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Sample records for anomalous elastic behavior

  1. Anomalous Elastic Behavior in hcp- and Sm-Type Dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Tschauner, Oliver; Grubor-Urosevic, Ognjen; Dera, Przemyslaw; Mulcahy, Sean R.

    2012-04-11

    The compression behavior of elemental dysprosium in the hcp- and the Sm-type phases has been examined under hydrostatic pressure. Sm-type Dy has been found about 1% denser than the hcp phase. This increase in density is due to c-axis contraction in Sm-type Dy, whereas the a-axis even expands compared with the hcp-phase. Both the hcp- and the Sm-type phases show an inversion in the pressure derivative of the c/a ratio. For hcp-Dy this inversion is very sharp with minimal c/a at 2.5 GPa. At the same pressure, the compression behavior of hcp-Dy changes abruptly from dominantly c-axis compression to almost isotropic compression with slightly softer S{sub 11}. The bulk modulus increases at this point by a factor of {approx}2. Both hcp- and Sm-type Dy exhibit a crossover from highly anisotropic compression mostly along the c-axis to almost isotropic compression. We discuss these anomalies with respect to a possible Lifshitz transition and structural soft modes.

  2. Anomalous behavior of curves of pseudo-elastic deformation of Ni-Fe-Ga-Co alloy crystals as a result of interphase stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, G. A.; Nikolaev, V. I.; Averkin, A. I.; Zograf, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The compression diagram of Ni49Fe18Ga27Co6 alloy crystals in the [011] direction was studied until full shape memory strain at various temperatures in the range of 259-340 K. It is found that all load curves are anomalously shaped and contain portions of sharp and gradual decreases in deformation stresses. Simulation of pseudo-elastic stress-strain curves within the theory of diffuse martensitic transitions, describing not only equilibrium of phases, but also the kinetics of the transition between them, shows that elastic interphase stresses during martensitic reactions Ll 2 → 14 M and 14 M → Ll 0 characteristic of this alloy can be responsible for the extraordinary shape of compression diagrams.

  3. Anomalously elastic intermediate phase in randomly layered superfluids, superconductors, and planar magnets.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Priyanka; Goldbart, Paul M; Narayanan, Rajesh; Toner, John; Vojta, Thomas

    2010-08-20

    We show that layered quenched randomness in planar magnets leads to an unusual intermediate phase between the conventional ferromagnetic low-temperature and paramagnetic high-temperature phases. In this intermediate phase, which is part of the Griffiths region, the spin-wave stiffness perpendicular to the random layers displays anomalous scaling behavior, with a continuously variable anomalous exponent, while the magnetization and the stiffness parallel to the layers both remain finite. Analogous results hold for superfluids and superconductors. We study the two phase transitions into the anomalous elastic phase, and we discuss the universality of these results, and implications of finite sample size as well as possible experiments.

  4. Fluctuation-stabilized marginal networks and anomalous entropic elasticity.

    PubMed

    Dennison, M; Sheinman, M; Storm, C; MacKintosh, F C

    2013-08-30

    We study the elastic properties of thermal networks of Hookean springs. In the purely mechanical limit, such systems are known to have a vanishing rigidity when their connectivity falls below a critical, isostatic value. In this work, we show that thermal networks exhibit a nonzero shear modulus G well below the isostatic point and that this modulus exhibits an anomalous, sublinear dependence on temperature T. At the isostatic point, G increases as the square root of T, while we find G∝Tα below the isostatic point, where α≃0.8. We show that this anomalous T dependence is entropic in origin.

  5. Low temperature elastic behavior of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, T. J.; Darling, T. W.; McCall, K. R.; Fenn, J.

    2002-12-01

    The resonant frequencies of a material sample are directly related to the elastic constants characterizing the sample. Thus, by studying trends in resonant frequencies as a function of temperature, the elastic behavior of the sample may be inferred, and changes in the physical properties of the material may be tracked (for example, phase changes). Historically, tracking the resonant frequencies of a crystalline sample as a function of temperature is one of the most sensitive methods for identifying phase changes in the sample. We are using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) to track the resonant frequencies of rock samples at low temperatures. Our initial measurements showed unexpected behavior in a millimeter-sized sample of Berea sandstone in the temperature range from 77 K to 300 K [Ulrich and Darling, 2001], including hysteresis in the temperature dependence of the resonant frequencies, and softening rather than hardening as the temperature decreases. A second experimental apparatus has been developed to make RUS measurements on samples up to 2 cm by 3 cm by 8 cm in size, and over the temperature range 77 K - 400 K. RUS measurements using the new experimental system have been made on several rock samples, as well as several standards, and will be described in this talk. In general, the rock samples exhibit anomalous elastic behavior, consistent with the initial measurements on much smaller samples. Similar elastic phenomena, with similar activation energies, are seen in these rocks in room temperature measurements of resonant frequency versus strain [Tencate and Shankland, 1996]. Thus, low temperature measurements could provide insight into the mechanisms for the nonlinear elastic behavior of rocks and other materials. Ulrich T.J., Darling T.W., Observation of anomalous elastic behavior in rock at low temperatures. Geophys. Res. Let., Vol. 28, No. 11, pgs. 2293-2296, June 1, 2001. Tencate J.A., Shankland, T.J., Slow dynamics in the nonlinear response of

  6. Kinetic faceting and anomalous coarsening in elastically inhomogeneous multiphase systems.

    PubMed

    Perez, Danny; Lewis, Laurent J

    2007-02-16

    With a view of finding a route toward microstructural stability in alloys, we numerically study the impact of elastic inhomogeneities on the growth of inclusions in multiphase systems. We show that growth can proceed either continuously at rough interfaces, or in a layer-by-layer fashion following an elastically induced kinetic faceting process. In the former case, the chemical potential of the inclusions is a smooth function of size, while in the latter case, elasticity increases the barrier for nucleation of new terraces on the facets, leading to an oscillatory behavior of the chemical potential and hence a strong resistance against coarsening, opening up the possibility to stabilize the structure.

  7. Anomalous Flexural Behaviors of Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojing; Zhou, Youhe; Gao, Huajian; Wang, Jizeng

    2012-01-01

    Apparent controversies exist on whether the persistence length of microtubules depends on its contour length. This issue is particularly challenging from a theoretical point of view due to the tubular structure and strongly anisotropic material property of microtubules. Here we adopt a higher order continuum orthotropic thin shell model to study the flexural behavior of microtubules. Our model overcomes some key limitations of a recent study based on a simplified anisotropic shell model and results in a closed-form solution for the contour-length-dependent persistence length of microtubules, with predictions in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. By studying the ratio between their contour and persistence lengths, we find that microtubules with length at ∼1.5 μm show the lowest flexural rigidity, whereas those with length at ∼15 μm show the highest flexural rigidity. This finding may provide an important theoretical basis for understanding the mechanical structure of mitotic spindles during cell division. Further analysis on the buckling of microtubules indicates that the critical buckling load becomes insensitive to the tube length for relatively short microtubules, in drastic contrast to the classical Euler buckling. These rich flexural behaviors of microtubules are of profound implication for many biological functions and biomimetic molecular devices. PMID:22768935

  8. Anomalous human behavior detection: an adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Coen; Halma, Arvid; Schutte, Klamer

    2013-05-01

    Detection of anomalies (outliers or abnormal instances) is an important element in a range of applications such as fault, fraud, suspicious behavior detection and knowledge discovery. In this article we propose a new method for anomaly detection and performed tested its ability to detect anomalous behavior in videos from DARPA's Mind's Eye program, containing a variety of human activities. In this semi-unsupervised task a set of normal instances is provided for training, after which unknown abnormal behavior has to be detected in a test set. The features extracted from the video data have high dimensionality, are sparse and inhomogeneously distributed in the feature space making it a challenging task. Given these characteristics a distance-based method is preferred, but choosing a threshold to classify instances as (ab)normal is non-trivial. Our novel aproach, the Adaptive Outlier Distance (AOD) is able to detect outliers in these conditions based on local distance ratios. The underlying assumption is that the local maximum distance between labeled examples is a good indicator of the variation in that neighborhood, and therefore a local threshold will result in more robust outlier detection. We compare our method to existing state-of-art methods such as the Local Outlier Factor (LOF) and the Local Distance-based Outlier Factor (LDOF). The results of the experiments show that our novel approach improves the quality of the anomaly detection.

  9. Anomalous incident-angle and elliptical-polarization rotation of an elastically refracted P-wave.

    PubMed

    Fa, Lin; Fa, Yuxiao; Zhang, Yandong; Ding, Pengfei; Gong, Jiamin; Li, Guohui; Li, Lijun; Tang, Shaojie; Zhao, Meishan

    2015-08-05

    We report a newly discovered anomalous incident-angle of an elastically refracted P-wave, arising from a P-wave impinging on an interface between two VTI media with strong anisotropy. This anomalous incident-angle is found to be located in the post-critical incident-angle region corresponding to a refracted P-wave. Invoking Snell's law for a refracted P-wave provides two distinctive solutions before and after the anomalous incident-angle. For an inhomogeneously refracted and elliptically polarized P-wave at the anomalous incident-angle, its rotational direction experiences an acute variation, from left-hand elliptical to right-hand elliptical polarization. The new findings provide us an enhanced understanding of acoustical-wave scattering and lead potentially to widespread and novel applications.

  10. Anomalous incident-angle and elliptical-polarization rotation of an elastically refracted P-wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Lin; Fa, Yuxiao; Zhang, Yandong; Ding, Pengfei; Gong, Jiamin; Li, Guohui; Li, Lijun; Tang, Shaojie; Zhao, Meishan

    2015-08-01

    We report a newly discovered anomalous incident-angle of an elastically refracted P-wave, arising from a P-wave impinging on an interface between two VTI media with strong anisotropy. This anomalous incident-angle is found to be located in the post-critical incident-angle region corresponding to a refracted P-wave. Invoking Snell’s law for a refracted P-wave provides two distinctive solutions before and after the anomalous incident-angle. For an inhomogeneously refracted and elliptically polarized P-wave at the anomalous incident-angle, its rotational direction experiences an acute variation, from left-hand elliptical to right-hand elliptical polarization. The new findings provide us an enhanced understanding of acoustical-wave scattering and lead potentially to widespread and novel applications.

  11. On the origins of anomalous elastic moduli and failure strains of GaP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yashinski, M S; Gutiérrez, H R; Muhlstein, C L

    2017-02-10

    Previous reports suggest that Raman peaks in uniaxially loaded nanowires with diamond cubic and zinc blende crystal structures shift at rates that are significantly different from bulk specimens. We have investigated the first order Raman scattering from individual, free-standing, [111] oriented GaP nanowires ranging from 75 to 180 nm in diameter at uniaxial tensile stresses up to 5 GPa. All of the phonon modes were shifted to frequencies lower than previously reported for bulk GaP, and significant splitting of the degenerate transverse optical mode was observed. A general analysis method using single and double Lorentzian fits of the Raman peaks is presented and used to report more accurate values of the phonon deformation potentials (PDPs) that relate uniaxial strains to Raman peak shifts in GaP. A new set of PDPs determined from the nanowires revealed that the they have elastic moduli and failure strains that are consistent with bulk GaP. The analysis method eliminated the anomalous, inconsistent deformation behavior commonly reported in Raman-based strain measurements of nanowires, and can be extended to other materials systems with degenerate phonons.

  12. On the origins of anomalous elastic moduli and failure strains of GaP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashinski, M. S.; Gutiérrez, H. R.; Muhlstein, C. L.

    2017-02-01

    Previous reports suggest that Raman peaks in uniaxially loaded nanowires with diamond cubic and zinc blende crystal structures shift at rates that are significantly different from bulk specimens. We have investigated the first order Raman scattering from individual, free-standing, [111] oriented GaP nanowires ranging from 75 to 180 nm in diameter at uniaxial tensile stresses up to 5 GPa. All of the phonon modes were shifted to frequencies lower than previously reported for bulk GaP, and significant splitting of the degenerate transverse optical mode was observed. A general analysis method using single and double Lorentzian fits of the Raman peaks is presented and used to report more accurate values of the phonon deformation potentials (PDPs) that relate uniaxial strains to Raman peak shifts in GaP. A new set of PDPs determined from the nanowires revealed that the they have elastic moduli and failure strains that are consistent with bulk GaP. The analysis method eliminated the anomalous, inconsistent deformation behavior commonly reported in Raman-based strain measurements of nanowires, and can be extended to other materials systems with degenerate phonons.

  13. Anomalous flow behavior in nanochannels: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Sohail; Luo, Lin; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-06-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of flow of water in nanochannels with a range of surface wettability characteristics (hydrophobic to strongly hydrophilic) and driving forces (pressures). Our results show apparently anomalous behavior. At low pressures, the rate is higher in nanochannels with hydrophilic surfaces than that with hydrophobic surfaces; however, with high pressure driven flow we observe opposite trends. This apparently anomalous behavior can be explained on the basis of molecular thermodynamics and fluid mechanics considerations. Understanding such behavior is important in many nanofluidic devices such as nanoreactors, nanosensors, and nanochips that are increasingly being designed and used.

  14. Anomalous Dynamical Behavior of Freestanding Graphene Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, M. L.; Kumar, P.; Neek-Amal, M.; Thibado, P. M.; Peeters, F. M.; Singh, Surendra

    2016-09-01

    We report subnanometer, high-bandwidth measurements of the out-of-plane (vertical) motion of atoms in freestanding graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy. By tracking the vertical position over a long time period, a 1000-fold increase in the ability to measure space-time dynamics of atomically thin membranes is achieved over the current state-of-the-art imaging technologies. We observe that the vertical motion of a graphene membrane exhibits rare long-scale excursions characterized by both anomalous mean-squared displacements and Cauchy-Lorentz power law jump distributions.

  15. Long-lived anomalous thermal diffusion induced by elastic cell membranes on nearby particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Guckenberger, Achim; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The physical approach of a small particle (virus, medical drug) to the cell membrane represents the crucial first step before active internalization and is governed by thermal diffusion. Using a fully analytical theory we show that the stretching and bending of the elastic membrane by the approaching particle induces a memory in the system, which leads to anomalous diffusion, even though the particle is immersed in a purely Newtonian liquid. For typical cell membranes the transient subdiffusive regime extends beyond 10 ms and can enhance residence times and possibly binding rates up to 50%. Our analytical predictions are validated by numerical simulations.

  16. Anomalous elastic properties of RF-sputtered amorphous TeO2+x thin film for temperature-stable SAW device applications.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Namrata; Sreenivas, Kondepudy; Gupta, Vinay

    2008-03-01

    The anomalous elastic properties of TeO2+x thin films deposited by rf diode sputtering on substrates at room temperature have been studied. The deposited films are amorphous, and IR spectroscopy reveals the formation of Te-O bond. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the variation in the stoichiometry of TeO2+x film from x=0 to 1 with an increase in the oxygen percentage in processing gas composition. The elastic parameters of the films in comparison to the reported values for TeO2+x single crystal are found to be low. However, the temperature coefficients of elastic parameters of all deposited films exhibit anomalous behavior showing positive values for TC(C11) in the range (32.0 to 600.0)x10(-4) degrees C(-1) and TC(C44)=(35.0 to 645.5)x10(-4) degrees C(-1) against the negative values TC(C11)=-2.7x10(-4) degrees C(-1) and TC(C44)=-0.73x10(-4) degrees C(-1) reported for TeO2+x single crystal. The variation in the elastic parameters and their temperature coefficients is correlated with the change in the three-dimensional network of Te-O bonding. The anomalous elastic properties of the TeO2+x films grown in 100% O2 are useful for potential application in the design of temperature stable surface acoustic wave devices.

  17. Elastic behavior of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite: An atomistic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suvankar; Dutta, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mechanical properties, nanocomposites with homogeneous chemical composition throughout the matrix and the dispersed phase are of particular interest. In this study, the elastic moduli of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite have been estimated using atomistic simulations. A comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the elastic behavior is significantly influenced by the crystal-amorphous interphase. On observing the effect of volume-fraction of the crystalline phase, an anomalous trend for the bulk modulus is obtained. This phenomenon is attributed to the relaxation displacements of the amorphous atoms.

  18. Observation of Anomalous Resistance Behavior in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Lew, Wen Siang; Liu, Zongwen

    2017-01-01

    Our measurement results have shown that bilayer graphene exhibits an unexpected sharp transition of the resistance value in the temperature region 200 250 K. We argue that this behavior originates from the interlayer ripple scattering effect between the top and bottom ripple graphene layer. The inter-scattering can mimic the Coulomb scattering but is strongly dependent on temperature. The observed behavior is consistent with the theoretical prediction that charged impurities are the dominant scatters in bilayer graphene. The resistance increase with increasing perpendicular magnetic field strongly supports the postulate that magnetic field induces an excitonic gap in bilayer graphene. Our results reveal that the relative change of resistance induced by magnetic field in the bilayer graphene shows an anomalous thermally activated property.

  19. Anomalous behavior of water inside the SecY translocon.

    PubMed

    Capponi, Sara; Heyden, Matthias; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Tobias, Douglas J; White, Stephen H

    2015-07-21

    The heterotrimeric SecY translocon complex is required for the cotranslational assembly of membrane proteins in bacteria and archaea. The insertion of transmembrane (TM) segments during nascent-chain passage through the translocon is generally viewed as a simple partitioning process between the water-filled translocon and membrane lipid bilayer, suggesting that partitioning is driven by the hydrophobic effect. Indeed, the apparent free energy of partitioning of unnatural aliphatic amino acids on TM segments is proportional to accessible surface area, which is a hallmark of the hydrophobic effect [Öjemalm K, et al. (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(31):E359-E364]. However, the apparent partitioning solvation parameter is less than one-half the value expected for simple bulk partitioning, suggesting that the water in the translocon departs from bulk behavior. To examine the state of water in a SecY translocon complex embedded in a lipid bilayer, we carried out all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations of the Pyrococcus furiosus SecYE, which was determined to be in a "primed" open state [Egea PF, Stroud RM (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(40):17182-17187]. Remarkably, SecYE remained in this state throughout our 450-ns simulation. Water molecules within SecY exhibited anomalous diffusion, had highly retarded rotational dynamics, and aligned their dipoles along the SecY transmembrane axis. The translocon is therefore not a simple water-filled pore, which raises the question of how anomalous water behavior affects the mechanism of translocon function and, more generally, the partitioning of hydrophobic molecules. Because large water-filled cavities are found in many membrane proteins, our findings may have broader implications.

  20. Anomalous behavior of cristobalite in helium under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomoko; Takada, Hiroto; Yagi, Takehiko; Gotou, Hirotada; Okada, Taku; Wakabayashi, Daisuke; Funamori, Nobumasa

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the high-pressure behavior of cristobalite in helium by powder X-ray diffraction. Cristobalite transformed to a new phase at about 8 GPa. This phase is supposed to have a molar volume of about 30 % larger than cristobalite, suggesting the dissolution of helium atoms in its interstitial voids. On further compression, the new phase transformed to a different phase which showed an X-ray diffraction pattern similar to cristobalite X-I at about 21 GPa. On the other hand, when the new phase was decompressed, it transformed to another new phase at about 7 GPa, which is also supposed to have a molar volume of about 25 % larger than cristobalite. On further decompression, the second new phase transformed to cristobalite II at about 2 GPa. In contrast to cristobalite, quartz did not show anomalous behavior in helium. The behavior of cristobalite in helium was also consistent with that in other mediums up to about 8 GPa, where the volume of cristobalite became close to that of quartz. These results suggest that dissolution of helium may be controlled not only by the density (amount of voids) but also by the network structure of SiO4 tetrahedra (topology of voids).

  1. Elastic constant versus temperature behavior of three hardened maraging steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledbetter, H. M.; Austin, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic constants of three maraging steels were determined by measuring ultrasonic velocities. Annealed steels show slightly lower bulk moduli and considerably lower shear moduli than hardened steels. All the elastic constants (Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio) show regular temperature behavior between 76 and 400 K. Young's modulus and the shear modulus increase with increasing yield strength, but the bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio are relatively unchanged. Elastic anisotropy is quite small.

  2. An anomalous behavior of trypsin immobilized in alginate network.

    PubMed

    Ganachaud, Chrystelle; Bernin, Diana; Isaksson, Dan; Holmberg, Krister

    2013-05-01

    Alginate is a biopolymer used in drug formulations and for surgical purposes. In the presence of divalent cations, it forms solid gels, and such gels are of interest for immobilization of cells and enzymes. In this work, we entrapped trypsin in an alginate gel together with a known substrate, N α-benzoyl-L-arginine-4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (L-BAPNA), and in the presence or absence of D-BAPNA, which is known to be a competitive inhibitor. Interactions between alginate and the substrate as well as the enzyme were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, rheology, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biocatalysis was monitored by spectrophotometry at temperatures ranging from 10 to 42 °C. It was found that at 37 and 42 °C a strong acceleration of the reaction was obtained, whereas at 10 °C and at room temperature, the presence of D-BAPNA leads to a retardation of the reaction rate. The same effect was found when the reaction was performed in a non-cross-linked alginate solution. In alginate-free buffer solution, as well as in a solution of carboxymethylcellulose, a biopolymer that resembles alginate, the normal behavior was obtained; however, with D-BAPNA acting as an inhibitor at all temperatures. A more detailed investigation of the reaction kinetics showed that at higher temperature and in the presence of alginate, the curve of initial reaction rate versus L-BAPNA concentration had a sigmoidal shape, indicating an allosteric behavior. We believe that the anomalous behavior of trypsin in the presence of alginate is due to conformational changes caused by interactions between the positively charged trypsin and the strongly negatively charged alginate.

  3. Electron's anomalous magnetic-moment effects on electron-hydrogen elastic collisions in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Elhandi, S.; Taj, S.; Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Oufni, L.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment on the relativistic electronic dressing for the process of electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions is investigated. We consider a laser field with circular polarization and various electric field strengths. The Dirac-Volkov states taking into account this anomaly are used to describe the process in the first order of perturbation theory. The correlation between the terms coming from this anomaly and the electric field strength gives rise to the strong dependence of the spinor part of the differential cross section (DCS) with respect to these terms. A detailed study has been devoted to the nonrelativistic regime as well as the moderate relativistic regime. Some aspects of this dependence as well as the dynamical behavior of the DCS in the relativistic regime have been addressed.

  4. Linear elastic behavior of dry soap foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1996-08-10

    Linear elastic constants are computed for three dry foams that have crystal symmetry, bubbles with equal volume V, and films with uniform surface tension T. The Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams contain one, two, and eight bubbles in the unit cell, respectively. All three foams have 14-sided bubbles, but these tetrakaidecahedra have different topology; the Weaire-Phelan foam also contains pentagonal dodecahedra. In addition to the bulk modulus for volume compression, the authors calculate two shear moduli for the Kelvin and Weaire-Phelan foams, which have cubic symmetry, and four shear moduli for the Williams foam, which has tetragonal symmetry. The Williams foam has five elastic constants, not six, because the stress remains isotropic for uniform expansion; this is not guaranteed by symmetry alone. The two shear moduli for the Weaire-Phelan foam differ by less than 5%. The other two foams exhibit much greater elastic anisotropy; their shear moduli differ by a factor of 2. An effective isotropic shear modulus {bar G}, which represents the response averaged over all orientations, is evaluated for each foam. Scaled by T/V{sup 1/3}, {bar G} is 0.8070, 0.7955, and 0.8684 for the Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams, respectively. When extrapolated to the dry limit, the shear modulus data of Princen and Kiss (for concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with polydisperse drop-size distributions) fall within the range of the calculations. The Surface Evolver program, developed by Brakke, was used to compute minimal surfaces for the dry foams. Also reported for each undeformed foam are various geometric constants relating to interfacial energy density, cell edge length, and bubble pressure.

  5. Investigation of Anomalous Behavior in Metallic-Based Materials Under Compressive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gil, Christopher M.; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1998-01-01

    An anomalous material response has been observed under the action of applied compressive loads in fibrous SiC/Ti (both Ti-6242 and Ti-15-3 alloys) and the monolithic nickel-base alloy IN-718 in the aged condition. The observed behavior is an increase, rather than a decrease, in the instantaneous Young's modulus with increasing load. This increase is small, but can be significant in yield surface determination tests, where an equivalent offset strain on the order of 10 micron(1 x 10(exp -6) m/m) is being used. Stiffening has been quantified by calculating offset strains from the linear elastic loading line. The offset strains associated with stiffening during compressive loading are positive and of the same order as the target offset strains in yield surface determination tests. At this time we do not have a reasonable explanation for this response nor can we identify a deformation mechanism that might cause it. On the other hand, we are not convinced that it is an artifact of the experimental procedure because a number of issues have been identified and seemingly ruled out. In fact, stiffening appears to be temperature dependent, since it decreases as the temperature increases.

  6. Anomalous behavior of 1/f noise in graphene near the charge neutrality point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Shunpei; Matsuo, Sadashige; Tanaka, Takahiro; Nakaharai, Shu; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Moriyama, Takahiro; Ono, Teruo; Arakawa, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the noise in single layer graphene devices from equilibrium to far-from equilibrium and found that the 1/f noise shows an anomalous dependence on the source-drain bias voltage (VSD). While the Hooge's relation is not the case around the charge neutrality point, we found that it is recovered at very low VSD region. We propose that the depinning of the electron-hole puddles is induced at finite VSD, which may explain this anomalous noise behavior.

  7. Anomalous postcritical refraction behavior for certain transversely isotropic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fa, L.; Brown, R.L.; Castagna, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Snell's law at the boundary between two transversely isotropic media with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI media) can be solved by setting up a fourth order polynomial for the sine of the reflection/transmission angles. This approach reveals the possible presence of an anomalous postcritical angle for certain transversely isotropic media. There are thus possibly three incident angle regimes for the reflection/refraction of longitudinal or transverse waves incident upon a VTI medium: precritical, postcritical/preanomalous, and postanomalous. The anomalous angle occurs for certain strongly anisotropic media where the required root to the phase velocity equation must be switched in order to obey Snell's law. The reflection/transmission coefficients, polarization directions, and the phase velocity are all affected by both the anisotropy and the incident angle. The incident critical angles are also effected by the anisotropy. ?? 2006 Acoustical Society of America.

  8. Anomalous postcritical refraction behavior for certain transversely isotropic media.

    PubMed

    Fa, Lin; Brown, Ray L; Castagna, John P

    2006-12-01

    Snell's law at the boundary between two transversely isotropic media with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI media) can be solved by setting up a fourth order polynomial for the sine of the reflection/transmission angles. This approach reveals the possible presence of an anomalous postcritical angle for certain transversely isotropic media. There are thus possibly three incident angle regimes for the reflection/refraction of longitudinal or transverse waves incident upon a VTI medium: precritical, postcritical/preanomalous, and postanomalous. The anomalous angle occurs for certain strongly anisotropic media where the required root to the phase velocity equation must be switched in order to obey Snell's law. The reflection/transmission coefficients, polarization directions, and the phase velocity are all affected by both the anisotropy and the incident angle. The incident critical angles are also effected by the anisotropy.

  9. Elastic-plastic behavior of non-woven fibrous mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Meredith N.; Pai, Chia-Ling; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2012-02-01

    Electrospinning is a novel method for creating non-woven polymer mats that have high surface area and high porosity. These attributes make them ideal candidates for multifunctional composites. Understanding the mechanical properties as a function of fiber properties and mat microstructure can aid in designing these composites. Further, a constitutive model which captures the membrane stress-strain behavior as a function of fiber properties and the geometry of the fibrous network would be a powerful design tool. Here, mats electrospun from amorphous polyamide are used as a model system. The elastic-plastic behavior of single fibers are obtained in tensile tests. Uniaxial monotonic and cyclic tensile tests are conducted on non-woven mats. The mat exhibits elastic-plastic stress-strain behavior. The transverse strain behavior provides important complementary data, showing a negligible initial Poisson's ratio followed by a transverse:axial strain ratio greater than -1:1 after an axial strain of 0.02. A triangulated framework has been developed to emulate the fibrous network structure of the mat. The micromechanically based model incorporates the elastic-plastic behavior of single fibers into a macroscopic membrane model of the mat. This representative volume element based model is shown to capture the uniaxial elastic-plastic response of the mat under monotonic and cyclic loading. The initial modulus and yield stress of the mat are governed by the fiber properties, the network geometry, and the network density. The transverse strain behavior is linked to discrete deformation mechanisms of the fibrous mat structure including fiber alignment, fiber bending, and network consolidation. The model is further validated in comparison to experiments under different constrained axial loading conditions and found to capture the constraint effect on stiffness, yield, post-yield hardening, and post-yield transverse strain behavior. Due to the direct connection between

  10. Degree-strength correlation reveals anomalous trading behavior.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Qian; Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation is an important issue for both developed and emerging stock markets. Many efforts have been made to detect manipulation in stock markets. However, it is still an open problem to identify the fraudulent traders, especially when they collude with each other. In this paper, we focus on the problem of identifying the anomalous traders using the transaction data of eight manipulated stocks and forty-four non-manipulated stocks during a one-year period. By analyzing the trading networks of stocks, we find that the trading networks of manipulated stocks exhibit significantly higher degree-strength correlation than the trading networks of non-manipulated stocks and the randomized trading networks. We further propose a method to detect anomalous traders of manipulated stocks based on statistical significance analysis of degree-strength correlation. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is effective at distinguishing the manipulated stocks from non-manipulated ones. Our method outperforms the traditional weight-threshold method at identifying the anomalous traders in manipulated stocks. More importantly, our method is difficult to be fooled by colluded traders.

  11. Degree-Strength Correlation Reveals Anomalous Trading Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Qian; Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation is an important issue for both developed and emerging stock markets. Many efforts have been made to detect manipulation in stock markets. However, it is still an open problem to identify the fraudulent traders, especially when they collude with each other. In this paper, we focus on the problem of identifying the anomalous traders using the transaction data of eight manipulated stocks and forty-four non-manipulated stocks during a one-year period. By analyzing the trading networks of stocks, we find that the trading networks of manipulated stocks exhibit significantly higher degree-strength correlation than the trading networks of non-manipulated stocks and the randomized trading networks. We further propose a method to detect anomalous traders of manipulated stocks based on statistical significance analysis of degree-strength correlation. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is effective at distinguishing the manipulated stocks from non-manipulated ones. Our method outperforms the traditional weight-threshold method at identifying the anomalous traders in manipulated stocks. More importantly, our method is difficult to be fooled by colluded traders. PMID:23082114

  12. Explaining the mechanical mechanisms of zeolitic metal-organic frameworks: revealing auxeticity and anomalous elasticity.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Matthew R; Tan, Jin-Chong

    2016-03-14

    The comprehensive elastic properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIF-1 to ZIF-4) have been computed using density functional theory (DFT). We employed the periodic CRYSTAL14 code to calculate the single-crystal elastic coefficients (Cij) at the B3LYP level of theory. While the chemical compositions of ZIFs-1 to -4 are the same, each structure features a distinct network topology, crystal symmetry and porosity configuration, which translate into differential structure-function mechanical correlations. We elucidate the anisotropic mechanical response with respect to the directionally dependent Young's and shear moduli properties. Our theoretical results suggest that ZIF-3 adopting a dft topology has an extremely low shear resistance (Gmin = 0.1 GPa), which is also underpinning the flexible mechanism responsible for its negative Poisson's ratio (auxetic νmin = -0.43). Interestingly, we identified that ZIF-1, ZIF-2, and ZIF-4 could exhibit a nearly zero Poisson's ratio for certain crystal orientations, which is reminescent of a rare "cork-like" phenomenon where there is practically no lateral deformation corresponding to an applied axial strain. Furthermore, we determined the bulk moduli and linear compressibilities, alongside the averaged elastic properties of the ZIF polycrystals.

  13. Unraveling complex nonlinear elastic behaviors in rocks using dynamic acousto-elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, J.; Guyer, R.; Renaud, G.; TenCate, J. A.; Johnson, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    In comparison with standard nonlinear ultrasonic methods like frequency mixing or resonance based measurements that allow one to extract average, bulk variations of modulus and attenuation versus strain level, dynamic acousto-elasticity (DAE) allows to obtain the elastic behavior over the entire dynamic cycle, detailing the full nonlinear behavior under tension and compression, including hysteresis and memory effects. This method consists of exciting a sample in Bulk-mode resonance at strains of 10-7 to 10-5 and simultaneously probing with a sequence of high frequency, low amplitude pulses. Time of flight and amplitudes of these pulses, respectively related to nonlinear elastic and dissipative parameters, can be plotted versus vibration strain level. Despite complex nonlinear signatures obtained for most rocks, it can be shown that for low strain amplitude (< 10-6), the nonlinear classical theory issued from a Taylor decomposition can explain the harmonic content. For higher strain, harmonic content becomes richer and the material exhibits more hysteretic behaviors, i.e. strain rate dependencies. Such observations have been made in the past (e.g., Pasqualini et al., JGR 2007), but not with the extreme detail of elasticity provided by DAE. Previous quasi-static measurements made in Berea sandstone (Claytor et al, GRL 2009), show that the hysteretic behavior disappears when the protocol is performed at a very low strain-rate (static limit). Therefore, future work will aim at linking quasi-static and dynamic observations, i.e. the frequency or strain-rate dependence, in order to understand underlying physical phenomena.

  14. Anomalous swimming behavior of bacteria in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Aranson, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Flagellated bacteria stop swimming in isotropic media of viscosity higher than 0.06kgm-1s-1. However, Bacillus Subtilis slows down by only about 30% in a nematic chromonic liquid crystal (CLC, 14wt% DSCG in water), where the anisotropic viscosity can be as high as 6kgm-1s-1. The bacteria velocity (Vb) is linear with the flagella rotation frequency. The phase velocity of the flagella Vf ~ 2Vb in LC, as compared to Vf ~ 10Vb in water. The flow generated by the bacteria is localized along the bacterial body axis, decaying slowly over tens of micrometers along, but rapidly over a few micrometers across this axis. The concentrated flow grants the bacteria new ability to carry cargo particles in LC, ability not seen in their habitat isotropic media. We attribute these anomalous features to the anisotropy of viscosity of the CLC, namely, the viscosities of splay and twist is hundreds times higher than that of bend deformation, which provides extra boost of swimming efficiency and enables the bacteria swim at considerable speed in a viscous medium. Our findings can potentially lead to applications such as particle transportation in microfluidic devices. A.S and I.A are supported by the US DOE, Office of Science, BES, Materials Science and Engineering Division. S.Z. and O.D.L are supported by NSF DMR 1104850, DMS-1434185.

  15. Dynamic Measures of Elastic Nonlinear (Anelastic) Behavior: Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity Testing (DAET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, G.; Le Bas, P.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Carey, J. W.; Han, J.; Darling, T. W.; Johnson, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Unraveling the physics of the earthquake source, reliable sequestration of CO2, predicting wellbore breakout in oil and gas reservoirs, monitoring thermal damage to rock in nuclear waste storage, and probing cement integrity require new approaches to material characterization and imaging. The elastic nonlinear material response is extremely promising in this regard. A persistent problem has been the direct relation between elastic nonlinearity and mechanical damage, because a reliable physics-based theory does not yet exist; however, recent work in medical nonlinear acoustics has led to an experimental breakthrough in measuring material nonlinear response. The breakthrough, termed Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity Testing (e.g., Renaud et al, 2008), has significant implication to development of a physics based theory, and thus ultimately to our ability to directly relate nonlinear material behavior to damage. The method provides the means to dynamically study the velocity-pressure and attenuation-pressure behaviors through the full wave cycle in contrast to most methods that measure average response (e.g., Nonlinear Resonance Ultrasound Spectroscopy [e.g., Guyer and Johnson, 2009]). The method relies on exciting a sample with a low frequency vibration in order to cycle it through stress-strain multiple times. Simultaneously, a high frequency ultrasonic source applies pulses and the change in wavespeed as a function of the low frequency stress is measured. In crystalline rock, we expect that the elastic nonlinearity arises from the microcracks and dislocations contained within individual crystals. In contrast, sandstones, limestones and other sedimentary rocks may have other origin(s) of elastic nonlinearity that are currently under debate. Thus we can use a crystalline sample as a point of reference from which to extrapolate to other sources of nonlinear mechanisms. We report results from our preliminary studies applying a number of room-dry rock samples of differing rock

  16. TargetVue: Visual Analysis of Anomalous User Behaviors in Online Communication Systems.

    PubMed

    Cao, Nan; Shi, Conglei; Lin, Sabrina; Lu, Jie; Lin, Yu-Ru; Lin, Ching-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Users with anomalous behaviors in online communication systems (e.g. email and social medial platforms) are potential threats to society. Automated anomaly detection based on advanced machine learning techniques has been developed to combat this issue; challenges remain, though, due to the difficulty of obtaining proper ground truth for model training and evaluation. Therefore, substantial human judgment on the automated analysis results is often required to better adjust the performance of anomaly detection. Unfortunately, techniques that allow users to understand the analysis results more efficiently, to make a confident judgment about anomalies, and to explore data in their context, are still lacking. In this paper, we propose a novel visual analysis system, TargetVue, which detects anomalous users via an unsupervised learning model and visualizes the behaviors of suspicious users in behavior-rich context through novel visualization designs and multiple coordinated contextual views. Particularly, TargetVue incorporates three new ego-centric glyphs to visually summarize a user's behaviors which effectively present the user's communication activities, features, and social interactions. An efficient layout method is proposed to place these glyphs on a triangle grid, which captures similarities among users and facilitates comparisons of behaviors of different users. We demonstrate the power of TargetVue through its application in a social bot detection challenge using Twitter data, a case study based on email records, and an interview with expert users. Our evaluation shows that TargetVue is beneficial to the detection of users with anomalous communication behaviors.

  17. Suppressing Anomalous Localized Waffle Behavior in Least Squares Wavefront Reconstructors

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D

    2002-10-08

    A major difficulty with wavefront slope sensors is their insensitivity to certain phase aberration patterns, the classic example being the waffle pattern in the Fried sampling geometry. As the number of degrees of freedom in AO systems grows larger, the possibility of troublesome waffle-like behavior over localized portions of the aperture is becoming evident. Reconstructor matrices have associated with them, either explicitly or implicitly, an orthogonal mode space over which they operate, called the singular mode space. If not properly preconditioned, the reconstructor's mode set can consist almost entirely of modes that each have some localized waffle-like behavior. In this paper we analyze the behavior of least-squares reconstructors with regard to their mode spaces. We introduce a new technique that is successful in producing a mode space that segregates the waffle-like behavior into a few ''high order'' modes, which can then be projected out of the reconstructor matrix. This technique can be adapted so as to remove any specific modes that are undesirable in the final reconstructor (such as piston, tip, and tilt for example) as well as suppress (the more nebulously defined) localized waffle behavior.

  18. Anomalous Anderson localization behaviors in disordered pseudospin systems.

    PubMed

    Fang, A; Zhang, Z Q; Louie, Steven G; Chan, C T

    2017-04-04

    We discovered unique Anderson localization behaviors of pseudospin systems in a 1D disordered potential. For a pseudospin-1 system, due to the absence of backscattering under normal incidence and the presence of a conical band structure, the wave localization behaviors are entirely different from those of conventional disordered systems. We show that there exists a critical strength of random potential ([Formula: see text]), which is equal to the incident energy ([Formula: see text]), below which the localization length [Formula: see text] decreases with the random strength [Formula: see text] for a fixed incident angle [Formula: see text] But the localization length drops abruptly to a minimum at [Formula: see text] and rises immediately afterward. The incident angle dependence of the localization length has different asymptotic behaviors in the two regions of random strength, with [Formula: see text] when [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] when [Formula: see text] The existence of a sharp transition at [Formula: see text] is due to the emergence of evanescent waves in the systems when [Formula: see text] Such localization behavior is unique to pseudospin-1 systems. For pseudospin-1/2 systems, there is also a minimum localization length as randomness increases, but the transition from decreasing to increasing localization length at the minimum is smooth rather than abrupt. In both decreasing and increasing regions, the [Formula: see text] dependence of the localization length has the same asymptotic behavior [Formula: see text].

  19. Anomalous bond length behavior and a new solid phase of bromine under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Tse, John S.; Pan, Yuanming

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of diatomic molecular solids under pressure have attracted great interest and been extensively studied. Under ambient pressure, the structure of bromine is known to be a molecular phase (phase I). With increasing pressure, it transforms into an incommensurate phase (phase V) before eventually to a monoatomic phase (phase II). However, between phases I and V, the interatomic distance was found to first increase with pressure and then decreased abruptly. This anomalous bond length behavior is accompanied by the splitting of the Raman bands. These phenomena have not been resolved. Here we suggest a new solid phase that explains the Raman spectra. Furthermore, the anomalous bond length behavior is found to be the result of subtle second neighbor intermolecular interactions and is an intrinsic property of bromine in molecular phases. PMID:27156710

  20. Anomalous bond length behavior and a new solid phase of bromine under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min; Tse, John S.; Pan, Yuanming

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of diatomic molecular solids under pressure have attracted great interest and been extensively studied. Under ambient pressure, the structure of bromine is known to be a molecular phase (phase I). With increasing pressure, it transforms into an incommensurate phase (phase V) before eventually to a monoatomic phase (phase II). However, between phases I and V, the interatomic distance was found to first increase with pressure and then decreased abruptly. This anomalous bond length behavior is accompanied by the splitting of the Raman bands. These phenomena have not been resolved. Here we suggest a new solid phase that explains the Raman spectra. Furthermore, the anomalous bond length behavior is found to be the result of subtle second neighbor intermolecular interactions and is an intrinsic property of bromine in molecular phases.

  1. Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xiaozhi; Tan, Dayong; Ren, Xiangting; Yang, Wenge E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; He, Duanwei E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2015-04-27

    In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition.

  2. Anomalous Behavior of High Quality Factor Planar Superconducting Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megrant, Anthony; Chen, Zijun; Chiaro, Ben; Dunsworth, Andrew; Quintana, Chris; Campbell, Brooks; Kelly, Julian; Barends, Rami; Chen, Yu; Jeffrey, Evan; Mutus, Josh; Neill, Charles; O'Malley, Peter; Sank, Daniel; Vainsencher, Amit; Wenner, Jim; White, Ted; Bochmann, Jorg; Hoi, Iochun; Palmstrom, Christopher; Martinis, John; Cleland, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators have proven to be invaluable tools in studying some of the decoherence mechanisms found in superconducting qubits. Surface two-level states tend to dominate decoherence at temperatures below Tc/10 and at very low microwave powers, assuming loss through other channels (e.g. quasiparticles, vortices, and radiation loss) has been mitigated through proper shielding and design. I will present recent measurements of resonators whose behavior diverges significantly from the standard two-level state model at low temperatures and low excitation energies, resulting in startling behavior of the internal quality factor. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), through the Army Research Office grant W911NF-09-1-0375.

  3. Hard tissue as a composite material. I - Bounds on the elastic behavior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Recent determination of the elastic moduli of hydroxyapatite by ultrasonic methods permits a re-examination of the Voigt or parallel model of the elastic behavior of bone, as a two phase composite material. It is shown that such a model alone cannot be used to describe the behavior of bone. Correlative data on the elastic moduli of dentin, enamel and various bone samples indicate the existence of a nonlinear dependence of elastic moduli on composition of hard tissue. Several composite models are used to calculate the bounds on the elastic behavior of these tissues. The limitations of these models are described, and experiments to obtain additional critical data are discussed.

  4. Pentamodal behaviors and acoustic bandgaps of asymmetric pentamode elastic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Lu, Xuegang; Liang, Gongying; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    The asymmetric pentamode metamaterial structure which is built by connecting double-cones with different cross-section shapes (regular triangle, square, pentagon and hexagon) to form diamond lattice is proposed in this paper. Then its phonon band structure is calculated by finite-element method (FEM), and its pentamodal behaviors and acoustic bandgaps are studied in detail. Results show that in the process of adjusting geometrical parameters, the asymmetric case performs similar pentamodal behaviors [ratio of bulk modulus to shear modulus B/G and single-mode bandgap (SBG)] with the symmetric cases. And the asymmetric case not only remains the intrinsic complete bandgap (CBG) of mode 12-13 like symmetric cases, but also opens new and wide CBG of mode 10-11 and mode 14-15 for appropriate parameters. Therefore, introducing structural asymmetry should be an effective way to open CBG in pentamode elastic metamaterials.

  5. Explanation of Anomalous Behavior Observed in Impedance Eduction Techniques Using Measured Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Several enhancements that improve the accuracy and robustness of an impedance eduction technique that use an automatic optimizer are presented. These enhancements are then used to launch an intensive investigation into the cause of anomalous behavior that occurs for a small number of test conditions. This anomalous behavior is investigated for both a hardwall insert and a conventional liner. The primary conclusions of the study are that: (1) for the hard wall insert, the anomalies are due to narrow peaks in the objective function, (2) For the conventional liner, the anomalies are due to the presence of an extremely flat objective function, and (3) the anomalies appear to be triggered by inconsistencies between the duct propagation model and the measured data. At high frequencies, the duct propagation model may need to include the effects of higher-order duct modes, whereas at low frequencies, the effects of the mean boundary layer may have to be included.

  6. Anomalous temperature dependence of elastic constants in the nematic phase of binary mixtures made of rodlike and bent-core molecules.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Brindaban; Pratibha, R; Madhusudana, N V

    2007-12-14

    We report on two anomalous trends in the temperature dependences of the splay (K11) and bend (K33) elastic constants in the nematic (N) phase of mixtures of compounds with rodlike (R) and bent-core (BC) molecules: As the sample is cooled from the isotropic to N transition point, (i) K33 increases, attains a maximum value and then decreases, and (ii) close to the N to smectic A (SmA) transition point, K11 decreases sharply. At higher temperatures the bow axes of BC molecules are aligned along the director n, strongly favoring a bend distortion of n as the orientational order parameter is increased. Close to the N-SmA transition point the smecticlike short-range order builds up, and the arrow axes of BC molecules are aligned along n, facilitating a splay distortion of n. A simple model calculation brings out the anomalous trend in K33.

  7. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of Elastic Constants in the Nematic Phase of Binary Mixtures Made of Rodlike and Bent-Core Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Brindaban; Pratibha, R.; Madhusudana, N. V.

    2007-12-01

    We report on two anomalous trends in the temperature dependences of the splay (K11) and bend (K33) elastic constants in the nematic (N) phase of mixtures of compounds with rodlike (R) and bent-core (BC) molecules: As the sample is cooled from the isotropic to N transition point, (i) K33 increases, attains a maximum value and then decreases, and (ii) close to the N to smectic A (SmA) transition point, K11 decreases sharply. At higher temperatures the bow axes of BC molecules are aligned along the director n^, strongly favoring a bend distortion of n^ as the orientational order parameter is increased. Close to the N-SmA transition point the smecticlike short-range order builds up, and the arrow axes of BC molecules are aligned along n^, facilitating a splay distortion of n^. A simple model calculation brings out the anomalous trend in K33.

  8. Anomalous Thermal Behavior in Microcalorimeter Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2009-12-16

    Improving the resolution of gamma-ray detectors is important for many fields, including determinations of the Lamb shift in atoms with high atomic numbers, nuclear treaty verification, and environmental monitoring. High-purity germanium detectors are currently the tool of choice for precision gamma-ray spectroscopy. The resolution of these detectors is limited to about 500 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV by Fano statistics. In comparison, low-temperature microcalorimeters can provide over an order of magnitude improvement in photon resolution. For instance, a gamma-ray microcalorimeter has achieved 25 eV FWHM resolution at 103 keV. These calorimeters consist of two components, a bulk absorber to stop incident gamma rays and a thermometer made from a thin film electrically biased in the superconducting-to-normal phase transition, called a Transition Edge Sensor, or TES. The standard absorber is bulk, superconducting tin. While tin has historically been the best performing absorber, pulse decays in Sn devices are much slower than predicted. We have begun a systematic study of absorber behavior in order to assess and improve response times. This study leverages two capabilities: the ability to microfabricate highly uniform arrays of gamma-ray detectors and the ability to read out many detectors in a single cool-down using SQUID multiplexer circuits. Here, we present two experiments to identify the source of thermal time constants. The first involves varying properties of the Sn absorber including purity, vendor, and crystal grain size. The second examines the role of the other elements in the microcalorimeter assembly.

  9. Anomalous Thermal Behavior in Microcalorimeter Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horansky, Robert D.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2009-12-01

    Improving the resolution of gamma-ray detectors is important for many fields, including determinations of the Lamb shift in atoms with high atomic numbers, nuclear treaty verification, and environmental monitoring. High-purity germanium detectors are currently the tool of choice for precision gamma-ray spectroscopy. The resolution of these detectors is limited to about 500 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV by Fano statistics. In comparison, low-temperature microcalorimeters can provide over an order of magnitude improvement in photon resolution. For instance, a gamma-ray microcalorimeter has achieved 25 eV FWHM resolution at 103 keV. These calorimeters consist of two components, a bulk absorber to stop incident gamma rays and a thermometer made from a thin film electrically biased in the superconducting-to-normal phase transition, called a Transition Edge Sensor, or TES. The standard absorber is bulk, superconducting tin. While tin has historically been the best performing absorber, pulse decays in Sn devices are much slower than predicted. We have begun a systematic study of absorber behavior in order to assess and improve response times. This study leverages two capabilities: the ability to microfabricate highly uniform arrays of gamma-ray detectors and the ability to read out many detectors in a single cool-down using SQUID multiplexer circuits. Here, we present two experiments to identify the source of thermal time constants. The first involves varying properties of the Sn absorber including purity, vendor, and crystal grain size. The second examines the role of the other elements in the microcalorimeter assembly.

  10. Evaluating a heated metal scrubber's effectiveness in preventing ozone monitors' anomalous behavior during hot and humid ambient sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Maddy, J.A.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to verify West Virginia's Wet/Dry test's prediction that Advanced Pollution Instrumentation's (API) ozone monitors, when using a heated metal scrubber in lieu of a standard MnO{sub 2} scrubber, would be made insensitive to sampling conditions which provoke anomalous behavior. Field trials involving two identical API model 400 ozone monitors, a Horiba APOA 360 ozone monitor, MnO{sub 2} scrubbers and API's optional heated metal scrubber would determine this. The heated metal scrubber succeeded in effectively eliminating the anomalous behavior. Evaluation results further verify the accuracy of West Virginia's Wet/Dry test. During the evaluation, a serendipitous event led to observations that confirmed previous observations by The Commonwealth of Virginia's monitoring staff, linking contamination of UV monitors' optics with anomalous behavior. Also, a partial summation of observations concerning ultraviolet ozone monitors' anomalous behavior, drawn from several sources, illustrates its complex nature.

  11. Anomalous Behavior of D-Layer Preparation Time of the Ionosphere Due to Earthquakes as observed from Malda (India)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Achintya K.; Nandy, Nilmadhab; Bari, Md. Washimul; Choudhury, Asit K.

    2010-10-20

    The anomalous behavior of D-layer preparation time of the ionosphere are observed only before, during and after the earthquakes, which took place in the neighbouring region by monitoring the Very Low Frequency (VLF) signal using Gyrator II loop antenna. The anomalies were also observed in the sunrise terminator times during seismically active days. These anomalous behavior may be due to the Lithosphere-Ionosphere coupling. These anomalies may be a precursor of earthquake.

  12. Anomalous scaling behavior and surface roughening in molecular thin-film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S.; Jones, T. S.

    2006-04-15

    The thin film growth dynamics of a molecular semiconductor, free-base phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}Pc), deposited by organic molecular beam deposition, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and height difference correlation function (HDCF) analysis. The measured dynamic scaling components ({alpha}{sub loc}=0.61{+-}0.12, {beta}=1.02{+-}0.08, and 1/z=0.72{+-}0.13) are consistent with rapid surface roughening and anomalous scaling behavior. A detailed analysis of AFM images and simple growth models suggest that this behavior arises from the pronounced upward growth of crystalline H{sub 2}Pc mounds during the initial stages of thin film growth.

  13. Anomalous behaviors of Wyrtki Jets in the equatorial Indian Ocean during 2013

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yongliang; Liu, Lin; Han, Guoqing; Liu, Hongwei; Yu, Weidong; Yang, Guang; Wang, Huiwu; Wang, Haiyuan; Liu, Yanliang; Zahid; Waheed, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    In-situ measurement of the upper ocean velocity discloses significant abnormal behaviors of two Wyrtki Jets (WJs) respectively in boreal spring and fall, over the tropical Indian Ocean in 2013. The two WJs both occurred within upper 130 m depth and persisted more than one month. The exceptional spring jet in May was unusually stronger than its counterpart in fall, which is clearly against the previous understanding. Furthermore, the fall WJ in 2013 unexpectedly peaked in December, one month later than its climatology. Data analysis and numerical experiments illustrate that the anomalous changes in the equatorial zonal wind, associated with the strong intra-seasonal oscillation events, are most likely the primary reason for such anomalous WJs activities. PMID:27436723

  14. Anomalous DC and RF behavior of virgin AlGaN/AlN/GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Martín, H.; García-Pérez, Ó.; Pérez, S.; Altuntas, P.; Hoel, V.; Rennesson, S.; Cordier, Y.; González, T.; Mateos, J.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.

