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Sample records for anomalous rf field

  1. Revisiting the Anomalous rf Field Penetration into a Warm Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Oleg V. Polomarov; Constantine E. Theodosiou

    2005-06-24

    Radio-frequency [rf] waves do not penetrate into a plasma and are damped within it. The electric field of the wave and plasma current are concentrated near the plasma boundary in a skin layer. Electrons can transport the plasma current away from the skin layer due to their thermal motion. As a result, the width of the skin layer increases when electron temperature effects are taken into account. This phenomenon is called anomalous skin effect. The anomalous penetration of the rf electric field occurs not only for transversely propagating to the plasma boundary wave (inductively coupled plasmas) but also for the wave propagating along the plasma boundary (capacitively coupled plasmas). Such anomalous penetration of the rf field modifies the structure of the capacitive sheath. Recent advances in the nonlinear, non-local theory of the capacitive sheath are reported. It is shown that separating the electric field profile into exponential and non-exponential parts yields an efficient qualitative and quantitative description of the anomalous skin effect in both inductively and capacitively coupled plasma.

  2. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  3. Persistently anomalous Pacific geomagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Constable, Catherine G.

    A new average geomagnetic field model for the past 3kyr (ALS3K) helps bridge a large temporal sampling gap between historical models and more traditional paleomagnetic studies spanning the last 5 Myr. A quasi-static feature seen historically in the central Pacific has the opposite sign in ALS3K; its structure is similar to, but of larger amplitude than, that in the time-averaged geomagnetic field for the last 5 Myr. Anomalous geomagnetic fields exist beneath the Pacific over timescales ranging from 10²-106 years. It is unlikely that bias over such long time scales arises from electromagnetic screening, but conceivable that the Lorentz force is influenced by long wavelength thermal variations and/or localized regions of increased electrical conductivity (associated with compositional anomalies and possibly partial melt). This is consistent with recent seismic observations of the lower mantle.

  4. Anomalous toroidal field penetration in Tormac V

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Vaucher, B. G.; Shaw, R. S.; Vella, M. C.

    1981-07-01

    We investigate magnetic field penetration into a cool, collisional, magnetized plasma in Tormac V. Magnetic probe and laser interferometer studies reveal anomalous penetration of the applied toroidal field into a plasma with an initial parallel bias toroidal field. The applied poloidal field, however, formed a well-defined magnetic front which was effective at sweeping up particles. Lastly, strong shear in the vacuum magnetic field does not inhibit the apparent decoupling of the applied toroidal field from the applied poloidal field.

  5. Exploration of Anomalous Gravity Effects by rf-Pumped Magnetized High-T(c) Superconducting Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tony; Litchford, Ron; Peters, Randall; Thompson, Byran; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A number of anomalous gravitational effects have been reported in the scientific literature during recent years, but there has been no independent confirmation with regard to any of these claims. Therefore, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in response to the propulsion challenges specified by NASA's Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) program, proposed to explore the possibility of observing anomalous gravitation behavior through the manipulation of Josephson junction effects in magnetized high-Tc superconducting oxides. The technical goal was to critically test this revolutionary physical claim and provide a rigorous, independent, empirical confirmation (or refutation) of anomalous effects related to the manipulation of gravity by radio frequency (rf)-pumped magnetized type-2 superconductors. Because the current empirical evidence for gravity modification is anecdotal, our objective was to design, construct, and meticulously implement a discriminating experiment, which would put these observations on a more firm footing within the scientific community. Our approach is unique in that we advocate the construction of an extremely sensitive torsion balance with which to measure gravity modification effects by rf-pumped type-2 superconductor test masses. This paper reviews the anecdotal evidence for anomalous gravity effects, describes the design and development of a simplified torsion balance experiment for empirically investigating these claims, and presents the results of preliminary experiments.

  6. Spectral analysis of the multiple-altitude anomalous geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yu. P.; Ivanov, V. V.; Petrov, V. G.; Filippov, S. V.; Brekhov, O. M.

    2016-11-01

    The spectra of the anomalous geomagnetic field measured at ground and balloon (30 km) altitudes were analyzed. The ground-based data were adapted from a map of the anomalous magnetic field of the Earth. A balloon surveys was carried out by the authors. It has been shown that the ground and balloon spectra of the anomalous magnetic field of the Earth substantially differ. Suppositions explaining the differences in the obtained spectra have been suggested.

  7. RF Head Coil Design with Improved RF Magnetic Near-Fields Uniformity for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Higher magnetic field strength in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems offers higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and spatial resolution in MR images. However, the wavelength in ultra-high fields (7 tesla and beyond) becomes shorter than the human body at the Larmor frequency with increasing static magnetic field (B0) of MRI system. At short wavelengths, interference effect appears resulting in non- uniformity of the RF magnetic near-field (B1) over the subject and MR images may have spatially anomalous contrast. The B1 near-field generated by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil’s microstrip line element has a maximum near the center of its length and falls off towards both ends. In this study, a double trapezoidal shaped microstrip transmission line element is proposed to obtain uniform B1 field distribution by gradual impedance variation. Two multi-channel RF head coils with uniform and trapezoidal shape elements were built and tested with a phantom at 7T MRI scanner for comparison. The simulation and experimental results show stronger and more uniform B1+ near-field with the trapezoidal shape. PMID:25892746

  8. RF Head Coil Design with Improved RF Magnetic Near-Fields Uniformity for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Systems.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Higher magnetic field strength in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems offers higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and spatial resolution in MR images. However, the wavelength in ultra-high fields (7 tesla and beyond) becomes shorter than the human body at the Larmor frequency with increasing static magnetic field (B0) of MRI system. At short wavelengths, interference effect appears resulting in non- uniformity of the RF magnetic near-field (B1) over the subject and MR images may have spatially anomalous contrast. The B1 near-field generated by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil's microstrip line element has a maximum near the center of its length and falls off towards both ends. In this study, a double trapezoidal shaped microstrip transmission line element is proposed to obtain uniform B1 field distribution by gradual impedance variation. Two multi-channel RF head coils with uniform and trapezoidal shape elements were built and tested with a phantom at 7T MRI scanner for comparison. The simulation and experimental results show stronger and more uniform B1(+) near-field with the trapezoidal shape.

  9. Evidence for water ice on the moon: Results for anomalous polar craters from the LRO Mini-RF imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  10. Evidence for Water Ie on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P.D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  11. Evidence for Water Ice on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  12. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the test campaigns designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QVPT), but instead will describe the recent test campaign. In addition, it contains a brief description of the supporting radio frequency (RF) field analysis, lessons learned, and potential applications of the technology to space exploration missions. During the first (Cannae) portion of the campaign, approximately 40 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 935 megahertz and 28 watts. During the subsequent (tapered cavity) portion of the campaign, approximately 91 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 1933 megahertz and 17 watts. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level. Test campaign results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma.

  13. Anomalous cosmic ray studies using the geomagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Cummings, J. R.; Leske, R. A.; Selesnick, R. S.; Stone, E. C.; Rosenvinge, T. T. von

    1996-07-20

    We use instrumentation on SAMPEX and the Earth's field as a magnetic filter, to obtain a 'pure' sample of anomalous cosmic rays. The energy spectrum of anomalous oxygen is found to extend to {approx}100 MeV/nuc, which has implications for models of the acceleration of these nuclei.

  14. VERSE-guided parallel RF excitations using dynamic field correction.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Mustafa; Mooiweer, Ronald; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Malik, Shaihan J

    2017-02-17

    In parallel RF pulse design, peak RF magnitudes and specific absorption rate levels are critical concerns in the hardware and safety limits. The variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) method is an efficient technique to limit the peak RF power by applying a local-only RF and gradient waveform reshaping while retaining the on-resonance profile. The accuracy of the excitation performed by the VERSEd RF and gradient waveforms strictly depends on the performance of the employed hardware. Any deviation from the nominal gradient fields as a result of frequency dependent system imperfections violates the VERSE condition similarly to off-resonance effects, leading to significant excitation errors and the RF pulse not converging to the targeted peak RF power. Moreover, for iterative VERSE-guided RF pulse design (i.e. reVERSE), the k-space trajectory actually changes at every iteration, which is assumed to be constant. In this work, we show both theoretically and experimentally the effect of gradient system imperfections on iteratively VERSEd parallel RF excitations. In order to improve the excitation accuracy besides limiting the RF power below certain thresholds, we propose to integrate gradient field monitoring or gradient impulse response function (GIRF) estimations of the actual gradient fields into the RF pulse design problem. A third-order dynamic field camera comprising a set of NMR field sensors and GIRFs was used to measure or estimate the actual gradient waveforms that are involved in the VERSE algorithm respectively. The deviating and variable k-space is counteracted at each iteration of the VERSE-guided iterative RF pulse design. The proposed approaches are demonstrated for accelerated multiple-channel spatially selective RF pulses, and highly improved experimental performance was achieved at both 3 T and 7 T.

  15. Anomalous scaling of a scalar field advected by turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kraichnan, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recent work leading to deduction of anomalous scaling exponents for the inertial range of an advected passive field from the equations of motion is reviewed. Implications for other turbulence problems are discussed.

  16. High field rf superconductivity: to pulse or not to pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.

    1984-10-01

    Experimental data on the behavior of superconductors under the application of rf fields of amplitude comparable to their critical fields are sporadic and not always consistent. In many cases the field level at which breakdown in superconducting rf cavities should be expected has not been clearly established. Tests conducted with very short (approx. 1 ..mu..s) rf pulses indicate that in this mode of operation fields close to the critical values can be consistently reached in superconducting cavities without breakdown. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed method are discussed compared to those of the more standard continuous wave (cw) systems. 60 references.

  17. Technique for Predicting the RF Field Strength Inside an Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, M.; Reddell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This Memorandum presents a simple analytical technique for predicting the RF electric field strength inside an enclosed volume in which radio frequency radiation occurs. The technique was developed to predict the radio frequency (RF) field strength within a launch vehicle's fairing from payloads launched with their telemetry transmitters radiating and to the impact of the radiation on the vehicle and payload. The RF field strength is shown to be a function of the surface materials and surface areas. The method accounts for RF energy losses within exposed surfaces, through RF windows, and within multiple layers of dielectric materials which may cover the surfaces. This Memorandum includes the rigorous derivation of all equations and presents examples and data to support the validity of the technique.

  18. Technique for Predicting the RF Field Strength Inside an Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, M.; Reddell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This Memorandum presents a simple analytical technique for predicting the RF electric field strength inside an enclosed volume in which radio frequency radiation occurs. The technique was developed to predict the radio frequency (RF) field strength within a launch vehicle's fairing from payloads launched with their telemetry transmitters radiating and to the impact of the radiation on the vehicle and payload. The RF field strength is shown to be a function of the surface materials and surface areas. The method accounts for RF energy losses within exposed surfaces, through RF windows, and within multiple layers of dielectric materials which may cover the surfaces. This Memorandum includes the rigorous derivation of all equations and presents examples and data to support the validity of the technique.

  19. The magnetic field in the anomalous arms in NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, E.; Krause, M.; Beck, R.

    The linearly polarized emission and total emission of NGC 4258 at 4.9 and 1.5 GHz were observed with the VLA in its D and C arrays respectively. The results strongly suggest that the anomalous arms are in the plane of NGC 4258, hence excluding models that require them to be out of the plane. The observed magnetic field structure is in essence bisymmetric (dynamo mode m = 1) and the magnetic field strength is highest in the ridges of the anomalous arms. The present structure may be the result of compression of a preexisting (not necessarily primordial) bisymmetric field. The KOM expulsion model could give an explanation for this compression.

  20. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  1. Anomalous Fano Profiles in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Alejandro; Majety, Vinay Pramod; Nagele, Stefan; Pazourek, Renate; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Scrinzi, Armin

    2015-12-01

    We show that the external control of Fano resonances in general leads to complex Fano q parameters. Fano line shapes of photoelectron and transient absorption spectra in the presence of an infrared control field are investigated. Computed transient absorption spectra are compared with a model proposed for a recent experiment [C. Ott et al., Science 340, 716 (2013)]. Control mechanisms for photoelectron spectra are exposed: control pulses applied during excitation modify the line shapes by momentum boosts of the continuum electrons. Pulses arriving after excitation generate interference fringes due to infrared two-photon transitions.

  2. Anomalous critical fields in quantum critical superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Putzke, C.; Walmsley, P.; Fletcher, J. D.; Malone, L.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; See, P.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kasahara, S.; Mizukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Carrington, A.

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations around an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point (QCP) are believed to lead to unconventional superconductivity and in some cases to high-temperature superconductivity. However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As1−xPx)2 is perhaps the clearest example to date of a high-temperature quantum critical superconductor, and so it is a particularly suitable system to study how the quantum critical fluctuations affect the superconducting state. Here we show that the proximity of the QCP yields unexpected anomalies in the superconducting critical fields. We find that both the lower and upper critical fields do not follow the behaviour, predicted by conventional theory, resulting from the observed mass enhancement near the QCP. Our results imply that the energy of superconducting vortices is enhanced, possibly due to a microscopic mixing of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, suggesting that a highly unusual vortex state is realized in quantum critical superconductors. PMID:25477044

  3. Anomalous resistivity and the evolution of magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the topological restructuring of a force-free magnetic field caused by the hypothetical sudden onset of a localized region of strong anomalous resistivity. It is shown that the topological complexity increases, with the primitive planar force-free field with straight field lines developing field lines that wrap half a turn around each other, evidently providing a surface of tangential discontinuity in the wraparound region. It is suggested that the topological restructuring contributes to the complexity of the geomagnetic substorm, the aurora, and perhaps some of the flare activity on the sun, or other star, and the Galactic halo.

  4. Anomalous resistivity and the evolution of magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the topological restructuring of a force-free magnetic field caused by the hypothetical sudden onset of a localized region of strong anomalous resistivity. It is shown that the topological complexity increases, with the primitive planar force-free field with straight field lines developing field lines that wrap half a turn around each other, evidently providing a surface of tangential discontinuity in the wraparound region. It is suggested that the topological restructuring contributes to the complexity of the geomagnetic substorm, the aurora, and perhaps some of the flare activity on the sun, or other star, and the Galactic halo.

  5. Performance evaluation of RF electric and magnetic field measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesmith, B. C. W.; Ruggers, P. S.

    1982-03-01

    The need to quantify the electromagnetic fields emitted by industrial, scientific, or medical (ISM) products operating in the 10 to 300 MHs region requires the testing of instrumentation suitable for use in RF radiation hazard surveys. To meet this requirement, several procedures were devised to test the accuracy of the RF survey instrumentation. Measurement systems and protocols were developed and evaluated. The electric (E) an magnetic (H) field measuring instruments were tested for linearity, calibration accuracy, amplitude modulation response, directivity, antenna patterns, temperature response, drift and noise, radiofrequency interference and polarization response. Tests were performed on three commercially available RF survey instruments and a one-of-a-kind device over the 10 to 100 MHs region. Complete tests were only performed at the ISM frequency of 27.12 MHs. Errors for each of the tests are presented in tabular form.

  6. Transient anomalous charge production in strong-field QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanji, Naoto; Mueller, Niklas; Berges, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We investigate axial charge production in two-color QCD out of equilibrium. We compute the real-time evolution starting with spatially homogeneous strong gauge fields, while the fermions are in vacuum. The idealized class of initial conditions is motivated by glasma flux tubes in the context of heavy-ion collisions. We focus on axial charge production at early times, where important aspects of the anomalous dynamics can be derived analytically. This is compared to real-time lattice simulations. Quark production at early times leading to anomalous charge generation is investigated using Wilson fermions. Our results indicate that coherent gauge fields can transiently produce significant amounts of axial charge density, while part of the induced charges persist to be present even well beyond characteristic decoherence times. The comparisons to analytic results provide stringent tests of real-time representations of the axial anomaly on the lattice.

  7. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  8. Anomalous cross-field diffusion in a magnetic trap.

    PubMed

    Savel'ev, Sergey E; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    We numerically simulated the diffusion of a charged Brownian particle confined to a plane under the action of an orthogonal magnetic field with intensity depending on the distance from a center. Despite its apparent simplicity, this system exhibits anomalous diffusion. For positive field gradients, radial and angular dynamics are asymptotically subdiffusive, with exponents given by simple analytical expressions. In contrast, when driven by a weakly decaying field, the particle attains normal diffusion only after exceedingly long superdiffusive transients. These mechanisms can be related to Bohm diffusion in magnetized plasmas.

  9. Ultrahigh-field MRI whole-slice and localized RF field excitations using the same RF transmit array.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a multiport driving mechanism is numerically implemented at ultra high-field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide 1) homogenous whole-slice (axial, sagittal, or coronal) and 2) highly localized radio frequency (RF) field excitation within the same slices, all with the same RF transmit array (here chosen to be a standard transverse electromagnetic (TEM) resonator/coil). The method is numerically tested using a full-wave model of a TEM coil loaded with a high-resolution/18-tissue/anatomically detailed human head mesh. The proposed approach is solely based on electromagnetic and phased array antenna theories. The results demonstrate that both homogenous whole-slice as well as localized RF excitation can be achieved within any slice of the head at 7 T (298 MHz for proton imaging).

  10. Identification of anomalous motion of thunderstorms using daily rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Moral, Anna; Llasat, Maria Carmen; Rigo, Tomeu

    2016-04-01

    Adverse weather phenomena in Catalonia (NE of the Iberian Peninsula) is commonly associated to heavy rains, large hail, strong winds, and/or tornados, all of them caused by thunderstorms. In most of the cases with adverse weather, thunderstorms vary sharply their trajectories in a concrete moment, changing completely the motion directions that have previously followed. Furthermore, it is possible that a breaking into several cells may be produced, or, in the opposite, it can be observed a joining of different thunderstorms into a bigger system. In order to identify the main features of the developing process of thunderstorms and the anomalous motions that these may follow in some cases, this contribution presents a classification of the events using daily rainfall fields, with the purpose of distinguishing quickly anomalous motion of thunderstorms. The methodology implemented allows classifying the daily rainfall fields in three categories by applying some thresholds related with the daily precipitation accumulated values and their extension: days with "no rain", days with "potentially convective" rain and days with "non-potentially convective" rain. Finally, for those "potentially convective" daily rainfall charts, it also allows a geometrical identification and classification of all the convective structures into "ellipse" and "non-ellipse", obtaining then the structures with "normal" or "anomalous" motion pattern, respectively. The work is focused on the period 2008-2015, and presents some characteristics of the rainfall behaviour in terms of the seasonal distribution of convective rainfall or the geographic variability. It shows that convective structures are mainly found during late spring and summer, even though they can be recorded in any time of the year. Consequently, the maximum number of convective structures with anomalous motion is recorded between July and November. Furthermore, the contribution shows the role of the orography of Catalonia in the

  11. Anomalous DC and RF behavior of virgin AlGaN/AlN/GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Martín, H.; García-Pérez, Ó.; Pérez, S.; Altuntas, P.; Hoel, V.; Rennesson, S.; Cordier, Y.; González, T.; Mateos, J.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.

    2017-03-01

    The performance of gallium nitride transistors is still limited by technological problems often related to defects and traps. In this work, virgin AlGaN/AlN/GaN HEMTs exhibiting an anomalous DC behavior accompanied by frequency dispersion in the microwave range, both in the transconductance and output conductance, are analyzed. This anomalous response, which is mitigated by high-bias conditions, is attributed to the presence of traps and defects both in the volume of the GaN channel and in the source and drain contacts. A simple equivalent circuit model is proposed to replicate the dispersive response of the transistor, achieving an excellent agreement with the measured S–parameters and thus providing relevant information about its characteristic frequency.

  12. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  13. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    The reversed field pinch is an effective tool to study the macroscopic consequences of magnetic fluctuations, such as the dynamo effect and anomalous transport. Several explanations exist for the dynamo (the self-generation of plasma current)--the MHD dynamo, the kinetic dynamo, and the diamagnetic dynamo. There is some experimental evidence for each, particularly from measurements of ion velocity and electron pressure fluctuations. Magnetic fluctuations are known to produce energy and particle flux in the RFP core. Current profile control is able to decrease fluctuation-induced transport by a factor of five. Improved confinement regimes are also obtained at deep reversal and, possibly, with flow shear.

  14. Anomalous Radiative Trapping in Laser Fields of Extreme Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonoskov, A.; Bashinov, A.; Gonoskov, I.; Harvey, C.; Ilderton, A.; Kim, A.; Marklund, M.; Mourou, G.; Sergeev, A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate that charged particles in a sufficiently intense standing wave are compressed toward, and oscillate synchronously at, the antinodes of the electric field. We call this unusual behavior anomalous radiative trapping (ART). We show using dipole pulses, which offer a path to increased laser intensity, that ART opens up new possibilities for the generation of radiation and particle beams, both of which are high energy, directed, and collimated. ART also provides a mechanism for particle control in high-intensity quantum-electrodynamics experiments.

  15. Receptive Field (RF) Properties of the Macaque Second Somatosensory Cortex: RF Size, Shape, and Somatotopic Organization

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Paul J.; Lane, John W.; Thakur, Pramodsingh H.; Hsiao, Steven S.

    2007-01-01

    The detailed structure of multidigit receptive fields (RFs) in somatosensory cortical areas such as the SII region has not been investigated previously using systematically controlled stimuli. Recently (Fitzgerald et al., 2004), we showed that the SII region comprises three adjoining fields: posterior, central, and anterior. Here we characterize the RF structures of the 928 neurons that were reported in that study using a motorized oriented bar that was indented into the 12 finger pads of digits 2–5. Most (81%) of the neurons were responsive to the oriented bar stimuli, and 81% of those neurons had RFs that spanned multiple digits. Furthermore, the RFs varied greatly in size, shape, and complexity. Some RFs contained only excitatory finger pads, some contained only inhibitory pads, and some contained both types of pads. A subset of the neurons (23%) showed orientation tuning within one or more pads. The RFs spread across different digits more than within individual digits, and the responsive finger pads for a given neuron tended to cluster together within the hand. Distal and lateral finger pads were better represented than proximal and medial finger pads. Furthermore, neurons in the posterior, central, and anterior SII region fields contained different proportions of RF types. These results collectively indicate that most SII region neurons are selective for different stimulus forms either within single finger pads or across multiple pads. We hypothesize that these RFs represent the kernels underlying the representation of tactile shape. PMID:16775136

  16. Identification of anomalous motion of thunderstorms using daily rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moral, Anna del; Llasat, María del Carmen; Rigo, Tomeu

    2017-03-01

    Most of the adverse weather phenomena in Catalonia (northeast Iberian Peninsula) are caused by convective events, which can produce heavy rains, large hailstones, strong winds, lightning and/or tornadoes. These thunderstorms usually have marked paths. However, their trajectories can vary sharply at any given time, completely changing direction from the path they have previously followed. Furthermore, some thunderstorms split or merge with each other, creating new formations with different behaviour. In order to identify the potentially anomalous movements that some thunderstorms make, this paper presents a two-step methodology using a database with 8 years of daily rainfall fields data for the Catalonia region (2008-2015). First, it classifies daily rainfall fields between days with "no rain", "non-potentially convective rain" and "potentially convective rain", based on daily accumulated precipitation and extension thresholds. Second, it categorises convective structures within rainfall fields and briefly identifies their main features, distinguishing whether there were any anomalous thunderstorm movements in each case. This methodology has been applied to the 2008-2015 period, and the main climatic features of convective and non-convective days were obtained. The methodology can be exported to other regions that do not have the necessary radar-based algorithms to detect convective cells, but where there is a good rain gauge network in place.

  17. A possible explanation of the anomalous emissive probe behavior in a reactive RF plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, R.; Barve, S. A.; Chopade, S. S.; Das, A. K.; Patil, D. S.

    2012-10-01

    Emissive probe diagnostics in saturated floating potential mode was carried out in RF plasmas of argon (Ar)-methane (CH4) and Ar-CH4-hexa methyl disiloxane (HMDSO). These plasmas are used for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and SiOx-containing DLC films, respectively. While performing the experiments it was found that the probe characteristics had two saturation regions instead of one. The same measurements when repeated in Ar and Ar-N2 plasmas showed a single saturation as expected. The first experiments when repeated again showed the same anomaly. The experimental findings question the validity of emissive probe diagnostics in reactive plasmas. A possible model of dust formation inside the reactive plasma is predicted and the first saturation is linked to dust. The second saturation is credited as the actual plasma potential. The concept of dust was invoked after being sure that no effects of RF and reference electrode contamination are responsible for this behavior. The results indicate that we should remain cautious when using emissive probes in reactive plasmas as they may occasionally lead to erroneous results.

  18. Anomalous current pinch of a toroidal axisymmetric plasma with stochastic magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaojie

    2016-07-15

    Anomalous current pinch, in addition to the anomalous diffusion due to stochastic magnetic perturbations, is theoretically found, which may qualitatively explain the recent DIII-D experiment on resonant magnetic field perturbation. The anomalous current pinch, which may resolve the long-standing issue of seed current in a fully bootstrapped tokamak, is also discussed for the electrostatic turbulence.

  19. Anomalous Capacitive Sheath with Deep Radio Frequency Electric Field Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich

    2002-01-18

    A novel nonlinear effect of anomalously deep penetration of an external radio-frequency electric field into a plasma is described. A self-consistent kinetic treatment reveals a transition region between the sheath and the plasma. Because of the electron velocity modulation in the sheath, bunches in the energetic electron density are formed in the transition region adjusted to the sheath. The width of the region is of order V(subscript T)/omega, where V(subscript T) is the electron thermal velocity, and w is frequency of the electric field. The presence of the electric field in the transition region results in a cooling of the energetic electrons and an additional heating of the cold electrons in comparison with the case when the transition region is neglected.

  20. Methodological approaches in estimating anomalous geochemical field structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, R.; Rudmin, M.

    2015-02-01

    Mathematical statistic methods were applied to analyze the core samples from vertical expendable wells in Chertovo Koryto gold ore field. The following methods were used to analyse gold in samples: assay tests and atomic absorption method (AAS), while emission spectrum semiquantative method was applied to identify traces. The analysis of geochemical association distribution in one central profile demonstrated that bulk metasomatic aureoles are characteristic of concentric zonal structure. The distribution of geochemical associations is correlated to the hydrothermal stages of mineral formation identified in this deposit. It was proved that the processed geochemical data by factor and cluster analyses provided additional information on the anomalous geochemical field structure in gold- bearing black-shale strata. Such methods are effective tools in interpretating specific features of geochemical field structures in analogous potential ore-bearing areas.

