

  4. Geometric phase of atoms in a magnetic storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; You, L.

    2006-12-15

    A magnetically trapped atom experiences an adiabatic geometric (Berry's) phase due to changing field direction. We investigate theoretically such an Aharonov-Bohm-like geometric phase for atoms adiabatically moving inside a storage ring as demonstrated in several recent experiments. Our result shows that this phase shift is easily observable in a closed-loop interference experiment, and thus the shift has to be accounted for in the proposed inertial sensing applications. The spread in phase shift due to the atom transverse distribution is quantified through numerical simulations.

  5. Experimental study of resonance fiber optic gyroscope employing a dual-ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A dual-ring resonator which is available to alter the full width at half maximum (FWHM) without altering the free spectrum range (FSR) for practice applications is analyzed theoretically and set up in practice. The parameters of the dual-ring resonator have been optimized in simulation, the resonance depth and the dynamic range are enhanced. The prototype is set up with single mode fiber of 8 meter and two 95 : 5 couplers for open loop experiment. The FWHM of the dual-ring resonator is demonstrated less than 1.5MHz and the fineness is calculated to be 37 during the frequency sweeping experiment. The frequency locking experiment with demodulation curve method has been accomplished, and the locking time achieves less than 40ms. All these provide a basic reference for optimizing the resonance fiber optic gyro based on dual-ring resonator.

  6. Cassini microwave observations provide clues to the origin of Saturn's C ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Hayes, A. G.; Janssen, M. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cuzzi, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Dunn, D. E.; Estrada, P. R.; Hedman, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable study, Saturn's rings continue to challenge current theories for their provenance. Water ice comprises the bulk of Saturn's rings, yet it is the small fraction of non-icy material that is arguably more valuable in revealing clues about the system's origin and age. Herein, we present new measurements of the non-icy material fraction in Saturn's C ring, determined from microwave radiometry observations acquired by the Cassini spacecraft. Our observations show an exceptionally high brightness at near-zero azimuthal angles, suggesting a high porosity of 70-75% for the C ring particles. Furthermore, our results show that most regions in the C ring contain about 1-2% silicates. These results are consistent with an initially nearly pure-ice ring system that has been continuously contaminated by in-falling micrometeoroids over ∼15-90 million years, using the currently accepted value of the micrometeoroid flux at infinity of ∼4.5 × 10-17g cm-2 s-1, and assuming that the C ring optical depth and surface density has not changed significantly during that time. This absolute time scale is inversely proportional not only to the flux at infinity, but also to the amount of gravitational focusing by Saturn the micrometeoroids experience before encountering the rings. We also find an enhanced abundance of non-icy material concentrated in the middle C ring. When assumed to be mixed volumetrically ("intramixed") with water ice, this enhanced contamination reaches a maximum concentration of 6-11% silicates by volume around a ring radius of 83,000 km, depending on the volume mixing model used. This is significantly higher than the inner and outer C ring. As opposed to an intramixing model, we also consider a silicate-core, icy-mantle model to address the fact that silicates may be present in chunks instead of fine powder in the ring particles. Such a model naturally helps to account for the observed opacity distribution. We propose several models to explain the

  7. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  8. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected.

  9. Buckling analysis of a ring stiffened hybrid composite cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potluri, Rakesh; Eswara Kumar, A.; Navuri, Karteek; Nagaraju, M.; Mojeswara Rao, Duduku

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to understand the response of the ring stiffened cylinders made up of hybrid composites subjected to buckling loads by using the concepts of Design of Experiments (DOE) and optimization by using Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation software Ansys workbench V15. Carbon epoxy and E-glass epoxy composites were used in the hybrid composite. This hybrid composite was analyzed by using different layup angles. Central composite design (CCD) was used to perform design of experiments (D.O.E) and kriging method was used to generate a response surface. The response surface optimization (RSO) was performed by using the method of the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA). After optimization, the best candidate was chosen and applied to the ring stiffened cylinder and eigenvalue buckling analysis was performed to understand the buckling behavior. Best laminate candidates with high buckling strength have been identified. A generalized procedure of the laminate optimization and analysis have been shown.

  10. Dynamics of dust in Jupiter's gossamer rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D.; Burns, J.; Krueger, H.; Showalter, M.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Galileo spacecraft has drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint rings. We now know the system to be composed of a main ring 7000km wide whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of gossamer rings, each one extending inward from a small moon. These moonlets, Thebe and Amalthea, have large orbital tilts and resulting vertical excursions of 1150km and 4300km, respectively. The vertical thicknesses of the two Gossamer rings accurately match these values, providing compelling evidence that the two small satellites act as the dominant sources of ring material. Ring Material is born during high speed impacts onto the moonlet surfaces, after which the material evolves inward under the action of a dissipative force, either Poynting-Robertson Drag or Resonant Charge Variations. The basic framework for the origin and evolution of the Gossamer Rings is well understood, but there are a few loose ends that are not so easily explained: i) an outward extension of the Thebe Ring, ii) the nature of the dissipative force. In this talk I will report my latest dynamical modeling of the Gossamer rings associated with Thebe and Amalthea, and will discuss how in-situ impact data collected by the Galileo dust detector during the first ever ring "fly-through" may help to resolve some of these and other outstanding issues.

  11. Interaction of Vortex Ring with Cutting Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musta, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a vortex ring impinging on a thin cutting plate was made experimentally using Volumetric 3-component Velocitmetry (v3v) technique. The vortex rings were generated with piston-cylinder vortex ring generator using piston stroke-to-diameter ratios and Re at 2-3 and 1500 - 3000, respectively. The cutting of vortex rings below center line leads to the formation of secondary vortices on each side of the plate which is look like two vortex rings, and a third vortex ring propagates further downstream in the direction of the initial vortex ring, which is previously showed by flow visualization study of Weigand (1993) and called ``trifurcation''. Trifurcation is very sensitive to the initial Reynolds number and the position of the plate with respect to the vortex ring generator pipe. The present work seeks more detailed investigation on the trifurcation using V3V technique. Conditions for the formation of trifurcation is analyzed and compared with Weigand (1993). The formed secondary vortex rings and the propagation of initial vortex ring in the downstream of the plate are analyzed by calculating their circulation, energy and trajectories.

  12. Boom and Bust Cycles in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Albers, N.

    2010-12-01

    Cassini UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn’s F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations perturbed by Mimas and Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. The maximum clumping lags the moon by roughly π in the forcing frame. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predator-prey system: the aggregate mean size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. For realistic values of the parameters this creates a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the boom-bust economic cycle. Solving for the long-term behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag roughly consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements. We conclude that the agitation by the moons at both these locations in the F ring and at the B ring outer edge drives aggregation and disaggregation in the forcing frame. This agitation of the ring material allows fortuitous formation of solid objects from the temporary clumps, via stochastic processes like compaction, adhesion, sintering or reorganization that drives the denser parts of the aggregate to the center or ejects the lighter elements. These more persistent objects would then orbit at the Kepler rate. Such processes can create the equinox objects seen at the B ring edge and in the F ring, explain the ragged nature of those ring regions and allow for rare events to aggregate ring particles into solid objects, recycling the ring material and extending the ring lifetime.

  13. Boom and Bust Cycles in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Albers, N.

    2010-10-01

    7/16/10 12:23 PM UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn's F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations perturbed by Mimas and Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. The maximum clumping lags the moon by π in the forcing frame. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predator-prey system: the aggregate mean size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. For realistic values of the parameters this creates a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the boom-bust economic cycle. Solving for the long-term behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements. We conclude that the agitation by the moons at both these locations in the F ring and at the B ring outer edge drives aggregation and disaggregation in the forcing frame. This agitation of the ring material allows fortuitous formation of solid objects from the temporary clumps, via stochastic processes like compaction, adhesion, sintering or reorganization that drives the denser parts of the aggregate to the center or ejects the lighter elements. These more persistent objects would then orbit at the Kepler rate. Such processes can create the equinox objects seen at the B ring edge and in the F ring, explain the ragged nature of those ring regions and allow for rare events to aggregate ring particles into solid objects, recycling the ring material and extending the ring lifetime. 7/16/10 12:23 PM 7/16/10 12:23 PM

  14. Saturn's rings thickness with the shadow hiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deau, Estelle; Brahic, André; Porco, Carolyn

    Using the Hapke shadow hiding model on various curves phases of ISS/Cassini, we were able to compute the thickness of Saturn's rings through the photometric filling factor. Our results show that diffuse rings (C ring and Cassini Division) are distributed in a monolayer with a thickness from a few centimeters to 5 meters. This seems to suggest that the layer is smaller than the larger particles. For the A and B rings, we find a thickness ranging from 10 to 20 meters, then leading to multiple layers of particles. Our results for the A ring are systematically lower than the values derived by density waves (Tiscareno et al., 2007) and dynamical simulations of Salo and Kaarjalainen (2003). For the first one, this can be explain by the fact the vertical height of the density waves are the upper limit of the real height. Indeed, the wakes (Julian & Toomre, 1966; Salo 1995) conduce the viscosity in the A ring (Daisaka et al., 2001), and produce random speeds greater in the ring plane than in the vertical direction (Daisaka & Ida, 1999), thereby reducing the thickness given by the vertical random speed used to compute the vertical height. However, for the latter one, simulations lead in all the cases (A and B rings such as C ring and Cassini Division) to vertical height of few meters. This constancy can be explained by the fact that simulations take a size distribution too truncated, and a coefficient of restitution rather simple (indeed, rings reflect different surface conditions related to the optical depth, thus the Bridges' law could not promote only one type of collisions). Finally, our results prefer monolayer (layer smaller than the larger particles which allow multilayer of smaller particules) for the faint rings (C ring and Cassini Division) and multilayer for the A and B rings.

  15. Perturbations to Saturn's F-ring strands at their closest approach to Prometheus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giuliatti, Winter S.M.; Murray, C.D.; Gordon, M.