    2017-03-01

    The performance of gallium nitride transistors is still limited by technological problems often related to defects and traps. In this work, virgin AlGaN/AlN/GaN HEMTs exhibiting an anomalous DC behavior accompanied by frequency dispersion in the microwave range, both in the transconductance and output conductance, are analyzed. This anomalous response, which is mitigated by high-bias conditions, is attributed to the presence of traps and defects both in the volume of the GaN channel and in the source and drain contacts. A simple equivalent circuit model is proposed to replicate the dispersive response of the transistor, achieving an excellent agreement with the measured S–parameters and thus providing relevant information about its characteristic frequency.

  15. Mechanical behavior and elastic properties of prestrained columnar ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Scott Aaron

    Experiments on columnar-grained ice at --10 °C reveal changes to its mechanical behavior and elastic properties due to compressive prestrain. Laboratory-grown (152-mm cube) specimens of freshwater and saline ice were prestrained under uniaxial across-column compression (to levels from epsilon p = 0.003 to epsilonp = 0.20, at constant strain rates in the ductile regime) and then reloaded, again under uniaxial across-column compression (at rates from 1x10--6 s--1 to 3 x 10--2s--1). Prestrain caused solid-state recrystallization as well as damage in the form of non-propagating microcracks. These microstructural changes were quantified by analysis of thin sections. Elastic properties in across-column directions, both parallel (x1) and perpendicular ( x2) to the initial loading direction, were obtained from P-wave and S-wave ultrasonic velocities. As a result (and depending on the level) of the prestrain imparted in both materials, Young's modulus E was reduced by as much as 30%; the ductile-to-brittle (D--B) transition strain rate epsilon D/B was increased up to a factor of 3 to 10; and the ductile behavior with respect to loading along a direction within the horizontal ( x1-x2) plane of the parent ice sheet changed from isotropic to anisotropic. As the prestrain rate approached the nominal D--B transition rate of initially undamaged material, the magnitudes of prestrain effects on elastic compliance increased. The shift in the D--B transition, on the other hand, was less sensitive to the prestrain rate. The results are interpreted within the framework of a recent model that predicts the transition strain rate based on the micromechanical boundary between creep and fracture processes. Prestrain primarily affected certain parameters in the model, specifically the power-law creep coefficient B (more so than the creep exponent n), Young's modulus E and, by extension, the fracture toughness KIc. The physical implications of these effects are discussed.

  16. Anomalous Fatigue Behavior and Fatigue-Induced Grain Growth in Nanocrystalline Nickel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Brad L.; Padilla, Henry A.

    2011-07-01

    Fatigue failure due to repetitive loading of metallic devices is a pervasive engineering concern. The present work reveals extraordinary fatigue resistance in nanocrystalline (NC) alloys, which appears to be associated with the small (<100 nm) grain size inhibiting traditional cyclic damage processes. In this study, we examine the fatigue performance of three electrodeposited NC Ni-based metals: Ni, Ni-0.5Mn, and Ni-22Fe (PERMALLOY). When subjected to fatigue stresses at and above the tensile yield strength where conventional coarse-grained (CG) counterparts undergo low-cycle fatigue failure (<104 cycles to failure), these alloys exhibit exceptional fatigue lives (in some cases, >107 cycles to failure). Postmortem examinations show that failed samples contain an aggregate of coarsened grains at the crack initiation site. The experimental data and accompanying microscopy suggest that the NC matrix undergoes abnormal grain growth during cyclic loading, allowing dislocation activity to persist over length scales necessary to initiate a fatigue crack by traditional fatigue mechanisms. Thus, the present observations demonstrate anomalous fatigue behavior in two regards: (1) quantitatively anomalous when considering the extremely high stress levels needed to drive fatigue failure and (2) mechanistically anomalous in light of the grain growth process that appears to be a necessary precursor to crack initiation.

  17. Investigation of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4) Glass Sample Anomalous Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.; Bibler, N. E.; Peeler, D. K.

    2005-08-15

    Two Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass samples from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) (Macrobatch 4) were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on February 23, 2005. One sample, S02244, was designated for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and elemental and radionuclide analyses. The second sample, S02247, was designated for archival storage. The samples were pulled from the melter pour stream during the feeding of Melter Feed Tank (MFT) Batch 308 and therefore roughly correspond to feed from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Batches 306-308. During the course of preparing sample S02244 for PCT and other analyses two observations were made which were characterized as ''unusual'' or anomalous behavior relative to historical observations of glasses prepared for the PCT. These observations ultimately led to a series of scoping tests in order to determine more about the nature of the behavior and possible mechanisms. The first observation was the behavior of the ground glass fraction (-100 +200 mesh) for PCT analysis when contacted with deionized water during the washing phase of the PCT procedure. The behavior was analogous to that of an organic compound in the presence of water: clumping, floating on the water surface, and crawling up the beaker walls. In other words, the glass sample did not ''wet'' normally, displaying a hydrophobic behavior in water. This had never been seen before in 18 years SRNL PCT tests on either radioactive or non-radioactive glasses. Typical glass behavior is largely to settle to the bottom of the water filled beaker, though there may be suspended fines which result in some cloudiness to the wash water. The typical appearance is analogous to wetting sand. The second observation was the presence of faint black rings at the initial and final solution levels in the Teflon vessels used for the mixed acid digestion of S02244 glass conducted for compositional analysis. The digestion is composed of two stages, and at both the

  18. Anomalous anisotropic compression behavior of superconducting CrAs under high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenhai; Wu, Wei; Hu, Qingyang; Zhao, Jinggeng; Li, Chunyu; Yang, Ke; Cheng, Jinguang; Luo, Jianlin; Wang, Lin; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2015-01-01

    CrAs was observed to possess the bulk superconductivity under high-pressure conditions. To understand the superconducting mechanism and explore the correlation between the structure and superconductivity, the high-pressure structural evolution of CrAs was investigated using the angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The structure of CrAs remains stable up to 1.8 GPa, whereas the lattice parameters exhibit anomalous compression behaviors. With increasing pressure, the lattice parameters a and c both demonstrate a nonmonotonic change, and the lattice parameter b undergoes a rapid contraction at ∼0.18−0.35 GPa, which suggests that a pressure-induced isostructural phase transition occurs in CrAs. Above the phase transition pressure, the axial compressibilities of CrAs present remarkable anisotropy. A schematic band model was used to address the anomalous compression behavior of CrAs. The present results shed light on the structural and related electronic responses to high pressure, which play a key role toward understanding the superconductivity of CrAs. PMID:26627230

  19. Anomalous Electrical Conductivity Behavior at Elevated Pressure in the Protic Ionic Liquid Procainamide Hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Roland, C. M.; Swiety-Pospiech, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Paluch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, we investigated the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the conductivity relaxation time τσ of the supercooled protic ionic liquid, procainamide hydrochloride, a common pharmaceutical. The pressure dependence of τσ exhibited anomalous behavior in the vicinity of the glass transition Tg, manifested by abrupt changes in activation volume. This peculiar behavior, paralleling the change in temperature dependence of τσ near Tg, is a manifestation of the decoupling between electrical conductivity and structural relaxation. Although the latter effectively ceases in the glassy state, free ions retain their mobility but with a reduced sensitivity to thermodynamic changes. This is the first observation of decoupling of ion migration from structural relaxation in a glassy conductor by isothermal densification.

  20. Anomalous behaviors of E1/E2 deep level defects in 6H silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. D.; Ling, C. C.; Gong, M.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.; Brauer, G.; Anwand, W.; Skorupa, W.

    2005-01-01

    Deep level defects E1/E2 were observed in He-implanted, 0.3 and 1.7MeV electron-irradiated n-type 6H-SiC. Similar to others' results, the behaviors of E1 and E2 (like the peak intensity ratio, the annealing behaviors or the introduction rates) often varied from sample to sample. This anomalous result is not expected of E1/E2 being usually considered arising from the same defect located at the cubic and hexagonal sites respectively. The present study shows that this anomaly is due to another DLTS peak overlapping with the E1/E2. The activation energy and the capture cross section of this defect are EC-0.31eV and σ ˜8×10-14cm2, respectively.

  1. Theory of the anomalous critical behavior for the smectic-A -hexatic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.; Lebedev, V. V.; Muratov, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a theoretical explanation for the long-standing problem of the anomalous critical behavior of the heat capacity near the smectic-A -hexatic phase transition. Experiments find a large specific heat critical exponent α =0.5 -0.7 , which is inconsistent with a small negative value α ≈-0.01 expected for the three-dimensional X Y universality class. We show that most of the observed features can be explained by treating simultaneously fluctuations of the hexatic orientational and translational (positional) order parameters. Assuming that the translational correlation length ξt r is much larger than the hexatic correlation length ξh, we calculate the temperature dependence of the heat capacity in the critical region near the smectic-A -hexatic phase transition. Our results are in quantitative agreement with the calorimetric experimental data.

  2. Anomalous behaviors of the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns for a class of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro

    2003-02-24

    In this paper, we investigate the Fraunhofer diffraction of a class of partially coherent light diffracted by a circular aperture. It is shown that by the illumination of partially coherent light of the special spatial correlation function, the anomalous behaviors of the diffraction patterns are found. We find that the decrease of the spatial coherence of the light in the aperture leads to the drastic changes of the diffraction pattern. Specifically, when the light in the aperture is fully coherent, the diffraction pattern is just an Airy disc. However, as the coherence decreases, the diffraction pattern becomes an annulus, and the radius of the annulus increases with the decrease of the coherence. Flattened annuli can be achieved, when the parameters characterizing the correlation of the partially coherent light are chosen with suitable values. Potential applications of modulating the coherence to achieve desired diffraction patterns are discussed.

  3. Theory of the anomalous critical behavior for the smectic-A-hexatic transition.

    PubMed

    Kats, E I; Lebedev, V V; Muratov, A R

    2016-06-01

    We propose a theoretical explanation for the long-standing problem of the anomalous critical behavior of the heat capacity near the smectic-A-hexatic phase transition. Experiments find a large specific heat critical exponent α=0.5-0.7, which is inconsistent with a small negative value α≈-0.01 expected for the three-dimensional XY universality class. We show that most of the observed features can be explained by treating simultaneously fluctuations of the hexatic orientational and translational (positional) order parameters. Assuming that the translational correlation length ξ_{tr} is much larger than the hexatic correlation length ξ_{h}, we calculate the temperature dependence of the heat capacity in the critical region near the smectic-A-hexatic phase transition. Our results are in quantitative agreement with the calorimetric experimental data.

  4. Anomalous behavior of the energy gap in the one-dimensional quantum XY model.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Manaka; Yamanaka, Yuuki; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Rams, Marek M

    2015-11-01

    We reexamine the well-studied one-dimensional spin-1/2 XY model to reveal its nontrivial energy spectrum, in particular the energy gap between the ground state and the first excited state. In the case of the isotropic XY model, the XX model, the gap behaves very irregularly as a function of the system size at a second order transition point. This is in stark contrast to the usual power-law decay of the gap and is reminiscent of the similar behavior at the first order phase transition in the infinite-range quantum XY model. The gap also shows nontrivial oscillatory behavior for the phase transitions in the anisotropic model in the incommensurate phase. We observe a close relation between this anomalous behavior of the gap and the correlation functions. These results, those for the isotropic case in particular, are important from the viewpoint of quantum annealing where the efficiency of computation is strongly affected by the size dependence of the energy gap.

  5. In situ nonlinear elastic behavior of soil observed by DAET

    SciTech Connect

    Larmat, Carene; Renaud, Guillaume; Rutledge, James T.; Lee, Richard C.; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Paul A.

    2012-07-05

    The key to safe design of critical facilities (strong ground motion in low velocity materials such as soils). Current approaches are predictions from measurements of the elastic non-linear properties of boreholes samples. Need for in-situ, local and complete determination of non-linear properties of soil, rock in response to high-strain motion.

  6. Study of the elastic behavior of synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Na

    Synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLAs), composed of coal fly ash and recycled plastics, represent a resilient construction material that could be a key aspect to future sustainable development. This research focuses on a prediction of the elastic modulus of SLA, assumed as a homogenous and isotropic composite of particulates of high carbon fly ash (HCFA) and a matrix of plastics (HDPE, LDPE, PS and mixture of plastics), with the emphasis on SLAs made of HCFA and PS. The elastic moduli of SLA with variable fly ash volume fractions are predicted based on finite element analyses (FEA) performed using the computer programs ABAQUS and PLAXIS. The effect of interface friction (roughness) between phases and other computation parameters; e.g., loading strain, stiffness of component, element type and boundary conditions, are included in these analyses. Analytical models and laboratory tests provide a baseline for comparison. Overall, results indicate ABAQUS generates elastic moduli closer to those predicted by well-established analytical models than moduli predicted from PLAXIS, especially for SLAs with lower fly ash content. In addition, an increase in roughness, loading strain indicated increase of SLAs stiffness, especially as fly ash content increases. The elastic moduli obtained from unconfined compression generally showed less elastic moduli than those obtained from analytical and ABAQUS 3D predictions. This may be caused by possible existence of pre-failure surface in specimen and the directly interaction between HCFA particles. Recommendations for the future work include laboratory measurements of SLAs moduli and FEM modeling that considers various sizes and random distribution of HCFA particles in SLAs.

  7. Anomalous magneto-elastic and charge doping effects in thallium-doped BaFe2As2

    DOE PAGES

    Sefat, Athena S.; Li, Li; Cao, Huibo B.; ...

    2016-02-12

    Within the BaFe2As2 crystal lattice, we partially substitute thallium for barium and report the effects of interlayer coupling in Ba1-xTlxFe2As2 crystals. We demonstrate the unusual effects of magneto-elastic coupling and charge doping in this iron-arsenide material, whereby Néel temperature rises with small x, and then falls with additional x. Specifically, we find that Néel and structural transitions in BaFe2As2 (TN = Ts = 133 K) increase for x = 0.05 (TN = 138 K, Ts = 140 K) from magnetization, heat capacity, resistivity, and neutron diffraction measurements. Evidence from single crystal X-ray diffraction and first principles calculations attributes the stronger magnetism in x = 0.05 to magneto-elastic coupling related to the shorter intraplanar Fe-Fe bondmore » distance. With further thallium substitution, the transition temperatures decrease for x = 0.09 (TN = Ts = 131 K), and this is due to charge doping. Finally, we illustrate that small changes related to 3d transition-metal state can have profound effects on magnetism.« less

  8. Anomalous magneto-elastic and charge doping effects in thallium-doped BaFe2As2

    PubMed Central

    Sefat, Athena S.; Li, Li; Cao, Huibo B.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian; Custelcean, Radu; Parker, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Within the BaFe2As2 crystal lattice, we partially substitute thallium for barium and report the effects of interlayer coupling in Ba1-xTlxFe2As2 crystals. We demonstrate the unusual effects of magneto-elastic coupling and charge doping in this iron-arsenide material, whereby Néel temperature rises with small x, and then falls with additional x. Specifically, we find that Néel and structural transitions in BaFe2As2 (TN = Ts = 133 K) increase for x = 0.05 (TN = 138 K, Ts = 140 K) from magnetization, heat capacity, resistivity, and neutron diffraction measurements. Evidence from single crystal X-ray diffraction and first principles calculations attributes the stronger magnetism in x = 0.05 to magneto-elastic coupling related to the shorter intraplanar Fe-Fe bond distance. With further thallium substitution, the transition temperatures decrease for x = 0.09 (TN = Ts = 131 K), and this is due to charge doping. We illustrate that small changes related to 3d transition-metal state can have profound effects on magnetism. PMID:26867821

  9. Elastic Behavior of Y-1-2-3/SILVER Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, S.; Reddy, R. Ravinder; Reddy, P. Venugopal; Mulay, V. N.

    A series of Y-1-2-3/Ag high Tc superconducting composites have been prepared using the sol-gel method by sintering at three different sintering temperatures, viz. 910°C, 945°C, and 975°C. After the usual characterization by XRD, electrical resistance, bulk density, and porosity measurements, the longitudinal (V1) and shear wave (Vs) velocities were measured by the pulse transmission technique. Using the experimental data, several elasticity parameters such as Young's modulus (E), rigidity modulus (G), etc. were evaluated. The variation of elastic constants with dopant concentration has been explained in terms of the binding forces between various atoms of the superconductor. A linear relationship between the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) and the Debye temperature (θD) has also been obtained.

  10. Anomalous brain functional connectivity contributing to poor adaptive behavior in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Jesus; del Hoyo, Laura; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; de Sola, Susana; Macià, Dídac; Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard; Amor, Marta; Deus, Joan; Rodríguez, Joan; Farré, Magí; Dierssen, Mara; de la Torre, Rafael

    2015-03-01

    Research in Down syndrome has substantially progressed in the understanding of the effect of gene overexpression at the molecular level, but there is a paucity of information on the ultimate consequences on overall brain functional organization. We have assessed the brain functional status in Down syndrome using functional connectivity MRI. Resting-state whole-brain connectivity degree maps were generated in 20 Down syndrome individuals and 20 control subjects to identify sites showing anomalous synchrony with other areas. A subsequent region-of-interest mapping served to detail the anomalies and to assess their potential contribution to poor adaptive behavior. Down syndrome individuals showed higher regional connectivity in a ventral brain system involving the amygdala/anterior temporal region and the ventral aspect of both the anterior cingulate and frontal cortices. By contrast, lower functional connectivity was identified in dorsal executive networks involving dorsal prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices and posterior insula. Both functional connectivity increases and decreases contributed to account for patient scoring on adaptive behavior related to communication skills. The data overall suggest a distinctive functional organization with system-specific anomalies associated with reduced adaptive efficiency. Opposite effects were identified on distinct frontal and anterior temporal structures and relative sparing of posterior brain areas, which is generally consistent with Down syndrome cognitive profile. Relevantly, measurable connectivity changes, as a marker of the brain functional anomaly, could have a role in the development of therapeutic strategies addressed to improve the quality of life in Down syndrome individuals.

  11. Elastic properties of FeSi

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, A. E.; Krasnorussky, V. N.; Stishov, S. M.

    2010-09-15

    Measurements of the sound velocities in a single crystal of FeSi were performed in the temperature range 4-300 K. Elastic constants C{sub 11} and C{sub 44} deviate from a quasiharmonic behavior at high temperature; on the other hand, elastic constants C{sub 12} increases anomalously in the entire temperature range, indicating a change in the electron structure of this material.

  12. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm-1 in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si4+ ions by Al3+ and Na+ ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties.

  13. Bistable Nonvolatile Elastic-Membrane Memcapacitor Exhibiting a Chaotic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Rincon, Julian; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2011-06-01

    We suggest a realization of a bistable non-volatile memory capacitor (memcapacitor). Its design utilizes a strained elastic membrane as a plate of a parallel-plate capacitor. The applied stress generates low and high capacitance configurations of the system. We demonstrate that a voltage pulse of an appropriate amplitude can be used to reliably switch the memcapacitor into the desired capacitance state. Moreover, charged-voltage and capacitance-voltage curves of such a system demonstrate hysteresis and transition into a chaotic regime in a certain range of ac voltage amplitudes and frequencies. Membrane memcapacitor connected to a voltage source comprises a single element nonautonomous chaotic circuit.

  14. Fractional and fractal dynamics approach to anomalous diffusion in porous media: application to landslide behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Bagnoli, Franco

    2016-04-01

    In the past three decades, fractional and fractal calculus (that is, calculus of derivatives and integral of any arbitrary real or complex order) appeared to be an important tool for its applications in many fields of science and engineering. This theory allows to face, analytically and/or numerically, fractional differential equations and fractional partial differential equations. In particular, one of the several applications deals with anomalous diffusion processes. The latter phenomena can be clearly described from the statistical viewpoint. Indeed, in various complex systems, the diffusion processes usually no longer follow Gaussian statistics, and thus Fick's second law fails to describe the related transport behavior. In particular, one observes deviations from the linear time dependence of the mean squared displacement ⟨x2(t)⟩ ∝ t, (1) which is characteristic of Brownian motion, i.e., a direct consequence of the central limit theorem and the Markovian nature of the underlying stochastic process [1-17]. Instead, anomalous diffusion is found in a wide diversity of systems and its feature is the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement over time. Especially the power-law pattern, with exponent γ different from 1 ⟨ ⟩ x2(t) ∝ tγ, (2) characterizes many systems [18, 19], but a variety of other rules, such as a logarithmic time dependence, exist [20]. The anomalous diffusion, as expressed in Eq. (2) is connected with the breakdown of the central limit theorem, caused by either broad distributions or long-range correlations, e.g., the extreme statistics and the power law distributions, typical of the self-organized criticality [42, 43]. Instead, anomalous diffusion rests on the validity of the Levy-Gnedenko generalized central limit theorem [21-23]. Particularly, broad spatial jumps or waiting time distributions lead to non-Gaussian distribution and non-Markovian time evolution of the system. Anomalous diffusion has been known since

  15. Heterogeneous structure of poly(vinyl chloride) as the origin of anomalous dynamical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbe, A.; Moral, A.; Alegria, A.; Colmenero, J.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Richter, D.; Farago, B.; Frick, B.

    2002-07-01

    We have investigated the thermal evolution of the structure and the dynamics of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) in a wide temperature range. Corroborating earlier findings, small angle neutron scattering revealed the presence of structural heterogeneities. On the other hand, the single chain form factor corresponds to that of Gaussian chains. Gradually with increasing temperature the system becomes homogeneous. A simple description of the heterogeneities in terms of microcrystallites is forwarded. The dynamical behavior of PVC has been investigated combining broadband dielectric spectroscopy (DS) with coherent and incoherent neutron scattering. In a wide temperature range broadband DS facilitated a precise determination of the dynamic response related to the segmental relaxation. Close to the glass transition temperature the line shape strongly deviates from the usual Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts functional form of common glassforming systems. Moreover, the characteristic relaxation time observed by incoherent scattering displays an anomalous dependence on momentum transfer indicating the possible existence of heterogeneities in the sample. Based on the structural and dynamical results, a model is proposed, that considers the coexistence of regions with different dynamical properties leading to a distribution of characteristic relaxation times. The model accounts for the experimental observations, assuming for all regions the same functional form for the alpha-relaxation. It may be univocally determined from the coherent scattering data at the first static structure peak. The distribution of relaxation times found is compatible with the distribution of only one variable, the glass transition temperature.

  16. What kind of noise is brain noise: anomalous scaling behavior of the resting brain activity fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Fraiman, Daniel; Chialvo, Dante R.

    2012-01-01

    The study of spontaneous fluctuations of brain activity, often referred as brain noise, is getting increasing attention in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Despite important efforts, much of the statistical properties of such fluctuations remain largely unknown. This work scrutinizes these fluctuations looking at specific statistical properties which are relevant to clarify its dynamical origins. Here, three statistical features which clearly differentiate brain data from naive expectations for random processes are uncovered: First, the variance of the fMRI mean signal as a function of the number of averaged voxels remains constant across a wide range of observed clusters sizes. Second, the anomalous behavior of the variance is originated by bursts of synchronized activity across regions, regardless of their widely different sizes. Finally, the correlation length (i.e., the length at which the correlation strength between two regions vanishes) as well as mutual information diverges with the cluster's size considered, such that arbitrarily large clusters exhibit the same collective dynamics than smaller ones. These three properties are known to be exclusive of complex systems exhibiting critical dynamics, where the spatio-temporal dynamics show these peculiar type of fluctuations. Thus, these findings are fully consistent with previous reports of brain critical dynamics, and are relevant for the interpretation of the role of fluctuations and variability in brain function in health and disease. PMID:22934058

  17. Core-softened system with attraction: trajectory dependence of anomalous behavior.

    PubMed

    Fomin, Yu D; Tsiok, E N; Ryzhov, V N

    2011-09-28

    In the present article we carry out a molecular dynamics study of the core-softened system and show that the existence of the water-like anomalies in this system depends on the trajectory in P-ρ-T space along which the behavior of the system is studied. For example, diffusion and structural anomalies are visible along isotherms as a function of density, but disappears along the isochores and isobars as a function of temperature. On the other hand, the diffusion anomaly may be seen along adiabats as a function of temperature, density, and pressure. It should be noted that it may be no signature of a particular anomaly along a particular trajectory, but the anomalous region for that particular anomaly can be defined when all possible trajectories in the same space are examined (for example, signature of diffusion anomaly is evident through the crossing of different isochors. However, there is no signature of diffusion anomaly along a particular isochor). We also analyze the applicability of the Rosenfeld entropy scaling relations to this system in the regions with the water-like anomalies. It is shown that the validity of the Rosenfeld scaling relation for the diffusion coefficient also depends on the trajectory in the P-ρ-T space along which the kinetic coefficients and the excess entropy are calculated.

  18. Core-softened system with attraction: Trajectory dependence of anomalous behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Yu. D.; Tsiok, E. N.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2011-09-01

    In the present article we carry out a molecular dynamics study of the core-softened system and show that the existence of the water-like anomalies in this system depends on the trajectory in P-ρ-T space along which the behavior of the system is studied. For example, diffusion and structural anomalies are visible along isotherms as a function of density, but disappears along the isochores and isobars as a function of temperature. On the other hand, the diffusion anomaly may be seen along adiabats as a function of temperature, density, and pressure. It should be noted that it may be no signature of a particular anomaly along a particular trajectory, but the anomalous region for that particular anomaly can be defined when all possible trajectories in the same space are examined (for example, signature of diffusion anomaly is evident through the crossing of different isochors. However, there is no signature of diffusion anomaly along a particular isochor). We also analyze the applicability of the Rosenfeld entropy scaling relations to this system in the regions with the water-like anomalies. It is shown that the validity of the Rosenfeld scaling relation for the diffusion coefficient also depends on the trajectory in the P-ρ-T space along which the kinetic coefficients and the excess entropy are calculated.

  19. The anomalous behavior of the Zeeman anticrossing spectra of à 1Au acetylene: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, George; Sherrill, C. David; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1996-02-01

    P. Dupré, R. Jost, M. Lombardi, P. G. Green, E. Abramson, and R. W. Field have observed anomalous behavior of the anticrossing density in the Zeeman anticrossing (ZAC) spectra of gas phase à 1Au acetylene in the 42 200 to 45 300 cm-1 energy range. To best explain this result, they hypothesize a large singlet-triplet coupling due to the existence of a linear isomerization barrier connecting a triplet-excited cis- and trans-acetylene in the vicinity of the studied energy range (˜45 500 cm-1). Theoretically such a linear stationary point, however, must have two different degenerate bending vibrational frequencies which are either imaginary or exactly zero. Neither case has yet been experimentally detected. Here, we have studied the two lowest-lying linear triplet-excited-state stationary points of acetylene, 3Σ+u and 3Δu, to see if they fit Dupré et al.'s hypothesis. We have completed geometry optimization and harmonic vibrational frequency analysis using complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave functions as well as determined energy points at those geometries using the second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) method. Harmonic vibrational analyses of both stationary points reveal two different doubly degenerate vibrational modes with imaginary vibrational frequencies (or negative force constants) indicating that they are indeed saddle points with a Hessian index of four. At the DZP SOCI//CASSCF level of theory with zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) correction, the 3Σ+u stationary point lies 35 840 cm-1 above the ground state of acetylene. This is much too low in energy to contribute to the ZAC spectral anomaly. At the same level of theory with ZPVE correction, the 3Δu stationary point lies 44 940 cm-1 above the ground state consistent with Dupré et al.'s hypothesis. Several solutions to the anomalous ZAC spectra are discussed. We propose that the anomaly may also be due to coupling with a nearly linear structure on the T3 surface of

  20. Linear elasticity and phase behavior of block copolymer melts by self consistent field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Christopher Austin

    Self Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) is a well established theory for describing the thermodynamics of block copolymer melts and blends. Although the theory is approximate, it has been quite successful in describing the phase behavior of diblock copolymers. We have applied SCFT to study the linear elastic behavior and the phase behavior of block copolymer melts. First, we calculate the linear elastic response of block copolymer melts ordered on a cubic lattice, with either body-centered or gyroid symmetry. We compare our results to experiments. A large, low-frequency plateau in the elastic storage modulus, corresponding to approximately 0.2kT per polymer chain, has been experimentally observed. By calculating the free energy of block copolymer melts on deformed lattices, we find that SOFT correctly predicts the elastic behavior of these three-dimensionally-ordered structures. We also investigate the phase behavior of triblock copolymer melts. Recent experimental work has identified a new, non-cubic, three-dimensional network phase, termed the O70 phase, in ABC triblock copolymers. We investigate the phase behavior of ABC triblock copolymer melts by calculating the free energy of several candidate phases, including the O70 phase. We find that O 70 is an equilibrium structure in triblock copolymer melts and that the SCFT and experimentally observed phase boundaries agree qualitatively. We also find that O70 is an equilibrium phase in diblock copolymer melts.

  1. The thermodynamical response functions and the origin of the anomalous behavior of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasic, Cirino; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    The density maximum of water dominates the thermodynamics of the system under ambient conditions, is strongly P-dependent, and disappears at a crossover pressure P(cross) approximately 1.8 kbar. We study this variable across a wide area of the T-P phase diagram. We consider old and new data of both the isothermal compressibility K(T)(T, P), the pressure constant specific heat C(P)(T) and the coefficient of thermal expansion alpha(P) (T, P). We observe that K(T)(T) shows a minimum at T* approximately 315 +/- 5 K for all of the studied pressures, whereas, at the same temperature, C(P)(T) has the minimal variation as a function of P in the interval 1 bar-4 kbar. We find the behavior of alpha(P) also to be surprising: all the alpha(P)(T) curves measured at different P cross at T*. The experimental data show a "singular and universal expansivity point" at T* approximately 315 K and alpha(P)(T*) = 0.44 10(-3) K(-1). Unlike other water singularities, we find this temperature to be thermodynamically consistent in the relationship connecting the three response functions. By considering also the P-T behavior of the self-diffusion coefficient D(S) and of the NMR proton chemical shift delta we have the information that at T* the water local order points out, with decreasing T, the crossover from a normal fluid to the anomalous and complex liquid characterized by the many anomalies.

  2. Thermo-elastic behavior of deformed woven fabric composites at elevated temperatures: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Vu-Khanh, T.; Liu, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effects of temperature on the thermo-elastic properties of woven fabric composites. The thermo-mechanical behavior of woven fabric composites is characterized by a laminate composed of four fictional unidirectional plies, called the sub-plies model. The model allows determination of the thermo-elastic properties of deformed fabric composites (non-orthogonal structure) and direct use of layered shell elements in finite element codes. A special procedure is also proposed to measure the fiber undulation effect and to predict the on-axis thermo-elastic coefficients of the equivalent constituent plies. The thermo-elastic behavior at elevated temperature was investigated on graphite/epoxy fabric composites. Experimental measurements were carried out from 23 C to 177 C. The results revealed that the equivalent thermal expansion coefficients of the sub-plies remain almost constant over a wide range of temperature. However, the equivalent elastic moduli and Poison`s ratio of the sub-plies vary nonlinearly with temperature. Semiempirical equations based on the experimental data were also developed to predict the equivalent on-axis thermo-elastic properties of the fictional constituent plies in the sub-plies model as a function of temperature.

  3. SmartFoams with magneto-sensitive elastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, Luigi; D'Auria, Marco; Davino, Daniele; Visone, Ciro; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Polymeric foams with embedded magnetic particles can be considered as a new class of lightweight systems that could lead to relevant industrial applications both for their enhanced directional (anisotropic) mechanical properties and for their sensitivity to magnetic field that can be used to actively control their elastic modulus. A new polyurethane (PU)/magnetosensitive particles composite foam (SmartFoam) was prepared by applying a magnetic field during its in situ polymerization/foaming process. A chain-like structure of magneto-sensitive particles was induced along the magnetic field lines, in turn controlling the degree of both structural anisotropy and functional properties without affecting the foam cellular morphology. The anisotropic distribution of magnetic particles in the SmartFoam imparted the capability to real-time control its structural properties under working conditions.

  4. Experimental Evidence of Truly Elastic Behavior of Artificial Sandstone Inside the Cementation Yield Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trads, N.; Lade, P. V.

    2014-03-01

    Hollow cylinder specimens of cemented sand, i.e., artificial sandstone, were produced and tested by applying normal stresses and shear stresses such as to form closed stress loops to investigate the elastic behavior of the artificial sandstone. The entire process of fabrication of the hollow cylinder specimens, measurement techniques, measurements and analyses are presented to show that the artificial sandstone can be characterized as an elastic material inside the initial cementation yield surface. By applying closed stress loops in which the points of initiation of loading and the final points are identical, it has been shown that the artificially cemented sandstone behaves as a truly elastic material inside the initial cementation yield surface, because no residual energy was generated or dissipated. Furthermore, the isotropic elastic parameters have been determined for the artificially cemented sandstone.

  5. Nonlinear coda wave analysis of hysteretic elastic behavior in strongly scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouarabi, M. Ait; Boubenider, F.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Scalerandi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Strongly scattering elastic media, such as consolidated granular materials, respond to ultrasonic pulse excitations with a long response signal with peculiar properties. The portion of the signal at late times, termed coda, is due to multiple scattering. It contains information about the elastic properties of the material, and it has been proven to be very sensitive to small variations in the modulus. Here we propose a technique based on a nonlinear analysis of the coda of a signal, which might be applied to quantify the nonlinear elastic response in consolidated granular media exhibiting a hysteretic elastic behavior. The method proposed allows for an intrinsic definition of the reference signal which is normally needed for applying coda-based methods.

  6. Effects of elastic support on the dynamic behaviors of the wind turbine drive train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xibin; Zhou, Tianfeng; Xie, Lijing; Jiao, Li; Liu, Zhibing; Liang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Pei

    2017-03-01

    The reliability and service life of wind turbines are influenced by the complex loading applied on the hub, especially amidst a poor external wind environment. A three-point elastic support, which includes the main bearing and two torque arms, was considered in this study. Based on the flexibilities of the planet carrier and the housing, a coupled dynamic model was developed for a wind turbine drive train. Then, the dynamic behaviors of the drive train for different elastic support parameters were computed and analyzed. Frequency response functions were used to examine how different elastic support parameters influence the dynamic behaviors of the drive train. Results showed that the elastic support parameters considerably influenced the dynamic behaviors of the wind turbine drive train. A large support stiffness of the torque arms decreased the dynamic response of the planet carrier and the main bearing, whereas a large support stiffness of the main bearing decreased the dynamic response of planet carrier while increasing that of the main bearing. The findings of this study provide the foundation for optimizing the elastic support stiffness of the wind turbine drive train.

  7. Anomalous density and elastic properties of basalt at high pressure: Reevaluating of the effect of melt fraction on seismic velocity in the Earth's crust and upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alisha N.; Lesher, Charles E.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Wang, Yanbin

    2016-06-01

    Independent measurements of the volumetric and elastic properties of Columbia River basalt glass were made up to 5.5 GPa by high-pressure X-ray microtomography and GHz-ultrasonic interferometry, respectively. The Columbia River basalt displays P and S wave velocity minima at 4.5 and 5 GPa, respectively, violating Birch's law. These data constrain the pressure dependence of the density and elastic moduli at high pressure, which cannot be modeled through usual equations of state nor determined by stepwise integrating the bulk sound velocity as is common practice. We propose a systematic variation in compression behavior of silicate glasses that is dependent on the degree of polymerization and arises from the flexibility of the aluminosilicate network. This behavior likely persists into the liquid state for basaltic melts resulting in weak pressure dependence for P wave velocities perhaps to depths of the transition zone. Modeling the effect of partial melt on P wave velocity reductions suggests that melt fraction determined by seismic velocity variations may be significantly overestimated in the crust and upper mantle.

  8. Petalite under pressure: Elastic behavior and phase stability

    DOE PAGES

    Ross, Nancy L.; Zhao, Jing; Slebodnick, Carla; ...

    2015-04-01

    The lithium aluminosilicate mineral petalite (LiAlSi4O10) has been studied using high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction (HP-XRD) up to 5 GPa. Petalite undergoes two pressure-induced first-order phase transitions, never reported in the literature, at ca. 1.5 and 2.5 GPa. The first of these transforms the low-pressure α-phase of petalite (P2/c) to an intermediate β-phase that then fully converts to the high-pressure β-phase at ca. 2.5 GPa. The α→β transition is isomorphic and is associated with a commensurate modulation that triples the unit cell volume. Analysis of the HP-XRD data show that although the fundamental features of the petalite structure are retained throughmore » this transition, there are subtle alterations in the internal structure of the silicate double-layers in the β-phase relative to the α-phase. Measurement of the unit cell parameters of petalite as a function of pressure, and fitting of the data with 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equations of state, has provided revised elastic constants for petalite. The bulk moduli of the α and β-phases are 49(1) and 35(3) GPa, respectively. These values indicate that the compressibility of the- phase of petalite lies between the alkali feldpsars and alkali feldspathoids, whereas the β-phase has a compressibility more comparable with layered silicates. Structure analysis has shown that the compression of the -phase is facilitated by the rigid body movement of the Si2O7 units from which the silicate double-layers are constructed.« less

  9. Petalite under pressure: Elastic behavior and phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Nancy L.; Zhao, Jing; Slebodnick, Carla; Spencer, Elinor C.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.

    2015-04-01

    The lithium aluminosilicate mineral petalite (LiAlSi4O10) has been studied using high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction (HP-XRD) up to 5 GPa. Petalite undergoes two pressure-induced first-order phase transitions, never reported in the literature, at ca. 1.5 and 2.5 GPa. The first of these transforms the low-pressure α-phase of petalite (P2/c) to an intermediate β-phase that then fully converts to the high-pressure β-phase at ca. 2.5 GPa. The α→β transition is isomorphic and is associated with a commensurate modulation that triples the unit cell volume. Analysis of the HP-XRD data show that although the fundamental features of the petalite structure are retained through this transition, there are subtle alterations in the internal structure of the silicate double-layers in the β-phase relative to the α-phase. Measurement of the unit cell parameters of petalite as a function of pressure, and fitting of the data with 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equations of state, has provided revised elastic constants for petalite. The bulk moduli of the α and β-phases are 49(1) and 35(3) GPa, respectively. These values indicate that the compressibility of the- phase of petalite lies between the alkali feldpsars and alkali feldspathoids, whereas the β-phase has a compressibility more comparable with layered silicates. Structure analysis has shown that the compression of the -phase is facilitated by the rigid body movement of the Si2O7 units from which the silicate double-layers are constructed.

  10. Deformation partitioning provides insight into elastic, plastic, and viscous contributions to bone material behavior.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, V L

    2009-08-01

    The relative contributions of elastic, plastic, and viscous material behavior are poorly described by the separate extraction and analysis of the plane strain modulus, E('), the contact hardness, H(c) (a hybrid parameter encompassing both elastic and plastic behavior), and various viscoelastic material constants. A multiple element mechanical model enables the partitioning of a single indentation response into its fundamental elastic, plastic, and viscous deformation components. The objective of this study was to apply deformation partitioning to explore the role of hydration, tissue type, and degree of mineralization in bone and calcified cartilage. Wet, ethanol-dehydrated, and PMMA-embedded equine cortical bone samples and PMMA-embedded human femoral head tissues were analyzed for contributions of elastic, plastic and viscous deformation to the overall nanoindentation response at each site. While the alteration of hydration state had little effect on any measure of deformation, unembedded tissues demonstrated significantly greater measures of resistance to plastic deformation than PMMA-embedded tissues. The PMMA appeared to mechanically stabilize the tissues and prevent extensive permanent deformation within the bone material. Increasing mineral volume fraction correlated with positive changes in E('), H(c), and resistance to plastic deformation, H; however, the partitioned deformation components were generally unaffected by mineralization. The contribution of viscous deformation was minimal and may only play a significant role in poorly mineralized tissues. Deformation partitioning enables a detailed interpretation of the elastic, plastic, and viscous contributions to the nanomechanical behavior of mineralized tissues that is not possible when examining modulus and contact hardness alone. Varying experimental or biological factors, such as hydration or mineralization level, enables the understanding of potential mechanisms for specific mechanical behavior

  11. Analysis of nonlinear elastic behavior in miniature pneumatic artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Erica G.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) are well known for their excellent actuator characteristics, including high specific work, specific power, and power density. Recent research has focused on miniaturizing this pneumatic actuator technology in order to develop PAMs for use in small-scale mechanical systems, such as those found in robotic or aerospace applications. The first step in implementing these miniature PAMs was to design and characterize the actuator. To that end, this study presents the manufacturing process, experimental characterization, and analytical modeling of PAMs with millimeter-scale diameters. A fabrication method was developed to consistently produce low-cost, high performance, miniature PAMs using commercially available materials. The quasi-static behavior of these PAMs was determined through experimentation on a single actuator with an active length of 39.16 mm (1.54 in) and a diameter of 4.13 mm (0.1625 in). Testing revealed the PAM’s full evolution of force with displacement for operating pressures ranging from 207 to 552 kPa (30-80 psi in 10 psi increments), as well as the blocked force and free contraction at each pressure. Three key nonlinear phenomena were observed: nonlinear PAM stiffness, hysteresis of the force versus displacement response for a given pressure, and a pressure deadband. To address the analysis of the nonlinear response of these miniature PAMs, a nonlinear stress versus strain model, a hysteresis model, and a pressure bias are introduced into a previously developed force balance analysis. Parameters of these nonlinear model refinements are identified from the measured force versus displacement data. This improved nonlinear force balance model is shown to capture the full actuation behavior of the miniature PAMs at each operating pressure and reconstruct miniature PAM response with much more accuracy than previously possible.

  12. Postbuckling behaviors of nanorods including the effects of nonlocal elasticity theory and surface stress

    SciTech Connect

    Thongyothee, Chawis Chucheepsakul, Somchai

    2013-12-28

    This paper is concerned with postbuckling behaviors of nanorods subjected to an end concentrated load. One end of the nanorod is clamped while the other end is fixed to a support that can slide in the slot. The governing equation is developed from static equilibrium and geometrical conditions by using the exact curvature corresponding to the elastica theory. The nonlocal elasticity, the effect of surface stress, and their combined effects are taken into account in Euler–Bernoulli beam theory. Differential equations in this problem can be solved numerically by using the shooting-optimization technique for the postbuckling loads and the buckled configurations. The results show that nanorods with the nonlocal elasticity effect undergo increasingly large deformation while the effect of surface stress in combination with nonlocal elasticity decreases the deflection of nanorods under the same postbuckling load.

  13. Anomalous Behavior Observed upon Annealing and Photodetachment of Anionic Copper Carbonyl Clusters in Argon Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ryan M.; Moore, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Using matrix isolation FTIR, we have observed the formation of anionic copper carbonyl complexes [Cu(CO)n]- (n=1-3) following co-deposition of Cu- and counter-cations (Ar+ or Kr+) into argon matrices doped with CO. When the deposition is carried out at 20 K, weak bands corresponding to the neutral copper carbonyl complexes Cu(CO)n (n=1-3) are also observed, and these grow in steadily as the matrix is annealed up to 30 K. This is in contrast to what is observed at 10 K (c.f. ISMS 2014 abstract #P631), where no appreciable neutral bands are observed, and indicates that some neutralization occurs during the formation of the complexes in the 20 K matrix. In addition, sharp peaks not previously observed grow in around the anionic bands upon annealing to 30 K; this is somewhat odd, since annealing typically simplifies the spectra of matrix samples as kinetically trapped metastable species relax to more stable forms. In this case, higher-resolution (0.125 wn) spectra reveal considerable new fine structure, with 5 and 20 peaks appearing in the regions of the mono- and tricarbonyl anions, respectively, each of which nominally has but a single IR-active CO-stretching mode. These new features are tentatively assigned (at least in part) to electric-field-induced splitting arising from long-range interactions with cationic species in the matrix. A second anomalous feature of these spectra is that, upon photodetachment, several new bands are observed in the region of the neutral copper carbonyl species. Upon annealing these bands then disappear, with concomitant growth of the expected neutral bands. This behavior raises the exciting possibility that these transient bands represent metastable "vertical detachment products", where the neutral species has been kinetically trapped by the matrix in the geometry of the anion. Evidence supporting this interpretation will be presented. Funding support from NSF CAREER Award CHE-0955637 is gratefully acknowledged Ryan M. Ludwig and David

  14. Nonlinear behavior of electric power transmission through an elastic wall by acoustic waves and piezoelectric transducers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zengtao; Yang, Jiashi; Hu, Yuantai

    2008-11-01

    Weakly nonlinear behavior of electric power transmission through an elastic wall by piezoelectric transducers and acoustic waves near resonance is studied based on the cubic theory of nonlinear electroelasticity. An approximate analytical solution is obtained. Output voltage is calculated and plotted. Basic nonlinear behaviors of the power transmission structure are examined. It is found that near nonlinear resonance the electrical input-output relation loses its linearity, becomes multi-valued, and experiences jumps due to large mechanical deformations. The behavior below and above resonance is qualitatively different and is qualitatively material dependent.

  15. Characterization and investigation of the anomalous behavior of the immersed-Bz diode during operation at 4 to 5 MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovang, D. C.; Bruner, N.; Johnston, M. D.; Madrid, E. A.; Maenchen, J. E.; Oliver, B. V.; Portillo, S.; Welch, D. R.

    2008-09-01

    The immersed-Bz diode is being developed as a high-brightness, flash x-ray radiography source at Sandia National Laboratories. This diode is a foil-less electron-beam diode with a long, thin, needlelike cathode which is inserted into the bore of a solenoid. The solenoidal magnetic field guides the electron beam emitted from the cathode to the anode while maintaining a small beam radius. The electron beam strikes a thin, high-atomic-number anode and produces forward-directed bremsstrahlung. In addition, electron beam heating of the anode produces surface plasmas allowing ion emission. Two different operating regimes for this diode have been identified: A nominal operating regime where the total diode current is characterized as classically bipolar with stable impedance [see D. C. Rovang et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 113107 (2007)] and an anomalous operating regime characterized by a rapid impedance collapse where the total diode current greatly exceeds the bipolar limit. The operating regimes are approximately separated by cathode diameters greater than 3mm for the nominal regime and less than 3mm for the anomalous impedance collapse regime. Results from a comprehensive series of experiments conducted at 4-5MV characterizing the transition from this nominal operating regime to the anomalous operating regime as the cathode diameter is reduced are presented. Results from experiments investigating the effects of anode-cathode gap, anode material, and cryogenic modification of the anode surface are also presented. Although these investigations were unsuccessful in completely mitigating the anomalous behavior, insight gained from these experiments has elucidated several key physics issues that are discussed.

  16. Influence of soft ferromagnetic substrate on magneto-elastic behavior in a superconducting coated conductor strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, An; Xue, Cun; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-11-01

    Ferromagnetic materials will affect not only the electromagnetic response but also the mechanical behaviors of coated conductors. The influence of soft ferromagnetic substrate on magneto-elastic behavior in a superconductor/ferromagnetic (SC/FM) bilayer exposed to a transverse magnetic field is investigated theoretically. The ferromagnetic substrate is regarded as ideal soft magnets with high permeability and small magnetic hysteresis. Due to the composite structure of SC/FM hybrids, magneto-elastic behavior will be subjected to combined effect of equivalent force and flexural moment. Analytical expressions for internal stress and strain components are derived by virtue of a two-dimensional elasticity analysis. It is worth pointing out that the y component of strain has much larger positive value during field ascent, which may result in the delamitation at the interface. Irreversible magnetostrictive behaviors are observed both along x direction and along y direction. For the thickness dependence of magnetostriction, the flexural moment dominates when the SC thickness is small while the equivalent force plays a critical role at higher SC thickness.

  17. Anharmonic behavior in the multisubunit protein apoferritin as revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Telling, Mark T F; Neylon, Cameron; Kilcoyne, Susan H; Arrighi, Valeria

    2008-09-04

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) has been used to study the deviation from Debye-law harmonic behavior in lyophilized and hydrated apoferritin, a naturally occurring, multisubunit protein. Whereas analysis of the measured mean squared displacement (msd) parameter reveals a hydration-dependent inflection above 240 K, characteristic of diffusive motion, a hydration-independent inflection is observed at 100 K. The mechanism responsible for this low-temperature anharmonic response is further investigated, via analysis of the elastic incoherent neutron scattering intensity, by applying models developed to describe side-group motion in glassy polymers. Our results suggest that the deviation from harmonic behavior is due to the onset of methyl group rotations which exhibit a broad distribution of activated processes ( E a,ave = 12.2 kJ.mol (-1), sigma = 5.0 kJ x mol (-1)). Our results are likened to those reported for other proteins.

  18. Quasi-static analysis of elastic behavior for some systems having higher fracture densities.

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.; Aydin, A.

    2009-10-15

    Elastic behavior of geomechanical systems with interacting (but not intersecting) fractures is treated using generalizations of the Backus and the Schoenberg-Muir methods for analyzing layered systems whose layers are intrinsically anisotropic due to locally aligned fractures. By permitting the axis of symmetry of the locally anisotropic compliance matrix for individual layers to differ from that of the layering direction, we derive analytical formulas for interacting fractured regions with arbitrary orientations to each other. This procedure provides a systematic tool for studying how contiguous, but not yet intersecting, fractured domains interact, and provides a direct (though approximate) means of predicting when and how such interactions lead to more dramatic weakening effects and ultimately to failure of these complicated systems. The method permits decomposition of the system elastic behavior into specific eigenmodes that can all be analyzed, and provides a better understanding about which of these specific modes are expected to be most important to the evolving failure process.

  19. Reasoning about anomalies: a study of the analytical process of detecting and identifying anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, Maria; Falkman, Göran; Ziemke, Tom; Kronhamn, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The goal of visual analytical tools is to support the analytical reasoning process, maximizing human perceptual, understanding and reasoning capabilities in complex and dynamic situations. Visual analytics software must be built upon an understanding of the reasoning process, since it must provide appropriate interactions that allow a true discourse with the information. In order to deepen our understanding of the human analytical process and guide developers in the creation of more efficient anomaly detection systems, this paper investigates how is the human analytical process of detecting and identifying anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data. The main focus of this work is to capture the entire analysis process that an analyst goes through, from the raw data to the detection and identification of anomalous behavior. Three different sources are used in this study: a literature survey of the science of analytical reasoning, requirements specified by experts from organizations with interest in port security and user field studies conducted in different marine surveillance control centers. Furthermore, this study elaborates on how to support the human analytical process using data mining, visualization and interaction methods. The contribution of this paper is twofold: (1) within visual analytics, contribute to the science of analytical reasoning with practical understanding of users tasks in order to develop a taxonomy of interactions that support the analytical reasoning process and (2) within anomaly detection, facilitate the design of future anomaly detector systems when fully automatic approaches are not viable and human participation is needed.

  20. Spatial distribution of filament elasticity determines the migratory behaviors of a cell

    PubMed Central

    Harn, Hans I-Chen; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Wang, Yang-Kao; Huang, Yi-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Cheng, Chao-Min; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Any cellular response leading to morphological changes is highly tuned to balance the force generated from structural reorganization, provided by actin cytoskeleton. Actin filaments serve as the backbone of intracellular force, and transduce external mechanical signal via focal adhesion complex into the cell. During migration, cells not only undergo molecular changes but also rapid mechanical modulation. Here we focus on determining, the role of spatial distribution of mechanical changes of actin filaments in epithelial, mesenchymal, fibrotic and cancer cells with non-migration, directional migration, and non-directional migration behaviors using the atomic force microscopy. We found 1) non-migratory cells only generated one type of filament elasticity, 2) cells generating spatially distributed two types of filament elasticity showed directional migration, and 3) pathologic cells that autonomously generated two types of filament elasticity without spatial distribution were actively migrating non-directionally. The demonstration of spatial regulation of filament elasticity of different cell types at the nano-scale highlights the coupling of cytoskeletal function with physical characters at the sub-cellular level, and provides new research directions for migration related disease. PMID:26919488

  1. Observation of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator to Anderson Insulator Quantum Phase Transition and its Scaling Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Zhao, Weiwei; Li, Jian; Jain, J. K.; Liu, Chaoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Chan, Moses H. W.

    2016-09-01

    Fundamental insight into the nature of the quantum phase transition from a superconductor to an insulator in two dimensions, or from one plateau to the next or to an insulator in the quantum Hall effect, has been revealed through the study of its scaling behavior. Here, we report on the experimental observation of a quantum phase transition from a quantum-anomalous-Hall insulator to an Anderson insulator in a magnetic topological insulator by tuning the chemical potential. Our experiment demonstrates the existence of scaling behavior from which we extract the critical exponent for this quantum phase transition. We expect that our work will motivate much further investigation of many properties of quantum phase transition in this new context.

  2. Anomalous magnetic behavior in nanocomposite materials of reduced graphene oxide-Ni/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kollu, Pratap E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Prathapani, Sateesh; Varaprasadarao, Eswara K.; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bahadur, D. E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Santosh, Chella; Grace, Andrews Nirmala E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in

    2014-08-04

    Magnetic Reduced Graphene Oxide-Nickel/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (RGO-Ni/NF) nanocomposite has been synthesized by one pot solvothermal method. Respective phase formations and their purities in the composite are confirmed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and X Ray Diffraction, respectively. For the RGO-Ni/NF composite material finite-size effects lead to the anomalous magnetic behavior, which is corroborated in temperature and field dependent magnetization curves. Here, we are reporting the behavior of higher magnetization values for Zero Field Cooled condition to that of Field Cooled for the RGO-Ni/NF nanocomposite. Also, the observed negative and positive moments in Hysteresis loops at relatively smaller applied fields (100 Oe and 200 Oe) are explained on the basis of surface spin disorder.