  1. Iterative Methods to Solve Linear RF Fields in Hot Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joseph; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Evstatiev, Evstati; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Most magnetic plasma confinement devices use radio frequency (RF) waves for current drive and/or heating. Numerical modeling of RF fields is an important part of performance analysis of such devices and a predictive tool aiding design and development of future devices. Prior attempts at this modeling have mostly used direct solvers to solve the formulated linear equations. Full wave modeling of RF fields in hot plasma with 3D nonuniformities is mostly prohibited, with memory demands of a direct solver placing a significant limitation on spatial resolution. Iterative methods can significantly increase spatial resolution. We explore the feasibility of using iterative methods in 3D full wave modeling. The linear wave equation is formulated using two approaches: for cold plasmas the local cold plasma dielectric tensor is used (resolving resonances by particle collisions), while for hot plasmas the conductivity kernel (which includes a nonlocal dielectric response) is calculated by integrating along test particle orbits. The wave equation is discretized using a finite difference approach. The initial guess is important in iterative methods, and we examine different initial guesses including the solution to the cold plasma wave equation. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  2. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the eight-day August 2013 test campaign designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster, but instead will describe the test integration, test operations, and the results obtained from the test campaign. Approximately 30-50 micro-Newtons of thrust were recorded from an electric propulsion test article consisting primarily of a radio frequency (RF) resonant cavity excited at approximately 935 megahertz. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level, within a stainless steel vacuum chamber with the door closed but at ambient atmospheric pressure. Several different test configurations were used, including two different test articles as well as a reversal of the test article orientation. In addition, the test article was replaced by an RF load to verify that the force was not being generated by effects not associated with the test article. The two test articles were designed by Cannae LLC of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The torsion pendulum was designed, built, and operated by Eagleworks Laboratories at the NASA Johnson Space Center of Houston, Texas. Approximately six days of test integration were required, followed by two days of test operations, during which, technical issues were discovered and resolved. Integration of the two test articles and their supporting equipment was performed in an iterative fashion between the test bench and the vacuum chamber. In other words, the test article was tested on the bench, then moved to the chamber, then moved back as needed to resolve issues. Manual frequency control was required throughout the test. Thrust was observed on both test articles, even though one of the test articles was designed with the expectation that it would not

  3. RF pulses for in vivo spectroscopy at high field designed under conditions of limited power using optimal control.

    PubMed

    Matson, Gerald B; Young, Karl; Kaiser, Lana G

    2009-07-01

    Localized in vivo spectroscopy at high magnetic field strength (>3T) is susceptible to localization artifacts such as the chemical shift artifact and the spatial interference artifact for J-coupled spins. This latter artifact results in regions of anomalous phase for J-coupled spins. These artifacts are exacerbated at high magnetic field due to the increased frequency dispersion, coupled with the limited RF pulse bandwidths used for localization. Approaches to minimize these artifacts include increasing the bandwidth of the frequency selective excitation pulses, and the use of frequency selective saturation pulses to suppress the signals in the regions with anomalous phase. The goal of this article is to demonstrate the efficacy of optimal control methods to provide broader bandwidth frequency selective pulses for in vivo spectroscopy in the presence of limited RF power. It is demonstrated by examples that the use of optimal control methods enable the generation of (i) improved bandwidth selective excitation pulses, (ii) more efficient selective inversion pulses to be used for generation of spin echoes, and (iii) improved frequency selective saturation pulses. While optimal control also allows for the generation of frequency selective spin echo pulses, it is argued that it is more efficient to use dual inversion pulses for broadband generation of spin echoes. Finally, the optimal control routines and example RF pulses are made available for downloading.

  4. Flat RF coils in static field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Stork, H; Gädke, A; Nestle, N; Fujara, F

    2009-10-01

    The use of flat RF coils allows considerable gains in the sensitivity of static field gradient (SFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. In this article, this effect is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. Additionally, the flat coil geometry has been studied theoretically depending on magnetic field gradient, pulse sequence and amplifier power. Moreover, detecting the signal directly from the free induction decay (FID) turned out to be quite attractive for STRAFI-like microimaging experiments, especially when using flat coils. In addition to wound rectangular flat coils also spiral flat coils have been developed which can be manufactured by photolithography from printed circuit boards.

  5. Coherent structures and anomalous transport in reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Cecconello, M.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.

    2006-02-01

    The results leading to the identification of coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence in the edge region of the reversed field pinch experiments EXTRAP-T2R and RFX are reviewed. These structures have traits of vortices in velocity field and blobs in density, and the reconstruction of their spatial structure and of their time evolution is discussed focusing on the analysis tools applied. The role of these structures in the particle anomalous transport is addressed, showing that their collisions can contribute up to 50% the total particle losses.This process is shown to be responsible for bursts in particle flux and it is found to set a characteristic collision time, which is in agreement with the statistical properties of laminar times for particle flux bursts.

  6. Anomalous anisotropies of cosmic rays from turbulent magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Markus

    2014-01-17

    The propagation of cosmic rays (CRs) in turbulent interstellar magnetic fields is typically described as a spatial diffusion process. This formalism predicts only a small deviation from an isotropic CR distribution in the form of a dipole in the direction of the CR density gradient or relative background flow. We show that the existence of a global CR dipole moment necessarily generates a spectrum of higher multipole moments in the local CR distribution. These anomalous anisotropies are a direct consequence of Liouville's theorem in the presence of a local turbulent magnetic field. We show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with the observed power spectrum of multi-TeV CRs.

  7. RF Electromagnetic Field Treatment of Tetragonal Kesterite CZTSSe Light Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Semenenko, Mykola O; Babichuk, Ivan S; Kyriienko, Oleksandr; Bodnar, Ivan V; Caballero, Raquel; Leon, Maximo

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we propose a method to improve electro-optical and structural parameters of light-absorbing kesterite materials. It relies on the application of weak power hydrogen plasma discharges using electromagnetic field of radio frequency range, which improves homogeneity of the samples. The method allows to reduce strain of light absorbers and is suitable for designing solar cells based on multilayered thin film structures. Structural characteristics of tetragonal kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S, Se)4 structures and their optical properties were studied by Raman, infrared, and reflectance spectroscopies. They revealed a reduction of the sample reflectivity after RF treatment and a modification of the energy band structure.

  8. RF Electromagnetic Field Treatment of Tetragonal Kesterite CZTSSe Light Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, Mykola O.; Babichuk, Ivan S.; Kyriienko, Oleksandr; Bodnar, Ivan V.; Caballero, Raquel; Leon, Maximo

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we propose a method to improve electro-optical and structural parameters of light-absorbing kesterite materials. It relies on the application of weak power hydrogen plasma discharges using electromagnetic field of radio frequency range, which improves homogeneity of the samples. The method allows to reduce strain of light absorbers and is suitable for designing solar cells based on multilayered thin film structures. Structural characteristics of tetragonal kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S, Se)4 structures and their optical properties were studied by Raman, infrared, and reflectance spectroscopies. They revealed a reduction of the sample reflectivity after RF treatment and a modification of the energy band structure.

  9. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  10. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestwick, Andrew; Fox, Eli; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2015-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) has recently been of great interest due to its recent experimental realization in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi, Sb)2Te3, a ferromagnetic 3D topological insulator. The presence of ferromagnetic exchange breaks time-reversal symmetry, opening a gap in the surface states, but gives rise to dissipationless chiral conduction at the edge of a magnetized film. Ideally, this leads to vanishing longitudinal resistance and Hall resistance quantized to h /e2 , where h is Planck's constant and e is the electron charge, but perfect quantization has so far proved elusive. Here, we study the QAHE in the limit of zero applied magnetic field, and measure Hall resistance quantized to within one part per 10,000. Deviation from quantization is due primarily to thermally activated carriers, which can be nearly eliminated through adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This result demonstrates an important step toward dissipationless electron transport in technologically relevant conditions.

  11. Anomalous transport in fracture networks: field scale experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous transport is widely observed in different settings and scales of transport through porous and fractured geologic media. A common signature of anomalous transport is the late-time power law tailing in breakthrough curves (BTCs) during tracer tests. Various conceptual models of anomalous transport have been proposed, including multirate mass transfer, continuous time random walk, and stream tube models. Since different conceptual models can produce equally good fits to a single BTC, tracer test interpretation has been plagued with ambiguity. Here, we propose to resolve such ambiguity by analyzing BTCs obtained from both convergent and push-pull flow configurations at two different fracture planes. We conducted field tracer tests in a fractured granite formation close to Ploemeur, France. We observe that BTC tailing depends on the flow configuration and the injection fracture. Specifically the tailing disappears under push-pull geometry, and when we injected at a fracture with high flux (Figure 1). This indicates that for this fractured granite, BTC tailing is controlled by heterogeneous advection and not by matrix diffusion. To explain the change in tailing behavior for different flow configurations, we employ a simple lattice network model with heterogeneous conductivity distribution. The model assigns random conductivities to the fractures and solves the Darcy equation for an incompressible fluid, enforcing mass conservation at fracture intersections. The mass conservation constraint yields a correlated random flow through the fracture system. We investigate whether BTC tailing can be explained by the spatial distribution of preferential flow paths and stagnation zones, which is controlled by the conductivity variance and correlation length. By combining the results from the field tests and numerical modeling, we show that the reversibility of spreading is a key mechanism that needs to be captured. We also demonstrate the dominant role of the injection

  12. Transverse low-field RF coils in MRI.

    PubMed

    Claasen-Vujcić, T; Borsboom, H M; Gaykema, H J; Mehlkopf, T

    1996-07-01

    Imaging at low fields imposes a number of nonstandard requirements on the RF coil. At low fields, coil losses are dominant over patient losses. This means that even more stress is put on the quality factor Q. Furthermore, the low frequency also implies a high inductance L and/or a high capacitance C product. Just increasing the capacitance C results in a difficult optimal matching to the preamplifier as well as increased costs and higher complexity of the resonator construction. Coils with a high quality factor Q and a high inductance are thus required at low fields. Birdcage coils possess a number of advantages over saddle and solenoidal coils. However, the currently used birdcages have inherently low inductances limited by the size of the coil. The problem can be solved by a novel design in which the strip configuration for inductors is abandoned and the inductors are realized as a certain number of turns. The Q factor can be further improved by using Litz wire. Three novel transverse RF coils with high inductances are presented and compared with each other as well as to the standard coils. Both linear and quadrature modes are discussed.

  13. Electron energy relaxation of electron swarms in RF fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bzenic, S.A.; Petrovic, Z.Lj.; Maeda, K.; Makabe, T.

    1995-12-31

    Efficient modeling of RF discharges requires approximate treatment of non-local transport of electrons both in time and space. Exact solution of space and time dependent Boltzmann equation is both very difficult and time consuming when taken in conjunction with self consistent calculation of the development of electric field and so are the Monte Carlo simulations. Therefore approximate methods have been developed based on fluid models which make modeling of one dimensional RF plasmas tractable and modeling of two dimensional plasmas becomes possible. The crucial problem in such numerical models is the non local electron transport and it is treated by different approximate schemes, one of the most successful being the Relaxation Continuum Theory (RCT). Critical part of the RCT scheme is application of relaxation times for various processes. The most important is the energy relaxation lifetime but it is of limited value when high energy electrons are important component of the energy distribution function. In addition behavior of different inelastic processes will depend not on the threshold energy and energy distribution time dependence above that threshold. In this paper we follow the relaxation of the mean energy and other properties of electron swarms in the high frequency RF field. We use both the specially developed Monte Carlo simulation technique-(MCS) and the direct numeric procedure for solving the Boltzmann equation. As the basis for calculations we use the cross section set for the Reid`s ramp model which has been used extensively in tests of numerical techniques and thus the accurate values of the transport coefficients are very well known.

  14. Kinetics of plasma electrons in static and rf fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Y.A.; Lebedev, Y.A.; Polak, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the frequency of the field producing a plasma on the isotropic part of the electron energy distribution is analyzed. Analytic solutions of the Boltzmann equation are derived for high-energy tail of the electron energy distribution for static and rf fields. The results show that the shape of the tail of the distribution can be effectively controlled by changing the ratio of the field frequency to the effective frequency with which electrons collide with heavy particles and by choosing the appropriate dependence of the cross section for elastic scattering of electrons by heavy particles on the electron energy (by appropriate choice of the gas from which the plasma is formed). These results agree with experimental results in the literature.

  15. RF coil optimization: evaluation of B1 field homogeneity using field histograms and finite element calculations.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Yang, Q X; Smith, M B

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) finite element analysis has been used to solve the full set of Maxwell's equations for the 2D magnetic field of radiofrequency (RF) coils. The field histogram method has been applied to evaluate and optimize the magnetic field homogeneity of some commonly used RF coils: the saddle coil, the slotted tube resonator, the multiple elements coil and the birdcage resonator, as well as the radial plate coil. Each coil model represents a cross-section of an infinitely long cylinder. The optimum configuration of each of these five RF coils is suggested. It was found that field homogeneity is more strongly dependent on the coil's window angle than on any other parameter. Additionally, eddy currents in the coil's conductive elements distort the current and magnetic field distribution. The frequency dependence of this eddy current distortion is analyzed and discussed.

  16. Error sources affecting thermocouple thermometry in RF electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D P; Brezovich, I A

    1982-03-01

    Thermocouple thermometry errors in radiofrequency (typically 13, 56 MHZ) electromagnetic fields such as are encountered in hyperthermia are described. RF currents capacitatively or inductively coupled into the thermocouple-detector circuit produce errors which are a combination of interference, i.e., 'pick-up' error, and genuine rf induced temperature changes at the junction of the thermocouple. The former can be eliminated by adequate filtering and shielding; the latter is due to (a) junction current heating in which the generally unequal resistances of the thermocouple wires cause a net current flow from the higher to the lower resistance wire across the junction, (b) heating in the surrounding resistive material (tissue in hyperthermia), and (c) eddy current heating of the thermocouple wires in the oscillating magnetic field. Low frequency theories are used to estimate these errors under given operating conditions and relevant experiments demonstrating these effects and precautions necessary to minimize the errors are described. It is shown that at 13.56 MHz and voltage levels below 100 V rms these errors do not exceed 0.1 degrees C if the precautions are observed and thermocouples with adequate insulation (e.g., Bailey IT-18) are used. Results of this study are being currently used in our clinical work with good success.

  17. Anomalous electrodynamics of neutral pion matter in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Kadam, Saurabh V.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state of quantum chromodynamics in sufficiently strong external magnetic fields and at moderate baryon chemical potential is a chiral soliton lattice (CSL) of neutral pions [1]. We investigate the interplay between the CSL structure and dynamical electromagnetic fields. Our main result is that in presence of the CSL background, the two physical photon polarizations and the neutral pion mix, giving rise to two gapped excitations and one gapless mode with a nonrelativistic dispersion relation. The nature of this mode depends on the direction of its propagation, interpolating between a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave [2] and a neutral pion surface wave, which in turn arises from the spontaneously broken translation invariance. Quite remarkably, there is a neutral-pion-like mode that remains gapped even in the chiral limit, in seeming contradiction to the Goldstone theorem. Finally, we have a first look at the effect of thermal fluctuations of the CSL, showing that even the soft nonrelativistic excitation does not lead to the Landau-Peierls instability. However, it leads to an anomalous contribution to pressure that scales with temperature and magnetic field as T 5/2( B/f π )3/2.

  18. Derivation of anomalous hydrodynamics from quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Masaru; Hayata, Tomoya; Hidaka, Yoshimasa; Minami, Yuki; Noumi, Toshifumi

    2014-09-01

    Hydrodynamics is a low-energy effective theory which describes a long-distance and long-time behavior of many-body systems. It has been recently pointed out that triangle anomalies affect macroscopic transport properties and generate anomaly-induced transports. These transport phenomena have a common feature that they are dissipationless, or in other words, they don't cause the entropy production. One example is the chiral magnetic effect, which represents the existence of a dissipationless vector current along the magnetic field and is expected to occur in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this study, we derive anomalous hydrodynamic equations from the point of view of quantum field theory. Assuming the local Gibbs distribution at initial time, we derive a thermodynamic potential for relativistic hydrodynamics. This action has a form in the curved space-time whose metric is determined by the thermodynamic variables such as the temperature. We show that anomaly-induced transports manifest from this thermodynamic potential if systems do not have the parity symmetry, and, therefore, are dissipationless. We also discuss a relation between our work and other recent approaches that aim at deriving hydrodynamic equations for the parity-violating systems. Hydrodynamics is a low-energy effective theory which describes a long-distance and long-time behavior of many-body systems. It has been recently pointed out that triangle anomalies affect macroscopic transport properties and generate anomaly-induced transports. These transport phenomena have a common feature that they are dissipationless, or in other words, they don't cause the entropy production. One example is the chiral magnetic effect, which represents the existence of a dissipationless vector current along the magnetic field and is expected to occur in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this study, we derive anomalous hydrodynamic equations from the point of view of quantum field theory. Assuming

  19. Concurrent recording of RF pulses and gradient fields - comprehensive field monitoring for MRI.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Çavuşoğlu, Mustafa; Wilm, Bertram J; Schmid, Thomas; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-09-01

    Reconstruction of MRI data is based on exact knowledge of all magnetic field dynamics, since the interplay of RF and gradient pulses generates the signal, defines the contrast and forms the basis of resolution in spatial and spectral dimensions. Deviations caused by various sources, such as system imperfections, delays, eddy currents, drifts or externally induced fields, can therefore critically limit the accuracy of MRI examinations. This is true especially at ultra-high fields, because many error terms scale with the main field strength, and higher available SNR renders even smaller errors relevant. Higher baseline field also often requires higher acquisition bandwidths and faster signal encoding, increasing hardware demands and the severity of many types of hardware imperfection. To address field imperfections comprehensively, in this work we propose to expand the concept of magnetic field monitoring to also encompass the recording of RF fields. In this way, all dynamic magnetic fields relevant for spin evolution are covered, including low- to audio-frequency magnetic fields as produced by main magnets, gradients and shim systems, as well as RF pulses generated with single- and multiple-channel transmission systems. The proposed approach permits field measurements concurrently with actual MRI procedures on a strict common time base. The combined measurement is achieved with an array of miniaturized field probes that measure low- to audio-frequency fields via (19) F NMR and simultaneously pick up RF pulses in the MRI system's (1) H transmit band. Field recordings can form the basis of system calibration, retrospective correction of imaging data or closed-loop feedback correction, all of which hold potential to render MRI more robust and relax hardware requirements. The proposed approach is demonstrated for a range of imaging methods performed on a 7 T human MRI system, including accelerated multiple-channel RF pulses. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Understanding and manipulating the RF fields at high field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Tamer S.; Hue, YiK-Kiong; Tang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a complete overview of the electromagnetics (radiofrequency aspect) of MRI at low and high fields. Using analytical formulations, numerical modeling (computational electromagnetics), and ultrahigh field imaging experiments, the physics that impacts the electromagnetic quantities associated with MRI, namely (1) the transmit field, (2) receive field, and (3) total electromagnetic power absorption, is analyzed. The physical interpretation of the above-mentioned quantities is investigated by electromagnetic theory, to understand ‘What happens, in terms of electromagnetics, when operating at different static field strengths?’ Using experimental studies and numerical simulations, this paper also examines the physical and technological feasibilities by which all or any of these specified electromagnetic quantities can be manipulated through techniques such as B1 shimming (phased array excitation) and signal combination using a receive array in order to advance MRI at high field strengths. Pertinent to this subject and with highly coupled coils operating at 7 T, this paper also presents the first phantom work on B1 shimming without B1 measurements. PMID:19621335

  1. Anomalous Transport Properties of Dense QCD in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Incera, Vivian

    2017-06-01

    Despite recent advancements in the study and understanding of the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter, the region of high baryonic densities and low temperatures has remained difficult to reach in the lab. Things are expected to change with the planned HIC experiments at FAIR in Germany and NICA in Russia, which will open a window to the high-density-low-temperature segment of the QCD phase map, providing a unique opportunity to test the validity of model calculations that have predicted the formation of spatially inhomogeneous phases with broken chiral symmetry at intermediate-to-high densities. Such a density region is also especially relevant for the physics of neutron stars, as they have cores that can have several times the nuclear saturation density. On the other hand, strong magnetic fields, whose presence is fairly common in HIC and in neutron stars, can affect the properties of these exotic phases and lead to signatures potentially observable in these two settings. In this paper, I examine the anomalous transport properties produced by the spectral asymmetry of the lowest Landau level (LLL) in a QCD-inspired NJL model with a background magnetic field that exhibits chiral symmetry breaking at high density via the formation of a Dual Chiral Density Wave (DCDW) condensate. It turns out that in this model the electromagnetic interactions are described by the axion electrodynamics equations and there is a dissipationless Hall current.

  2. Multipactor in crossed rf fields on the cavity equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelin, Valery

    2013-01-01

    Multipactor discharge in an accelerating superconducting elliptic cavity occurs usually near its equator. As simulations show, the dimensions of the trajectories of multipacting electrons are very small compared to the dimensions of a cavity. This feature gives a way for solving explicit equations of motion instead of cumbersome simulations. Electric and magnetic fields near the cavity equator are presented in a form of expansions up to the third power of coordinates. Comparisons with numerical calculations of fields made with the SLANS code for the TESLA cavity cells, as well as with the analytical solution for a spherical cavity, are done. These fields are used for solving the equations of motion of electrons in crossed rf fields near the equator. Based on the analysis of these equations, general features of multipacting in this area are obtained. Results are compared with simulations and experimental data. The experimental formulas for multipacting zones are explained and their dependence on the cavity geometries is shown. Because of small sizes of electron trajectories, the influence of the weld seams is taken into account. This suggests a possible explanation of multipacting in a cavity which was not found by simulations. The developed approach allows evaluation of multipacting in a cavity without its simulations but after an analysis of fields in the equatorial region. These fields can be computed by any code used for cavity calculation.

  3. Dependence of the microwave surface resistance of superconducting niobium on the magnitude of the rf field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-06-24

    Utilizing difference in temperature dependencies we decoupled Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and residual components of the microwave surface resistance of superconducting niobium at all rf fields up to B{sub rf}{approx}115 mT. We reveal that the residual resistance decreases with field at B{sub rf} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 40 mT and strongly increases in chemically treated niobium at B{sub rf}>80 mT. We find that BCS surface resistance is weakly dependent on field in the clean limit, whereas a strong and peculiar field dependence emerges after 120 Degree-Sign C vacuum baking.

  4. Spintronics r.f. oscillator driven by magnetic field feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulapurkar, Ashwin; Dixit, Dinesh; Konishi, Katsunori; Tomy, C. V.; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) can be used as nano-scale rf oscillators using spin-transfer torque effect. Here we present an alternative novel mechanism of ``magnetic field feedback'' for driving MTJs into precessional states. To realize this effect, MTJ needs to be fabricated on top of a co-planar wave-guide. A dc current is passed through MTJ to produce a fluctuating voltage across it as a combination of thermal fluctuations of free layer and magneto-resistance effect. This voltage is applied across co-planar wave-guide to create a fluctuating magnetic field which acts on the free layer to enhance its fluctuations. If the dc current exceeds a critical value, precessional states of free layer are excited. We have derived expression for the critical current using lineralized LLG equation, modified to include the ``feedback'' magnetic field. We have verified the feedback effect by numerical simulation of stochastic LLG equation including random magnetic field: we find that the damping of the free layer can be increased/decreased by applying -ve/ +ve dc current. Simulations show that by applying dc current more than critical current, large amplitude oscillations with high quality factors are possible.

  5. A Method to Localize RF B1 Field in High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, B0 fields of 7 and 9.4 T, the RF field shows greater inhomogeneity compared to clinical MRI systems with B0 fields of 1.5 and 3.0 T. In multichannel RF coils, the magnitude and phase of the input to each coil element can be controlled independently to reduce the nonuniformity of the RF field. The convex optimization technique has been used to obtain the optimum excitation parameters with iterative solutions for homogeneity in a selected region of interest. The pseudoinverse method has also been used to find a solution. The simulation results for 9.4- and 7-T MRI systems are discussed in detail for the head model. Variation of the simulation results in a 9.4-T system with the number of RF coil elements for different positions of the regions of interest in a spherical phantom are also discussed. Experimental results were obtained in a phantom in the 9.4-T system and are compared to the simulation results and the specific absorption rate has been evaluated. PMID:22929360

  6. Simulation of RF power and multi-cusp magnetic field requirement for H- ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Manish; Senecha, V. K.; Kumar, Rajnish; Ghodke, Dharmraj. V.

    2016-12-01

    A computer simulation study for multi-cusp RF based H- ion source has been carried out using energy and particle balance equation for inductively coupled uniformly dense plasma considering sheath formation near the boundary wall of the plasma chamber for RF ion source used as high current injector for 1 Gev H- Linac project for SNS applications. The average reaction rates for different reactions responsible for H- ion production and destruction have been considered in the simulation model. The RF power requirement for the caesium free H- ion source for a maximum possible H- ion beam current has been derived by evaluating the required current and RF voltage fed to the coil antenna using transformer model for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Different parameters of RF based H- ion source like excited hydrogen molecular density, H- ion density, RF voltage and current of RF antenna have been calculated through simulations in the presence and absence of multicusp magnetic field to distinctly observe the effect of multicusp field. The RF power evaluated for different H- ion current values have been compared with the experimental reported results showing reasonably good agreement considering the fact that some RF power will be reflected from the plasma medium. The results obtained have helped in understanding the optimum field strength and field free regions suitable for volume emission based H- ion sources. The compact RF ion source exhibits nearly 6 times better efficiency compare to large diameter ion source.

  7. On Consideration of Radiated Power in RF Field Simulations for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanzhan; Kao, Chien-ping; Collins, Christopher M.; Smith, Michael B.; Yang, Qing X.