    2000-01-01

    The strange morphology of the F ring of Saturn is thought to be caused by the perturbing effects of two close satellites, Prometheus and Pandora. The F ring and the satellites also experience periodic close encounters as a result of differential precession arising from Saturn's oblateness. Using the orbits of the F-ring strands derived by Murray et al. (1997, Icarus 129, 304-316) the behaviour of the ring particles at their closest approach to Prometheus is analysed using numerical simulations. The results show that a gap and a wave are formed in the ring at each encounter with the satellite. However, the gap is expected to have a short lifetime due to keplerian shear. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mode beating and heterodyning of monolithically integrated semiconductor ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chiyu

    Monolithically integrated semiconductor ring lasers (SRLs) are attractive optical sources for optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs) because they do not require any feedback elements, do not have parts exposed to external ambient, and can operate in a traveling-wave mode. They are promising candidates for wavelength filtering, unidirectional traveling-wave operation, and multiplexing/demultiplexing applications. Ring lasers can also be used as ultrashort pulse generators using various mode-locking schemes and as active gyro components. However, the SRL is a very complicated dynamic system, which requires more investigations to understand the performance regarding details of the design and fabrication. As a part of NASA-supported project "Monolithically Integrated Semiconductor Ring Laser Gyro for Space Applications", this dissertation research was focused on design and characterization of a novel monolithically integrated rotation sensor based on two large-size independent SRLs. Numerical modeling based on the beam propagation method (BPM) was used to design the fabrication parameters for the single-mode ridge-waveguide ring cavity and directional coupler waveguides. The mode internal coupling in single lateral-mode laser diodes with InGaAs/GaAs material system was investigated by optical experiments and numerical modeling. To gain the understanding of the SRL performance, optical and electrical characterization was performed on fabricated SRLs. Particular emphasis was placed on the study of optical and radio frequency (RF) beating spectra of longitudinal modes of ring lasers. RF measurements provide high accuracy in the diagnosis of laser oscillation parameters by purely electronic means, particularly in the measurement of the group index and its dependence on current and temperature. Theoretical analysis based on the effective index method provides good agreement between the experimental data and numerical calculations. Finally, optical heterodyning spectra

  17. Development of a longitudinal density monitor for storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, M.; Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; Datte, P.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Riot, V.; Schoenlein, R.; Turner, W.

    2003-05-28

    We report on development of a new storage ring operations tool for measurement of longitudinal beam density profile. The technique mixes synchrotron light with light from a mode locked solid-state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal and detects the up-converted radiation with a photo-multiplier. The laser is phase locked to the storage ring RF system. The laser choices available for repetition frequency, pulse length and phase modulation give a very wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of particular storage rings. Progress in the technology of solid-state lasers ensures this system can be made robust for routine use in storage ring operations. A very large number of important applications are possible including measurement of the fraction of untrapped particles prior to acceleration, the population of particles in the nominally unfilled RF buckets in a bunch train (''ghost bunches''), longitudinal tails, the diffusion of particles into the beam abort gap and th e normal bunch parameters of longitudinal shape and intensity. We are currently investigating application to two devices: (1) the 1.9 GeV ALS electron storage ring at LBNL with 328 RF buckets, 2ns bucket spacing, 276 nominally filled bunches, 15-30ps rms bunch length and (2) the 7 TeV LHC proton collider under construction at CERN with 35,640 RF buckets, 2.5 ns bucket spacing, 2,808 nominally filled bunches, 280-620 ps rms bunch length. A proof of principle experiment is being conducted on ALS. The results of the ALS experiment and detailed analyses of the application to LHC and its requirements are described.

  18. Protein Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Ksendzov, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Prototype transducers based on integrated optical ring resonators have been demonstrated to be useful for detecting the protein avidin in extremely dilute solutions. In an experiment, one of the transducers proved to be capable of indicating the presence of avidin at a concentration of as little as 300 pM in a buffer solution a detection sensitivity comparable to that achievable by previously reported protein-detection techniques. These transducers are serving as models for the further development of integrated-optics sensors for detecting small quantities of other proteins and protein-like substances. The basic principle of these transducers was described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. The differences between the present transducers and the ones described in the cited prior article lie in details of implementation of the basic principle. As before, the resonator in a transducer of the present type is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, consists of a layer comprising sublayers having indices of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core. The outermost sublayer absorbs the chemical of interest (in this case, avidin). The index of refraction of the outermost sublayer changes with the concentration of absorbed avidin. The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong evanescent-wave coupling between the outer sublayer and the electromagnetic field propagating along the waveguide core. By virtue of this coupling, the chemically induced change in the index of refraction of the outermost sublayer causes a measurable change in the spectrum of the resonator output.

  19. Construction and testing of the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Williams, D.A.; Zucchelli, P. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Whitaker, J.S.; Wilson, R.J. . Dept. of Physics); Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S. . Dept. of Physics); Johns

    1990-01-01

    We report on the construction of the Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider and the testing of its components. We include results from testing the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays, and mirrors for the barrel CRID. We also discuss development of the support systems essential for the operation of the CRID: gas and liquid recirculator systems and monitoring. 15 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Fluid entrainment by isolated vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, John O.; Gharib, Morteza

    2004-07-01

    Of particular importance to the development of models for isolated vortex ring dynamics in a real fluid is knowledge of ambient fluid entrainment by the ring. This time-dependent process dictates changes in the volume of fluid that must share impulse delivered by the vortex ring generator. Therefore fluid entrainment is also of immediate significance to the unsteady forces that arise due to the presence of vortex rings in starting flows. Applications ranging from industrial and transportation, to animal locomotion and cardiac flows, are currently being investigated to understand the dynamical role of the observed vortex ring structures. Despite this growing interest, fully empirical measurements of fluid entrainment by isolated vortex rings have remained elusive. The primary difficulties arise in defining the unsteady boundary of the ring, as well as an inability to maintain the vortex ring in the test section sufficiently long to facilitate measurements. We present a new technique for entrainment measurement that utilizes a coaxial counter-flow to retard translation of vortex rings generated from a piston cylinder apparatus, so that their growth due to fluid entrainment can be observed. Instantaneous streamlines of the flow are used to determine the unsteady vortex ring boundary and compute ambient fluid entrainment. Measurements indicate that the entrainment process does not promote self-similar vortex ring growth, but instead consists of a rapid convection-based entrainment phase during ring formation, followed by a slower diffusive mechanism that entrains ambient fluid into the isolated vortex ring. Entrained fluid typically constitutes 30% to 40% of the total volume of fluid carried with the vortex ring. Various counter-flow protocols were used to substantially manipulate the diffusive entrainment process, producing rings with entrained fluid fractions up to 65%. Measurements of vortex ring growth rate and vorticity distribution during diffusive entrainment

  1. Application of Taguchi method in optimization of cervical ring cage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Teo, Ee-Chon; Fuss, Franz Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    The Taguchi method is a statistical approach to overcome the limitation of the factorial and fractional factorial experiments by simplifying and standardizing the fractional factorial design. The objective of the current study is to illustrate the procedures and strengths of the Taguchi method in biomechanical analysis by using a case study of a cervical ring cage optimization. A three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of C(5)-C(6) with a generic cervical ring cage inserted was modelled. Taguchi method was applied in the optimization of the cervical ring cage in material property and dimensions for producing the lowest stress on the endplate to reduce the risk of cage subsidence, as in the following steps: (1) establishment of objective function; (2) determination of controllable factors and their levels; (3) identification of uncontrollable factors and test conditions; (4) design of Taguchi crossed array layout; (5) execution of experiments according to trial conditions; (6) analysis of results; (7) determination of optimal run; (8) confirmation of optimum run. The results showed that a cage with larger width, depth and wall thickness can produce the lower von Mises stress under various conditions. The contribution of implant materials is found trivial. The current case study illustrates that the strengths of the Taguchi method lie in (1) consistency in experimental design and analysis; (2) reduction of time and cost of experiments; (3) robustness of performance with removing the noise factors. The Taguchi method will have a great potential application in biomechanical field when factors of the issues are at discrete level.

  2. Gravito-electromagnetic effects of massive rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2015-05-01

    The Einstein field equations in linear post-Newtonian approximation can be written in analogy with electromagnetism, in the so-called gravito-electromagnetic (GEM) formalism. We use this analogy to study the gravitational field of a massive ring: In particular, we consider a continuous mass distribution on Keplerian orbit around a central body, and we work out the gravitational field generated by this mass distribution in the intermediate zone between the central body and the ring, focusing on the gravitomagnetic (GM) component that originates from the rotation of the ring. In doing so, we generalize and complement some previous results that focused on the purely Newtonian effects of the ring (thus neglecting its rotation) or that were applied to the case, of rotating spherical shells. Eventually, we study in some simple cases, the effect of the rotation of the ring, and suggest that, in principle, this approach could be used to infer information about the angular momentum of the ring.

  3. Passive scalar mixing in vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Rajes; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2006-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of passive scalar mixing in vortex rings are performed, with and without crossflow. The simulation results without crossflow agree well with experimental data for `formation number', total circulation, trajectory and entrainment fraction. Scalar profiles, mixedness and volume of scalar carrying fluid are used to quantify mixing, whose characteristics are quite different in the formation and propagation phases of the ring. These results are explained in terms of entrainment by the ring. The simulations with crossflow show that the ring tilts and deforms. When the stroke ratio is greater than formation number, the ring tilts in the direction of the crossflow. On the other hand, when the stroke ratio is less than formation number, the ring tilts in the opposite direction, such that its induced velocity opposes the crossflow. The Magnus effect may be used to provide a simple explanation. The impact of this behavior on mixing will be discussed.

  4. Electromagnetic angular momentum transport in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Ip, W.; Gruen, E.; Havnes, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that submicrometer dust particles sporadically elevated above Saturn's ring are subject to electromagnetic forces which will reduce their angular momentum inside synchronous orbit and increase it outside. When the dust is reabsorbed by the ring the angular momentum of the ring is decreased (increased) inside (outside) of synchronous orbit. For the case of the spokes in Saturn's B-ring it is estimated that the timescale for transporting ring material due to this angular momentum coupling effect is comparable to the viscous transport time or even smaller. It is suggested that the minimum in the optical depth of the B-ring at synchronous orbit is due to this effect.