  3. Analytical modeling of elastic-plastic wave behavior near grain boundaries in crystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric; Greenfield, Scott; Luo, Shengnian; Swift, Damian; Peralta, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that changes in material properties across an interface will produce differences in the behavior of reflected and transmitted waves. This is seen frequently in planar impact experiments, and to a lesser extent, oblique impacts. In anisotropic elastic materials, wave behavior as a function of direction is usually accomplished with the aid of velocity surfaces, a graphical method for predicting wave scattering configurations. They have expanded this method to account for inelastic deformation due to crystal plasticity. The set of derived equations could not be put into a characteristic form, but instead led to an implicit problem. to overcome this difficulty an algorithm was developed to search the parameters space defined by a wave normal vector, particle velocity vector, and a wave speed. A solution was said to exist when a set from this parameter space satisfied the governing vector equation. Using this technique they can predict the anisotropic elastic-plastic velocity surfaces and grain boundary scattering configuration for crystalline materials undergoing deformation by slip. Specifically, they have calculated the configuration of scattered elastic-plastic waves in anisotropic NiAl for an incident compressional wave propagating along a <111> direction and contacting a 45 degree inclined grain boundary and found that large amplitude transmitted waves exist owing to the fact that the wave surface geometry forces it to propagate near the zero Schmid factor direction <100>.

  4. Random polycrystals of grains containing cracks: Model of quasistatic elastic behavior for fractured systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, James G.; Grechka, Vladimir

    2006-12-01

    A model study on fractured systems was performed using a concept that treats isotropic cracked systems as ensembles of cracked grains by analogy to isotropic polycrystalline elastic media. The approach has two advantages: (a) Averaging performed is ensemble averaging, thus avoiding the criticism legitimately leveled at most effective medium theories of quasistatic elastic behavior for cracked media based on volume concentrations of inclusions. Since crack effects are largely independent of the volume they occupy in the composite, such a non-volume-based method offers an appealingly simple modeling alternative. (b) The second advantage is that both polycrystals and fractured media are stiffer than might otherwise be expected, due to natural bridging effects of the strong components. These same effects have also often been interpreted as crack-crack screening in high-crack-density fractured media, but there is no inherent conflict between these two interpretations of this phenomenon. Results of the study are somewhat mixed. The spread in elastic constants observed in a set of numerical experiments is found to be very comparable to the spread in values contained between the Reuss and Voigt bounds for the polycrystal model. Unfortunately, computed Hashin-Shtrikman bounds are much too tight to be in agreement with the numerical data, showing that polycrystals of cracked grains tend to violate some implicit assumptions of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding approach. However, the self-consistent estimates obtained for the random polycrystal model are nevertheless very good estimators of the observed average behavior.

  5. Random polycrystals of grains containing cracks: Model ofquasistatic elastic behavior for fractured systems

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.; Grechka, Vladimir

    2006-07-08

    A model study on fractured systems was performed using aconcept that treats isotropic cracked systems as ensembles of crackedgrains by analogy to isotropic polycrystalline elastic media. Theapproach has two advantages: (a) Averaging performed is ensembleaveraging, thus avoiding the criticism legitimately leveled at mosteffective medium theories of quasistatic elastic behavior for crackedmedia based on volume concentrations of inclusions. Since crack effectsare largely independent of the volume they occupy in the composite, sucha non-volume-based method offers an appealingly simple modelingalternative. (b) The second advantage is that both polycrystals andfractured media are stiffer than might otherwise be expected, due tonatural bridging effects of the strong components. These same effectshave also often been interpreted as crack-crack screening inhigh-crack-density fractured media, but there is no inherent conflictbetween these two interpretations of this phenomenon. Results of thestudy are somewhat mixed. The spread in elastic constants observed in aset of numerical experiments is found to be very comparable to the spreadin values contained between the Reuss and Voigt bounds for thepolycrystal model. However, computed Hashin-Shtrikman bounds are much tootight to be in agreement with the numerical data, showing thatpolycrystals of cracked grains tend to violate some implicit assumptionsof the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding approach. However, the self-consistentestimates obtained for the random polycrystal model are nevertheless verygood estimators of the observed average behavior.

  6. Anomalous scattering behavior of selected impact parabola features: Magellan cycle-to-cycle comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Saunders, R. Stephen; Stofan, E. R.; Kirk, R. L.; Schaber, G. G.; Soderblom, L. A.; Ford, P. G.; Pettengill, G. H.; Campbell, D. B.; Stacy, N. J. S.

    1992-01-01

    Magellan observations indicate that many venusian impact craters have associated surfaces, typically lower in backscatter and emissivity than the surroundings, that extend up to hundreds of kilometers to the west of craters, in parabolic planforms. During Magellan's second mapping cycle, a number of these parabolic features were imaged for a second time, under a different viewing geometry. In some cases, the SAR backscatter appearance of portions of the parabolic features was quite different in the two datasets. We present a description and preliminary interpretations of the anomalous appearance of these features as observed during Magellan's first and second mapping cycles.

  7. Constitutive acoustic-emission elastic-stress behavior of magnesium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Emerson, G. P.

    1977-01-01

    Repeated laoding and unloading of a magnesium alloy below the macroscopic yield stress result in continuous acoustic emissions which are generally repeatable for a given specimen and which are reproducible between different specimens having the same load history. An acoustic emission Bauschinger strain model is proposed to describe the unloading emission behavior. For the limited range of stress examined, loading and unloading stress delays of the order of 50 MN/sq m are observed, and they appear to be dependent upon the direction of loading, the stress rate, and the stress history. The stress delay is hypothesized to be the manifestation of an effective friction stress. The existence of acoustic emission elastic stress constitutive relations is concluded, which provides support for a previously proposed concept for the monitoring of elastic stresses by acoustic emission.

  8. Computer simulation of material behavior at the notch tip: Effect of microrotations on elastic energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, D. D.; Panin, S. V.; Maksimov, P. V.; Panin, V. E.; Babich, D. S.; Berto, F.

    2016-11-01

    The paper is devoted to detailed investigation of rotational deformation modes at the notch tip during shock loading. Using hybrid discrete-continuum approach of Excitable Cellular Automata the series of numerical experiments were conducted to simulate deformation behavior of ductile steel in the vicinities of U-, I- and V-notches. The detailed analysis of the force moment distribution at the notch tip allowed revealing the relationship between the rotational deformation modes at different scales. It was found that the elastic energy release is realized by means of the modulation of the magnitude and the sign of the force moment. The obtained results makes possible to optimize crystal structure for improvement of mechanical properties of the material in the way of elastic energy release by reversible microrotations.

  9. Elastic and Anelastic Behavior of TBCs Sprayed at High-Deposition Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valarezo, A.; Dwivedi, G.; Sampath, S.; Musalek, R.; Matejicek, J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatings sprayed at high-deposition rates often result in stiff, dense, and highly stressed coatings. The high deposition temperature at which the coatings are formed is responsible for these characteristics. In this paper, TBCs were sprayed at high-deposition rates, increasing the tensile quenching stresses beyond the threshold of crack opening during spraying. Dense structures were observed within a pass, in the presence of micro and macro defects specifically horizontal cracks within interpasses and vertical segmentation cracks. Mechanical properties, mainly the elastic and anelastic behavior of TBCs were significantly affected by the strain accommodation and friction occurring within intersplats and interpass interfaces. The strain tolerance obtained in as-sprayed conditions decreased as the microstructure and defects sintered during high-temperature heat cycles. The non-linearity degree decreased while the elastic modulus of the various coatings increased to a maximum value.

  10. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  11. Elastic behavior of porcine coronary artery tissue under uniaxial and equibiaxial tension.

    PubMed

    Lally, C; Reid, A J; Prendergast, P J

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the nonlinear anisotropic elastic behavior of healthy porcine coronary arteries under uniaxial and equibiaxial tension. Porcine coronary tissue was chosen for its availability and similarity to human arterial tissue. A biaxial test device previously used to test human femoral arterial tissue samples (Prendergast, P. J., C. Lally, S. Daly, A. J. Reid, T. C. Lee, D. Quinn, and F. Dolan. ASME J. Biomech. Eng., Vol. 125, pp. 692-699, 2003) was further developed to test porcine coronary tissue specimens. The device applies an equal force to the four sides of a square specimen and therefore creates a biaxial stretch that demonstrates the anisotropy of arterial tissue. The nonlinear elastic behavior was marked in both uniaxial and biaxial tests. The tissue demonstrated higher stiffness in the circumferential direction in four out of eight cases subjected to biaxial tension. Even though anisotropy is demonstrated it is proposed that an isotropic hyperelastic model may adequately represent the properties of an artery, provided that an axial stretch is applied to the vessel to simulate the in vivo longitudinal tethering on the vessel. Isotropic hyperelastic models based on the Mooney-Rivlin constitutive equation were derived from the test data by averaging the longitudinal and circumferential equibiaxial data. Three different hyperelastic models were established to represent the test specimens that exhibited a high stiffness, an average stiffness, and a low stiffness response; these three models allow the analyst to account for the variability in the arterial tissue mechanical properties. These models, which take account of the nonlinear elastic behavior of coronary tissue, may be implemented in finite element models and used to carry out preclinical tests of intravascular devices. The errors associated with the hyperelastic models when fitting to both the uniaxial and equibiaxial data for the low stiffness, average stiffness, and

  12. Effect of chain stiffness and entanglements on the elastic behavior of end-linked elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawe, Dhananjay M.; Cohen, Claude; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2005-07-01

    The effect of chain stiffness and entanglements on the elastic behavior and microscopic structure of cross-linked polymer networks was studied using Monte Carlo simulations. We investigated the behavior of entangled and entanglement-free networks at various degrees of chain stiffness and densities. Based on previous results that indicated that trapped entanglements prevent strain-induced order-disorder transitions in semiflexible chain networks, we prepared the entangled networks by end-linking the chains in very dilute conditions so as to minimize the extent of trapped entanglements. We also considered the entanglement-free case by using a "diamond" structure. We found that the presence of even a very small amount of trapped entanglements is enough to prevent a discontinuous strain-induced transition to an ordered phase. In these mildly entangled networks, a nematiclike order is eventually attained at high extensions but the elastic response remains continuous and the cross-links remain uniformly distributed through the simulation box. The entanglement-free diamond networks on the other hand show discontinuities in their stress-strain data. Networks at higher densities exhibit a more stable ordered phase and show an unusual staircaselike stress-strain curve. This is the result of a stepwise extension mechanism in which the chains form ordered domains that exclude the cross-links. Extension is achieved by increasing the number of these ordered domains in the strain direction. Cross-links aggregate in the spaces between these ordered domains and form periodic bands. Each vertical upturn in the stress-strain data corresponds to the existence of an integer number of ordered domains. This stepwise elastic behavior is found to be similar to that exhibited by some tough natural materials.

  13. A nonlocal elastic anisotropic shell model for microtubule buckling behaviors in cytoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanwen; An, Le

    2010-07-01

    The buckling behaviors of microtubules (MTs) in a living cell have been studied based on the nonlocal anisotropic shell theory and Stokes flow theory. The analytical expressions for the buckling load and the growth rate of the buckling are obtained and discussed. In addition, the pressure on MTs, resulting from cytosol motion, is derived on the basis of the Stokes flow theory. The influences of filament network elasticity and the shear modulus of MTs, especially the cytosol viscosity and MT small scale effects on MT buckling behaviors, are investigated. The analytical results show that the MT buckling growth rate increases with the MT small scale parameter, while decreases as the filament network elastic modulus, the MT shear modulus and cytoplasm viscosity increase. Although the cytosol viscosity has a significant influence on the value of the growth rate, it shows little effects on the range of the axial wave number of buckling as well as the critical axial wave number that corresponds to the maximal growth rate. Finally, the MT buckling growth rates have been calculated using the beam model, the isotropic shell model, and the anisotropic shell model. The results indicate that using the anisotropy shell theory to model the buckling behavior of MTs is necessary.

  14. Microstructure, elastic deformation behavior and mechanical properties of biomedical β-type titanium alloy thin-tube used for stents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuxing; Yu, Zhentao; Ong, Chun Yee Aaron; Kent, Damon; Wang, Gui

    2015-05-01

    Cold-deformability and mechanical compatibility of the biomedical β-type titanium alloy are the foremost considerations for their application in stents, because the lower ductility restricts the cold-forming of thin-tube and unsatisfactory mechanical performance causes a failed tissue repair. In this paper, β-type titanium alloy (Ti-25Nb-3Zr-3Mo-2Sn, wt%) thin-tube fabricated by routine cold rolling is reported for the first time, and its elastic behavior and mechanical properties are discussed for the various microstructures. The as cold-rolled tube exhibits nonlinear elastic behavior with large recoverable strain of 2.3%. After annealing and aging, a nonlinear elasticity, considered as the intermediate stage between "double yielding" and normal linear elasticity, is attributable to a moderate precipitation of α phase. Quantitive relationships are established between volume fraction of α phase (Vα) and elastic modulus, strength as well as maximal recoverable strain (εmax-R), where the εmax-R of above 2.0% corresponds to the Vα range of 3-10%. It is considered that the "mechanical" stabilization of the (α+β) microstructure is a possible elastic mechanism for explaining the nonlinear elastic behavior.

  15. Size-dependent anomalous dielectric behavior in La2O3: SiO2 nano-glass composite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, T. H.; Mukherjee, S.; Lin, Y. H.; Chou, C. C.; Yang, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    An intriguing anomalous dielectric behavior is observed in nanoparticle (NP) La2O3: SiO2 nano-glass composite system synthesized via sol-gel route at different calcination temperatures. Temperature dependent dielectric properties exhibit a notable dielectric broadening, indicating of diffuse phase transition with high ɛ', quite different from and much higher than pure bulk La2O3 and SiO2. We postulate such dielectric effect in the context of the oxygen vacancies of the rare earth oxide nano-glass composite, where lattice strain related with NPs and their size plays a vital role. Such a material might be treated as a potential candidate to solve the problem of devices miniaturization.

  16. Autoregressive processes with anomalous scaling behavior: applications to high-frequency variations of a stock market index.

    PubMed

    Dose, Christian; Porto, Markus; Roman, H Eduardo

    2003-06-01

    We employ autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity processes to model the probability distribution function (PDF) of high-frequency relative variations of the Standard & Poors 500 market index data, obtained at the time horizon of 1 min. The model reproduces quantitatively the shape of the PDF, characterized by a Lévy-type power-law decay around its center, followed by a crossover to a faster decay at the tails. Furthermore, it is able to reproduce accurately the anomalous decay of the central part of the PDF at larger time horizons and, by the introduction of a short-range memory, also the crossover behavior of the corresponding standard deviations and the time scale of the exponentially decaying autocorrelation function of returns displayed by the empirical data.

  17. Highly deformed band in [sup 136]Pm and the anomalous dynamical moment of inertia behavior in the [ital A][similar to]135 superdeformed region

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.A.; Petters, T.; Shick, J.; Archer, D.E.; Doering, J.; Holcomb, J.W.; Johns, G.D.; Johnson, T.D.; Tekyi-Mensah, O.N.; Tabor, S.L.; Womble, P.C.; Wood, V.A. ); Baktash, C.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Lee, I.Y. ); Charity, R.J.; Sarantites, D.G.; Wittmer, L.L. ); Simpson, J. )

    1993-02-01

    A highly deformed rotational band has been observed in the odd-odd nucleus [sup 136]Pm. This band sheds important new light on the anomalous behavior of the dynamical moments of inertia of rotational bands previously observed in the Ce-Nd-Sm [ital A][similar to]135 superdeformed region which has been a theoretical puzzle for several years.

  18. Aeroelastic Flutter Behavior of a Cantilever and Elastically Mounted Plate within a Nozzle-Diffuser Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Jet Propulsion Laboratory Collaboration; California Institute of Technology Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Aeroelastic flutter arises when the motion of a structure and its surrounding flowing fluid are coupled in a constructive manner, causing large amplitudes of vibration in the immersed solid. A cantilevered beam in axial flow within a nozzle-diffuser geometry exhibits interesting resonance behavior that presents good prospects for internal flow energy harvesting. Different modes can be excited as a function of throat velocity, nozzle geometry, fluid and cantilever material parameters. Similar behavior has been also observed in elastically mounted rigid plates, enabling new designs for such devices. This work explores the relationship between the aeroelastic flutter instability boundaries and relevant non-dimensional parameters via experiments, numerical, and stability analyses. Parameters explored consist of a non-dimensional stiffness, a non-dimensional mass, non-dimensional throat size, and Reynolds number. A map of the system response in this parameter space may serve as a guide to future work concerning possible electrical output and failure prediction in harvesting devices.

  19. Mechanical Behaviors and Elastic Parameters of Laminated Fabric URETEK3216LV Subjected to Uniaxial and Biaxial Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwen; Chen, Wujun; Wang, Mingyang; Ding, Yong; Zhou, Han; Zhao, Bing; Fan, Jin

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental study of the laminated fabric URETEK3216LV subjected to mono-uniaxial, uniaxial cyclic and biaxial cyclic loading was performed to expose the detailed mechanical behaviors and determine proper elastic parameters for the laminated fabrics under specific stress states. The elastic modulus-strain curves and elastic parameter response surfaces were used to reveal the mechanical behaviors, and a weighted average method of integrals was proposed to calculate the elastic parameters for different stress states. Results show that typical stress-strain curves consist of three distinct regions during loading: crimp region, nonlinear transition region and yarn extension region, which is consistent with those of the constitutive yarns. The elastic parameters and mechanical behaviors of the laminated fabric are stress-state specific, and they vary noticeably with the experimental protocols, stress ratios and stress levels. The proposed method is feasible to evaluate the elastic parameters no matter what stress states the materials are subjected to, and thus it may offer potential access to obtain accurate design and analysis of the airship structures under different loading conditions.

  20. Quantitative observations of the behavior of anomalous low altitude ClO in the Antarctic spring Stratosphere, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezafra, R. L.; Jaramillo, M.; Barrett, J.; Emmons, L.; Solomon, P.; Parrish, A.

    1988-01-01

    During the second National Ozone Expedition ground-based observations at McMurdo Station Antarctica were performed which resulted in a second season's measurement of abnormally large amounts of ClO in the Antarctic spring stratosphere. The original measurements of 1986, in which the presence of this anomalous layer was first discovered, were limited in low altitude recovery of the ClO mixing ratio profile by the restrictions of the spectral bandwidth (256 MHz) which was used to measure the pressure-broadened ClO emission line shape. The 1987 measurements were marked by the use of twice the spectral bandpass employed the previous year, and allow a better characterization of the ClO mixing ratio profile in the critical altitude range 18 to 25 km. In-situ aircraft measurements of ClO made over the Palmer Peninsula during Aug. and Sept. of 1987 by Anderson, et al. effectively determined the important question of the ClO mixing ratio profile at altitudes inaccessible to our technique, below approximately 18 to 18.5 km. These flights did not penetrate further than 75 deg S, however, (vs 78 deg S for McMurdo) and were thus limited to coverage near the outer boundaries of the region of severest ozone depletion over Antarctica in 1987, did not reach an altitude convincingly above that of the peak mixing ratio for ClO, and were not able to make significant observations of the diurnal variation of ClO. The two techniques, and the body of data recovered by each, thus complement one another in producing a full picture of the anomalous ClO layer intimately connected with the region of Antarctic spring ozone depletion. An analysis is presented of the mixing ratio profile from approximately 18 to 45 km, the diurnal behavior, and the secular change in ClO over McMurdo Station during Sept. and early Oct. 1987.

  1. The elastic and inelastic behavior of woven graphite fabric reinforced polyimide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searles, Kevin H.

    In many aerospace and conventional engineering applications, load-bearing composite structures are designed with the intent of being subjected to uniaxial stresses that are predominantly tensile or compressive. However, it is likely that biaxial and possibly triaxial states of stress will exist throughout the in-service life of the structure or component. The existing paradigm suggests that unidirectional tape materials are superior under uniaxial conditions since the vast majority of fibers lie in-plane and can be aligned to the loading axis. This may be true, but not without detriment to impact performance, interlaminar strength, strain to failure and complexity of part geometry. In circumstances where a sufficient balance of these properties is required, composites based on woven fabric reinforcements become attractive choices. In this thesis, the micro- and mesoscale elastic behavior of composites based on 8HS woven graphite fabric architectures and polyimide matrices is studied analytically and numerically. An analytical model is proposed to predict the composite elastic constants and is verified using numerical strain energy methods of equivalence. The model shows good agreement with the experiments and numerical strain energy equivalence. Lamina stresses generated numerically from in-plane shear loading show substantial shear and transverse normal stress concentrations in the transverse undulated tow which potentially leads to intralaminar damage. The macroscale inelastic behavior of the same composites is also studied experimentally and numerically. On an experimental basis, the biaxial and modified biaxial Iosipescu test methods are employed to study the weaker-mode shear and biaxial failure properties at room and elevated temperatures. On a numerical basis, the macroscale inelastic shear behavior of the composites is studied. Structural nonlinearities and material nonlinearities are identified and resolved. In terms of specimen-to-fixture interactions

  2. On the enhanced detectability of GPS anomalous behavior with relative entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeongho

    2016-10-01

    A standard receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) technique for the global positioning system (GPS) has been dedicated to provide an integrity monitoring capability for safety-critical GPS applications, such as in civil aviation for the en-route (ER) through non-precision approach (NPA) or lateral navigation (LNAV). The performance of the existing RAIM method, however, may not meet more stringent aviation requirements for availability and integrity during the precision approach and landing phases of flight due to insufficient observables and/or untimely warning to the user beyond a specified time-to-alert in the event of a significant GPS failure. This has led to an enhanced RAIM architecture ensuring stricter integrity requirement by greatly decreasing the detection time when a satellite failure or a measurement error has occurred. We thus attempted to devise a user integrity monitor which is capable of identifying the GPS failure more rapidly than a standard RAIM scheme by incorporating the RAIM with the relative entropy, which is a likelihood ratio approach to assess the inconsistence between two data streams, quite different from a Euclidean distance. In addition, the delay-coordinate embedding technique needs to be considered and preprocessed to associate the discriminant measure obtained from the RAIM with the relative entropy in the new RAIM design. In simulation results, we demonstrate that the proposed user integrity monitor outperforms the standard RAIM with a higher level of detection rate of anomalies which could be hazardous to the users in the approach or landing phase and is a very promising alternative for the detection of deviations in GPS signal. The comparison also shows that it enables to catch even small anomalous gradients more rapidly than a typical user integrity monitor.

  3. Anomalous phase separation behavior of gel-derived soda-silica glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of retained bound hydroxyl groups on amorphous immiscibility behavior and on the kinetics of phase separation were studied in glasses containing from 10 to 19 percent sodium oxide preparaed by the gel process. Differences in behavior as functions of preliminary thermal treatment of the gel precursor and of melting conditions were studied, employing IR spectroscopy, SAXS and WAXD to monitor the variation in glass microstructure. Both the initial gel treatment and the OH concentration in the prepared glasses were found to affect the immiscibility temperatures, and the magnitude of the maximum temperature increase was also a function of the sodium oxide concentration. It is suggested that the variation in thermodynamic behavior may be caused by the structural arrangement attained by the OH groups during the gel condensation process, which in turn affects the extent of hydrogen bonding to nonbridging oxygen ions.

  4. Buckling Behavior of Long Anisotropic Plates Subjected to Elastically Restrained Thermal Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    An approach for synthesizing buckling results for, and behavior of, thin balanced and unbalanced symmetric laminates that are subjected to uniform heating or cooling and elastically restrained against thermal expansion or contraction is presented. This approach uses a nondimensional analysis for infinitely long, flexurally anisotropic plates that are subjected to combined mechanical loads and is based on useful nondimensional parameters. In addition, stiffness-weighted laminate thermal-expansion parameters and compliance coefficients are derived that are used to determine critical temperatures in terms of physically intuitive mechanical-buckling coefficients. The effects of membrane orthotropy and membrane anisotropy are included in the general formulation. Many results are presented for some common laminates that are intended to facilitate a structural designer's transition to the use of generic buckling design curves. Several curves that illustrate the fundamental parameters used in the analysis are presented, for nine contemporary material systems, that provide physical insight into the buckling response in addition to providing useful design data. Examples are presented that demonstrate the use of generic design curves. The analysis approach and generic results indicate the effects and characteristics of elastically restrained laminate thermal expansion or contraction, membrane orthotropy and anisotropy, and flexural orthotropy and anisotropy in a very general and unifying manner.

  5. The behavior of elastic anisotropic laminated composite flat structures subjected to deterministic and random loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, Liviu

    1990-01-01

    Within this research project, the following topics were studied: (1) foundation of the refined theory of flat cross-ply laminated composite flat and curved panels as well as their static and dynamic response analysis; (2) foundation of a geometrically-nonlinear shear-deformable theory of composite laminated flat panels including the effect of initial geometric imperfections and its application in the postbuckling analysis; (3) the study of the dynamic response of shear deformable elastic laminated composite panels to deterministic time-dependent external excitations as the sonic boom and explosive blast type-loadings; (4) the study of the dynamic response of shear deformable elastic laminated composite panels to random excitation as e.g. the one produced by a jet noise or by any time-dependent external excitation whose characteristics are expressed in a statistical sense; and (5) the dynamic stability of fiber-reinforced composite flat panels whose materials (due to e.g. an ambient high temperature field) exhibit a time-dependent physical behavior.

  6. Theory of buckling and post-buckling behavior of elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budiansky, B.

    1974-01-01

    The present paper provides a unified, general presentation of the basic theory of the buckling and post-buckling behavior of elastic structures in a form suitable for application to a wide variety of special problems. The notation of functional analysis is used for this purpose. Before the general analysis, simple conceptual models are used to elucidate the basic concepts of bifurcation buckling, snap buckling, imperfection sensitivity, load-shortening relations, and stability. The energy approach, the virtual-work approach, and mode interaction are discussed. The derivations and results are applicable to continua and finite-dimensional systems. The virtual-work and energy approaches are given separate treatments, but their equivalence is made explicit. The basic concepts of stability occupy a secondary position in the present approach.

  7. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. IV. Anomalous Behavior of the Broad Ultraviolet Emission Lines in NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goad, M. R.; Korista, K. T.; De Rosa, G.; Kriss, G. A.; Edelson, R.; Barth, A. J.; Ferland, G. J.; Kochanek, C. S.; Netzer, H.; Peterson, B. M.; Bentz, M. C.; Bisogni, S.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Denney, K. D.; Ely, J.; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Grier, C. J.; Gupta, A.; Horne, K. D.; Kaastra, J.; Pancoast, A.; Pei, L.; Pogge, R. W.; Skielboe, A.; Starkey, D.; Vestergaard, M.; Zu, Y.; Anderson, M. D.; Arévalo, P.; Bazhaw, C.; Borman, G. A.; Boroson, T. A.; Bottorff, M. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brewer, B. J.; Cackett, E. M.; Carini, M. T.; Croxall, K. V.; Dalla Bontà, E.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Evans, P. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Gonzalez, L.; Gorjian, V.; Grupe, D.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Jensen, J. J.; Joner, M. D.; Jones, J.; Kaspi, S.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. C.; Klimanov, S. A.; Lee, J. C.; Leonard, D. C.; Lira, P.; MacInnis, F.; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Papadakis, I.; Parks, J. R.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schimoia, J. S.; Schnülle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Siegel, M.; Spencer, M.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Treu, T.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.; Zheng, W.-K.

    2016-06-01

    During an intensive Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) UV monitoring campaign of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 performed from 2014 February to July, the normally highly correlated far UV continuum and broad emission line variations decorrelated for ˜60-70 days, starting ˜75 days after the first HST/COS observation. Following this anomalous state, the flux and variability of the broad emission lines returned to a more normal state. This transient behavior, characterized by significant deficits in flux and equivalent width of the strong broad UV emission lines, is the first of its kind to be unambiguously identified in an active galactic nucleus reverberation mapping campaign. The largest corresponding emission line flux deficits occurred for the high ionization, collisionally excited lines C iv and Si iv(+O iv]), and also He ii(+O iii]), while the anomaly in Lyα was substantially smaller. This pattern of behavior indicates a depletion in the flux of photons with {E}{{ph}}\\gt 54 {{eV}} relative to those near 13.6 eV. We suggest two plausible mechanisms for the observed behavior: (i) temporary obscuration of the ionizing continuum incident upon broad line region (BLR) clouds by a moving veil of material lying between the inner accretion disk and inner (BLR), perhaps resulting from an episodic ejection of material from the disk, or (ii) a temporary change in the intrinsic ionizing continuum spectral energy distribution resulting in a deficit of ionizing photons with energies >54 eV, possibly due to a transient restructuring of the Comptonizing atmosphere above the disk. Current evidence appears to favor the latter explanation.

  8. Ageneral approach to first order phase transitions and the anomalous behavior of coexisting phases in the magnetic case.

    SciTech Connect

    Gama, S.; de Campos, A.; Coelho, A. A.; Alves, C. S.; Ren, Y.; Garcia, F.; Brown, D. E.; da Silva, L. M.; Magnus, A.; Carvalho, G.; Gandra, G. C.; dos Santos, A. O.; Cardoso, L. P.; von Ranke, P. J.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. Federal de Sao Paulo; Unv. Estadual de Champinas; Univ. Estadual de Maringa Lab. Nacional de Luz Sincrotron; Northern Univ.; Univ. de Estado do Rio de Janerio

    2009-01-01

    First order phase transitions for materials with exotic properties are usually believed to happen at fixed values of the intensive parameters (such as pressure, temperature, etc.) characterizing their properties. It is also considered that the extensive properties of the phases (such as entropy, volume, etc.) have discontinuities at the transition point, but that for each phase the intensive parameters remain constant during the transition. These features are a hallmark for systems described by two thermodynamic degrees of freedom. In this work it is shown that first order phase transitions must be understood in the broader framework of thermodynamic systems described by three or more degrees of freedom. This means that the transitions occur along intervals of the intensive parameters, that the properties of the phases coexisting during the transition may show peculiar behaviors characteristic of each system, and that a generalized Clausius-Clapeyron equation must be obeyed. These features for the magnetic case are confirmed, and it is shown that experimental calorimetric data agree well with the magnetic Clausius-Clapeyron equation for MnAs. An estimate for the point in the temperature-field plane where the first order magnetic transition turns to a second order one is obtained (the critical parameters) for MnAs and Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compounds. Anomalous behavior of the volumes of the coexisting phases during the magnetic first order transition is measured, and it is shown that the anomalies for the individual phases are hidden in the behavior of the global properties as the volume.

  9. Elastic behavior of MFI-type zeolites: 3 - Compressibility of silicalite and mutinaite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartieri, Simona; Arletti, Rossella; Vezzalini, Giovanna; Di Renzo, Francesco; Dmitriev, Vladimir

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study - performed using silicone oil as "non-penetrating" pressure transmitting medium - of the elastic behavior of three zeolites with MFI-type framework: the natural zeolite mutinaite and two silicalites (labeled A and B) synthesized under different conditions. While in mutinaite no symmetry change is observed as a function of pressure, a phase transition from monoclinic (P21/n) to orthorhombic (Pnma) symmetry occurs at about 1.0 GPa in the silicalite samples. This phase transition is irreversible upon decompression. The second order bulk moduli of silicalite A and silicalite B, calculated after the fulfillment of the phase transition, are: K0=18.2(2) and K0=14.3 (2) GPa, respectively. These values makes silicalite the most compressible zeolite among those up to now studied in silicone oil. The structural deformations induced by HP in silicalite A were investigated by means of complete Rietveld structural refinements, before and after the phase transition, at Pamb and 0.9 GPa, respectively. The elastic behaviors of the three MFI-type zeolites here investigated were compared with those of Na-ZSM-5 and H-ZSM-5, studied in similar experimental conditions: the two silicalites - which are the phases with the highest Si/Al ratios and hence the lowest extraframework contents - show the highest compressibility. On the contrary, the most rigid material is mutinaite, which has a very complex extraframework composition characterized by a high number of cations and water molecules.

  10. Introduction of an ionic liquid into the micropores of a metal-organic framework and its anomalous phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Teppei; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-10-13

    Controlling the dynamics of ionic liquids (ILs) is a significant issue for widespread use. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are ideal host materials for ILs because of their small micropores and tunable host-guest interactions. Herein, we demonstrate the first example of an IL incorporated within the micropores of a MOF. The system studied consisted of EMI-TFSA (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide) and ZIF-8 (composed of Zn(MeIM)2 ; H(MeIM)=2-methylimidazole) as the IL and MOF, respectively. Construction of the EMI-TFSA in ZIF-8 was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction, nitrogen gas adsorption, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry and solid-state NMR measurements showed that the EMI-TFSA inside the micropores demonstrated no freezing transition down to 123 K, whereas bulk EMI-TFSA froze at 231 K. Such anomalous phase behavior originates from the nanosize effect of the MOF on the IL. This result provides a novel strategy for stabilizing the liquid phase of the ILs down to a lower temperature region.

  11. Anomalous Structural Transition and Electrical Transport Behaviors in Compressed Zn2SnO4: Effect of Interface

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiwa; Ke, Feng; Li, Yan; Wang, Li; Liu, Cailong; Zeng, Yi; Yao, Mingguang; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Gao, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    The interface effect is one of the most important factors that strongly affect the structural transformations and the properties of nano-/submicro-crystals under pressure. However, characterization of the granular boundary changes in materials is always challenging. Here, using tetrakaidecahedral Zn2SnO4 microcrystals as an example, we employed alternating current impedance, X-ray diffraction methods and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the effect of the interface on the structure and electrical transport behavior of the Zn2SnO4 material under pressure. We clearly show that grain refinement of the initial microcrystals into nanocrystals (approximately 5 nm) occurs at above 12.5 GPa and is characterized by an anomalous resistance variation without a structural phase transition. A new phase transition pathway from the cubic to hexagonal structure occurs at approximately 29.8 GPa in Zn2SnO4. The unexpected grain refinement may explain the new structural transition in Zn2SnO4, which is different from the previous theoretical prediction. Our results provide new insights into the link between the structural transition, interface changes and electrical transport properties of Zn2SnO4. PMID:26399167

  12. Anomalous structural behavior in the metamagnetic transition of FeRh thin films from a local viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakisaka, Yuki; Uemura, Yohei; Yokoyama, Toshihiko; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Tabuchi, Masao; Ohshima, Daiki; Kato, Takeshi; Iwata, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    The metamagnetic transition in FeRh thin films has been investigated via temperature-dependent x-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy in order to gain correlations between magnetization and local electronic and geometric structures. According to the Fe and Rh K -edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), strong hybridization between Fe and Rh was revealed to exist. This Fe-Rh hybridization was observed to decrease during the phase transition from the antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) phases from the systematic change in the Fe K -edge XANES. In addition, only the Debye-Waller factor of the Fe-Fe pair in the AFM phase was observed to be considerably enhanced when compared with that in the FM phase, which was ascribed to local structural fluctuation inherent in the AFM phase. By considering the different features of the exchange interactions in Fe-Rh and Fe-Fe, this anomalous behavior is interpreted as being consistent with the recent theoretical study proposing the local fluctuations of spin and structure. Therefore, we consider that the local spin and Fe-Fe distance fluctuations play an important role in driving the metamagnetic transition, whereas the Fe-Rh hybridization correlates with the static stability of each magnetic phase.

  13. Anomalous behavior of visible light active TiO2 for the photocatalytic degradation of different Reactive dyes.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navneet; Shahi, Satwant Kaur; Singh, Vasundhara

    2015-11-01

    Nanocrystalline undoped, N-doped, N and metal codoped titania with different particle size, surface area, anatase phase content, crystallinity, band gap and zeta potential were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The photocatalytic activities of the synthesized TiO2 powders were compared by employing four different Reactive dyes. The order of photocatalytic activity observed for Reactive Red 198 dye (RR 198) was undoped = N,Cu codoped = N-doped > N,Fe codoped TiO2, Reactive Blue 4 dye (RB 4) was N,Cu codoped > N,Fe codoped > N-doped > undoped TiO2, Reactive Black 5 dye (RB 5) was N,Cu codoped* > undoped > N-doped > N,Fe codoped TiO2 and negligible degradation was observed for Reactive Orange 16 dye (RO 16). In this paper, the anomalous trend of the photocatalytic activity of various photocatalysts for the degradation of a particular class of dyes has been observed and accounted for based upon three parameters: mechanism of degradation, physicochemical properties of the catalyst and adsorption behavior based on the zeta potential. It was concluded that apart from these parameters, the substrate-specificity of the catalyst is also of equal importance in developing new catalysts for the photodegradation of dyes present in textile effluents.

  14. Electrodynamic soil plate oscillator: Modeling nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior and hysteresis in nonlinear acoustic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, M. S.; Duong, D. V.; Kalsbeck, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    An apparatus (SPO), designed to study flexural vibrations of a soil loaded plate, consists of a thin circular elastic clamped plate (and cylindrical wall) supporting a vertical soil column. A small magnet attached to the center of the plate is driven by a rigid AC coil (located coaxially below the plate) to complete the electrodynamic soil plate oscillator SPO design. The frequency dependent mechanical impedance Zmech (force / particle velocity, at the plate's center) is inversely proportional to the electrical motional impedance Zmot. Measurements of Zmot are made using the complex output to input response of a Wheatstone bridge that has an identical coil element in one of its legs. Near resonance, measurements of Zmot (with no soil) before and after a slight point mass loading at the center help determine effective mass, spring, damping and coupling constant parameters of the system. "Tuning curve" behavior of real{ Zmot } and imaginary{ Zmot } at successively higher vibration amplitudes of dry sifted masonry sand are measured. They exhibit a decrease "softening" in resonance frequency along with a decrease in the quality Q factor. In soil surface vibration measurements a bilinear hysteresis model predicts the tuning curve shape for this nonlinear mesoscopic elastic SPO behavior - which also models the soil vibration over an actual plastic "inert" VS 1.6 buried landmine. Experiments are performed where a buried 1m cube concrete block supports a 12 inch deep by 30 inch by 30 inch concrete soil box for burying a VS 1.6 in dry sifted masonry sand for on-the-mine and off-the-mine soil vibration experiments. The backbone curve (a plot of the peak amplitude vs. corresponding resonant frequency from a family of tuning curves) exhibits mostly linear behavior for "on target" soil surface vibration measurements of the buried VS 1.6 or drum-like mine simulants for relatively low particle velocities of the soil. Backbone curves for "on target" measurements exhibit

  15. Elastic behavior of MFI-type zeolites: 3 - Compressibility of silicalite and mutinaite

    SciTech Connect

    Quartieri, Simona; Arletti, Rossella; Vezzalini, Giovanna; Di Renzo, Francesco; Dmitriev, Vladimir

    2012-07-15

    We report the results of an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study - performed using silicone oil as 'non-penetrating' pressure transmitting medium - of the elastic behavior of three zeolites with MFI-type framework: the natural zeolite mutinaite and two silicalites (labeled A and B) synthesized under different conditions. While in mutinaite no symmetry change is observed as a function of pressure, a phase transition from monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) to orthorhombic (Pnma) symmetry occurs at about 1.0 GPa in the silicalite samples. This phase transition is irreversible upon decompression. The second order bulk moduli of silicalite A and silicalite B, calculated after the fulfillment of the phase transition, are: K{sub 0}=18.2(2) and K{sub 0}=14.3 (2) GPa, respectively. These values makes silicalite the most compressible zeolite among those up to now studied in silicone oil. The structural deformations induced by HP in silicalite A were investigated by means of complete Rietveld structural refinements, before and after the phase transition, at P{sub amb} and 0.9 GPa, respectively. The elastic behaviors of the three MFI-type zeolites here investigated were compared with those of Na-ZSM-5 and H-ZSM-5, studied in similar experimental conditions: the two silicalites - which are the phases with the highest Si/Al ratios and hence the lowest extraframework contents - show the highest compressibility. On the contrary, the most rigid material is mutinaite, which has a very complex extraframework composition characterized by a high number of cations and water molecules. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure behavior of silicalite compressed in silicone oil: projection of the structure along the [0 1 0] direction at Pamb(a), 0.9 GPa (b). (c) Comparison of the unit-cell volume variations as a function of pressure for mutinaite, H-ZSM5, Na-ZSM5, silicalite A, and silicalite B compressed in silicone oil. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray powder diffraction

  16. Elastic behavior and pressure-induced structure evolution of topaz up to 45 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. D.; Morgenroth, W.; Dera, P.; Petitgirard, S.; Liermann, H.-P.

    2014-09-01

    The behavior of a natural topaz, Al2.00Si1.05O4.00(OH0.26F1.75), has been investigated by means of in situ single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 45 GPa. No phase transition or change in the compressional regime has been observed within the pressure-range investigated. The compressional behavior was described with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (III-BM-EoS). The III-BM-EoS parameters, simultaneously refined using the data weighted by the uncertainties in P and V, are as follows: K V = 158(4) GPa and K V ' = 3.3(3). The confidence ellipse at 68.3 % (Δχ2 = 2.30, 1σ) was calculated starting from the variance-covariance matrix of K V and K' obtained from the III-BM-EoS least-square procedure. The ellipse is elongated with a negative slope, indicating a negative correlation of the parameters K V and K V ', with K V = 158 ± 6 GPa and K V ' = 3.3 ± 4. A linearized III-BM-EoS was used to obtain the axial-EoS parameters (at room- P), yielding: K( a) = 146(5) GPa [ β a = 1/(3 K( a)) = 0.00228(6) GPa-1] and K'( a) = 4.6(3) for the a-axis; K( b) = 220(4) GPa [ β b = 0.00152(4) GPa-1] and K'( b) = 2.6(3) for the b-axis; K( c) = 132(4) GPa [ β c = 0.00252(7) GPa-1] and K'( c) = 3.3(3) for the c-axis. The elastic anisotropy of topaz at room- P can be expressed as: K( a): K( b): K( c) = 1.10:1.67:1.00 ( β a: β b: β c = 1.50:1.00:1.66). A series of structure refinements have been performed based on the intensity data collected at high pressure, showing that the P-induced structure evolution at the atomic scale is mainly represented by polyhedral compression along with inter-polyhedral tilting. A comparative analysis of the elastic behavior and P/ T-stability of topaz polymorphs and "phase egg" (i.e., AlSiO3OH) is carried out.

  17. Study of nonlinear behaviors and modal reductions for friction destabilized systems. Application to an elastic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyer, A.; Sinou, J.-J.; Chiello, O.; Lorang, X.

    2012-02-01

    As noise reduction tends to be part of environmental directives, predicting squeal noise generated by disc brakes is an important industrial issue. It involves both the transient and stationary nonlinear dynamics of self-excited systems with frictional contact. Time simulation of the phenomenon is an attractive option for reducing experiment costs. However, since such computations using full finite element models of industrial disc brake systems is time-consuming, model reduction has to be performed. In this paper, both the transient and stationary nonlinear behaviors of the friction destabilized system and the effect of dynamical reduction on the nonlinear response of a simple friction destabilized system are carried out. The first part provides a description of the general modeling retained for friction destabilized systems. Then, discretization and solving processes for the stability analysis and the temporal evolution are presented. The third part presents an analysis of a sliding elastic layer for different operating conditions, in order to better understand the nonlinear behavior of such systems. Finally, spatial model reduction is performed with different kinds of reduction bases in order to analyze the different effects of modal reductions. This clearly shows the necessity of including static modes in the reduction basis and that nonlinear interactions between unstable modes are very difficult to represent with reduced bases. Finally, the proposed model and the associated studies are intended to be the benchmark cases for future comparison.

  18. A study on the characteristic behavior of mass inclusions added to a poro-elastic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrisi, Kamal; Johnson, Marty E.; Theurich, Daniel; Carneal, James P.

    2010-09-01

    Heterogeneous (HG) blankets consist of a layer of poro-elastic media with small embedded masses that replicate the behavior of a distributed mass-spring-damper system. The concept of an HG blanket used to control the sound transmission through an aircraft double-panel system has already been developed and cited in the present literature. However, deficiencies in methodical property control exist; therefore, the prime objective of this research is to provide a simple method to predict and control material properties of the heterogeneous blankets through alteration of mass and stiffness parameters. Mass inclusion size, shape, and placement were varied. If optimized heterogeneous (HG) blankets targeted to specific applications are to be successfully developed, control of these parameters is necessary. This research offers a detailed analysis of the behavior of the mass inclusions, highlighting controlled stiffness variation of the mass-spring-damper systems inside the HG blanket. Characteristic parameters of the HG blanket like the "footprint," "effective area," and the "mass interaction distance" are defined and confirmed through mathematical calculations and experimental results. A novel, empirical approach to predict the natural frequency of different mass shapes embedded in porous media was derived and experimentally verified for many different types of porous media, including melamine foam, polyurethane, and polyamide. A maximum error of 8% existed for all the predictions made in this document.

  19. A possible explanation of the anomalous emissive probe behavior in a reactive RF plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, R.; Barve, S. A.; Chopade, S. S.; Das, A. K.; Patil, D. S.

    2012-10-01

    Emissive probe diagnostics in saturated floating potential mode was carried out in RF plasmas of argon (Ar)-methane (CH4) and Ar-CH4-hexa methyl disiloxane (HMDSO). These plasmas are used for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and SiOx-containing DLC films, respectively. While performing the experiments it was found that the probe characteristics had two saturation regions instead of one. The same measurements when repeated in Ar and Ar-N2 plasmas showed a single saturation as expected. The first experiments when repeated again showed the same anomaly. The experimental findings question the validity of emissive probe diagnostics in reactive plasmas. A possible model of dust formation inside the reactive plasma is predicted and the first saturation is linked to dust. The second saturation is credited as the actual plasma potential. The concept of dust was invoked after being sure that no effects of RF and reference electrode contamination are responsible for this behavior. The results indicate that we should remain cautious when using emissive probes in reactive plasmas as they may occasionally lead to erroneous results.

  20. The anomalous behavior of the density of water in the range 30 K < T < 373 K.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Branca, Caterina; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2007-11-20

    The temperature dependence of the density of water, rho(T), is obtained by means of optical scattering data, Raman and Fourier transform infrared, in a very wide temperature range, 30 < T < 373 K. This interval covers three regions: the thermodynamically stable liquid phase, the metastable supercooled phase, and the low-density amorphous solid phase, at very low T. From analyses of the profile of the OH stretching spectra, we determine the fractional weight of the two main spectral components characterized by two different local hydrogen bond structures. They are, as predicted by the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis of liquid water, the low- and the high-density liquid phases. We evaluate contributions to the density of these two phases and thus are able to calculate the absolute density of water as a function of T. We observe in rho(T) a complex thermal behavior characterized not only by the well known maximum in the stable liquid phase at T = 277 K, but also by a well defined minimum in the deeply supercooled region at 203 +/- 5 K, in agreement with suggestions from molecular dynamics simulations.

  1. The anomalous behavior of the density of water in the range 30 K < T < 373 K

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Branca, Caterina; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2007-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density of water, ρ(T), is obtained by means of optical scattering data, Raman and Fourier transform infrared, in a very wide temperature range, 30 < T < 373 K. This interval covers three regions: the thermodynamically stable liquid phase, the metastable supercooled phase, and the low-density amorphous solid phase, at very low T. From analyses of the profile of the OH stretching spectra, we determine the fractional weight of the two main spectral components characterized by two different local hydrogen bond structures. They are, as predicted by the liquid–liquid phase transition hypothesis of liquid water, the low- and the high-density liquid phases. We evaluate contributions to the density of these two phases and thus are able to calculate the absolute density of water as a function of T. We observe in ρ(T) a complex thermal behavior characterized not only by the well known maximum in the stable liquid phase at T = 277 K, but also by a well defined minimum in the deeply supercooled region at 203 ± 5 K, in agreement with suggestions from molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:18000049

  2. Anomalous magneto-elastic and charge doping effects in thallium-doped BaFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Sefat, Athena S.; Li, Li; Cao, Huibo B.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian; Custelcean, Radu; Parker, David S.

    2016-02-12

    Within the BaFe2As2 crystal lattice, we partially substitute thallium for barium and report the effects of interlayer coupling in Ba1-xTlxFe2As2 crystals. We demonstrate the unusual effects of magneto-elastic coupling and charge doping in this iron-arsenide material, whereby Néel temperature rises with small x, and then falls with additional x. Specifically, we find that Néel and structural transitions in BaFe2As2 (TN = Ts = 133 K) increase for x = 0.05 (TN = 138 K, Ts = 140 K) from magnetization, heat capacity, resistivity, and neutron diffraction measurements. Evidence from single crystal X-ray diffraction and first principles calculations attributes the stronger magnetism in x = 0.05 to magneto-elastic coupling related to the shorter intraplanar Fe-Fe bond distance. With further thallium substitution, the transition temperatures decrease for x = 0.09 (TN = Ts = 131 K), and this is due to charge doping. Finally, we illustrate that small changes related to 3d transition-metal state can have profound effects on magnetism.

  3. Elastic behavior of CNT-reinforced polymer composites with discontinuities in CNT configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Puneet; Srinivas, J., Dr.

    2017-02-01

    A numerical study has been made towards the effective elastic properties estimation of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube reinforced composite using finite element modelling (FEM). First, the elastic properties of Carbon nanotube (CNT) were predicted by considering that carbon atoms as nodes and carbon-carbon bonds as beam elements with linear and isotropic behaviour. It was observed that elastic properties of CNT predicted by FE analysis were in good agreement with previous data. Carbon atom vacancy defects were also included to investigate the adverse effect on elastic modulus of SWCNTs. To explore the macroscopic elastic behaviour of CNT in a finite densely packed polymer resin, a representative volume element (RVE) was selected instead of whole composite material in which the polymer resin was modelled as continuum material while CNT as an equivalent long fibre. FE results of RVE manifest that the CNT volume fraction and waviness have significant effect on elastic modulus of CNT reinforced polymer composite. An analytical formulation in terms of elastic properties and waviness ratio was also introduced in this study for waviness analysis. Moreover, the elastic properties of wavy CNT reinforced composite was compared with analytical outcomes. We extended present RVE model to incorporate the effects of CNTs agglomeration on the elastic behaviour of CNT-reinforced polymer composites. It was observed that anticipated elastic results not only depended on the volume fraction of CNTs, but also on the CNTs geometry, waviness and agglomeration.

  4. A fractional calculus model of anomalous dispersion of acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wharmby, Andrew W

    2016-09-01

    An empirical formula based on viscoelastic analysis techniques that employs concepts from the fractional calculus that was used to model the dielectric behavior of materials exposed to oscillating electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency, terahertz, and infrared bands. This work adapts and applies the formula to model viscoelastic behavior of materials that show an apparent increase of phase velocity of vibration with an increase in frequency, otherwise known as anomalous dispersion. A fractional order wave equation is derived through the application of the classic elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle whose analytical solution is used to describe absorption and dispersion of acoustic waves in the viscoelastic material displaying anomalous dispersion in a specific frequency range. A brief discussion and comparison of an alternative fractional order wave equation recently formulated is also included.

  5. Nonlocal strain gradient based wave dispersion behavior of smart rotating magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Dabbagh, Ali

    2017-02-01

    Main object of the present research is an exact investigation of wave propagation responses of smart rotating magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) graded nanoscale plates. In addition, effective material properties of functionally graded (FG) nanoplate are presumed to be calculated using the power-law formulations. Also, it has been tried to cover both softening and stiffness-hardening behaviors of nanostructures by the means of employing nonlocal strain gradient theory (NSGT). Due to increasing the accuracy of the presented model in predicting shear deformation effects, a refined higher-order plate theory is introduced. In order to cover the most enormous circumstances, maximum amount of load generated by plate’s rotation is considered. Furthermore, utilizing a developed form of Hamilton’s principle, containing magneto-electric effects, the nonlocal governing equations of MEE-FG rotating nanoplates are derived. An analytical solution is obtained to solve the governing equations and validity of the solution method is proven by comparing results from present method with those of former attempts. At last, outcomes are plotted in the framework of some figures to show the influences of various parameters such as wave number, nonlocality, length scale parameter, magnetic potential, electric voltage, gradient index and angular velocity on wave frequency, phase velocity and escape frequency of the examined nanoplate.

  6. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  7. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  8. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  9. Micromechanical Prediction of the Effective Behavior of Fully Coupled Electro-Magneto-Thermo-Elastic Multiphase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The micromechanical generalized method of cells model is employed for the prediction of the effective moduli of electro-magneto-thermo-elastic composites. These include the effective elastic, piezoelectric, piezomagnetic, dielectric, magnetic permeability, electromagnetic coupling moduli, as well as the effective thermal expansion coefficients and the associated pyroelectric and pyromagnetic constants. Results are given for fibrous and periodically bilaminated composites.

  10. Magnetic field and in situ stress dependence of elastic behavior in EuTiO3 from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemer, Jason; Spalek, Leszek J.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Panagopoulos, Christos; Katsufuji, Takuro; Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Köhler, Jürgen; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling phenomena in EuTiO3 are of considerable fundamental interest and are also understood to be key to reported multiferroic behavior in strained films, which exhibit distinctly different properties to the bulk. Here, the magnetoelastic coupling of EuTiO3 is investigated by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy with in situ applied magnetic field and stress as a function of temperature ranging from temperatures above the structural transition temperature T s to below the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature T n. One single crystal and two polycrystalline samples are investigated and compared to each other. Both paramagnetic and diamagnetic transducer carriers are used, allowing an examination of the effect of both stress and magnetic field on the behavior of the sample. The properties are reported in constant field/variable temperature and in constant temperature/variable field mode where substantial differences between both data sets are observed. In addition, elastic and magnetic poling at high fields and stresses at low temperature has been performed in order to trace the history dependence of the elastic constants. Four different temperature regions are identified, characterized by unusual elastic responses. The low-temperature phase diagram has been explored and found to exhibit rich complexity. The data evidence a considerable relaxation of elastic constants at high temperatures, but with little effect from magnetic field alone above 20 K, in addition to the known low-temperature coupling.