    2012-01-01

    In numerical analyses of RF fields for MRI, RF power is often permitted to radiate out of the problem region. In reality, RF power will be confined by the magnet bore and RF screen enclosing the magnet room. We present numerical calculations at different frequencies for various surface and volume coils, with samples from simple spheres to the human body in environments from free space to a shielded RF room. Results for calculations within a limited problem region show radiated power increases with frequency. When the magnet room RF screen is included, nearly all the power is dissipated in the human subject. For limited problem regions, inclusion of a term for radiation loss results in an underestimation of transmit efficiency compared to results including the complete bore and RF screen. If the term for radiated power is not included, calculated coil efficiencies are slightly overestimated compared to the complete case. PMID:22473620

  8. New phenomenology of gas breakdown in DC and RF fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Sivoš, Jelena; Savić, Marija; Škoro, Nikola; Radmilović Radenović, Marija; Malović, Gordana; Gocić, Saša; Marić, Dragana

    2014-05-01

    This paper follows a review lecture on the new developments in the field of gas breakdown and low current discharges, usually covered by a form of Townsend's theory and phenomenology. It gives an overview of a new approach to identifying which feedback agents provide breakdown, how to model gas discharge conditions and reconcile the results with binary experiments and how to employ that knowledge in modelling gas discharges. The next step is an illustration on how to record volt-ampere characteristics and use them on one hand to obtain the breakdown voltage and, on the other, to identify the regime of operation and model the secondary electron yields. The second aspect of this section concerns understanding the different regimes, their anatomy, how those are generated and how free running oscillations occur. While temporal development is the most useful and interesting part of the new developments, the difficulty of presenting the data in a written form precludes an easy publication and discussion. Thus, we shall only mention some of the results that stem from these measurements. Most micro discharges operate in DC albeit with complex geometries. Thus, parallel plate micro discharge measurements were needed to establish that Townsend's theory, with all its recent extensions, is still valid until some very small gaps. We have shown, for example, how a long-path breakdown puts in jeopardy many experimental observations and why a flat left-hand side of the Paschen curve often does not represent good physics. We will also summarize a kinetic representation of the RF breakdown revealing a somewhat more complex picture than the standard model. Finally, we will address briefly the breakdown in radially inhomogeneous conditions and how that affects the measured properties of the discharge. This review has the goal of summarizing (rather than developing details of) the current status of the low-current DC discharges formation and operation as a discipline which, in spite of

  9. Investigation of the asymmetric distributions of RF transmission and reception fields at high static field.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    When radiofrequency (RF) transmission field represents B(1)(+), the reception field represents B(1)(-)*. The distribution of those maps demonstrates asymmetric features at high field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Both maps are in mirror symmetry to one another. Almost symmetric distribution of the B(1) field was expected on the laboratory frame in a symmetric sample loaded inside the RF coil designed to achieve a homogeneous B(1) field. Then, a simple change was made in the coordinate transformation equation of RF fields between the rotating and laboratory frames in both linear and quadrature modes to investigate the source of this feature of asymmetry. The magnitude of rotating frame components, B(1)(+) and B(1)(-), consists of the magnitude and the phase difference of the laboratory frame components. The rotating frame components differ in the sign of the sinusoidal phase difference. B(1)(+) is equal to B(1)(-) at lower field because phase changes that depend on position can be ignored. At higher fields, the magnitude component has a symmetric profile, and distribution in the phase component is antisymmetric. Thus, the distributions of B(1)(+) and B(1)(-) maps demonstrate mirror symmetry. Maps of magnitude and phase components were examined in the laboratory frame. Their maps were computed from B(1)(+) and B(1)(-) maps of the human brain and of a spherical saline phantom measured at 4.7T. It was concluded from these analytical and experimental results that the asymmetric and mirror symmetric distributions in B(1)(+) and B(1)(-) are derived from the phase difference in the laboratory frame.

  10. Separation of variations of the geomagnetic field into normal and anomalous parts on a bounded territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Plotnikov, S. V.

    1981-12-01

    A method based on convolution integrals is developed for separating geomagnetic variations into normal and anomalous parts. It is shown for a number of typical models of normal geoelectric section that the kernels of the integral transforms have the form of spatial windows which fluctuate (depending on the variation period) from several tens to several hundreds of kilometers. This indicates the possibility of separating fields specified on a bounded territory into normal and anomalous parts.

  11. Anomalous current transients in organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Mathijssen, S. G. J.; Cramer, T.; Kemerink, M.; de Leeuw, D. M.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2010-03-01

    Here we study the origin of the gate bias-stress effect in organic p-type transistors. Based on water-mediated exchange between holes in the semiconductor and protons in the gate dielectric, we predict anomalous current transients for a non-constant gate bias, while ensuring accumulation. When applying a strongly negative gate bias followed by a less negative bias a back-transfer of protons to holes and an increase of the current is expected. We verify this counterintuitive behavior experimentally and can quantitatively model the transients with the same parameters as used to describe the threshold voltage shift.

  12. Effects of rf current on critical field for magnetization reversal in spin torque devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenyu; Florez, Sylvia; Katine, Jordan; Carey, Matthew; Folks, Liesl; Terris, Bruce

    2009-03-01

    Current induced switching assisted by rf current has recently been observed in spin torque devices at low temperature [1, 2]. This effect allows control of spin transfer induced magnetization reversal through the frequency of an injected rf current. In this study, the effects of the rf current injection on critical field for magnetization reversal in spin valve junctions have been investigated. Measurements were conducted at room temperature, and the magnetic field was applied along the easy axis of the junction. An rf current was injected into the nanojunction at various frequencies ranging between 1 and 20 GHz. The dynamic resistance, dV/dI, was measured as a function of the rf frequency, power and the dc bias current while ramping the magnetic field. The rf current injection was observed to change the critical field for free layer magnetization reversal when the intrinsic spin-transfer-induced dynamics is frequency-locked with the injected rf. The results will be discussed in the context of macrospin models of spin transfer in metallic spin valve structures. [1] S. H. Florez et al. Phys. Rev. B 78, 184403 (2008) [2] Y.-T. Cui et al. Phys. Rev. B 77, 214440 (2008)

  13. Thermospheric topside neutral density, ionospheric anomalous electric field and resistivity measurements by active experiment at EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, Michael; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Rietveld, Michael; Blagoveshchenskaya, Nataly; Yamazaki, Yosuke

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an active ground-based technique to estimate the topside thermospheric neutral density as well as topside ionospheric anomalous electric field and resistivity at EISCAT, combining the EISCAT UHF radar, HF heater and optics. When pumping the ionosphere the F-region electron temperature is significantly raised, increasing the upward plasma pressure gradient in the topside ionosphere, resulting in observed ion up-flow along the magnetic field line. Simultaneously, pump-induced suprathermal electrons produce artificial optical emissions. Using the modified ion-momentum equation, the thermospheric neutral density is estimated. Alternatively, using the MSIS model the field-aligned anomalous electric field is estimated. From the optical data the suprathermal electron flux is estimated, giving an estimate of the anomalous resistivity. Results from recent observations at EISCAT are presented.

  14. Modeling of anomalous Wtb interactions in single top quark events using subsidiary fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dudko, L.; Perfilov, M.

    2017-01-01

    A method to simulate anomalous fermion-boson interactions in Wtb vertex is presented with a minimal set of simulated samples of single top quark events at the LHC energies. In the proposed method, additional subsidiary vector fields corresponding to the Standard Model gauge fields are implemented for each type of the anomalous vertex structure. The method allows to simulate a manifestation of anomalous gauge couplings in two approaches used in experimental analyses either keeping only the linear order contributions in the anomalous couplings or keeping all contributions in numerators and denominators as appeared in matrix elements. For the processes with several anomalous couplings contributing simultaneously to the production and to the decay as well as to various interference terms the method allows to model correctly the dependence of kinematic distributions on anomalous couplings. The method shows how to generate a minimum set of event samples needed for a concrete analysis. All the single top quark production mechanisms, t-, s- and associative tW-channels, are considered. The correctness of the proposed method is demonstrated.

  15. A New First-Principles Calculation of Field-Dependent RF Surface Impedance of BCS Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping; Reece, Charles E.

    2014-02-01

    There is a need to understand the intrinsic limit of radiofrequency (RF) surface impedance that determines the performance of superconducting RF cavities in particle accelerators. Here we present a field-dependent derivation of Mattis-Bardeen theory of the RF surface impedance of BCS superconductors based on the shifted density of states resulting from coherently moving Cooper pairs. Our theoretical prediction of the effective BCS RF surface resistance (Rs) of niobium as a function of peak surface magnetic field amplitude agrees well with recently reported record low loss resonant cavity measurements from JLab and FNAL with carefully, yet differently, prepared niobium material. The surprising reduction in resistance with increasing field is explained to be an intrinsic effect.

  16. Dual Optimization Method of RF and Quasi-Static Field Simulations for Reduction of Eddy Currents Generated on 7T RF Coil Shielding

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Zhao, Tiejun; Raval, Shailesh B.; Krishnamurthy, Narayanan; Zheng, Hai; Harris, Chad T.; Handler, William B.; Chronik, Blaine A.; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To optimize the design of radiofrequency (RF) shielding of transmit coils at 7T and reduce eddy currents generated on the RF shielding when imaging with rapid gradient waveforms. Methods One set of a four-element, 2×2 Tic-Tac-Toe (TTT) head coil structure is selected and constructed to study eddy currents on the RF coil shielding. The generated eddy currents are quantitatively studied in the time and frequency domains. The RF characteristics are studied using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Five different kinds of RF shielding were tested on a 7T MRI scanner with phantoms and in-vivo human subjects. Results The eddy current simulation method is verified by the measurement results. Eddy currents induced by solid/intact and simple-structured slotted RF shielding can significantly distort the gradient fields. EPI images, B1+ maps and S matrix measurements verified that the proposed slot pattern can suppress the eddy currents while maintaining the RF characteristics of the transmit coil. Conclusion The presented dual-optimization method could be used to design the RF shielding and reduce the gradient field-induced eddy currents while maintaining the RF characteristics of the transmit coil. PMID:25367703

  17. Printed-Circuit RF-Keyed Crossed-Field Amplifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-25

    100 watt region while employing techniques , such as printed-circuit slow -wave structures, to achieve low-cost technology. Although printed-circuit...circuit slow -wave structure. The theoretical results indicate that higher interaction impedances than have presently been obtained with printed-circuit... slow -wave structures will be required to achieve the goal of low RF-keying levels. Experimental results indicate good agreement between theory and

  18. Reduction of implant RF heating through modification of transmit coil electric field.

    PubMed

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Akin, Burak; Atalar, Ergin

    2011-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the possibility to modify the electric-field distribution of a radio frequency (RF) coil to generate electric field-free zones in the body without significantly altering the transmit sensitivity. Because implant heating is directly related to the electric-field distribution, implant-friendly RF transmit coils can be obtained by this approach. We propose a linear birdcage transmit coil with a zero electric-field plane as an example of such implant-friendly coils. When the zero electric-field plane coincides with the implant position, implant heating is reduced, as we demonstrated by the phantom experiments. By feeding RF pulses with identical phases and shapes but different amplitudes to the two orthogonal ports of the coil, the position of the zero electric-field plane can also be adjusted. Although implant heating is reduced with this method, a linear birdcage coil results in a whole-volume average specific absorption rate that is twice that of a quadrature birdcage coil. To solve this issue, we propose alternative methods to design implant-friendly RF coils with optimized electromagnetic fields and reduced whole-volume average specific absorption rate. With these methods, the transmit field was modified to reduce RF heating of implants and obtain uniform transmit sensitivity. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Anomalous elastic properties of RF-sputtered amorphous TeO2+x thin film for temperature-stable SAW device applications.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Namrata; Sreenivas, Kondepudy; Gupta, Vinay

    2008-03-01

    The anomalous elastic properties of TeO2+x thin films deposited by rf diode sputtering on substrates at room temperature have been studied. The deposited films are amorphous, and IR spectroscopy reveals the formation of Te-O bond. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the variation in the stoichiometry of TeO2+x film from x=0 to 1 with an increase in the oxygen percentage in processing gas composition. The elastic parameters of the films in comparison to the reported values for TeO2+x single crystal are found to be low. However, the temperature coefficients of elastic parameters of all deposited films exhibit anomalous behavior showing positive values for TC(C11) in the range (32.0 to 600.0)x10(-4) degrees C(-1) and TC(C44)=(35.0 to 645.5)x10(-4) degrees C(-1) against the negative values TC(C11)=-2.7x10(-4) degrees C(-1) and TC(C44)=-0.73x10(-4) degrees C(-1) reported for TeO2+x single crystal. The variation in the elastic parameters and their temperature coefficients is correlated with the change in the three-dimensional network of Te-O bonding. The anomalous elastic properties of the TeO2+x films grown in 100% O2 are useful for potential application in the design of temperature stable surface acoustic wave devices.

  20. Sample-Induced RF Perturbations in High-Field, High-Resolution NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crozier, Stuart; Brereton, Ian M.; Zelaya, Fernando O.; Roffmann, Wolfgang U.; Doddrell, David M.

    1997-05-01

    Conducting dielectric samples are often used in high-resolution experiments at high field. It is shown that significant amplitude and phase distortions of the RF magnetic field may result from perturbations caused by such samples. Theoretical analyses demonstrate the spatial variation of the RF field amplitude and phase across the sample, and comparisons of the effect are made for a variety of sample properties and operating field strengths. Although the effect is highly nonlinear, it tends to increase with increasing field strength, permittivity, conductivity, and sample size. There are cases, however, in which increasing the conductivity of the sample improves the homogeneity of the amplitude of the RF field across the sample at the expense of distorted RF phase. It is important that the perturbation effects be calculated for the experimental conditions used, as they have the potential to reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of NMR experiments and may increase the generation of spurious coherences. The effect of RF-coil geometry on the coherences is also modeled, with the use of homogeneous resonators such as the birdcage design being preferred. Recommendations are made concerning methods of reducing sample-induced perturbations. Experimental high-field imaging and high-resolution studies demonstrate the effect.

  1. Efficient anomalous reflection through near-field interactions in metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalabi, H.; Ra'di, Y.; Sounas, D. L.; Alù, A.

    2017-08-01

    Gradient metasurfaces have been extensively used in the past few years for advanced wave manipulation over a thin surface. These metasurfaces have been mostly designed based on the generalized laws of reflection and refraction. However, it was recently revealed that metasurfaces based on this approach tend to suffer from inefficiencies and complex design requirements. We have recently proposed a different approach to the problem of efficient beam steering using a surface, based on bianisotropic particles in a periodic array. Here, we show highly efficient reflective metasurfaces formed by pairs of isotropic dielectric rods, which can offer asymmetrical scattering of normally incident beams with unitary efficiency. Our theory shows that moderately broadband anomalous reflection can be achieved with suitably designed periodic arrays of isotropic nanoparticles. We also demonstrate practical designs using TiO2 cylindrical nanorods to deflect normally incident light toward a desired direction. The proposed structures may pave the way to a broader range of light management opportunities, with applications in energy harvesting, signaling, and communications.

  2. Anomalous cross-B field transport and spokes in HiPIMS plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, A.

    2016-05-01

    Localized light emission patterns observed during on time of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge on a planar magnetron, known as spokes or ionization zones, have been identified as a potential source of anomalous cross-B field diffusion. In this paper experimental evidence is presented that anomalous diffusion is triggered by the appearance of spokes. The Hall parameter {ω\\text{ce}}{τ\\text{c}} , product of the electron cyclotron frequency and the classical collision time, reduces from Bohm diffusion values (∼ 16 and higher) down to the value of 3 as spokes appear, indicating anomalous cross-B field transport. A combination of intensified charge coupled device imaging and electric probe measurements reveals that the ions from the spokes are instantaneously diffusing away from the target. The ion diffusion coefficients calculated from a sideways image of the spoke are six times higher than Bohm diffusion coefficients, which is consistent with the reduction of the Hall parameter.

  3. Hearing aids' electromagnetic immunity to environmental RF fields.

    PubMed

    Facta, S; Benedetto, A; Anglesio, L; d'Amore, G

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the electromagnetic interference on hearing aids was evaluated. Electromagnetic (EM) immunity tests on different types of hearing aids were carried out, using signals of intensity and modulation comparable to those present in the environment. The purpose of this work is to characterise the interference, establishing the immunity threshold for different frequencies and finding out which types of hearing aids are more susceptible, and in which frequency range. The tests were carried out in a GTEM cell on seven hearing aids, using AM and GSM signals in the radiofrequency (RF) range.

  4. Characterization of rf-SSET in both in-plane and perpendicular magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chunyang; Yang, Zhen; Yuan, Mingyun; Rimberg, A. J.; Savage, D. E.; Eriksson, M. A.; Rimberg Team; Eriksson Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Previous success in coupling an aluminum radio-frequency superconducting single electron transistor (rf-SSET) to quantum dots (QDs) has demonstrated use of the rf-SSET as an ultra-sensitive and fast charge sensor. Since a magnetic field is usually necessary for quantum dot qubit manipulation, it is important to understand the effect of magnetic fields, either in-plane or perpendicular, on the performance of any charge sensor near the QDs. Here we report characterization of rf-SSETs in both in-plane and perpendicular magnetic fields. The rf-SSET works well in an in-plane fields up to 1 Tesla at a temperature of 30 mK. At 0.3K, in a perpendicular field generated by a stripline located 700 nm away, the rf-SSET charge sensitivity even shows improvement for up to 2.1 mA current through the stripline (corresponding roughly to a field of 6 Gauss). This work was supported by NSA, LPS and ARO

  5. Interferences in the transverse profile of a toluene beam induced by a resonant RF electric field.

    PubMed

    Morato, M; Cáceres, J O; Gonzálvez, A G; González Ureña, A

    2009-12-31

    In this work, the interaction of a supersonic beam of toluene diluted in He with a resonant oscillating RF field is investigated both experimental and theoretically. It is shown how the resonant field induces a peak structure in the transverse beam profile which can be explained by the onset of molecular interferences. Specifically, the interaction of a toluene beam of 0.12 eV of translational energy with a resonant RF field of 1.12 kV/m amplitude, and -610 kV/m(2) of gradient at the horizontal plane, during 160 micros produces a series of maxima in the transverse beam profile. The observed structure was satisfactorily reproduced by a quantum interference model based on the interaction of two coherent superpositions induced by the resonant RF field. It appears the present experimental technique could be useful to investigate the spectroscopy and dynamical behavior of coherent beams of polar molecules.

  6. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current In Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  7. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current in Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Unlisted

    2010-09-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  8. Computational Investigation of Helical Traveling Wave Tube Transverse RF Field Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A.

    1998-01-01

    In a previous study using a fully three-dimensional (3D) helical slow-wave circuit cold- test model it was found, contrary to classical helical circuit analyses, that transverse FF electric fields have significant amplitudes compared with the longitudinal component. The RF fields obtained using this helical cold-test model have been scaled to correspond to those of an actual TWT. At the output of the tube, RF field forces reach 61%, 26% and 132% for radial, azimuthal and longitudinal components, respectively, compared to radial space charge forces indicating the importance of considering them in the design of electron beam focusing.

  9. Anomalous photoelectron angular distribution in ionization of Kr in intense ultraviolet laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Motoyoshi; Otobe, Tomohito; Itakura, Ryuji

    2017-06-01

    We investigate multiphoton ionization of Kr for the formation of the two spin-orbit split states 1/2 2P and 3/2 2P of Kr+ in intense ultraviolet femtosecond laser fields (λ ≈ 398 nm, τ ≈ 50 fs). As the laser intensity increases from 8 to 39 TW cm-2, the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) exhibits the anomalous enhancement in the direction perpendicular to the laser polarization. With the support of the time-dependent density functional theory taking account of the spin-orbit interaction, the measured anomalous PAD is ascribed to the autoionization to 3/2 2P.

  10. Numerical study of anomalous absorption of O mode waves on magnetic field-aligned striations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2015-04-01

    Simple expressions that describe mode conversion and anomalous absorption of ordinary (O) mode waves injected at angles between the vertical and magnetic zenith to upper hybrid (UH) oscillations in the presence of field-aligned density striations are presented. The absorption takes place in a region above the UH resonance layer where the striations allow trapped eigenmodes, leading to excitation of large-amplitude UH waves. The derivation of the expressions is guided by dimensional analysis and numerical simulations. The results are relevant in interpreting high-latitude heating experiments where anomalous absorption due to striations plays a crucial role.

  11. Improved steering of the RF field of traveling wave MR with a multimode, coaxial waveguide.

    PubMed

    Andreychenko, A; Kroeze, H; Boer, V O; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of humans at high magnetic field strengths is strongly influenced by the interference of the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field and the body. To minimize this effect, multiple RF sources could be used. A novel setup (called multimode, coaxial waveguide) is proposed that facilitates RF shimming based on the traveling waves. The multimode, coaxial waveguide combines the coaxial waveguide, cylindrical waveguide, high dielectric permittivity lining, and eight radial stub antennas. Each antenna excites multiple waveguide modes. Based on modes orthogonality, a method was devised to decompose an excitation pattern of single stub antenna into waveguide modes. The number of modes present in the excitation pattern of a single stub antenna increased with the higher effective permittivity of the dielectric lining. Thus, RF shimming performance of the setup was improved. An average homogeneity of 10% was demonstrated for a single slice of each principle plane in the human head at 7 T. Traveling wave RF shimming is feasible both in axial and longitudinal directions and is improved with an increased amount of orthogonal waveguide modes. Nevertheless, with the currently available RF amplifiers at 7 T, the performance of the setup is limited to low flip angles. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of free-field transfer functions in anomalous reverberant fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guo; He, Lin; Xu, Rongwu

    2017-01-01

    The structural-acoustic transfer functions of complex structures are often measured in anomalous reverberant environments. Aiming to eliminating the influences of these reverberant fields on structural-acoustic transfer functions, an impulse-based synchronization average evaluation method is proposed. Structures are actuated according to an impulse signal, and the response signals are synchronized in time and averaged in space. This method does not require complex data processing, and the free-field transfer functions can be obtained based on the measurements in reverberant fields and the transfer characteristics of the structures are preserved. Moreover, in combination with the principle of reciprocity, the proposed method does not require the installation of impulse actuators in structures. The proposed method is verified numerically and validated in a deep lake experiment using a cylindrical model. The results show that the structural-acoustic transfer functions in the profundal zone can be effectively evaluated using the data collected in the shallow zone, and the error is less than 3 dB at most frequencies.

  13. A study of the composition and energy spectra of anomalous cosmic rays using the geomagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mewaldt, R.A.; Cummings, J.R.; Leske, R.A.; Selesnick, R.S.; Stone, E.C.

    1996-03-15

    The authors use instrumentation on SAMPEX and the Earth`s field as a magnetic rigidity filter in a {open_quotes}double spectrometer{close_quotes} approach to measure the composition and energy spectra of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) with Z>6. A {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} sample of anomalous cosmic ray C, N, O, and Ne is obtained, with no significant evidence for other species. The bulk of ACRs are now known to be singly-charged, and the geomagnetic filter allows their energy spectra to be measured to higher energies than before. The anomalous oxygen spectrum is found to extend to at least {approx} 100 MeV/nuc, which has implications for models of the acceleration of these ions. 27 refs., 3 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Plasma injection and capture at electron cyclotron resonance in a mirror system with additional rf fields

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.D.; Karyaka, V.I.; Milant'ev, V.P.; Turikov, V.A.

    1980-03-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out to determine how cyclotron-resonance rf fields in an open magnetic mirror system affect the capture and confinement of a plasma injected along the axis. The results show that at electron cyclotron resonance the fields greatly improve the longitudinal plasma confinement.

  15. Impurity migration with RF sheath and ELMs perturbed electric field in tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bin; Xiao, Xiaotao; Tang, Tengfei; Xu, Xueqiao

    2016-10-01

    In radio frequency (RF) experiments, impurity generation and transport are important due to the phenomenon of RF enhanced impurity generation. In BOUT + + framework, the equilibrium radial electric field with RF sheath boundary condition on the limiter or the divertor surface is self-consistently calculated by using a two-field model. Based on this self-consistent calculation, it is found the positive radial electric field forms in the SOL region which qualitatively agrees with the experimental on the TEXTOR. The test particle module is developed in BOUT + + framework to simulate both turbulence and neoclassical physics in realistic geometry. Firstly, the drift orbit is calculated in cylinder coordinates due to singularity of x-point in flux coordinate. The turbulence transport of impurity generated from hot spot of RF limiter is simulated by random walk model. The numerical results show that less impurities will migrate into core and divertor region, more impurities migrate into nearby SOL boundary when turbulence transport enhanced. Then the effect of RF sheath potential on impurity migration will be simulated. Using the perturbed electric field from our BOUT + + nonlinear ELMs simulation, the transport of the impurities in different phase of ELMs are also discussed. USDOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. LH and ICRH RF electric field measurements using Doppler-free Saturation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. H.; Zafar, A.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Isler, R. C.; Bell, G. L.

    2016-10-01

    The physics mechanisms of wave heating and current drive processes in the bulk hot plasma are generally well identified, however, details of the wave-plasma interaction in the cold plasma edge are still not fully understood. To investigate the alluding physics non-perturbative diagnostics are required due to the large energy flux traversing the space associated with the corresponding RF antenna/launcher. A spectroscopic diagnostic, based on Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy, is currently under development at ORNL that will be capable of measuring RF electric fields with high precision (20 V/cm). The RF electric field is determined by systematically fitting a Balmer series spectral line profile obtained via DFSS using a previous validated non-perturbative quantum mechanically model. The spectral line profile is measured using Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy (DFSS). DFSS is a laser-based technique involving two counter-propagating beams, referred to as the pump and probe, which are made to overlap at a single point in space. The frequency of the laser is swept over that associated with the electronic transition of interest and the probe beam absorption intensity is measured. In this presentation an active spectroscopic technique allowing for measurements of the RF electric field driving wave-plasma interactions for lower hybrid (LH) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems, based on DFSS, will be discussed. Initial measurements of the electric field in the magnetized capacitively coupled RF sheath obtained on a laboratory test stand will be presented.

  17. Development of a patch antenna array RF coil for ultra-high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Manabu; Nakajima, Iwao; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nagai, Yuji; Obata, Takayuki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Ikehira, Hiroo

    2007-01-01

    In radiofrequency (RF) coil design for ultra-high-field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, short RF wavelengths present various challenges to creating a big volume coil. When imaging a human body using an ultra-high magnetic field MR imaging system (magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla or more), short wavelength may induce artifacts from dielectric effect and other factors. To overcome these problems, we developed a patch antenna array coil (PAAC), which is a coil configured as a combination of patch antennas. We prototyped this type of coil for 7T proton MR imaging, imaged a monkey brain, and confirmed the coil's utility as an RF coil for ultra-high-field MR imaging.