  5. Cooling system for three hook ring segment

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X.; Eng, Darryl; Lee, Ching-Pang; Patat, Harry

    2014-08-26

    A triple hook ring segment including forward, midsection and aft mounting hooks for engagement with respective hangers formed on a ring segment carrier for supporting a ring segment panel, and defining a forward high pressure chamber and an aft low pressure chamber on opposing sides of the midsection mounting hook. An isolation plate is provided on the aft side of the midsection mounting hook to form an isolation chamber between the aft low pressure chamber and the ring segment panel. High pressure air is supplied to the forward chamber and flows to the isolation chamber through crossover passages in the midsection hook. The isolation chamber provides convection cooling air to an aft portion of the ring segment panel and enables a reduction of air pressure in the aft low pressure chamber to reduce leakage flow of cooling air from the ring segment.

  6. Aqueous Polymer in water alter the Coffee-ring effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Changdeok; Jang, Daeho; Na, Wonhwi; Park, Sera; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-11-01

    When evaporating in droplet system, small particles move toward an edge by outward capillary flow. This phenomenon is known as coffee-ring effect. In experiments that are required to uniformly accumulate particles, this effect can be fatal. In spite of recent challenges for suppressing the coffee-ring effect, it is still insufficiently controlled in film and droplet with various solutions. For deliberate applications, various materials should be out of influence of coffee-ring effect. In this research, we used a bio-compatible and aqueous polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG) for altering the coffee-ring effect. The influence of PEG on the evaporation of drying colloidal droplets is examined in a wide range of initial concentrations. Adding PEG to water causes a strong vortex flow near the edge of droplet and subsequently leads to significantly uniform patterns of colloidal particle deposition after evaporation. We found the vortex phenomenon by combination of radially outward capillary flow and radially inward Marangoni flows are induced by the radial variation of polymer concentration along the air?water interface. Furthermore, increasing polymer concentration significantly alters the characteristic of ``Marangoni Vortex'' and leads to reproducible patterning of conical structures.

  7. Nonlinear hopping transport in ring systems and open channels.

    PubMed

    Einax, Mario; Körner, Martin; Maass, Philipp; Nitzan, Abraham

    2010-01-21

    We study the nonlinear hopping transport in one-dimensional rings and open channels. Analytical results are derived for the stationary current response to a constant bias without assuming any specific coupling of the rates to the external fields. It is shown that anomalous large effective jump lengths, as observed in recent experiments by taking the ratio of the third-order nonlinear and the linear conductivity, can occur already in ordered systems. Rectification effects due to site energy disorder in ring systems are expected to become irrelevant for large system sizes. In open channels, in contrast, rectification effects occur already for disorder in the jump barriers and do not vanish in the thermodynamic limit. Numerical solutions for a sinusoidal bias show that the ring system provides a good description for the transport behavior in the open channel for intermediate and high frequencies. For low frequencies temporal variations in the mean particle number have to be taken into account in the open channel, which cannot be captured in the more simple ring model.

  8. Three Quantum Dots Embedded in Aharonov-Bohm Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, Ryan; Hãttel, Andreas; Goswami, Srijit; Eberl, Karl; Eriksson, Mark; van der Weide, Daniel; Blick, Robert

    2004-03-01

    Coherent coupling of two quantum dots embedded in a ring-geometry has been demonstrated by Holleitner et al.(A.W. Holleitner, H. Qin, C.R. Decker, K. Eberl, and R.H. Blick, phCoherent Coupling of Two Quantum Dots Embedded in an Aharonov-Bohm Ring), Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 256802 (2001) Recording of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in such a circuit has proven that the phases of electron wave functions can be manipulated directly. We have since enhanced the complexity of this system by embedding three quantum dots in such a ring-geometry. As before, our quantum dots are formed by laterally constricting a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in an Al_xGa_1-xAs/GaAs heterostructure. The new, essential ingredient of this experiment is an additional third port--added to the ring for individually addressing the third quantum dot. This circuit allows us to investigate phenomena associated with phase-switching between separate ports. We will discuss first results and give a simple model of circuit operation.

  9. Ring-Constraint High-Pressure Torsion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a constraint ring around a workpiece was employed in order to develop back pressure in addition to a compressive die pressure in high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. The influence of the constraint ring during the HPT process was analyzed using the finite element method and experimental analyses. Greater back pressure was developed when a ring of a stronger material enveloped the workpiece. In the experiments, fracture of a brittle material [ e.g., La-based bulk metallic glass (BMG)], was limited even at large shear strain (~315) during the ring-constraint HPT (RC-HPT) process due to reduced tensile stress at the edge of the deforming BMG workpiece. Furthermore, the RC-HPT process had beneficial effects on powder consolidation and bonding. The RC-HPT process exhibited smaller loss of material than did the conventional semi-constrained HPT process. The Cu disk produced by the powder RC-HPT had smaller grain sizes because back pressure generated more dislocations and finer grain size in the Cu workpiece.

  10. Oil Leakage from the Seal Ring of a Scroll Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Fukui, Atsushi; Horiguchi, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu; Toyama, Toshiyuki

    In scroll compressors for air conditioners, there is a compressor with back-pressure chamber spaced by seal ring behind orbiting scroll. High pressure in the backpressure chamber presses the orbiting scroll to fixed scroll. In the case that lubrication oil and refrigerant gas with high pressure and temperature in the backpressure chamber leak to low pressure chamber through the seal ring, the efficiency of compressor decreases and the oil circulation rate can increase. In the present study the leakage characteristics of lubrication oil from the backpressure chamber to the low pressure chamber were investigated. In experiment, it was found that the oil leakage is larger for higher rotational speed of rotating disk, higher viscosity of oil and smaller pressure difference between the backpressure and low-pressure chambers. This could be explained by the calculation in which the seal ring was assumed to have a tilt angle. It was also found in the calculation that oil leakage is larger due to the thicker oil film between the seal ring and the rotating disk in the case of higher rotational speed of the disk, higher viscosity of oil and smaller pressure difference between the backpressure and low-pressure chambers.

  11. Passive Vibration Control of Airborne Equipment using a Circular Steel Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Joseph; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Kehoe, Mike

    1997-01-01

    Vibration isolation is needed to protect avionics equipment from adverse aircraft vibration environments. Passive isolation is the simplest means to achieve this goal. The system used here consists of a circular steel ring with a lump mass on top and exposed to base excitation. Sinusoidal and filtered zero-mean Gaussian white noise are used to excite the structure and the acceleration response spectra at the top of the ring are computed. An experiment is performed to identify the natural frequencies and modal damping of the circular ring. Comparison is made between the analytical and experimental results and good agreement is observed. The ring response is also evaluated with a concentrated mass attached to the top of the ring. The effectiveness of the ring in isolating the equipment from base excitation is studied. The acceleration response spectra of a single degree of freedom system attached to the top of the ring are evaluated and the results are compared with those exposed directly to the base excitation. It is shown that a properly designed ring could effectively protect the avionics from possible damaging excitation levels.

  12. Satellite-rocket docking ring recognition method based on mathematical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Shang, Yang; Ma, Xuan

    2015-10-01

    Satellite-rocket docking ring recognition method based on mathematical morphology is presented in this paper, according to the geometric and grayscale characteristics of the docking ring typical structure. The docking ring used in this paper is a circle with a cross in the middle. Most of spacecrafts are transported into orbit by rocket, and they retain the connection component with the rocket. The tracing spacecraft should capture the target spacecraft first before operating the target spacecraft. The docking ring is one of the typical parts of a spacecraft, and it can be recognized automatically. Thereby we can capture the spacecraft through the information of the docking ring. Firstly a multi-step mathematical morphology processing is applied to the image of the target spacecraft with different structure element, followed by edge detection and line detection, and finally docking ring typical structure is located in the image by relative geometry analysis. The images used in this paper are taken of real satellite in lab. The docking ring can be recognized when the distance between the two spacecraft is different. The results of physical simulation experiment show that the method in this paper can recognize docking ring typical structure accurately when the tracing spacecraft is approaching the target spacecraft.

  13. Model of myosin node aggregation into a contractile ring: the effect of local alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojkic, Nikola; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2011-09-01

    Actomyosin bundles frequently form through aggregation of membrane-bound myosin clusters. One such example is the formation of the contractile ring in fission yeast from a broad band of cortical nodes. Nodes are macromolecular complexes containing several dozens of myosin-II molecules and a few formin dimers. The condensation of a broad band of nodes into the contractile ring has been previously described by a search, capture, pull and release (SCPR) model. In SCPR, a random search process mediated by actin filaments nucleated by formins leads to transient actomyosin connections among nodes that pull one another into a ring. The SCPR model reproduces the transport of nodes over long distances and predicts observed clump-formation instabilities in mutants. However, the model does not generate transient linear elements and meshwork structures as observed in some wild-type and mutant cells during ring assembly. As a minimal model of node alignment, we added short-range aligning forces to the SCPR model representing currently unresolved mechanisms that may involve structural components, cross-linking and bundling proteins. We studied the effect of the local node alignment mechanism on ring formation numerically. We varied the new parameters and found viable rings for a realistic range of values. Morphologically, transient structures that form during ring assembly resemble those observed in experiments with wild-type and cdc25-22 cells. Our work supports a hierarchical process of ring self-organization involving components drawn together from distant parts of the cell followed by progressive stabilization.

  14. Signet ring lymphoma: a potential diagnostic mishap.

    PubMed

    Krause, John R

    2013-07-01

    Signet ring lymphomas are proliferations of malignant lymphoid cells containing cytoplasmic inclusions or vacuoles that displace the nucleus to the side, imparting a "signet ring" appearance. These signet ring cells, particularly those with cytoplasmic vacuoles, may be mistaken for an adenocarcinoma rather than a lymphoma, if sufficient material is not available to differentiate the case by immunohistochemical stains or flow cytometry. The pathologist must also be aware of this entity so that appropriate studies may be untaken.

  15. Interferometric ring lasers and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1995-03-14

    Two ring diode lasers are optically coupled together to produce tunable, stable output through a Y-junction output coupler which may also be a laser diode or can be an active waveguide. These devices demonstrate a sharp peak in light output with an excellent side-mode-rejection ratio. The rings can also be made of passive or active waveguide material. With additional rings the device is a tunable optical multiplexer/demultiplexer. 11 figs.