  11. Relaxation from Steady States Far from Equilibrium and the Persistence of Anomalous Shock Behavior in Weakly Ionized Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Auslender, Aaron H.

    1999-01-01

    The decay of anomalous effects on shock waves in weakly ionized gases following plasma generator extinction has been measured in the anticipation that the decay time must correlate well with the relaxation time of the mechanism responsible for the anomalous effects. When the relaxation times cannot be measured directly, they are inferred theoretically, usually assuming that the initial state is nearly in thermal equilibrium. In this paper, it is demonstrated that relaxation from any steady state far from equilibrium, including the state of a weakly ionized gas, can proceed much more slowly than arguments based on relaxation from near equilibrium states might suggest. This result justifies a more careful analysis of the relaxation times in weakly ionized gases and suggests that although the experimental measurements of relaxation times did not lead to an unambiguous conclusion, this approach to understanding the anomalous effects may warrant further investigation.

  12. Movement and diving behavior of male California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) during anomalous oceanographic conditions of 2005 compared to those of 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Michael J.; Costa, Daniel P.; Kudela, Raphael M.

    2006-11-01

    During the highly anomalous conditions in early 2005, characterized by increased water temperatures and decreased productivity, male California sea lions adopted previously undocumented foraging behaviors. We investigated the movement and spatially explicit foraging behavior of males using satellite-linked data loggers and compared foraging behavior and effort between 2003-2004 and 2004-2005. Males foraged almost exclusively over the continental shelf during short trips in 2003-2004, while during anomalous conditions in 2004-2005 they altered their foraging effort by spending more time at sea and venturing up to 450 km offshore. Foraging trips in 2004-2005 were more than twice the distance and three times the duration of trips during 2003-2004. Our data indicated that the effects of climatic shifts during 2005 extended beyond the physical oceanography and lower trophic levels, to an apex predator; providing insight into the plasticity of foraging behavior and movement patterns of sea lions as they respond to environmental perturbations.

  13. A numerical analysis of contact and limit-point behavior in a class of problems of finite elastic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endo, T.; Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T.

    1984-01-01

    Finite element methods for the analysis of bifurcations, limit-point behavior, and unilateral frictionless contact of elastic bodies undergoing finite deformation are presented. Particular attention is given to the development and application of Riks-type algorithms for the analysis of limit points and exterior penalty methods for handling the unilateral constraints. Applications focus on the problem of finite axisymmetric deformations, snap-through, and inflation of thick rubber spherical shells.

  14. Universal behavior of changes in elastic moduli of hot compressed oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Guerette, Michael; Huang, Liping; Lönnroth, Nadja; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2016-05-01

    The elastic moduli of glasses are important for numerous applications, but predicting them based on their chemical composition and forming history remains a great challenge. In this study, we investigate the relationship between densification and changes in elastic moduli as a result of isostatic compression up to 1 GPa of various oxide compositions at elevated temperature (so-called hot compression). An approximately linear relationship is observed between the relative changes in density and elastic moduli across a variety of glass families, although these glasses exhibit a diverse range of structural responses during compression owing to their dramatically different chemistries.

  15. Revealing highly complex elastic nonlinear (anelastic) behavior of Earth materials applying a new probe: Dynamic acoustoelastic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, G.; Le Bas, P.-Y.; Johnson, P. A.

    2012-06-01

    Recent work in medical nonlinear acoustics has led to the development of refined experimental method to measure material elastic nonlinear (anelastic) response. The technique, termed dynamic acoustoelastic testing, has significant implications for the development of a physics-based theory because it provides information that existing methods cannot. It provides the means to dynamically study the velocity-strain and attenuation-strain relations through the full wave cycle in contrast to most methods that measure average response. The method relies on vibrating a sample at low frequency in order to cycle it through different levels of stress-strain. Simultaneously, an ultrasonic source applies pulses and the change in wave speed and attenuation as a function of the low frequency strain is measured. We report preliminary results in eleven room-dry rock samples. In crystalline rock, we expect that the elastic nonlinearity arises from the microcracks and dislocations contained within individual crystals. In contrast, sedimentary rocks may have other origins of elastic nonlinearity, currently under debate. A large quadratic elastic nonlinearity is observed in Berkeley blue granite, presumably due to microcracks and dislocation-point defect interactions. In sedimentary rocks that include limestones and sandstones we observe behaviors that can differ markedly from the granite, potentially indicating different mechanical mechanisms. We further observe changes in measured nonlinear coefficients that are wave-strain amplitude dependent. Ultimately we hope that the new approach will provide the means to quantitatively relate material nonlinear elastic behavior to the responsible features, that include soft bonds dislocations, microcracks, and the modulating influences of water content, temperature and pressure.

  16. Modeling Nonlinear Elastic-plastic Behavior of RDX Single Crystals During Indentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    SCHOENFELD RDRL WMP B R BECKER S BILYK D CASEM J CLAYTON (10 CPS) D DANDEKAR M GREENFIELD C HOPPEL R KRAFT B LEAVY D POWELL M RAFTENBERG S SATAPATHY M...SCHEIDLER T WEERISOORIYA C WILLIAMS RDRL WMP C T BJERKE S SEGLETES RDRL WMP F N GNIAZDOWSKI RDRL WMP G R EHLERS N ELDREDGE S KUKUCK 52 ...depth: isotropic elastic simulation results and analytical solutions, R = 1.482 µm, elastic constants of Haussuhl (1

  17. Elasticity and Phase Behavior of DPPC Membrane Modulated by Cholesterol, Ergosterol, and Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Kara J.; Block, David E.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2005-01-01

    Giant vesicles formed of 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and sterols (cholesterol or ergosterol) in water and water/ethanol solutions have been used to examine the effect of sterol composition and ethanol concentration on the area compressibility modulus (Ka), overall mechanical behavior, vesicle morphology, and induction of lipid alkyl chain interdigitation. Our results from micropipette aspiration suggest that cholesterol and ergosterol impact the order and microstructure of the gel (Lβ′) phase DPPC membrane. At low concentration (10–15 mol%) these sterols disrupt the long-range lateral order and fluidize the membrane (Ka ∼ 300 mN/m). Then at 18 mol%, these sterols participate in the formation of a continuous cohesive liquid-ordered (Lo) phase with a sterol-dependent membrane density (Ka ∼ 750 for DPPC/ergosterol and Ka ∼ 1100 mN/m for DPPC/cholesterol). Finally at ∼40 mol% both cholesterol and ergosterol impart similar condensation to the membrane (Ka ∼ 1200 mN/m). Introduction of ethanol (5–25 vol%) results in drops in the magnitude of Ka, which can be substantial, and sometimes individual vesicles with lowered Ka reveal two slopes of tension versus apparent area strain. We postulate that this behavior represents disruption of lipid-sterol intermolecular interactions and therefore the membrane becomes interdigitation prone. We find that for DPPC vesicles with sterol concentrations of 20–25 mol%, significantly more ethanol is required to induce interdigitation compared to pure DPPC vesicles; ∼7 vol% more for ergosterol and ∼10 vol% more for cholesterol. For lower sterol concentrations (10–15 mol%), interdigitation is offset, but by <5 vol%. These data support the idea that ergosterol and cholesterol do enhance survivability for cells exposed to high concentrations of ethanol and provide evidence that the appearance of the interdigitated (LβI) phase bilayer is a major factor in the disruption of cellular activity, which

  18. Effect of PbO on the elastic behavior of ZnO-P2O5 glass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidek, H. A. A.; El-Mallawany, R.; Matori, K. A.; Halimah, M. K.

    A series of ternary phosphate glasses in the form of 40(P2O5)-(60 - x)ZnO-xPbO and 50(P2O5)-(50 - x)ZnO-xPbO where x = 0-60 mol%, have been successfully prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. Both longitudinal and shear ultrasonic velocities were measured in different compositions of PbO using the MBS8000 ultrasonic data acquisition system at 10 MHz frequency and at room temperature. The ultrasonic velocity data, the density and the calculated elastic moduli are found to be composition dependent and discussed in terms of PbO modifiers. The correlation of elastic moduli with the atomic packing density of these glasses was discussed. To predict the compositional dependence of elastic moduli of this glass system, the interpretation of the variation in the experimental elastic behavior observed has been studied based on various of the bond compression and the Makishima-Mackenzie models.

  19. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  20. Discrete rearranging disordered patterns: prediction of elastic and plastic behavior, and application to two-dimensional foams.

    PubMed

    Raufaste, C; Cox, S J; Marmottant, P; Graner, F

    2010-03-01

    We study the elasto-plastic behavior of materials made of individual (discrete) objects such as a liquid foam made of bubbles. The evolution of positions and mutual arrangements of individual objects is taken into account through statistical quantities such as the elastic strain of the structure, the yield strain, and the yield function. The past history of the sample plays no explicit role except through its effect on these statistical quantities. They suffice to relate the discrete scale with the collective global scale. At this global scale, the material behaves as a continuous medium; it is described with tensors such as elastic strain, stress, and velocity gradient. We write the differential equations which predict their elastic and plastic behavior in both the general case and the case of simple shear. An overshoot in the shear strain or shear stress is interpreted as a rotation of the deformed structure, which is a purely tensorial effect that exists only if the yield strain is at least of order 0.3. We suggest practical applications including the following: when to choose a scalar formalism rather than a tensorial one; how to relax trapped stresses; and how to model materials with a low, or a high, yield strain.

  1. Phonons and elasticity of cementite through the Curie temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauger, L.; Herriman, J. E.; Hellman, O.; Tracy, S. J.; Lucas, M. S.; Muñoz, J. A.; Xiao, Yuming; Li, J.; Fultz, B.

    2017-01-01

    Phonon partial densities of states (pDOS) of Fe573C were measured from cryogenic temperatures through the Curie transition at 460 K using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The cementite pDOS reveal that low-energy acoustic phonons shift to higher energies (stiffen) with temperature before the magnetic transition. This unexpected stiffening suggests strongly nonharmonic vibrational behavior that impacts the thermodynamics and elastic properties of cementite. Density functional theory calculations reproduced the anomalous stiffening observed experimentally in cementite by accounting for phonon-phonon interactions at finite temperatures. The calculations show that the low-energy acoustic phonon branches with polarizations along the [010] direction are largely responsible for the anomalous thermal stiffening. The effect was further localized to the motions of the FeII site within the orthorhombic structure, which participates disproportionately in the anomalous phonon stiffening.

  2. Surface effects on the vibration behavior of flexoelectric nanobeams based on nonlocal elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    In this research, vibration characteristics of a flexoelectric nanobeam in contact with Winkler-Pasternak foundation is investigated based on the nonlocal elasticity theory considering surface effects. This nonclassical nanobeam model contains flexoelectric effect to capture coupling of strain gradients and electrical polarizations. Moreover, the nonlocal elasticity theory is employed to study the nonlocal and long-range interactions between the particles. The present model can degenerate into the classical model if the nonlocal parameter, flexoelectric and surface effects are omitted. Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the governing equations and the related boundary conditions which are solved applying a Galerkin-based solution. Natural frequencies are verified with those of previous papers on nanobeams. It is illustrated that flexoelectricity, nonlocality, surface stresses, elastic foundation and boundary conditions affects considerably the vibration frequencies of piezoelectric nanobeams.

  3. Implications and Assessment of the Elastic Behavior of Lamins in Laminopathies

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Subarna; Bhattacharyya, Maitree; Sengupta, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are mechanosensitive and elastic components of the nuclear lamina that respond to external mechanical cues by altering gene regulation in a feedback mechanism. Numerous mutations in A-type lamins cause a plethora of diverse diseases collectively termed as laminopathies, the majority of which are characterized by irregularly shaped, fragile, and plastic nuclei. These nuclei are challenged to normal mechanotransduction and lead to disease phenotypes. Here, we review our current understanding of the nucleocytoskeleton coupling in mechanotransduction mediated by lamins. We also present an up-to-date understanding of the methods used to determine laminar elasticity both at the bulk and single molecule level. PMID:27754432

  4. Modeling and characterization of the elastic behavior of interfaces in nanostructured materials: From an atomistic description to a continuum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingreville, Remi

    Steady technological progresses in all fields of nanoscale technology and probe technology have enabled the synthesis, the assembly, the development, the characterization and the improvement of nanostructured materials. The lack of understanding of their macroscopic behavior is a major roadblock for inserting these materials into engineering applications. Partially due to these rapid advances in nano-scale and nano-structured materials, there has been a resurgence of interest in surface elastic properties such as surface energy, surface stresses, and surface elastic stiffness. Because of the large surface-to-volume ratio in nano-materials, surface elastic properties become more prominent. They have strong influence on the overall thermo-mechanical behavior of the nano-materials. In this dissertation, an innovative approach combining continuum mechanics and atomistic simulations is exposed to develop a nanomechanics theory for modeling and predicting the macroscopic behavior of nanomaterials. This nanomechanics theory exhibits the simplicity of the continuum formulation while taking into account the discrete atomic structure and interaction near surfaces/interfaces. There are four primary objectives to this dissertation. First, theory of interfaces is revisited to better understand its behavior and effects on the overall behavior of nanostructures. Second, atomistic tools are provided in order to efficiently determine the properties of free surfaces and interfaces. Interface properties are reported in this work, with comparison to both theoretical and experimental characterizations of interfaces. Specifically, we report surface elastic properties of groups 10--11 transition metals as well as properties for low-CSL grain boundaries in copper. Third, we propose a continuum framework that casts the atomic level information into continuum quantities that can be used to analyze, model and simulate macroscopic behavior of nanostructured materials. In particular, we study

  5. Spin-glass behavior and anomalous magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}Te epilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jindong; Cheng, Xiaomin Tong, Fei; Miao, Xiangshui

    2014-07-28

    We report that the Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}Te thin film exhibits spin-glass behavior when the Fe concentration increases to 0.08. A large bifurcation between the zero-field cooling and field cooling temperature-dependent magnetization was observed. The hysteresis loops after zero-field cooling and field cooling show an exchange bias effect. A time-dependent thermoremanent magnetization follows power-law decay, which confirms the existence of spin glass. The anomalous magnetotranport properties present a further evidence for spin-glass behavior and give a freezing temperature T{sub g} ∼ 5 K in the Ge{sub 0.92}Fe{sub 0.08}Te thin film.

  6. On Dynamic Nonlinear Elasticity and Small Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Sutin, A.; Guyer, R. A.; Tencate, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    We are addressing the question of whether or not there is a threshold strain behavior where anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics (ANFD) commences in rock and other similar solids, or if the elastic nonlinearity persists to the smallest measurable values. In qualitative measures of many rock types and other materials that behave in the same manner, we have not observed a threshold; however the only careful, small strain level study conducted under controlled conditions that we are aware of is that of TenCate et al. in Berea sandstone (Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1020-1024 (2000)). This work indicates that in Berea sandstone, the elastic nonlinearity persists to the minimum measured strains of at least 10-8. Recently, we have begun controlled experiments in other materials that exhibit ANFD in order to see whether or not they behave as Berea sandstone does. We are employing Young's mode resonance to study resonance peak shift and amplitude variations as a function of drive level and detected strain level. In this type of experiment, the time average amplitude is recorded as the sample is driven by a continuous wave source from below to above the fundamental mode resonance. The drive level is increased, and the measurement is repeated progressively over larger and larger drive levels. Experiments are conducted at ambient pressure. Pure alumina ceramic is a material that is highly, elastically-nonlinear and nonporous, and therefore the significant influence of relative humidity on elastic nonlinear response that rock suffers is avoided. Temperature is carefully monitored. Measurements on pure alumina ceramic show that, like Berea sandstone, there is no threshold of elastic nonlinearity within our measurement capability. We are now studying other solids that exhibit ANFD including rock and mixed phase metal. These results indicate that elastic nonlinearity influences all elastic measurments on these solids including modulus and Q at ambient conditions. There appears to be no

  7. Anomalous behavior of Tc and pseudogap in the superconductor CaxLa1 -xBa1.75 -xLa0.25 +xCu3Oy with respect to doping and ion size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallon, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    The cuprate superconductor CaxLa1 -xBa1.75 -xLa0.25 +xCu3Oy has been proposed as a model system which allows systematic variation in the optimum transition temperature, Tc ,max, with doping and ion size. However, we show that the Tc ,max values are anomalous in this system. We determine the doping accurately and show that the phase curve, as a function of doping, is anomalously truncated so that values of Tc ,max appear to decrease with decreasing x , concealing the generic increase expected as ion size increases. We also thereby resolve its reported anomalous pseudogap behavior from NMR and anomalous superconducting gap from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  8. Finite deformation analysis of continuum structures with time dependent anisotropic elastic plastic material behavior (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutula, D.N.

    1980-03-01

    A finite element procedure is presented for finite deformation analysis of continuum structures with time-dependent anisotropic elastic-plastic material behavior. An updated Lagrangian formulation is used to describe the kinematics of deformation. Anisotropic constitutive relations are referred, at each material point, to a set of three mutually orthogonal axes which rotate as a unit with an angular velocity equal to the spin at the point. The time-history of the solution is generated by using a linear incremental procedure with residual force correction, along with an automatic time step control algorithm which chooses time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution.

  9. Investigation and modeling of the elastic-plastic fracture behavior of continuous woven fabric-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, W.K.

    1997-03-01

    The paper describes a study which attempted to extrapolate meaningful elastic-plastic fracture toughness data from flexure tests of a chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC/Nicalon fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite. Fibers in the fabricated composites were pre-coated with pyrolytic carbon to varying thicknesses. In the tests, crack length was not measured and the study employed an estimate procedure, previously used successfully for ductile metals, to derive J-R curve information. Results are presented in normalized load vs. normalized displacements and comparative J{sub Ic} behavior as a function of fiber precoating thickness.

  10. Anomalous Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malov, I. F.

    Many astrophysicists believe that Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars (AXP), Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters (SGR), Rotational Radio Transients (RRAT), Compact Central Objects (CCO) and X-Ray Dim Isolated Neutron Stars (XDINS) belong to different classes of anomalous objects with neutron stars as the central bodies inducing all their observable peculiarities. We have shown earlier [1] that AXPs and SGRs could be described by the drift model in the framework of the preposition on usual properties of the central neutron star (rotation periods P 0.01 - 1 sec and, surface magnetic fields B ~ 10^11-10^13 G). Here we shall try to show that some differences of the sources under consideration will be explained by their geometry (particularly, by the angle β between their rotation and magnetic axes). If β <~ 100 (the aligned rotator) the drift waves at the outer layers of the neutron star magnetosphere should play a key role in the observable periodicity. For large values of β (the case of the nearly orthogonal rotator) an accretion from the surrounding medium (for example, from the relic disk) can cause some modulation and transient events in received radiation. Recently Kramer et al. [2] and Camilo et al. [3] have shown that AXPs J1810-197 and 1E 1547.0 - 5408 have both small angles β, that is these sources are nearly aligned rotators, and the drift model should be used for their description. On the other hand, Wang et al. [4] detected IR radiation from the cold disk around the isolated young X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61. This was the first evidence of the disk-like matter around the neutron star. Probably there is the bimodality of anomalous pulsars. AXPs, SGRs and some radio transients belong to the population of aligned rotators with the angle between the rotation axis and the magnetic moment β < 200. These objects are described by the drift model, and their observed periods are connected with a periodicity of drift waves. Other sources have β ~ 900, and switching on's and switching off

  11. Age-related changes in pumping mechanical behavior of rat ventricle in terms of systolic elastance and resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, K C; Peng, Y I; Dai, S H; Tseng, Y Z

    2000-09-01

    Both the maximal systolic elastance (Emax) and the theoretical maximal flow (Qmax) can quantify the systolic mechanical behavior of the ventricular pump. Physically, Emax can reflect the intrinsic contractility of the myocardium as an intact heart. The quantity in (Qmax is inversely related to the internal resistance of the left ventricle. How great the effects of age are on these Emax and Qmax has never been examined, however. This study was to determine the ventricular pumping mechanics in terms of the systolic elastance and resistance in male Fischer rats at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. We measured left ventricular (LV) pressure and ascending aortic flow waves using a high-fidelity pressure sensor and an electromagnetic flow probe, respectively. Those two parameters that characterize the systolic pumping mechanics of the left ventricle are obtained by making use of an elastance-resistance model. The basic hemodynamic condition in those animals with different ages is characterized by (i) no significant change in cardiac output and (ii) a decrease in basal heart rate, LV end-systolic pressure, as well as effective arterial volume elastance. Changes that take place in the left ventricle with age include a decline in Emax and an increase in Qmax especially at 24 months. These results demonstrate that the impaired intrinsic contractility of an aging heart may be compensated to some extent by the diminished ventricular internal resistance. Such compensation in aging rats may maintain normal blood flow essential for the metabolic needs of tissues and/or organs before heart dysfunction and failure occur.

  12. Rubber and gel origami: visco- and poro-elastic behavior of folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur; Bende, Nakul; Na, Junhee; Hayward, Ryan; Santangelo, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese art of origami is rapidly becoming a platform for material design, as researchers develop systematic methods to exploit the purely geometric rules that allow paper to folded without stretching. Since any thin sheet couples mechanics strongly to geometry, origami provides a natural template for generating length-scale independent structures from a variety of different materials. In this talk I discuss some of the implications of using polymeric sheets and shells over many length scales to create folded materials with tunable shapes and properties. These implications include visco-elastic snap-through transitions and poro-elastically driven micro origami. In each case, mechanical response, dynamics, and reversible folding is tuned through a combination of geometry and constitutive properties, demonstrating the efficacy of using origami principles for designing functional materials.

  13. Functional behavior of the anomalous magnetic relaxation observed in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7-δ samples showing the paramagnetic Meissner effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F. T.; Vieira, V. N.; Garcia, E. L.; Wolff-Fabris, F.; Kampert, E.; Gouvêa, C. P.; Schaf, J.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T.; Roa, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the functional behavior of the field-cooled (FC) magnetic relaxation observed in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Y123) samples with 30 wt% of Y2Ba1Cu1O5 (Y211) phase, in order to investigate anomalous paramagnetic moments observed during the experiments. FC magnetic relaxation experiments were performed under controlled conditions, such as cooling rate and temperature. Magnetic fields up to 5T were applied parallel to the ab plane and along the c-axis. Our results are associated with the paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), characterized by positive moments during FC experiments, and related to the magnetic flux compression into the samples. After different attempts our experimental data could be adequately fitted by an exponential decay function with different relaxation times. We discuss our results suggesting the existence of different and preferential flux dynamics governing the anomalous FC paramagnetic relaxation in different time intervals. This work is one of the first attempts to interpret this controversial effect in a simple analysis of the pinning mechanisms and flux dynamics acting during the time evolution of the magnetic moment. However, the results may be useful to develop models to explain this interesting and still misunderstood feature of the paramagnetic Meissner effect.

  14. Acoustic, elastic, and anharmonic properties of Sm1- x R x S solid solutions with trivalent impurities (R = Y, Lа, Tm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belomestnykh, V. N.; Tesleva, E. P.

    2012-10-01

    Based on the known experimental data on the rigidity constants c ij ( x) of single crystals of samarium monosulfide solid solutions (alloys) with yttrium, lanthanum, and thulium impurities, their anisotropic and isotropic acoustic (sound velocities), elastic (elasticity moduli and Poisson's ratios), and anharmonic (Grüneisen parameters) properties are investigated. Anomalous behavior of these characteristics at isostructural electron phase transitions in the examined mixed systems in the intermediate valence state is discussed.

  15. Hyper-elastic modeling and mechanical behavior investigation of porous poly-D-L-lactide/nano-hydroxyapatite scaffold material.

    PubMed

    Han, Quan Feng; Wang, Ze Wu; Tang, Chak Yin; Chen, Ling; Tsui, Chi Pong; Law, Wing Cheung

    2017-03-28

    Poly-D-L-lactide/nano-hydroxyapatite (PDLLA/nano-HA) can be used as the biological scaffold material in bone tissue engineering as it can be readily made into a porous composite material with excellent performance. However, constitutive modeling for the mechanical response of porous PDLLA/nano-HA under various stress conditions has been very limited so far. In this work, four types of fundamental compressible hyper-elastic constitutive models were introduced for constitutive modeling and investigation of mechanical behaviors of porous PDLLA/nano-HA. Moreover, the unitary expressions of Cauchy stress tensor have been derived for the PDLLA/nano-HA under uniaxial compression (or stretch), biaxial compression (or stretch), pure shear and simple shear load by using the theory of continuum mechanics. The theoretical results determined from the approach based on the Ogden compressible hyper-elastic constitutive model were in good agreement with the experimental data from the uniaxial compression tests. Furthermore, this approach can also be used to predict the mechanical behaviors of the porous PDLLA/nano-HA material under the biaxial compression (or stretch), pure shear and simple shear.

  16. Elastic?plastic FEM analysis on low cycle fatigue behavior for alumina dispersion-strengthened copper/stainless steel joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, H.

    2004-08-01

    Since the first wall and divertor components of fusion power plants are subjected to severe stresses caused by thermal expansion and electromagnetic forces, it is important to evaluate the fatigue strength of joints. In this study, elastic-plastic finite element analysis was performed for low cycle fatigue behavior of stainless steel/alumina dispersion-strengthened copper (DS Cu) joint in order to investigate the fatigue life and the fracture behavior of the joint. The results showed that a strain concentration occurred at the interface during low cycle fatigue, but as the strain range increased the strain concentration shifted away from the interface and into the DS Cu. The fatigue life and fracture location were evaluated taking into account of the strain concentration. Predictions of the fatigue life and fracture location were consistent with those measured by the low cycle fatigue test.

  17. Nonlinear Acoustic Landmine Detection: Profiling Soil Surface Vibrations and Modeling Mesoscopic Elastic Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-04

    amplitude of oscillation, 01 0, kF ox <<−=− and A kF ox <<−=+ 02 , , where 12 kk < . If 02 =k , the elastoplastic case of Iwan’s model for...curve identifies the system as potentially mesoscopic elastic. The elasto-slip model of elastoplastic hysteresis presented by Iwan exhibits linear...in damaged concrete: Quantitative analysis of slow and fast dynamics,” Phys. Rev. B, 73, 014116 (2006). Bolton, M.D., and Wilson, J.M.R, “An

  18. The elastic and yield behavior of polyethylene tubes subjected to biaxial loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Semeliss, M.; Wong, R.

    1992-01-01

    The elastic and yield response of extruded thin-walled high-density polyethylene tubes with a density in the range of 0.961 to 0.964 gm/cu cm was investigated. Material properties in the axial and hoop directions were measured, and the tubes were found to be mildly transversely isotropic. The yield response was pressure sensitive, and was well predicted using the pressure-modified Hill criterion using a compressive to tensile yield strength ratio of 1:12.

  19. Dynamic elastic behavior of alpha-satellite DNA domains visualized in situ in living human cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have constructed a fluorescent alpha-satellite DNA-binding protein to explore the motile and mechanical properties of human centromeres. A fusion protein consisting of human CENP-B coupled to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of A. victoria specifically targets to centromeres when expressed in human cells. Morphometric analysis revealed that the alpha-satellite DNA domain bound by CENPB-GFP becomes elongated in mitosis in a microtubule-dependent fashion. Time lapse confocal microscopy in live mitotic cells revealed apparent elastic deformations of the central domain of the centromere that occurred during metaphase chromosome oscillations. These observations demonstrate that the interior region of the centromere behaves as an elastic element that could play a role in the mechanoregulatory mechanisms recently identified at centromeres. Fluorescent labeling of centromeres revealed that they disperse throughout the nucleus in a nearly isometric expansion during chromosome decondensation in telophase and early G1. During interphase, centromeres were primarily stationary, although motility of individual or small groups of centromeres was occasionally observed at very slow rates of 7-10 microns/h. PMID:8909532

  20. Electrochemical corrosion behavior and elasticity properties of Ti-6Al-xFe alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinwen; Zhao, Yongqing; Niu, Hongzhi; Zhang, Yusheng; Du, Yuzhou; Zhang, Wei; Huo, Wangtu

    2016-05-01

    The present study is to investigate the microstructural characteristics, electrochemical corrosion behavior and elasticity properties of Ti-6Al-xFe alloys with Fe addition for biomedical application, and Ti-6Al-4V alloy with two-phase (α+β) microstructure is also studied as a comparison. Microstructural characterization reveals that the phase and crystal structure are sensitive to the Fe content. Ti-6Al alloy displays feather-like hexagonal α phase, and Ti-6Al-1Fe exhibits coarse lath structure of hexagonal α phase and a small amount of β phase. Ti-6Al-2Fe and Ti-6Al-4Fe alloys are dominated by elongated, equiaxed α phase and retained β phase, but the size of α phase particle in Ti-6Al-4Fe alloy is much smaller than that in Ti-6Al-2Fe alloy. The corrosion resistance of these alloys is determined in SBF solution at 37 °C. It is found that the alloys spontaneously form a passive oxide film on their surface after immersion for 500 s, and then they are stable for polarizations up to 0 VSCE. In comparison with Ti-6Al and Ti-6Al-4V alloys, Ti-6Al-xFe alloys exhibit better corrosion resistance with lower anodic current densities, larger polarization resistances and higher open-circuit potentials. The passive layers show stable characteristics, and the wide frequency ranges displaying capacitive characteristics occur for high iron contents. Elasticity experiments are performed to evaluate the elasticity property at room temperature. Ti-6Al-4Fe alloy has the lowest Young's modulus (112 GPa) and exhibits the highest strength/modulus ratios as large as 8.6, which is similar to that of c.p. Ti (8.5). These characteristics of Ti-6Al-xFe alloys form the basis of a great potential to be used as biomedical implantation materials.

  1. Buckling Behavior of Long Anisotropic Plates Subjected to Elastically Restrained Thermal Expansion and Contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    An approach for synthesizing buckling results for thin balanced and unbalanced symmetric laminates that are subjected to uniform heating or cooling and elastically restrained against thermal expansion or contraction is presented. This approach uses a nondimensional analysis for infinitely long, flexural anisotropic plates that are subjected to combined mechanical loads. In addition, stiffness-weighted laminate thermal-expansion parameters and compliance coefficients are derived that are used to determine critical temperatures in terms of physically intuitive mechanical-buckling coefficients. Many results are presented for some common laminates that are intended to facilitate a structural designer s transition to the use of the generic buckling design curves. Several curves that illustrate the fundamental parameters used in the analysis are presented, for nine contemporary material systems, that provide physical insight into the buckling response in addition to providing useful design data. Examples are presented that demonstrate the use of the generic design curves.

  2. Elastic behavior and platelet retraction in low- and high-density fibrin gels.

    PubMed

    Wufsus, Adam R; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Brown, Andrea; Dorgan, John R; Liberatore, Matthew W; Neeves, Keith B

    2015-01-06

    Fibrin is a biopolymer that gives thrombi the mechanical strength to withstand the forces imparted on them by blood flow. Importantly, fibrin is highly extensible, but strain hardens at low deformation rates. The density of fibrin in clots, especially arterial clots, is higher than that in gels made at plasma concentrations of fibrinogen (3-10 mg/mL), where most rheology studies have been conducted. Our objective in this study was to measure and characterize the elastic regimes of low (3-10 mg/mL) and high (30-100 mg/mL) density fibrin gels using shear and extensional rheology. Confocal microscopy of the gels shows that fiber density increases with fibrinogen concentration. At low strains, fibrin gels act as thermal networks independent of fibrinogen concentration. Within the low-strain regime, one can predict the mesh size of fibrin gels by the elastic modulus using semiflexible polymer theory. Significantly, this provides a link between gel mechanics and interstitial fluid flow. At moderate strains, we find that low-density fibrin gels act as nonaffine mechanical networks and transition to affine mechanical networks with increasing strains within the moderate regime, whereas high-density fibrin gels only act as affine mechanical networks. At high strains, the backbone of individual fibrin fibers stretches for all fibrin gels. Platelets can retract low-density gels by >80% of their initial volumes, but retraction is attenuated in high-density fibrin gels and with decreasing platelet density. Taken together, these results show that the nature of fibrin deformation is a strong function of fibrin fiber density, which has ramifications for the growth, embolization, and lysis of thrombi.

  3. Influence of Copper Layer Content in the Elastic and Damping Behavior of Glass-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, V. H.; Capela, P.; Teixeira, J. C.; Teixeira, S.; Cerqueira, F.; Macedo, F.; Ribas, L.; Soares, D.

    2016-12-01

    The impact in the elastic behavior and internal friction, caused by the introduction of Copper layers in Glass-Fiber/Epoxy Resin composites and temperature effects, were studied and evaluated recurring to Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. It is shown that the introduction of Copper layers increases the storage modulus of the composites and delays their glass transition temperature, however, it allows a faster transformation. Additionally, it is concluded that the introduction of Copper layers elevates the internal friction during the glass transition phase by the inversion of the deformation mechanism due to thermal expansion and increase in the Poisson's ratio of the epoxy resin to a value near 0.5 where its deformation is approximately isochoric. This increase in damping capacity is relevant in application with cyclic fatigue and mechanical vibration.

  4. Structure-mediated transition in the behavior of elastic and inelastic properties of beach tree bio-carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardashev, B. K.; Orlova, T. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2013-09-01

    Microstructural characteristics and amplitude dependences of the Young modulus E and of internal friction (logarithmic decrement δ) of bio-carbon matrices prepared from beech tree wood at different carbonization temperatures T carb ranging from 600 to 1600°C have been studied. The dependences E( T carb) and δ( T carb) thus obtained revealed two linear regions of increase of the Young modulus and of decrease of the decrement with increasing carbonization temperature, namely, Δ E ˜ AΔ T carb and Δδ ˜ BΔ T carb, with A ≈ 13.4 MPa/K and B ≈ -2.2 × 10-6 K-1 for T carb < 1000°C and A ≈ 2.5 MPa/K and B ≈ -3.0 × 10-7 K-1 for T carb > 1000°C. The transition observed in the behavior of E( T carb) and δ( T carb) at T carb = 900-1000°C can be assigned to a change of sample microstructure, more specifically, a change in the ratio of the fractions of the amorphous matrix and of the nanocrystalline phase. For T carb < 1000°C, the elastic properties are governed primarily by the amorphous matrix, whereas for T carb > 1000°C the nanocrystalline phase plays the dominant part. The structurally induced transition in the behavior of the elastic and microplastic characteristics at a temperature close to 1000°C correlates with the variation of the physical properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and thermopower, reported in the literature.

  5. Non-Gaussian behavior of elastic incoherent neutron scattering profiles of proteins studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Joti, Yasumasa; Kitao, Akio; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Mikio

    2007-04-15

    Elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) data can be approximated with a Gaussian function of q in a low q region. However, in a higher q region the deviation from a Gaussian function becomes non-negligible. Protein dynamic properties can be derived from the analyses of the non-Gaussian behavior, which has been experimentally investigated. To evaluate the origins of the non-Gaussian behavior of protein dynamics, we conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of staphylococcal nuclease. Instead of the ordinary cumulant expansion, we decomposed the non-Gaussian terms into three components: (i) the component originating from the heterogeneity of the mean-square fluctuation (ii) that from the anisotropy, and (iii) that from higher-order terms such as anharmonicity. The MD simulation revealed various dynamics for each atom. The atomic motions are classified into three types: (i) 'harmonic', (ii) 'anisotropic', and (iii) 'anharmonic'. However, each atom has a different degree of anisotropy. The contribution of the anisotropy to the total scattering function averages out due to these differences. Anharmonic motion is described as the jump among multiple minima. The jump distance and the probability of the residence at one site vary from atom to atom. Each anharmonic component oscillates between positive and negative values. Thus, the contribution of the anharmonicity to the total scattering is canceled due to the variations in the anharmonicity. Consequently, the non-Gaussian behavior of the total EINS from a protein can be analyzed by the dynamical heterogeneity.

  6. The time-dependent magneto-visco-elastic behavior of a magnetostrictive fiber actuated viscoelastic polymer matrix composite.

    PubMed

    Hogea, Cosmina S; Armstrong, William D

    2002-11-01

    The paper develops a one-dimensional magneto-elastic model of a magnetostrictive fiber actuated polymer matrix composite material which accounts for a strong viscoelastic response in the polymer matrix. The viscoelastic behavior of the composite polymer matrix is modeled with a three parallel Maxwell element viscoelastic model, the magnetoelastic behavior of the composite fibers is modeled with an anhysteric directional potential based domain occupation theory. Example calculations are performed to identify and explain the dynamical behavior of the composite. These calculations assume that a constant stress and the oscillating magnetic field are applied in the fiber longitudinal direction. The inclusion of matrix viscosity results in an apparent hysteresis loop in the magnetization and magnetostriction curves even though the model does not include magnetoelastic hysteresis in the fibers. The apparent hysteresis is a consequence of the interaction of the time varying fiber stress caused by matrix viscosity with a multidomain state in the fiber. The small increase in fiber longitudinal compressive stress due to matrix viscosity under increasing field inhibits the occupation of domains with magnetization orientations near the fiber longitudinal [112] direction. As a consequence, the summed longitudinal magnetization and magnetostriction is reduced as compared to the decreasing field limb.

  7. Unusual potential behavior for the weakly bound nucleus 9Be in elastic scattering from 208Pb and 209Bi near the threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, N.; Zhang, H. Q.; Jia, H. M.; Zhang, S. T.; Ruan, M.; Yang, F.; Wu, Z. D.; Xu, X. X.; Bai, C. L.

    2010-07-01

    The elastic scattering angular distributions of the weakly bound 9Be projectile from 208Pb and 209Bi have been measured for 14 beam energies near the threshold from 37 to 50 MeV. The parameters of the optical potential are extracted by means of phenomenological optical model analysis with PTOLEMY. Both of the systems show unusual potential behavior in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier that the strength of the imaginary (absorptive) part of the potential is increasing (rather than decreasing) with decreasing energy, which is quite different from the results of some previous reports. This unusual threshold phenomenon indicates that the breakup channel is strongly coupled with the elastic channel and has obvious effects on the optical potential. The analyses also show that high precision elastic scattering angular distributions, especially those below the Coulomb barrier, are very important for extracting correct threshold behavior of the optical potential.

  8. Quantitative modeling of coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior of piezoelectric actuators bonded to an elastic medium for structural health monitoring: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoliang; Song, Fei; Wang, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Elastic waves, especially guided waves, generated by a piezoelectric actuator/sensor network, have shown great potential for on-line health monitoring of advanced aerospace, nuclear, and automotive structures in recent decades. Piezoelectric materials can function as both actuators and sensors in these applications due to wide bandwidth, quick response and low costs. One of the most fundamental issues surrounding the effective use of piezoelectric actuators is the quantitative evaluation of the resulting elastic wave propagation by considering the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior between the actuator and the host medium. Accurate characterization of the local interfacial stress distribution between the actuator and the host medium is the key issue for the problem. This paper presents a review of the development of analytical, numerical and hybrid approaches for modeling of the coupled piezo-elastodynamic behavior. The resulting elastic wave propagation for structural health monitoring is also summarized.

  9. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGES

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  10. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  11. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  12. Soft elasticity of RNA gels and negative Poisson ratio.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Amir; Rudnick, Joseph; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2007-12-01

    We propose a model for the elastic properties of RNA gels. The model predicts anomalous elastic properties in the form of a negative Poisson ratio and shape instabilities. The anomalous elasticity is generated by the non-Gaussian force-deformation relation of single-stranded RNA. The effect is greatly magnified by broken rotational symmetry produced by double-stranded sequences and the concomitant soft modes of uniaxial elastomers.

  13. A novel two-layer, coupled finite element approach for modeling the nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic behavior of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, Thomas; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2011-07-01

    A novel finite element approach is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of human red blood cells (RBC, erythrocytes). As the RBC membrane comprises a phospholipid bilayer with an intervening protein network, we propose to model the membrane with two distinct layers. The fairly complex characteristics of the very thin lipid bilayer are represented by special incompressible solid shell elements and an anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model. Properties of the protein network are modeled with an isotropic hyperelastic third-order material. The elastic behavior of the model is validated with existing optical tweezers studies with quasi-static deformations. Employing material parameters consistent with literature, simulation results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Available models in literature neglect either the surface area conservation of the RBC membrane or realistic loading conditions of the optical tweezers experiments. The importance of these modeling assumptions, that are both included in this study, are discussed and their influence quantified. For the simulation of the dynamic motion of RBC, the model is extended to incorporate the cytoplasm. This is realized with a monolithic fully coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation, where the fluid is described by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian framework. It is shown that both membrane viscosity and cytoplasm viscosity have significant influence on simulation results. Characteristic recovery times and energy dissipation for varying strain rates in dynamic laser trap experiments are calculated for the first time and are found to be comparable with experimental data.

  14. Anomalous pH dependent stability behavior of surfactant-free nonpolar oil drops in aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Clasohm, Lucy Y; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2007-08-28

    Recent advances in atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurement techniques have allowed the direct measurement and theoretical interpretation of the interaction between a liquid droplet and a solid surface or between two liquid droplets. In this study, we investigated the interaction across an aqueous thin film between fluorocarbon (perfluoropentane) droplets, hydrocarbon (tetradecane) droplets, and a droplet and a flat mica surface in the absence of stabilizers. It was found that even at a relatively elevated electrolyte concentration of 0.1 M NaNO3, depending on the solution pH, interactions between two identical droplets or a droplet and a mica surface could be repulsive. A simple theoretical analysis of the magnitude and range of these interactive forces suggests that the DLVO theory cannot explain the observed behavior. The measured force behavior is discussed in the context of ion adsorption, and the arising charging effects, at the bare oil-water interface.

  15. A distributional model for elastic-plastic behavior of shock loaded materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Tracy John; Asay, James Russell

    2003-07-01

    To address known shortcomings of classical metal plasticity for describing material behavior under shock loading, a model which incorporates a distribution in the deviatoric stress state is developed. This distribution will translate in stress space under loading, and growth of the distribution can be included in the model as well. This proposed model is capable of duplicating the key features of a set of reshock and release experiments on 6061-T6 aluminum, many of which are not captured by classical plasticity. The model is relatively simple, is only moderately more computationally intensive, and requires few additional material parameters.

  16. Anomalous magnetic behavior in the transition metal ions doped Cu{sub 2}O flower-like nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Asar; Gajbhiye, Namdeo S.

    2011-01-15

    Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) flower-like nanostructures doped with various metal ions i.e. Fe, Co, Ni and Mn have been synthesized by an organic phase solution method. The powder X-ray diffraction study clearly reveals them as single phase simple cubic cuprite lattice. Study of their magnetic properties have shown that these doped samples are ferromagnetic in nature; however, no such property was observed for the undoped Cu{sub 2}O sample. The magnitude of the ferromagnetic behavior was found to be dependent on the dopant metal ions amount, which increased consistently with its increase. As total magnetic moment contribution of the doped metal ions calculated was insignificant, it is believed to have originated from the induced magnetic moments at cation deficiency sites in the material, created possibly due to the disturbance of the crystal lattice by the dopant ions. The existence of the defects has been supported by photoluminescence spectra of the doped samples. -- Graphical abstract: Room temperature ferromagnetic behavior was observed in the Cu{sub 2}O nanoflowers doped with Fe, Co, Ni and Mn ions. Cation deficiencies formed due to dopant ions were possibly responsible for ferromagnetism. Display Omitted

  17. Effect of surface modification by nitrogen ion implantation on the electrochemical and cellular behaviors of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Maleki-Ghaleh, H; Khalil-Allafi, J; Sadeghpour-Motlagh, M; Shakeri, M S; Masoudfar, S; Farrokhi, A; Beygi Khosrowshahi, Y; Nadernezhad, A; Siadati, M H; Javidi, M; Shakiba, M; Aghaie, E

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to enhance the biological behavior of NiTi shape memory alloy while preserving its super-elastic behavior in order to facilitate its compatibility for application in human body. The surfaces of NiTi samples were bombarded by three different nitrogen doses. Small-angle X-ray diffraction was employed for evaluating the generated phases on the bombarded surfaces. The electrochemical behaviors of the bare and surface-modified NiTi samples were studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) using electrochemical impedance and potentio-dynamic polarization tests. Ni ion release during a 2-month period of service in the SBF environment was evaluated using atomic absorption spectrometry. The cellular behavior of nitrogen-modified samples was studied using fibroblast cells. Furthermore, the effect of surface modification on super-elasticity was investigated by tensile test. The results showed the improvement of both corrosion and biological behaviors of the modified NiTi samples. However, no significant change in the super-elasticity was observed. Samples modified at 1.4E18 ion cm(-2) showed the highest corrosion resistance and the lowest Ni ion release.

  18. Elastic buckling, stability, and vibration of linear and geometrically nonlinear behavior of structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper explores the physical and fundamental way of obtaining buckling loads of structures as well as their natural frequencies. The resulting mathematical formulations are shown, in both cases, to lead to the determination of the eigenvalues and vectors for similar transcendental equations. The analysis of a axially loaded straight member is first considered to show that when the axial load is tensile the corresponding natural frequencies are larger than when their is no applied axial load. Conversely when the axial load is compressive a decrease in the natural frequencies will take place and in the limit the natural frequencies become zero when the applied axial load is equal to the buckling load of the member. The paper will also present the results for a finite element analysis for the large deflection geometrically non-linear behavior of arches. The resulting complex relationships between load and deflection are discussed in terms of instability and snap through phenomena. The large-amplitude vibration of arches are then considered and the relationship between frequency and amplitude is discussed by inferring to the previously obtained statical loading cases.

  19. Micromorphic homogenization of a porous medium: elastic behavior and quasi-brittle damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütter, Geralf; Mühlich, Uwe; Kuna, Meinhard

    2015-11-01

    Today it is well known that the classical Cauchy continuum theory is insufficient to describe the deformation behavior of solids if gradients occur over distances which are comparable to the microstructure of the material. This becomes crucial e.g., for small specimens or during localization of deformation induced by material degradation (damage). Higher-order continuum approaches like micromorphic theories are established to address such problems. However, such theories require the formulation of respective constitutive laws, which account for the microstructural interactions. Especially in damage mechanics such laws are mostly formulated in a purely heuristic way, which leads to physical and numerical problems. In the present contribution, the fully micromorphic constitutive law for a porous medium is obtained in closed form by homogenization based on the minimal boundary conditions concept. It is shown that this model describes size effects of porous media like foams adequately. The model is extended toward quasi-brittle damage overcoming the physical and numerical limitations of purely heuristic approaches.

  20. Investigation of hyperelastic models for nonlinear elastic behavior of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, M; Ghoreishi, M; Narooei, K

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the hyperelastic models of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone were investigated and appropriate models were developed. Using uniaxial compression test data, the strain energy versus stretch was calculated and the appropriate hyperelastic strain energy functions were fitted on data in order to calculate the material parameters. To obtain the mechanical behavior in other loading conditions, the hyperelastic strain energy equations were investigated for pure shear and equi-biaxial tension loadings. The results showed the Mooney-Rivlin and Ogden models cannot predict the mechanical response of demineralized and deproteinized bovine cortical femur bone accurately, while the general exponential-exponential and general exponential-power law models have a good agreement with the experimental results. To investigate the sensitivity of the hyperelastic models, a variation of 10% in material parameters was performed and the results indicated an acceptable stability for the general exponential-exponential and general exponential-power law models. Finally, the uniaxial tension and compression of cortical femur bone were studied using the finite element method in VUMAT user subroutine of ABAQUS software and the computed stress-stretch curves were shown a good agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Anomalous dielectric and AC conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline Ni-Cu ferrite synthesized via combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, B. J.; Rashmi, B. N.; Banu, Arshiya; Seema, G. A.; Shruthi, B.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2013-02-05

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Cu ferrites (Ni{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were prepared using solution combustion method. The structure of the samples were studied with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Cu-K{sub {alpha}} radiation. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric and a.c. conductivity studies have been undertaken on the Ni-Cu nanoferrites in the frequency region 100Hz-5MHz. The dielectric constant ({epsilon} Prime ) is found to decrease initially with the frequency and finally reaching a constant value at higher frequencies. Observed trends in the dielectric constant are ascribed to the Maxwell-Wagner type interfacial polarization, which is in agreement with the Koop'fs phenomenological theory. The a.c. conductivity ({sigma}{sub ac}) is found to increase with an increase in the frequency from room temperature up to 300 Degree-Sign C. However, at a temperature of 400 Degree-Sign C, the a.c. conductivity is found to decrease with an increase in the frequency exhibiting an abnormal behavior. The electrical conduction mechanism in the present nano nickel-copper ferrite is found to be in accordance with the electron hopping model.

  2. Anomalous dielectric and AC conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline Ni-Cu ferrite synthesized via combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, B. J.; Rashmi, B. N.; Banu, Arshiya; Seema, G. A.; Shruthi, B.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2013-02-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Cu ferrites (Ni0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4) were prepared using solution combustion method. The structure of the samples were studied with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Cu-Kα radiation. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric and a.c. conductivity studies have been undertaken on the Ni-Cu nanoferrites in the frequency region 100Hz-5MHz. The dielectric constant (ɛ') is found to decrease initially with the frequency and finally reaching a constant value at higher frequencies. Observed trends in the dielectric constant are ascribed to the Maxwell-Wagner type interfacial polarization, which is in agreement with the Koop'fs phenomenological theory. The a.c. conductivity (σac) is found to increase with an increase in the frequency from room temperature up to 300 °C. However, at a temperature of 400 °C, the a.c. conductivity is found to decrease with an increase in the frequency exhibiting an abnormal behavior. The electrical conduction mechanism in the present nano nickel-copper ferrite is found to be in accordance with the electron hopping model.

  3. Anomalously large anisotropic magnetoresistance in a perovskite manganite.

    PubMed

    Li, Run-Wei; Wang, Huabing; Wang, Xuewen; Yu, X Z; Matsui, Y; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Bao-Gen; Plummer, E Ward; Zhang, Jiandi

    2009-08-25

    The signature of correlated electron materials (CEMs) is the coupling between spin, charge, orbital and lattice resulting in exotic functionality. This complexity is directly responsible for their tunability. We demonstrate here that the broken symmetry, through cubic to orthorhombic distortion in the lattice structure in a prototype manganite single crystal, La(0.69)Ca(0.31)MnO(3), leads to an anisotropic magneto-elastic response to an external field, and consequently to remarkable magneto-transport behavior. An anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect occurs close to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the system, showing a direct correlation with the anisotropic field-tuned MIT in the system and can be understood by means of a simple phenomenological model. A small crystalline anisotropy stimulates a "colossal" AMR near the MIT phase boundary of the system, thus revealing the intimate interplay between magneto- and electronic-crystalline couplings.

  4. Elastic behavior of MFI-type zeolites: Compressibility of H-ZSM-5 in penetrating and non-penetrating media

    SciTech Connect

    Quartieri, Simona; Montagna, Gabriele; Arletti, Rossella; Vezzalini, Giovanna

    2011-06-15

    The elastic behavior of H-ZSM-5 was investigated by in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, using both silicone oil (s.o.) and (16:3:1) methanol:ethanol:water (m.e.w.) as 'non-penetrating' and 'penetrating' pressure transmitting media, respectively. From P{sub amb} to 6.2 GPa the volume reduction observed in s.o. is 16.6%. This testifies that H-ZSM-5 is one of the most flexible microporous materials up to now compressed in s.o. Volume reduction observed in m.e.w. up to 7.6 GPa is 14.6%. A strong increase in the total electron number of the extraframework system, due to the penetration of water/alcohol molecules in the pores, is observed in m.e.w. This effect is the largest up to now observed in zeolites undergoing this phenomenon without cell volume expansion. The higher compressibility in s.o. than in m.e.w. can be ascribed to the penetration of the extra-water/alcohol molecules, which stiffen the structure and contrast the channel deformations. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure behavior of H-ZSM-5 compressed in (16:3:1) methanol:ethanol:water: (a) projection of the structure along the [0 1 0] direction at P{sub amb}, 2 GPa and after pressure release to original ambient conditions (P{sub amb} (rev)), and (b) P-dependence of the extraframework content expressed as total number of electrons (gray square represents the number of the extraframework electrons at P{sub amb} after decompression). Highlights: > X-ray powder diffraction study of H-ZSM-5 compressibility. > H-ZSM-5 is one of the softest porous material compressed in silicon oil. > Penetration of additional water/alcohol molecules upon compression in m.e.w. > Extra molecules contribute to stiffen the structure and to contrast HP effects.