  18. Relationship between mobility factors (Rf) of two hydrophobic termiticides and selected field and artificial soil parameters.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-nan; Sun, Yang; Yang, Ting; Huangpu, Wei-guo

    2007-12-15

    Mobility of two commonly used hydrophobic termiticides, chlorpyrifos and fenvalerate, was carried out by soil thin layer chromatograph using 3 field soils and 7 artificial soil as absorbent phases. Mobility factors (R(f)) were measured, and single- and multi-variable linear regression equations were then established. The result indicated that chlorpyrifos removed faster than fenvalerate in both field and artificial soils. In field soils negative correlation coefficients (r) was found between R(f) and organic matter (OM) content, pH, cationic exchange capacity (CEC), and clay content. It was noticeable, however, that correlation coefficient (r) derived from single-variable equations were not a reliable criterion for evaluation of relative importance of individual soil parameter in R(f) determination. One could see, in multi-variable regression, a functional superposition of OM and CEC in pesticide/soil interaction, and the influence of soil pH was overwhelmed by joint action of the other 3 parameters. R(f) of the two hydrophobic termiticides could therefore be predicted with adequate accuracy by either of the combinations of the two parameter: 1) OM content and clay content, 2) CEC and clay content. Introducing field soil properties into equations established from artificial soils one could see that the four-variable equations, which toke sphagnum as the only source of CEC, gave better prediction of field soil R(f). In spite of that these equations were different in two points with those from field soils: Firstly the parameter of soil pH could not be deprived, and secondly, R(f) of chlorpyrifos was positively correlated with the level of clay content.

  19. Runaway electrons in a magnetized plasma in an rf electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Razdorskii, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    Runaway electrons may appear during electron-cyclotron heating of a plasma. In a constant magnetic field crossed with an rf electric field an effective acceleration of plasma electrons across the magnetic field takes place. When Coulomb collisions are taken into account, this acceleration gives rise to a stream of runaway electrons. The current in this stream is determined as a function of the amplitude of the electric field and the plasma parameters.

  20. An FEM approach for the characterization of the RF field homogeneity at high field.

    PubMed

    Guclu, C; Kashmar, G; Hacinliyan, A; Nalcioglu, O

    1997-01-01

    High field magnetic resonance offers new opportunities because of its high SNR and better spectral resolution for MRI and MRS. However, new problems also emerge at high field. As the field strength increases, the wavelength in the tissue becomes shorter and comparable with the body dimensions. This perturbs the field and also causes standing waves within the patient as a result of the impedance mismatching at the tissue interfaces. Due to the complexity of the boundary conditions and the solution of Maxwell's equations, an exact analytical calculation for a loaded RF resonator has not been possible. In this paper, we present a birdcage coil simulation study based on a 3D finite element method (FEM) model for the characterization of the field within the tissue. First, the accuracy of the FEM solutions is validated by the 2D analytical solutions at 64 and 223 MHz. In these solutions, the frequency dependence of the conductivity and permittivity is also taken into account. Then, a more realistic 3D model is studied. The results are compared with the experimental measurements. It is shown that the 3D model makes it possible to explore the effects of the end rings in the presence of a tissue sample inside the coil.

  1. Multipole and field uniformity tailoring of a 750 MHz rf dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean R.; Castillo, Alejandro

    2014-12-01

    In recent years great interest has been shown in developing rf structures for beam separation, correction of geometrical degradation on luminosity, and diagnostic applications in both lepton and hadron machines. The rf dipole being a very promising one among all of them. The rf dipole has been tested and proven to have attractive properties that include high shunt impedance, low and balance surface fields, absence of lower order modes and far-spaced higher order modes that simplify their damping scheme. As well as to be a compact and versatile design in a considerable range of frequencies, its fairly simple geometry dependency is suitable both for fabrication and surface treatment. The rf dipole geometry can also be optimized for lowering multipacting risk and multipole tailoring to meet machine specific field uniformity tolerances. In the present work a survey of field uniformities, and multipole contents for a set of 750 MHz rf dipole designs is presented as both a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the inherent flexibility of the structure and its limitations.

  2. Anomalous cross-field velocities in a CIV laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axnaes, Ingvar

    1988-10-01

    The axial and radial ion velocities and the electron radial velocity were determined in coaxial plasma gun operated under critical velocity conditions. The particle velocities were determined from probe measurements together with He I 3889 A absolute intensity measurements and the consideration of the total momentum balance of the current sheet. The ions were found to move axially and the electrons radially much faster than predicted by the Electrified/Magnetic Field (E/B) drift in the macroscopic fields. These results agree with what can be expected from the instability processes, which has earlier been proposed to operate in these experiments. It is therefore a direct experimental demonstration that instability processes have to be invoked not only for the electron heating, but also to explain the macroscopic velocities and currents.

  3. RF Power and Magnetic Field Modulation Experiments with Simple Mirror Geometry in the Central Cell of Hanbit Device

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.G.; Bak, J.G.; Jhang, H.G.; Kim, S.S.

    2005-01-15

    The radio frequency (RF) stabilization effects to investigate the characteristics of the interchange instability by RF power and magnetic field modulation experiments were performed near {omega}/{omega}{sub i} {approx} = 1 and with low beta ({approx} 0.1%) plasmas in the central cell of the Hanbit mirror device. Temporal behaviors of the interchange mode were measured and analyzed when the interchange mode was triggered by sudden changes of the RF power and magnetic field intensity.

  4. Anomalous transport theory for the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Hegna, C.C; Sovinec, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Physically motivated transport models with predictive capabilities and significance beyond the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. It is shown that the ambipolar constrained electron heat loss observed in MST can be quantitatively modeled by taking account of the clumping in parallel streaming electrons and the resultant self-consistent interaction with collective modes; that the discrete dynamo process is a relaxation oscillation whose dependence on the tearing instability and profile relaxation physics leads to amplitude and period scaling predictions consistent with experiment; that the Lundquist number scaling in relaxed plasmas driven by magnetic turbulence has a weak S{sup {minus}1/4} scaling; and that radial E{times}B shear flow can lead to large reductions in the edge particle flux with little change in the heat flux, as observed in the RFP and tokamak. 24 refs.

  5. Anomalous cross-field currents in a CIV laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axnäs, Ingvar

    The axial and radial ion velocities and the electron radial velocity are determined in coaxial plasma gun operated under critical velocity conditions. The particle velocities are determined from probe measurements together with He I 3889 Å absolute intensity measurements and the consideration of the total momentum balance of the current sheet. The ions are found to move axially and the electrons radially much faster than predicted by the E/B drift in the macroscopic fields. These results agree with what can be expected from the instability processes, which has earlier been proposed to operate in these experiments. The experiment is therefore a direct experimental demonstration that instability processes have to be invoked not only for the electron heating, but also to explain the macroscopic velocities and currents.

  6. Structured rf hydrogen plasma induced by magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnat, Edward V.

    2007-11-01

    Images of the spatial structure of a capacitively coupled hydrogen discharge are presented for various strengths of applied magnetic field. With increasing magnetic field, we find that not only does the distribution of emission change because of the confinement of the electrons by the magnetic field, but we also find 'dark-bands' regions that form in the discharge. By using narrowband interference filters (10 nm bandwidth), we examine how the relative optical emission centered on H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}} (with respect to the total optical emission) change with the applied magnetic field.

  7. Anomalous foreshock field-aligned beams observed by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, K.; Hamza, A. M.; Wilber, M.; Mazelle, C.; Lee, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    We report occasional observations of two simultaneously distinct ion foreshock components recorded by the Cluster spacecraft upstream of the Earth's bow shock. In most occurrences, the lower-energy population originates as a field-aligned beam (FAB) associated with quasi-perpendicular regions, which loses energy as the IMF rotates into oblique geometries. A second beam, with energies in excess of ~10 keV, appears sometimes in association with the onset of ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves, and sometimes ahead of the appearance of the latter. Measurements from the mass spectrometer indicate that both beams consist of protons. While the lower-speed beam is well-accounted for by a known reflection mechanism, the non-radial IMF orientations as well as other arguments seem to rule out magnetosheath or magnetospheric sources for the higher energy component. The wave characteristics are typical of the oblique foreshock and we have found that they are in cyclotron-resonance with the low speed beam (FAB). These observations constitute a theoretical challenge since conventional mechanisms described in the literature cannot account for the production of beams at two different energies.

  8. ALTERATIONS IN CALCIUM ION ACTIVITY BY ELF AND RF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Alterations in calcium ion activity by ELF and RF electromagnetic fields

    Introduction

    Calcium ions play many important roles in biological systems. For example, calcium ion activity can be used as an indicator of second-messenger signal-transduction processe...

  9. ALTERATIONS IN CALCIUM ION ACTIVITY BY ELF AND RF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Alterations in calcium ion activity by ELF and RF electromagnetic fields

    Introduction

    Calcium ions play many important roles in biological systems. For example, calcium ion activity can be used as an indicator of second-messenger signal-transduction processe...

  10. Electrodeless RF Plasma Propulsion by Rotating Magnetic Field Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Takerku; Takizawa, Kohei; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Shinohara, Shunjiro

    2016-10-01

    Electric propulsion scheme is promising in the field of the space propulsion because of high fuel efficiency and long operating time. However, this time is limited due to the loss of electrodes contacting with plasmas directly. In order to solve this problem, we have proposed electrodeless acceleration schemes, e.g., a rotating magnetic field (RMF) scheme. In this RMF scheme, we use two pairs of 5 turns RMF coils with AC currents, which have a 90 deg. phase difference. The rotating magnetic field induces azimuthal current j by a nonlinear effect. Then, plasma is accelerated by the axial Lorentz force using the product of j and the radial component of external magnetic field. We have investigated the effect of the RMF current frequency f, and 24% increase of ion velocity in the case of f = 3 MHz. We will present the experimental results, using lower f and gas pressure, and also discuss the penetration of RMF into the plasma.

  11. Character of the correlation between the geographic distribution of auroras and the anomalous geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtiarev, V. I.; Nadubovich, Iu. A.; Platonov, O. I.; Shumilova, N. A.; Mishurinskii, B. E.

    1987-06-01

    Photographic measurements obtained on Taimyr and in the Iakutsk region are used in a statistical correlation of the distributions of the relative occurrence probability of auroras along the auroral zone and the magnitude of the anomalous geomagnetic field (AGF). A negative correlation between the AGF and the geographic distribution of auroras is established. Using topside sounding data, the characteristic dimensions of ionospheric irregularities in the auroral zone are determined which coincide with the regional scale of aurora distribution.

  12. Final Technical Report- Back-gate Field Emission-based Cathode RF Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Gary; Martin, Allen; Noonan, John

    2010-10-30

    The objective was to complete the design of an electron gun which utilizes a radio frequency (RF) power source to apply a voltage to a field emission (FE) cathode, a so called cold cathode, in order to produce an electron beam. The concept of the RF electron gun was originally conceived at Argonne National Laboratory but never reduced to practice. The research allowed the completion of the design based upon the integration of the FE electron source. Compared to other electron guns, the RF gun is very compact, less than one third the size of other comparable guns, and produces a high energy (to several MeV), high quality, high power electron beam with a long focal length with high repetition rates. The resultant electron gun may be used in welding, materials processing, analytical equipment and waste treatment.

  13. Crossover from normal to anomalous diffusion in systems of field-aligned dipolar particles.

    PubMed

    Jordanovic, Jelena; Jäger, Sebastian; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2011-01-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the translational dynamics of particles with dipolar interactions in homogenous external fields. For a broad range of concentrations, we find that the anisotropic, yet normal diffusive behavior characterizing weakly coupled systems becomes anomalous both parallel and perpendicular to the field at sufficiently high dipolar coupling and field strength. After the ballistic regime, chain formation first yields cagelike motion in all directions, followed by transient, mixed diffusive-superdiffusive behavior resulting from cooperative motion of the chains. The enhanced dynamics disappears only at higher densities close to crystallization.

  14. OPEN CAVITY SOLUTIONS TO THE RF IN MAGNETIC FIELD PROBLEM.

    SciTech Connect

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.

    2007-08-06

    It has been observed [1] that breakdown in an 805 MHz pill-box cavity occurs at much lower gradients as an external axial magnetic field is increased. This effect was not observed with on open iris cavity. It is proposed that this effect depends on the relative angles of the magnetic and maximum electric fields: parallel in the pill-box case; at an angle in the open iris case. If so, using an open iris structure with solenoid coils in the irises should perform even better. A lattice, using this principle, is presented, for use in 6D cooling for a Muon Collider. Experimental layouts to test this principle are proposed.

  15. Open Cavity Solutions to the rf in Magnetic Field Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Robert B.; Berg, J. Scott; Fernow, Richard C.; Gallardo, Juan C.; Kirk, Harold G.

    2008-02-21

    It has been observed that breakdown in an 805 MHz pill-box cavity occurs at much lower gradients as an external axial magnetic field is increased. This effect was not observed with on open iris cavity. It is proposed that this effect depends on the relative angles of the magnetic and maximum electric fields: parallel in the pill-box case; at an angle in the open iris case. If so, using an open iris structure with solenoid coils in the irises should perform even better. A lattice, using this principle, is presented, for use in 6D cooling for a Muon Collider. Experimental layouts to test this principle are proposed.

  16. Generalization of susceptibility of RF systems through far-field pattern superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, B.; Debroux, P.

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to perform an analysis of RF (Radio Frequency) communication systems in a large electromagnetic environment to identify its susceptibility to jamming systems. We propose a new method that incorporates the use of reciprocity and superposition of the far-field radiation pattern of the RF system and the far-field radiation pattern of the jammer system. By using this method we can find the susceptibility pattern of RF systems with respect to the elevation and azimuth angles. A scenario was modeled with HFSS (High Frequency Structural Simulator) where the radiation pattern of the jammer was simulated as a cylindrical horn antenna. The RF jamming entry point used was a half-wave dipole inside a cavity with apertures that approximates a land-mobile vehicle, the dipole approximates a leaky coax cable. Because of the limitation of the simulation method, electrically large electromagnetic environments cannot be quickly simulated using HFSS's finite element method (FEM). Therefore, the combination of the transmit antenna radiation pattern (horn) superimposed onto the receive antenna pattern (dipole) was performed in MATLAB. A 2D or 3D susceptibility pattern is obtained with respect to the azimuth and elevation angles. In addition, by incorporating the jamming equation into this algorithm, the received jamming power as a function of distance at the RF receiver Pr(Φr, θr) can be calculated. The received power depends on antenna properties, propagation factor and system losses. Test cases include: a cavity with four apertures, a cavity above an infinite ground plane, and a land-mobile vehicle approximation. By using the proposed algorithm a susceptibility analysis of RF systems in electromagnetic environments can be performed.

  17. Evaluation of the dielectric constant for RF shimming at high field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayatilake, Mohan; Storrs, Judd; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2010-10-01

    Optimal image quality for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at high fields requires a homogeneous RF (B1) field; however, the dielectric properties of the human brain result in B1 field inhomogeneities and signal loss at the periphery of the head. These result from constructive and destructive RF interactions of complex wave behaviour, which become worse with increasing magnetic field strength. Placement of a shim object with high-dielectric constant adjacent to the body has been proposed as a method for reducing B1 inhomogeneity by altering wave propagation within the volume of interest. Selecting the appropriate permittivity and quantity of material for the shim is essential. Whereas previous work has determined the dielectric properties of the shim empirically, this work introduces an improved theoretical framework for determining the requisite dielectric constant of the passive shim material directly by increasing the axial or minimizing the radial propagation constant.

  18. Simulation of RF-fields in a fusion device

    SciTech Connect

    De Witte, Dieter; Bogaert, Ignace; De Zutter, Daniel; Van Oost, Guido; Van Eester, Dirk

    2009-11-26

    In this paper the problem of scattering off a fusion plasma is approached from the point of view of integral equations. Using the volume equivalence principle an integral equation is derived which describes the electromagnetic fields in a plasma. The equation is discretized with MoM using conforming basis functions. This reduces the problem to solving a dense matrix equation. This can be done iteratively. Each iteration can be sped up using FFTs.

  19. Vacuum current induced by an axial-vector condensate and electron anomalous magnetic moment in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnov, A. F.; Gubina, N. V.; Zhukovsky, V. Ch.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we consider vacuum polarization effects in the model of charged fermions with anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction term in a constant and uniform magnetic field. Nontrivial corrections to the effective Lagrangian from the anomalous moment and axial-vector term are calculated with account for various configurations of parameters of the model. An analogue of the chiral magnetic effect in the axial-vector background as well as a vacuum current induced under the combined action of the anomalous magnetic moment of fermions and the axial vector background in a magnetic field is also calculated.

  20. Microstrip RF surface coil design for extremely high-field MRI and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Ugurbil, K; Chen, W

    2001-09-01

    A new type of high-frequency RF surface coil was developed for in vivo proton or other nuclei NMR applications at 7T. This is a purely distributed-element and transmission line design. The coil consists of a thin strip conductor (copper or silver) and a ground plane separated by a low-loss dielectric material with a thickness (H). Due to its specific semi-open transmission line structure, substantial electromagnetic energy is stored in the dielectric material between the thin conductor and the ground plane, which results in a reduced radiation loss and a reduced perturbation of sample loading to the RF coil compared to conventional surface coils. The coil is characterized by a high Q factor, no RF shielding, small physical coil size, lower cost, and easy fabrication. A brief theoretical description of the microstrip RF coil is given that can be used to guide the coil designs. A set of gradient-recalled echo images were acquired by using the single- and two-turn microstrip RF surface coils from both phantom and human brain at 7T, which show good penetration and sensitivity. The two-turn coil design significantly improves the B1 symmetry as predicted by the microstrip theory. The optimum H for microstrip surface coils is approximately 7 mm. This coil geometry yields a B1 penetration similar to that of conventional surface coils. SNR comparison was made between the microstrip coil and conventional surface coils with and without RF shielding. The results reveal that the novel surface coil design based on the microstrip concept makes very high-field MRI/MRS more convenient and efficient in research and future clinics.

  1. Anomalous attenuation of ultrasound in ferrofluids under the influence of a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isler, W. E.; Chung, D. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation has been studied in a water-base ferrofluid by pulse-echo methods. A commercial box-car integrator was used to measure the change in attenuation due to an external magnetic field applied at various angles relative to the ultrasonic propagation vector. Anomalous results were obtained when the attenuation was plotted as a function of the magnetic field strength. As the field increased, the attenuation reached a maximum and then decreased to a flat minimum before it approached saturation at a field of 2 KG. This variation of attenuation with magnetic field cannot be explained from the simple picture derivable from the work of McTague on the viscosity of ferrofluids. In no case was the viscosity seen to decrease with field, nor was the oscillatory behavior observed. The results of this study were compared with the theory developed by Parsons.

  2. Anomalous attenuation of ultrasound in ferrofluids under the influence of a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isler, W. E.; Chung, D. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation has been studied in a water-base ferrofluid by pulse-echo methods. A commercial box-car integrator was used to measure the change in attenuation due to an external magnetic field applied at various angles relative to the ultrasonic propagation vector. Anomalous results were obtained when the attenuation was plotted as a function of the magnetic field strength. As the field increased, the attenuation reached a maximum and then decreased to a flat minimum before it approached saturation at a field of 2 KG. This variation of attenuation with magnetic field cannot be explained from the simple picture derivable from the work of McTague on the viscosity of ferrofluids. In no case was the viscosity seen to decrease with field, nor was the oscillatory behavior observed. The results of this study were compared with the theory developed by Parsons.

  3. On the Importance of Symmetrizing RF Coupler Fields for Low Emittance Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    The input power of accelerator structure is normally fed through a coupling slot(s) on the outer wall of the accelerator structure via magnetic coupling. While providing perfect matching, the coupling slots may produce non-axial-symmetric fields in the coupler cell that can induce emittance growth as the beam is accelerated in such a field. This effect is especially important for low emittance beams at low energies such as in the injector accelerators for light sources. In this paper, we present studies of multipole fields of different rf coupler designs and their effect on beam emittance for an X-band photocathode gun being jointly designed with LLNL, and X-band accelerator structures. We will present symmetrized rf coupler designs for these components to preserve the beam emittance.

  4. Simulations of Field-Emission Electron Beams from CNT Cathodes in RF Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Faillace, Luigi; Panuganti, Harsha; Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Piot, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Average field emission currents of up to 700 mA were produced by Carbon Nano Tube (CNT) cathodes in a 1.3 GHz RF gun at Fermilab High Brightness Electron Source Lab. (HBESL). The CNT cathodes were manufactured at Xintek and tested under DC conditions at RadiaBeam. The electron beam intensity as well as the other beam properties are directly related to the time-dependent electric field at the cathode and the geometry of the RF gun. This report focuses on simulations of the electron beam generated through field-emission and the results are compared with experimental measurements. These simulations were performed with the time-dependent Particle In Cell (PIC) code WARP.

  5. Theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic field inside an anomalous-dispersion microresonator under synthetical pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xu; Xiaohong, Hu; Ye, Feng; Yuanshan, Liu; Wei, Zhang; Zhi, Yang; Wei, Zhao; Yishan, Wang

    2016-03-01

    We study the spatiotemporal evolution of the electromagnetic field inside a microresonator showing an anomalous dispersion at the pump wavelength by using the normalized Lugiato-Lefever equation. Unlike the traditional single continuous wave (CW) pumping, an additional pump source consisting of periodical pulse train with variable repetition rate is adopted. The influences of the microresonator properties and the pump parameters on the field evolution and the electromagnetic field profile are analyzed. The simulation results indicate that, in the anomalous dispersion regime, both increases of the input pulse amplitude and the repetition frequency can result in the field profiles consisting of multiple peaks. A series of equidistant pulses can also be obtained by increasing the CW pump power. In addition, we find that a large physical detuning between the pump laser carrier and the cavity resonance frequency also causes the splitting of the inside field. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Instrumentation Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011YQ120022), CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams, China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61275164).

  6. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temeperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Struts shaping of the NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing structure. Reduction in the RF near-field exposure will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas. Both reductions of RF near-field exposure and antenna noise temperature were verified through measurements and agree very well with calculated results.

  7. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temeperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Struts shaping of the NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing structure. Reduction in the RF near-field exposure will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas. Both reductions of RF near-field exposure and antenna noise temperature were verified through measurements and agree very well with calculated results.

  8. Use of Exotic Coordinate Systems in the Design of RF Resonators for High-Field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Edward

    2008-10-01

    High field human MRI (11.7 Tesla is FDC approved for human research) renders standard RF coil design inadequate because the resonant wavelength in human soft tissue (about 8 cm at 500 MHz) is significantly smaller than the physical size of the human body. I propose optimizing the design of such RF coils using coordinate systems appropriate to human body parts, as has been done with ellipticalootnotetextCrozier et al, Concepts Magn Reson 1997; 9:195-210. and Cassinian ovalootnotetextDe Zanche et al, Magn Reson Med 2005; 53:201-211. cross sections. I have computed analytically the magnetic fields produced by a device of toroidal cross section using a cascade of conformal transformations.ootnotetextButterworth & Gore, J Magn Reson 2005; 175:114-123. Building upon these efforts, I will use the eleven coordinate systems of Moon & Spencer,ootnotetextMoon & Spencer, Field Theory Handbook, Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1971. along with other possible coordinate systems and conformal transformations, to identify a small number of configurations that have the highest probability of being useful as RF coil designs for ultrahigh-field MRI.

  9. RF interference suppression in a cardiac synchronization system operating in a high magnetic field NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Damji, A.A.; Snyder, R.E.; Ellinger, D.C.; Witkowski, F.X.; Allen, P.S.

    1988-11-01

    An electrocardiographic (ECG) unit suitable for cardiac-synchronized nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in high magnetic fields is presented. The unit includes lossy transmission lines as ECG leads in order to suppress radio frequency (RF) interference in the electrocardiogram. The unit's immunity to RF interference is demonstrated.

  10. Impact of device engineering on analog/RF performances of tunnel field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayvargiya, V.; Reniwal, B. S.; Singh, P.; Vishvakarma, S. K.

    2017-06-01

    The tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) and its analog/RF performance is being aggressively studied at device architecture level for low power SoC design. Therefore, in this paper we have investigated the influence of the gate-drain underlap (UL) and different dielectric materials for the spacer and gate oxide on DG-TFET (double gate TFET) and its analog/RF performance for low power applications. Here, it is found that the drive current behavior in DG-TFET with a UL feature while implementing dielectric material for the spacer is different in comparison to that of DG-FET. Further, hetero gate dielectric-based DG-TFET (HGDG-TFET) is more resistive against drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) as compared to DG-TFET with high-k (HK) gate dielectric. Along with that, as compared to DG-FET, this paper also analyses the attributes of UL and dielectric material on analog/RF performance of DG-TFET in terms of transconductance (gm ), transconductance generation factor (TGF), capacitance, intrinsic resistance (Rdcr), cut-off frequency (F T), and maximum oscillation frequency (F max). The LK spacer-based HGDG-TFET with a gate-drain UL has the potential to improve the RF performance of device.

  11. Tumor Selective Hyperthermia Induced by Short-Wave Capacitively-Coupled RF Electric-Fields

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Corr, Stuart J.; Palalon, Flavio; Curley, Steven A.; Koshkina, Nadezhda V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in developing high-intensity short wave capacitively-coupled radiofrequency (RF) electric-fields for nanoparticle-mediated tumor-targeted hyperthermia. However, the direct thermal effects of such high-intensity electric-fields (13.56 MHZ, 600 W) on normal and tumor tissues are not completely understood. In this study, we investigate the heating behavior and dielectric properties of normal mouse tissues and orthotopically-implanted human hepatocellular and pancreatic carcinoma xenografts. We note tumor-selective hyperthermia (relative to normal mouse tissues) in implanted xenografts that can be explained on the basis of differential dielectric properties. Furthermore, we demonstrate that repeated RF exposure of tumor-bearing mice can result in significant anti-tumor effects compared to control groups without detectable harm to normal mouse tissues. PMID:23861912

  12. Turbulent compressible fluid: Renormalization group analysis, scaling regimes, and anomalous scaling of advected scalar fields.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Gulitskiy, N M; Kostenko, M M; Lučivjanský, T

    2017-03-01

    We study a model of fully developed turbulence of a compressible fluid, based on the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation, by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group. In this approach, scaling properties are related to the fixed points of the renormalization group equations. Previous analysis of this model near the real-world space dimension 3 identified a scaling regime [N. V. Antonov et al., Theor. Math. Phys. 110, 305 (1997)TMPHAH0040-577910.1007/BF02630456]. The aim of the present paper is to explore the existence of additional regimes, which could not be found using the direct perturbative approach of the previous work, and to analyze the crossover between different regimes. It seems possible to determine them near the special value of space dimension 4 in the framework of double y and ɛ expansion, where y is the exponent associated with the random force and ɛ=4-d is the deviation from the space dimension 4. Our calculations show that there exists an additional fixed point that governs scaling behavior. Turbulent advection of a passive scalar (density) field by this velocity ensemble is considered as well. We demonstrate that various correlation functions of the scalar field exhibit anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified as scaling dimensions of certain composite fields, can be systematically calculated as a series in y and ɛ. All calculations are performed in the leading one-loop approximation.