  16. Saturn Ring Data Analysis and Thermal Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Coleman

    2011-01-01

    CIRS, VIMS, UVIS, and ISS (Cassini's Composite Infrared Specrtometer, Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, Ultra Violet Imaging Spectrometer and Imaging Science Subsystem, respectively), have each operated in a multidimensional observation space and have acquired scans of the lit and unlit rings at multiple phase angles. To better understand physical and dynamical ring particle parametric dependence, we co-registered profiles from these three instruments, taken at a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared, to associate changes in ring particle temperature with changes in observed brightness, specifically with albedos inferred by ISS, UVIS and VIMS. We work in a parameter space where the solar elevation range is constrained to 12 deg - 14 deg and the chosen radial region is the B3 region of the B ring; this region is the most optically thick region in Saturn's rings. From this compilation of multiple wavelength data, we construct and fit phase curves and color ratios using independent dynamical thermal models for ring structure and overplot Saturn, Saturn ring, and Solar spectra. Analysis of phase curve construction and color ratios reveals thermal emission to fall within the extrema of the ISS bandwidth and a geometrical dependence of reddening on phase angle, respectively. Analysis of spectra reveals Cassini CIRS Saturn spectra dominate Cassini CIRS B3 Ring Spectra from 19 to 1000 microns, while Earth-based B Ring Spectrum dominates Earth-based Saturn Spectrum from 0.4 to 4 microns. From our fits we test out dynamical thermal models; from the phase curves we derive ring albedos and non-lambertian properties of the ring particle surfaces; and from the color ratios we examine multiple scattering within the regolith of ring particles.

  17. Variant congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Brien, W F; Mant, M J; Etches, W S

    1985-01-01

    A family is described with mild anaemia characterized by marked dyserythropoiesis and by prominent ringed sideroblasts. Inheritance is autosomal recessive. Other features include marked microcytosis, poikilocytosis, mild haemolysis, slightly increased haemoglobin A2, bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia and non-specific structural abnormalities of erythroid precursors on electron microscopy. This appears to be a previously unreported type of hereditary anaemia with both dyserythropoiesis and ringed sideroblasts. We propose the designation 'variant congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts'.

  18. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation.

  19. Interferometric ring lasers and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Two ring diode lasers are optically coupled together to produce tunable, stable output through a Y-junction output coupler which may also be a laser diode or can be an active waveguide. These devices demonstrate a sharp peak in light output with an excellent side-mode-rejection ratio. The rings can also be made of passive or active waveguide material. With additional rings the device is a tunable optical multiplexer/demultiplexer.

  20. Modeling a Large Ring Resonator Gyroscope.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    quantum noise and low frequency noise b) Basic modeling of the ring with Gaussian beam and ray matrices c) Technical design: Effect of residual gas in...ring on quality factor and light drag, scanning of beam, effect of misalignment and mismatch of source to ring, calibration procedures. The results show...Frequencies of Hermite-Gaussian modes in a ringlaser 64 II. F. Injection errors: Misalignment and mismatching of an injected 77 Gaussian beam. Effects of offset

  1. Report of the eRHIC Ring-Ring Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Berg, S.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, M.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Litvinenko, V.; Montag, C.; Palmer, R.; Parker, B.; Peggs, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjbar, V.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Willeke, F.

    2015-10-13

    This report evaluates the ring-ring option for eRHIC as a lower risk alternative to the linac-ring option. The reduced risk goes along with a reduced initial luminosity performance. However, a luminosity upgrade path is kept open. This upgrade path consists of two branches, with the ultimate upgrade being either a ring-ring or a linac-ring scheme. The linac-ring upgrade could be almost identical to the proposed linac-ring scheme, which is based on an ERL in the RHIC tunnel. This linac-ring version has been studied in great detail over the past ten years, and its significant risks are known. On the other hand, no detailed work on an ultimate performance ring-ring scenario has been performed yet, other than the development of a consistent parameter set. Pursuing the ring-ring upgrade path introduces high risks and requires significant design work that is beyond the scope of this report.

  2. FIFTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.

    2010-11-01

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{sup reg.} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for six years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Sixty-seven mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested at nominal six month intervals to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 36 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200--350 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in 5 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 and 350 F, and in all 3 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at higher temperatures. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 30--48 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KAMS. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200--300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 or 300 F for 19 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the O-rings displayed a compression set ranging from 51--95%. This is significantly greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAMS field surveillance (23% average). For GLT O-rings, service life based on the room temperature leak rate criterion is comparable to that predicted by compression stress relaxation (CSR) data at higher temperatures (350--400 F). While there are no comparable failure data yet at aging temperatures below 300 F, extrapolations of the data for GLT O-rings suggests that CSR model predictions provide a conservative prediction of

  3. Condenser for illuminating a ring field

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1994-11-01

    A series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ring field have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ring field camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ring field radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ring field. 5 figs.

  4. Condenser for illuminating a ring field

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    1994-01-01

    A series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at at a si-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ring field have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ring field camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ring field radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ring field.

  5. Development of a liquid metal slip ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    A liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism was designed and a model tested. This was a follow-up of previous efforts for the development of a gallium liquid metal slip ring in which the major problem was the formation and ejection of debris. A number of slip ring design approaches were studied. The probe design concept was fully implemented with detail drawings and a model was successfully tested for dielectric strength, shock vibration, acceleration and operation. The conclusions are that a gallium liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism is feasible and that the problem of debris formation and ejection has been successfully solved.

  6. Apse-Alignment of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    An explanation of the dynamical mechanism for apse-alignment of the eccentric Uranian rings is necessary before observations can be used to determine properties such as ring masses, particle sizes, and elasticities. The leading model relies on the ring self-gravity to accomplish this task, yet it yields equilibrium masses which are not in accord with Voyager radio measurements. We explore possible solutions such that the self-gravity and the collisional terms are both involved in the process of apse-alignment. We consider limits that correspond to a hot and a cold ring, and show that pressure terms may play a significant role in the equilibrium conditions for the narrow Uranian rings. In the cold ring case, where the scale height of the ring near periapse is comparable to the ring particle size, we introduce a new pressure correction pertaining to a region of the ring where the particles are locked in their relative positions and jammed against their neighbors, and the velocity dispersion is so low that the collisions are nearly elastic. In this case, we find a solution such that the ring self-gravity maintains apse-alignment against both differential precession (m = 1 mode) and the fluid pressure. We apply this model to the Uranian alpha ring, and show that, compared to the previous self-gravity model, the mass estimate for this ring increases by an order of magnitude. In the case of a hot ring, where the scale height can reach a value as much as fifty times larger than a particle size, we find velocity dispersion profiles that result in pressure forces which act in such a way as to alter the ring equilibrium conditions, again leading to a ring mass increase of an order of magnitude; however, such a velocity dispersion profile would require a different mechanism than is currently envisioned for establishing heating/cooling balance in a finite-sized, inelastic particle ring. Finally, we introduce an important correction to the model of Chiang and Goldreich.

  7. What Perturbs the ggrdgr Rings of Uranus?

    PubMed

    French, R G; Kangas, J A; Elliot, J L

    1986-01-31

    The gamma and delta rings have by far the largest radial perturbations of any of the nine known Uranian rings. These two rings deviate from Keplerian orbits, having typical root-mean-square residuals of about 3 kilometers (compared to a few hundred meters for the other seven known rings). Possible causes for the perturbations include nearby shepherd satellites and Lindblad resonances. If shepherd satellites are responsible, they could be as large as several tens of kilometers in diameter. The perturbation patterns of the gamma and delta rings have been examined for evidence of Lindblad resonances of azimuthal wave number m = 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4. The beta ring radial residuals are well matched by a 2:1 Lindblad resonance. If this represents a real physical phenomenon and is not an artifact of undersampling, then the most plausible interpretation is that there is an undiscovered satellite orbiting 76,522 +/- 8 kilometers from Uranus, with an orbital period of 15.3595 +/- 0.0001 hours and a radius of 75 to 100 kilometers. Such a satellite would be easily detected by the Voyager spacecraft when it encounters Uranus. The 2:1 resonance location is 41 +/- 9 kilometers inside the delta ring, which makes it unlikely that the resonance is due to a viscous instability within the ring. In contrast, no low-order Lindblad resonance matches the gamma ring perturbations, which are probably caused by one or more shepherd satellites large enough to be clearly visible in Voyager images.

  8. Horizon detection and higher dimensional black rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; McNutt, D. D.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we study the stationary horizons of the rotating black ring and the supersymmetric black ring spacetimes in five dimensions. In the case of the rotating black ring we use Weyl aligned null directions to algebraically classify the Weyl tensor, and utilize an adapted Cartan algorithm in order to produce Cartan invariants. For the supersymmetric black ring we employ the discriminant approach and repeat the adapted Cartan algorithm. For both of these metrics we are able to construct Cartan invariants that detect the horizon alone, and which are easier to compute and analyse than scalar polynomial curvature invariants.

  9. Simulation of Rings about Ellipsoidal Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akash; Nadkarni-Ghosh, Sharvari; Sharma, Ishan

    2016-10-01

    Recent discovery of rings around Chariklo, a centaur orbiting the Sun (F. Braga-Ribas et al., 2014) and speculations of rings around minor planet, Chiron (Ortiz et al., 2015), Saturn's satellites, Rhea (Jones et al., 2008; Schenk et al., 2011), Iapetus (Ip, 2006) or exoplanets, suggest that rings about non-spherical bodies is perhaps a more general phenomenon than anticipated. As a first step towards understanding such systems, we examine the dynamical behavior of rings around similar bodies using N-body simulations. Our code employs the `local simulation method' (Wisdom & Tremaine, 1988; Salo, 1995) and accounts for particle interactions via collisions using Discrete Element Method (Cundall & Strack, 1978; Bhateja et al., 2016) and mutual gravitation. The central body has been modeled as an axisymmetric ellipsoid characterized by its axis ratio, or defined via characteristic frequencies (circular, vertical and epicyclic frequency) representing the gravitational field of an axisymmetric body. We vary the central body's characterizing parameter and observe the change in various ring properties like the granular temperature, impact frequency, radial width and vertical thickness. We also look into the effect on ring properties upon variation in the size of the central body-ring system. Further, we investigate the role of characteristic frequencies in dictating the ring dynamics, and how this could help in qualitatively estimating the ring dynamics about any arbitrary central body with symmetry about the equatorial plane and the axis normal to it.