  5. Substrate elasticity regulates the behavior of human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Adlerz, Katrina M; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Hayenga, Heather N

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerosis, cancer, and in the response to implanted medical devices. In each of these situations, the mechanical environment of a macrophage can vary from soft to stiff. However, how stiffness affects macrophage behavior remains uncertain. Using substrates of varying stiffness, we show macrophage phenotype and function depends on substrate stiffness. Notably, the cell area increases slightly from a sphere after 18 h on substrates mimicking healthy arterial stiffness (1-5 kPa), whereas macrophages on stiffer substrates (280 kPa-70 GPa) increased in area by nearly eight-fold. Macrophage migration is random regardless of substrate stiffness. The total average track speed was 7.8 ± 0.5 μm/h, with macrophages traveling fastest on the 280-kPa substrate (12.0 ± 0.5 μm/h) and slowest on the 3-kPa substrate (5.0 ± 0.4 μm/h). In addition F-actin organization in macrophages depends on substrate stiffness. On soft substrates, F-actin is spread uniformly throughout the cytoplasm, whereas on stiff substrates F-actin is functionalized into stress fibers. The proliferation rate of macrophages was faster on stiff substrates. Cells plated on the 280-kPa gel had a significantly shorter doubling time than those plated on the softer substrate. However, the ability of macrophages to phagocytose 1-μm particles did not depend on substrate stiffness. In conclusion, the results herein show macrophages are mechanosensitive; they respond to changes in stiffness by modifying their area, migration speed, actin organization, and proliferation rate. These results are important to understanding how macrophages respond in complex mechanical environments such as an atherosclerotic plaque.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Gravity-driven Spreading of Viscoelastic Fluids: Investigation of the Effect of Shear-thinning and Elastic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah

    2011-11-01

    Many complex fluids of interest exhibit viscoelastic hehavior. Polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides, are among these fluids. For the optimal design of microbicides, the combined effect of shear-thinning and elastic behavior on the gravity-driven spreading of viscoelastic fluids is studied. We develop a 2D model to simulate the fluids spreading down an incline using ANSYS POLYFLOW software package. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method combined with Lagrangian remeshing is applied to track the moving free surface of fluids during spreading. Adaptive meshing method is used to generate high quality mesh for the remeshing process. Based on an elastic viscous split stress (EVSS) approach, several differential viscoelastic constitutive models are studied to investigate the combined effect of shear-thinning and elastic behavior. Mesh convergence test and constant volume check are studied to verify the new model. Moreover, the new model with zero elasticity is compared with previous studies of Newtonian and power-law fluids.

  7. Anomalous zones (domal)

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, D.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Each zone contains several anomalous salt properties (anomalous features). Zones cannot be characterized by any single property Zones are highly variable, lenticular, and discontinuous in detail; however, once established, they commonly have a predictable trend. The individual anomalous features can occur alone (locally in pairs) over areas of various sizes and shapes. These alone occurrences are not anomalous zones. Anomalous zones may be of any origin, and origin is not part of the definition. Typical origins include: primary (sedimentary), external sheath zone, separating two spines of salt, or caused by toroidal flow. The major importance of an anomalous zone is that it consists of various anomalous features distributed discontinuously along the zone. Thus, if three or more anomalous properties are observed together, one should look for others. The anomalous zones observed in the Gulf Coast thus far are vertical, linear, and semicontinuous. Most are reasonably straight, but some bend sharply, end abruptly, or coalesce. Textures in salt involve grain size, color (white to dark gray), grain shape, or grain distribution of the salt. Typical anomalous textures are coarse-grain, poikiloblastic, and friability. A change in color is commonplace and seldom anomalous. Structural anomalous features, broadly defined, account for most of the rest of the anomalous features. Not uncommonly they cause mining problems. Among the structural anomalous features: INCLUSIONS: Sediments, hydrocarbons, brine, gases. Common gases are air (as N{sub 2}), CH-compounds, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S. STRUCTURES: Sheared salt, undue stabbing or jointing, voids (crystal-lined pockets), permeability, increased porosity COMPOSITION: High anhydrite content, visible anhydrite as grains or boudins, very black salt = disseminated impurities such as clay.

  8. Ultrasonic evaluation of oxidation and reduction effects on the elastic behavior and global microstructure of YBa2Cu3O7-x

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Deguire, Mark R.; Dolhert, Leonard E.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity measurement techniques were used to evaluate the effects of oxidation and reduction on the elastic properties, global microstructure and oxygen content of the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) ceramic superconductor for samples ranging from 70 to 90 pct. of theoretical density. Bulk density, velocity, and elastic modulus generally increased with increasing oxygen content upon oxidation, and this behavior was reversible. Velocity image patterns were similar after oxidation and reduction treatments for a 90 pct. dense sample, although the velocity value at any given point on the sample was changed following the treatments. The unchanging pattern correlated with destructive measurements showing that the spatial pore distribution (fraction and size) was not measurably altered after the treatments. Changes in superconducting behavior, crystal structure, and grain structure were observed consistent with changes in oxygen content.

  9. Structural phase transition causing anomalous photoluminescence behavior in perovskite (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}[PbI{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Yangui, A.; Pillet, S.; Mlayah, A.; Lusson, A.; Bouchez, G.; Boukheddaden, K. E-mail: kbo@physique.uvsq.fr; Triki, S.; Abid, Y. E-mail: kbo@physique.uvsq.fr

    2015-12-14

    Optical and structural properties of the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite-type (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}[PbI{sub 4}] (abbreviated as C{sub 6}PbI{sub 4}) were investigated using optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and x-ray diffraction measurements. Room temperature, optical absorption measurements, performed on spin-coated films of C{sub 6}PbI{sub 4}, revealed two absorption bands at 2.44 and 3.21 eV. Upon 325 nm (3.815 eV) laser irradiation, strong green PL emission peaks were observed at 2.41 eV (P1) and 2.24 eV (P2) and assigned to free and localized excitons, respectively. The exciton binding energy was estimated at 356 meV. At low temperature, two additional emission bands were detected at 2.366 eV (P3) and a large band (LB) at 1.97 eV. The former appeared only below 40 K and the latter emerged below 130 K. The thermal dependence of the PL spectra revealed an abnormal behavior accompanied by singularities in the peak positions and intensities at 40 and 130 K. X-ray diffraction studies performed on powder and single crystals as a function of temperature evidenced significant changes of the interlayer spacing at 50 K and ∼138 K. Around 138 K, a commensurate to incommensurate structural phase transition occurred on cooling. It involves a symmetry breaking leading to a distortion of the PbI{sub 6} octahedron. The resulting incommensurate spatial modulation of the Pb–I distances (and Pb–I–Pb angles) causes a spatial modulation of the band gap, which is at the origin of the emergence of the LB below ∼130 K and the anomalous behavior of the position of P1 below 130 K. The change of the interlayer spacing in the 40-50 K range may in turn be related to the significant decrease of the intensity of P2 and the maximum emission of the LB. These results underline the intricate character of the structural and the PL properties of the hybrid perovskites; understanding such properties should benefit to the design of optoelectronic devices with

  10. Structural phase transition causing anomalous photoluminescence behavior in perovskite (C6H11NH3)2[PbI4].

    PubMed

    Yangui, A; Pillet, S; Mlayah, A; Lusson, A; Bouchez, G; Triki, S; Abid, Y; Boukheddaden, K

    2015-12-14

    Optical and structural properties of the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite-type (C6H11NH3)2[PbI4] (abbreviated as C6PbI4) were investigated using optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and x-ray diffraction measurements. Room temperature, optical absorption measurements, performed on spin-coated films of C6PbI4, revealed two absorption bands at 2.44 and 3.21 eV. Upon 325 nm (3.815 eV) laser irradiation, strong green PL emission peaks were observed at 2.41 eV (P1) and 2.24 eV (P2) and assigned to free and localized excitons, respectively. The exciton binding energy was estimated at 356 meV. At low temperature, two additional emission bands were detected at 2.366 eV (P3) and a large band (LB) at 1.97 eV. The former appeared only below 40 K and the latter emerged below 130 K. The thermal dependence of the PL spectra revealed an abnormal behavior accompanied by singularities in the peak positions and intensities at 40 and 130 K. X-ray diffraction studies performed on powder and single crystals as a function of temperature evidenced significant changes of the interlayer spacing at 50 K and ∼138 K. Around 138 K, a commensurate to incommensurate structural phase transition occurred on cooling. It involves a symmetry breaking leading to a distortion of the PbI6 octahedron. The resulting incommensurate spatial modulation of the Pb-I distances (and Pb-I-Pb angles) causes a spatial modulation of the band gap, which is at the origin of the emergence of the LB below ∼130 K and the anomalous behavior of the position of P1 below 130 K. The change of the interlayer spacing in the 40-50 K range may in turn be related to the significant decrease of the intensity of P2 and the maximum emission of the LB. These results underline the intricate character of the structural and the PL properties of the hybrid perovskites; understanding such properties should benefit to the design of optoelectronic devices with targeted properties.

  11. Minimal model for anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2017-01-01

    A random walk model with a local probability of removal is solved exactly and shown to exhibit subdiffusive behavior with a mean square displacement the evolves as ˜t1 /2 at late times. This model is shown to be well described by a diffusion equation with a sink term, which also describes the evolution of a pressure or temperature field in a leaky environment. For this reason a number of physical processes are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion. The presence of the sink term is shown to change the late time behavior of the field from 1 /t1 /2 to 1 /t3 /2 .

  12. Modeling complicated rheological behaviors in encapsulating shells of lipid-coated microbubbles accounting for nonlinear changes of both shell viscosity and elasticity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Matula, Thomas J; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2013-02-21

    It has been accepted that the dynamic responses of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles will be significantly affected by the encapsulating shell properties (e.g., shell elasticity and viscosity). In this work, a new model is proposed to describe the complicated rheological behaviors in an encapsulating shell of UCA microbubbles by applying the nonlinear 'Cross law' to the shell viscous term in the Marmottant model. The proposed new model was verified by fitting the dynamic responses of UCAs measured with either a high-speed optical imaging system or a light scattering system. The comparison results between the measured radius-time curves and the numerical simulations demonstrate that the 'compression-only' behavior of UCAs can be successfully simulated with the new model. Then, the shell elastic and viscous coefficients of SonoVue microbubbles were evaluated based on the new model simulations, and compared to the results obtained from some existing UCA models. The results confirm the capability of the current model for reducing the dependence of bubble shell parameters on the initial bubble radius, which indicates that the current model might be more comprehensive to describe the complex rheological nature (e.g., 'shear-thinning' and 'strain-softening') in encapsulating shells of UCA microbubbles by taking into account the nonlinear changes of both shell elasticity and shell viscosity.

  13. Insight into elastic behavior of calcium silicate hydrated oxide (C-S-H) under pressure and composition effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zaoui, Ali

    2012-02-15

    The present work relates to the study of structural and elastic properties of Tobermorite 11 A as a function of external pressure and composition in terms of calcium to silicon ratio. Basing on the lattice dynamics method, the main aim of this work is precisely to shed light, for the first time, on the high pressure structural phase transition in Tobermorite 11 A and the possible correlation with some elastic quantities. In order to check the transferability of the potentials used we have, additionally, performed a single calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT) for a pressure of 15 GPa in the case of Ca/Si = 1. The variation of the unit cell parameters with pressure indicates that Tobermorite 11 A undergoes a structural instability around 15 GPa along b-axis and around 20 GPa along a-axis which is confirmed from our calculations of X-Rays diffraction patterns at various pressure values. We have also observed the anisotropic character of the Tobermorite structure for both cases (Ca/Si = 1 and Ca/Si = 0.83). Our results show that around 20 GPa an important change appears in the elastic behaviour of Tobermorite. As pressure increases the calculated elastic quantities for Ca/Si = 1 became closer to those evaluated for Ca/Si = 0.83, which may stimulate further experimental and theoretical research on the matter.

  14. The Gaussian Curvature Elastic Modulus of N-Monomethylated Dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine: Relevance to Membrane Fusion and Lipid Phase Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, D. P.; Kozlov, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    The energy of intermediates in fusion of phospholipid bilayers is sensitive to \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\bar {{\\kappa}}}_{{\\mathrm{m}}},\\end{equation*}\\end{document} the saddle splay (Gaussian curvature) elastic modulus of the lipid monolayers. The value \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\bar {{\\kappa}}}_{{\\mathrm{m}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} is also important in understanding the stability of inverted cubic (QII) and rhombohedral (R) phases relative to the lamellar (Lα) and inverted hexagonal (HII) phases in phospholipids. However, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\bar {{\\kappa}}}_{{\\mathrm{m}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} cannot be measured directly. It was previously measured by observing changes in QII phase lattice dimensions as a function of water content. Here we use observations of the phase behavior of N-mono-methylated dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE-Me) to determine \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\bar {{\\kappa}}}_{{\\mathrm{m}}}.\\end{equation*}\\end{document} At the temperature of the Lα/QII phase transition, TQ, the partial energies of the two phases are equal, and we can express \\documentclass[12pt

  15. Low temperature elastic constants and nonlinear acoustic response in rocks and complex materials

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, T. W.; Ulrich, T. J.; Johnson, P. A.; Tencate, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The 'P-M Space' model of Guyer and McCall has some success in describing the large nonlinear effects ('slow dynamics') observed by Johnson et al. in rocks. The model uses elements which couple classical nonlinear elasticity with hysteretic components. The actual processes and scales corresponding to the model elements are not yet defined, however it is reasonable to seek energy scales by studying the low-temperature dependence of the elastic constants. We have measured qualitative elastic properties of basalt and Berea sandstone from room temperature down to 4 K using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). A simple elastic solid should show a monotonic increase in the elastic constants as temperature decreases. The basalt samples show this gross behavior but the sandstone shows a very unexpected anomalous regime between 40 K and 200 K where the elastic constants decrease with decreasing temperature. Both rocks show temperature-dependent structure in both the modulus and internal friction, and also significant hysteresis, indicating history and rate-dependent properties. This data provides insight into the time and energy scales of dynamical effects observed in sandstones.

  16. Elasticity of two-dimensional crystals of polydisperse hard disks near close packing: surprising behavior of the Poisson's ratio.

    PubMed

    Tretiakov, Konstantin V; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W

    2012-05-28

    The equation of state, elastic constants, and Poisson's ratio of a crystalline two-dimensional polydisperse hard disk system were determined in the close packing limit. Monte Carlo simulations in the NpT ensemble with variable shape of the periodic box reveal that the pressure and elastic constants grow with increasing polydispersity. The equation of state and the bulk modulus are well described by the free volume approximation. The latter approximation fails, however, for the shear modulus. The simulations also show that the introduction of any amount of size polydispersity in the hard disk systems causes a discontinuous "jump" of the Poisson's ratio in the close packing limit from the value ν(δ=0) = 0.1308(22), obtained for equidiameter hard disks, to ν(δ>0) ≈ 1, estimated for the polydisperse disks.

  17. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  18. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  19. Anomalous diffraction approximation limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Chýlek, Petr

    It has been reported in a recent article [Liu, C., Jonas, P.R., Saunders, C.P.R., 1996. Accuracy of the anomalous diffraction approximation to light scattering by column-like ice crystals. Atmos. Res., 41, pp. 63-69] that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) accuracy does not depend on particle refractive index, but instead is dependent on the particle size parameter. Since this is at odds with previous research, we thought these results warranted further discussion.

  20. Characterization of Thermo-Elastic Properties and Microcracking Behaviors of CFRP Laminates Using Cup-Stacked Carbon Nanotubes (CSCNT) Dispersed Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Iwahori, Yutaka; Ishiwata, Shin

    This study investigated the thermo-elastic properties and microscopic ply cracking behaviors in carbon fiber reinforced nanotube-dispersed epoxy laminates. The nanocomposite laminates used in this study consisted of traditional carbon fibers and epoxy resin filled with cup-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs). Thermo-mechanical properties of unidirectional nanocomposite laminates were evaluated, and quasi-static and fatigue tension tests of cross-ply laminates were carried out in order to observe the damage accumulation behaviors of matrix cracks. Clear retardation of matrix crack onset and accumulation was found in composite laminates with CSCNT compared to those without CSCNT. Fracture toughness associated with matrix cracking was evaluated based on the analytical model using the experimental results. It was concluded that the dispersion of CSCNT resulted in fracture toughness improvement and residual thermal strain decrease, and specifically, the former was the main contribution to the retardation of matrix crack formation.

  1. Pressure derivatives of elastic moduli of fused quartz to 10 kb

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.; Wilson, W.H.

    1967-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and shear moduli were made on fused quartz to 10 kb at 24??5??C. The anomalous behavior of the bulk modulus K at low pressure, ???K ???P 0, at higher pressures. The pressure derivative of the rigidity modulus ???G ???P remains constant and negative for the pressure range covered. A 15-kb hydrostatic pressure vessel is described for use with ultrasonic pulse instrumentation for precise measurements of elastic moduli and density changes with pressure. The placing of the transducer outside the pressure medium, and the use of C-ring pressure seals result in ease of operation and simplicity of design. ?? 1967.

  2. Elastic Modulus Evolution and Behavior of Si/Mullite/BSAS-Based Environmental Barrier Coatings Exposed to High Temperature in Water Vapor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, C. V.; Kruger, S. E.; Moreau, C.; Lima, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    Si-based ceramics (e.g., SiC and Si3N4) are known as promising high-temperature structural materials in various components where metals/alloys reached their ultimate performances (e.g., advanced gas turbine engines and structural components of future hypersonic vehicles). To alleviate the surface recession that Si-based ceramics undergo in a high-temperature environmental attack (e.g., H2O vapor), appropriate refractory oxides are engineered to serve as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). The current state-of-the-art EBCs multilayer system comprises a silicon (Si) bond coat, mullite (3Al2O3·2SiO2) interlayer and (1 - x)BaO· xSrO·Al2O3·2SiO2, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 (BSAS) top coat. In this article, the role of high-temperature exposure (1300 °C) performed in H2O vapor environment (for time intervals up to 500 h) on the elastic moduli of air plasma sprayed Si/mullite/BSAS layers deposited on SiC substrates was investigated via depth-sensing indentation. Laser-ultrasonics was employed to evaluate the E values of as-sprayed BSAS coatings as an attempt to validate the indentation results. Fully crystalline, crack-free, and near-crack-free as-sprayed EBCs were engineered under controlled deposition conditions. The absence of phase transformation and stability of the low elastic modulus values (e.g., ~60-70 GPa) retained by the BSAS top layers after harsh environmental exposure provides a plausible explanation for the almost crack-free coatings observed. The relationships between the measured elastic moduli of the EBCs and their microstructural behavior during the high-temperature exposure are discussed.

  3. Anomalous Growth of Aging Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a discrete-time population dynamics with age-dependent structure. At every time step, one of the alive individuals from the population is chosen randomly and removed with probability q_k depending on its age, whereas a new individual of age 1 is born with probability r. The model can also describe a single queue in which the service order is random while the service efficiency depends on a customer's "age" in the queue. We propose a mean field approximation to investigate the long-time asymptotic behavior of the mean population size. The age dependence is shown to lead to anomalous power-law growth of the population at the critical regime. The scaling exponent is determined by the asymptotic behavior of the probabilities q_k at large k. The mean field approximation is validated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Models of anomalous diffusion: the subdiffusive case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piryatinska, A.; Saichev, A. I.; Woyczynski, W. A.

    2005-04-01

    The paper discusses a model for anomalous diffusion processes. Their one-point probability density functions (p.d.f.) are exact solutions of fractional diffusion equations. The model reflects the asymptotic behavior of a jump (anomalous random walk) process with random jump sizes and random inter-jump time intervals with infinite means (and variances) which do not satisfy the Law of Large Numbers. In the case when these intervals have a fractional exponential p.d.f., the fractional Komogorov-Feller equation for the corresponding anomalous diffusion is provided and methods of finding its solutions are discussed. Finally, some statistical properties of solutions of the related Langevin equation are studied. The subdiffusive case is explored in detail. The emphasis is on a rigorous presentation which, however, would be accessible to the physical sciences audience.

  5. Deformation Behavior of Solid-Solution-Strengthened Mg-9wt%Al Alloy: In-Situ Neutron Diffraction and Elastic-Viscoplastic Self-Consistent Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sooyeol; Wang, H; Gharghouri, Michael; Nayyeri, G.; Woo, Wan; Shin, E; Wu, Peidong; Poole, W. J.; Wu, Wei; An, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In situ neutron diffraction and elastic viscoplastic self-consistent (EVPSC) modeling have been employed to understand the deformation mechanisms of the loading unloading process under uniaxial tension in a solid-solution-strengthened extruded Mg 9 wt.% Al alloy. The initial texture measured by neutron diffraction shows that the {00.2} basal planes in most grains are tilted around 20 30 from the extrusion axis, indicating that basal slip should be easily activated in a majority of grains under tension. Non-linear stress strain responses are observed during unloading and reloading after the material is fully plastically deformed under tension. In situ neutron diffraction measurements have also demonstrated the non-linear behavior of lattice strains during unloading and reloading, revealing that load redistribution continuously occurs between soft and hard grain orientations. The predicted macroscopic stress strain curve and the lattice strain evolution by the EVPSC model are in good agreement with the experimental data. The EVPSC model provides the relative activities of the available slip and twinning modes, as well as the elastic and plastic strains of the various grain families. It is suggested that the non-linear phenomena in the macroscopic stress strain responses and microscopic lattice strains during unloading and reloading are due to plastic deformation by the operation of basal a slip in the soft grain orientations (e.g. {10.1}, {11.2} and {10.2} grain families).

  6. Anomalous behavior of B{sub 1g} mode in highly transparent anatase nano-crystalline Nb-doped Titanium Dioxide (NTO) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Subodh K. E-mail: fouran@gmail.com; Ojha, S.; Singh, Fouran E-mail: fouran@gmail.com; Gautam, Naina; Singh, R. G.; Shukla, D. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effect of Niobium doping and size of crystallites on highly transparent nano-crystalline Niobium doped Titanium Dioxide (NTO) thin films with stable anatase phase are reported. The Nb doping concentration is varied within the solubility limit in TiO{sub 2} lattice. Films were annealed in controlled environment for improving the crystallinity and size of crystallites. Elemental and thickness analysis were carried out using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and cross sectional field emission scanning electron microscopy. Structural characteristics reveal a substitutional incorporation of Nb{sup +5} in the TiO{sub 2} lattice which inhibits the anatase crystallites growth with increasing the doping percentage. The micro-Raman (MR) spectra of films with small size crystallites shows stiffening of about 4 cm{sup −1} for the E{sub g(1)} mode and is ascribed to phonon confinement and non-stoichiometry. In contrast, B{sub 1g} mode exhibits a large anomalous softening of 20 cm{sup −1} with asymmetrical broadening; which was not reported for the case of pure TiO{sub 2} crystallites. This anomalous behaviour is explained by contraction of the apical Ti-O bonds at the surface upon substitutional Nb{sup 5+} doping induced reduction of Ti{sup 4+} ions also known as hetero-coordination effect. The proposed hypotheses is manifested through studying the electronic structure and phonon dynamics by performing the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and temperature dependent MR down to liquid nitrogen temperature on pure and 2.5 at.% doped NTO films, respectively.

  7. Anomalous electric birefringence behavior of sonicated DNA fragments as observed in reversing-pulse transients and steady-state sign reversal: a multicomponent approach.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kiwamu

    2007-04-15

    Anomalous electric birefringence signals of a sonicated and column-fractionated medium-size calf thymus DNA sample (bp=570) in Na(+) solutions were measured at 7 degrees C. The reversing-pulse electric birefringence (RPEB) signal pattern was theoretically calculated in the low electric field region for two axially symmetric models coexisting in equilibrium in solution. The RPEB theory is based on the electric dipole moment due to ion-fluctuation along the longitudinal direction and the electric polarizability anisotropy (Deltaalpha'), together with various electric and optical parameters assigned to the models. An analytical method was developed for the steady-state birefringence of the two-component system in a wide range of electric fields. The NaDNA samples exhibit complex RPEB patterns mixed with negative- and positive-going profiles. An experimental RPEB signal of NaDNA at an absorbance (A(260)) of 8 was fitted to theoretical curve at weak electric fields. The anomalous RPEB signal was attributed to the component 2, which shows a dip in the buildup and another in the reverse processes with a positive sign and a larger relaxation time. For the component 1, a normal DNA profile with negative sign is associated with a narrow dip in the reverse and a faster relaxation time in the decay signal. The field-strength dependence of observed steady-state birefringence delta(infinity) could be fitted for NaDNA at A(260)=8 by the SUSID orientation function with saturated ionic and electronic moments. An apparent positive maximum and the sign reversal in delta(infinity) at weak electric fields is an interplay between the positive component 2 with positive optical factor Deltag and negative Deltaalpha' and the negative component 1 with negative Deltag and positive Deltaalpha'. Possible conformation of two DNA components involved in solution was estimated.

  8. Constructing "behavioral" comparison groups: A difference-in-difference analysis of the effect of copayment based on the patient's price elasticity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chaohsin; Hsu, Shuofen

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that the differences-in-differences (DD) estimator is based on the assumption that in the absence of treatment, the average outcomes for the treated group and the control group will follow a common trend over time. That can be problematic, especially when the selection for the treatment is influenced by the individual's unobserved behavior correlating with the medical utilization. The aim of this study was to develop an index for controlling a patient's unobserved heterogeneous response to reform, in order to improve the comparability of treatment assignment. This study showed that a DD estimator of the reform effects can be decomposed into effects induced by moral hazard and by changes in health risk within the same treated/untreated group. This article also presented evidence that the constructed index of the price elasticity of the adjusted clinical group has good statistical properties for identifying the impact of reform.

  9. Anomalous Sediment Mixing by Bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, K. R.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Xie, M.; Packman, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Bioturbation, the reworking of sediments by animals and plants, is the dominant mode of sediment mixing in low-energy environments, and plays an important role in sedimentary biogeochemical processes. Mixing resulting from bioturbation has historically been modeled as a diffusive process. However, diffusion models often do not provide a sufficient description of sediment mixing due to bioturbation. Stochastic models, such as the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, provide more general descriptions of mixing behavior that are applicable even when regular diffusion assumptions are not met. Here we present results from an experimental investigation of anomalous sediment mixing by bioturbation in freshwater sediments. Clean and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments were collected from Lake DePue, a backwater lake of the Illinois River. The burrowing worm species Lumbriculus variegatus was introduced to homogenized Lake DePue sediments in aerated aquaria. We then introduced inert fine fluorescent particles to the sediment-water interface. Using time-lapse photography, we observed the mixing of the fluorescent particles into the sediment bed over a two-week period. We developed image analysis software to characterize the concentration distribution of the fluorescent particles as a function of sediment depth, and applied this to the time-series of images to evaluate sediment mixing. We fit a one-dimensional CTRW model to the depth profiles to evaluate the underlying statistical properties of the mixing behavior. This analysis suggests that the sediment mixing caused by L. variegatus burrowing is subdiffusive in time and superdiffusive in space. We also found that heavy metal contamination significantly reduces L. variegatus burrowing, causing increasingly anomalous sediment mixing. This result implies that there can be important feedbacks between sediment chemistry, organism behavior, and sediment mixing that are not considered in current environmental models.

  10. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  11. Piezoelectric, elastic, Infrared and Raman behavior of ZnO wurtzite under pressure from periodic DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marana, Naiara Letícia; Casassa, Silvia Maria; Sambrano, Julio Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    The influence of pressure on elastic, piezoelectric (total and clamped-ion contribution), dielectric constants, Infrared and Raman spectra, and topological properties of ZnO wurtzite structure was carried out via periodic DFT/B3LYP methodology. The computational simulation indicated that, as the pressure increases, the structure becomes more rigid and an enhancement of the direct piezoelectric response along the z-direction was observed. Bader topological analysis and Hirshfeld-I charges showed a slight increase in the ionic character of Zn-O bond. Besides that, changes in the piezoelectric response are mainly due to the approach between Zn and O than to charge transfer phenomena among the two atoms. Pressure induces a sensitive displacement in the Infrared and Raman frequencies and a decrease of the E2 mode. Nevertheless, the increase of pressure does not lead to a change in the semiconductor character, which proves that the ZnO support high pressures and can be applied in different devices.

  12. Deficient Behavioral Inhibition and Anomalous Selective Attention in a Community Sample of Adolescents with Psychopathic Traits and Low-Anxiety Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Jennifer E.; Newman, Joseph P.; Bates, John E.; Goodnight, Jackson; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Pettit, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    Socialization is the important process by which individuals learn and then effectively apply the rules of appropriate societal behavior. Response modulation is a psychobiological process theorized to aid in socialization by allowing individuals to utilize contextual information to modify ongoing behavior appropriately. Using Hare's (1991)…

  13. Dynamic behaviors of water contained in calcium-silicate-hydrate gel at different temperatures studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhou; Deng, Pei-Na; Zhang, Li-Li; Li, Hua

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic behaviors of water contained in calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel with different water content values from 10% to 30% (by weight), are studied by using an empirical diffusion model (EDM) to analyze the experimental data of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra at measured temperatures ranging from 230 K to 280 K. In the study, the experimental QENS spectra with the whole Q-range are considered. Several important parameters including the bound/immobile water elastic coefficient A, the bound water index BWI, the Lorentzian with a half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) Γ 1(Q) and Γ 2(Q), the self-diffusion coefficients D t1 and D t2 of water molecules, the average residence times τ 01 and τ 02, and the proton mean squared displacement (MSD) are obtained. The results show that the QENS spectra can be fitted very well not only for small Q (≤ 1 Å-1) but also for large Q. The bound/immobile water fraction in a C-S-H gel sample can be shown by the fitted BWI. The distinction between bound/immobile and mobile water, which includes confined water and ultra-confined water, can be seen by the fitted MSD. All the MSD tend to be the smallest value below 0.25 Å2 (the MSD of bound/immobile water) as the Q increases to 1.9 Å-1, no matter what the temperature and water content are. Furthermore, by the abrupt changes of the fitted values of D t1, τ 01, and Γ 1(Q), a crossover temperature at 250 K, namely the liquid-to-crystal-like transition temperature, can be identified for confined water in large gel pores (LGPs) and/or small gel pores (SGPs) contained in the C-S-H gel sample with 30% water content.

  14. Elastic properties and buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with diethyltoluenediamines using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.; Rouhi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) modification processes are of great importance for good dispersion of CNTs and load transfer issues in nanocomposites. Among these processes, polymer covalent functionalization is found to be an effective way to alter the mechanical properties and behavior of pristine CNTs. Therefore, the mechanical properties and buckling behavior of diethyltoluenediamines (DETDA) functionalized CNTs are investigated employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results demonstrate that as the polymer weight percentage increases, Young's modulus and critical buckling load increase almost linearly for both regular and random polymer distributions, whereas critical strain decreases with different trends depending on the type of polymer distribution. Finally, the buckling mode shapes of the presented models are illustrated and it was revealed that there are some differences between the mode shapes of functionalized CNTs and those of pristine CNTs.

  15. Determination of the elastic moduli of a machinable ceramic over the range from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H.; Nagai, S.; Imai, H.

    1987-07-01

    The ultrasonic velocities of a machinable ceramic were measured using the pulse echo overlap technique. The machinable ceramic consists of 5- to 10-..mu..m crystallite blocks of mica in a boroaluminosilicate glass matrix. The elastic moduli are deduced from the sound velocities over the temperature range from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C. Their temperature change is well described by a fourth-degree polynomial. Although the moduli decrease with increasing temperature, a plateau region appears at about 450/sup 0/C. This anomalous behavior is explained by applying the simple rule of mixtures to cnstitutent materials, the mica crystallites, and the glass matrix.

  16. Phonons, nature of bonding, and their relation to anomalous thermal expansion behavior of M{sub 2}O (M = Au, Ag, Cu)

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Chaplot, S. L.; Rols, S.

    2014-03-07

    We report a comparative study of the dynamics of Cu{sub 2}O, Ag{sub 2}O, and Au{sub 2}O (i.e., M{sub 2}O with M = Au, Ag, and Cu) using first principle calculations based on the density functional theory. Here, for the first time, we show that the nature of chemical bonding and open space in the unit cell are directly related to the magnitude of thermal expansion coefficient. A good match between the calculated phonon density of states and that derived from inelastic neutron scattering measurements is obtained for Cu{sub 2}O and Ag{sub 2}O. The calculated thermal expansions of Ag{sub 2}O and Cu{sub 2}O are negative, in agreement with available experimental data, while it is found to be positive for Au{sub 2}O. We identify the low energy phonon modes responsible for this anomalous thermal expansion. We further calculate the charge density in the three compounds and find that the magnitude of the ionic character of the Ag{sub 2}O, Cu{sub 2}O, and Au{sub 2}O crystals is in decreasing order, with an Au-O bond of covalent nature strongly rigidifying the Au{sub 4}O tetrahedral units. The nature of the chemical bonding is also found to be an important ingredient to understand the large shift of the phonon frequencies of these solids with pressure and temperature. In particular, the quartic component of the anharmonic term in the crystal potential is able to account for the temperature dependence of the phonon modes.

  17. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  18. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  19. Anomalous time behaviors of remanent and normal magnetizations in spinel spin glass Ga{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}NiCrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, J.K.; Treutmann, W.; Untersteller, E.

    2005-05-01

    Complex spin glass behavior is found to be present in a spinel system Ga{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}NiCrO{sub 4} where the cations occupy two different sites, namely the tetrahedrally coordinated A site and the octahedrally coordinated B site. The complex findings include anomalous time (t) variations of isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), thermoremanent magnetization (TRM), zero field cooled magnetization [M(ZFC)], and field cooled magnetization [M(FC)]. Surprising results, like M(FC)behaviors of the A- and B-site magnetizations in the system.

  20. Composite Behavior of Lath Martensite Steels Induced by Plastic Strain, a New Paradigm for the Elastic-Plastic Response of Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungár, Tamás; Harjo, Stefanus; Kawasaki, Takuro; Tomota, Yo; Ribárik, Gábor; Shi, Zengmin

    2017-01-01

    Based on high-resolution neutron diffraction experiments, we will show that in lath martensite steels, the initially homogeneous dislocation structure, i.e., homogeneous on the length scale of grain size, is disrupted by plastic deformation, which, in turn, produces a composite on the length scale of martensite lath packets. The diffraction patterns of plastically strained martensitic steel reveal characteristically asymmetric peak profiles in the same way as has been observed in materials with heterogeneous dislocation structures. The quasi homogeneous lath structure, formed by quenching, is disrupted by plastic deformation producing a composite structure. Lath packets oriented favorably or unfavorably for dislocation glide become soft or hard. Two lath packet types develop by work softening or work hardening in which the dislocation densities become smaller or larger compared to the initial average dislocation density. The decomposition into soft and hard lath packets is accompanied by load redistribution and the formation of long-range internal stresses between the two lath packet types. The composite behavior of plastically deformed lath martensite opens a new way to understand the elastic-plastic response in this class of materials.

  1. Anomalous Behavior in the Rotational Spectra of the NU(8) = 2 and the NU(8) = 3 Vibrations for the Carbon -13 and NITROGEN-15 Tagged Isotopes of the Methyl Cyanide Molecule in the Frequency Range 17-95 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Share, Mohammad Abdel Karim

    1990-01-01

    The rotational microwave spectra of the three isotopes (^{13}CH _3^{12}C^ {15}N, ^{12} CH_3^{13}C ^{15}N, and ^ {13}CH_3^{13 }C^{15}N) of the methyl cyanide molecule in the nu _8 = 3, nu_8 = 2, nu_7 = 1 and nu_4 = 1 vibrational energy levels for the rotational components 1 <=q J <=q 5 (for a range of frequency 17-95 GHz.) were experimentally and theoretically examined. Rotational components in each vibration were measured to determine the mutual interactions in each vibration between any of the vibrational levels investigated. The method of isotopic substitution was employed for internal tuning of each vibrational level by single and double substitution of ^{13} C in the two sites of the molecule. It was found that relative frequencies within each vibration with respect to another vibration were shifted in a systematic way. The results given in this work were interpreted on the basis of these energy shifts. Large departure between experimentally measured and theoretically predicted frequency for the quantum sets (J, K = +/-1, l = +/-1), K l = 1 in the nu_8 = 3 vibrational states for the ^{13 }C and ^{15}N tagged isotopes of CH_3CN showed anomalous behavior which was explained as being due to Fermi resonance. Accidentally strong resonances (ASR) were introduced to account for some departures were not explained by Fermi resonance.

  2. Anomalous spin Josephson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei-Juan; Wang, Jun; Hao, Lei; Liu, Jun-Feng

    2016-10-01

    We report a theoretical study on the spin Josephson effect arising from the exchange coupling of the two ferromagnets (Fs), which are deposited on a two-dimensional (2D) time-reversal-invariant topological insulator. An anomalous spin supercurrent Js z˜sin(α +α0) is found to flow in between the two Fs and the ground state of the system is not limited to the magnetically collinear configuration (α =n π ,n is an integer) but determined by a controllable angle α0, where α is the crossed angle between the two F magnetizations. The angle α0 is the dynamic phase of the electrons traveling in between the two Fs and can be controlled electrically by a gate voltage. This anomalous spin Josephson effect, similar to the conventional φ0 superconductor junction, originates from the definite electron chirality of the helical edge states in the 2D topological insulator. These results indicate that the magnetic coupling in a topological system is different from the usual one in conventional materials.

  3. Deficient Behavioral Inhibition and Anomalous Selective Attention in a Community Sample of Adolescents with Psychopathic Traits and Low-Anxiety Traits

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Jennifer E.; Newman, Joseph P.; Bates, John E.; Goodnight, Jackson; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Pettit, Gregory S.

    2009-01-01

    Socialization is the important process by which individuals learn and then effectively apply the rules of appropriate societal behavior. Response modulation is a psychobiological process theorized to aid in socialization by allowing individuals to utilize contextual information to modify ongoing behavior appropriately. Using Hare’s (1991) Psychopathy Checklist and the Welsh (1956) anxiety scale, researchers have identified a relatively specific form of a response modulation deficit in lowanxious, Caucasian psychopaths. Preliminary evidence suggests that the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001) may be used to identify children with a similar vulnerability. Using a representative community sample of 308 16-year-olds from the Child Development Project (Dodge, Bates, & Pettit, 1990), we tested and corroborated the hypotheses that participants with relatively low anxiety and high APSD scores would display poorer passive avoidance learning and less interference on a spatially separated, picture-word Stroop task than controls. Consistent with hypotheses, the expected group differences in picture-word Stroop interference were found with male and female participants, whereas predicted differences in passive avoidance were specific to male participants. To the extent that response modulation deficits contributing to poor socialization among psychopathic adult offenders also characterize a subgroup of adolescents with mild conduct problems, clarification of the developmental processes that moderate the expression of this vulnerability could inform early interventions. PMID:16118992

  4. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    DOE PAGES

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; ...

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, andmore » an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.« less

  5. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, and an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.

  6. Elastic Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles

    2006-03-01

    -divided into an Inertial-Non-Collisional where the stresses scale inertially, but the particles interact in clusters through long duration contacts, and the Inertial-Collisional (or the old rapid-flow) regime. Finally, the simulations show that Stress-Controlled flows are rheologically different from Controlled-Volume flows. Physically, there is a range of dense concentrations (0.5<ν<0.6) in which it is possible, but not necessary to form force chains and demonstrate elastic behavior. (In other words it is possible for the material to exhibit two different states at the same concentration.) By forcing the material to support an applied loads across force chains, Stress-Controlled flows may behave elastically through this range of concentrations while, at the same shear rates rate Controlled-Volume flows, fixed at the average concentration of the Stress-Controlled flow, behave inertially.

  7. Emergence of anomalous transport in stressed rough fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Peter K.; Brown, Stephen; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    We report the emergence of anomalous (non-Fickian) transport through a rough-walled fracture as a result of increasing normal stress on the fracture. We show that the origin of this anomalous transport behavior can be traced to the emergence of a heterogeneous flow field dominated by preferential channels and stagnation zones, as a result of the larger number of contacts in a highly stressed fracture. We show that the velocity distribution determines the late-time scaling of particle spreading, and velocity correlation determines the magnitude of spreading and the transition time from the initial ballistic regime to the asymptotic anomalous behavior. We also propose a spatial Markov model that reproduces the transport behavior at the scale of the entire fracture with only three physical parameters. Our results point to a heretofore unrecognized link between geomechanics and particle transport in fractured media.

  8. Detection of anomalous events

    DOEpatents

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  9. Anomalous Micellization of Pluronic Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Amanda; Ryu, Chang Y.

    2014-03-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) - poly(propylene oxide) - poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymers, commercially known as Pluronics, are a unique family of amphiphilic triblock polymers, which self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution. These copolymers have shown promise in therapeutic, biomedical, cosmetic, and nanotech applications. As-received samples of Pluronics contain low molecular weight impurities (introduced during the manufacturing and processing), that are ignored in most applications. It has been observed, however, that in semi-dilute aqueous solutions, at concentrations above 1 wt%, the temperature dependent micellization behavior of the Pluronics is altered. Anomalous behavior includes a shift of the critical micellization temperature and formation of large aggregates at intermediate temperatures before stable sized micelles form. We attribute this behavior to the low molecular weight impurities that are inherent to the Pluronics which interfere with the micellization process. Through the use of Dynamic Light Scattering and HPLC, we compared the anomalous behavior of different Pluronics of different impurity levels to their purified counterparts.

  10. Theoretical study of the elasticity, mechanical behavior, electronic structure, interatomic bonding, and dielectric function of an intergranular glassy film model in prismatic β-Si3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, W. Y.; Rulis, Paul; Ouyang, Lizhi; Aryal, Sitaram; Misra, Anil.

    2010-06-01

    Microstructures such as intergranular glassy films (IGFs) are ubiquitous in many structural ceramics. They control many of the important physical properties of polycrystalline ceramics and can be influenced during processing to modify the performance of devices that contain them. In recent years, there has been intense research, both experimentally and computationally, on the structure and properties of IGFs. Unlike grain boundaries or dislocations with well-defined crystalline planes, the atomic scale structure of IGFs, their fundamental electronic interactions, and their bonding characteristics are far more complicated and not well known. In this paper, we present the results of theoretical simulations using ab initio methods on an IGF model in β-Si3N4 with prismatic crystalline planes. The 907-atom model has a dimension of 14.533Å×15.225Å×47.420Å . The IGF layer is perpendicular to the z axis, 16.4Å wide, and contains 72 Si, 32 N, and 124 O atoms. Based on this model, the mechanical and elastic properties, the electronic structure, the interatomic bonding, the localization of defective states, the distribution of electrostatic potential, and the optical dielectric function are evaluated and compared with crystalline β-Si3N4 . We have also performed a theoretical tensile experiment on this model by incrementally extending the structure in the direction perpendicular to the IGF plane until the model fully separated. It is shown that fracture occurs at a strain of 9.42% with a maximum stress of 13.9 GPa. The fractured segments show plastic behavior and the formation of surfacial films on the β-Si3N4 . These results are very different from those of a previously studied basal plane model [J. Chen , Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 256103 (2005)10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.256103] and add insights to the structure and behavior of IGFs in polycrystalline ceramics. The implications of these results and the need for further investigations are discussed.

  11. Geometric Stability and Elastic Response of a Supported Nanoparticle Film

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, Brian D.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Meron, Mati; Lam, Kin Lok; Salas, Desiree; Viccaro, P. James; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Lin, Binhua

    2011-09-16

    The mechanical response to compression of a self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer and trilayer at the air-liquid interface is examined. Analysis of the film's buckling morphology under compression reveals an anomalously low bending rigidity for both the monolayer and the trilayer, in contrast with continuum elastic plates. We attribute this to the spherical geometry of the nanoparticles and poor coupling between layers, respectively. The elastic energy of the trilayers is first delocalized in wrinkles and then localized into folds, as predicted by linear and nonlinear elastic theory for an inextensible thin film supported on a fluid.

  12. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  13. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    clearly needed. We also show how the combination of single-crystal elasticity data and volume compression data for diopside can be used to constrain the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus -- an important parameter for modeling seismic velocities in mantle assemblages. More broadly, the mineral elasticity data set can provide insights into the systematic variation of elastic properties that are of great importance in mineral physics and geophysics. We will examine the role of anisotropy, Vp/Vs variations, pressure derivatives of elastic moduli, and auxetic behavior to name a few properties of interest. The pioneering work on mineral elasticity carried out by Bob Liebermann has made an immense contribution to this important database, as well as providing strong scientific motivation for this work.

  14. Elastic, Conductive, Polymeric Hydrogels and Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yun; He, Weina; Cao, Tai; Guo, Haitao; Zhang, Yongyi; Li, Qingwen; Shao, Ziqiang; Cui, Yulin; Zhang, Xuetong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of inherent rigidity of the conjugated macromolecular chains resulted from the delocalized π-electron system along the polymer backbone, it has been a huge challenge to make conducting polymer hydrogels elastic by far. Herein elastic and conductive polypyrrole hydrogels with only conducting polymer as the continuous phase have been simply synthesized in the indispensable conditions of 1) mixed solvent, 2) deficient oxidant, and 3) monthly secondary growth. The elastic mechanism and oxidative polymerization mechanism on the resulting PPy hydrogels have been discussed. The resulting hydrogels show some novel properties, e.g., shape memory elasticity, fast functionalization with various guest objects, and fast removal of organic infectants from aqueous solutions, all of which cannot be observed from traditional non-elastic conducting polymer counterparts. What's more, light-weight, elastic, and conductive organic sponges with excellent stress-sensing behavior have been successfully achieved via using the resulting polypyrrole hydrogels as precursors. PMID:25052015

  15. Development of the average lattice phase-strain and global elastic macro-strain in Al/TiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, N.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Allison, J.E.

    1994-02-01

    The development of elastic lattice phase strains and global elastic macro-strain in a 15 vol% TiC particle reinforced 2219-T6 Al composite was modeled by finite element method (FEM) as a function of tensile uniaxial loading. The numerical predictions are in excellent agreement with strain measurements at a spallation neutron source. Results from the measurements and modeling indicate that the lattice phase-strains go through a ``zigzag`` increase with the applied load in the direction perpendicular to the load, while the changes of slope in the parallel direction are monotonic. FEM results further showed that it is essential to consider the effect of thermal residual stresses (TRS) in understanding this anomalous behavior. It was demonstrated that, due to TRS, the site of matrix plastic flow initiation changed. On the other hand, the changes of slope of the elastic global macrostrain is solely determined by the phase-stress partition in the composite. An analytical calculation showed that both experimental and numerical slope changes during elastic global strain response under loading could be accurately reproduced by accounting for the changes of phase-stress ratio between the matrix and the matrix.

  16. Transport properties of elastically coupled fractional Brownian motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wangyong; Wang, Huiqi; Lin, Lifeng; Wang, Fei; Zhong, Suchuan

    2015-11-01

    Under the background of anomalous diffusion, which is characterized by the sub-linear or super-linear mean-square displacement in time, we proposed the coupled fractional Brownian motors, in which the asymmetrical periodic potential as ratchet is coupled mutually with elastic springs, and the driving source is the external harmonic force and internal thermal fluctuations. The transport mechanism of coupled particles in the overdamped limit is investigated as the function of the temperature of baths, coupling constant and natural length of the spring, the amplitude and frequency of driving force, and the asymmetry of ratchet potential by numerical stimulations. The results indicate that the damping force involving the information of historical velocity leads to the nonlocal memory property and blocks the traditional dissipative motion behaviors, and it even plays a cooperative role of driving force in drift motion of the coupled particles. Thus, we observe various non-monotonic resonance-like behaviors of collective directed transport in the mediums with different diffusion exponents.

  17. Elastic moduli of rock glasses under pressure to 8 kilobars and geophysical implications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meister, R.; Robertson, E.C.; Werke, R.W.; Raspet, R.

    1980-01-01

    Shear and longitudinal velocities were measured by the ultrasonic phase comparison method as a function of pressure to 8 kbar on synthetic glasses of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, and quartz composition and on natural obsidian. Velocities of most of the glasses decrease anomalously with pressure, but increasingly more-normal behavior occurs with decrease in SiO2 content. The pressure derivatives of rigidity and bulk modulus increase linearly, from -3.39 to -0.26 and from -5.91 to +2.09, respectively, with decrease in SiO2 content from 100 to 49%. The change from negative to positive in the pressure derivatives of both moduli and observed at Poisson's ratio of about 0.25 is consitent with the Smyth model for the anomalous elastic behavior of glass. If the temperature in the upper mantle is about 1500oC, tholeiitic basalt would be molten in accordance with the partial melt explanation for the low-velocity zone; at 1300oC and below, basalt would be in the glassy state, especially if more felsic than tholeiite. -Authors

  18. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  19. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  20. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomeng; Li, Ji; Li, Jing; Cai, Baiqiang

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study described the characteristics of the systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration (PS) in an attempt to better distinguish PS from other acquired lesions. METHODS: We identified 25 patients hospitalized at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital during January 2013 to December 2015 with the assistance of medical catalogers. Twenty-three patients with a definite diagnosis of “pulmonary sequestration” clinically or pathologically were included in the study. The medical records, imaging information, and pathological data were reviewed retrospectively. The general characteristics of the patients and the features of the anomalous arteries were summarized. RESULTS: Aberrant arterial supply of PS was found in all 23 (100%) cases. Among them, twenty patients received surgery, including 14 (70%) with aberrant arterial supply found before surgery, and the other 6 (30%) found during surgery. Nineteen (82.6%) patients had a single systematic arterial supply, with a median diameter of 8 mm. More than one arterial supplies were found in four (17.4%) cases. In 21 (91.3%) cases, the anomalous systemic artery originated from the descending thoracic aorta just adjacent to the sequestrated lung which it supplied, without the presence of accompanying bronchi. In twenty (87.0%) patients who received the surgical intervention, samples of 12 (85.7%) were proved to have elastic vessel walls, out of the 14 samples in which the anomalous systemic arteries were available for analysis. CONCLUSIONS: There are no certain pathology diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of PS. The detecting of the aberrant systematic artery and distinguishing it from the bronchial arteries corresponded to certain lung abnormalities are the keys to the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients. We propose that the characteristic features of the anomalous arteries include: Originating from aorta and its main branches, adjacent to the sequestrated area

  1. Elastic Properties of Plasticine, Silly Putty, and Tennis Strings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    How would a physicist describe the elastic properties of an apple or a banana? Physics students and teachers are familiar with the elastic properties of metal springs, but are likely to be less familiar with the elastic properties of other common materials. The behavior of a metal spring is commonly examined in the laboratory by adding masses to…

  2. Consumer brand choice: individual and group analyses of demand elasticity.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Castro, Jorge M; Foxall, Gordon R; Schrezenmaier, Teresa C

    2006-03-01

    Following the behavior-analytic tradition of analyzing individual behavior, the present research investigated demand elasticity of individual consumers purchasing supermarket products, and compared individual and group analyses of elasticity. Panel data from 80 UK consumers purchasing 9 product categories (i.e., baked beans, biscuits, breakfast cereals, butter, cheese, fruit juice, instant coffee, margarine and tea) during a 16-week period were used. Elasticity coefficients were calculated for individual consumers with data from all or only 1 product category (intra-consumer elasticities), and for each product category using all data points from all consumers (overall product elasticity) or 1 average data point per consumer (interconsumer elasticity). In addition to this, split-sample elasticity coefficients were obtained for each individual with data from all product categories purchased during weeks 1 to 8 and 9 to 16. The results suggest that: 1) demand elasticity coefficients calculated for individual consumers purchasing supermarket food products are compatible with predictions from economic theory and behavioral economics; 2) overall product elasticities, typically employed in marketing and econometric research, include effects of interconsumer and intraconsumer elasticities; 3) when comparing demand elasticities of different product categories, group and individual analyses yield similar trends; and 4) individual differences in demand elasticity are relatively consistent across time, but do not seem to be consistent across products. These results demonstrate the theoretical, methodological, and managerial relevance of investigating the behavior of individual consumers.

  3. Consumer Brand Choice: Individual and Group Analyses of Demand Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Castro, Jorge M; Foxall, Gordon R; Schrezenmaier, Teresa C

    2006-01-01

    Following the behavior-analytic tradition of analyzing individual behavior, the present research investigated demand elasticity of individual consumers purchasing supermarket products, and compared individual and group analyses of elasticity. Panel data from 80 UK consumers purchasing 9 product categories (i.e., baked beans, biscuits, breakfast cereals, butter, cheese, fruit juice, instant coffee, margarine and tea) during a 16-week period were used. Elasticity coefficients were calculated for individual consumers with data from all or only 1 product category (intra-consumer elasticities), and for each product category using all data points from all consumers (overall product elasticity) or 1 average data point per consumer (interconsumer elasticity). In addition to this, split-sample elasticity coefficients were obtained for each individual with data from all product categories purchased during weeks 1 to 8 and 9 to 16. The results suggest that: 1) demand elasticity coefficients calculated for individual consumers purchasing supermarket food products are compatible with predictions from economic theory and behavioral economics; 2) overall product elasticities, typically employed in marketing and econometric research, include effects of interconsumer and intraconsumer elasticities; 3) when comparing demand elasticities of different product categories, group and individual analyses yield similar trends; and 4) individual differences in demand elasticity are relatively consistent across time, but do not seem to be consistent across products. These results demonstrate the theoretical, methodological, and managerial relevance of investigating the behavior of individual consumers. PMID:16673823

  4. Anomalous Earth flybys of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2015-07-01

    A small deviation from the potential is expected for the gravitational interaction of extended bodies. It is explained as a consequence of a recently proposed gravitational impact model (Wilhelm et al. in Astrophys. Space Sci. 343:135-144, 2013) and has been applied to anomalous perihelion advances by Wilhelm and Dwivedi (New Astron. 31:51-55, 2014). The effect—an offset of the effective gravitational centre from the geometric centre of a spherical symmetric body—might also be responsible for the observed anomalous orbital energy gains and speed increases during Earth flybys of several spacecraft. However, close flybys would require detailed considerations of the orbit geometry. In this study, an attempt is made to explain the anomalous Earth flybys of the Galileo, NEAR Shoemaker and Rosetta spacecraft.