  13. Turbulent compressible fluid: Renormalization group analysis, scaling regimes, and anomalous scaling of advected scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.; Kostenko, M. M.; Lučivjanský, T.

    2017-03-01

    We study a model of fully developed turbulence of a compressible fluid, based on the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation, by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group. In this approach, scaling properties are related to the fixed points of the renormalization group equations. Previous analysis of this model near the real-world space dimension 3 identified a scaling regime [N. V. Antonov et al., Theor. Math. Phys. 110, 305 (1997), 10.1007/BF02630456]. The aim of the present paper is to explore the existence of additional regimes, which could not be found using the direct perturbative approach of the previous work, and to analyze the crossover between different regimes. It seems possible to determine them near the special value of space dimension 4 in the framework of double y and ɛ expansion, where y is the exponent associated with the random force and ɛ =4 -d is the deviation from the space dimension 4. Our calculations show that there exists an additional fixed point that governs scaling behavior. Turbulent advection of a passive scalar (density) field by this velocity ensemble is considered as well. We demonstrate that various correlation functions of the scalar field exhibit anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified as scaling dimensions of certain composite fields, can be systematically calculated as a series in y and ɛ . All calculations are performed in the leading one-loop approximation.

  14. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF BCS RF SURFACE IMPEDANCE WITH MAGNETIC FIELD USING THE XIAO CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Charles E.; Xiao, Binping

    2013-09-01

    A recent new analysis of field-dependent BCS rf surface impedance based on moving Cooper pairs has been presented.[1] Using this analysis coded in Mathematica TM, survey calculations have been completed which examine the sensitivities of this surface impedance to variation of the BCS material parameters and temperature. The results present a refined description of the "best theoretical" performance available to potential applications with corresponding materials.

  15. Broadband radiation transport in an optically dense gas in the presence of an RF field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barantsev, K. A.; Litvinov, A. N.; Popov, E. N.

    2017-07-01

    The theory of transport of fluctuating double-frequency optical radiation in a gas of three-level atoms in the presence of rf radiation forming a closed excitation circuit has been generalized. The theory is based on the quantum kinetic equations for the atomic density matrix, which are solved together with the wave equations for classical electromagnetic fields. After averaging over the radiation fluctuation ensemble, a transition is made to equations for atomic-field correlation functions and transport equations for the spectral density of fields.

  16. Neutron stars including the effects of chaotic magnetic fields and anomalous magnetic moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fei; Wu, Chen; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2017-04-01

    The relativistic mean field (RMF) FSUGold model extended to include hyperons is employed to study the properties of neutron stars with strong magnetic fields. The chaotic magnetic field approximation is utilized. The effect of anomalous magnetic moments (AMMs) is also investigated. It is shown that the equation of state (EOS) of neutron star matter is stiffened by the presence of the magnetic field, which increases the maximum mass of a neutron star by around 6%. The AMMs only have a small influence on the EOS of neutron star matter, and increase the maximum mass of a neutron star by 0.02M sun. Neutral particles are spin polarized due to the presence of the AMMs. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11535004, 11375086, 11120101005, 11175085, 11235001), 973 National Major State Basic Research and Development of China (2013CB834400), and Science and Technology Development Fund of Macau (068/2011/A)

  17. Parallel transmission RF pulse design for eddy current correction at ultra high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hai; Zhao, Tiejun; Qian, Yongxian; Ibrahim, Tamer; Boada, Fernando

    2012-08-01

    Multidimensional spatially selective RF pulses have been used in MRI applications such as B1 and B0 inhomogeneities mitigation. However, the long pulse duration has limited their practical applications. Recently, theoretical and experimental studies have shown that parallel transmission can effectively shorten pulse duration without sacrificing the quality of the excitation pattern. Nonetheless, parallel transmission with accelerated pulses can be severely impeded by hardware and/or system imperfections. One of such imperfections is the effect of the eddy current field. In this paper, we first show the effects of the eddy current field on the excitation pattern and then report an RF pulse the design method to correct eddy current fields caused by the RF coil and the gradient system. Experimental results on a 7 T human eight-channel parallel transmit system show substantial improvements on excitation patterns with the use of eddy current correction. Moreover, the proposed model-based correction method not only demonstrates comparable excitation patterns as the trajectory measurement method, but also significantly improves time efficiency.

  18. Mitigation of B1+ inhomogeneity using spatially selective excitation with jointly designed quadratic spatial encoding magnetic fields and RF shimming.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Chu, Ying-Hua; Cloos, Martijn A; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2017-08-01

    The inhomogeneity of flip angle distribution is a major challenge impeding the application of high-field MRI. We report a method combining spatially selective excitation using generalized spatial encoding magnetic fields (SAGS) with radiofrequency (RF) shimming to achieve homogeneous excitation. This method can be an alternative approach to address the challenge of B1+ inhomogeneity using nonlinear gradients. We proposed a two-step algorithm that jointly optimizes the combination of nonlinear spatial encoding magnetic fields and the combination of multiple RF transmitter coils and then optimizes the locations, RF amplitudes, and phases of the spokes. Our results show that jointly designed SAGS and RF shimming can provide a more homogeneous flip angle distribution than using SAGS or RF shimming alone. Compared with RF shimming alone, our approach can reduce the relative standard deviation of flip angle by 56% and 52% using phantom and human head data, respectively. The jointly designed SAGS and RF shimming method can be used to achieve homogeneous flip angle distributions when fully parallel RF transmission is not available. Magn Reson Med 78:577-587, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. International policy and advisory response regarding children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF).

    PubMed

    Redmayne, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure regulations/guidelines generally only consider acute effects, and not chronic, low exposures. Concerns for children's exposure are warranted due to the amazingly rapid uptake of many wireless devices by increasingly younger children. This review of policy and advice regarding children's RF-EMF exposure draws material from a wide variety of sources focusing on the current situation. This is not a systematic review, but aims to provide a representative cross-section of policy and advisory responses within set boundaries. There are a wide variety of approaches which I have categorized and tabulated ranging from ICNIRP/IEEE guidelines and "no extra precautions needed" to precautionary or scientific much lower maxima and extensive advice to minimize RF-EMF exposure, ban advertising/sale to children, and add exposure information to packaging. Precautionary standards use what I term an exclusion principle. The wide range of policy approaches can be confusing for parents/carers of children. Some consensus among advisory organizations would be helpful acknowledging that, despite extensive research, the highly complex nature of both RF-EMF and the human body, and frequent technological updates, means simple assurance of long-term safety cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, minimum exposure of children to RF-EMF is recommended. This does not indicate need for alarm, but mirrors routine health-and-safety precautions. Simple steps are suggested. ICNIRP guidelines need to urgently publish how the head, torso, and limbs' exposure limits were calculated and what safety margin was applied since this exposure, especially to the abdomen, is now dominant in many children.

  20. Numerical investigations of MRI RF field induced heating for external fixation devices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radio frequency (RF) field induced heating on external fixation devices can be very high in the vicinity of device screws. Such induced RF heating is related to device constructs, device placements, as well as the device insertion depth into human subjects. In this study, computational modeling is performed to determine factors associated with such induced heating. Methods Numerical modeling, based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, is used to evaluate the temperature rises near external device screw tips inside the ASTM phantom for both 1.5-T and 3-T MRI systems. The modeling approach consists of 1) the development of RF coils for 1.5-T and 3-T, 2) the electromagnetic simulations of energy deposition near the screw tips of external fixation devices, and 3) the thermal simulations of temperature rises near the tips of these devices. Results It is found that changing insertion depth and screw spacing could largely affect the heating of these devices. In 1.5-T MRI system, smaller insertion depth and larger pin spacing will lead to higher temperature rise. However, for 3-T MRI system, the relation is not very clear when insertion depth is larger than 5 cm or when pin spacing became larger than 20 cm. The effect of connection bar material on device heating is also studied and the heating mechanism of the device is analysed. Conclusions Numerical simulation is used to study RF heating for external fixation devices in both 1.5-T and 3-T MRI coils. Typically, shallower insertion depth and larger pin spacing with conductive bar lead to higher RF heating. The heating mechanism is explained using induced current along the device and power decay inside ASTM phantom. PMID:23394173

  1. Period Clustering of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars and Magnetic Field Decay in Magnetars.

    PubMed

    Colpi; Geppert; Page

    2000-01-20

    We confront theoretical models for the rotational, magnetic, and thermal evolution of an ultramagnetized neutron star, or magnetar, with available data on the anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). We argue that, if the AXPs are interpreted as magnetars, their clustering of spin periods between 6 and 12 s (observed at present in this class of objects), their period derivatives, their thermal X-ray luminosities, and the association of two of them with young supernova remnants can only be understood globally if the magnetic field in magnetars decays significantly on a timescale of the order of 104 yr.

  2. A transmit-only/receive-only (TORO) RF system for high-field MRI/MRS applications.

    PubMed

    Barberi, E A; Gati, J S; Rutt, B K; Menon, R S

    2000-02-01

    The design and operation of a detunable shielded hybrid birdcage RF head coil optimized for human brain imaging at 170 MHz is presented. A high duty-cycle and rapid-switching decoupling scheme that allows uniform RF transmission with the head coil and reception with a surface coil within the volume of the head coil is also demonstrated. In addition, the circumscribing hybrid coil can be biased to operate as a conventional transmit/receive head coil. Our RF design allows the use of higher sensitivity surface coils or phased-array coils at very high magnetic fields where body RF resonators are not currently available or whose use is precluded by specific-absorption ratio restrictions. The design also allows the use of receive-only coils within head gradient inserts, which normally do not allow transmission with an RF body resonator at any field strength.

  3. The pattern of anomalous geomagnetic variation fields over the midcontinent gravity high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prugger, Arnfinn F.; Woods, Dennis V.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetometer array data, collected by H. Porath and co-workers from the University of Texas at Dallas in the midwest United States during the fall of 1969, have been reanalyzed to further define the nature of the reported geomagnetic variation anomaly in the region of the midcontinent gravity high. Variation events with a wide range of horizontal source field polarization and frequency have been digitized from the original film records. These data have been used in a vertical-field response arrow (induction vector) analysis. The results indicate that there is no significant overall conductivity anomaly associated with the geologic structure causing the gravity feature. Rather, the pattern of anomalous variation fields is one of isolated anomalies at high frequency. These anomalies are coincident with postulated fault structures perpendicular to the gravity high lineament and with localized regions of high heat flow.

  4. RF skin-depth measurement of UIrGe in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nasreen, Farzana; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Harrison, Neil; Kothapalli, Karunakar; Nakotte, Heinz; Bruck, Ekkehard

    2010-01-01

    UIrGe crystallizes in the orthorhombic TiNiSi structure and it orders anti ferromagnetically at low temperatures. Previous magnetoresistance and magnetization studies had revealed multiple metamagnetic transitions between {approx}12 T and {approx}19T. Our present studies show that RF skin depth measurement offers an alternative magnetotransport probe. A proximity detector oscillator (PDO) is used to perform the contact less RF skin-depth measurements of UIrGe in pulsed magnetic fields up to 47 T in temperature range 0.57-12 K. The frequency and amplitude shifts reflect the changes in both the real and imaginary components of the conductivity. Our results confirm that the measured frequency shifts can be related to the magnetoresistance effects.

  5. Investigation of Fully Three-Dimensional Helical RF Field Effects on TWT Beam/Circuit Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2000-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, helical traveling wave-tube (TWT) interaction model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA. The model includes a short section of helical slow-wave circuit with excitation fed by RF input/output couplers, and electron beam contained by periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing. All components of the model are simulated in three dimensions allowing the effects of the fully 3D helical fields on RF circuit/beam interaction to be investigated for the first time. The development of the interaction model is presented, and predicted TWT performance using 2.5D and 3D models is compared to investigate the effect of conventional approximations used in TWT analyses.

  6. A time-harmonic target-field method for designing unshielded RF coils in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    While, Peter T.; Forbes, Larry K.; Crozier, Stuart

    2005-04-01

    Time-harmonic methods are required in the accurate design of RF coils as operating frequency increases. This paper presents such a method to find a current density solution on the coil that will induce some desired magnetic field upon an asymmetrically located target region within. This inverse method appropriately considers the geometry of the coil via a Fourier series expansion, and incorporates some new regularization penalty functions in the solution process. A new technique is introduced by which the complex, time-dependent current density solution is approximated by a static coil winding pattern. Several winding pattern solutions are given, with more complex winding patterns corresponding to more desirable induced magnetic fields.

  7. Measuring electromagnetic properties of superconductors in high and localized rf magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Tamin

    Niobium-based Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) particle accelerator cavity performance is sensitive to localized defects that give rise to quenches at high accelerating gradients. In order to identify these material defects on bulk Nb surfaces at their operating frequency and temperature, it is important to develop a new kind of wide bandwidth microwave microscopy with localized and strong RF magnetic fields. A novel near-field magnetic field microwave microscope that enables mapping of the local electrodynamic response in the multi-GHz frequency regime at liquid helium cryogenic temperatures was successful built via the combination of a magnetic writer and a near field-microwave microscope [1] [2]. This magnetic writer can create a localized and strong RF magnetic field and should achieve a condition with Bsurface ~150 mT and sub-micron resolution (Chapter 3). Our objective is to study the extreme and local electrodynamic properties of Niobium (Nb), and to relate these properties to specific defects that limit the ultimate RF performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities made from Nb. Therefore, in this dissertation, many superconducting materials, especially the candidate materials for superconducting RF cavities, were tested at a fixed location to analyze the local electrodynamic response through linear and nonlinear microwave measurements. For the linear measurement (Chapter 4), many fundamental properties of RF superconductivity such as the critical temperature Tc and penetration depth lambda can be identified. For the nonlinear response measurement (Chapter 5), both the intrinsic and extrinsic nonlinearities from the superconductors are excited by our magnetic write head probe. Many models are introduced to identify the measured nonlinearity, including the intrinsic nonlinearity from the modulation of the superconducting order parameter near Tc, and the extrinsic nonlinearity from the moving vortex model, weak-link Josephson effect, and the

  8. Anomalous degradation of low-field mobility in short-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, Kenji; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kakushima, Kuniyuki

    2015-12-01

    The anomalous degradation of the low-field mobility observed in short-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors is analyzed by collating various reported data in experiments and simulations. It is inferred that the degradation is not caused by the channel scattering of the carriers. The origin is proposed to be the backscattering of channel carriers on injection into the drain. The expression of the low-field mobility, including the backscattering effect, is derived. The inverse of the low-field mobility is a linear function of the inverse of channel length, the expression of which reproduces that empirically derived by Bidal's group. By fitting the expression to simulated as well as experimental data, we can estimate the value of parameters related to the channel scattering and also to the backscattering from the drain. We find that these values are in reasonable magnitude.

  9. Anomalous resistivity at the field null of the FRC: a quasi-linear expression based upon flute-type modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gerwin, R.

    1983-10-01

    In the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch (FRC) experiment, the poloidal flux is observed to be lost at a rate several times greater than classical resistivity would allow. Thus, there must be anomalous resistivity at the field null. Assuming that an electromagnetic microinstability of the flute mode type is responsible for this, we derived a general expression for the anomalous resistivity at the field null based upon a quasi-linear model of the microturbulence. This general expression does not depend upon the details of the ion-species model, for example, whether the ions are fluid or kinetic.

  10. Anomalous magnetic field of the sun at the beginning of cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, I. V.; Kotov, S. V.; Kotov, V. A.

    2001-10-01

    Measurements of the mean magnetic field (MMF) of the Sun from 1968-1999 showed that (1) the Sun's magnetic field has a predominance of S-polarity, (2) it changes with periods 1.04, 1.60 and 23 yr, (3) the yearly-mean index of MMF energy reached the peak value in 1991, and after that (4) a significant decrease of MMF was observed. It is supposed that (a) the magnetic asymmetry of the Sun is a fundamental property of solar magnetism, (b) there are near-resonances between the MMF and orbital motions of Mercury, Venus and Earth which arose at early stages of formation of the Solar system, and (c) cycle 23 will display an anomalously low magnetic and sunspot activity.

  11. Anomalous diffusion across the magnetic field-plasma boundary - The Porcupine artificial plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Kapitanov, V. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.

    1986-09-01

    Very fast magnetic field diffusion into the beam is required for observation of the nearly undisturbed penetration of the Porcupine's dense, fast and heavy ion beam into the magnetized ionospheric plasma after termination of the short adiabatic phase. The diffusion is presently attributed to a transverse electron drift current-driven electrostatic instability that is excited by the diamagnetic current flowing in the boundary layer between the injected beam and the ambient field. The anomalous collision frequencies turn out to be of the order of the local lower hybrid frequency in the dense Xe plasma. Since only a very small fraction of beam energy is dissipated in the diffusion process, no significant deceleration of the ion beam is observable.

  12. Zero-field Dissipationless Chiral Edge Current in Quantum Anomalous Hall State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Zhao, Weiwei; Kim, Duk Y.; Wei, Peng; Jain, J. K.; Liu, Chaoxing; Chan, Moses H. W.; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is predicted to possess, at zero magnetic field, chiral edge channels that conduct spin polarized current without dissipation, and thus holds great promise for future high-performance information processing. In this talk, we will discuss our transport experiments that probe the QAH state with gate bias and temperature dependences, by local and nonlocal magnetoresistance measurements. This allows us to unambiguously distinguish the dissipationless edge transport from transport via other dissipative channels in the QAH system. Our experiments confirm a fundamental feature of the QAH state, namely the dissipationless transport by edge channels in zero applied fields, which will be crucial for future chiral interconnected electric and spintronic applications. This research is supported by the NSF Grants (DMR-1420620, Penn State MRSEC; in MIT by DMR-1207469 and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF Grant DMR-1231319) and by ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0301.

  13. Brownian Motion in a Speckle Light Field: Tunable Anomalous Diffusion and Selective Optical Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Giorgio; Volpe, Giovanni; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The motion of particles in random potentials occurs in several natural phenomena ranging from the mobility of organelles within a biological cell to the diffusion of stars within a galaxy. A Brownian particle moving in the random optical potential associated to a speckle pattern, i.e., a complex interference pattern generated by the scattering of coherent light by a random medium, provides an ideal model system to study such phenomena. Here, we derive a theory for the motion of a Brownian particle in a speckle field and, in particular, we identify its universal characteristic timescale. Based on this theoretical insight, we show how speckle light fields can be used to control the anomalous diffusion of a Brownian particle and to perform some basic optical manipulation tasks such as guiding and sorting. Our results might broaden the perspectives of optical manipulation for real-life applications. PMID:24496461

  14. Study of thermionic RF-gun phase-space dynamics and slice emittance under influence of external electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2011-07-01

    A high brightness electron source of ultra-small emittance and high-average current is one of the most important components for future accelerators. In a RF-electron-gun, rapid acceleration can reduce emittance growth due to space charge effects. However, twisting or rotation of the transverse phase-space distribution as a function of time is observed in thermionic RF-electron-guns and may set a lower limit to the projected beam emittance. Such rotation being caused by the variation of the RF field with time may be compensated by fields from a specific cavity. In this work, we study RF-electron-gun phase-space dynamics and emittance under the influence of external fields to evaluate the compensation schemes.

  15. Micro-instabilities and anomalous transport effects in collisionless guide field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio Alejandro; Büchner, Jörg; Kilian, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    It is often the case that magnetic reconnection takes place in collisionless plasmas with a current aligned guide magnetic field, such as in the Solar corona. The general characteristics of this process have been exhaustively analyzed with theory and numerical simulations, under different approximations, since some time ago. However, some consequences and properties of the secondary instabilities arising spontaneously -other than tearing instability-, and their dependence on the guide field strength, have not been completely understood yet. For this sake, we use the results of fully kinetic 2D PIC numerical simulations of guide field reconnection. By using a mean field approach for the Generalized Ohm's law that explains the balance of the reconnected electric field, we find that some of the cross-streaming and gradient driven instabilities -in the guide field case- produce an additional anomalous transport term. The latter can be interpreted as a result of the enhanced correlated electromagnetic fluctuations, leading to a slow down of the current carriers and kinetic scale turbulence. We characterize these processes on dependence on the guide field strength, and explore the causal relation with the source of free energy driving the mentioned instabilities. Finally, we show the main consequences that a fully 3D approach have on all those phenomena in contrast to the reduced 2D description.

  16. Hypersensitivity to RF fields emitted from CDMA cellular phones: a provocation study.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Chang; Lee, Ju Hyung; Noh, Hyung Wook; Cha, Eun Jong; Kim, Nam Hyun; Kim, Deok Won

    2009-12-01

    With the number of cellular phone users rapidly increasing, there is a considerable amount of public concern regarding the effects that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from cellular phones have on health. People with self-attributed electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) complain of subjective symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, and memory loss, and attribute these symptoms to radio frequency (RF) radiation from cellular phones and/or base stations. However, EHS is difficult to diagnose because it relies on a person's subjective judgment. Various provocation studies have been conducted on EHS caused by Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) phones in which heart rate and blood pressure or subjective symptoms were investigated. However, there have been few sham-controlled provocation studies on EHS with Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) phones where physiological parameters, subjective symptoms, and perception of RF radiation for EHS and non-EHS groups were simultaneously investigated. In this study, two volunteer groups of 18 self-reported EHS and 19 non-EHS persons were tested for both sham and real RF exposure from CDMA cellular phones with a 300 mW maximum exposure that lasted half an hour. We investigated not only the physiological parameters such as heart rate, respiration rate, and heart rate variability (HRV), but also various subjective symptoms and the perception of EMF. In conclusion, RF exposure did not have any effects on physiological parameters or subjective symptoms in either group. As for EMF perception, there was no evidence that the EHS group better perceived EMF than the non-EHS group.

  17. Imaging electric properties of biological tissues by RF field mapping in MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2010-02-01

    The electric properties (EPs) of biological tissue, i.e., the electric conductivity and permittivity, can provide important information in the diagnosis of various diseases. The EPs also play an important role in specific absorption rate calculation, a major concern in high-field MRI, as well as in nonmedical areas such as wireless telecommunications. The high-field MRI system is accompanied by significant wave propagation effects, and the RF radiation is dependent on the EPs of biological tissue. On the basis of the measurement of the active transverse magnetic component of the applied RF field (known as B(1)-mapping technique), we propose a dual-excitation algorithm, which uses two sets of measured B(1) data to noninvasively reconstruct the EPs of biological tissues. The finite-element method was utilized in 3-D modeling and B(1) field calculation. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed method on a 3-D head model within a TEM coil and a birdcage coil. Using a TEM coil, when noise free, the reconstructed EP distribution of tissues in the brain has relative errors of 12%-28% and correlated coefficients of greater than 0.91. Compared with other B(1)-mapping-based reconstruction algorithms, our approach provides superior performance without the need for iterative computations. The present simulation results suggest that good reconstruction of EPs from B1 mapping can be achieved.

  18. Photosensing Resolution of Wireless Communication Chip in Inhomogeneous RF-Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Takehiko; Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Tase, Takashi; Kamahori, Masao; Watanabe, Kazuki; Oonishi, Tadashi

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a wireless biosensing system for bioluminescence measurements that includes a sensor chip with a volume of 2.5 × 2.5 × 0.5 mm3 and a read/write (R/W) coil. This sensor chip monolithically integrates a photosensor for detecting bioluminescence, a control circuit, and a coil for communication. In order to operate the sensor chip in a sample solution, we employed an RF magnetic field for the transmission of data and electric power between the chip and the R/W unit. The magnitude of the field around the chip changes significantly with the positional relationship between the sensor chip and the R/W coil. Therefore, evaluating the stability of the sensor chip operation, especially the resolution of signal processing, is important. In our system, a resolution of ± 30 μV was achieved in an inhomogeneous field ranging from 160 to 379 A/m. We also quantified the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by measuring bioluminescence to demonstrate the stability of the sensing operation. Although the RF magnetic field fluctuated in the reaction cell where the sensor chip was located, an almost linear relationship between the ATP amount and the sensor response was obtained.

  19. Anomalous dielectric relaxation with linear reaction dynamics in space-dependent force fields.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Tang, Zhengming; Zhu, Huacheng

    2016-12-28

    The anomalous dielectric relaxation of disordered reaction with linear reaction dynamics is studied via the continuous time random walk model in the presence of space-dependent electric field. Two kinds of modified reaction-subdiffusion equations are derived for different linear reaction processes by the master equation, including the instantaneous annihilation reaction and the noninstantaneous annihilation reaction. If a constant proportion of walkers is added or removed instantaneously at the end of each step, there will be a modified reaction-subdiffusion equation with a fractional order temporal derivative operating on both the standard diffusion term and a linear reaction kinetics term. If the walkers are added or removed at a constant per capita rate during the waiting time between steps, there will be a standard linear reaction kinetics term but a fractional order temporal derivative operating on an anomalous diffusion term. The dielectric polarization is analyzed based on the Legendre polynomials and the dielectric properties of both reactions can be expressed by the effective rotational diffusion function and component concentration function, which is similar to the standard reaction-diffusion process. The results show that the effective permittivity can be used to describe the dielectric properties in these reactions if the chemical reaction time is much longer than the relaxation time.

  20. Anomalous dielectric relaxation with linear reaction dynamics in space-dependent force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao; Tang, Zhengming; Zhu, Huacheng

    2016-12-01

    The anomalous dielectric relaxation of disordered reaction with linear reaction dynamics is studied via the continuous time random walk model in the presence of space-dependent electric field. Two kinds of modified reaction-subdiffusion equations are derived for different linear reaction processes by the master equation, including the instantaneous annihilation reaction and the noninstantaneous annihilation reaction. If a constant proportion of walkers is added or removed instantaneously at the end of each step, there will be a modified reaction-subdiffusion equation with a fractional order temporal derivative operating on both the standard diffusion term and a linear reaction kinetics term. If the walkers are added or removed at a constant per capita rate during the waiting time between steps, there will be a standard linear reaction kinetics term but a fractional order temporal derivative operating on an anomalous diffusion term. The dielectric polarization is analyzed based on the Legendre polynomials and the dielectric properties of both reactions can be expressed by the effective rotational diffusion function and component concentration function, which is similar to the standard reaction-diffusion process. The results show that the effective permittivity can be used to describe the dielectric properties in these reactions if the chemical reaction time is much longer than the relaxation time.