  10. Edge-on View of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    TOP - This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshot of Saturn with its rings barely visible. Normally, astronomers see Saturn with its rings tilted. Earth was almost in the plane of Saturn's rings, thus the rings appear edge-on.

    In this view, Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is casting a shadow on Saturn. Titan's atmosphere is a dark brown haze. The other moons appear white because of their bright, icy surfaces. Four moons - from left to right, Mimas, Tethys, Janus, and Enceladus - are clustered around the edge of Saturn's rings on the right. Two other moons appear in front of the ring plane. Prometheus is on the right edge; Pandora, on the left. The rings also are casting a shadow on Saturn because the Sun was above the ring plane.

    BOTTOM - This photograph shows Saturn with its rings slightly tilted. The moon called Dione, on the lower right, is casting a long, thin shadow across the whole ring system due to the setting Sun on the ring plane. The moon on the upper left of Saturn is Tethys.

    Astronomers also are studying the unusual appearance of Saturn's rings. The bottom image displays a faint, narrow ring, the F-ring just outside the main ring, which normally is invisible from Earth. Close to the edge of Saturn's disk, the front section of rings seem brighter and more yellow than the back due to the additional lumination by yellowish Saturn.

    The color images were assembled from separate exposures taken August 6 (top) and November 17 (bottom), 1995 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  11. Acoustic focusing by metal circular ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    We report an exotic acoustic focusing effect through a simple brass circular ring structure immersed in water. The acoustic waves can be focused on a prefect point at the centre of the ring structure. This exotic acoustic focusing phenomenon arises from the intrinsic modes in the ring structure at some special eigenfrequencies, which is essentially distinct from the previous studies originating from the negative refraction. The focusing effect is closely related to the size and shape of the ring structure. Interesting applications of the focusing mechanism in black box detectors in the sea and medical ultrasound treatment are further discussed.

  12. The Conversion and operation of the Cornell electron storage ring as a test accelerator (cesrta) for damping rings research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.A.; Alexander, J.; Byrd, J.; Celata, C.M.; Corlett, J.; De Santis, S.; Furman, M.; Jackson, A.; Kraft, R.; Munson, D.; Penn, G.; Plate, D.; Rawlins, A.; Venturini, M.; Zisman, M.; Billing, M.; Calvey, J.; Chapman, S.; Codner, G.; Conolly, C.; Crittenden, J.; Dobbins, J.; Dugan, G.; Fontes, E.; Forster, M.; Gallagher, R.; Gray, S.; Greenwald, S.; Hartill, D.; Hopkins, W.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Livezey, J.; Lyndaker, A.; Medjidzade, V.; Meller, R.; Peck, S.; Peterson, D.; Rendina, M.; Revesz, P.; Rice, D.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Savino, J.; Seeley, R.; Sexton, J.; Shanks, J.; Sikora, J.; Smolenski, K.; Strohman, C.; Temnykh, A.; tigner, M.; Whitney, W.; Williams, H.; Vishniakou, S.; Wilkens, T.; Harkay, K.; Holtzapple, R.; Smith, E.; Jones, J.; Wolski, A.; He, Y.; Ross, M.; Tan, C.Y.; Zwaska, R.; Flanagan, J.; Jain, P.; Kanazawa, K.; Ohmi, K.; Sakai, H.; Shibata, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Kharakh, D.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    In March of 2008, the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) concluded twenty eight years of colliding beam operations for the CLEO high energy physics experiment. We have reconfigured CESR as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R&D. The primary goals of the CesrTA program are to achieve a beam emittance approaching that of the ILC Damping Rings with a positron beam, to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with both low emittance positron and electron beams, to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, and to develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies (in particular a fast x-ray beam size monitor capable of single pass measurements of individual bunches). We report on progress with the CESR conversion activities, the status and schedule for the experimental program, and the first experimental results that have been obtained.

  13. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings.

  14. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-07-20

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings. 2 figs.

  15. Mechanical support of a ceramic gas turbine vane ring

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.; Mosher, Daniel A.; Holowczak, John E.; Reinhardt, Gregory E.

    2010-07-27

    An assembly for mounting a ceramic turbine vane ring onto a turbine support casing comprises a first metal clamping ring and a second metal clamping ring. The first metal clamping ring is configured to engage with a first side of a tab member of the ceramic turbine vane ring. The second metal clamping ring is configured to engage with a second side of the tab member such that the tab member is disposed between the first and second metal clamping rings.

  16. A hybrid-structure of a cavity polariton system and an optical-ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Xie, Wei; Zhang, Long; Wang, Yinglei; Gu, Jie; Hu, Tao; Wu, Lin; Chen, Zhanghai

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid-structure of a ZnO polariton system and an optical-ring in this work. In this structure, we create room-temperature polariton condensate in the ZnO nanowire. The coherent light emission from the polariton condensate is coupled to the ring, and the coherence of the coupled light is examined by Young interference experiment using a photoluminescence mapping system. Finally, the efficiency of the waveguide of the coupled light in the ring has been carefully discussed.

  17. Experimental determination of gravitomagnetic effects by means of ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2013-08-01

    A new experiment aimed to the detection of the gravito-magnetic Lense-Thirring effect at the surface of the Earth will be presented; the name of the experiment is GINGER. The proposed technique is based on the behavior of light beams in ring-lasers, also known as gyrolasers. A three-dimensional array of ringlasers will be attached to a rigid "monument"; each ring will have a different orientation in space. Within the space-time of a rotating mass the propagation of light is indeed anisotropic; part of the anisotropy is purely kinematical (Sagnac effect), part is due to the interaction between the gravito-electric field of the source and the kinematical motion of the observer (de Sitter effect), finally there is a contribution from the gravito-magnetic component of the Earth (gravito-magnetic frame dragging or Lense-Thirring effect). In a ring-laser a light beam traveling counterclockwise is superposed to another beam traveling in the opposite sense. The anisotropy in the propagation leads to standing waves with slightly different frequencies in the two directions; the final effect is a beat frequency proportional to the size of the instrument and its effective rotation rate in space, including the gravito-magnetic drag. Current laser techniques and the performances of the best existing ring-lasers allow at the moment a sensitivity within one order of magnitude of the required accuracy for the detection of gravito-magnetic effects, so that the objective of GINGER is in the range of feasibility and aims to improve the sensitivity of a couple of orders of magnitude with respect to present. The experiment will be underground, probably in the Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy, and is based on an international collaboration among four Italian groups, the Technische Universität München and the University of Canterbury in Christchurch (NZ).

  18. Human Arterial Ring Angiogenesis Assay.

    PubMed

    Seano, Giorgio; Primo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a model of human angiogenesis where artery explants from umbilical cords are embedded in gel matrices and subsequently produce capillary-like structures. The human arterial ring (hAR) assay is an innovative system that enables three-dimensional (3D) and live studies of human angiogenesis. This ex vivo model has the advantage of recapitulating several steps of angiogenesis, including endothelial sprouting, migration, and differentiation into capillaries. Furthermore, it can be exploited for (1) identification of new genes regulating sprouting angiogenesis, (2) screening for pro- or anti-angiogenic drugs, (3) identification of biomarkers to monitor the efficacy of anti-angiogenic regimens, and (4) dynamic analysis of tumor microenvironmental effects on vessel formation.

  19. VUV optical ring resonator for Duke storage ring free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The conceptual design of the multifaceted-mirror ring resonator for Duke storage ring VUV FEL is presented. The expected performance of the OK-4 FEL with ring resonator is described. We discuss in this paper our plans to study reflectivity of VUV mirrors and their resistivity to soft X-ray spontaneous radiation from OK-4 undulator.

  20. On a suspected ring external to the visible rings of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Beebe, R. F.; Smith, B. A.; Cook, A. F., II

    1974-01-01

    The reexamination of a photograph of Saturn taken on 15 November 1966 when the earth was nearly in the ring plane is investigated which indicates that ring material does exist outside the visible rings, extending to more than 6 Saturnian radii. The observed brightness in blue light was estimated per linear arc second, implying a normal optical thickness, for ice-covered particles.

  1. One-port ring refractive index sensor with attached sub-ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayama, H.; Takahisa, H.; Tsutsui, M.; Mendez-Astudillo, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2017-02-01

    In this report, we propose a ring resonator with one port for surface normal input/output attached with another ring resonator. A resonance generated by one of the ring resonators is used for sensing and that by the other as a reference. The device characteristics were examined using the FDTD simulation.

  2. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    DOE PAGES

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; ...

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  3. MeV proton flux predictions near Saturn's D ring.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, P; Roussos, E; Kotova, A; Cooper, J F; Mitchell, D G; Krupp, N; Paranicas, C

    2015-10-01

    Radiation belts of MeV protons have been observed just outward of Saturn's main rings. During the final stages of the mission, the Cassini spacecraft will pass through the gap between the main rings and the planet. Based on how the known radiation belts of Saturn are formed, it is expected that MeV protons will be present in this gap and also bounce through the tenuous D ring right outside the gap. At least one model has suggested that the intensity of MeV protons near the planet could be much larger than in the known belts. We model this inner radiation belt using a technique developed earlier to understand Saturn's known radiation belts. We find that the inner belt is very different from the outer belts in the sense that its intensity is limited by the densities of the D ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere, not by radial diffusion and satellite absorption. The atmospheric density is relatively well constrained by EUV occultations. Based on that we predict an intensity in the gap region that is well below that of the known belts. It is more difficult to do the same for the region magnetically connected to the D ring since its density is poorly constrained. We find that the intensity in this region can be comparable to the known belts. Such intensities pose no hazard to the mission since Cassini would only experience these fluxes on timescales of minutes but might affect scientific measurements by decreasing the signal-to-contamination ratio of instruments.

  4. MeV proton flux predictions near Saturn's D ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Roussos, E.; Kotova, A.; Cooper, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.