  5. Comparative study of structural, electronic and elastic behavior of OsAl and OsSi in B2 and B20 phases under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, N.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    The structural, electronic, bonding, elastic and mechanical properties of osmium intermetallic OsX (X = Al and Si) compounds in B2-phase as well as in B20-phase have been studied using full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method in the framework of density functional theory within generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice constants (a0) and bulk modulus (B) are in good agreement with experimental and available theoretical results. From the band structure calculations, it is shown that OsAl is metallic in both the phases while OsSi is found to be semiconductor in B20-phase with the indirect band gap of 0.33 eV but at high pressure the density of states at Fermi level N(EF) decreases and the bands spread over the entire reason in both the compounds. The elastic constants of these compounds obey the stability criteria for cubic system at 0 pressure as well as at high pressure. With increasing pressure, all the elastic constants for OsAl and OsSi increase almost linearly with pressure in both the phases except C44 for OsAl-B20 which shows its softening nature. Bonding nature is discussed in terms of charge density difference plots and Fermi surfaces.

  6. Scaling theory for anomalous semiclassical quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena-Junior, M. I.; Macêdo, A. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum transport through devices coupled to electron reservoirs can be described in terms of the full counting statistics (FCS) of charge transfer. Transport observables, such as conductance and shot-noise power are just cumulants of FCS and can be obtained from the sample's average density of transmission eigenvalues, which in turn can be obtained from a finite element representation of the saddle-point equation of the Keldysh (or supersymmetric) nonlinear sigma model, known as quantum circuit theory. Normal universal metallic behavior in the semiclassical regime is controlled by the presence of a Fabry-Pérot singularity in the average density of transmission eigenvalues. We present general conditions for the suppression of Fabry-Pérot modes in the semiclassical regime in a sample of arbitrary shape, a disordered conductor or a network of ballistic quantum dots, which leads to an anomalous metallic phase. Through a double-scaling limit, we derive a scaling equation for anomalous metallic transport, in the form of a nonlinear differential equation, which generalizes the ballistic-diffusive scaling equation of a normal metal. The two-parameter stationary solution of our scaling equation generalizes Dorokhov's universal single-parameter distribution of transmission eigenvalues. We provide a simple interpretation of the stationary solution using a thermodynamic analogy with a spin-glass system. As an application, we consider a system formed by a diffusive wire coupled via a barrier to normal-superconductor reservoirs. We observe anomalous reflectionless tunneling, when all perfectly transmitting channels are suppressed, which cannot be explained by the usual mechanism of disorder-induced opening of tunneling channels.

  7. Catastrophic extraction of anomalous events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas; Ro, Sookwang; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we discuss extraction of anomalous events based on the theory of catastrophes, a mathematical theory of continuous geometrical manifolds with discrete singularities called catastrophes. Intelligence exploitation systems and technologies include such novel data mining techniques as automatic extraction of discrete anomalous events by software algorithms based on the theory of catastrophes, that can reduce complex problems to a few essential so-called state variables. This paper discusses mostly corank-1 catastrophes with only one state variable, for simplicity. As an example we discuss mostly avionics platforms and catastrophic failures that can be recorded by flight instruments.

  8. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  9. Consumer Brand Choice: Individual and Group Analyses of Demand Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira-Castro, Jorge M.; Foxall, Gordon R.; Schrezenmaier, Teresa C.

    2006-01-01

    Following the behavior-analytic tradition of analyzing individual behavior, the present research investigated demand elasticity of individual consumers purchasing supermarket products, and compared individual and group analyses of elasticity. Panel data from 80 UK consumers purchasing 9 product categories (i.e., baked beans, biscuits, breakfast…

  10. Near tip stress and strain fields for short elastic cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soediono, A. H.; Kardomateas, G. A.; Carlson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental fatigue crack growth studies have concluded an apparent anomalous behavior of short cracks. To investigate the reasons for this unexpected behavior, the present paper focuses on identifying the crack length circumstances under which the requirements for a single parameter (K(sub I) or delta K(sub I) if cyclic loading is considered) characterization are violated. Furthermore, an additional quantity, the T stress, as introduced by Rice, and the related biaxiality ratio, B, are calculated for several crack lengths and two configurations, the single-edge-cracked and the centrally-cracked specimen. It is postulated that a two-parameter characterization by K and T (or B) is needed for the adequate description of the stress and strain field around a short crack. To further verify the validity of this postulate, the influence of the third term of the Williams series on the stress, strain and displacement fields around the crack tip and in particular on the B parameter is also examined. It is found that the biaxiality ratio would be more negative if the third term effects are included in both geometries. The study is conducted using the finite element method with linearly elastic material and isoparametric elements and axial (mode I) loading. Moreover, it is clearly shown that it is not proper to postulate the crack size limits for 'short crack' behavior as a normalized ratio with the specimen width, a/w; it should instead be stated as an absolute, or normalized with respect to a small characteristic dimension such as the grain size. Finally, implications regarding the prediction of cyclic (fatigue) growth of short cracks are discussed.

  11. Precise Quantization of Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestwick, Andrew

    In the quantum anomalous Hall effect, electron transport in a magnetically-doped topological insulator takes place through chiral, dissipationless edge channels. In this talk, we discuss the behavior of a nearly ideal implementations of the effect in which the Hall resistance is within a part per 10,000 of its quantized value and the longitudinal resistivity can reach below 1 Ω per square. Nearly all Cr-doped topological insulator samples demonstrate extreme temperature dependence that is well-modeled by a small effective gap, allowing control over quantization with an unexpected magnetocaloric effect. We also discuss measurements of new device geometries and non-local resistances that identify the sources of dissipation that limit the effect. (Now at Rigetti Computing).

  12. Anomalous Diffusion of Single Particles in Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Regner, Benjamin M.; Vučinić, Dejan; Domnisoru, Cristina; Bartol, Thomas M.; Hetzer, Martin W.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2013-01-01

    The crowded intracellular environment poses a formidable challenge to experimental and theoretical analyses of intracellular transport mechanisms. Our measurements of single-particle trajectories in cytoplasm and their random-walk interpretations elucidate two of these mechanisms: molecular diffusion in crowded environments and cytoskeletal transport along microtubules. We employed acousto-optic deflector microscopy to map out the three-dimensional trajectories of microspheres migrating in the cytosolic fraction of a cellular extract. Classical Brownian motion (BM), continuous time random walk, and fractional BM were alternatively used to represent these trajectories. The comparison of the experimental and numerical data demonstrates that cytoskeletal transport along microtubules and diffusion in the cytosolic fraction exhibit anomalous (nonFickian) behavior and posses statistically distinct signatures. Among the three random-walk models used, continuous time random walk provides the best representation of diffusion, whereas microtubular transport is accurately modeled with fractional BM. PMID:23601312

  13. Anomalous Stress Response of Ultrahard WBn Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Zhou, Dan; Zheng, Weitao; Ma, Yanming; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-10-01

    Boron-rich tungsten borides are premier prototypes of a new class of ultrahard compounds. Here, we show by first-principles calculations that their stress-strain relations display surprisingly diverse and anomalous behavior under a variety of loading conditions. Most remarkable is the dramatically changing bonding configurations and deformation modes with rising boron concentration in WBn (n =2 , 3, 4), resulting in significantly different stress responses and unexpected indentation strength variations. This novel phenomenon stems from the peculiar structural arrangements in tungsten borides driven by boron's ability to form unusually versatile bonding states. Our results elucidate the intriguing deformation mechanisms that define a distinct type of ultrahard material. These new insights underscore the need to explore unconventional structure-property relations in a broad range of transition-metal light-element compounds.

  14. Anomalous stress response of ultrahard WBn compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Quan; Zhou, Dan; Zheng, Weitao; ...

    2015-10-29

    Boron-rich tungsten borides are premier prototypes of a new class of ultrahard compounds. Here, we show by first-principles calculations that their stress-strain relations display surprisingly diverse and anomalous behavior under a variety of loading conditions. Most remarkable is the dramatically changing bonding configurations and deformation modes with rising boron concentration in WBn (n=2, 3, 4), resulting in significantly different stress responses and unexpected indentation strength variations. This novel phenomenon stems from the peculiar structural arrangements in tungsten borides driven by boron’s ability to form unusually versatile bonding states. Our results elucidate the intriguing deformation mechanisms that define a distinct typemore » of ultrahard material. Here, these new insights underscore the need to explore unconventional structure-property relations in a broad range of transition-metal light-element compounds.« less

  15. Anomalous electrical conductivity of nanoscale colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Suman; Padhy, Sourav

    2008-10-28

    The electrical conductivity of colloidal suspensions containing nanoscale conducting particles is nontrivially related to the particle volume fraction and the electrical double layer thickness. Classical electrochemical models, however, tend to grossly overpredict the pertinent effective electrical conductivity values, as compared to those obtained under experimental conditions. We attempt to address this discrepancy by appealing to the complex interconnection between the aggregation kinetics of the nanoscale particles and the electrodynamics within the double layer. In particular, we model the consequent alterations in the effective electrophoretic mobility values of the suspension by addressing the fundamentals of agglomeration-deagglomeration mechanisms through the pertinent variations in the effective particulate dimensions, solid fractions, as well as the equivalent suspension viscosity. The consequent alterations in the electrical conductivity values provide a substantially improved prediction of the corresponding experimental findings and explain the apparent anomalous behavior predicted by the classical theoretical postulates.

  16. Elasticity of the Rod-Shaped Gram-Negative Eubacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulbitch, A.; Quinn, B.; Pink, D.

    2000-12-01

    We report a theoretical calculation of the elasticity of the peptidoglycan network, the only stress-bearing part of rod-shaped Gram-negative eubacteria. The peptidoglycan network consists of elastic peptides and inextensible glycan strands, and it has been proposed that the latter form zigzag filaments along the circumference of the cylindrical bacterial shell. The zigzag geometry of the glycan strands gives rise to nonlinear elastic behavior. The four elastic moduli of the peptidoglycan network depend on its stressed state. For a bacterium under physiological conditions the elasticity is proportional to the bacterial turgor pressure. Our results are in good agreement with recent measurements.

  17. Hysteresis and the Dynamic Elasticity of Consolidated Granular Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guyer, R.A.; TenCate, J.; Johnson, P.

    1999-04-01

    Quasistatic elasticity measurements on rocks show them to be strikingly nonlinear and to have elastic hysteresis with end point memory. When the model for this quasistatic elasticity is extended to the description of nonlinear dynamic elasticity the elastic elements responsible for the hysteresis dominate the behavior. Consequently, in a resonant bar, driven to nonlinearity, the frequency shift and the attenuation are predicted to be nonanalytic functions of the strain field. A resonant bar experiment yielding results in substantial qualitative and quantitative accord with these predictions is reported. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  18. Anomalous transport in the crowded world of biological cells.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Felix; Franosch, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    A ubiquitous observation in cell biology is that the diffusive motion of macromolecules and organelles is anomalous, and a description simply based on the conventional diffusion equation with diffusion constants measured in dilute solution fails. This is commonly attributed to macromolecular crowding in the interior of cells and in cellular membranes, summarizing their densely packed and heterogeneous structures. The most familiar phenomenon is a sublinear, power-law increase of the mean-square displacement (MSD) as a function of the lag time, but there are other manifestations like strongly reduced and time-dependent diffusion coefficients, persistent correlations in time, non-Gaussian distributions of spatial displacements, heterogeneous diffusion and a fraction of immobile particles. After a general introduction to the statistical description of slow, anomalous transport, we summarize some widely used theoretical models: Gaussian models like fractional Brownian motion and Langevin equations for visco-elastic media, the continuous-time random walk model, and the Lorentz model describing obstructed transport in a heterogeneous environment. Particular emphasis is put on the spatio-temporal properties of the transport in terms of two-point correlation functions, dynamic scaling behaviour, and how the models are distinguished by their propagators even if the MSDs are identical. Then, we review the theory underlying commonly applied experimental techniques in the presence of anomalous transport like single-particle tracking, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). We report on the large body of recent experimental evidence for anomalous transport in crowded biological media: in cyto- and nucleoplasm as well as in cellular membranes, complemented by in vitro experiments where a variety of model systems mimic physiological crowding conditions. Finally, computer simulations are discussed which play an important

  19. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  20. Anomalous Thermalization in Ergodic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitz, David J.; Bar Lev, Yevgeny

    2016-10-01

    It is commonly believed that quantum isolated systems satisfying the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) are diffusive. We show that this assumption is too restrictive since there are systems that are asymptotically in a thermal state yet exhibit anomalous, subdiffusive thermalization. We show that such systems satisfy a modified version of the ETH ansatz and derive a general connection between the scaling of the variance of the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators, written in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian, and the dynamical exponent. We find that for subdiffusively thermalizing systems the variance scales more slowly with system size than expected for diffusive systems. We corroborate our findings by numerically studying the distribution of the coefficients of the eigenfunctions and the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators of the random field Heisenberg chain, which has anomalous transport in its thermal phase. Surprisingly, this system also has non-Gaussian distributions of the eigenfunctions, thus, directly violating Berry's conjecture.

  1. Anomalous Thermalization in Ergodic Systems.

    PubMed

    Luitz, David J; Bar Lev, Yevgeny

    2016-10-21

    It is commonly believed that quantum isolated systems satisfying the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) are diffusive. We show that this assumption is too restrictive since there are systems that are asymptotically in a thermal state yet exhibit anomalous, subdiffusive thermalization. We show that such systems satisfy a modified version of the ETH ansatz and derive a general connection between the scaling of the variance of the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators, written in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian, and the dynamical exponent. We find that for subdiffusively thermalizing systems the variance scales more slowly with system size than expected for diffusive systems. We corroborate our findings by numerically studying the distribution of the coefficients of the eigenfunctions and the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators of the random field Heisenberg chain, which has anomalous transport in its thermal phase. Surprisingly, this system also has non-Gaussian distributions of the eigenfunctions, thus, directly violating Berry's conjecture.

  2. Colligative properties of anomalous water.

    PubMed

    Everett, D H; Haynes, J M; McElroy, P J

    1970-06-13

    Investigations of the phase behaviour on freezing and subsequent melting and of other properties indicate that anomalous water is a solution containing a fixed amount of relatively involatile material in normal water. There seems to be no need to postulate the existence of a new polymer of water in such solutions. If only water and silica are present, the properties are consistent with those of a silicic acid gel.

  3. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  4. Vibrations of elastically restrained frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, Carlos Marcelo; Grossi, Ricardo Oscar

    2005-07-01

    This paper deals with the determination of eigenfrequencies of a frame which consists of a beam supported by a column and is submitted to intermediate elastic constraints. The ends of the frame are elastically restrained against rotation and translation. The individual members of the frame are assumed to be governed by the transverse and axial vibration theory of an Euler-Bernoulli beam. The boundary and eigenvalue problem which governs the dynamical behavior of the frame structure is derived using the techniques of calculus of variations. Exact values of eigenfrequencies are determined by the application of the separation of variables method. Also, results are obtained by the use of the finite element method. The natural frequencies and mode shapes are presented for a wide range of values of the restraint parameters. Several particular cases are presented and some of these have been compared with those available in the literature.

  5. Anomalous diffusion with transient subordinators: a link to compound relaxation laws.

    PubMed

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Weron, Karina; Weron, Aleksander

    2014-02-07

    This paper deals with a problem of transient anomalous diffusion which is currently found to emerge from a wide range of complex processes. The nonscaling behavior of such phenomena reflects changes in time-scaling exponents of the mean-squared displacement through time domain - a more general picture of the anomalous diffusion observed in nature. Our study is based on the identification of some transient subordinators responsible for transient anomalous diffusion. We derive the corresponding fractional diffusion equation and provide links to the corresponding compound relaxation laws supported by this case generalizing many empirical dependencies well-known in relaxation investigations.

  6. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-03

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  7. Geophysical Characterization and Monitoring for Anomalous Transport (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    For several decades, geophysical methods (e.g., electrical, electromagnetic, and radar) have been used to monitor transport of ionic tracers and contaminants, thus providing information about the spatial and temporal morphology and evolution of tracer or contaminant plumes. In the last five years, time-lapse geophysical methods have been applied to understand non-equilibrium between mobile and immobile (or less mobile) domains in porous media (e.g., fractures and matrix) and surface water (i.e., transient storage). Electrical methods have been used in combination with conventional sampling to investigate the exchange of solute between domains and thereby infer exchange rates and relative volumes of mobile and immobile domains. Other methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance and complex resistivity, have been used to study the distribution of pore sizes present, which in turn control anomalous transport. Here, we (1) review the underlying petrophysical/hydrologic link between anomalous transport and geophysical monitoring; (2) review the emerging body of work using geophysical methods to understand anomalous transport and summarize case studies involving field experiments at an aquifer-storage recovery site in Charleston, SC, and two Department of Energy sites in Hanford, WA and Naturita, CO; and (3) discuss potential future directions for geophysical research to further elucidate anomalous transport behavior.

  8. Theory Of Anomalous X-Ray Scattering From Atoms And Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, R. H.; Kissel, Lynn

    1988-07-01

    New developments in the theory of anomalous x-ray scattering are reviewed. The second order S-matrix calculations remove several previous discrepancies, in particular it is now known that there is an error in the Cromer-Liberman tables. In high Z elements a window is found in near threshold scattering at back angles. New results obtained for ions indicate that with increasing degrees of ionization the anomalous behavior near threshold weakens.

  9. Dynamic response of visco-elastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadıoǧlu, Fethi; Tekin, Gülçin

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a comprehensive analysis about the dynamic response characteristics of visco-elastic plates is given. To construct the functional in the Laplace-Carson domain for the analysis of visco-elastic plates based on the Kirchhoff hypothesis, functional analysis method is employed. By using this new energy functional in the Laplace-Carson domain, moment values that are important for engineers can be obtained directly with excellent accuracy and element equations can be written explicitly. Three-element model is considered for modelling the visco-elastic material behavior. The solutions obtained in the Laplace-Carson domain by utilizing mixed finite element formulation are transformed to the time domain using the Durbin's inverse Laplace transform technique. The proposed mixed finite element formulation is shown to be simple to implement and gives satisfactory results for dynamic response of visco-elastic plates.

  10. Dislocation core radii near elastic stability limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. A.; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies of transition metal alloys with compositions that place them near their limits of elastic stability [e.g., near the body-centered-cubic (BCC) to hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) transition] suggest interesting behavior for the dislocation cores. Specifically, the dislocation core size is predicted to diverge as the stability limit is approached. Here a simple analysis rooted in elasticity theory and the computation of ideal strength is used to analyze this divergence. This analysis indicates that dislocation core radii should diverge as the elastic limits of stability are approached in the BCC, HCP, and face-centered-cubic (FCC) structures. Moreover, external stresses and dislocation-induced stresses also increase the core radii. Density functional theory based total-energy calculations are combined with anisotropic elasticity theory to compute numerical estimates of dislocation core radii.

  11. Analytico-numerical tool for studying the influence of the inhomogeneity on the behavior of cracked magneto-electro-elastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stoynov, Y.

    2015-10-28

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are extensively used in modern industry. They are composite materials with continuously varying properties in one or more special dimensions, according to the specific purpose. In view of the wide range of applications of FGM, stress analysis is important for their structural integrity and reliable service life. In this study we will consider functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic materials with one or more cracks subjected to SH waves. We assume that the material properties vary in one and the same way, described by an inhomogeneity function. The boundary value problem is reduced to a system of integro-differential equations based on the existence of fundamental solutions. Different inhomogeneity classes are used to obtain a wave equation with constant coefficients. Radon transform is applied to derive the fundamental solution in a closed form. Program code in FORTRAN 77 is developed and validated using available examples from literature. Simulations show the dependence of stress field concentration near the crack tips on the frequency of the applied time-harmonic load for different types of material inhomogeneity.

  12. Properties of elastic percolating networks in isotropic media with arbitrary elastic constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla, O.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Guinea, F.; Louis, E.

    1990-06-01

    The properties of diluted elastic media in two dimensions are investigated in an isotropic system in which the ratio between the two Lamé coefficients can be varied. Changes in the ratio between the continuum elastic constants induce significant variations in the behavior of the system away from the threshold for percolation, but not in the properties near the percolation transition. We discuss the results in both cases and their relevance to the definition of the universal properties of diluted elastic networks. It is shown that many features of interest, like the bulk modulus at intermediate concentrations of voids and the backbone, are very dependent on the microscopic details of the model, and not only on its macroscopic behavior. Thus, elastic percolation does not seem to have the same degree of universality as scalar percolation.

  13. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  14. The role of Self-Organized Criticality in elasticity of metallic springs: Observations of a new dissipation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Salvo, Riccardo; Di Cintio, Arianna; Lundin, Mark

    2011-08-01

    We present investigations of low-frequency stochastic deviations from elasticity of Maraging steel springs used in the seismic isolation of the Virgo, Advanced LIGO, and TAMA interferometers. Our studies reveal unexpected facets of elasticity and dissipation in metals, in which a spring is observed to abandon its linear behavior. Various forms of anomalous low-frequency oscillator behavior are characterized, quantified and discussed. These include fluctuations of the Young's Modulus, hysteretic properties, random walk of equilibrium point and spontaneous de-stabilization events, which occasionally lead to collapse. We made a conjecture that rationalizes all of the anomalies, namely that the observed effects are due to collective interactions of entangling and disentangling dislocations. A phase transition involving switching from a linear to a chaotic regimes is observed —at time scales less than one second— and is shown to be consistent with Self-Organized Criticality (SOC). The threshold frequency to this regime is determined by the material characteristics, as well as by the physical shape and dimensions of flexures.

  15. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present calculations of the performance of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters (FADOF) on IR transitions indicate that such filters may furnish high transmission, narrow-pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth under optimum operating conditions. A FADOF consists of an atomic vapor cell between crossed polarizers that are subject to a dc magnetic field along the optical path; when linearly polarized light travels along the direction of the magnetic field through the dispersive atomic vapor, a polarization rotation occurs. If FADOF conditions are suitably adjusted, a maximum transmission with very narrow bandwidth is obtained.

  16. Galilean satellites - Anomalous temperatures disputed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Veeder, G. J.; Cutts, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Anomalous averaged infrared brightness temperatures of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter reported by Gross (1975) are rejected as falsely conceived and lacking physical reality. It is argued that the calculations of equilibrium temperatures should be corrected, whereupon predictions would be in satisfactory agreement with observations, in conformity with the radiometric method of determining the diameters of asteroids and satellites. The IR irradiance and the related disk-averaged brightness temperature for the spectral band are recommended as more relevant. Attention is drawn to some interesting discrepancies between calculated and observed temperatures of the Jovian satellites which merit further investigation.

  17. Phase diagram of elastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, L; Ziherl, P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments show that polymeric nanoparticles often self-assemble into several non-close-packed lattices in addition to the face-centered cubic lattice. Here, we explore theoretically the possibility that the observed phase sequences may be associated with the softness of the particles, which are modeled as elastic spheres interacting upon contact. The spheres are described by two finite-deformation theories of elasticity, the modified Saint-Venant-Kirchhoff model and the neo-Hookean model. We determine the range of indentations where the repulsion between the spheres is pairwise additive and agrees with the Hertz theory. By computing the elastic energies of nine trial crystal lattices at densities far beyond the Hertzian range, we construct the phase diagram and find the face- and body-centered cubic lattices as well as the A15 lattice and the simple hexagonal lattice, with the last two being stable at large densities where the spheres are completely faceted. These results are qualitatively consistent with observations, suggesting that deformability may indeed be viewed as a generic property that determines the phase behavior in nanocolloidal suspensions.

  18. Observation of anomalous Iron Ion Charge Distribution in FTU

    SciTech Connect

    Finkenthal, M; May, M; Pacella, D; Leigheb, M; Zagorski, R; Mattioli, M; Fournier, K

    2003-11-14

    Iron coming from the poloidal limiter or the stainless steel vessel is an important intrinsic impurity in the FTU tokamak discharges, and X-ray and VUV spectroscopy provide useful information about the impurity behavior. The iron ion charge state distribution, as usual for tokamaks, is analyzed assuming a collisional radiative model and an anomalous perpendicular diffusion. In our experiment the iron ionization level depends, as it is expected, on central electron temperature (fig. 1), but the ion charge state distribution shows a different behavior when the first wall material or the iron source are changed.

  19. Breakdown of nonlinear elasticity in amorphous solids at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procaccia, Itamar; Rainone, Corrado; Shor, Carmel A. B. Z.; Singh, Murari

    2016-06-01

    It is known [H. G. E. Hentschel et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 061101 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.061101] that amorphous solids at zero temperature do not possess a nonlinear elasticity theory: besides the shear modulus, which exists, none of the higher order coefficients exist in the thermodynamic limit. Here we show that the same phenomenon persists up to temperatures comparable to that of the glass transition. The zero-temperature mechanism due to the prevalence of dangerous plastic modes of the Hessian matrix is replaced by anomalous stress fluctuations that lead to the divergence of the variances of the higher order elastic coefficients. The conclusion is that in amorphous solids elasticity can never be decoupled from plasticity: the nonlinear response is very substantially plastic.

  20. Geomagnetically trapped anomalous cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Selesnick, R.S.; Cummings, A.C.; Cummings, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    Since its launch in July 1992, the polar-orbiting satellite SAMPEX has been collecting data on geomagnetically trapped heavy ions, predominantly O, N, and Ne, at energies {ge}15 MeV/nucleon and in a narrow L shell range L = 2. Their location, elemental composition, energy spectra, pitch angle distribution, and time variations all support the theory that these particles originated as singly ionized interplanetary anomalous cosmic rays that were stripped of electrons in the Earth`s upper atmosphere and subsequently trapped. The O are observed primarily at pitch angles outside the atmospheric loss cones, consistent with a trapped population, and their distribution there is nearly isotropic. The abundances relative to O of the N, possible Ne, and especially C are lower than the corresponding interplanetary values, which may be indicative of the trapping efficiencies. The distributions of trapped N, O, and Ne in energy and L shell suggest that most of the ions observed at the SAMPEX altitude of {approximately}600 km are not fully stripped when initially trapped. A comparison of the trapped intensity with the much lower interplanetary intensity of anomalous cosmic rays provides model-dependent estimates of the product of the trapping probability and the average trapped particle lifetime against ionization losses in the residual atmosphere for particles that mirror near the SAMPEX altitude. 36 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Anomalous plasticity in defect-mediated phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Punam; Ravelo, R.; Germann, T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shocked wave propagation in metallic single crystals exhibit high elastic limits and are ideally suited for investigating the role defect nucleation and multiplication play on the kinetics of phase transformations. Here we report on the morphology and kinetics of shocked-induced phase transformations in Aluminum single crystals. The atomic interactions were modeled utilizing various embedded atom method (EAM) models of Aluminum, with most models exhibiting an artificial fcc -->bcc phase transformation in the 25-30 GPa range. For cases where plastic deformation precedes the phase transformation, anomalous defect structures atypical of plastic deformation in bcc lattices nucleate early on but anneal out with time. In all cases, the defect-mediated phase transitions proceed at faster rates than defect-free ones. Part of this work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-12-1-0476.

  2. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  3. Time-average based on scaling law in anomalous diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2015-05-01

    To solve the obscureness in measurement brought about from the weak ergodicity breaking appeared in anomalous diffusions, we have suggested the time-averaged mean squared displacement (MSD) /line{δ 2 (τ )}τ with an integral interval depending linearly on the lag time τ. For the continuous time random walk describing a subdiffusive behavior, we have found that /line{δ 2 (τ )}τ ˜ τ γ like that of the ensemble-averaged MSD, which makes it be possible to measure the proper exponent values through time-average in experiments like a single molecule tracking. Also, we have found that it has originated from the scaling nature of the MSD at an aging time in anomalous diffusion and confirmed them through numerical results of the other microscopic non-Markovian model showing subdiffusions and superdiffusions with the origin of memory enhancement.

  4. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  5. Hypo-Elastic Model for Lung Parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    A simple elastic isotropic constitutive model for the spongy tissue in lung is derived from the theory of hypoelasticity. The model is shown to exhibit a pressure dependent behavior that has been interpreted by some as indicating extensional anisotropy. In contrast, we show that this behavior arises natural from an analysis of isotropic hypoelastic invariants, and is a likely result of non-linearity, not anisotropy. The response of the model is determined analytically for several boundary value problems used for material characterization. These responses give insight into both the material behavior as well as admissible bounds on parameters. The model is characterized against published experimental data for dog lung. Future work includes non-elastic model behavior.

  6. High pressure induced phase transition and superdiffusion in anomalous fluid confined in flexible nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Bordin, José Rafael; Krott, Leandro B. Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2014-10-14

    The behavior of a confined spherical symmetric anomalous fluid under high external pressure was studied with Molecular Dynamics simulations. The fluid is modeled by a core-softened potential with two characteristic length scales, which in bulk reproduces the dynamical, thermodynamical, and structural anomalous behavior observed for water and other anomalous fluids. Our findings show that this system has a superdiffusion regime for sufficient high pressure and low temperature. As well, our results indicate that this superdiffusive regime is strongly related with the fluid structural properties and the superdiffusion to diffusion transition is a first order phase transition. We show how the simulation time and statistics are important to obtain the correct dynamical behavior of the confined fluid. Our results are discussed on the basis of the two length scales.

  7. Mechanism of Resilin Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guokui; Hu, Xiao; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Resilin is critical in the flight and jumping systems of insects as a polymeric rubber-like protein with outstanding elasticity. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. Here we report the structure and function of resilin from Drosophila CG15920. A reversible beta-turn transition was identified in the peptide encoded by exon III and for full length resilin during energy input and release, features that correlate to the rapid deformation of resilin during functions in vivo. Micellar structures and nano-porous patterns formed after beta-turn structures were present via changes in either the thermal or mechanical inputs. A model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for this protein. Further, this model offers a view of elastomeric proteins in general where beta-turn related structures serve as fundamental units of the structure and elasticity. PMID:22893127

  8. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilliet, Catherine; Quemeneur, François; Marmottant, Philippe; Imhof, Arnout; Pépin-Donat, Brigitte; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2010-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively explained through simple calculations. This allows to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some biological objects. The extension of this process to other geometries allows to modelize vegetal objects such as the ultrafast trap of carnivorous plants.

  9. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-05

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  10. Anomalous Extracellular Diffusion in Rat Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  11. Anomalous diffraction in hyperbolic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Boardman, Allan D.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that light is subject to anomalous (i.e., negative) diffraction when propagating in the presence of hyperbolic dispersion. We show that light propagation in hyperbolic media resembles the dynamics of a quantum particle of negative mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. The negative effective mass implies time reversal if the medium is homogeneous. Such property paves the way to diffraction compensation, i.e., spatial analog of dispersion compensating fibers in the temporal domain. At variance with materials exhibiting standard elliptic dispersion, in inhomogeneous hyperbolic materials light waves are pulled towards regions with a lower refractive index. In the presence of a Kerr-like optical response, bright (dark) solitons are supported by a negative (positive) nonlinearity.

  12. Persistently anomalous Pacific geomagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Constable, Catherine G.

    A new average geomagnetic field model for the past 3kyr (ALS3K) helps bridge a large temporal sampling gap between historical models and more traditional paleomagnetic studies spanning the last 5 Myr. A quasi-static feature seen historically in the central Pacific has the opposite sign in ALS3K; its structure is similar to, but of larger amplitude than, that in the time-averaged geomagnetic field for the last 5 Myr. Anomalous geomagnetic fields exist beneath the Pacific over timescales ranging from 10²-106 years. It is unlikely that bias over such long time scales arises from electromagnetic screening, but conceivable that the Lorentz force is influenced by long wavelength thermal variations and/or localized regions of increased electrical conductivity (associated with compositional anomalies and possibly partial melt). This is consistent with recent seismic observations of the lower mantle.

  13. Surface elasticity effect on the size-dependent elastic property of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haiyan; Yun, Guohong; Bai, Narsu; Li, Jiangang

    2012-04-01

    A modified core-shell (MC-S) model is proposed to investigate the effect of surface elasticity on the elastic properties of nanowires under bending and tension loading modes. The continuous exponential function based on bulk elasticity is applied to the surface region of nanowires to better describe the elasticity in the surface layer. Two parameters related to the surface, namely, the inhomogeneous degree constant α˜, and the transition region of this inhomogeneous state rs (i.e., surface layer thickness), are introduced for examining the size effects of the elastic modulus of the overall nanowires. A strong size dependence of elasticity is revealed under both bending and tension loads. Furthermore, the theoretical solution for an effective Young's modulus with relevant experiments, as well as the results of a molecular statistical thermodynamics (MST) method for zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for silicon (Si) nanowires, are compared. It is shown that the theoretical curves not only agree well with the experimental data, but also fit the computational results (MST or MD) approximately below 20 nm. As a result, our model can predict the behavior of surface elasticity, with respect to the lateral size of nanostructures at a relatively small scale, no matter how stiff or soft the surface of the nanomaterials.

  14. Carbon content in the Earth's inner core from the elasticity of iron carbide at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle-Neumann, G.; Mookherjee, M.

    2009-12-01

    Discrepancy between sound wave velocity of Fe-Ni alloys and seismological models indicate that Earth’s core is likely to contain lighter elements such as H, C, O, Si and S. Carbon is a plausible candidate because of its cosmic abundance and chemical affinity to iron at low pressures. Earlier it was thought that carbon, being volatile might have been lost during the accretionary stages of the planet. However, it is now known, that core formation likely took place from the deep magma ocean surrounded by solar-nebula type proto-atmosphere enriched in volatiles thus enabling incorporation of volatiles in to the molten core. Experimental studies conducted to study the phase diagram of Fe-C system revealed that volatility of carbon is only significant at pressures lower than 10-5 GPa. (Wood, 1993, EPSL, 117, 593) suggested that solid inner core might be composed of Fe3C. Recent experimental studies have extended the Fe-C phase diagram to considerably higher pressures (~70 GPa) and have found that Fe7C3 is the likely phase at the inner core conditions (Lord et al., 2009, EPSL, 284, 157). In this study we determine the elasticity of Fe7C3 using first principle methods. Results of compression for the ferromagnetic Fe7C3 is well represented by a third order Birch Murnaghan finite strain expression with K0~ 275 GPa, K‧~2.5 and V0~ 182 Å3. Under compression magnetic moment gradually decreases and at ~69 GPa magnetic moment is instantaneously lost. Similar behavior has been reported for Fe3C at 60 GPa (Vocadlo et al., 2002, EPSL, 203, 567). The high-pressure non-magnetic phase has distinct elastic parameters with K0~ 228 GPa, K‧~4.9 and V0~ 181 Å3. Calculated elastic constants also exhibit softening associated with the loss of magnetization. Similar anomalous behavior in thermoelastic parameter owing to loss of magnetization has been observed for Fe3C (Fiquet et al. 2009, PEPI, 172, 125) at 68 GPa. We will present full elastic tensor and sound wave velocity results for

  15. Elastic softening of zircon by radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2006-09-25

    The bulk modulus and the shear modulus of zircon soften by ca. 50% when zircon is amorphized by radiation damage. A theoretical description of the experimental findings is presented which shows that the elastic response on a zircon ceramics with radiation damage follows Hashin-Shtrikman [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 11, 127 (1963)] behavior with very narrow bounds. The elastic response depends, in good approximation, on the square of the volume fraction f{sub a} of the amorphized regions. In a slightly coarser approximation one finds an almost linear interpolation of the bulk and the shear modulus between those of the crystalline state and those of the fully amorphous state.

  16. Anomalous water diffusion in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yun; Hassanali, Ali A.; Parrinello, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of water exhibits anomalous behavior in the presence of different electrolytes. Recent experiments [Kim JS, Wu Z, Morrow AR, Yethiraj A, Yethiraj A (2012) J Phys Chem B 116(39):12007–12013] have found that the self-diffusion of water can either be enhanced or suppressed around CsI and NaCl, respectively, relative to that of neat water. Here we show that unlike classical empirical potentials, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations successfully reproduce the qualitative trends observed experimentally. These types of phenomena have often been rationalized in terms of the “structure-making” or “structure-breaking” effects of different ions on the solvent, although the microscopic origins of these features have remained elusive. Rather than disrupting the network in a significant manner, the electrolytes studied here cause rather subtle changes in both structural and dynamical properties of water. In particular, we show that water in the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations is characterized by dynamic heterogeneity, which turns out to be critical in reproducing the experimental trends. PMID:24522111

  17. Anomalous diffusion in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yoshi; Herring, Jackson

    2006-11-01

    Diffusion in rotating and stratified fluids is one of the central subjects in geophysical and astrophysical dynamics. In this paper, we report features of the dispersion of Lagrangian fluid particles in rotating stratified flows using the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. And for calculation of particle dispersion, we use the cubic spline interpolation method by Yeung and Pope. Our main concern is the picture different from the Taylor dispersion theory, i.e. ˜t^2 for ttB (ballistic mode) and ˜t for ttB(Brownian mode), where tB is the time after which the Lagrangian velocity auto-correlation function drops rapidly. The different features of diffusion from the standard Taylor picture is often called anomalous diffusion. Particle dispersion shows quite large anisotropy. In the vertical direction, particles stop migration after they pass the time interval of the ballistic mode when only stratification is active and rotation enhances this tendency (for decaying turbulence). In the horizontal direction, we observe that t^2 behavior is more evident not only for the initial ballistic mode but also at later times, and that there is a transition period between the two t^2 regimes. The duration and the starting time of the transition period are a function of the parameters of stratification and rotation. For a fixed value of stratification, the transition period shifts to earlier time with rotation. And with strong stratification, the transition period disappears.

  18. Elastic and electromechanical properties of polypropylene foam ferroelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansachmüller, M.; Schwödiauer, R.; Bauer-Gogonea, S.; Bauer, S.; Paajanen, M.; Raukola, J.

    2005-01-01

    Internally charged closed-cell polymer electrets exhibit ferroelectric-like behavior and have been called ferroelectrets. They are attractive for soft electroactive transducers, the high compressibility leads to d33 transducer coefficients exceeding those of ferroelectric polymers. A technique for the measurement of the elastic modulus and the transducer coefficient of ferroelectrets is reported. The elastic behavior of ferroelectretic polypropylene foams is correlated with the piezoelectric-like properties. Prestress treatments linearize the transducer properties.

  19. High Pressure Elastic Behavior of Synthetic Mg 3 Y 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 Garnet up to 9 GPa

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Dawei; Ma, Maining; Wei, Shuyi; ...

    2013-01-01

    Tmore » he compression behavior of synthetic magnesium- (Mg-) yttrium (Y) garnet Mg 3 Y 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 has been investigated upto about 8.79 GPa at 300 K using in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell at the beamline X17C, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. No phase transition has been observed within the pressure range investigated.he unit-cell parameters and volume decreased systematically with increasing pressure, and a reliable isothermal bulk modulus ( K T 0 ) and its pressure derivative ( K T 0 ′ ) were obtained in this study.he values of zero-pressure volume V 0 , K 0 , and K 0 ′ refined with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state are V 0 = 1727.9 ± 0.2  Å 3 , K T 0 = 145 ± 3  GPa, and K 0 ′ = 8.5 ± 0.9 . If K T 0 ′ is fixed at 4, K T 0 is obtained as 158 ± 2  GPa.« less

  20. Cooperative lattice dynamics and anomalous fluctuations of microtubules.

    PubMed

    Mohrbach, Hervé; Johner, Albert; Kulić, Igor M

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules have been in the focus of biophysical research for several decades. However, the confusing and mutually contradictory results regarding their elasticity and fluctuations have cast doubt on their present understanding. In this paper, we present the empirical evidence for the existence of discrete guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-tubulin fluctuations between a curved and a straight configuration at room temperature as well as for conformational tubulin cooperativity. Guided by a number of experimental findings, we build the case for a novel microtubule model, with the principal result that microtubules can spontaneously form micron-sized cooperative helical states with unique elastic and dynamic features. The polymorphic dynamics of the microtubule lattice resulting from the tubulin bistability quantitatively explains several experimental puzzles, including anomalous scaling of dynamic fluctuations of grafted microtubules, their apparent length-stiffness relation, and their remarkable curved-helical appearance in general. We point out that the multistability and cooperative switching of tubulin dimers could participate in important cellular processes, and could in particular lead to efficient mechanochemical signaling along single microtubules.

  1. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  2. Mechanisms of anomalous dispersion in flow through heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukhova, Alina; Dentz, Marco; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Willmann, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the origins of anomalous dispersion in heterogeneous porous media in terms of the medium and flow properties. To identify and quantify the heterogeneity controls, we focus on porous media which are organized in assemblies of equally sized conductive inclusions embedded in a constant conductivity matrix. We study the behavior of particle arrival times for different conductivity distributions and link the statistical medium characteristics to large-scale transport using a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach. The CTRW models particle motion as a sequence of transitions in space and time. We derive an explicit map of the conductivity onto the transition time distribution. The derived CTRW model predicts solute transport based on the conductivity distribution and the characteristic heterogeneity length. In this way, heavy tails in solute arrival times and anomalous particle dispersion as measured by the centered mean square displacement are directly related to the medium properties. These findings shed light on the mechanisms of anomalous dispersion in heterogeneous porous media, and provide a basis for the predictive modeling of large-scale transport.

  3. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  4. Correspondence between Soft and Rapidity Anomalous Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Alexey A.

    2017-02-01

    We establish a correspondence between ultraviolet singularities of soft factors for multiparticle production and rapidity singularities of soft factors for multiparton scattering. This correspondence is a consequence of the conformal mapping between scattering geometries. The correspondence is valid to all orders of perturbation theory and in this way, provides one with a proof of rapidity renormalization procedure for multiparton scattering [including the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) factorization as a special case]. As a by-product, we obtain an exact relation between the rapidity anomalous dimension and the well-known soft anomalous dimension. The three-loop expressions for TMD and a general multiparton scattering rapidity anomalous dimension are derived.

  5. Three loop cusp anomalous dimension in QCD.

    PubMed

    Grozin, Andrey; Henn, Johannes M; Korchemsky, Gregory P; Marquard, Peter

    2015-02-13

    We present the full analytic result for the three loop angle-dependent cusp anomalous dimension in QCD. With this result, infrared divergences of planar scattering processes with massive particles can be predicted to that order. Moreover, we define a closely related quantity in terms of an effective coupling defined by the lightlike cusp anomalous dimension. We find evidence that this quantity is universal for any gauge theory and use this observation to predict the nonplanar n(f)-dependent terms of the four loop cusp anomalous dimension.

  6. Experimental phasing using zinc anomalous scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sun-Shin; An, Young Jun; Jeong, Chang-Sook; Kim, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2012-09-01

    The surface of proteins can be charged with zinc ions and the anomalous signals from these zinc ions can be used for structure determination of proteins. Zinc is a suitable metal for anomalous dispersion phasing methods in protein crystallography. Structure determination using zinc anomalous scattering has been almost exclusively limited to proteins with intrinsically bound zinc(s). Here, it is reported that multiple zinc ions can easily be charged onto the surface of proteins with no intrinsic zinc-binding site by using zinc-containing solutions. Zn derivatization of protein surfaces appears to be a largely unnoticed but promising method of protein structure determination.

  7. Anomalous dispersion enhanced Cerenkov phase-matching

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Singer, K.D.; Cahill, P.A.

    1993-11-01

    The authors report on a scheme for phase-matching second harmonic generation in polymer waveguides based on the use of anomalous dispersion to optimize Cerenkov phase matching. They have used the theoretical results of Hashizume et al. and Onda and Ito to design an optimum structure for phase-matched conversion. They have found that the use of anomalous dispersion in the design results in a 100-fold enhancement in the calculated conversion efficiency. This technique also overcomes the limitation of anomalous dispersion phase-matching which results from absorption at the second harmonic. Experiments are in progress to demonstrate these results.

  8. Correspondence between Soft and Rapidity Anomalous Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Alexey A

    2017-02-10

    We establish a correspondence between ultraviolet singularities of soft factors for multiparticle production and rapidity singularities of soft factors for multiparton scattering. This correspondence is a consequence of the conformal mapping between scattering geometries. The correspondence is valid to all orders of perturbation theory and in this way, provides one with a proof of rapidity renormalization procedure for multiparton scattering [including the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) factorization as a special case]. As a by-product, we obtain an exact relation between the rapidity anomalous dimension and the well-known soft anomalous dimension. The three-loop expressions for TMD and a general multiparton scattering rapidity anomalous dimension are derived.

  9. Elastic properties of pyrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Bridget; Bass, Jay D.; Rossman, George R.; Geiger, Charles A.; Langer, Klaus

    1991-03-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy was used to measure the single crystal elastic properties of a pure synthetic pyrope and a natural garnet containing 89.9 mol% of the pyrope end member (Mg3Al2Si3O12). The elastic moduli, c ij , of the two samples are entirely consistent and agree with previous estimates of the elastic properties of pyrope based upon the moduli of solid solutions. Our results indicate that the elastic moduli of pyrope end-member are c 11=296.2±0.5, c 12=111.1±0.6, c 44=91.6±0.3, Ks=172.8±0.3, μ=92.0±0.2, all in units of GPa. These results differ by several percent from those reported previously for synthetic pyrope, but are based upon a much larger data set. Although the hydrous components of the two samples from the present study are substantially different, representing both ‘dry’ and ‘saturated’ samples, we find no discernable effect of structurally bound water on the elastic properties. This is due to the small absolute solubility of water in pyrope, as compared with other garnets such as grossular.

  10. Anomalous scaling and super-roughness in the growth of CdTe polycrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, Angélica S.; Ferreira, Silvio C., Jr.; Ribeiro, Igor R. B.; Ferreira, Sukarno O.

    2008-09-01

    CdTe films grown on glass substrates covered by fluorine-doped tin oxide by hot-wall epitaxy were studied through the interface dynamical scaling theory. Direct measures of the dynamical exponent revealed an intrinsically anomalous scaling characterized by a global roughness exponent α , distinct from the local one (the Hurst exponent H ) previously reported by Ferreira [Appl. Phys. Lett.88, 244103 (2006)]. A variety of scaling behaviors was obtained with varying substrate temperature. In particular, a transition from an intrinsically anomalous scaling regime with H≠α<1 at low temperatures to a super-rough regime with H≠α>1 at high temperatures was observed. The temperature is a growth parameter that controls both the interface roughness and dynamical scaling exponents. Nonlocal effects are pointed out as the factors ruling the anomalous scaling behavior.

  11. Anomalous Phase Separation Kinetics Observed in a Micelle Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcoxon, Jess P.; Martin, James E.; Odinek, Judy

    1995-08-01

    We report a real-time, two-dimensional light scattering study of the evolution of structure in a two-component nonionic micelle system undergoing phase separation. We find that the structure of the domains is qualitatively similar to that observed in binary fluid systems, with some anomalies observed. However, compared to the Lifshitz-Slyozov prediction for simple binary fluids, the domain growth is unexpectedly slow. In fact, the growth kinetics can be empirically described as a stretched exponential approach to a pinned domain size. This anomalous behavior may be due to the ability of the spherical micelles to reorganize into more complex structures.

  12. Anomalous Radiative Trapping in Laser Fields of Extreme Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonoskov, A.; Bashinov, A.; Gonoskov, I.; Harvey, C.; Ilderton, A.; Kim, A.; Marklund, M.; Mourou, G.; Sergeev, A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate that charged particles in a sufficiently intense standing wave are compressed toward, and oscillate synchronously at, the antinodes of the electric field. We call this unusual behavior anomalous radiative trapping (ART). We show using dipole pulses, which offer a path to increased laser intensity, that ART opens up new possibilities for the generation of radiation and particle beams, both of which are high energy, directed, and collimated. ART also provides a mechanism for particle control in high-intensity quantum-electrodynamics experiments.

  13. An elastic second skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  14. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  15. Yielding Elastic Tethers Stabilize Robust Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Matt J.; Luo, Jonathon P.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds. PMID:25473833

  16. The Elastic Constants for Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, R L; Hartmann, E C

    1945-01-01

    There are several constants which have been devised as numerical representations of the behavior of metals under the action of loadings which stress the metal within the range of elastic action. Some of these constants, such as Young's modulus of elasticity in tension and compression, shearing modulus of elasticity, and Poisson's ratio, are regularly used in engineering calculations. Precise tests and experience indicate that these elastic constants are practically unaffected by many of the factors which influence the other mechanical properties of materials and that a few careful determinations under properly controlled conditions are more useful and reliable than many determinations made under less favorable conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to outline the methods employed by the Aluminum Research Laboratories for the determination of some of these elastic constants, to list the values that have been determined for some of the wrought aluminum alloys, and to indicate the variations in the values that may be expected for some of the commercial products of these alloys.

  17. Elastic and Electrical Properties Evaluation of Low Resistivity Pays in Malay Basin Clastics Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanna Lubis, Luluan; Ghosh, Deva P.; Hermana, Maman

    2016-07-01

    The elastic and electrical properties of low resistivity pays clastics reservoirs in Malay Basin are strongly dependent on the complex nature of the clay content, either dispersed or laminated/layered. Estimating the hydrocarbon pore volume from conventional electrical log, i.e. resistivity log, is quite a challenge. The low elastic impedance contrast also found as one of the challenge thus create a problem to map the distribution of the low resistivity reservoirs. In this paper, we evaluate the electrical properties and elastic rock properties to discriminate the pay from the adjacent cap rock or shale. Forward modeling of well log responses including electrical properties are applied to analyze the nature of the possible pays on laminated reservoir rocks. In the implementation of rock properties analysis, several conventional elastic properties are comparatively analyzed for the sensitivity and feasibility analysis on each elastic parameters. Finally, we discussed the advantages of each elastic parameters in detail. In addition, cross-plots of elastic and electrical properties attributes help us in the clear separation of anomalous zone and lithologic properties of sand and shale facies over conventional elastic parameter crossplots attributes. The possible relationship on electrical and elastic properties are discussed for further studies.

  18. Elastic model of supercoiling.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C J

    1977-01-01

    An elastic model for the supercoiling of duplex DNA is developed. The simplest assumptions regarding the elastic properties of double-helical DNA (homogeneous, isotropic, of circular cross section, and remaining straight when unstressed) will generate two orders of superhelicity when stressed. Recent experimental results [Brady, G.W., Fein, D.B. & Brumberger, H. (1976) Nature 264, 231-234] suggest that in supercoiled DNA molecules there are regions where two distinct orders of supercoiling arise, as predicted by this model. PMID:267934

  19. Anomalous Diffraction in Crystallographic Phase Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from crystals of biological macromolecules contain sufficient information to define atomic structures, but atomic positions are inextricable without having electron-density images. Diffraction measurements provide amplitudes, but the computation of electron density also requires phases for the diffracted waves. The resonance phenomenon known as anomalous scattering offers a powerful solution to this phase problem. Exploiting scattering resonances from diverse elements, the methods of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) now predominate for de novo determinations of atomic-level biological structures. This review describes the physical underpinnings of anomalous diffraction methods, the evolution of these methods to their current maturity, the elements, procedures and instrumentation used for effective implementation, and the realm of applications. PMID:24726017

  20. Detecting anomalous phase synchronization from time series

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Isao T.; Kumar Dana, Syamal; Kurths, Juergen

    2008-06-15

    Modeling approaches are presented for detecting an anomalous route to phase synchronization from time series of two interacting nonlinear oscillators. The anomalous transition is characterized by an enlargement of the mean frequency difference between the oscillators with an initial increase in the coupling strength. Although such a structure is common in a large class of coupled nonisochronous oscillators, prediction of the anomalous transition is nontrivial for experimental systems, whose dynamical properties are unknown. Two approaches are examined; one is a phase equational modeling of coupled limit cycle oscillators and the other is a nonlinear predictive modeling of coupled chaotic oscillators. Application to prototypical models such as two interacting predator-prey systems in both limit cycle and chaotic regimes demonstrates the capability of detecting the anomalous structure from only a few sets of time series. Experimental data from two coupled Chua circuits shows its applicability to real experimental system.

  1. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  2. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE PAGES

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  3. Aggregate and Single-Crystalline Elasticity of hcp Cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonangeli, D.; Krisch, M.; Fiquet, G.; Badro, J.; Farber, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    The capability to produce detailed models of the internal structure of the Earth and other planets critically hinges on our knowledge of the pressure dependence of sound velocities and elastic moduli. Here we present data on the complete elastic tensor of hcp cobalt under hydrostatic compression to 39 GPa, derived by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering (IXS). These results are complemented by an IXS study on polycrystalline cobalt throughout the stability range of the hcp phase, to 99 GPa. Interestingly, the single crystal elastic anisotropy is only very weakly reflected in the effective anisotropy of the aggregate. A Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the single crystal moduli reproduces the results on powder within 3%, up to 75 GPa. Above this pressure, we observe an anomalous softening in the density evolution of the aggregate velocities. This type of comparative analysis between single crystal and polycrystal is essential for characterizing the bulk properties of textured samples and provides a basis for the rigorous testing of the orientational averaging schemes currently employed to link the single crystal elastic moduli with the aggregate sound velocities. We note that only through the combined approach of experiment and theory (ab initio calculations) we can progress in both refining first principle methods and in getting more insights into the physics of the investigated system. In the specific case of Co, we inferred a magnetic transition to be the physical origin for the high pressure elastic anomaly. Finally, our study points out the importance of coupling between the electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom to elastic properties at high pressure. We suggest that these effects likely play an important role in elasticity of deep planetary interiors.