  1. Measurement of RF electric field in high- β plasma using a Pockels detector in magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushiake, Toshiki; Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1 generates a dipole magnetic field that can confine high- β plasma by using a levitated superconducting coil. So far it is reported that high temperature electrons (up to 50keV) exist and that the local electron βe value exceeds more than 100%. However, the ion β value βi remains low in the present high- β state. To realize a high-βi state, we have started Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) experiments. For efficient ICH in a dipole topology, it is important to measure RF electric fields and characterize the propagation of RF waves in plasmas. On this viewpoint, we started direct measurement of local RF electric fields in RT-1 with a Pockels sensor system. A non-linear optical crystal in the Pockels sensor produces birefringence in an ambient electric field. The refractive index change of the birefringence is proportional to the applied electric field strength, which can be used to measure local electric fields. RF electric field distribution radiated from an ICH antenna was measured inside RT-1 in air, and was compared with numerical results calculated by TASK code. Results on the measurement of electric field distribution in high- β plasma and evaluation of the absorbed RF power into ions will be reported. Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 23224014.

  2. Effective field theory of an anomalous Hall metal from interband quantum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Victor; Assawasunthonnet, Wathid; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    We construct an effective field theory, a two-dimensional two-component metallic system described by a model with two Fermi surfaces ("pockets"). This model describes a translationally invariant metallic system with two types of fermions, each with its own Fermi surface, with forward scattering interactions. This model, in addition to the O (2 ) rotational invariance, has a U (1 )×U (1 ) symmetry of separate charge conservation for each Fermi surface. For sufficiently attractive interactions in the d -wave (quadrupolar) channel, this model has an interesting phase diagram that includes a spontaneously generated anomalous Hall metal phase. We derive the Landau-Ginzburg effective action of quadrupolar order parameter fields which enjoys an O (2 )×U (1 ) global symmetry associated to spatial isotropy and the internal U (1 ) relative phase symmetries, respectively. We show that the order parameter theory is dynamically local with a dynamical scaling of z =2 and perform a one-loop renormalization group analysis of the Landau-Ginzburg theory. The electronic liquid crystal phases that result from spontaneous symmetry breaking are studied and we show the presence of Landau damped Nambu-Goldstone modes at low momenta that is a signature of non-Fermi-liquid behavior. Electromagnetic linear response is also analyzed in both the normal and symmetry broken phases from the point of view of the order parameter theory. The nature of the coupling of electromagnetism to the order parameter fields in the normal phase is non-minimal and decidedly contains a precursor to the anomalous Hall response in the form of a order-parameter-dependent Chern-Simons term in the effective action.

  3. Evaluation of Common RF Coil Setups for MR Imaging at Ultrahigh Magnetic Field: A Numerical Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jonathan; Pang, Yong; Wang, Chunsheng; Wu, Bing; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2011-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of the ratio of electric field to magnetic field (E/B1), specific absorption rate (SAR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) generated by three different RF transceiver coil setups: surface coil, surface coil with shielding, and microstrip using a finite discrete time domain (FDTD) simulation in the presence of a head phantom. One of our main focuses in this study is to better understand coil designs that would improve patient safety at high fields by studying a coil type that may potentially minimize SAR while examining potential changes in SNR. In the presence of a human head load, the microstrip's E/B1 ratio was on average smallest while its SAR was also on average smallest of the three setups, suggesting the microstrip may be a better RF coil choice for MRI concerning patient safety and parallel excitation applications than the other two coils. In addition, the study suggests that the microstrip also has a higher SNR compared with the other two coils demonstrating the possibility that the microstrip could lead to higher quality MRI images.

  4. Evaluation of Common RF Coil Setups for MR Imaging at Ultrahigh Magnetic Field: A Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jonathan; Pang, Yong; Wang, Chunsheng; Wu, Bing; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2017-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of the ratio of electric field to magnetic field (E/B1), specific absorption rate (SAR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) generated by three different RF transceiver coil setups: surface coil, surface coil with shielding, and microstrip using a finite discrete time domain (FDTD) simulation in the presence of a head phantom. One of our main focuses in this study is to better understand coil designs that would improve patient safety at high fields by studying a coil type that may potentially minimize SAR while examining potential changes in SNR. In the presence of a human head load, the microstrip's E/B1 ratio was on average smallest while its SAR was also on average smallest of the three setups, suggesting the microstrip may be a better RF coil choice for MRI concerning patient safety and parallel excitation applications than the other two coils. In addition, the study suggests that the microstrip also has a higher SNR compared with the other two coils demonstrating the possibility that the microstrip could lead to higher quality MRI images. PMID:28966929

  5. A simplified HTc rf SQUID to analyze the human cardiac magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chen E-mail: tfk616@sina.com E-mail: zizhaogan@pku.edu.cn; Tang, Fakuan E-mail: tfk616@sina.com E-mail: zizhaogan@pku.edu.cn; Ma, Ping E-mail: tfk616@sina.com E-mail: zizhaogan@pku.edu.cn; Gan, Zizhao E-mail: tfk616@sina.com E-mail: zizhaogan@pku.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    We have developed a four-channel high temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HT{sub c} rf SQUID) in a simple magnetically shielded room (MSR) that can be used to analyze the cardiac magnetic field. It is more robust and compact than existing systems. To achieve the high-quality magnetocardiographic signal, we explored new adaptive software gradiometry technology constructed by the first-order axial gradiometer with a baseline of 80mm, which can adjust its performance timely with the surrounding conditions. The magnetic field sensitivity of each channel was less than 100fT/√Hz in the white noise region. Especially, in the analysis of MCG signal data, we proposed the total transient mapping (TTM) technique to visualize current density map (CDM), then we focused to observe the time-varying behavior of excitation propagation and estimated the underlying currents at T wave. According to the clear 3D imaging, isomagnetic field and CDM, the position and distribution of a current source in the heart can be visualized. It is believed that our four-channel HT{sub c} rf SQUID magnetometer based on biomagnetic system is available to detect MCG signals with sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. In addition, the CDM showed the macroscopic current activation pattern, in a way, it has established strong underpinnings for researching the cardiac microscopic movement mechanism and opening the way for its use in clinical diagnosis.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Human Sample Effect on RF Penetration and Liver MR Imaging at Ultrahigh Field.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Wu, Bing; Wang, Chunsheng; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide clinically-valuable images for hepatic diseases and has become one of the most promising noninvasive methods in evaluating liver lesions. To facilitate the ultrahigh field human liver MRI, in this work, the RF penetration behavior in the conductive and high dielectric human body at the ultrahigh field of 7 Tesla (7T) is investigated and evaluated using the finite-difference time-domain numerical analysis. The study shows that in brain imaging at the ultrahigh field of 7T, the "dielectric resonance" effect dominates among other factors, resulting in improved B(1) penetration; while in liver imaging, due to its irregular geometry of the liver, the "dielectric resonance" effect is not readily to be established, leading to a reduced B(1) penetration or limited image coverage comparing to that in the brain. Therefore, it is necessary to build a large size coil to have deeper penetration to image human liver although the coil design may become more challenging due to the required high frequency. Based on this study, a bisected microstrip coil operating at 300 MHz range is designed and constructed. Three-dimensional in vivo liver images in axial, sagittal and coronal orientations are then acquired from healthy volunteers using this dedicated RF coil on a 7T whole body MR scanner.

  7. A simplified HTc rf SQUID to analyze the human cardiac magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Tang, Fakuan; Ma, Ping; Gan, Zizhao

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a four-channel high temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HTc rf SQUID) in a simple magnetically shielded room (MSR) that can be used to analyze the cardiac magnetic field. It is more robust and compact than existing systems. To achieve the high-quality magnetocardiographic signal, we explored new adaptive software gradiometry technology constructed by the first-order axial gradiometer with a baseline of 80mm, which can adjust its performance timely with the surrounding conditions. The magnetic field sensitivity of each channel was less than 100fT/√Hz in the white noise region. Especially, in the analysis of MCG signal data, we proposed the total transient mapping (TTM) technique to visualize current density map (CDM), then we focused to observe the time-varying behavior of excitation propagation and estimated the underlying currents at T wave. According to the clear 3D imaging, isomagnetic field and CDM, the position and distribution of a current source in the heart can be visualized. It is believed that our four-channel HTc rf SQUID magnetometer based on biomagnetic system is available to detect MCG signals with sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. In addition, the CDM showed the macroscopic current activation pattern, in a way, it has established strong underpinnings for researching the cardiac microscopic movement mechanism and opening the way for its use in clinical diagnosis.

  8. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Strut shaping of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing antenna. Reduction in the RF near-field level will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Measured antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas.

  9. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Strut shaping of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing antenna. Reduction in the RF near-field level will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Measured antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas.

  10. Anomalous transport in fluid field with random waiting time depending on the preceding jump length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Guo-Hua

    2016-11-01

    Anomalous (or non-Fickian) transport behaviors of particles have been widely observed in complex porous media. To capture the energy-dependent characteristics of non-Fickian transport of a particle in flow fields, in the present paper a generalized continuous time random walk model whose waiting time probability distribution depends on the preceding jump length is introduced, and the corresponding master equation in Fourier-Laplace space for the distribution of particles is derived. As examples, two generalized advection-dispersion equations for Gaussian distribution and lévy flight with the probability density function of waiting time being quadratic dependent on the preceding jump length are obtained by applying the derived master equation. Project supported by the Foundation for Young Key Teachers of Chengdu University of Technology, China (Grant No. KYGG201414) and the Opening Foundation of Geomathematics Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, China (Grant No. scsxdz2013009).

  11. Acoustic pressure waves induced in human heads by RF pulses from high-field MRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Lin, James C; Wang, Zhangwei

    2010-04-01

    The current evolution toward greater image resolution from magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanners has prompted the exploration of higher strength magnetic fields and use of higher levels of radio frequencies (RFs). Auditory perception of RF pulses by humans has been reported during MRI with head coils. It has shown that the mechanism of interaction for the auditory effect is caused by an RF pulse-induced thermoelastic pressure wave inside the head. We report a computational study of the intensity and frequency of thermoelastic pressure waves generated by RF pulses in the human head inside high-field MRI and clinical scanners. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) guides limit the local specific absorption rate (SAR) in the body-including the head-to 8 W kg(-1). We present results as functions of SAR and show that for a given SAR the peak acoustic pressures generated in the anatomic head model were essentially the same at 64, 300, and 400 MHz (1.5, 7.0, and 9.4 T). Pressures generated in the anatomic head are comparable to the threshold pressure of 20 mPa for sound perception by humans at the cochlea for 4 W kg(-1). Moreover, results indicate that the peak acoustic pressure in the brain is only 2 to 3 times the auditory threshold at the U.S. FDA guideline of 8 W kg(-1). Even at a high SAR of 20 W kg(-1), where the acoustic pressure in the brain could be more than 7 times the auditory threshold, the sound pressure levels would not be more than 17 db above threshold of perception at the cochlea.

  12. Effect of low-frequency ambient magnetic fields on the control unit and RF head of a commercial SQUID magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The control unit and RF head of the SHE model 330XRFSQUID system are shown to be sensitive to ambient ac magnetic fields below 1 HZ, which cause the appearance of false signals corresponding to a magnetometer signal of 0.000001 phi(0) per gauss of field applied. The control unit shows a sensitivity that is linear with frequency, suggesting that the signal is generated by Faraday induction. In contrast, the RF head response is independent of frequency and shows a strong second-harmonic coversion. This response may be due to the magnetic field sensitivity of the ferrite core inductor in the tuned amplifier of the RF head. These signals induced by ambient fields are a potential source of error in Stanford's Relativity Gyroscope experiment, which uses SQUID's on board a rolling satellite as part of the gyroscope readout system. The extent of the magnetic field sensitivity in these components necessitates the use of additional magnetic shielding aboard the satellite.

  13. Effect of low-frequency ambient magnetic fields on the control unit and RF head of a commercial SQUID magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The control unit and RF head of the SHE model 330XRFSQUID system are shown to be sensitive to ambient ac magnetic fields below 1 HZ, which cause the appearance of false signals corresponding to a magnetometer signal of 0.000001 phi(0) per gauss of field applied. The control unit shows a sensitivity that is linear with frequency, suggesting that the signal is generated by Faraday induction. In contrast, the RF head response is independent of frequency and shows a strong second-harmonic coversion. This response may be due to the magnetic field sensitivity of the ferrite core inductor in the tuned amplifier of the RF head. These signals induced by ambient fields are a potential source of error in Stanford's Relativity Gyroscope experiment, which uses SQUID's on board a rolling satellite as part of the gyroscope readout system. The extent of the magnetic field sensitivity in these components necessitates the use of additional magnetic shielding aboard the satellite.

  14. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, B.; Ram, A. K.; Holguin, F.; Krishnamurthy, V.

    2014-10-01

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, the field lines are superdiffusive. The time evolution of an ensemble of charged particles moving in the chaotic ABC fields is divided into three time domains. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic. The intermediate times are characterized by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function. For longer times, the particles undergo anomalous superdiffusion. Detailed theoretical and numerical results will be presented. Supported by DoE, NSF, U. Alabama.

  15. Anomalous Kondo transport in a single-electron transistor driven by microwave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhan; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Fu-Zhou; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2014-03-01

    The Kondo transport in a single-electron transistor continues to provide unexpected physics due to the interplay between magnetic field and microwave applied, as shown in a recent experiment(B. Hemingway et al., arXiv:1304.0037). For a given microwave frequency, the Kondo differential conductance shows an anomalous magnetic field dependence, and a very sharp peak is observed for certain field applied. Additionally, the microwave frequency is found to be larger of about one order than the corresponding Zeeman energy. These two features are not understood in the current theory. Here we propose a phenomenological mechanism to explain these observations. When both magnetic field and microwave are applied in the SET, if the frequency matches the (renormalized) Zeeman energy, it is assumed that the microwave is able to induce spin-ip in the single-electron transistor, which leads to two consequences. One is the dot level shifts down and the other is the renormalization of the Zeeman energy. This picture can not only explain qualitatively the main findings in the experiment but also further stimulate the related experimental study of the Kondo transport. Additional microwave modulation may provide a novel way to explore the functional of the SET in nanotechnology and quantum information processing.

  16. Disruption in climatic rhythm and anomalous cooling during large decreases in geomagnetic field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaba, I.; Hyodo, M.; Katoh, S.; Sato, H.; Matsushita, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's climate is regulated by many factors. Especially, the orbital elements have a large influence on climate. Are there any factors which impact this strong regulation force? The galactic cosmic ray (CR) can be a candidate for such factors. The correlation between CR flux and global cloud cover suggests that the geomagnetic field affects the Earth's climate. CR is strongly modulated by the geomagnetic field. During the geomagnetic polarity reversal, the decrease in field intensity causes an increase in CR flux which would raise cloud cover. In order to examine this effect in the geological past, we examined climate and sea-level changes focusing on marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 31 to 17. The climate changes well accord with eustatic sea-level variations dominated by the Earth's orbital elements. However, in MIS 31 and 19, the thermal maximum was clearly lagged behind the sea-level highstand, and instead anomalous cooling occurred. These interglacial periods have the Lower Jaramillo and Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic polarity reversals, respectively. Comparing the climate and relative paleointensity variations for the interglacials, the cooling event coincides with the paleointensity minimum associated with the geomagnetic reversal. The coincidence suggests that the geomagnetic field decrease may have caused the disruption of the orbitally forced Earth's climate rhythm.

  17. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  18. A Theory for the RF Surface Field for Various Metals at the Destructive Breakdown Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Perry B.; /SLAC

    2007-03-06

    By destructive breakdown we mean a breakdown event that results in surface melting over a macroscopic area in a high E-field region of an accelerator structure. A plasma forms over the molten area, bombarding the surface with an intense ion current ({approx} 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2}), equivalent to a pressure of about a thousand Atmospheres. This pressure in turn causes molten copper to migrate away from the iris tip, resulting in measurable changes in the iris shape. The breakdown process can be roughly divided into four stages: (1) the formation of ''plasma spots'' at field emission sites, each spot leaving a crater-like footprint; (2) crater clustering, and the formation of areas with hundreds of overlapping craters; (3) surface melting in the region of a crater cluster; (4) the process after surface melting that leads to destructive breakdown. The physics underlying each of these stages is developed, and a comparison is made between the theory and experimental evidence whenever possible. The key to preventing breakdown lies in stage (3). A single plasma spot emits a current of several amperes, a portion of which returns to impact the surrounding area with a power density on the order 10{sup 7} Watt/cm{sup 2}. This power density is not quite adequate to melt the surrounding surface on a time scale short compared to the rf pulse length. In a crater field, however, the impact areas from multiple plasma spots overlap to provide sufficient power density for surface melting over an area on the order of 0.1 mm{sup 2} or more. The key to preventing breakdown is to choose an iris tip material that requires the highest power density (proportional to the square of the rf surface field) for surface melting, taking into account the penetration depth of the impacting electrons. The rf surface field required for surface melting (relative to copper) has been calculated for a large number elementary metals, plus stainless-steel and carbon.

  19. Rod-filter-field optimization of the J-PARC RF-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second-stage requirements of an H- ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H- ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Although rod-filter-field (RFF) is indispensable and one of the most beam performance dominative parameters for the RF-driven H- ion source with the internal-antenna, the procedure to optimize it is not established. In order to optimize the RFF and establish the procedure, the beam performances of the J-PARC source with various types of rod-filter-magnets (RFMs) were measured. By changing RFM's gap length and gap number inside of the region projecting the antenna inner-diameter along the beam axis, the dependence of the H- ion beam intensity on the net 2MHz-RF power was optimized. Furthermore, the fine-tuning of RFM's cross-section (magnetmotive force) was indispensable for easy operation with the temperature (TPE) of the plasma electrode (PE) lower than 70°C, which minimizes the transverse emittances. The 5% reduction of RFM's cross-section decreased the time-constant to recover the cesium effects after an slightly excessive cesiation on the PE from several 10 minutes to several minutes for TPE around 60°C.

  20. Control of damping partition numbers in a ring accelerator with rf electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Shimosaki, Yoshito; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2013-04-12

    A novel scheme to reduce transverse beam emittance in a ring accelerator is proposed by using a pair of coupling cavities as a basic unit to control damping partition numbers. As indicated by Robinson in 1958, a simple rf electromagnetic field (e.g., a TM210 mode by a single coupling cavity) cannot control the damping partition of three eigenoscillation modes in a ring accelerator due to the cancellation between the contributions from the magnetic and electric fields. Based on both analytical and numerical studies, we show that a pair of coupling cavities that satisfy phase and optics matching conditions can overcome this cancellation. The results indicate that the horizontal emittance is reducible to the theoretical limit based on the steady state condition and also, the emittance is reducible below the reduction limit under a nonsteady state by driving the coupling cavities with gated signals.

  1. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M

    2015-11-04

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science.

  2. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science. PMID:26531855

  3. Spin-Down Mechanisms in Neutron Stars with ``Anomalous'' Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are attributed to a number of factors, the most common assumption being the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This energy loss mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori. This typically causes a discrepancy in the characteristic age of these objects and the age of their associated Supernova Remnants (SNRs). In this work we consider neutron stars with ``anomalous'' magnetic fields - namely magnetars, high-B radio pulsars, and the Central Compact Objects (proposed to be `anti-magnetars’) that are securely associated with SNRs. Without making any assumptions about the initial spin periods of these objects and by constraining the SNR ages to match their associated pulsar ages, we compare the predictions of distinct energy loss mechanisms, such as field decay and the emission of relativistic winds using all observed data on the braking indices. This study has important implications on the proposed emission models for these exotic objects and helps in resolving the PSR-SNR age discrepancy.

  4. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science.

  5. Quantum anomalous Hall effect with field-tunable Chern number near Z2 topological critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Le Quy; Lin, Hsin; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Feng, Yuan Ping

    We study the practicability of achieving quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect with field-tunable Chern number in a magnetically doped, topologically trivial insulating thin film. Specifically in a candidate material, TlBi(S1-δSeδ)2, we demonstrate that the QAH phases with different Chern numbers can be achieved by means of tuning the exchange field strength or the sample thickness near the Z2 topological critical point. Our physics scenario successfully reduces the necessary exchange coupling strength for a targeted Chern number. This QAH mechanism differs from the traditional QAH picture with a magnetic topological insulating thin film, where the ``surface'' states must involve and sometimes complicate the realization issue. Furthermore, we find that a given Chern number can also be tuned by a perpendicular electric field, which naturally occurs when a substrate is present. High-Chern number QAH phase obtained from magnetically doped topological crystalline insulator thin films will also be discussed. Support by the Singapore National Research Foundation under NRF Award No. NRF-NRFF2013-03 is acknowledged.

  6. Anomalous scaling of a passive scalar advected by the Navier-Stokes velocity field: two-loop approximation.

    PubMed

    Adzhemyan, L Ts; Antonov, N V; Honkonen, J; Kim, T L

    2005-01-01

    The field theoretic renormalization group and operator-product expansion are applied to the model of a passive scalar quantity advected by a non-Gaussian velocity field with finite correlation time. The velocity is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation, subject to an external random stirring force with the correlation function proportional to delta(t- t')k(4-d-2epsilon). It is shown that the scalar field is intermittent already for small epsilon, its structure functions display anomalous scaling behavior, and the corresponding exponents can be systematically calculated as series in epsilon. The practical calculation is accomplished to order epsilon2 (two-loop approximation), including anisotropic sectors. As for the well-known Kraichnan rapid-change model, the anomalous scaling results from the existence in the model of composite fields (operators) with negative scaling dimensions, identified with the anomalous exponents. Thus the mechanism of the origin of anomalous scaling appears similar for the Gaussian model with zero correlation time and the non-Gaussian model with finite correlation time. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian velocity ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory discussed here are manifestly Galilean covariant. The relevance of these results for real passive advection and comparison with the Gaussian models and experiments are briefly discussed.

  7. Reduction of the higher-order field distribution in a photocathode rf gun for the X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Juho; Parc, Yong Woon; Ko, In Soo

    2014-12-01

    The mechanism of the higher-order rf field elimination in the photocathode rf gun used for the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) machine is discovered. The analysis and the measurement results of the rf field in several models of the rf gun with several holes at the cavity wall are presented. The contribution of the holes to the asymmetrical distribution of the rf field along the azimuthal angle is measured with several model cavities. Using a comparison between the experimental results and the numerically-obtained rf field distribution, we can reveal that the origin of the quadrupole component growing at the cavity with two holes and of the octapole component growing at the cavity with four holes is the superposition of the rf fields in the cavity. Two kinds of model cavities with several holes at the cavity wall have been fabricated, and the rf field distributions of the model cavities have been measured to compare with the theoretical analysis and the numerically-obtained rf field. From the analyses, we decided to adopt an rf gun that has dual feeds and two pumping holes for the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL-XFEL) project.

  8. The quantum anomalous Hall effect on a star lattice with spin-orbit coupling and an exchange field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengsu; Wan, Shaolong

    2012-08-15

    We study a star lattice with Rashba spin-orbit coupling and an exchange field and find that there is a quantum anomalous Hall effect in this system, and that there are five energy gaps at Dirac points and quadratic band crossing points. We calculate the Berry curvature distribution and obtain the Hall conductivity (Chern number ν) quantized as integers, and find that ν =- 1,2,1,1,2 when the Fermi level lies in these five gaps. Our model can be viewed as a general quantum anomalous Hall system and, in limit cases, can give what the honeycomb lattice and kagome lattice give. We also find that there is a nearly flat band with ν = 1 which may provide an opportunity for realizing the fractional quantum anomalous Hall effect. Finally, the chiral edge states on a zigzag star lattice are given numerically, to confirm the topological property of this system.

  9. Thermal effects of mobile phone RF fields on children: a provocation study.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Harri; Alanko, Tommi; Rintamäki, Hannu; Kännälä, Sami; Toivonen, Tommi; Sistonen, Heli; Tiikkaja, Maria; Halonen, Janne; Mäkinen, Tero; Hietanen, Maila

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine thermal and local blood flow responses in the head area of the preadolescent boys during exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields produced by a GSM mobile phone. The design was a double-blinded sham-controlled study of 26 boys, aged 14-15 years. The SAR distribution was calculated and modelled in detail. The duration of the sham periods and exposures with GSM 900 phone was 15 min each, and the tests were carried out in a climatic chamber in controlled thermoneutral conditions. The ear canal temperatures were registered from both ear canals, and the skin temperatures at several sites of the head, trunk and extremities. The local cerebral blood flow was monitored by a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and the autonomic nervous system function by recordings of ECG and continuous blood pressure. During the short-term RF exposure, local cerebral blood flow did not change, the ear canal temperature did not increase significantly and autonomic nervous system was not interfered. The strengths of this study were the age of the population, multifactorial physiological monitoring and strictly controlled thermal environment. The limitations of the study were large inter-individual variation in the physiological responses, and short duration of the exposure. Longer provocation protocols, however, might cause in children distress related confounding physiological responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of full wave code for modeling RF fields in hot non-uniform plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liangji; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Spencer, Andrew; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-10-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a full wave RF modeling code to model RF fields in fusion devices and in general plasma applications. As an important component of the code, an adaptive meshless technique is introduced to solve the wave equations, which allows resolving plasma resonances efficiently and adapting to the complexity of antenna geometry and device boundary. The computational points are generated using either a point elimination method or a force balancing method based on the monitor function, which is calculated by solving the cold plasma dispersion equation locally. Another part of the code is the conductivity kernel calculation, used for modeling the nonlocal hot plasma dielectric response. The conductivity kernel is calculated on a coarse grid of test points and then interpolated linearly onto the computational points. All the components of the code are parallelized using MPI and OpenMP libraries to optimize the execution speed and memory. The algorithm and the results of our numerical approach to solving 2-D wave equations in a tokamak geometry will be presented. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  11. Full Wave Parallel Code for Modeling RF Fields in Hot Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joseph; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Evstatiev, Evstati; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a suite of full wave RF codes in hot plasmas. It is based on a formulation in configuration space with grid adaptation capability. The conductivity kernel (which includes a nonlocal dielectric response) is calculated by integrating the linearized Vlasov equation along unperturbed test particle orbits. For Tokamak applications a 2-D version of the code is being developed. Progress of this work will be reported. This suite of codes has the following advantages over existing spectral codes: 1) It utilizes the localized nature of plasma dielectric response to the RF field and calculates this response numerically without approximations. 2) It uses an adaptive grid to better resolve resonances in plasma and antenna structures. 3) It uses an efficient sparse matrix solver to solve the formulated linear equations. The linear wave equation is formulated using two approaches: for cold plasmas the local cold plasma dielectric tensor is used (resolving resonances by particle collisions), while for hot plasmas the conductivity kernel is calculated. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  12. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. SPIRAL field mapping on NSTX for comparison to divertor RF heat deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosea, J. C.; Perkins, R.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Wilson, J. R.; NSTX Team

    2014-02-01

    Field-aligned losses of HHFW power in the SOL of NSTX have been studied with IR cameras and probes, but the interpretation of the data depends somewhat on the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction. Both EFIT02 and LRDFIT04 magnetic equilibria have been used with the SPIRAL code to provide field mappings in the scrape off layer (SOL) on NSTX from the midplane SOL in front of the HHFW antenna to the divertor regions, where the heat deposition spirals are measured. The field-line mapping spiral produced at the divertor plate with LRDFIT04 matches the HHFW-produced heat deposition best, in general. An independent method for comparing the field-line strike patterns on the outer divertor for the two equilibria is provided by measuring Langmuir probe characteristics in the vicinity of the outer vessel strike radius (OVSR) and observing the effect on floating potential, saturation current, and zero-probe-voltage current (IV=0) with the crossing of the OVSR over the probe. Interestingly, these comparisons also reveal that LRDFIT04 gives the more accurate location of the predicted OVSR, and confirm that the RF power flow in the SOL is essentially along the magnetic field lines. Also, the probe characteristics and IV=0 data indicate that current flows under the OVSR in the divertor tiles in most cases studied.