    2015-10-01

    Radiation belts of MeV protons have been observed just outward of Saturn's main rings. During the final stages of the mission, the Cassini spacecraft will pass through the gap between the main rings and the planet. Based on how the known radiation belts of Saturn are formed, it is expected that MeV protons will be present in this gap and also bounce through the tenuous D ring right outside the gap. At least one model has suggested that the intensity of MeV protons near the planet could be much larger than in the known belts. We model this inner radiation belt using a technique developed earlier to understand Saturn's known radiation belts. We find that the inner belt is very different from the outer belts in the sense that its intensity is limited by the densities of the D ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere, not by radial diffusion and satellite absorption. The atmospheric density is relatively well constrained by EUV occultations. Based on that we predict an intensity in the gap region that is well below that of the known belts. It is more difficult to do the same for the region magnetically connected to the D ring since its density is poorly constrained. We find that the intensity in this region can be comparable to the known belts. Such intensities pose no hazard to the mission since Cassini would only experience these fluxes on timescales of minutes but might affect scientific measurements by decreasing the signal-to-contamination ratio of instruments.

  5. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by {alpha}-helical region substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2010-04-16

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the {alpha}-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  6. Vortex-ring-induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact.

    PubMed

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Li, Yangfan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2016-03-01

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops that are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and the pool, controls the crater deformations and pinchoff. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings that are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices that can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts are not produced by oblate drops but by more prolate drop shapes, as had been observed in previous experiments.

  7. PMIX_Ring patch for SLURM

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A. T.

    2014-04-20

    This code adds an implementation of PMIX_Ring to the existing PM12 Library in the SLURM open source software package (Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management). PMIX_Ring executes a particular communication pattern that is used to bootstrap connections between MPI processes in a parallel job.

  8. Cullin RING Ligases: Glommed by Glomulin

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Stringer, Daniel K.; Weissman, Allan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cullin ring ligases (CRLs) constitute the largest group of RING finger ubiquitin ligases. Two recent studies in Molecular Cell describe glomulin as a CRL1 inhibitor that blocks interactions with its ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) (Duda et al., 2012; Tron et al., 2012). These findings and their significance are discussed. PMID:22883621

  9. Evolution of Vortex Rings Exiting Inclined Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Webster, D. R.; Reetz, M.; Gefroh, D.

    1996-11-01

    Vortex rings initiated in cylinders with exit incline lengths of 0, D/4, and D/2 were investigated for Reynolds numbers up to 30,000. The fluid exiting each cylinder was visualized with an ionized bromothymol blue solution, and velocity fields were obtained with PIV. In each inclined case, vortex rings form at angles smaller than the cylinder incline angle. Entrainment of ambient fluid on the short side of the cylinder is much stronger than that on the long side. This results in a larger circulation about the short side of the ring and a greater propagation velocity on that side. The incline angle of the ring thus decreases as it moves downstream. Behind the ring core, an impulsive wave of entrained ambient fluid flows parallel to the cylinder exit plane. Some of this fluid is wrapped into the core, while the rest is ejected outward past the long cylinder edge. The vortex ring dynamics differ significantly from those observed in jets from inclined nozzles where neighboring rings are connected by straining zones, and ring incline angles increase with downstream distance.

  10. SLC positron damping ring optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, J.P.; Rivkin, L.

    1984-12-01

    The basic SLAC Linear Collider operation scheme assumes the use of two damping rings, one for the e/sup -/, one for the e/sup +/, in order to reduce the colliding beam normalized emittances to 30..pi.. ..mu..radm hence raising the corresponding luminosity by a factor 170. The e/sup -/ damping ring which optics was designed by H. Wiedemann, has been extensively studied and modelled since it's completion at the end of 1982. The e/sup +/ damping ring to be built soon will be based on the same design except for some modifications resulting from the studies on the e/sup -/ damping ring which clearly pointed out two major optics weak points: the extracted normalized emittances are 30 to 60% bigger than the design values, which already left no margin for unavoidable blow-up between the damping rings and the SLC interaction point, and the chromaticity correction based on distributed sextupole components provided by shaping the ends of the bending magnet poles was insufficient. Moreover the QDI quadrupoles introduce a strong coupling between transverse planes due to an undesirable skew component. The present note describes the basic modifications of the ring lattice and main equipment positions in order to improve the first two points in the Positron Damping Ring. The QDI quadrupole design has already been modified and magnets of a new type will be implemented in both damping rings.

  11. Let Freedom Ring! Bulletin, 1937, No. 32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Harold G.; Calhoun, Dorothy; Hatch, Roy W.; Cohen, Philip H.; Schramm, Rudolf

    1937-01-01

    This volume of "Let Freedom Ring!" contains the scripts of the 13 national broadcasts of the radio series of that name presented in the spring of 1937 over the national network of the Columbia Broadcast System. In "Let Freedom Ring!" you will find the courage, the struggle, the triumph of men and women who fought to win and safeguard liberties…

  12. Introduction: Special issue on planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip; Esposito, Larry

    2016-11-01

    This issue of Icarus is devoted largely to papers presented at an open conference held at the Univ. of Colorado on 13-15 August 2014. This Planetary Rings Workshop is the fourth in a series organized by the Rings Working Group of the Cassini-Huygens mission and most of the papers presented dealt with phenomena revealed

  13. New Horizons Imaging of Jupiter's Main Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Hamilton, D. P.; Weaver, Harold A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    New Horizons took roughly 520 visible-light images of Jupiter's ring system during its 2007 flyby, using the spacecraft's Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). These observations were taken over nine days surrounding Jupiter close-approach. They span a range in distance of 30 - 100 RJ, and a phase angle range of 20 - 174 degrees. The highest resolution images -- more than 200 frames -- were taken at a resolution approaching 20 km/pix.We will present an analysis of this dataset, much of which has not been studied in detail before. Our results include New Horizons' first quantitative measurements of the ring's intrinsic brightness and variability. We will also present results on the ring's azimuthal and radial structure. Our measurements of the ring's phase curve will be used to infer properties of the ring's dust grains.Our results build on the only previous analysis of the New Horizons Jupiter ring data set, presented in Showalter et al (2007, Science 318, 232-234), which detected ring clumps and placed a lower limit on the population of undetected ring-moons.This work was supported by NASA's OPR program.

  14. Microwave Observations on Saturn's Main Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhimeng; Hayes, Alexander; Janssen, Michael A.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; de Pater, Imke; Dunn, David; Hedman, Matthew M.; Estrada, Paul R.

    2016-10-01

    Despite considerable study, Saturn's rings continue to challenge current theories for their provenance. Water ice comprises the bulk of Saturn's rings, yet it is the small fraction of non-icy material that is arguably more valuable in revealing clues about the system's origin and age. Herein, we present new measurements of the non-icy material fraction in Saturn's main rings, determined from microwave observations obtained by Cassini Radar and EVLA.Our Cassini Radar observations in the C Ring show an exceptionally high brightness at near-zero azimuthal angles, suggesting a high porosity of 70%-75% for the particles. Furthermore, most regions in the C ring contain about 1-2% silicates while with an enhanced abundance concentrated in the middle C ring reaching a maximum of 6%-11%. We proposed that the C ring has been continuously polluted by meteoroid bombardment for 15-90Myr, while the middle C ring was further contaminated by an incoming Centaur disrupted by Saturn tidal force. Owing to the B ring's high opacity, the particles there are likely to have 85% - 90% porosity, with corresponding non-icy material fractions of ~ 0.3% - 0.5% in the inner and outer B ring, and ~0.1% - 0.2% in the middle regions. For the A ring interior to the Encke gap, the derived non-icy material is ~0.2% - 0.3% everywhere for porosities ranging from 55% - 90%. Finally, our results for the Cassini Division indicate a non-icy material fraction of ~1% - 2% similar to most regions in the C ring, except that the Cassini Division particles are more likely to contain ~ 90% porosity due to the high opacity there. Our results here further support the idea that Saturn's rings may be less than 150 Myr old suggesting an origin scenario in which the rings are derived from the relatively recent breakup of an icy moon.Furthermore, we calibrated and analyzed multi-wavelengths EVLA observation at wavelengths ranging from 0.7cm to 13cm. As the array operates in a wavelength regime where the absorption

  15. FIFTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.

    2011-04-11

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for six years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Sixty-seven mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested at nominal six month intervals to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 36 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200-350 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in 6 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 and 350 F, and in all 3 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at higher temperatures. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 30-48 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KAMS. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 or 300 F for 19 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the Orings displayed a compression set ranging from 51-95%. This is significantly greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAMS field surveillance (23% average). For GLT O-rings, service life based on the room temperature leak rate criterion is comparable to that predicted by compression stress relaxation (CSR) data at higher temperatures (350-400 F). While there are no comparable failure data yet at aging temperatures below 300 F, extrapolations of the data for GLT O-rings suggests the CSR model predictions provide a conservative prediction of service

  16. A topologically driven glass in ring polymers

    PubMed Central

    Michieletto, Davide; Turner, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    The static and dynamic properties of ring polymers in concentrated solutions remains one of the last deep unsolved questions in polymer physics. At the same time, the nature of the glass transition in polymeric systems is also not well understood. In this work, we study a novel glass transition in systems made of circular polymers by exploiting the topological constraints that are conjectured to populate concentrated solutions of rings. We show that such rings strongly interpenetrate through one another, generating an extensive network of topological interactions that dramatically affects their dynamics. We show that a kinetically arrested state can be induced by randomly pinning a small fraction of the rings. This occurs well above the classical glass transition temperature at which microscopic mobility is lost. Our work both demonstrates the existence of long-lived inter-ring penetrations and realizes a novel, topologically induced, glass transition. PMID:27118847

  17. Instability of a rotating liquid ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sicheng; Tao, Jianjun

    2013-09-01

    It is shown numerically that a rotating inviscid liquid ring has a temporally oscillating state, where the radius of the ring varies periodically because of the competition between the centrifugal force and the centripetal force caused by the surface tension. Stability analysis reveals that an enlarging or shrinking ring is unstable to a varicose-type mode, which is affected by both the radial velocity and the radius ratio between the cross section and the ring. Furthermore, uniform rotation of a ring leads to a traveling unstable mode, whose frequency is determined by a simple sinuous mode, while the surface shape is modulated by the varicose mode and twisted by the rotation-induced Coriolis force.