  4. Electrodynamics of memory-dependent nonlocal elastic continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eringen, A. Cemal

    1984-11-01

    Balance laws and constitutive equations are given for elastic continua with memory of past motions and electromagnetic fields. Nonlinear, finite-linear, and linear constitutive equations are obtained and restricted by the second law of thermodynamics. Memory-dependent nonlocal piezoelectricity, piezomagnetism, heat and electric conduction, viscoelasticity, and other allied physical phenomena are in the domain of the general theory. The theory is applied to discuss infrared dispersion and lattice vibrations, natural optical activity, anomalous skin effect, and superconductivity, indicating the power and the potential of the nonlocal theory.

  5. The Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  6. Elastic swimming I: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Yu, Tony; Hosoi, Anette

    2006-03-01

    We consider the problem of swimming at low Reynolds number by oscillating an elastic filament in a viscous liquid, as investigated by Wiggins and Goldstein (1998, Phys Rev Lett). In this first part of the study, we characterize the optimal forcing conditions of the swimming strategy and its optimal geometrical characteristics.

  7. Elastic swimming II: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tony; Lauga, Eric; Hosoi, Anette

    2006-03-01

    We consider the problem of swimming at low Reynolds number by oscillating an elastic filament in a viscous liquid, as investigated by Wiggins and Goldstein (1998, Phys Rev Lett). In this second part of the study, we present results of a series of experiments characterizing the performance of the propulsive mechanism.

  8. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M. L.; Levatin, J. A.

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  9. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  10. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  11. Anomalous optical conductivity in the normal state of high Tc oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Toru; Takahashi, Yoshinori

    1991-03-01

    The optical resistivity due to antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations in two-dimensional metals, as a possible model for high Tc oxides, is calculated within the Born approximation and the self-consistent renormalization (SCR) theory for the spin fluctuations. The result is shown to explain the observed anomalous behavior of optical conductivity in YBa2Cu3O7 above Tc quantitatively.

  12. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabarraei, Alireza; Wang, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate the mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.

  13. The dimensionality of color vision in carriers of anomalous trichromacy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Gabriele; Deeb, Samir S; Bosten, Jenny M; Mollon, J D

    2010-07-01

    Some 12% of women are carriers of the mild, X-linked forms of color vision deficiencies called "anomalous trichromacy." Owing to random X chromosome inactivation, their retinae must contain four classes of cone rather than the normal three; and it has previously been speculated that these female carriers might be tetrachromatic, capable of discriminating spectral stimuli that are indistinguishable to the normal trichromat. However, the existing evidence is sparse and inconclusive. Here, we address the question using (a) a forced-choice version of the Rayleigh test, (b) a test using multidimensional scaling to reveal directly the dimensionality of the participants' color space, and (c) molecular genetic analyses to estimate the X-linked cone peak sensitivities of a selected sample of strong candidates for tetrachromacy. Our results suggest that most carriers of color anomaly do not exhibit four-dimensional color vision, and so we believe that anomalous trichromacy is unlikely to be maintained by an advantage to the carriers in discriminating colors. However, 1 of 24 obligate carriers of deuteranomaly exhibited tetrachromatic behavior on all our tests; this participant has three well-separated cone photopigments in the long-wave spectral region in addition to her short-wave cone. We assess the likelihood that behavioral tetrachromacy exists in the human population.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-28

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics.

  16. Origin of anomalous water permeation through graphene oxide membrane.

    PubMed

    Boukhvalov, Danil W; Katsnelson, Mikhail I; Son, Young-Woo

    2013-08-14

    Water inside the low-dimensional carbon structures has been considered seriously owing to fundamental interest in its flow and structures as well as its practical impact. Recently, the anomalous perfect penetration of water through graphene oxide membrane was demonstrated although the membrane was impenetrable for other liquids and even gases. The unusual auxetic behavior of graphene oxide in the presence of water was also reported. Here, on the basis of first-principles calculations, we establish atomistic models for hybrid systems composed of water and graphene oxides revealing the anomalous water behavior inside the stacked graphene oxides. We show that formation of hexagonal ice bilayer in between the flakes as well as melting transition of ice at the edges of flakes are crucial to realize the perfect water permeation across the whole stacked structures. The distance between adjacent layers that can be controlled either by oxygen reduction process or pressure is shown to determine the water flow thus highlighting a unique water dynamics in randomly connected two-dimensional spaces.

  17. High-pressure Brillouin scattering and elastic properties of liquid and solid methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, H.; Nakashima, N.; Sasaki, S.

    1996-01-01

    The acoustic velocities in any direction, refractive index, elastic constants, and elastic anisotropy of liquid and solid methane (CH4) have been determined at pressures up to 5 GPa by applying Brillouin spectroscopy whereby the crystal orientation in a diamond-anvil cell could be found in the same fitting analysis. The elastic constant of C12 in a solid phase I shows larger values near C11, which are reflected on the high degree of elastic anisotropy (A) around A=5.2 to 6.3. Anomalously high ratios of longitudinal- to transverse-acoustic velocities indicate the strong rotation-translation coupling in an orientationally disordered phase I, and these ratios increase up to about 5 at 5 GPa with pressure, resulting in a compression, effectively along the <110> direction for the face-centered-cubic crystalline system of CH4.

  18. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  19. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  20. Elasticity dominates strength and failure in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. Q.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-01-07

    Two distinct deformation mechanisms of shearing and volume dilatation are quantitatively analyzed in metallic glasses (MGs) from the fundamental thermodynamics. Their competition is deduced to intrinsically dominate the strength and failure behaviors of MGs. Both the intrinsic shear and normal strengths give rise to the critical mechanical energies to activate destabilization of amorphous structures, under pure shearing and volume dilatation, respectively, and can be determined in terms of elastic constants. By adopting an ellipse failure criterion, the strength and failure behaviors of MGs can be precisely described just according to their shear modulus and Poisson's ratio without mechanical testing. Quantitative relations are established systematically and verified by experimental results. Accordingly, the real-sense non-destructive failure prediction can be achieved in various MGs. By highlighting the broad key significance of elasticity, a “composition-elasticity-property” scheme is further outlined for better understanding and controlling the mechanical properties of MGs and other glassy materials from the elastic perspectives.

  1. Elastic response of thermal spray deposits under indentation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, S.H.; Lin, C.K.; Berndt, C.C.

    1997-08-01

    The elastic response behavior of thermal spray deposits at Knoop indentations has been investigated using indentation techniques. The ration of hardness to elastic modulus, which is an important prerequisite for the evaluation of indentation fracture toughness, is determined by measuring the elastic recovery of the in-surface dimensions of Knoop indentations. The elastic moduli of thermal spray deposits are in the range of 12%--78% of the comparable bulk materials and reveal the anisotropic behavior of thermal spray deposits. A variety of thermal spray deposits has been examined, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ), and NiAl. Statistical tools have been used to evaluate the error estimates of the data.

  2. Linear Elastic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revenough, Justin

    Elastic waves propagating in simple media manifest a surprisingly rich collection of phenomena. Although some can't withstand the complexities of Earth's structure, the majority only grow more interesting and more important as remote sensing probes for seismologists studying the planet's interior. To fully mine the information carried to the surface by seismic waves, seismologists must produce accurate models of the waves. Great strides have been made in this regard. Problems that were entirely intractable a decade ago are now routinely solved on inexpensive workstations. The mathematical representations of waves coded into algorithms have grown vastly more sophisticated and are troubled by many fewer approximations, enforced symmetries, and limitations. They are far from straightforward, and seismologists using them need a firm grasp on wave propagation in simple media. Linear Elastic Waves, by applied mathematician John G. Harris, responds to this need.

  3. Series elastic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Matthew M.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, construction, control and evaluation of a novel for controlled actuator. Traditional force controlled actuators are designed from the premise that 'Stiffer is better'. This approach gives a high bandwidth system, prone to problems of contact instability, noise, and low power density. The actuator presented in this thesis is designed from the premise that 'Stiffness isn't everything'. The actuator, which incorporates a series elastic element, trades off achievable bandwidth for gains in stable, low noise force control, and protection against shock loads. This thesis reviews related work in robot force control, presents theoretical descriptions of the control and expected performance from a series elastic actuator, and describes the design of a test actuator constructed to gather performance data. Finally the performance of the system is evaluated by comparing the performance data to theoretical predictions.

  4. UY Puppis - New Anomalous Z Cam Type Dwarf Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbings, R.; Simonsen, M.

    2016-12-01

    The defining characteristic of Z Cam stars are "standstills" in their light curves. Some Z Cams exhibit atypical behavior by going into outburst from a standstill. It has previously been suggested that UY Pup had been a Z Cam star, but it was ruled out due to its long-term light curve. However, in December 2015 UY Pup went into outburst and unexpectedly entered into a short standstill instead of returning to quiescence. Furthermore, UY Pup exhibited additional unusual behavior with two outbursts detected during its standstill. After this standstill UY Pup made a brief excursion to a quiescent state and slowly rose to a longer and well-defined standstill, where it again went into another outburst. Through comparative analysis, research, and observational data of UY Pup, it is evident and thus concluded that it is indeed a Z Cam star, which renders it one of only four known "anomalous Z Cam stars."

  5. Elastic plate spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  6. Elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model for fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, T. S.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    A constitutive model to describe the elastic/viscoplastic behavior of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites under plane stress conditions is presented. Formulations are given for quasi-static plasticity and time-dependent viscoplasticity. Experimental procedures required to generate the necessary material constants are explained, and the experimental data is compared to the predicted behavior.

  7. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy: Elastic properties of some intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, F.; Thoma, D.J.; He, Y.; Maloy, S.A.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1996-09-01

    A novel nondestructive evaluation method, resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS), is reviewed with an emphasis upon defining the elastic properties of intermetallic phases. The applications and advantages of RUS as compared to other conventional elastic constant measurement methods are explained. RUS has been employed to measure the elastic properties of single crystal and/or polycrystalline intermetallics, such as Laves phases (C15 HfV{sub 2} and NbCr{sub 2}), Nb-modified titanium aluminides, and transition metal disilicides (C11{sub b} MoSi{sub 2}, C40 NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2}). For Laves phases, the elastic properties of HfV{sub 2}-based C15 phases show various anomalies and those of C15 NbCr{sub 2} do not. For Nb-modified titanium aluminides, the elastic properties of O-phase alloys are investigated as a function of alloying content. For transition metal disilicides, single crystal elastic constants of MoSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2}, and TaSi{sub 2} are obtained and compared. Based on the experimentally determined elastic properties, the characteristics of interatomic bonding in these materials are examined and the possible impact of the elastic properties on mechanical behavior is discussed.

  8. Anomalous lattice softening of Ni2MnGa austenite due to magnetoelastic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, Oleg; Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Kopeček, Jaromír; Landa, Michal

    2012-04-01

    Elastic constants of the cubic Ni2MnGa austenite phase and corresponding mechanical damping were determined in the temperature range from 220 K to 400 K and magnetic field up to 2 T using ultrasound pulse-echo method and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. The shear coefficient c' increases from 3.6 GPa in the demagnetized state to 5.9 GPa at magnetic saturation, whereas the damping decreased nearly six times. The changes of other elastic constants, c11 and c44 with an applied field were less than 1%. In the ferromagnetic state, the c' was proportional to the square of magnetization. Above the Curie point, the coefficient c' and damping were field-independent. The anomalous shear softening is attributed to strong magnetoelastic coupling enhanced by low magnetic anisotropy.

  9. Engineering approach for elastic-plastic fracture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V; German, M D; Shih, C F

    1981-07-01

    This report for RP1237-1 presents formulas, charts, and background material that allow calculation of safety margins in ductile structures containing flaws. It is intended as a reference book for engineers who are concerned with design and analysis of flawed structures. The work extends the analysis procedures already available for brittle elastic materials to the tough and ductile steels used in the construction of pressure-boundary components. These new elastic-plastic methods more accurately describe the behavior of ductile materials and show more tolerance to flaws than the elastic methods contained in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and the Code of Federal Regulations.

  10. Numerical schemes for anomalous diffusion of single-phase fluids in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awotunde, Abeeb A.; Ghanam, Ryad A.; Al-Homidan, Suliman S.; Tatar, Nasser-eddine

    2016-10-01

    Simulation of fluid flow in porous media is an indispensable part of oil and gas reservoir management. Accurate prediction of reservoir performance and profitability of investment rely on our ability to model the flow behavior of reservoir fluids. Over the years, numerical reservoir simulation models have been based mainly on solutions to the normal diffusion of fluids in the porous reservoir. Recently, however, it has been documented that fluid flow in porous media does not always follow strictly the normal diffusion process. Small deviations from normal diffusion, called anomalous diffusion, have been reported in some experimental studies. Such deviations can be caused by different factors such as the viscous state of the fluid, the fractal nature of the porous media and the pressure pulse in the system. In this work, we present explicit and implicit numerical solutions to the anomalous diffusion of single-phase fluids in heterogeneous reservoirs. An analytical solution is used to validate the numerical solution to the simple homogeneous case. The conventional wellbore flow model is modified to account for anomalous behavior. Example applications are used to show the behavior of wellbore and wellblock pressures during the single-phase anomalous flow of fluids in the reservoirs considered.

  11. Development of Hard Elastic Solids from Glassy Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-10

    elastic polypropylene (PP) as reported by Park and Noether 5 The stress-strain behavior for three intermittent cycles to 40% extension is shown in Fig. Zb...system. Such viscoelastic effects have been concluded by Park and Noether 1 5 from more extensive stress relaxation investigations of hard elastic PP...Petermann and H. Gleiter, J. Macromol. Sc.- Phys., B12(4), 523 (1976). 4. H. D. Noether , Intern. J. Polymeric Mater.,. 7, 57 (1979). 5. M. E. Mackay

  12. Viscous-elastic dynamics of power-law fluids within an elastic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Amir; Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran

    2016-11-01

    We study the fluid-structure interaction dynamics of non-Newtonian flow through a slender linearly elastic cylinder at the creeping flow regime. Specifically, considering power-law fluids and applying the thin shell approximation for the elastic cylinder, we obtain a non-homogeneous p-Laplacian equation governing the viscous-elastic dynamics. We obtain exact solutions for the pressure and deformation fields for various initial and boundary conditions, for both shear thinning and shear thickening fluids. In particular, impulse or a step in inlet pressure yield self-similar solutions, which exhibit a compactly supported propagation front solely for shear thinning fluids. Applying asymptotic expansions, we provide approximations for weakly non-Newtonian behavior showing good agreement with the exact solutions sufficiently far from the front.

  13. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.; Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.

    2009-05-01

    We present initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [2]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. As a test case, we apply the code to modeling flows in the HSX stellarator. Due to variations in the neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  14. Drag suppression in anomalous chiral media

    DOE PAGES

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We study a heavy impurity moving longitudinal with the direction of an external magnetic field in an anomalous chiral medium. Such system would carry a non-dissipative current of chiral magnetic effect associated with the anomaly. We show, by generalizing Landau's criterion for super fluidity, that the "anomalous component" which gives rise to the anomalous transport will not contribute to the drag experienced by an impurity. We argue on a very general basis that those systems with a strong magnetic field would exhibit an interesting transport phenomenon$-$the motion of the heavy impurity is frictionless, in analogy to the case of amore » super fluid. Finally, we demonstrate and confirm our general results with two complementary examples: weakly coupled chiral fermion gases and strongly interacting chiral liquids.« less

  15. Drag suppression in anomalous chiral media

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We study a heavy impurity moving longitudinal with the direction of an external magnetic field in an anomalous chiral medium. Such system would carry a non-dissipative current of chiral magnetic effect associated with the anomaly. We show, by generalizing Landau's criterion for super fluidity, that the "anomalous component" which gives rise to the anomalous transport will not contribute to the drag experienced by an impurity. We argue on a very general basis that those systems with a strong magnetic field would exhibit an interesting transport phenomenon$-$the motion of the heavy impurity is frictionless, in analogy to the case of a super fluid. Finally, we demonstrate and confirm our general results with two complementary examples: weakly coupled chiral fermion gases and strongly interacting chiral liquids.

  16. Correlation between the characteristics of acceleration and visco elasticity of artery wall under pulsatile flow conditions (physical meaning of I* as a parameter of progressive behaviors of atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis).

    PubMed

    Yokobori, A Toshimitsu; Ohmi, Toshihito; Monma, Ryouhei; Tomono, Yuki; Inoue, Kyousuke; Owa, Michiaki; Ichiki, Masataka; Mochizuki, Noriko; Yamashita, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Previously, I* parameter has been proposed to diagnose noninvasively the progressive degree of atherosclerosis which is considered to concern the discrimination of the progressive degree of visco elasticity of blood vessel wall. However, the detailed physical meaning of this parameter has not yet been clarified. In this paper, the theoretical analysis and experiments were conducted and the detailed physical meaning of I* parameter was clarified. The following results were obtained. I* parameter was found to well correlate with the progressive degree of visco elasticity of blood vessel wall characterized by the Ith* parameter derived based on the analysis of visco elasticity in this paper. That is, I* was found to have the physical meaning of representing the progressive degree of visco elasticity of blood vessel wall. On the basis of this results, using clinical data, two dimensional representation between the progressive degree of visco elasticity of blood vessel wall by I* and the decrease in the rigidity of blood vessel wall by PWV was found to be useful to conduct much more detailed diagnosis of atherosclerosis.

  17. Anomalous magnetoresistance in Fibonacci multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L. D.; Bezerra, C. G.; Correa, M. A.; Chesman, C.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigated magnetoresistance curves in quasiperiodic magnetic multilayers for two different growth directions, namely, [110] and [100]. We considered identical ferromagnetic layers separated by nonmagnetic layers with two different thicknesses chosen based on the Fibonacci sequence. Using parameters for Fe/Cr multilayers, four terms were included in our description of the magnetic energy: Zeeman, cubic anisotropy, bilinear coupling, and biquadratic coupling. The minimum energy was determined by the gradient method and the equilibrium magnetization directions found were used to calculate magnetoresistance curves. By choosing spacers with a thickness such that biquadratic coupling is stronger than bilinear coupling, unusual behaviors for the magnetoresistance were observed: (i) for the [110] case, there is a different behavior for structures based on even and odd Fibonacci generations, and, more interesting, (ii) for the [100] case, we found magnetic field ranges for which the magnetoresistance increases with magnetic field.

  18. Anomalous mass dimension in multiflavor QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doff, A.; Natale, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Models of strongly interacting theories with a large mass anomalous dimension (γm) provide an interesting possibility for the dynamical origin of the electroweak symmetry breaking. A laboratory for these models is QCD with many flavors, which may present a nontrivial fixed point associated to a conformal region. Studies based on conformal field theories and on Schwinger-Dyson equations have suggested the existence of bounds on the mass anomalous dimension at the fixed points of these models. In this note we discuss γm values of multiflavor QCD exhibiting a nontrivial fixed point and affected by relevant four-fermion interactions.

  19. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of anomalous coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anitha; Keegan, Jennifer; Pennell, Dudley J

    2005-09-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of anomalous coronary arteries is a class I indication. The term anomalous coronary artery encompasses those with an abnormal origin (from the incorrect sinus, too-high or too-low from the correct sinus, or from the pulmonary artery) and/or number of ostia. Their clinical significance results from the increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death associated with those traversing an interarterial course between the aorta and main pulmonary artery/right ventricular outflow tract. In this article, we review the role and practice of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in this field.

  1. Linear and anomalous front propagation in systems with non-Gaussian diffusion: The importance of tails.

    PubMed

    Serva, Maurizio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    We investigate front propagation in systems with diffusive and subdiffusive behavior. The scaling behavior of moments of the diffusive problem, both in the standard and in the anomalous cases, is not enough to determine the features of the reactive front. In fact, the shape of the bulk of the probability distribution of the transport process, which determines the diffusive properties, is important just for preasymptotic behavior of front propagation, while the precise shape of the tails of the probability distribution determines asymptotic behavior of front propagation.

  2. Probabilistic elastography: estimating lung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Risholm, Petter; Ross, James; Washko, George R; Wells, William M

    2011-01-01

    We formulate registration-based elastography in a probabilistic framework and apply it to study lung elasticity in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue. The elasticity calculations are based on a Finite Element discretization of a linear elastic biomechanical model. We marginalize over the boundary conditions (deformation) of the biomechanical model to determine the posterior distribution over elasticity parameters. Image similarity is included in the likelihood, an elastic prior is included to constrain the boundary conditions, while a Markov model is used to spatially smooth the inhomogeneous elasticity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to characterize the posterior distribution over elasticity from which we extract the most probable elasticity as well as the uncertainty of this estimate. Even though registration-based lung elastography with inhomogeneous elasticity is challenging due the problem's highly underdetermined nature and the sparse image information available in lung CT, we show promising preliminary results on estimating lung elasticity contrast in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue.

  3. Following fluctuating signs: Anomalous active superdiffusion of swimmers in anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Toner, John; Löwen, Hartmut; Wensink, Henricus H

    2016-06-01

    Active (i.e., self-propelled or swimming) particles moving through an isotropic fluid exhibit conventional diffusive behavior. We report anomalous diffusion of an active particle moving in an anisotropic nematic background. While the translational motion parallel to the nematic director shows ballistic behavior, the long-time transverse motion is superdiffusive, with an anomalous scaling proportional to tlnt of the mean-square displacement with time t. This behavior is predicted by an analytical theory that we present here and is corroborated by numerical simulation of active particle diffusion in a simple lattice model for a nematic liquid crystal. It is universal for any collection of self-propelled elements (e.g., bacteria or active rods) moving in a nematic background, provided only that the swimmers are sufficiently dilute that their interactions with each other can be neglected and that they do not perform hairpin turns.

  4. Block diagonal representations for covariance based anomalous change detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsekh, Anna; Theiler, James

    2009-01-01

    Change detection methods are of crucial importance in many remote sensing applications such as monitoring and surveillance, where the goal is to identify and separate changes of interest from pervasive changes inevitably present in images taken at different times and in different environmental and illumination conditions. Anomalous change detection (ACD) methods aim to identify rare, unusual, or anomalous changes among the changes of interest. Covariance-based ACD methods provide a powerful tool for detection of unusual changes in hyper-spectral images. In this paper we study the properties of the eigenvalue spectra of a family of ACD matrices in order to better understand the algebraic and numerical behavior of the covariance-based quadratic ACD methods. We propose to use singular vectors of covariance matrices of two hyper-spectral images in whitened coordinates for obtaining block-diagonal representations of the matrices of quadratic ACD methods. SVD transformation gives an equivalent representation of ACD matrices in compact block-diagonal form. In the paper we show that the eigenvalue spectrum of a block-diagonal ACD matrix can be identified analytically as a function of the singular value spectrum of the corresponding covariance matrix in whitened coordinates.

  5. Anomalous diffusion of electromagnetic eddy currents in geological formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Chester J.; Everett, Mark E.

    2007-08-01

    Controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) induction in some geological formations is shown here to be compactly described by an anomalous subdiffusion process. Such a process, which is not universal, is governed by a fractional diffusion equation or alternatively the convolutional form of Ohm's law. A subdiffusing eddy current vortex, or electromagnetic smoke ring, propagates in such a way that its position of median intensity overruns its position of peak intensity. This behavior is not allowed in classical diffusion but is a simple consequence of diffusion within a stationary fractal medium. A similar analysis has been applied to understand heavy-tailed traveltime distributions that appear in certain hydrological time series. The tell-tale signature of anomalous electromagnetic diffusion is a slope β of the magnetic zero-crossing moveout curve that is constant with transmitter-receiver (RX) offset and significantly different from unity. Neither lateral heterogeneity nor unixial anisotropy can generate such a constant-slope moveout curve with an economy of model parameters. Controlled-source EM data from two sites in Texas and one in New Mexico are used in this study to test the eddy current subdiffusion hypothesis.

  6. Anomalous magnetic properties of mechanically milled cobalt oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S R; Dubenko, I; Losby, J; Ghosh, l K; Khan, M; Ali, N

    2005-12-01

    Defect induced magnetic properties of CoO nanoparticles produced via mechanical ball milling have been assessed by detailed magnetic measurements. A progressive decrease in the particle size and a concomitant increase in the induced strain have been observed with the milling times. The mechanically milled nanoparticles of CoO exhibit anomalous magnetic properties such as FM hysteresis when compared with the unmilled CoO sample. The presence of weak ferromagnetism, with a highest value of magnetization of 0.532 emu/g at 10 K in the 100 h milled sample, is attributed to the uncompensated surface spins resulting from induced surface defects via mechanical milling. The ZFC coercive force, measured at 10 K, increases with milling time reaching a maximum value of 1066 Oe for the 100 h milled sample. The temperature dependent field-cooled (FC) and zero-field-cooled (ZFC) magnetic measurements indicate a presence of an exchange bias field arising from uncompensated moments generated by mechanical strain and the antiferromagnetic (AFM) core. The exchange bias field measured at 10 K reaches a value 210 Oe for the 50 h milled sample and decreases upon prolonged milling. The exchange bias field vanishes at a temperature approximately 200 K, a temperature much lower than the Neel temperature of CoO (TN approximately 291 K). The observed anomalous magnetic behavior of CoO could be interpreted in terms of the exchanged bias FM-AFM model.

  7. Anomalous Cepheids in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.A.; Stryker, L.L.

    1986-08-01

    The Sculptor dwarf galaxy contains at least three Cepheids (V25, V26, and V119), each with a period near 1 day and B magnitudes about 1.4 mag brighter than those of the Sculptor RR Lyrae stars. Low-resolution spectra of these so-called anomalous Cepheids were obtained. Metal abundances of the Cepheids have been determined by the Delta-S method and are found to be: Fe/H = -1.9 + or - 0.2, -1.8 + or - 0.2, and -2.2 + or - 0.3 for V25, V26, and V119, respectively. These values are consistent with the metal abundances of Sculptor red giants estimated from the color of the giant branch. Pulsational masses have been estimated for V25 and V26, but there is a need for improved photometry of these stars to obtain accurate results. It cannot be unambiguously established whether the Sculptor anomalous Cepheids are evolved single stars, aged about 3 Gyr, or whether they are created by mass transfer in older binary systems. The occurrence of anomalous Cepheids in other systems is discussed. There is some evidence that most anomalous Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud are evolved single stars. 89 references.

  8. RSRM Nozzle Anomalous Throat Erosion Investigation Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Wendel, Gary M.

    1998-01-01

    In September, 1996, anomalous pocketing erosion was observed in the aft end of the throat ring of the nozzle of one of the reusable solid rocket motors (RSRM 56B) used on NASA's space transportation system (STS) mission 79. The RSRM throat ring is constructed of bias tape-wrapped carbon cloth/ phenolic (CCP) ablative material. A comprehensive investigation revealed necessary and sufficient conditions for occurrence of the pocketing event and provided rationale that the solid rocket motors for the subsequent mission, STS-80, were safe to fly. The nozzles of both of these motors also exhibited anomalous erosion similar to, but less extensive than that observed on STS-79. Subsequent to this flight, the investigation to identify both the specific causes and the corrective actions for elimination of the necessary and sufficient conditions for the pocketing erosion was intensified. A detailed fault tree approach was utilized to examine potential material and process contributors to the anomalous performance. The investigation involved extensive constituent and component material property testing, pedigree assessments, supplier audits, process audits, full scale processing test article fabrication and evaluation, thermal and thermostructural analyses, nondestructive evaluation, and material performance tests conducted using hot fire simulation in laboratory test beds and subscale and full scale solid rocket motor static test firings. This presentation will provide an over-view of the observed anomalous nozzle erosion and the comprehensive, fault-tree based investigation conducted to resolve this issue.

  9. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  10. COS NUV Detector Recovery after Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the NUV-MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high-voltage ramp-up, 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage, and 4} fold analysis test {See COS TIR 2010-01}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13129. Adjustments were made the the Software Global Monitor {SGM} to account for an increase in the dark counts due to window glow and to align the SGM to previously obtained Fold Analysis event data.

  11. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage. The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, high-voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, 3} a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the nominal operating HV, and 4} fold analysis test. Each must be completed successfully before proceeding onto the next. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on Proposal 13163 from Cycle 20. For additional MAMA recovery information, see STIS ISR 98-02R.

  12. STIS MAMA Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the STIS FUV MAMA or NUV MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flags are used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of three separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ_Ts health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high voltage ramp-up, and 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage followed by a fold analysis test {See STIS ISR 98-02R}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 19 proposal 12779.

  13. COS NUV Detector Recovery After Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the NUV-MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ_Ts health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high-voltage ramp-up, 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage, and 4} fold analysis test {See COS TIR 2010-01}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes almost the same steps as Cycle 19 proposal 12723. Adjustments were made the the Software Global Monitor {SGM} to account for an increase in the dark counts due to window glow and to align the SGM to previously obtained Fold Analysis event data.

  14. STIS MAMA Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the STIS FUV MAMA or NUV MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flags are used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of three separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high voltage ramp-up, and 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage followed by a fold analysis test {See STIS ISR 98-02R}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13150.

  15. Measurement of elastic properties of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Ilic, D; Moix, T; Lambercy, O; Sache, L; Bleuler, H; Ohta, M; Augsburger, L

    2005-01-01

    This paper is related to the measurements of the modulus of elasticity of an artery by studying the deformations due to the inflation of an angioplasty balloon catheter used for Interventional Radiology (IR) procedures. Various types of balloons are studied in order to characterize and compare their behaviors at the time of inflation. A test bench, consisting of an angioplasty balloon, a Polyvinyl alcohol model and an actuator used to inflate a balloon, is developed for the realization of the experiments. The pressure-volume curve during the inflation of a balloon is observed. Elasticity modulus are derived with an analytical model of the measurement system. The results are then analyzed and compared to existing data from literature.

  16. Rubber elasticity: From topology to filled elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, G.; Vilgis, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    Various new aspects in the elasticity of rubbers and statistics of unfilled and filled elastomers, together with various consequences for practical application are discussed. It is shown that the role of network topology is crucial in the statistics of rubbers. This is seen mostly on the influence of heterogeneities of crosslink density which determine the elastic modulus, ultimate properties as well as the dynamical behavior. The filler effects, entanglements in filled rubbers, and the filler/bound rubber/mobile rubber problem are discussed from a novel point of view. A localization model is adopted, where it can be shown that on a rough (filler) surface more polymer can be adsorbed compared to a flat surface with similar energetic properties. The role of carbon black networking and fractal properties of the filler are discussed in relation to the dynamic-mechanical properties of the elastomer.

  17. Experiments on Elastic Cloaking in Thin Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Nicolas; Wilhelm, Manfred; Wegener, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Following a theoretical proposal [M. Farhat , Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 024301 (2009)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.024301], we design, fabricate, and characterize a cloaking structure for elastic waves in 1 mm thin structured polymer plates. The cloak consists of 20 concentric rings of 16 different metamaterials, each being a tailored composite of polyvinyl chloride and polydimethylsiloxane. By using stroboscopic imaging with a camera from the direction normal to the plate, we record movies of the elastic waves for monochromatic plane-wave excitation. We observe good cloaking behavior for carrier frequencies in the range from 200 to 400 Hz (one octave), in good agreement with a complete continuum-mechanics numerical treatment. This system is thus ideally suited for demonstration experiments conveying the ideas of transformation optics.

  18. Anomalous transports in a time-delayed system subjected to anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ru-Yin; Tong, Lu-Mei; Nie, Lin-Ru; Wang, Chaojie; Pan, Wanli

    2017-02-01

    We investigate anomalous transports of an inertial Brownian particle in a time-delayed periodic potential subjected to an external time-periodic force, a constant bias force, and the Lévy noise. By means of numerical calculations, effect of the time delay and the Lévy noise on its mean velocity are discussed. The results indicate that: (i) The time delay can induce both multiple current reversals (CRs) and absolute negative mobility (ANM) phenomena in the system; (ii) The CRs and ANM phenomena only take place in the region of superdiffusion, while disappear in the regions of normal diffusion; (iii) The time delay can cause state transition of the system from anomalous →normal →anomalous →normal →anomalous →normal transport in the case of superdiffusion.

  19. Anomalous Refraction of Acoustic Guided Waves in Solids with Geometrically Tapered Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongfei; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2016-07-15

    The concept of a metasurface opens new exciting directions to engineer the refraction properties in both optical and acoustic media. Metasurfaces are typically designed by assembling arrays of subwavelength anisotropic scatterers able to mold incoming wave fronts in rather unconventional ways. The concept of a metasurface was pioneered in photonics and later extended to acoustics while its application to the propagation of elastic waves in solids is still relatively unexplored. We investigate the design of acoustic metasurfaces to control elastic guided waves in thin-walled structural elements. These engineered discontinuities enable the anomalous refraction of guided wave modes according to the generalized Snell's law. The metasurfaces are made out of locally resonant toruslike tapers enabling an accurate phase shift of the incoming wave, which ultimately affects the refraction properties. We show that anomalous refraction can be achieved on transmitted antisymmetric modes (A_{0}) either when using a symmetric (S_{0}) or antisymmetric (A_{0}) incident wave, the former clearly involving mode conversion. The same metasurface design also allows achieving structure embedded planar focal lenses and phase masks for nonparaxial propagation.

  20. Anomalous Refraction of Acoustic Guided Waves in Solids with Geometrically Tapered Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongfei; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    The concept of a metasurface opens new exciting directions to engineer the refraction properties in both optical and acoustic media. Metasurfaces are typically designed by assembling arrays of subwavelength anisotropic scatterers able to mold incoming wave fronts in rather unconventional ways. The concept of a metasurface was pioneered in photonics and later extended to acoustics while its application to the propagation of elastic waves in solids is still relatively unexplored. We investigate the design of acoustic metasurfaces to control elastic guided waves in thin-walled structural elements. These engineered discontinuities enable the anomalous refraction of guided wave modes according to the generalized Snell's law. The metasurfaces are made out of locally resonant toruslike tapers enabling an accurate phase shift of the incoming wave, which ultimately affects the refraction properties. We show that anomalous refraction can be achieved on transmitted antisymmetric modes (A0) either when using a symmetric (S0) or antisymmetric (A0) incident wave, the former clearly involving mode conversion. The same metasurface design also allows achieving structure embedded planar focal lenses and phase masks for nonparaxial propagation.

  1. Anomalous versus Slowed-Down Brownian Diffusion in the Ligand-Binding Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Soula, Hédi; Caré, Bertrand; Beslon, Guillaume; Berry, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of protein motion in living cells and membranes consistently report transient anomalous diffusion (subdiffusion) that converges back to a Brownian motion with reduced diffusion coefficient at long times after the anomalous diffusion regime. Therefore, slowed-down Brownian motion could be considered the macroscopic limit of transient anomalous diffusion. On the other hand, membranes are also heterogeneous media in which Brownian motion may be locally slowed down due to variations in lipid composition. Here, we investigate whether both situations lead to a similar behavior for the reversible ligand-binding reaction in two dimensions. We compare the (long-time) equilibrium properties obtained with transient anomalous diffusion due to obstacle hindrance or power-law-distributed residence times (continuous-time random walks) to those obtained with space-dependent slowed-down Brownian motion. Using theoretical arguments and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that these three scenarios have distinctive effects on the apparent affinity of the reaction. Whereas continuous-time random walks decrease the apparent affinity of the reaction, locally slowed-down Brownian motion and local hindrance by obstacles both improve it. However, only in the case of slowed-down Brownian motion is the affinity maximal when the slowdown is restricted to a subregion of the available space. Hence, even at long times (equilibrium), these processes are different and exhibit irreconcilable behaviors when the area fraction of reduced mobility changes. PMID:24209851

  2. Design guidance for elastic followup

    SciTech Connect

    Naugle, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The basic mechanism of elastic followup is discussed in relation to piping design. It is shown how mechanistic insight gained from solutions for a two-bar problem can be used to identify dominant design parameters and to determine appropriate modifications where elastic followup is a potential problem. It is generally recognized that quantitative criteria are needed for elastic followup in the creep range where badly unbalanced lines can pose potential problems. Approaches for criteria development are discussed.

  3. Theory of epithelial elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnc, Matej; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-11-01

    We propose an elastic theory of epithelial monolayers based on a two-dimensional discrete model of dropletlike cells characterized by differential surface tensions of their apical, basal, and lateral sides. We show that the effective tissue bending modulus depends on the apicobasal differential tension and changes sign at the transition from the flat to the fold morphology. We discuss three mechanisms that stabilize the finite-wavelength fold structures: Physical constraint on cell geometry, hard-core interaction between non-neighboring cells, and bending elasticity of the basement membrane. We show that the thickness of the monolayer changes along the waveform and thus needs to be considered as a variable rather than a parameter. Next we show that the coupling between the curvature and the thickness is governed by the apicobasal polarity and that the amplitude of thickness modulation along the waveform is proportional to the apicobasal differential tension. This suggests that intracellular stresses can be measured indirectly by observing easily measurable morphometric parameters. We also study the mechanics of three-dimensional structures with cylindrical symmetry.

  4. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  5. Anomalous dynamics in intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinner, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    This talk will describe quantitative analyses of particle tracking data for systems with cytoskeletally associated molecular motors to better understand the motions contributing to intracellular transport and, more generally, means for characterizing systems far from equilibrium. In particular, we have studied the motions of insulin-containing vesicles (granules) in a pancreatic beta cell line. We find subdiffusive behavior with correlations in both space and time. These data can be modeled by subordinating an ergodic random walk process to a non-ergodic one. We relate the dynamics to the underlying microtubule structure by imaging in the presence of the drug vinblastine. Our results provide a simple physical mechanism for how diverse pools of insulin granules and, in turn, biphasic secretion could arise. Time permitting, these dynamics will be compared with those of actomyosin assemblies.

  6. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  7. Towards a Better Understanding of the Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Di; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Recent experimental efforts to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions in the anomalous Hall effect are reviewed. Benefited from the experimental control of artificial impurity density in single crystalline magnetic thin films, a comprehensive physical picture of the anomalous Hall effect involving multiple competing scattering processes has been established. Some new insights into the microscopic mechanisms of the anomalous Hall effect are discussed.

  8. The Comprehension of Anomalous Sentences: Evidence from Structural Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanova, Iva; Pickering, Martin J.; Branigan, Holly P.; McLean, Janet F.; Costa, Albert

    2012-01-01

    We report three experiments investigating how people process anomalous sentences, in particular those in which the anomaly is associated with the verb. We contrast two accounts for the processing of such anomalous sentences: a syntactic account, in which the representations constructed for anomalous sentences are similar in nature to the ones…

  9. Propagation of ultrasonic Love waves in nonhomogeneous elastic functionally graded materials.

    PubMed

    Kiełczyński, P; Szalewski, M; Balcerzak, A; Wieja, K

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the propagation behavior of ultrasonic Love waves in nonhomogeneous functionally graded elastic materials, which is a vital problem in the mechanics of solids. The elastic properties (shear modulus) of a semi-infinite elastic half-space vary monotonically with the depth (distance from the surface of the material). The Direct Sturm-Liouville Problem that describes the propagation of Love waves in nonhomogeneous elastic functionally graded materials is formulated and solved by using two methods: i.e., (1) Finite Difference Method, and (2) Haskell-Thompson Transfer Matrix Method. The dispersion curves of phase and group velocity of surface Love waves in inhomogeneous elastic graded materials are evaluated. The integral formula for the group velocity of Love waves in nonhomogeneous elastic graded materials has been established. The effect of elastic non-homogeneities on the dispersion curves of Love waves is discussed. Two Love wave waveguide structures are analyzed: (1) a nonhomogeneous elastic surface layer deposited on a homogeneous elastic substrate, and (2) a semi-infinite nonhomogeneous elastic half-space. Obtained in this work, the phase and group velocity dispersion curves of Love waves propagating in the considered nonhomogeneous elastic waveguides have not previously been reported in the scientific literature. The results of this paper may give a deeper insight into the nature of Love waves propagation in elastic nonhomogeneous functionally graded materials, and can provide theoretical guidance for the design and optimization of Love wave based devices.

  10. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  11. Analyses of elastic-plastic problems based on the principle of superposition. II - Elastic-plastic analysis of an infinite plate with an elliptic hole or a crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dai-Heng; Nisitani, Hironobu

    This article is concerned with the elastic-plastic analysis of an infinite plate with an elliptic hole or a crack. The method of analysis is the body force method extended to the elastic-plastic problems. In this method, the solutions are obtained by superposing the elastic fields due to the force doublets acting in an infinite plate with an elliptic hole or a crack, so as to satisfy the constitutive equation of plasticity. The elastic-plastic behaviors near a notch root or a crack tip are discussed from the viewpoint of the linear notch mechanics.

  12. Spinodal surface instability of soft elastic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shi Qing; Feng, Xi Qiao

    2008-06-01

    When the thicknesses of thin films reduce to microns or even nanometers, surface energy and surface interaction often play a significant role in their deformation behavior and surface morphology. The spinodal surface instability induced by the van der Waals force in a soft elastic thin film perfectly bonded to a rigid substrate is investigated theoretically using the bifurcation theory of elastic structures. The analytical solution is derived for the critical condition of spinodal surface morphology instability by accounting for the competition of the van der Waals interaction energy, elastic strain energy and surface energy. Detailed examinations on the effect of surface energy, thickness and elastic properties of the film show that the characteristic wavelength of the deformation bifurcation mode depends on the film thickness via an exponential relation, with the power index in the range from 0.749 to 1.0. The theoretical solution has a good agreement with relevant experiment results.

  13. Elasticity-Driven Backflow of Fluid-Driven Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Zheng, Zhong; Dressaire, Emilie; Ramon, Guy; Huppert, Herbert E.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-11-01

    Fluid-driven cracks are generated by the injection of pressurized fluid into an elastic medium. Once the injection pressure is released, the crack closes up due to elasticity and the fluid in the crack drains out of the crack through an outlet, which we refer to as backflow. We experimentally study the effects of crack size, elasticity of the matrix, and fluid viscosity on the backflow dynamics. During backflow, the volume of liquid remaining in the crack as a function of time exhibits a transition from a fast decay at early times to a power law behavior at late times. Our results at late times can be explained by scaling arguments balancing elastic and viscous stresses in the crack. This work may relate to the environmental issue of flowback in hydraulic fracturing. This work is supported by National Science Foundation via Grant CBET-1509347 and partially supported by Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University.

  14. Elastic stability of high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Chan, S.K.; Garner, F.A.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to identify ceramic materials that are suitable for fusion reactor applications. Elastic constants (C{sub 11}, C{sub 12}, and C{sub 44}) of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) single crystals irradiated to very high neutron fluences have geen measured by an ultrasonic technique. Although results of a neutron diffraction study show that cation occupation sites are significantly changed in the irradiated samples, no measurable differences occurred in their elastic properties. In order to understand such behavior, the elastic properties of a variety of materials with either normal or inverse spinel structures were studied. The cation valence and cation distribution appear to have little influence on the elastic properties of spinel materials.

  15. Investigating dissipation in the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Eli; Bestwick, Andrew; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Feng, Yang; Ou, Yunbo; He, Ke; Wang, Yayu; Xue, Qi-Kun; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang

    In the quantum anomalous Hall effect, a magnetic exchange gap in a 3D topological insulator gives rise to dissipationless chiral edge states. Though the effect has recently been realized in a family of ferromagnetically-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 topological insulator thin films, experiments to date have found non-vanishing longitudinal resistance, contrary to initial theoretical expectations. Proposed sources of this dissipation include extra gapless or activated quasi-helical edge states, thermally activated 2D conduction, and variable-range hopping. Here, we discuss transport measurements of Corbino disk and non-local geometries to identify the mechanism of non-ideal behavior. This work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, under Award No. 19-7503.

  16. Viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions and anomalous CM diffusion in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hendrik; Farago, Jean; Semenov, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    We have recently discovered that anomalous center-of-mass (CM) diffusion occurring on intermediate time scales in polymer melts can be explained by the interplay of viscoelastic and hydrodynamic interactions (VHI). The theory has been solved for unentangled melts in 3D and 2D and excellent agreement between theory and simulation is found. The physical mechanism considers that hydrodynamic interactions are time dependent because of increasing viscosity before the terminal relaxation time; it is generally active in melts of any topology. Surprisingly, the effects are relevant for both, momentum-conserving and Langevin dynamics and this presentation will focus on the differences: The commonly employed Langevin thermostat significantly changes the CM motion on short and intermediate time scales, but approaching the Rouse time, the melt behavior is close to momentum-conserving simulations. On the other hand, if momentum-conserving simulations are run in too small a simulation box, the result looks as if a Langevin thermostat was used.

  17. Seemingly anomalous angular distributions in H + D₂ reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Jankunas, Justin; Zare, Richard N; Bouakline, Foudhil; Althorpe, Stuart C; Herráez-Aguilar, Diego; Aoiz, F Javier

    2012-06-29

    When a hydrogen (H) atom approaches a deuterium (D(2)) molecule, the minimum-energy path is for the three nuclei to line up. Consequently, nearly collinear collisions cause HD reaction products to be backscattered with low rotational excitation, whereas more glancing collisions yield sideways-scattered HD products with higher rotational excitation. Here we report that measured cross sections for the H + D(2) → HD(v' = 4, j') + D reaction at a collision energy of 1.97 electron volts contradict this behavior. The anomalous angular distributions match closely fully quantum mechanical calculations, and for the most part quasiclassical trajectory calculations. As the energy available in product recoil is reduced, a rotational barrier to reaction cuts off contributions from glancing collisions, causing high-j' HD products to become backward scattered.

  18. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  19. Anomalous transport in fracture networks: field scale experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous transport is widely observed in different settings and scales of transport through porous and fractured geologic media. A common signature of anomalous transport is the late-time power law tailing in breakthrough curves (BTCs) during tracer tests. Various conceptual models of anomalous transport have been proposed, including multirate mass transfer, continuous time random walk, and stream tube models. Since different conceptual models can produce equally good fits to a single BTC, tracer test interpretation has been plagued with ambiguity. Here, we propose to resolve such ambiguity by analyzing BTCs obtained from both convergent and push-pull flow configurations at two different fracture planes. We conducted field tracer tests in a fractured granite formation close to Ploemeur, France. We observe that BTC tailing depends on the flow configuration and the injection fracture. Specifically the tailing disappears under push-pull geometry, and when we injected at a fracture with high flux (Figure 1). This indicates that for this fractured granite, BTC tailing is controlled by heterogeneous advection and not by matrix diffusion. To explain the change in tailing behavior for different flow configurations, we employ a simple lattice network model with heterogeneous conductivity distribution. The model assigns random conductivities to the fractures and solves the Darcy equation for an incompressible fluid, enforcing mass conservation at fracture intersections. The mass conservation constraint yields a correlated random flow through the fracture system. We investigate whether BTC tailing can be explained by the spatial distribution of preferential flow paths and stagnation zones, which is controlled by the conductivity variance and correlation length. By combining the results from the field tests and numerical modeling, we show that the reversibility of spreading is a key mechanism that needs to be captured. We also demonstrate the dominant role of the injection

  20. Elastic instabilities in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gent, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Materials that undergo large elastic deformations can exhibit novel instabilities. Several examples are described: development of an aneurysm on inflating a rubber tube; non-uniform stretching on inflating a spherical balloon; formation of internal cracks in rubber blocks at a critical level of triaxial tension or when supersaturated with a dissolved gas; surface wrinkling of a block at a critical amount of compression; debonding or fracture of constrained films on swelling, and formation of ``knots'' on twisting stretched cylindrical rods. These various deformations are analyzed in terms of a simple strain energy function, using Rivlin's theory of large elastic deformations, and the results are compared with experimental measurements of the onset of unstable states. Such comparisons provide new tests of Rivlin's theory and, at least in principle, critical tests of proposed strain energy functions for rubber. Moreover the onset of highly non-uniform deformations has serious implications for the fatigue life and fracture resistance of rubber components. [4pt] References: [0pt] R. S. Rivlin, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. Ser. A241 (1948) 379--397. [0pt] A. Mallock, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. 49 (1890--1891) 458--463. [0pt] M. A. Biot, ``Mechanics of Incremental Deformations'', Wiley, New York, 1965. [0pt] A. N. Gent and P. B. Lindley, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 249 (1958) 195--205. [0pt] A. N. Gent, W. J. Hung and M. F. Tse, Rubb. Chem. Technol. 74 (2001) 89--99. [0pt] A. N. Gent, Internatl. J. Non-Linear Mech. 40 (2005) 165--175.

  1. The First Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girill, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Boyle-Mariotte gas law was formulated in terms of pneumatic springs," subsumed by Hooke under his own stress-strain relation, and generally regarded as a law of elasticity. The subsequent development of Boyle's principle and elasticity provide thought-provoking test cases for Kuhn's notations of paradigm and puzzle solving in physics.…

  2. Valve designed with elastic seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Glashan, W. F., Jr.

    1965-01-01

    Absolute valve closure is accomplished by a machined valve with an axially annular channel which changes the outlet passage into a thin tubular elastic seat member with a retainer backup ring. The elasticity of the seat provides tight conformity to ball irregularity.

  3. PAGOSA Sample Problem. Elastic Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Weseloh, Wayne N.; Clancy, Sean Patrick

    2016-02-03

    A PAGOSA simulation of a flyer plate impact which produces an elastic precursor wave is examined. The simulation is compared to an analytic theory for the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and an elastic-perfectly-plastic strength model.

  4. Estimating Price Elasticity using Market-Level Appliance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2015-08-04

    This report provides and update to and expansion upon our 2008 LBNL report “An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Appliances,” in which we estimated an average relative price elasticity of -0.34 for major household appliances (Dale and Fujita 2008). Consumer responsiveness to price change is a key component of energy efficiency policy analysis; these policies influence consumer purchases through price both explicitly and implicitly. However, few studies address appliance demand elasticity in the U.S. market and public data sources are generally insufficient for rigorous estimation. Therefore, analysts have relied on a small set of outdated papers focused on limited appliance types, assuming long-term elasticities estimated for other durables (e.g., vehicles) decades ago are applicable to current and future appliance purchasing behavior. We aim to partially rectify this problem in the context of appliance efficiency standards by revisiting our previous analysis, utilizing data released over the last ten years and identifying additional estimates of durable goods price elasticities in the literature. Reviewing the literature, we find the following ranges of market-level price elasticities: -0.14 to -0.42 for appliances; -0.30 to -1.28 for automobiles; -0.47 to -2.55 for other durable goods. Brand price elasticities are substantially higher for these product groups, with most estimates -2.0 or more elastic. Using market-level shipments, sales value, and efficiency level data for 1989-2009, we run various iterations of a log-log regression model, arriving at a recommended range of short run appliance price elasticity between -0.4 and -0.5, with a default value of -0.45.

  5. Anomalous Local Fermi Liquid in f2-Singlet Configuration: Impurity Model for Heavy-Electron System UPt3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsuhashi, Satoshi; Miyake, Kazumasa; Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    It is shown by the Wilson numerical renormalization group method that a strongly correlated impurity with a crystalline-electric-field singlet ground state in the f2-configuration exhibits an anomalous local Fermi liquid state in which the static magnetic susceptibility remains an uncorrelated value while the NMR relaxation rate is enhanced in proportion to the square of the mass enhancement factor. Namely, the Korringa-Shiba relation is apparently broken. This feature closely matches the anomalous behaviors observed in UPt3, i.e., the coexistence of an unenhanced value of the Knight shift due to quasiparticles contribution (the decrease across the superconducting transition) and the enhanced relaxation rate of NMR. Such an anomalous Fermi liquid behavior suggests that the Fermi liquid corrections for the susceptibility are highly anisotropic.

  6. Elasticity of Flowing Soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2016-11-01

    The robustness of soap films and bubbles manifests their mechanical stability. The single most important factor underlying the mechanical stability of soap films is its elasticity. Non-destructive measurement of the elasticity in these films has been cumbersome, because of its flowing nature. Here we provide a convenient, reproducible, and non-destructive method for measuring the elasticity by generating and inspecting Marangoni waves. Our method is based on generating an oblique shock by inserting a thin cylindrical obstacle in the flowing film, and converting the measured the shock angle to elasticity. Using this method, we find a constant value for the elasticity of 22 dyne/cm in the commonly used range of film widths, thicknesses or flow rates, implying that the surface of the film is chemically saturated with soap molecules.

  7. Remote sensing and characterization of anomalous debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Beavers, W.; Lambour, R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Kansky, J.; Stansbery, E.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of orbital debris data shows a band of anomalously high debris concentration in the altitude range between 800 and 1000 km. Analysis indicates that the origin is the leaking coolant fluid from nuclear power sources that powered a now defunct Soviet space-based series of ocean surveillance satellites. A project carried out to detect, track and characterize a sample of the anomalous debris is reported. The nature of the size and shape of the sample set, and the possibility of inferring the composition of the droplets were assessed. The technique used to detect, track and characterize the sample set is described and the results of the characterization analysis are presented. It is concluded that the nature of the debris is consistent with leaked Na-K fluid, although this cannot be proved with the remote sensing techniques used.