  14. FDTD computation of temperature elevation in human body for RF far-field exposure.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Asano, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in an anatomically-based human model for RF far-field exposure. First, we investigated the effect of blood temperature variation and thermoregulation modeling on body-core temperature. The modeling of blood temperature variation was found to be the dominant factor influencing the body core temperature. This is because the temperature in the inner tissues is elevated via the circulation of blood warmed due to EM absorption. For the same whole-body average SAR at different frequencies, the body-core temperature elevation was almost same, suggesting the effectiveness of the measure used in the ICNIRP guidelines. Then, we discussed the effect of sweating rate on the temperature elevation and thermal time constant of blood temperature. The uncertainty of temperature elevation due to the sweating rate was 30% or so.

  15. Exploiting adiabatically switched RF-field for manipulating spin hyperpolarization induced by parahydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-21

    A method for precise manipulation of non-thermal nuclear spin polarization by switching a RF-field is presented. The method harnesses adiabatic correlation of spin states in the rotating frame. A detailed theory behind the technique is outlined; examples of two-spin and three-spin systems prepared in a non-equilibrium state by Para-Hydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) are considered. We demonstrate that the method is suitable for converting the initial multiplet polarization of spins into net polarization: compensation of positive and negative lines in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which is detrimental when the spectral resolution is low, is avoided. Such a conversion is performed for real two-spin and three-spin systems polarized by means of PHIP. Potential applications of the presented technique are discussed for manipulating PHIP and its recent modification termed signal amplification by reversible exchange as well as for preparing and observing long-lived spin states.

  16. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Krishnamurthy, V.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2014-07-01

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t2, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to tα, where α > 1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic

  17. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Krishnamurthy, V.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2014-07-15

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup α}, where α > 1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics

  18. Simultaneous influence of helicity and compressibility on anomalous scaling of the magnetic field in the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

    PubMed

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M; Menkyna, M

    2017-05-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique and the operator product expansion, the systematic investigation of the influence of the spatial parity violation on the anomalous scaling behavior of correlation functions of the weak passive magnetic field in the framework of the compressible Kazantsev-Kraichnan model with the presence of a large-scale anisotropy is performed up to the second order of the perturbation theory (two-loop approximation). The renormalization group analysis of the model is done and the two-loop explicit expressions for the anomalous and critical dimensions of the leading composite operators are found as functions of the helicity and compressibility parameters and their anisotropic hierarchies are discussed. It is shown that for arbitrary values of the helicity parameter and for physically acceptable (small enough) values of the compressibility parameter, the main role is played by the composite operators near the isotropic shell in accordance with the Kolmogorov's local isotropy restoration hypothesis. The anomalous dimensions of the relevant composite operators are then compared with the anomalous dimensions of the corresponding leading composite operators in the Kraichnan model of passively advected scalar field. The significant difference between these two sets of anomalous dimensions is discussed. The two-loop inertial-range scaling exponents of the single-time two-point correlation functions of the magnetic field are found and their dependence on the helicity and compressibility parameters is studied in detail. It is shown that while the presence of the helicity leads to more pronounced anomalous scaling for correlation functions of arbitrary order, the compressibility, in general, makes the anomalous scaling more pronounced in comparison to the incompressible case only for low-order correlation functions. The persistence of the anisotropy deep inside the inertial interval is investigated using the appropriate odd ratios of

  19. Anomalous transport effects on the parallel E field in downward auroral current regions of the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasperse, John R.; Basu, Bamandas; Lund, Eric J.; Grossbard, Neil

    2011-08-01

    The physical processes that determine the fluid quantities and the self-consistent electric field (E$\\parallel$) parallel to the magnetic field have been an unresolved problem in magnetospheric physics for over 40 years. We review a recently developed kinetic and multimoment fluid theory for inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized plasma with temperature anisotropy in the guiding-center and gyrotropic approximation and apply the theory to solve for the quasi steady state in the long-range potential region of a downward Birkeland current sheet when electrostatic ion cyclotron turbulence is dominant. We find that an electron, bump-on-tail-driven ion cyclotron instability produces the turbulence and that a large enhancement in ∣E$\\parallel$∣ by nearly a factor of 40 occurs when the turbulence is present compared to the case when it is absent. Anomalous momentum transfer (anomalous resistivity) by itself has a very small effect on E$\\parallel$; however, the presence of the turbulence and the anomalous energy transfers (anomalous heating and cooling) that result have a very large effect on the entire solution. In the electron and ion momentum balance equations for E$\\parallel$, the turbulence enhances the magnitude of E$\\parallel$ by reducing the effect of the generalized parallel pressure gradients and thereby enhancing the effect of the mirror forces. A new, nonlinear formula for the current-voltage relationship in downward Birkeland current regions is also given.

  20. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  1. Combined acquisition technique (CAT) for high-field neuroimaging with reduced RF power.

    PubMed

    Choli, Morwan; Blaimer, Martin; Breuer, Felix A; Ehses, Philipp; Speck, Oliver; Bartsch, Andreas J; Jakob, Peter M

    2013-08-01

    Clinical 3 T MRI systems are rapidly increasing and MRI systems with a static field of 7 T or even more have been installed. The RF power deposition is proportional to the square of the static magnetic field strength and is characterized by the specific absorption rate (SAR). Therefore, there exist defined safety limits to avoid heating of the patient. Here, we describe a hybrid method to significantly reduce the SAR compared to a turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence. We investigate the potential benefits of a combined acquisition technique (CAT) for high-field neuroimaging at 3 and 7 T. The TSE/EPI CAT experiments were performed on volunteers and patients and compared with standard TSE and GRASE protocols. Problems and solutions regarding T2 weighted CAT imaging are discussed. We present in vivo images with T2 and proton density contrast obtained on 3 and 7 T with significant SAR reduction (up to 60%) compared with standard TSE. Image quality is comparable to TSE but CAT shows fewer artifacts than a GRASE sequence. CAT is a promising candidate for neuroimaging at high fields up to 7 T. The SAR reduction allows one to shorten the waiting time between two excitations or to image more slices thereby reducing the overall measurement time.

  2. Effect of low-frequency ambient magnetic fields on the control unit and rf head of a commercial SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, C.M.

    1984-09-01

    The control unit and rf head of the SHE model 330X rf SQUID system are shown to be sensitive to ambient ac magnetic fields below 1 Hz, which cause the appearance of false signals corresponding to a magnetometer signal of 10/sup -6/ phi/sub 0/ per gauss of field applied. The control unit shows a sensitivity that is linear with frequency, suggesting that the signal is generated by Faraday induction. In contrast, the rf head response is independent of frequency and shows a strong second-harmonic conversion. This response may be due to the magnetic field sensitivity of the ferrite core inductor in the tuned amplifier of the rf head. These signals induced by ambient fields are a potential source of error in Stanford's Relativity Gyroscope experiment, which uses SQUID's on board a rolling satellite as part of the gyroscope readout system. The extent of the magnetic field sensitivity in these components necessitates the use of additional magnetic shielding aboard the satellite.

  3. Exposure system to study hypotheses of ELF and RF electromagnetic field interactions of mobile phones with the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Murbach, Manuel; Christopoulou, Maria; Crespo-Valero, Pedro; Achermann, Peter; Kuster, Niels

    2012-09-01

    A novel exposure system for double-blind human electromagnetic provocation studies has been developed that satisfies the precision, control of fields and potential artifacts, and provides the flexibility to investigate the response of hypotheses-driven electromagnetic field exposure schemes on brain function, ranging from extremely low frequency (ELF) to radio frequency (RF) fields. The system can provide the same exposure of the lateral cerebral cortex at two different RF frequencies (900 and 2140 MHz) but with different exposure levels at subcortical structures, and also allows uniform ELF magnetic field exposure of the brain. The RF modulation and ELF signal are obtained by a freely programmable arbitrary signal generator allowing a wide range of worst-case exposure scenarios to be simulated, including those caused by wireless devices. The maximum achievable RF exposure is larger than 60 W/kg peak spatial specific absorption rate averaged over 10 g of tissue. The maximum ELF magnetic field exposure of the brain is 800 A/m at 50 Hz with a deviation from uniformity of 8% (SD).

  4. Anomalous triple gauge couplings in the effective field theory approach at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David; Son, Minho

    2017-02-01

    We discuss how to perform consistent extractions of anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGC) from electroweak boson pair production at the LHC in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT). After recasting recent ATLAS and CMS searches in pp → W Z( W W ) → ℓ'νℓ+ℓ-(νℓ) channels, we find that: (a) working consistently at order Λ-2 in the SMEFT expansion the existing aTGC bounds from Higgs and LEP-2 data are not improved, (b) the strong limits quoted by the experimental collaborations are due to the partial Λ-4 corrections (dimension-6 squared contributions). Using helicity selection rule arguments we are able to explain the suppression in some of the interference terms, and discuss conditions on New Physics (NP) models that can benefit from such LHC analyses. Furthermore, standard analyses assume implicitly a quite large NP scale, an assumption that can be relaxed by imposing cuts on the underlying scale of the process ( √{widehat{s}} ). In practice, we find almost no correlation between √{widehat{s}} and the experimentally accessible quantities, which complicates the SMEFT interpretation. Nevertheless, we provide a method to set (conservative) aTGC bounds in this situation, and recast the present searches accordingly. Finally, we introduce a simple NP model for aTGC to compare the bounds obtained directly in the model with those from the SMEFT analysis.

  5. Anomalous, quasilinear, and percolative regimes for magnetic-field-line transport in axially symmetric turbulence

    PubMed

    Zimbardo; Veltri; Pommois

    2000-02-01

    We studied a magnetic turbulence axisymmetric around the unperturbed magnetic field for cases having different ratios l( ||)/l( perpendicular). We find, in addition to the fact that a higher fluctuation level deltaB/B(0) makes the system more stochastic, that by increasing the ratio l( ||)/l( perpendicular) at fixed deltaB/B(0), the stochasticity increases. It appears that the different transport regimes can be organized in terms of the Kubo number R=(deltaB/B(0))(l( ||)/l( perpendicular)). The simulation results are compared with the two analytical limits, that is the percolative limit and the quasilinear limit. When R<1 weak chaos, closed magnetic surfaces, and anomalous transport regimes are found. When R approximately 1 the diffusion regime is Gaussian, and the quasilinear scaling of the diffusion coefficient D( perpendicular) approximately (deltaB/B(0))(2) is recovered. Finally, for R>1 the percolation scaling of the diffusion coefficient D( perpendicular) approximately (deltaB/B(0))(0.7) is obtained.

  6. Primary experimental study on safety of deep brain stimulation in RF electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jun, Xu; Luming, Li; Hongwei, Hao

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid growth of clinical application of Deep Brain Stimulation, its safety and functional concern in the electromagnetic field, another pollution becoming much more serious, has become more and more significant. Meanwhile, the measuring standards on Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) for DBS are still incomplete. Particularly, the knowledge of the electromagnetic field induced signals on the implanted lead is ignorant while some informal reports some side effects. This paper briefly surmised the status of EMC standards on implantable medical devices. Based on the EMC experiments of DBS device we developed, two experiments for measuring the induced voltage of the deep brain stimulator in RF electromagnetic field were reported. The measured data showed that the induced voltage in some frequency was prominent, for example over 2V. As a primary research, we think these results would be significant to cause researcher to pay more attention to the EMC safety problem and biological effects of the induced voltage in deep brain stimulation and other implantable devices.

  7. An inverse methodology for high frequency RF head coil design with preemphasized B/sub 1/ field in MRI.

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Crozier, S; Li, B K; Wei, Q; Liu, F

    2004-01-01

    An inverse methodology to assist in the design of radio-frequency (RF) head coils for high field MRI application is described in this work. Free space time-harmonic electromagnetic Green's functions and preemphasized B/sub 1/ field are used to calculate the current density on the coil cylinder. With B/sub 1/ field preemphasized and lowered in the middle of the RF transverse plane, the calculated current distribution can generate an internal magnetic field that can reduce the EM field/tissue interactions at high frequencies. The current distribution of a head coil operating at 4 T is calculated using inverse methodology with preemphasized B/sub 1/ fields. FDTD is employed to calculate B/sub 1/ field and signal intensity inside a homogenous cylindrical phantom and human head. A comparison with conventional RF birdcage coil is reported here and demonstrated that inverse-method designed coil with preemphasized B/sub 1/ field can help in decreasing the notorious bright region caused by EM field/tissue interactions in the human head images at 4 T.

  8. High field side launch of RF waves: A new approach to reactor actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lin, Y.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Vieira, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Launching radio frequency (RF) waves from the high field side (HFS) of a tokamak offers significant advantages over low field side (LFS) launch with respect to both wave physics and plasma material interactions (PMI). For lower hybrid (LH) waves, the higher magnetic field opens the window between wave accessibility (n∥≡c k∥/ω >√{1 -ωpi 2/ω2+ωpe 2/ωce 2 }+ωp e/|ωc e| ) and the condition for strong electron Landau damping (n∥˜√{30 /Te } with Te in keV), allowing LH waves from the HFS to penetrate into the core of a burning plasma, while waves launched from the LFS are restricted to the periphery of the plasma. The lower n∥ of waves absorbed at higher Te yields a higher current drive efficiency as well. In the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), HFS launch allows for direct access to the mode conversion layer where mode converted waves absorb strongly on thermal electrons and ions, thus avoiding the generation of energetic minority ion tails. The absence of turbulent heat and particle fluxes on the HFS, particularly in double null configuration, makes it the ideal location to minimize PMI damage to the antenna structure. The quiescent SOL also eliminates the need to couple LH waves across a long distance to the separatrix, as the antenna can be located close to plasma without risking damage to the structure. Improved impurity screening on the HFS will help eliminate the long-standing issues of high Z impurity accumulation with ICRF. Looking toward a fusion reactor, the HFS is the only possible location for a plasma-facing RF antenna that will survive long-term. By integrating the antenna into the blanket module it is possible to improve the tritium breeding ratio compared with an antenna occupying an equatorial port plug. Blanket modules will require remote handling of numerous cooling pipes and electrical connections, and the addition of transmission lines will not substantially increase the level of complexity. The obvious engineering

  9. Electric Field Measurements of the Capacitively Coupled Magnetized RF Sheath Utilizing Passive Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elijah Henry

    A major challenge facing magnetic confinement fusion is the implementation of reliable plasma heating systems. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a key technique utilized to achieve the ion temperatures necessary for desirable fusion reaction rates. ICRH systems are designed to couple energy into the core plasma ions through a resonant interaction with an electromagnetic wave in the radio frequency range. The interaction of the wave with the scrape off layer plasma establishes an electric field which terminates directly on the plasma facing surfaces and is referred to as the near-field. In order to bridge the gap between the theoretical and actual performance of ICRF antennas, experimental measurement of this electric field is highly desired. However, due to the large amount of power launched by ICRF antennas only non-local measurements have thus far been obtained. The research presented in this dissertation is centered on the development of a non-perturbative diagnostic to locally measure the near-field with high spatial and temporal resolution. The main objective of the research presented in this dissertation is to develop and validate a spectroscopic diagnostic capable of measuring local time periodic electric fields. The development phase of the diagnostic consisted of atomic physics formulation and was carried out in two steps. The first involved the calculation of the electronic structure of the one and two-electron atom utilizing the hydrogenic wave function. The second involved the calculation of the spectral line profile based on the electric dipole connection operator. The validate phase of the diagnostic consisted of implementation of the atomic physics to measure the electric field topology associated with the capacitively coupled magnetized RF sheath using passive OES. The experimental measurements are then compared to a simple one-dimensional analytical model providing the validation of the developed atomic physics.

  10. Influence of anisotropy on anomalous scaling of a passive scalar advected by the Navier-Stokes velocity field.

    PubMed

    Jurcisinová, E; Jurcisin, M; Remecký, R

    2009-10-01

    The influence of weak uniaxial small-scale anisotropy on the stability of the scaling regime and on the anomalous scaling of the single-time structure functions of a passive scalar advected by the velocity field governed by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is investigated by the field theoretic renormalization group and operator-product expansion within one-loop approximation of a perturbation theory. The explicit analytical expressions for coordinates of the corresponding fixed point of the renormalization-group equations as functions of anisotropy parameters are found, the stability of the three-dimensional Kolmogorov-like scaling regime is demonstrated, and the dependence of the borderline dimension d(c) is an element of (2,3] between stable and unstable scaling regimes is found as a function of the anisotropy parameters. The dependence of the turbulent Prandtl number on the anisotropy parameters is also briefly discussed. The influence of weak small-scale anisotropy on the anomalous scaling of the structure functions of a passive scalar field is studied by the operator-product expansion and their explicit dependence on the anisotropy parameters is present. It is shown that the anomalous dimensions of the structure functions, which are the same (universal) for the Kraichnan model, for the model with finite time correlations of the velocity field, and for the model with the advection by the velocity field driven by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation in the isotropic case, can be distinguished by the assumption of the presence of the small-scale anisotropy in the systems even within one-loop approximation. The corresponding comparison of the anisotropic anomalous dimensions for the present model with that obtained within the Kraichnan rapid-change model is done.

  11. An inverse methodology for high-frequency RF coil design for MRI with de-emphasized B1 fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Wei, Qing; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2005-09-01

    An inverse methodology for the design of biologically loaded radio-frequency (RF) coils for magnetic resonance imaging applications is described. Free space time-harmonic electromagnetic Green's functions and de-emphasized B1 target fields are used to calculate the current density on the coil cylinder. In theory, with the B1 field de-emphasized in the middle of the RF transverse plane, the calculated current distribution can generate an internal magnetic field that can reduce the central overemphasis effect caused by field/tissue interactions at high frequencies. The current distribution of a head coil operating at 4 T (170 MHz) is calculated using an inverse methodology with de-emphasized B1 target fields. An in-house finite-difference time-domain routine is employed to evaluate B1 field and signal intensity inside a homogenous cylindrical phantom and then a complete human head model. A comparison with a conventional RF birdcage coil is carried out and demonstrates that this method can help in decreasing the normal bright region caused by field/tissue interactions in head images at 170 MHz and higher field strengths.

  12. Anomalous and neoclassical transport suppression by the radial electric field, induced by Alfvén waves in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsypin, V. S.; Nascimento, I. C.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Elfimov, A. G.; Amarante Segundo, G. S.; Tendler, M.

    1999-09-01

    The suppression of anomalous transport and/or reduction of neoclassical transport caused by the Alfvén-wave-induced shear of the radial electric field in tokamaks is investigated. The simple quantitative estimates reported in previous papers are checked by a consistent evaluation of the profile of the radial electric field created by the resonant absorption of Alfvén waves. The radial variations of the ion viscosity and heat conductivity across the mode conversion layer are evaluated both in the banana and potato regions. In agreement with previous analytical results, it is shown that the kinetic Alfvén waves may play the role of a convenient mechanism for reduction of anomalous and neoclassical transport and formation of transport barriers in tokamaks.

  13. A Coupled Field Multiphysics Modeling Approach to Investigate RF MEMS Switch Failure Modes under Various Operational Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Khaled; Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the reliability of capacitive shunt RF MEMS switches have been investigated using three dimensional (3D) coupled multiphysics finite element (FE) analysis. The coupled field analysis involved three consecutive multiphysics interactions. The first interaction is characterized as a two-way sequential electromagnetic (EM)-thermal field coupling. The second interaction represented a one-way sequential thermal-structural field coupling. The third interaction portrayed a two-way sequential structural-electrostatic field coupling. An automated substructuring algorithm was utilized to reduce the computational cost of the complicated coupled multiphysics FE analysis. The results of the substructured FE model with coupled field analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the outcome of previously published experimental and numerical studies. The current numerical results indicate that the pull-in voltage and the buckling temperature of the RF switch are functions of the microfabrication residual stress state, the switch operational frequency and the surrounding packaging temperature. Furthermore, the current results point out that by introducing proper mechanical approaches such as corrugated switches and through-holes in the switch membrane, it is possible to achieve reliable pull-in voltages, at various operating temperatures. The performed analysis also shows that by controlling the mean and gradient residual stresses, generated during microfabrication, in conjunction with the proposed mechanical approaches, the power handling capability of RF MEMS switches can be increased, at a wide range of operational frequencies. These design features of RF MEMS switches are of particular importance in applications where a high RF power (frequencies above 10 GHz) and large temperature variations are expected, such as in satellites and airplane condition monitoring. PMID:22408490

  14. Lunar Field Geological Interpretations Assisted by LROC, Mini-RF and M3: Taurus-Littrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. H.; Petro, N. E.; Robinson, M. S.; Wells, R.; Weiss, B. P.; Mercer, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Integration of Apollo 17 field observations and photographs, sample investigations, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images, Moon Mineralogical Mapper data, and Mini-RF images provides new insights into the geology of the valley of Taurus Littrow. Samples from the North Massif and the Sculptured Hills appear to represent a stratigraphic sequence of ejecta from the Cranium and Serenitatis basin-forming events. Published analyses of these samples provide the approximate ages for those events that appear consistent with this sequence; however, within current 2 sigma error limits, these ages overlap. Strong evidence exists that the Sculptured Hills physiographic unit consists of Imbrium ejecta made up of a layered, Mg-suite pluton. Rim boulders at Camelot Crater constitute wall rocks of the crater rather than ejecta and provide a potential opportunity for investigations of remnant magnetic field orientation at the time of the eruption of late mare basalt lavas in the valley. A second and older light mantle avalanche deposit has been identified, and the origin, potential fluidized flow mechanisms, and geology of the two avalanches from the South Massif have been clarified, including the probability of significant agitation heating during flow. The structure, potential effects, and timing of the Lee-Lincoln thrust fault, and of an ancillary fault revealed by radar, have been defined and raise doubts about the association of the light mantle avalanche with secondary impacts related to the Tycho event.

  15. Genotoxic effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in HL-60 cells are not reproducible.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Gminski, Richard; Tauber, Rudolf

    2013-08-15

    Conflicting results have been published regarding the induction of genotoxic effects by exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). Various results indicating a genotoxic potential of RF-EMF were reported by the collaborative EU-funded REFLEX (Risk Evaluation of Potential Environmental Hazards From Low Energy Electromagnetic Field Exposure Using Sensitive in vitro Methods) project. There has been a long-lasting scientific debate about the reliability of the reported results and an attempt to reproduce parts of the results obtained with human fibroblasts failed. Another part of the REFLEX study was performed in Berlin with the human lymphoblastoid cell line HL-60; genotoxic effects of RF-EMF were measured by means of the comet assay and the micronucleus test. The plausibility and reliability of these results were also questioned. In order to contribute to a clarification of the biological significance of the reported findings, a repeat study was performed, involving scientists of the original study. Comet-assay experiments and micronucleus tests were performed under the same experimental conditions that had led to genotoxic effects in the REFLEX study. Here we report that the attempts to reproduce the induction of genotoxic effects by RF-EMF in HL-60 cells failed. No genotoxic effects of RF-EMF were measured in the repeat experiments. We could not find an explanation for the conflicting results. However, the negative repeat experiments suggest that the biological significance of genotoxic effects of RF-EMF reported by the REFLEX study should be re-assessed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G.; Sandalidis, Harilaos G.; Aletras, Anthony H.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R = 0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI.

  17. Spin-orbit coupling and perpendicular Zeeman field for fermionic cold atoms: Observation of the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chuanwei

    2010-08-15

    We propose a scheme for generating Rashba spin-orbit coupling and a perpendicular Zeeman field simultaneously for cold fermionic atoms in a harmonic trap through the coupling between atoms and laser fields. The realization of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and a perpendicular Zeeman field provides opportunities for exploring many topological phenomena using cold fermionic atoms. We focus on the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and show that it may be observed through the response of atomic density to a rotation of the harmonic trap.