  18. Mysteries of the ringed planets. [colloquium review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment is presented of the recent progress in the theory of planetary rings which was in evidence at the IAU's recent, 75th Colloquium. Observational material was dominated by spacecraft data, and theoretical consideration of the problems posed comes predominantly from gravitational mechanics. An understanding of collective effects, in light of both fluid mechanical and statistical mechanical methodologies, is being approached, and the importance of electromagnetic phenomena studies is noted. Voyager observations of Saturn's rings, and accumulating data from stellar occultations by the rings of Uranus, provided most of the observational material. Jupiter's faint ring was closely examined by the 1979 Voyager flight. These three known ring systems are found to exhibit such family resemblances as their proximity to the parent planet and magnetospheric environment.

  19. Monlithic nonplanar ring oscillator and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, Alan C. (Inventor); Byer, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A monolithic nonplanar ring oscillator having an optically isotropic solid-state laser body for propagating laser radiation about a nonplanar ring path internal to the laser body is disclosed. The monolithic laser body is configured to produce a 2N reflection nonplanar ring light path, where N is an integer greater than or equal to 2, comprising 2N-1 total internal reflections and one reflection at a coupler in a single round trip. Undirectional traveling wave oscillation of the laser is induced by the geometry of the nonplanar ring path together with the effect of an applied magnetic field and partial polarizer characteristics of the oblique reflection from the coupler. The 6-reflection nonplanar ring oscillator makes possible otpimal unidirectional oscillation (low loss for the oscillating direction of propagation and, simultaneously high loss for the nonoscillating direction of propagation) in monolithic NPROs using materials with index of refraction smaller than the square root of 3, for example, laser glass.

  20. Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-07-15

    The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

  1. Ring particles - Collisional interactions and physical nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Davis, D. R.; Greenberg, R.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the properties of, and dynamical processes affecting individual particles of Saturn's rings. Because particles tend to be gravitationally bound when located on the surfaces of larger particles, and since net tidal stresses within the particles are small, particle collisions should produce accretion in Saturn's rings. Rapid accretionary processes within the rings are counterbalanced by tidal disruption of the larger accreted aggregates, which are presently designated 'dynamic ephemeral bodies'. The coefficient of restitution is probably very low, implying that the large particles containing most of the rings' mass are in a monolayer, although the small particles responsible for most of the rings' visible cross section form a layer many particles thick. Kinematic viscosity and interparticle erosive process models should incorporate these properties.

  2. Edges of Saturn's rings are fractal.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The images recently sent by the Cassini spacecraft mission (on the NASA website http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/halloffame/) show the complex and beautiful rings of Saturn. Over the past few decades, various conjectures were advanced that Saturn's rings are Cantor-like sets, although no convincing fractal analysis of actual images has ever appeared. Here we focus on four images sent by the Cassini spacecraft mission (slide #42 "Mapping Clumps in Saturn's Rings", slide #54 "Scattered Sunshine", slide #66 taken two weeks before the planet's Augus't 200'9 equinox, and slide #68 showing edge waves raised by Daphnis on the Keeler Gap) and one image from the Voyager 2' mission in 1981. Using three box-counting methods, we determine the fractal dimension of edges of rings seen here to be consistently about 1.63 ~ 1.78. This clarifies in what sense Saturn's rings are fractal.

  3. The Circumnuclear Starburst Ring in NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray-Lacko, Beverly; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Sheth, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    The circumnuclear ring in galaxy NGC 1097 is bursting with star formation at a rate of five solar masses per year as previously measured through Hα emission. The rate of star formation drops by a factor of one thousand outside the circumnuclear ring. We characterize the behavior of the dust in this region by measuring the spectral energy distribution focused exclusively on the circumnuclear ring using a selective variety of high resolution science images spanning wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared, and adding proprietary high resolution radio data from Atacoma Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile. High resolution radio data obtained from ALMA allows us to constrain the shape of the spectral energy distribution curve specifically at longer wavelengths, and therefore the rate of star formation within the circumnuclear ring. Comparing the spectral energy distribution of the entire galaxy with that of the circumnuclear ring indicates how starburst activity influences the galactic spectral energy distribution.

  4. Cassini CIRS Observations of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Pilorz, Stuart H.; Wallis, Brad D.; Brooks, Shawn M.; Edgington, Scott G.; Flasar, F. Michael; Pearl, John C.; Showalter, Mark R.; Ferrari, Cecile; Achterberg, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    In the spring of 2004, during Cassini s approach to Saturn, the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) began acquiring thermal spectra of Saturn s rings. CIRS is a Fourier-transform spectrometer that measures radiation in the thermal infrared from 7 microns to 1 millimeter (1400 to 10/cm). CIRS has a set of 21 detectors, consisting of two 1 x 10 linear arrays with a pixel size of 0.3 mrad, and one 4 mrad circular detector. Just after the completion of the Saturn orbit insertion (SOI) burn, CIRS performed an especially high spatial resolution scan of portions of Saturn s A, B and C rings. In the months following SOI, additional ring measurements have been obtained, including radial scans on the lit and unlit sides of the rings, and azimuthal scans across the shadowed regions of the A, B and C rings.

  5. Micro Ring Grating Spectrometer with Adjustable Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spectrometer includes a micro-ring grating device having coaxially-aligned ring gratings for diffracting incident light onto a target focal point, a detection device for detecting light intensity, one or more actuators, and an adjustable aperture device defining a circular aperture. The aperture circumscribes a target focal point, and directs a light to the detection device. The aperture device is selectively adjustable using the actuators to select a portion of a frequency band for transmission to the detection device. A method of detecting intensity of a selected band of incident light includes directing incident light onto coaxially-aligned ring gratings of a micro-ring grating device, and diffracting the selected band onto a target focal point using the ring gratings. The method includes using an actuator to adjust an aperture device and pass a selected portion of the frequency band to a detection device for measuring the intensity of the selected portion.

  6. Experimental and trial-based study of Resilient Packet Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramnath, Vasudha; Cheng, Heng Seng; Ngoh, Lek Heng

    2002-08-01

    An experimental study of the Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) media access control (MAC) technology that is optimized for IP traffic in the metropolitan-area-network (MAN) environment is described. The study involved the deployment and trials of a RPR testbed encompassing a public optical fiber infrastructure in which Cisco Systems' Dynamic Packet Transport (DPT) Ring Technology - a prestandard RPR implementation - was used. We focus on a number of important RPR protocol features that are vital to the future success of RPR as a MAN/wide-area-network (WAN) network technology. Related research on RPR/DPT has been done so far through simulation studies only. Standardization of RPR is currently being performed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.17 working group and is expected to be completed in 2003. Also, we present and discuss the experiments and tests performed to investigate the key features of RPR, along with the results obtained.

  7. Turning the LHC ring into a new physics search machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orava, Risto

    2017-03-01

    The LHC Collider Ring is proposed to be turned into an ultimate automatic search engine for new physics in four consecutive phases: (1) Searches for heavy particles produced in Central Exclusive Process (CEP): pp → p + X + p based on the existing Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the LHC; (2) Feasibility study of using the LHC Ring as a gravitation wave antenna; (3) Extensions to the current BLM system to facilitate precise registration of the selected CEP proton exit points from the LHC beam vacuum chamber; (4) Integration of the BLM based event tagging system together with the trigger/data acquisition systems of the LHC experiments to facilitate an on-line automatic search machine for the physics of tomorrow.

  8. eRHIC ring-ring design with head-on beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pozdeyev, E.; Fischer, W.; MacKay, W. W.

    2009-05-04

    The luminosity of the eRHIC ring-ring design is limited by the beam-beam effect exerted on the electron beam. Recent simulation studies have shown that the beam-beam limit can be increased by means of an electron lens that compensates the beam-beam effect experienced by the electron beam. This scheme requires proper design of the electron ring, providing the correct betatron phase advance between interaction point and electron lens. We review the performance of the eRHIC ring-ring version and discuss various parameter sets, based on different cooling schemes for the proton/ion beam.

  9. Tandem Ring-Opening-Ring-Closing Metathesis for Functional Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nagarkar, Amit A; Yasir, Mohammad; Crochet, Aurelien; Fromm, Katharina M; Kilbinger, Andreas F M

    2016-09-26

    Use of a tandem ring-opening-ring-closing metathesis (RORCM) strategy for the synthesis of functional metathesis catalysts is reported. Ring opening of 7-substituted norbornenes and subsequent ring-closing metathesis forming a thermodynamically stable 6-membered ring lead to a very efficient synthesis of new catalysts from commercially available Grubbs' catalysts. Hydroxy functionalized Grubbs' first- as well as third-generation catalysts have been synthesized. Mechanistic studies have been performed to elucidate the order of attack of the olefinic bonds. This strategy was also used to synthesize the ruthenium methylidene complex.