  8. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  9. The resurgence of the cusp anomalous dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniceto, Inês

    2016-02-01

    This work addresses the resurgent properties of the cusp anomalous dimension’s strong coupling expansion, obtained from the integral Beisert-Eden-Staudacher (BES) equation. This expansion is factorially divergent, and its first non-perturbative corrections are related to the mass gap of the O(6)σ -model. The factorial divergence can also be analyzed from a resurgence perspective. Building on the work of Basso and Korchemsky, a transseries ansatz for the cusp anomalous dimension is proposed and the corresponding expected large-order behaviour studied. One finds non-perturbative phenomena in both the positive and negative real coupling directions, which need to be included to address the analyticity conditions coming from the BES equation. After checking the resurgence structure of the proposed transseries, it is shown that it naturally leads to an unambiguous resummation procedure, furthermore allowing for a strong/weak coupling interpolation.

  10. Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2011-02-15

    The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  11. Anomalous magnetic viscosity in relativistic accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fujun; Liu, Sanqiu; Li, Xiaoqing

    2013-07-01

    It has been proved that the self-generated magnetic fields by transverse plasmons in the relativistic regime are modulationally unstable, leading to a self-similar collapse of the magnetic flux tubes and resulting in local magnetic structures; highly spatially intermittent flux is responsible for generating the anomalous viscosity. We derive the anomalous magnetic viscosity coefficient, in accretion disks around compact objects, such as black holes, pulsars and quasars, where the plasmas are relativistic, in order to help clarify the nature of viscosity in the theory of accretion disks. The results indicate that, the magnetic viscosity is modified by the relativistic effects of plasmas, and its' strength would be 1015 stronger than the molecular viscosity, which may be helpful in explaining the observations.

  12. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    We discuss initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1,2] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [3]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. A. Spong, Fusion Sci. Technology 50, 343 (2006). [3] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  13. Anomalous superficial ulnar artery based flap

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, C. V.; Kundagulwar, Girish K.; Prabha, Yadav S.; Dushyanth, Jaiswal

    2014-01-01

    Upper limb shows a large number of arterial variations. This case report describes the presence of additional superficial ulnar artery which was used to raise a pedicle flap to cover an arm defect thus avoided using the main vessel of the forearm - radial or ulnar artery. Vascular anomalies occurring in the arm and forearm tend to increase the likelihood of damaging the superficial anomalous arteries during surgery. Superficial ulnar or radial arteries have been described to originate from the upper third of the brachial artery; here we report the origin of the anomalous superficial ulnar artery originating from the brachial artery at the level of elbow with the concomitant presence of normal deep radial and ulnar arteries. PMID:24987217

  14. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  15. Anomalous gluon content of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsuda, T.

    1990-01-01

    The proton matrix element of the flavor singlet axial current is evaluated using the large Nc chiral dynamics satisfying the anomalous Ward-Takahashi identities. We relate the quark and gluon contributions ( Δq and Δg) of the matrix element to the nucleon-meson ( η, η', π0) pseudo-scalar coupling constants. It is shown that the weak η'-nucleon coupling is preferred to reproduce the recent EMC data. The origin of the anomalous value of Δg pointed out by Cheng and Li is clarified in the context of the large isospin violation due to the anomaly. A subtlety related to the matrix element of the gauge-variant topological current Kμ is also discussed.

  16. Bibliography on Small Systems: Nonequilibrium Phenomena and Anomalous Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Fei; Lamberto, Rondoni; TANG, Lei-Han; ZHOU, Hai-Jun; WANG, Yan-Ting

    2014-10-01

    The workshop and satellite conference held in July 2013 at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) brought together experts of a variety of different fields, and constituted a unique opportunity to share ideas and breed new ones in a strongly interdisciplinary fashion. At the same time, the breadth of the scope of these two meetings was so wide that the need for a collection of reference books and papers was pointed out, in order to help the interested professionals, as well as graduate students, both to tackle the technically advanced issues and to bridge the gaps, necessarily present in each other's background. Therefore, we invited some of the participants to produce a bibliography containing the most relevant works in their own fields, and to complement this bibliography with a short explanation of the content of those books and papers. We are thus very grateful to Igor Goychuk, David Lacoste, Annick Lesne, Andrea Puglisi, Hong Qian and Hugo Touchette for having accepted our invitation and for having produced what we consider a very useful tool for all those who want to learn or to understand more deeply the current theories concerning small and nonequilibrium systems.

  17. Anomalous toroidal field penetration in Tormac V

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Vaucher, B. G.; Shaw, R. S.; Vella, M. C.

    1981-07-01

    We investigate magnetic field penetration into a cool, collisional, magnetized plasma in Tormac V. Magnetic probe and laser interferometer studies reveal anomalous penetration of the applied toroidal field into a plasma with an initial parallel bias toroidal field. The applied poloidal field, however, formed a well-defined magnetic front which was effective at sweeping up particles. Lastly, strong shear in the vacuum magnetic field does not inhibit the apparent decoupling of the applied toroidal field from the applied poloidal field.

  18. Anomalous Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Muniandy, S. V.; Woon, K. L.; Choo, K. Y.

    2011-03-30

    Anomalous charge carrier transport in disordered organic semiconductors is studied using fractional differential equations. The connection between index of fractional derivative and dispersion exponent is examined from the perspective of fractional Fokker-Planck equation and its link to the continuous time random walk formalism. The fractional model is used to describe the bi-scaling power-laws observed in the time-of flight photo-current transient data for two different types of organic semiconductors.

  19. Anomalous Water and Other Polymeric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    could be called anomalous in some ways, no material that gives the exact spectrum of ’ polywater ’ could be found. An interesting and previously...unreported form of sodium carbonate is formed when this compound crystallizes from methanol. Yields of the polywater -like material seem to vary greatly from...laboratory to laboratory, even when simple procedures that are seen to work in one are tried in another. Polywater -like material can be formed from

  20. Size-Dependent Elasticity of Nanocrystalline Titania

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Zhang, H; Dunphy-Guzman, K; Spagnoli, D; Kruger, M; Muthu, D; Kunz, M; Fakra, S; Hu, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction measurements indicate that compressibility, a fundamental materials property, can have a size-specific minimum value. The bulk modulus of nanocrystalline titania has a maximum at particle size of 15 nm. This can be explained by dislocation behavior because very high dislocation contents can be achieved when shear stress induced within nanoparticles counters the repulsion between dislocations. As particle size decreases, compression increasingly generates dislocation networks (hardened by overlap of strain fields) that shield intervening regions from external pressure. However, when particles become too small to sustain high dislocation concentrations, elastic stiffening declines. The compressibility has a minimum at intermediate sizes.

  1. Dynamic elastic response of KMn1-xCaxF3 : Elastic softening and domain freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schranz, W.; Sondergeld, P.; Kityk, A. V.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2009-09-01

    Results of continuous-wave resonance (MHz-region) and ultralow-frequency (Hz-region) dynamic mechanical analyzer measurements of pure KMnF3 and mixed crystals KMn1-xCaxF3 (x<0.017) are presented in a broad temperature range including the phase-transition regions. The elastic anomalies depend strongly on the measurement frequency: The MHz-elastic constants can be well fitted by Landau theory including the difference between isothermal and adiabatic behavior. Contrary, at low frequencies (0.1-50 Hz) an elastic softening (superelasticity) due to domain-wall motion is found quite similar to that observed recently in isostructural SrTiO3 [A. V. Kityk , Phys. Rev. B 61, 946 (2000)]. However, unlike to SrTiO3 , for the mixed system KMn1-xCaxF3 we have measured freezing of the domain-wall movement around 100 K in a certain range of concentration of Ca2+ ions (x=0.003) . Calculating the dynamic elastic response to the ac-stress field by taking into account the motion of randomly pinned ferroelastic domain walls in KMn1-xCaxF3 yields excellent agreement between theory and experiment.

  2. Characterizing cosmic inhomogeneity with anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraljic, D.

    2015-08-01

    Dark matter (DM) clustering at the present epoch is investigated from a fractal viewpoint in order to determine the scale where the self-similar scaling property of the DM halo distribution transits to homogeneity. Methods based on well-established `counts-in-cells' as well as new methods based on anomalous diffusion and random walks are investigated. Both are applied to DM haloes of the biggest N-body simulation in the `Dark Sky Simulations' (DS) catalogue and an equivalent randomly distributed catalogue. Results based on the smaller `Millennium Run' (MR) simulation are revisited and improved. It is found that the MR simulation volume is too small and prone to bias to reliably identify the onset of homogeneity. Transition to homogeneity is defined when the fractal dimension of the clustered and random distributions cannot be distinguished within the associated uncertainties. The `counts-in-cells' method applied to the DS then yields a homogeneity scale roughly consistent with previous work (˜150 h-1 Mpc). The characteristic length-scale for anomalous diffusion to behave homogeneously is found to be at about 250 h-1 Mpc. The behaviour of the fractal dimensions for a halo catalogue with the same two-point function as the original but with shuffled Fourier phases is investigated. The methods based on anomalous diffusion are shown to be sensitive to the phase information, whereas the `counts-in-cells' methods are not.

  3. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same for the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 54 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same or the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 8 figs.

  5. Neoclassical and anomalous flows in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Marine, T.; Spong, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    The impact of magnetic geometry and plasma profiles on flows and viscosities in stellarators is investigated. This work examines both neoclassical and anomalous flows for a number of configurations including a particular focus on the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) and other quasi-symmetric configurations. Neoclassical flows and viscosities are calculated using the PENTA code [1]. For anomalous flows, the neoclassical viscosities from PENTA are used in a transport code that includes Reynolds stress flow generation [2]. This is done for the standard quasi-helically symmetric configuration of HSX, a symmetry-breaking mirror configuration and a hill configuration. The impact of these changes in the magnetic geometry on neoclassical viscosities and flows in HSX are discussed. Due to variations in neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. These effects are shown to vary as the ratio of electron to ion temperature varies. In particular, as the ion temperature increases relative to the electron flow shear is shown to increase. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  6. Large magneto-chemical-elastic coupling in highly magnetostrictive Fe-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Narsu, B.; Wang, Gui-Sheng; Johansson, B.; Vitos, L.

    2013-12-02

    The strong softening of the tetragonal shear elastic constant (C{sup ′}) is the main reason for the second magnetostriction peak observed in Fe{sub 100–x}Ga{sub x} alloys. Here, we study the coupling between chemical order and magnetism with the aim to understand the origin of the elastic softening. We demonstrate that C{sup ′} strongly depends on the degree of order of Ga atoms in α-Fe. The B{sub 2} type ordering proves to have an important role on the elastic softening for x<19%, whereas the extreme shear lattice softening and the anomalous temperature dependence of C{sup ′} are found to be due to the strong magnetochemical coupling in the DO{sub 3} phase.

  7. Comment on "Anomalous wave propagation in a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial having simultaneously negative mass density and Young's modulus" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)].

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L

    2014-03-01

    The phase and group velocities of elastic guided waves are important in the physical interpretation of high frequency scattering by fluid-loaded elastic shells. Outside the context of scattering, those properties are also important for understanding the energy flow in acoustic metamaterials. In a recent investigation of acoustic metamaterials exhibiting anomalous wave propagation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)] criticism of negative group velocity terminology was generalized to elastic waves guided on ordinary materials. Some context and justification for retaining the identification of negative group velocities associated with a type of backscattering enhancement for shells are explained here. The phase evolution direction is determined by the boundary conditions.

  8. Exploration of Anomalous Gravity Effects by rf-Pumped Magnetized High-T(c) Superconducting Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tony; Litchford, Ron; Peters, Randall; Thompson, Byran; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A number of anomalous gravitational effects have been reported in the scientific literature during recent years, but there has been no independent confirmation with regard to any of these claims. Therefore, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in response to the propulsion challenges specified by NASA's Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) program, proposed to explore the possibility of observing anomalous gravitation behavior through the manipulation of Josephson junction effects in magnetized high-Tc superconducting oxides. The technical goal was to critically test this revolutionary physical claim and provide a rigorous, independent, empirical confirmation (or refutation) of anomalous effects related to the manipulation of gravity by radio frequency (rf)-pumped magnetized type-2 superconductors. Because the current empirical evidence for gravity modification is anecdotal, our objective was to design, construct, and meticulously implement a discriminating experiment, which would put these observations on a more firm footing within the scientific community. Our approach is unique in that we advocate the construction of an extremely sensitive torsion balance with which to measure gravity modification effects by rf-pumped type-2 superconductor test masses. This paper reviews the anecdotal evidence for anomalous gravity effects, describes the design and development of a simplified torsion balance experiment for empirically investigating these claims, and presents the results of preliminary experiments.

  9. Evidence that Clouds of keV Hydrogen Ion Clusters Bounce Elastically from a Solid Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. A.; Martin, James J.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen ion clusters is tested by an inject/hold/extract technique in a Penning-Malmberg trap. The timing pattern of the extraction signals is consistent with the clusters bouncing elastically from a detector several times. The ion clusters behave more like an elastic fluid than a beam of ions.

  10. Relations between the modulus of elasticity of binary alloys and their structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Werner; Rauscher, Walter

    1951-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of the elastic modulus of binary alloys as a function of the concentration is presented. Alloys that form continuous solid solutions, limited solid solutions, eutectic alloys, and alloys with intermetallic phases are investigated. Systems having the most important structures have been examined to obtain criteria for the relation between lattice structure, type of binding, and elastic behavior.

  11. NDE Elastic Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are increasingly replacing metallic alloys as structural materials for primary components of fracture-critical structures. This trend is a result of the growing understanding of material behavior and recognition of the desirable properties of composites. A research program was conducted on NDE methods for determining the elastic properties of composites.

  12. Elastic instabilities in planar elongational flow of monodisperse polymer solutions

    PubMed Central

    Haward, Simon J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Shen, Amy Q.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate purely elastic flow instabilities in the almost ideal planar stagnation point elongational flow field generated by a microfluidic optimized-shape cross-slot extensional rheometer (OSCER). We use time-resolved flow velocimetry and full-field birefringence microscopy to study the behavior of a series of well-characterized viscoelastic polymer solutions under conditions of low fluid inertia and over a wide range of imposed deformation rates. At low deformation rates the flow is steady and symmetric and appears Newtonian-like, while at high deformation rates we observe the onset of a flow asymmetry resembling the purely elastic instabilities reported in standard-shaped cross-slot devices. However, for intermediate rates, we observe a new type of elastic instability characterized by a lateral displacement and time-dependent motion of the stagnation point. At the onset of this new instability, we evaluate a well-known dimensionless criterion M that predicts the onset of elastic instabilities based on geometric and rheological scaling parameters. The criterion yields maximum values of M which compare well with critical values of M for the onset of elastic instabilities in viscometric torsional flows. We conclude that the same mechanism of tension acting along curved streamlines governs the onset of elastic instabilities in both extensional (irrotational) and torsional (rotational) viscoelastic flows. PMID:27616181

  13. Elastic instabilities in planar elongational flow of monodisperse polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J; McKinley, Gareth H; Shen, Amy Q

    2016-09-12

    We investigate purely elastic flow instabilities in the almost ideal planar stagnation point elongational flow field generated by a microfluidic optimized-shape cross-slot extensional rheometer (OSCER). We use time-resolved flow velocimetry and full-field birefringence microscopy to study the behavior of a series of well-characterized viscoelastic polymer solutions under conditions of low fluid inertia and over a wide range of imposed deformation rates. At low deformation rates the flow is steady and symmetric and appears Newtonian-like, while at high deformation rates we observe the onset of a flow asymmetry resembling the purely elastic instabilities reported in standard-shaped cross-slot devices. However, for intermediate rates, we observe a new type of elastic instability characterized by a lateral displacement and time-dependent motion of the stagnation point. At the onset of this new instability, we evaluate a well-known dimensionless criterion M that predicts the onset of elastic instabilities based on geometric and rheological scaling parameters. The criterion yields maximum values of M which compare well with critical values of M for the onset of elastic instabilities in viscometric torsional flows. We conclude that the same mechanism of tension acting along curved streamlines governs the onset of elastic instabilities in both extensional (irrotational) and torsional (rotational) viscoelastic flows.

  14. Elastic instabilities in planar elongational flow of monodisperse polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haward, Simon J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Shen, Amy Q.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate purely elastic flow instabilities in the almost ideal planar stagnation point elongational flow field generated by a microfluidic optimized-shape cross-slot extensional rheometer (OSCER). We use time-resolved flow velocimetry and full-field birefringence microscopy to study the behavior of a series of well-characterized viscoelastic polymer solutions under conditions of low fluid inertia and over a wide range of imposed deformation rates. At low deformation rates the flow is steady and symmetric and appears Newtonian-like, while at high deformation rates we observe the onset of a flow asymmetry resembling the purely elastic instabilities reported in standard-shaped cross-slot devices. However, for intermediate rates, we observe a new type of elastic instability characterized by a lateral displacement and time-dependent motion of the stagnation point. At the onset of this new instability, we evaluate a well-known dimensionless criterion M that predicts the onset of elastic instabilities based on geometric and rheological scaling parameters. The criterion yields maximum values of M which compare well with critical values of M for the onset of elastic instabilities in viscometric torsional flows. We conclude that the same mechanism of tension acting along curved streamlines governs the onset of elastic instabilities in both extensional (irrotational) and torsional (rotational) viscoelastic flows.

  15. Total elastic cross section for H-bar-H scattering at thermal energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab; Ghosh, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the elastic scattering cross sections for a few low-lying partial waves and also the converged elastic cross sections with added partial waves in the energy range 10{sup -10}-10{sup -2} a.u. for the H-bar-H system using atomic orbital techniques. The present s-wave predictions are in good agreement with the other existing theoretical estimates. Nonzero low-order partial-wave elastic cross sections show dips like for s-wave scattering. The converged elastic cross section shows structurelike behavior in the energy range 4.2x10{sup -4}-10{sup -2} a.u.

  16. Elastic-plastic mixed-iterative finite element analysis: Implementation and performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    An elastic-plastic algorithm based on Von Mises and associative flow criteria is implemented in MHOST-a mixed iterative finite element analysis computer program developed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The performance of the resulting elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors of 4-node quadrilateral shell finite elements are tested for elastic-plastic performance. Generally, the membrane results are excellent, indicating the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate.

  17. Elastic protectors for ultrasound injection

    SciTech Connect

    Barkhatov, V.A.; Nesterova, L.A.

    1995-07-01

    A new material has been developed for elastic protectors on ultrasonic probes: sonar rubber. This combines low ultrasonic absorption, high strength, and wear resistance, and so the rubber can be used in sensor designs.

  18. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  19. Elastic waves in quasiperiodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, V. R.; Zárate, J. E.

    2001-08-01

    We study the transverse and sagittal elastic waves in different quasiperiodic structures by means of the full transfer-matrix technique and surface Green-function matching method. The quasiperiodic structures follow Fibonacci, Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences, respectively. We consider finite structures having stress-free bounding surfaces and different generation orders, including up to more than 1000 interfaces. We obtain the dispersion relations for elastic waves and spatial localization of the different modes. The fragmentation of the spectrum for different sequences is evident for intermediate generation orders, in the case of transverse elastic waves, whereas, for sagittal elastic waves, higher generation orders are needed to show clearly the spectrum fragmentation. The results of Fibonacci and Thue-Morse sequences exhibit similarities not present in the results of Rudin-Shapiro sequences.

  20. Hilbert complexes of nonlinear elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angoshtari, Arzhang; Yavari, Arash

    2016-12-01

    We introduce some Hilbert complexes involving second-order tensors on flat compact manifolds with boundary that describe the kinematics and the kinetics of motion in nonlinear elasticity. We then use the general framework of Hilbert complexes to write Hodge-type and Helmholtz-type orthogonal decompositions for second-order tensors. As some applications of these decompositions in nonlinear elasticity, we study the strain compatibility equations of linear and nonlinear elasticity in the presence of Dirichlet boundary conditions and the existence of stress functions on non-contractible bodies. As an application of these Hilbert complexes in computational mechanics, we briefly discuss the derivation of a new class of mixed finite element methods for nonlinear elasticity.

  1. Elasticity of excised dog lung parenchyma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vawter, D. L.; Fung, Y. C.; West, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    An optical-electromechanical system is used to measure the force-deformation behavior of biaxially loaded rectangular slabs of excised dog lung parenchyma. In the course of the study, the effects of time, the consistency of reference lengths and areas, the presence of hysteresis, the necessity of preconditioning, the repeatability of results, the effects of lateral load, the effect of strain rate, the effect of pH, the influence of temperature, and the variations among specimens are considered. A new finding is that there is a change in elastic behavior when the tissue undergoes a compressive strain. When the tissue is in tension, increasing the lateral load decreases the compliance, whereas the opposite is true when compressive strain is present.

  2. InGaN Selfassembled Quantum Dots Investigated By X-Ray Diffraction-Anomalous-Fine Structure Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Piskorska, E.; Siebert, M.; Schmidt, T.; Falta, J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Hommel, D.; Renevier, H.

    2007-04-10

    Local chemical composition of InGaN quantum dots grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaN virtual substrates was investigated by x-ray diffraction anomalous fine-structure method. Using this approach, we found that the In content increases from 20% at the dot base to 40-50% at the top. From the detailed numerical analysis of the data we were able to reconstruct the local neighborhood of Ga atoms in different positions in the dots, as well as the local elastic relaxation state.

  3. The Two-loop Soft Anomalous Dimension Matrix and Resummation at Next-to-next-to Leading Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Mert Aybat, S.; Dixon, Lance J.; Sterman, George; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-09-08

    We extend the resummation of dimensionally-regulated amplitudes to next-to-next-to-leading poles. This requires the calculation of two-loop anomalous dimension matrices for color mixing through soft gluon exchange. Remarkably, we find that they are proportional to the corresponding one-loop matrices. Using the color generator notation, we reproduce the two-loop single-pole quantities H{sup (2)} introduced by Catani for quark and gluon elastic scattering. Our results also make possible threshold and a variety of other resummations at next-to-next-to leading logarithm. All of these considerations apply to 2 {yields} n processes with massless external lines.

  4. Anomalous Josephson Hall effect in magnet/triplet superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takehito

    2015-11-01

    We investigate anomalous Hall effect in a magnet coupled to a triplet superconductor under phase gradient. It is found that the anomalous Hall supercurrent arises from the nontrivial structure of the magnetization. The magnetic structure manifested in the Hall supercurrent is characterized by even order terms of the exchange coupling, essentially different from that discussed in the context of anomalous Hall effect, reflecting the dissipationless nature of the supercurrent. We also discuss a possible candidate for magnetic structure to verify our prediction.

  5. Tellurium - Should it be isotopically anomalous in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.

    1981-01-01

    Isotopically anomalous Te is a by-product of the nuclear processes in zones of supernovae that have been proposed as sources for isotopically anomalous Xe. The calculated composition of the anomalous Te is roughly consistent with the disputed measurements made by Ballad et at. (1979) and Oliver et al. (1979) of samples of the Allende meteorite, with the exception that the large Te-123 overabundance reported by Oliver et al. (1979) is not predicted by the theory.

  6. Spectral analysis of the multiple-altitude anomalous geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yu. P.; Ivanov, V. V.; Petrov, V. G.; Filippov, S. V.; Brekhov, O. M.

    2016-11-01

    The spectra of the anomalous geomagnetic field measured at ground and balloon (30 km) altitudes were analyzed. The ground-based data were adapted from a map of the anomalous magnetic field of the Earth. A balloon surveys was carried out by the authors. It has been shown that the ground and balloon spectra of the anomalous magnetic field of the Earth substantially differ. Suppositions explaining the differences in the obtained spectra have been suggested.

  7. An "anomalous" triggered lightning flash in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J.; Ngin, T.; Jordan, D. M.; Mata, C. T.

    2013-04-01

    An "anomalous" rocket-and-wire triggered lightning flash, a flash whose leaders do not follow the triggering wire remnants to ground, is characterized via high-speed video images at 10 and 300 kilo-frames per second, still camera images, 66-72 MHz source locations from a Lightning Mapping Array, channel-base current, and electric field and electric field derivative (dE/dt) measurements. This is the first anomalous flash of about 410 classically triggered flashes in north-central Florida. The flash began with an upward positively charged leader (UPL) initiating from the tip of the upward-moving triggering wire about 280 m above ground level. All but the bottom 17 m of wire exploded (became luminous) 37.6 ms after UPL initiation. A stepped leader initiated, likely from the top of the wire remnants, 282 m above ground level about 1.3 ms after the wire explosion and propagated downward for 2.1 ms, attaching to the top of a grounded utility pole 117 m southwest of the launching facility. The line charge density on the stepped leader is estimated to be of the order of 10-3 C m-1. Contrary to previously reported "anomalous" flashes in France and New Mexico (roughly 16% and 31%, respectively, of their triggered flashes), in our event, there was not a tens of milliseconds current-zero period preceding the stepped leader, there was no observed downward dart leader in the UPL channel prior to the stepped leader to ground, and there was a failed attempt to reestablish current in the exploded-wire channel between the UPL and ground.

  8. Interpreting anomalous magnetic fabrics in ophiolite dikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Gauthier, D.

    2003-02-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) may reveal mineral orientation-distributions defining magmatic flow-axes in igneous dikes. The mafic silicates are the best indication of magmatic flow but Fe-Ti accessories may contribute more to the bulk susceptibility. If the orientation-distributions of the two subfabrics are incongruent, anomalous fabrics will occur that do not reflect magma-flow axes. For ophiolite dikes, ocean-floor metamorphism changes the mineralogy producing new Fe-oxides by retrogression and exsolution from mafic silicates and by the oxidation of primary oxides. Incompatibly oriented 'ferro'-magnetic subfabrics may be isolated by anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence (AARM). Anomalous AMS fabrics in ophiolites elsewhere have been attributed to inverse-fabric contributions from single-domain magnetite in varying combinations. However, in ophiolite dikes from the Troodos ophiolite of Cyprus, anomalous fabrics arise from ocean-floor metamorphism extensively or completely replacing the original magnetite and titanomagnetite accessory phases with titanomagnetite (˜Fe 2.4Ti 0.6O 4=TM60) and its oxidised versions, titanomaghemite, to varying degrees according to depth beneath the ocean-floor, distance from spreading axis and proximity to transform-faults. At best, the oxide orientation-distribution defined by AARM could only be indirectly related to magma-flow if its nucleation-orientation controlled by a host-lattice. However, more commonly the topotactic lattice reorganization produces weaker ARM fabric anisotropies. Although 'recrystallized', oxidised TM60 dominates the bulk low-field susceptibility, its anisotropy is generally too feeble to compete with the flow-fabric defined by the AMS contribution from paramagnetic mafic silicates.

  9. Elasticity of Single-Crystal Quartz to 10 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Mao, Z.; Jiang, F.; Duffy, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    Quartz is a geologically abundant and technically important mineral. Upon static compression at 300 K, alpha-quartz is found to undergo pressure-driven amorphization and related phase transition, which provide insights into the metastable behavior of materials as a function of pressure [Hemley et al.1988, Haines et al. 2001]. This metastable behavior may be related to the elastic instabilities of quartz. The elasticity of alpha-quartz is also fundamental to a range of solid-state phenomena including elastic wave propagation and the equation of state. Despite this, the single-crystal elastic constants of quartz at high pressures are poorly constrained. Previous studies of quartz elasticity at high pressures by Brillouin scattering, ultrasonic interferometry and density functional theory (DFT) exhibit discrepancies that are unresolved [Gregoryanz et al. 2000, Calderon et al. 2007, Kimizuka et al. 2007]. Here, we report new high-quality Brillouin scattering data using two different orientations of carefully characterized, untwined crystals of pure alpha-quartz compressed in hydrostatic pressure media. Our results provide new insights into the evolution of the mechanical behavior of SiO2 with compression up to 10.2 GPa. Using our measured elastic constants, we directly compared our individual Cijs with previous studies within this pressure range. Our data are more consistent with DFT calculations. Extrapolation of ultrasonic data measured below 1 GPa to high pressure yields poor agreement with our data. Equation of state data obtained from this study match previous synchrotron X-ray studies [Angel et al. 1997, Levien et al. 1980, Hazen et al. 1989] with uncertainties. Calculation of linear compressibility shows that quartz remains strongly anisotropic with compression.

  10. Quartz: Anomalous Weakness of Synthetic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Griggs, D T; Blacic, J D

    1965-01-15

    The strength of a synthetic quartz crystal drops rapidly at 400 degrees C, and at 600 degrees C is a hundredfold lower than at 300 degrees C. Large plastic deformations can be produced without fracture. The predominant mechanism of deformation is translation gliding. The preferred explanation for this anomalous weakness is that this synthetic quartz contains water which has hydrolyzed the silicon-oxygen bonds. The silanol groups so formed are presumed to be rendered sufficiently mobile by elevating the temperature to 400 degrees C so that they align themselves in dislocation lines and move through the crystal with the dislocation under the small applied shear stress.

  11. Anomalous-scattering region on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Helfenstein, Paul; Veverka, Joseph; Mccarthy, Derek

    1992-01-01

    A photometric analysis of Voyager 2 images of a broad, 'anomalous scattering region' (ASR) on Triton shows its material to differ from the average Triton regolith in being only weakly backward scattering at all Voyager 2 camera wavelengths; the ASR also displays distinctive phase-dependent green/violet color ratios and clear-filter albedo. These characteristics are used to map the global distribution of the ASR areas for which photometric coverage is incomplete. The ASR may form an almost continuous band of material that runs parallel to the Triton equator, characterized by the presence of a transparent and optically thin, seasonally-controlled veneer of well-annealed solid N2.

  12. Anomalous transport modelling of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, J.; Singer, C.; Malone, G.; Tiouririne, N.

    1992-12-31

    Theory based transport simulations of DIII-D, JET, ITER are compared to experimental data using a combination of anamolous transport models. The Multiple-mode Transport Model is calibrated to a give set of L-mode and H-mode discharges with an emphasis on testing the adequacy of anomalous flux contributions from drift/{eta}{sub i} and resistive ballooning mode theories. A survey of possible additions and/or alternatives to the model from recent theories on neoclassical MHD effects, hot ion modes, circulating electron modes, and high-m tearing modes is also included.

  13. Anomalous transport modelling of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, J.; Singer, C.; Malone, G.; Tiouririne, N.

    1992-01-01

    Theory based transport simulations of DIII-D, JET, ITER are compared to experimental data using a combination of anamolous transport models. The Multiple-mode Transport Model is calibrated to a give set of L-mode and H-mode discharges with an emphasis on testing the adequacy of anomalous flux contributions from drift/[eta][sub i] and resistive ballooning mode theories. A survey of possible additions and/or alternatives to the model from recent theories on neoclassical MHD effects, hot ion modes, circulating electron modes, and high-m tearing modes is also included.

  14. The anomalous effect of surface diffusion on the nuclear magnetic resonance signal in restricted geometry.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, E P N S; Apalkov, V M; Cymbalyuk, G S

    2010-04-14

    Anisotropy of diffusion properties in a specimen plays a key role in numerous applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, like non-invasive tracking of fibers in the central nervous system. We suggest that contrasting fiber structures with certain diameters could be improved if second-order effects are taken into account. We introduce a procedure consisting of two standard diffusion NMR experiments differing in their gradient pulse characteristics. These two echo signals will be called the background and principal signals. We show that the difference obtained by subtracting one echo signal from the other has either typical or anomalous properties. In the typical case, as the duration of the gradient pulse in the second experiment is set to smaller and smaller values, the difference from the background echo signal tends toward its maximum. In contrast, in the anomalous case the difference between the background and the principal signals has a maximum at a certain nonzero duration of the pulse in the second experiment. This critical duration is determined by different characteristics, including the diameters of fibers. For this anomalous effect to take place the fast surface diffusion channel coupled to the surrounding media is required. The diffusion of magnetic molecules along the surface of restricted media and the coupling of the surface and the bulk translational motions can strongly modify the echo attenuation NMR signal. The origin of this strong anomalous effect is the change of the symmetry of the lowest diffusion eigenmode of the system. We illustrate the effect of surface diffusion for a cylindrically symmetric system and describe the experimental conditions under which the anomalous behavior of the echo signals can be observed.

  15. Nonuniform elastic properties of macromolecules and effect of prestrain on their continuum nature.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankush; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Klug, William S

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical methods have been developed to calculate the coarse-grained continuum elastic properties of macromolecules. However, all of those methods assume uniform elastic properties. Following the continuum mechanics framework, we present a systematic way of calculating the nonuniform effective elastic properties from atomic thermal fluctuations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation at any coarse-grained scale using a potential of the mean-force approach. We present the results for a mutant of Sesbania mosaic virus capsid, where we calculate the elastic moduli at different scales and observe an apparent problem with the chosen reference configuration in some cases. We present a possible explanation using an elastic network model, where inducing random prestrain results in a similar behavior. This phenomenon provides a novel insight into the continuum nature of macromolecules and defines the limits on details that the elasticity theory can capture. Further investigation into prestrains could elucidate important aspects of conformational dynamics of macromolecules.

  16. An elastic-perfectly plastic analysis of the bending of the lithosphere at a trench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Mcadoo, D. C.; Caldwell, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    A number of authors have modeled the flexure of the lithosphere at an oceanic trench using a thin elastic plate with a hydrostatic restoring force. In some cases good agreement with observed topography is obtained but in other cases the slope of the lithosphere within the trench is greater than that predicted by the elastic theory. In this paper the bending of a thin plate is considered using an elastic-perfectly plastic rheology. It is found that the lithosphere behaves elastically seaward of the trench, but that plasticity decreases the radius of curvature within the trench. The results are compared with a number of observed trench profiles. The elastic-perfectly plastic profiles are in excellent agreement with those profiles that deviate from elastic behavior.

  17. Anomalous charge transport in CeB{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatov, M.I. . E-mail: ignatov@lt.gpi.ru; Bogach, A.V.; Demishev, S.V.; Glushkov, V.V.; Levchenko, A.V.; Paderno, Yu.B.; Shitsevalova, N.Yu.; Sluchanko, N.E.

    2006-09-15

    The comprehensive study of conductivity {sigma}, Hall coefficient R{sub H} and Seebeck coefficient S has been carried out on high-quality single crystals of CeB{sub 6} in a wide range of temperatures 1.8-300K. An anomalous behavior of all transport characteristics ({sigma}, R{sub H}, S) was found for the first time in the vicinity of T*{approx}80K. The strong decrease of conductivity {sigma} as well as the unusual asymptotic behavior of Seebeck coefficient S(T){approx}-lnT observed below T* allowed us to conclude in favor of crossover between different regimes of charge transport in CeB{sub 6}. The pronounced change of Hall mobility {mu}{sub H}, which diminishes from the maximum value of 20cm{sup 2}/(Vs) at T* to the values of {approx}6cm{sup 2}/(Vs) at T{approx}10K, seems to be attributed to the strong enhancement of charge carriers scattering due to fast spin fluctuations on Ce-sites. The low-temperature anomalies of the charge transport characteristics are compared with the predictions of the Kondo-lattice model.

  18. Crossover from normal to anomalous diffusion in systems of field-aligned dipolar particles.

    PubMed

    Jordanovic, Jelena; Jäger, Sebastian; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2011-01-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the translational dynamics of particles with dipolar interactions in homogenous external fields. For a broad range of concentrations, we find that the anisotropic, yet normal diffusive behavior characterizing weakly coupled systems becomes anomalous both parallel and perpendicular to the field at sufficiently high dipolar coupling and field strength. After the ballistic regime, chain formation first yields cagelike motion in all directions, followed by transient, mixed diffusive-superdiffusive behavior resulting from cooperative motion of the chains. The enhanced dynamics disappears only at higher densities close to crystallization.

  19. Anomalous diffusion and non-monotonic relaxation processes in Ge-Se liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Can; Raty, Jean-Yves; Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamical properties of liquid GexSe100-x as a function of Ge content by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations for a certain number of temperatures in the liquid state. The focus is set on ten compositions (where x ≤ 33%) encompassing the reported flexible to rigid and rigid to stressed-rigid transitions. We examine diffusion coefficients, diffusion activation energies, glassy relaxation behavior, and viscosity of these liquids from Van Hove correlation and intermediate scattering functions. At fixed temperature, all properties/functions exhibit an anomalous behavior with Ge content in the region 18%-22%, and provide a direct and quantitative link to the network rigidity.

  20. Growth, Characterization, and Elastic Properties of Bismuth Based High Temperature Superconducting Whiskers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marone, Matthew John

    Whiskers of bismuth based high temperature superconductors have been grown by two different techniques. Splat quenched glass, and disks of sintered material have been used. Good quality single crystals have been obtained from both techniques. Electron diffraction shows the structure to be rm Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_{x} for whiskers grown by both techniques. Transport and SQUID magnetometer measurements indicate that the transition temperature for whiskers grown from the sintered material is between rm T_{c}~ 75 K and rm T_{c} ~ 90 K. Whiskers grown from the glass have shown transition temperatures near 107 K indicating the presence of rm Bi_2Sr_2Ca _2Cu_3O_{x}. Young's modulus has been measured using a device that applies uniaxial stress and simultaneously measures the elongation (strain) of the whisker. Whiskers with rm T_{c}~ 75 K grown from sintered disks have displayed anomalous elastic properties. Above 270 K, the stress-strain response is hysteretic. Young's modulus is soft, with Y ~ 20 GPa at 270 K and decreases sharply with increasing temperature. Below 270 K, hysteretic behavior is not observed and Y does not vary as quickly with temperature. This suggests that a structural phase transition may occur (ferroelastic). Other whiskers grown from sintered disks show a stiffer Young's modulus with Y ~ 80 GPa. No hysteresis is observed in the stress-strain response of these whiskers nor is Y strongly temperature dependent. Whiskers grown from a glass also show a stiff Young's modulus of Y ~ 80 GPa without hysteresis. Again, very little temperature dependence is observed.

  1. Precisely predicting and designing the elasticity of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. Q. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn; Wang, R. F.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn

    2014-05-28

    We reveal that the elastic moduli of metallic glasses (MGs) invariably vary in a much steeper manner than that predicted by the conventional “rule of mixtures” in individual alloy systems. Such deviations are proved to originate fundamentally from their disordered atomic structures and intrinsic local heterogeneities. By treating the MGs as atomic-level dual phase hybrids, we further propose universal relations to be capable of precisely predicting and designing the elastic constants of MGs. This may contribute to the development of MGs with intended properties and behaviors, and allow new understandings on the structures and properties as well as their relationships in MGs.

  2. An elastic compound tube model for a single osteon.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Sciubba, E; Stagni, L

    1995-04-01

    A model is developed whereby the secondary osteon--the dominant microstructural component of the cortical bone tissue--is considered as an n-layered cylinder with internal stresses in linear isotropic elasticity. An exact solution is obtained for a loading condition represented by a tensile-compressive force. The lengthening, the side deformation, and the strain energy of the system are explicitly calculated. The behavior of the main elastic quantities is illustrated by graphs. In particular, the important role played by the parity of the number of lamellae is revealed.

  3. Tantalum and vanadium response to shock-wave loading at normal and elevated temperatures. Non-monotonous decay of the elastic wave in vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2014-06-28

    The evolution of the elastic precursor waves in pure tantalum and vanadium is presented at normal and elevated temperatures over propagation distances that ranged from 0.125 to 3 mm. Measurements were performed in order to obtain experimental data about the temperature-rate dependence of the yield stress of the two metals. With increasing propagation distance, the rate of the decay of elastic precursor decreases, as the shear stress in the elastic precursor wave approaches the Peierls stresses. It has been found that the decay, with propagation distance, of the post-spike minimum of the spike-like elastic precursor wave in vanadium is essentially non-monotonous. The experiments also revealed that annealing of tantalum and vanadium increases their Hugoniot elastic limit. The anomalous increase of the high strain rate yield stress with temperature, as observed earlier for some FCC and HCP metals, has not been detected in these measurements.

  4. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  5. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Lombardini, M.; Hill, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=es(I1)+eh(ρ,ς), where es accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and eh represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., eh=eh(ρ), with a power-law dependence eh∝ρα, shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M∝[log(1/R)]α, independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M∝R-(s-1) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part eh is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M∝R-(s-1)/n(γ) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the hydrostatic part of the energy essentially commands the strong-shock behavior, the shear

  6. #FluxFlow: Visual Analysis of Anomalous Information Spreading on Social Media.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Cao, Nan; Wen, Zhen; Song, Yale; Lin, Yu-Ru; Collins, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    We present FluxFlow, an interactive visual analysis system for revealing and analyzing anomalous information spreading in social media. Everyday, millions of messages are created, commented, and shared by people on social media websites, such as Twitter and Facebook. This provides valuable data for researchers and practitioners in many application domains, such as marketing, to inform decision-making. Distilling valuable social signals from the huge crowd's messages, however, is challenging, due to the heterogeneous and dynamic crowd behaviors. The challenge is rooted in data analysts' capability of discerning the anomalous information behaviors, such as the spreading of rumors or misinformation, from the rest that are more conventional patterns, such as popular topics and newsworthy events, in a timely fashion. FluxFlow incorporates advanced machine learning algorithms to detect anomalies, and offers a set of novel visualization designs for presenting the detected threads for deeper analysis. We evaluated FluxFlow with real datasets containing the Twitter feeds captured during significant events such as Hurricane Sandy. Through quantitative measurements of the algorithmic performance and qualitative interviews with domain experts, the results show that the back-end anomaly detection model is effective in identifying anomalous retweeting threads, and its front-end interactive visualizations are intuitive and useful for analysts to discover insights in data and comprehend the underlying analytical model.

  7. Anomalous Hall effect in a ferromagnetic Fe3Sn2 single crystal with a geometrically frustrated Fe bilayer kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Shanshan; Zhang, Xiao; Pang, Fei; Lei, Hechang

    2016-08-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is investigated for a ferromagnetic Fe3Sn2 single crystal with a geometrically frustrated kagome bilayer of Fe. The scaling behavior between anomalous Hall resistivity ρxy A and longitudinal resistivity ρx x is quadratic and further analysis implies that the AHE in the Fe3Sn2 single crystal should be dominated by the intrinsic Karplus-Luttinger mechanism rather than extrinsic skew-scattering or side-jump mechanisms. Moreover, there is a sudden jump of anomalous Hall conductivity σxy A appearing at about 100 K where the spin-reorientation transition from the c axis to the a b plane is completed. This change of σxy A might be related to the evolution of the Fermi surface induced by the spin-reorientation transition.

  8. Macromolecular structure phasing by neutron anomalous diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Maxime G.; Mason, Sax A.; Mossou, Estelle; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Mitchell, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we show for the first time that neutron anomalous dispersion can be used in a practical manner to determine experimental phases of a protein crystal structure, providing a new tool for structural biologists. The approach is demonstrated through the use of a state-of-the-art monochromatic neutron diffractometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in combination with crystals of perdeuterated protein that minimise the level of hydrogen incoherent scattering and enhance the visibility of the anomalous signal. The protein used was rubredoxin in which cadmium replaced the iron at the iron-sulphur site. While this study was carried out using a steady-state neutron beam source, the results will be of major interest for capabilities at existing and emerging spallation neutron sources where time-of-flight instruments provide inherent energy discrimination. In particular this capability may be expected to offer unique opportunities to a rapidly developing structural biology community where there is increasing interest in the identification of protonation states, protein/water interactions and protein-ligand interactions – all of which are of central importance to a wide range of fundamental and applied areas in the biosciences. PMID:27511806

  9. Anomalous Enthalpy Relaxation in Vitreous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-08-01

    It is a challenge to calorimetrically determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of vitreous silica. Here we demonstrate that this challenge mainly arises from the extreme sensitivity of the Tg to the hydroxyl content in vitreous silica, but also from the irreversibility of its glass transition when repeating the calorimetric scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica.

  10. Anomalous event diagnosis for environmental satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Bruce H.

    1993-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is responsible for the operation of the NOAA geostationary and polar orbiting satellites. NESDIS provides a wide array of operational meteorological and oceanographic products and services and operates various computer and communication systems on a 24-hour, seven days per week schedule. The Anomaly Reporting System contains a database of anomalous events regarding the operations of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), communication, or computer systems that have degraded or caused the loss of GOES imagery. Data is currently entered manually via an automated query user interface. There are 21 possible symptoms (e.g., No Data), and 73 possible causes (e.g., Sectorizer - World Weather Building) of an anomalous event. The determination of an event's cause(s) is made by the on-duty computer operator, who enters the event in a paper based daily log, and by the analyst entering the data into the reporting system. The determination of the event's cause(s) impacts both the operational status of these systems, and the performance evaluation of the on-site computer and communication operations contractor.

  11. Anomalous piezoresistance effect in ultrastrained silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lugstein, A; Steinmair, M; Steiger, A; Kosina, H; Bertagnolli, E

    2010-08-11

    In this paper we demonstrate that under ultrahigh strain conditions p-type single crystal silicon nanowires possess an anomalous piezoresistance effect. The measurements were performed on vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown Si nanowires, monolithically integrated in a microelectro-mechanical loading module. The special setup enables the application of pure uniaxial tensile strain along the <111> growth direction of individual, 100 nm thick Si nanowires while simultaneously measuring the resistance of the nanowires. For low strain levels (nanowire elongation less than 0.8%), our measurements revealed the expected positive piezoresistance effect, whereas for ultrahigh strain levels a transition to anomalous negative piezoresistance was observed. For the maximum tensile strain of 3.5%, the resistance of the Si nanowires decreased by a factor of 10. Even at these high strain amplitudes, no fatigue failures are observed for several hundred loading cycles. The ability to fabricate single-crystal nanowires that are widely free of structural defects will it make possible to apply high strain without fracturing to other materials as well, therefore in any application where crystallinity and strain are important, the idea of making nanowires should be of a high value.

  12. Lattice dynamics and anomalous softening in the YbFe4Sb12 skutterudite

    SciTech Connect

    Mochel, A.; Sergueev, I.; Wille, H. -C.; Voigt, J.; Prager, M.; Stone, Matthew B; Sales, Brian C; Guguchia, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keppens, V.; Hermann, Raphael P.

    2011-01-01

    The lattice dynamics of the filled skutterudite YbFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} was studied by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and an anomalous softening in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants at {approx}50 K was observed. This anomaly can not be explained by the dynamics of the filler, in contrast to other filled skutterudites. We have further investigated the origin of this anomaly using macroscopic and microscopic measurements. A rearrangement of the spectral weight of the Yb phonon states was observed in the temperature dependence of the density of phonon states, obtained by inelastic neutron scattering. We suggest that the anomaly is due to a change of the Yb valence state and that the anomaly and the phonon spectral weight rearrangement have the same origin.

  13. Anomalously high thermoelectric power factor in epitaxial ScN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdsongpanya, Sit; Van Nong, Ngo; Pryds, Nini; Žukauskaitė, Agnė; Jensen, Jens; Birch, Jens; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Wingqvist, Gunilla; Eklund, Per

    2011-12-01

    Thermoelectric properties of ScN thin films grown by reactive magnetron sputtering on Al2O3(0001) wafers are reported. X-ray diffraction and elastic recoil detection analyses show that the composition of the films is close to stoichiometry with trace amounts (˜1 at. % in total) of C, O, and F. We found that the ScN thin-film exhibits a rather low electrical resistivity of ˜2.94 μΩm, while its Seebeck coefficient is approximately ˜-86 μV/K at 800 K, yielding a power factor of ˜2.5 × 10-3 W/mK2. This value is anomalously high for common transition-metal nitrides.

  14. Anomalous compressibility of ferropericlase throughout the iron spin cross-over

    PubMed Central

    Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Justo, J. F.; Wu, Z.; da Silva, C. R. S.; Yuen, D. A.; Kohlstedt, D.

    2009-01-01

    The thermoelastic properties of ferropericlase Mg1−xFexO (x = 0.1875) throughout the iron high-to-low spin cross-over have been investigated by first principles at Earth's lower mantle conditions. This cross-over has important consequences for elasticity such as an anomalous bulk modulus (KS) reduction. At room temperature the anomaly is somewhat sharp in pressure but broadens with increasing temperature. Along a typical geotherm it occurs across most of the lower mantle with a more significant KS reduction at ≈1,400–1,600 km depth. This anomaly might also cause a reduction in the effective activation energy for diffusion creep and lead to a viscosity minimum in the mid-lower mantle, in apparent agreement with results from inversion of data related with mantle convection and postglacial rebound. PMID:19439661

  15. Thermodynamics of Rubber Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicer, J.; Manzanares, J. A.; Zúñiga, J.; Utrillas, P.; Fernández, J.

    2001-02-01

    A thermodynamic study of an isotropic rubber band under uniaxial stress is presented on the basis of its equation of state. The behavior of the rubber band is compared with both that of an ideal elastomer and that of an ideal gas, considering the generalized Joule's law as the ideality criterion. First, the thermal expansion of rubber at constant stress and the change in the stress with temperature at constant length are described. Thermoelastic inversion is then considered, and the experimental observations are easily rationalized. Finally, the temperature changes observed in the adiabatic stretching of a rubber band are evaluated from the decrease of entropy with length.

  16. Signal attenuation of PFG restricted anomalous diffusions in plate, sphere, and cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoxing; Zheng, Shaokuan; Liao, Xinli

    2016-11-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR is a noninvasive tool to study anomalous diffusion, which exists widely in many systems such as in polymer or biological systems, in porous material, in single file structures and in fractal geometries. In a real system, the diffusion could be a restricted or a tortuous anomalous diffusion, rather than a free diffusion as the domains for fast and slow transport could coexist. Though there are signal attenuation expressions for free anomalous diffusion in literature, the signal attenuation formalisms for restricted anomalous diffusion is very limited, except for a restricted time-fractional diffusion within a plate reported recently. To better understand the PFG restricted fractional diffusion, in this paper, the PFG signal attenuation expressions were derived for three typical structures (plate, sphere, and cylinder) based on two models: fractal derivative model and fractional derivative model. These signal attenuation expressions include two parts, the time part Tn(t) and the space part Xn(r). Unlike normal diffusion, the time part Tn(t) in time-fractional diffusion can be either a Mittag-Leffler function from the fractional derivative model or a stretched exponential function from the fractal derivative model. However, provided the restricted normal diffusion and the restricted time-fractional diffusion are in an identical structure, they will have the same space part Xn(r) as both diffusions have the same space derivative parameter β equaling 2, therefore, they should have similar diffractive patterns. The restricted general fractional diffusion within a plate is also investigated, which indicates that at a long time limit, the diffusion type is insignificant to the diffractive pattern that depends only on the structure and the gradient pulses. The expressions describing the time-dependent behaviors of apparent diffusion coefficient Df,app for restricted anomalous diffusion are also proposed in this paper. Both the short and long

  17. Anomalous partitioning of water in coexisting liquid phases of lipid multilayers near 100% relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yicong; Ghosh, Sajal K.; Bera, Sambhunath; Jiang, Zhang; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Karapetrova, Evguenia; Lurio, Laurence B.; Sinha, Sunil K.

    2015-11-30

    X-ray diffraction is used to determine the hydration dependence of a ternary mixture lipid multilayer structure which has phase separated into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases. An anomaly is observed in the swelling behavior of the Ld phase at a relative humidity (RH) close to 100%, which is different from the anomalous swelling happens close to the main lipid gel-fluid transition. The lamellar repeat distance of the Ld phase swells by an extra 4 Å, well beyond the equilibrium spacing predicted by the inter-bilayer forces. This anomalous swelling is caused by the hydrophobic mismatch energy at the domain boundaries, which produces surprisingly long range effect.

  18. Anomalous impurity segregation and local bonding fluctuation in l-Si.

    PubMed

    Fisicaro, G; Huet, K; Negru, R; Hackenberg, M; Pichler, P; Taleb, N; La Magna, A

    2013-03-15

    Anomalous impurity redistribution after a laser irradiation process in group-IV elements has been reported in numerous papers. In this Letter, we correlate this still unexplained behavior with the peculiar bonding character of the liquid state of group-IV semiconductors. Analyzing the B-Si system in a wide range of experimental conditions we demonstrate that this phenomenon derives from the non-Fickian diffusion transport of B in l-Si. The proposed diffusion model relies on the balance between two impurity states in different bonding configurations: one migrating at higher diffusivity than the other. This microscopic mechanism explains the anomalous B segregation, whereas accurate comparisons between experimental chemical profiles and simulation results validate the model.

  19. Tiny Tremors to Titanic Explosions: Tackling Transients in Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    We are requesting the target-of-oppurtunity (ToO) component of an ongoing, successful, long-term RXTE monitoring campaign of anomalous X- ray pulsars (AXPs). Their nature had been a mystery, but with our discoveries of X-ray bursts from AXPs, there is compelling evidence that they are young, isolated, ultra-magnetized neutron stars or "magnetars." We request ToO observations of any of the known and candidate AXPs as well as of any newly discovered AXPs should they exhibit anomalous behavior of one or more of the following types: bursts, significant sudden pulse profile changes, glitches or other rotational anomalies, or pulse fractions changes. These observations will allow us to answer basic physical questions about neutron star structure.

  20. Tiny Hiccups to Titanic Explosions: Tackling Transients in Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    We request the Target-of-Opportunity (TOO) component of an ongoing, successful, long-term RXTE monitoring campaign of anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). Their nature had been a long-standing mystery, but with our discoveries of soft gamma-ray repeater-like X-ray bursts from two AXPs, there is compelling evidence that they are magnetars. We request TOO observations of any of five AXPs (and one candidate) should they exhibit anomalous behavior of one or more of the following types: bursts, significant pulse profile changes, glitches or other rotational anomalies, or pulse fractions changes. These observations will allow us to answer basic physical questions about neutron star structure and constrain the physics of magnetars.