  10. Electro-optical hybrid slip ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, En

    2005-11-01

    The slip ring is a rotary electrical interface, collector, swivel or rotary joint. It is a physical system that can perform continuous data transfer and data exchange between a stationary and a rotating structure. A slip ring is generally used to transfer data or power from an unrestrained, continuously rotating electro-mechanical system in real-time, thereby simplifying operations and eliminating damage-prone wires dangling from moving joints. Slip rings are widely used for testing, evaluating, developing and improving various technical equipment and facilities with rotating parts. They are widely used in industry, especially in manufacturing industries employing turbo machinery, as in aviation, shipbuilding, aerospace, defense, and in precise facilities having rotating parts such as medical Computerized Tomography (CT) and MRI scanners and so forth. Therefore, any improvement in slip ring technology can impact large markets. Research and development in this field will have broad prospects long into the future. The goal in developing the current slip ring technology is to improve and increase the reliability, stability, anti-interference, and high data fidelity between rotating and stationary structures. Up to now, there have been numerous approaches used for signal and data transfer utilizing a slip ring such as metal contacts, wires, radio transmission, and even liquid media. However, all suffer from drawbacks such as data transfer speed limitations, reliability, stability, electro-magnetic interference and durability. The purpose of the current research is to break through these basic limitations using an optical solution, thereby improving performance in current slip ring applications. This dissertation introduces a novel Electro-Optical Hybrid Slip Ring technology, which makes "through the air" digital-optical communication between stationary and rotating systems a reality with high data transfer speed, better reliability and low interference susceptibility

  11. Statistical Correlations Between Near-Infrared Luminosities and Ring Sizes in Field Ringed Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wentao

    2008-01-01

    Statistically complete samples of inner-pseudo-, inner-, and outer-ringed galaxies can be extracted from the Catalog of Southern Ringed Galaxies. Redshifts and near-infrared (NIR) photometric data are available for the samples, allowing the derivation of the statistical correlations between the total NIR luminosities (L NIR) and the projected ring major axes in the physical scale (D) for these galaxies. For any of the three types of rings, the correlations are approximately L NIR vprop D 1.2 among the early-type ringed galaxies (the most commonly observed ringed galaxies). The correlations among late-type ringed galaxies appear significantly different. The results contradict the previous suggestion by Kormendy (1979, ApJ, 227, 714), who gave LB vprop D 2 (LB : B-band galaxy luminosity). The relations can be used in future to test theoretical simulations of dynamical structures of ringed galaxies as well as those of ring formation under the framework of cosmological models. Currently the results indicate at most small differences in the relative contributions of disk components to total galaxy masses and in the initial disk velocity dispersions between commonly observed ringed galaxies of similar type. The correlations also suggest a new approach to effectively use ring sizes as tertiary cosmological distance indicators, to help enhance the reliability of the measurement of the Hubble Constant.

  12. The "Lord of the Rings": Affective Approaches to Teaching Literature. DRICE (Development & Research in Confluent Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Aaron

    This paper was intended to be read to a class or group of people who will in turn respond to the directions given in the paper. It is an attempt to merge the affective and cognitive experiences of literature in order to provide a more meaningful experience while studying J.R.R. Tolkien's trilogy, "The Lord of the Rings." The directions…

  13. Structure of a BRCA1/BARD1 Complex: a Heterodimeric RING-RING Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brzovic, Peter S.; Rajagopal, Ponni; Hoyt, David W.; King, Mary-Claire; Klevit, Rachel E.

    2001-10-01

    The N-terminal RING domain of the breast and ovarian cancer tumor suppressor BRCA1 interacts with multiple cognate proteins, including the RING protein, BARD1. Proper function of the BRCA1 RING domain is critical, as evidenced by the many cancer-predisposing mutations found within this domain. We present the solution structure of the N-terminal RING domain heterodimer of BRCA1 and BARD1. Comparison with the RAG1 RING homodimer reveals the structural diversity of complexes formed by interactions between different RING domains. The BRCA1/BARD1 structure provides a model for its ubiquitin ligase activity, illustrates how the BRCA1 RING domain can be involved in associations with multiple protein partners, and provdes a framework for understanding cancer-causing mutations at the molecular level.

  14. Keck Infrared Observations of Jupiter's Ring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Graham, J. R.; Liu, M. C.; Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    We imaged the Jovian ring system at a wavelength of 2.27 mu m with the 10-m W.M. Keck telescope in August and October 1997, when the ring plane was almost edge-on. We obtained the first images of the Jovian halo and gossamer ring in back-scattered light, and the best ground-based images to date of Jupiter's main ring. The main ring is radially confined between 1.70 -- 1.82 R_J, with a maximum (after inversion) at 1.79 R_J, in agreement with the Voyager findings (1 R_J=71398 km). The halo extends inwards from the main ring (at 1.71 R_J) down to 1.40 R_J, bounded by the locations of Lorentz resonances. Roughly 50% of the halo's intensity originates from a region within ~ 700 km from the equatorial plane, while the halo is visible up to ~ 10,000 km above and below the plane. Although the vertical extent agrees with Voyager findings, the halo's intensity relative to that of the main ring in the Keck images is much less than in Voyager images, which is attributed to the fact that the halo contains fewer macroscopic particles, which preferentially backscatter visible light. The gossamer ring is found to have two components, with steep dropoffs in brightness at the orbits of Amalthea and Thebe. The first, Amalthea's gossamer ring, is visible between the main ring's periphery and ~ 2.5 R_J; it is relatively uniform in brightness and has a vertical thickness (FWHM) of 0.06 R_J, clearly broader than the FWHM of the main ring (0.045 R_J) and image resolution of 0.6('') =0.025;R_J. The other component, a factor of five fainter than Amalthea's ring and about twice as broad vertically (FWHM ~ 0.12 ; R_J), is seen inwards from 3.11 R_J, i.e., inwards of Thebe's orbit. Additional material still seems present, albeit barely, at larger distances, until ~ 3.6 R_J, near the edge of our images. Our data are consistent with the Galileo results, and suggest the ring material originates at the bounding satellites Thebe, Amalthea, Adrastea and Metis (see abstracts by Burns et al., and

  15. Narcotics detection using piezoelectric ringing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; Magnuson, Erik E.; West, Rebecca; Lyndquist, R.

    1997-02-01

    Piezo-electric ringing (PER) has been demonstrated to be an effective means of scanning cargo for the presence of hidden narcotics. The PER signal is characteristic of certain types of crystallized material, such as cocaine hydrochloride. However, the PER signal cannot be used to conclusively identify all types of narcotic material, as the signal is not unique. For the purposes of cargo scanning, the PER technique is therefore most effective when used in combination with quadrupole resonance analysis (QRA). PER shares the same methodology as QRA technology, and can therefore be very easily and inexpensively integrated into existing QRA detectors. PER can be used as a pre-scanning technique before the QRA scan is applied and, because the PER scan is of a very short duration, can effectively offset some of the throughput limitations of standard QRA narcotics detectors. Following is a discussion of a PER detector developed by Quantum Manetics under contract to United States Customs. Design philosophy and performance are discussed, supported by results from recent tests conducted by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency and U.S. Customs.

  16. Recycler ring conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.

    1995-07-18

    The Tevatron Collider provides the highest center of mass energy collisions in the world. To fully exploit this unique tool, Fermilab is committed to a program of accelerator upgrades for the purpose of increasing the Collider luminosity. Over the past 7 years the luminosity has been increased from a peak of 1.6{times}10{sup 30}cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1} in 1989 to over 3{times}10{sup 31}cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1} during 1995. The Main Injector will supply a larger flux of protons for antiproton production and more intense proton bunches for use in the Collider, and this is expected to increase the peak luminosity to close to 1{times}10{sup 32}cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}. Further increases in luminosity will require additional upgrades to the Fermilab accelerator complex. This report documents the design of a new fixed-energy storage ring to be placed in the Main Injector tunnel which will provide an initial factor of 2 increase to 2{times}10{sup 32}cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}, and ultimately provide the basis for an additional order of magnitude luminosity increase up to 1{times}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}.

  17. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  18. Stable isotopes in tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarroll, Danny; Loader, Neil J.

    2004-04-01

    Stable isotopes in tree rings could provide palaeoclimate reconstructions with perfect annual resolution and statistically defined confidence limits. Recent advances make the approach viable for non-specialist laboratories. The relevant literature is, however, spread across several disciplines, with common problems approached in different ways. Here we provide the first overview of isotope dendroclimatology, explaining the underlying theory and describing the steps taken in building and interpreting isotope chronologies. Stable carbon isotopes record the balance between stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate, dominated at dry sites by relative humidity and soil water status and at moist sites by summer irradiance and temperature. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic ratios record source water, which contains a temperature signal, and leaf transpiration, controlled dominantly by vapour pressure deficit. Variable exchange with xylem (source) water during wood synthesis determines the relative strength of the source water and leaf enrichment signals. Producing long Holocene chronologies will require a change in emphasis towards processing very large numbers of samples efficiently, whilst retaining analytical precision. A variety of sample preparation and data treatment protocols have been used, some of which have a deleterious effect on the palaeoclimate signal. These are reviewed and suggestions made for a more standardised approach.

  19. Size distribution of ring polymers

    PubMed Central

    Medalion, Shlomi; Aghion, Erez; Meirovitch, Hagai; Barkai, Eli; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an exact solution for the distribution of sample averaged monomer to monomer distance of ring polymers. For non-interacting and local-interaction models these distributions correspond to the distribution of the area under the reflected Bessel bridge and the Bessel excursion respectively, and are shown to be identical in dimension d ≥ 2, albeit with pronounced finite size effects at the critical dimension, d = 2. A symmetry of the problem reveals that dimension d and 4 − d are equivalent, thus the celebrated Airy distribution describing the areal distribution of the d = 1 Brownian excursion describes also a polymer in three dimensions. For a self-avoiding polymer in dimension d we find numerically that the fluctuations of the scaled averaged distance are nearly identical in dimension d = 2, 3 and are well described to a first approximation by the non-interacting excursion model in dimension 5. PMID:27302596

  20. Dynamical systems analysis of fluid transport in time-periodic vortex ring flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony; Ferziger, Joel H.

    2006-04-01

    It is known that the stable and unstable manifolds of dynamical systems theory provide a powerful tool for understanding Lagrangian aspects of time-periodic flows. In this work we consider two time-periodic vortex ring flows. The first is a vortex ring with an elliptical core. The manifolds provide information about entrainment and detrainment of irrotational fluid into and out of the volume transported with the ring. The likeness of the manifolds with features observed in flow visualization experiments of turbulent vortex rings suggests that a similar process might be at play. However, what precise modes of unsteadiness are responsible for stirring in a turbulent vortex ring is left as an open question. The second situation is that of two leapfrogging rings. The unstable manifold shows striking agreement with even the fine features of smoke visualization photographs, suggesting that fluid elements in the vicinity of the manifold are drawn out along it and begin to reveal its structure. We suggest that interpretations of these photographs that argue for complex vorticity dynamics ought to be reconsidered. Recently, theoretical and computational tools have been developed to locate structures analogous to stable and unstable manifolds in aperiodic, or finite-time systems. The usefulness of these analogs is demonstrated, using vortex ring flows as an example, in the paper by Shadden, Dabiri, and Marsden [Phys. Fluids 18, 047105 (2006)].