  18. Transmit Array Spatial Encoding (TRASE) using broadband WURST pulses for RF spatial encoding in inhomogeneous B0 fields.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Jason P; Cooley, Clarissa Z; Guerin, Bastien; Rosen, Matthew S; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-07-01

    Transmit Array Spatial Encoding (TRASE) is a promising new MR encoding method that uses transmit RF (B1(+)) phase gradients over the field-of-view to perform Fourier spatial encoding. Acquisitions use a spin echo train in which the transmit coil phase ramp is modulated to jump from one k-space point to the next. This work extends the capability of TRASE by using swept radiofrequency (RF) pulses and a quadratic phase removal method to enable TRASE where it is arguably most needed: portable imaging systems with inhomogeneous B0 fields. The approach is particularly well-suited for portable MR scanners where (a) inhomogeneous B0 fields are a byproduct of lightweight magnet design, (b) heavy, high power-consumption gradient coil systems are a limitation to siting the system in non-conventional locations and (c) synergy with the use of spin echo trains is required to overcome intra-voxel dephasing (short T2(∗)) in the inhomogeneous field. TRASE does not use a modulation of the B0 field to encode, but it does suffer from secondary effects of the inhomogeneous field. Severe artifacts arise in TRASE images due to off-resonance effects when the RF pulse does not cover the full bandwidth of spin resonances in the imaging FOV. Thus, for highly inhomogeneous B0 fields, the peak RF power needed for high-bandwidth refocusing hard pulses becomes very expensive, in addition to requiring RF coils that can withstand thousands of volts. In this work, we use swept WURST RF pulse echo trains to achieve TRASE imaging in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field (ΔB0/B0∼0.33% over the sample). By accurately exciting and refocusing the full bandwidth of spins, the WURST pulses eliminate artifacts caused by the limited bandwidth of the hard pulses used in previous realizations of TRASE imaging. We introduce a correction scheme to remove the unwanted quadratic phase modulation caused by the swept pulses. Also, a phase alternation scheme is employed to mitigate artifacts caused by mixture of

  19. Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electrons in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Cudzinovic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Dexter, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fonck, R.; Henry, J.; Holly, D.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Sprott, C.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1992-09-01

    Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electron populations have been studied in the MST reversed-field pinch. The ion heating is much stronger than that given by classical electron-ion friction, and is particularly strong during dynamo bursts. The heating displays a marked density dependence: in a 350-kA discharge with a maximum {bar n} = 0.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus} 3}, T{sub i} rises sharply as {bar n} drops below 0.4 {times} 10{sub 13} cm{sup {minus}3} late in the discharge. Superthermal electrons are produced in the core, with temperatures of T{sub eh}, = 350--700 eV while the bulk core temperature is T{sub e}o = 130--230 eV. The fraction of superthermal electrons decreases with increasing density, from 40% at {bar n} = 0.5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} to 8% at {bar n} = 1.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} at I = 350 kA. However, data with similar plasma parameters but higher oxygen impurity content had a lower T{sub eh} and higher hot fraction. The edge superthermal electron distribution is well fit by a drifted bi-Maxwellian distribution with T{sub {parallel}} {approximately} T{sub e0} and relative drift speed v{sub d}/v{sub th} = 0.4. With the assumption that the parallel heat flux measured with a pyroelectric probe is carried by superthermal electrons, the measured electron current is consistent with T{sub {perpendicular}} {approximately} T{sub ea} {approximately} T{sub e0}/3 and accounts for over half of the total edge parallel current measured with magnetic probes.

  20. Origin of anomalously high exchange field in antiferromagnetically coupled magnetic structures: Spin reorientation versus interface anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, M.; Piramanayagam, S. N.; Wong, S. K.; Sbiaa, R.; Song, W.; Tan, H. K.; Gonzaga, L.; Chong, T. C.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetization reorientation from in-plane to perpendicular direction, observed in Co thin film coupled antiferromagnetically to high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (Co/Pd) multilayers, is studied systematically for Co thickness ranging from 0 to 2.4 nm. The sample with 0.75 nm thick Co showed an exchange coupling field (Hex) exceeding 15 kOe at room temperature and 17.2 kOe at 5 K. With an increase of Co thickness, Hex decreased as expected and beyond certain thickness, magnetization reorientation was not observed. Indeed, three regions were observed in the thickness dependence of magnetization of the thin layer; one in which the thin layer (in the thickness range up to 0.8 nm) had a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to interface effects and antiferromagnetic coupling, another in which the thin layer (0.9-1.2 nm) magnetization had no interface or crystallographic anisotropy but was reoriented in the perpendicular direction due to antiferromagnetic coupling, and the third (above 1.2 nm) in which the magnetization was in-plane. In addition, Hall effect measurements were carried out to observe the anomalous and planar Hall voltages and to quantify the perpendicular and in-plane components of magnetization. The sample with thicker Co layer (2.4 nm) showed an in-plane component of magnetization, whereas the sample with 0.75 nm Co showed no in-plane component. The high value of Hex observed in 0.75 nm Co samples can have important implications in spintronics and bit patterned media.

  1. Temporal trends of radio-frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure in everyday environments across European cities.

    PubMed

    Urbinello, Damiano; Joseph, Wout; Verloock, Leen; Martens, Luc; Röösli, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The rapid development and increased use of wireless telecommunication technologies led to a substantial change of radio-frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure in the general population but little is known about temporal trends of RF-EMF in our everyday environment. The objective of our study is to evaluate temporal trends of RF-EMF exposure levels in different microenvironments of three European cities using a common measurement protocol. We performed measurements in the cities of Basel (Switzerland), Ghent and Brussels (Belgium) during one year, between April 2011 and March 2012. RF-EMF exposure in 11 different frequency bands ranging from FM (Frequency Modulation, 88 MHz) to WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network, 2.5 GHz) was quantified with portable measurement devices (exposimeters) in various microenvironments: outdoor areas (residential areas, downtown and suburb), public transports (train, bus and tram or metro rides) and indoor places (airport, railway station and shopping centers). Measurements were collected every 4s during 10-50 min per environment and measurement day. Linear temporal trends were analyzed by mixed linear regression models. Highest total RF-EMF exposure levels occurred in public transports (all public transports combined) with arithmetic mean values of 0.84 V/m in Brussels, 0.72 V/m in Ghent, and 0.59 V/m in Basel. In all outdoor areas combined, mean exposure levels were 0.41 V/m in Brussels, 0.31 V/m in Ghent and 0.26 V/m in Basel. Within one year, total RF-EMF exposure levels in all outdoor areas in combination increased by 57.1% (p<0.001) in Basel by 20.1% in Ghent (p=0.053) and by 38.2% (p=0.012) in Brussels. Exposure increase was most consistently observed in outdoor areas due to emissions from mobile phone base stations. In public transports RF-EMF levels tended also to increase but mostly without statistical significance. An increase of RF-EMF exposure levels has been observed between April 2011 and March 2012 in various

  2. Algorithms on MR imaging and RF fields maps of birdcage resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadik, Abdelhamid

    2001-03-01

    birdcages. Due to lack of cylindrical symmetry in the rectangular coil, RF field uniformity was evaluated and found critically dependent upon which column was driven. Effective L1 and L2 inductance elements were determined using known formulas for self and mutual inductance contributions, and compensation of the different inductance elements of the hand coil was performed to produce standard birdcage current patterns. RF field mapping using the Biot-Savart law demonstrated a rectangular coil sensitivity greater than a comparable cylindrical version. The signal-to-noise ratio of the rectangular birdcage was greater than that for the cylindrical coil. Also, MR hand and wrist images were acquired using the rectangular birdcage coil.

  3. Dust particles under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields in the sheath of an rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Puttscher, M. Melzer, A.

    2014-12-15

    Experimental studies on the interaction of micron-sized dust particles in plasmas with external magnetic fields are presented. The particles are levitated in the sheath region of an rf discharge by gravity and electric field force under the presence of a horizontal magnetic field of up to 50 mT. It is observed that the dust particles are pushed either in the E{sup →}×B{sup →}- or in the opposite direction depending on magnetic field strength, particle properties, and discharge conditions. This transport behavior is described by a competition between horizontal ambipolar electric field force and ion and neutral drag.

  4. Green function for a charged spin-½ particle with anomalous magnetic moment in a plane-wave external electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan Vaidya, Arvind; Barbosa da Silva Filho, Pedro

    1999-09-01

    The Green function for a charged spin- 1/2 particle with anomalous magnetic moment in the presence of a plane-wave external electromagnetic field is calculated and shown to be simply related to the free-particle one.

  5. Nonlocal and local magnetization dynamics excited by an RF magnetic field in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Takahiro

    A microwave study in spintronic devices has been actively pursued in the past several years due to the fertile physics and potential applications. On one hand, a passive use of microwave can be very helpful to analyze and understand the magnetization dynamics in spintronic devices. Examples include ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements, and various microwave spectrum analyses in ferromagnetic materials. The most important chrematistic parameter for the phenomenological analysis on the magnetization dynamics is, so called, the Gilbert damping constant. In this work, a relatively new measurement technique, a flip-chip FMR measurement, to conduct the ferromagnetic resonance measurements has been developed. The measurement technique is equally comparable to a conventional FMR measurement. The Gilbert damping constants were extracted for single ferromagnetic layer, spin vale structures, and magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). On the other hand, an active use of microwave yields a great potential for interesting phenomena which give new functionalities into spintronic devices. For instance, a spin wave excitation by an rf field can be used to reduce the switching field of a ferromagnet, i.e. microwave assisted magnetization reversal, which could be a potential application in advanced recording media. More interestingly, a precessing magnetization driven by an rf field can generate a pure spin current into a neighboring layer, i.e. spin pumping effect, which is one of the candidates for generating a pure spin current. A ferromagnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is one of the important devices in spintronics, which is also the key device to investigate the local and nonlocal magnetization dynamics in this work. Therefore, it is also important to develop high quality MTJs. My work starts from the development of MTJ with AlOx and MgO tunnel barriers where it was found it is crucial to find the proper condition for forming a few nanometers thick tunnel barrier. After obtaining

  6. Noninvasive quantitative mapping of conductivity and dielectric distributions using RF wave propagation effects in high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Han

    2003-06-01

    In this paper I show with phantom and animal experiments a non-invasive and quantitative method for measuring the conductivity and dielectric distributions based on high field magnetic resonance imaging. High field MRI is accompanied by significant RF wave propagation effects. They are observed as phase and magnitude variations of the image that cannot be removed by optimizing the static field homogeneity, or by improving the RF coils. These variations reflect the RF field distribution in the sample, and in fact obey a modified Helmholtz equation. By mapping both the phase and magnitude of the field with MRI techniques, both the conductivity and the dielectric constant are determined non-invasively. In phantom experiments at 1.5 tesla, conductivity values were measured at 4 mm resolution to 0.5 S/m accuracy. At 4.7 tesla, the accuracy was improved to 0.2 S/m, and the dielectric constant was measured to an accuracy of 5 (relative to vacuum) for 2cm regions.

  7. RF Magnetic Field Uniformity of Rectangular Planar Coils for Resonance Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-04

    which can also be applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( MRI ). Index Terms—NQR, NMR, rectangle coil, planar coil, overlap, tuning, decoupling, RF...related to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and its offspring, magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ). One significant advantage of NQR is the absence...pulsed RF excitation [1]. These observed signals are usually detected using a surface coil. Surface coil arrays are used in unilateral NMR scans

  8. Polynomial Chaos Expansion method as a tool to evaluate and quantify field homogeneities of a novel waveguide RF Wien filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slim, J.; Rathmann, F.; Nass, A.; Soltner, H.; Gebel, R.; Pretz, J.; Heberling, D.

    2017-07-01

    For the measurement of the electric dipole moment of protons and deuterons, a novel waveguide RF Wien filter has been designed and will soon be integrated at the COoler SYnchrotron at Jülich. The device operates at the harmonic frequencies of the spin motion. It is based on a waveguide structure that is capable of fulfilling the Wien filter condition (E → ⊥ B →) by design. The full-wave calculations demonstrated that the waveguide RF Wien filter is able to generate high-quality RF electric and magnetic fields. In reality, mechanical tolerances and misalignments decrease the simulated field quality, and it is therefore important to consider them in the simulations. In particular, for the electric dipole moment measurement, it is important to quantify the field errors systematically. Since Monte-Carlo simulations are computationally very expensive, we discuss here an efficient surrogate modeling scheme based on the Polynomial Chaos Expansion method to compute the field quality in the presence of tolerances and misalignments and subsequently to perform the sensitivity analysis at zero additional computational cost.

  9. Anomalous Hanle effect due to optically created transverse overhauser field in single InAs/GaAs quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Krebs, O; Maletinsky, P; Amand, T; Urbaszek, B; Lemaître, A; Voisin, P; Marie, X; Imamoglu, A

    2010-02-05

    We report on experimental observations of an anomalous Hanle effect in individual self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots. A sizable electron spin polarization photocreated under constant illumination is maintained in transverse magnetic fields as high as approximately 1 T, up to a critical field where it abruptly collapses. These striking anomalies of the Hanle curve point to a novel mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarization giving rise to an effective magnetic field generated perpendicular to the optically injected electron spin polarization. This transverse Overhauser field, confirmed by the cancellation of electron Zeeman splitting below the critical field, is likely to be a consequence of the strong inhomogeneous quadrupolar interactions typical for strained quantum dots.

  10. Anomalously High Geothermal Gradients in the Buckman Well Field, Santa Fe County, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, A.; Munda, R.; Farrell, T. F.; Kelley, S. A.; Frost, J.; Jiracek, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature as a function of depth was measured in ten wells in the Santa Fe, NM area as part of the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE) program. Eight of the wells are within 5.5 km of the city's Buckman municipal well field and two wells are at La Tierra, 16.5 km to the SE. Geothermal gradients increase from east to west towards the Buckman area, from 20°C/km at La Tierra to 76°C/km at Buckman. Within the Buckman well field, two wells on its eastern side were determined to have temperature gradients of 32°C/km and 42°C/km. Only 300 m west, the geothermal gradient sharply increases, and measured gradients reach 76 °C/km (well number SF4A), 62°C/km (SF4B), and 68°C/km (SF3A) in three shallow (<100 m) monitoring drill holes. Both local and regional causes may explain the geothermal anomaly. The short spatial wavelength of the horizontal gradient increase argues for a localized source. The unusually high gradients in three of the wells may be associated with fault-controlled, effective shallow-source, warm water upflow or with lateral flow in a shallow aquifer. On the regional level, the east to west increase in temperature gradients can be explained by deep circulating groundwater flow in the Espanola Basin and upwelling near the Rio Grande. Another possible explanation comes from gravity data gathered by SAGE over several years that shows a local NW-striking structural high in the area that could force localized convective upflow. Regional aeromag maps indicate magnetic lows exactly underneath the anomalous wells. These may be interpreted as buried volcanic plugs beneath the Buckman well field, acting as conduits for upwelling warmer waters. They may also indicate hydrothermally altered rock beneath the surface. A more nontraditional cause of the sharp thermal anomaly is also possible. The geothermal gradient anomaly coincides with the dramatic discovery by InSAR in 1993-2000 of localized ground subsidence due to excessive water well pumping

  11. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) Method and Probe for Generating RF Magnetic Fields in Different Directions to Distinguish NQR from Acoustic Ringing Induced in a Sample

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    77,719 TITLE OF THE INVENTION NUCLEAR QUADRUPOLE RESONANCE ( NQR ) METHOD AND PROBE FOR GENERATING RF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS TO...DISTINGUISH NQR FROM ACOUSTIC RINGING INDUCED IN A SAMPLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a...nuclear quadrupole 15 resonance ( NQR ) method and probe for generating RF magnetic fields in different directions towards a sample. More specifically

  12. Unified segmentation based correction of R1 brain maps for RF transmit field inhomogeneities (UNICORT)

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Lutti, Antoine; Helms, Gunther; Novak, Marianne; Ashburner, John; Hutton, Chloe

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative mapping of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) in the human brain enables the investigation of tissue microstructure and macroscopic morphology which are becoming increasingly important for clinical and neuroimaging applications. R1 maps are now commonly estimated from two fast high-resolution 3D FLASH acquisitions with variable excitation flip angles, because this approach is fast and does not rely on special acquisition techniques. However, these R1 maps need to be corrected for bias due to RF transmit field (B1+) inhomogeneities, requiring additional B1+ mapping which is usually time consuming and difficult to implement. We propose a technique that simultaneously estimates the B1+ inhomogeneities and R1 values from the uncorrected R1 maps in the human brain without need for B1+ mapping. It employs a probabilistic framework for unified segmentation based correction of R1 maps for B1+ inhomogeneities (UNICORT). The framework incorporates a physically informed generative model of smooth B1+ inhomogeneities and their multiplicative effect on R1 estimates. Extensive cross-validation with the established standard using measured B1+ maps shows that UNICORT yields accurate B1+ and R1 maps with a mean deviation from the standard of less than 4.3% and 5%, respectively. The results of different groups of subjects with a wide age range and different levels of atypical brain anatomy further suggest that the method is robust and generalizes well to wider populations. UNICORT is easy to apply, as it is computationally efficient and its basic framework is implemented as part of the tissue segmentation in SPM8. PMID:20965260

  13. Unified segmentation based correction of R1 brain maps for RF transmit field inhomogeneities (UNICORT).

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Lutti, Antoine; Helms, Gunther; Novak, Marianne; Ashburner, John; Hutton, Chloe

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative mapping of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1=1/T1) in the human brain enables the investigation of tissue microstructure and macroscopic morphology which are becoming increasingly important for clinical and neuroimaging applications. R1 maps are now commonly estimated from two fast high-resolution 3D FLASH acquisitions with variable excitation flip angles, because this approach is fast and does not rely on special acquisition techniques. However, these R1 maps need to be corrected for bias due to RF transmit field (B1(+)) inhomogeneities, requiring additional B1(+) mapping which is usually time consuming and difficult to implement. We propose a technique that simultaneously estimates the B1(+) inhomogeneities and R1 values from the uncorrected R1 maps in the human brain without need for B1(+) mapping. It employs a probabilistic framework for unified segmentation based correction of R1 maps for B1(+) inhomogeneities (UNICORT). The framework incorporates a physically informed generative model of smooth B1(+) inhomogeneities and their multiplicative effect on R1 estimates. Extensive cross-validation with the established standard using measured B1(+) maps shows that UNICORT yields accurate B1(+) and R1 maps with a mean deviation from the standard of less than 4.3% and 5%, respectively. The results of different groups of subjects with a wide age range and different levels of atypical brain anatomy further suggest that the method is robust and generalizes well to wider populations. UNICORT is easy to apply, as it is computationally efficient and its basic framework is implemented as part of the tissue segmentation in SPM8.

  14. The occurrence of anomalous resistance and longitudinal electric fields on auroral lines of force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropotkin, A. P.

    1981-06-01

    A model for calculating the longitudinal current velocity of electrons on high latitude lines of force is proposed. These velocities may surpass the ion cyclotron current instability threshold in certain tubes of force while remaining below this threshold in others in close proximity. The turbulence arising as a result of this instability produces anomalous longitudinal resistance. The longitudinal current density is approximately proportional to the full longitudinal potential difference on a given line of force.

  15. Black body and transverse electromagnetic resonators operating at 340 MHz: volume RF coils for ultra high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, P M

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to describe the newly formulated black body (BB) resonator with historical perspective and to outline the construction and assembly of the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil for use in ultra high field MRI (UHFMRI) studies at 340 MHz. TEM and BB resonators were machined from acrylic and Teflon tubing, copper foil, and brass connectors. Tuning was accomplished through adjustable TEM elements. Variable Teflon-based capacitors were utilized to provide matching to the 50 omega line. The TEM resonator operated in quadrature, and the BB resonator operated in linear mode. The final resonators were fully adjustable from 63 to 430 MHz. Quality (Q) values were measured using a network analyzer over this frequency range for the unloaded and loaded coils. Coil performance was also evaluated using gradient and spin echo imaging at 8 T. Both resonators yielded excellent images from mineral oil phantoms, with good homogeneity throughout the imaging volume. The BB resonator was characterized with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and greatly reduced RF power requirements relative to the TEM resonator. Images obtained from the human head at 8 T with the TEM resonator were also excellent. Tuning remains a tedious process. The TEM resonator provides an excellent RF coil for imaging studies up to 340 MHz. Its homogeneity reliability remains to be improved. In part as a result of its inability to sustain radiative loses, the BB resonator has extremely low RF power requirements. The BB resonator may have important uses in limiting RF power requirements and enhancing signal-to-noise ratio at other frequencies. Larger slightly modified versions may also prove useful in human imaging, depending on tolerances and final quality factors.

  16. Exact Green function for neutral Pauli-Dirac particle with anomalous magnetic momentum in linear magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdaci, Abdeldjalil; Jellal, Ahmed; Chetouani, Lyazid

    2017-09-01

    It is shown that the propagator of the neutral Pauli-Dirac particle with an anomalous magnetic moment μ in an external linear magnetic field B(x) = B +B‧ x is the causal Green function Sc(xb ,xa) of the Pauli-Dirac equation. The corresponding Green function is calculated via path integral method in global projection, giving rise to the exact eigenspinor expressions. The effective action is used to explicitly determine the production rate in vacuum of neutral Dirac particle in terms of B‧ and μ, which is B independent.

  17. Single-field inflation, anomalous enhancement of superhorizon fluctuations and non-Gaussianity in primordial black hole formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Ryo; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Nagata, Ryo E-mail: yokoyama@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-06-15

    We show a textbook potential for single-field inflation, namely the Coleman-Weinberg model can induce double inflation and formation of primordial black holes (PBHs), because fluctuations that leave the horizon near the end of first inflation are anomalously enhanced at the onset of second inflation when the time-dependent mode turns into a growing mode rather than a decaying mode. The mass of PBHs produced in this mechanism with an appreciable density are distributed at certain intervals depending on the model parameters. We also calculate the effects of non-Gaussian statistics due to higher-order interactions on the abundance of PBHs, which turns out to be small.

  18. Genotoxic effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in cultured mammalian cells are not independently reproducible.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Hoffmann, Heike

    2007-01-10

    Conflicting results have been published regarding the induction of genotoxic effects by exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). Using the comet assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosome aberration test with human fibroblasts (ES1 cells), the EU-funded "REFLEX" project (Risk Evaluation of Potential Environmental Hazards From Low Energy Electromagnetic Field Exposure Using Sensitive in vitro Methods) reported clearly positive effects for various exposure conditions. Because of the ongoing discussion on the biological significance of the effects observed, it was the aim of the present study to independently repeat the results using the same cells, the same equipment and the same exposure conditions. We therefore exposed ES1 cells to RF-EMF (1800 MHz; SAR 2 W/kg, continuous wave with intermittent exposure) for different time periods and then performed the alkaline (pH>13) comet assay and the micronucleus test (MNT). For both tests, clearly negative results were obtained in independently repeated experiments. We also performed these experiments with V79 cells, a sensitive Chinese hamster cell line that is frequently used in genotoxicity testing, and also did not measure any genotoxic effect in the comet assay and the MNT. Appropriate measures of quality control were considered to exclude variations in the test performance, failure of the RF-EMF exposure or an evaluation bias. The reasons for the difference between the results reported by the REFLEX project and our experiments remain unclear.

  19. Dependence of in-situ Bose condensate size on final frequency of RF-field in evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. R.; Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2017-04-01

    We report the results of in-situ characterization of 87Rb atom cloud in a quadrupole Ioffe configuration (QUIC) magnetic trap after a radio-frequency (RF) evaporative cooling of the trapped atom cloud. The in-situ absorption images of the atom cloud have shown clear bimodal optical density (OD) profiles which indicate the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) phase transition in the trapped gas. Also, we report here, for the first time, the measured variation in the sizes of the condensate and thermal clouds with the final frequency selected in the frequency scan of the RF-field for evaporative cooling. These results on frequency-dependent sizes of the clouds are consistent with the theoretical understanding of the BEC phenomenon in the trap.

  20. Anomalous Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malov, I. F.

    Many astrophysicists believe that Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars (AXP), Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters (SGR), Rotational Radio Transients (RRAT), Compact Central Objects (CCO) and X-Ray Dim Isolated Neutron Stars (XDINS) belong to different classes of anomalous objects with neutron stars as the central bodies inducing all their observable peculiarities. We have shown earlier [1] that AXPs and SGRs could be described by the drift model in the framework of the preposition on usual properties of the central neutron star (rotation periods P 0.01 - 1 sec and, surface magnetic fields B ~ 10^11-10^13 G). Here we shall try to show that some differences of the sources under consideration will be explained by their geometry (particularly, by the angle β between their rotation and magnetic axes). If β <~ 100 (the aligned rotator) the drift waves at the outer layers of the neutron star magnetosphere should play a key role in the observable periodicity. For large values of β (the case of the nearly orthogonal rotator) an accretion from the surrounding medium (for example, from the relic disk) can cause some modulation and transient events in received radiation. Recently Kramer et al. [2] and Camilo et al. [3] have shown that AXPs J1810-197 and 1E 1547.0 - 5408 have both small angles β, that is these sources are nearly aligned rotators, and the drift model should be used for their description. On the other hand, Wang et al. [4] detected IR radiation from the cold disk around the isolated young X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61. This was the first evidence of the disk-like matter around the neutron star. Probably there is the bimodality of anomalous pulsars. AXPs, SGRs and some radio transients belong to the population of aligned rotators with the angle between the rotation axis and the magnetic moment β < 200. These objects are described by the drift model, and their observed periods are connected with a periodicity of drift waves. Other sources have β ~ 900, and switching on's and switching off

  1. Pressurized H2 rf Cavities in Ionizing Beams and Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Collura, M. G.; Flanagan, G.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P. M.; Jana, M. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Kaplan, D. M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-10-01

    A major technological challenge in building a muon cooling channel is operating RF cavities in multi-tesla external magnetic fields. We report the first experimental characterization of a high pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity for use with intense ionizing beams and strong external magnetic fields. RF power consumption by beam-induced plasma was investigated with hydrogen and deuterium gases with pressures between 20 and 100 atm and peak RF gradients between 5 and 50 MV/m. The energy absorption per ion pair-RF cycle ranges from 10-18 to 10-16 J. The low pressure case agrees well with an analytical model based on electron and ion mobilities. Varying concentrations of oxygen gas were investigated to remove free electrons from the cavity and reduce the RF power consumption. Measurements of the electron attachment time to oxygen and rate of ion-ion recombination were also made. Additionally, we demonstrate the operation of the gas-filled RF cavity in a solenoidal field of up to 3 T, finding no major magnetic field dependence. These results indicate that a high pressure gas-filled cavity is potentially a viable technology for muon ionization cooling.

  2. Phase locking of the rotation of a graphene nanoplatelet to an RF electric field in a quadrupole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Joyce E.; Nagornykh, Pavel; Murphy, Jacob P. J.; Kane, Bruce E.

    2016-09-01

    Particle trapping technologies provide the opportunity to study two-dimensional materials that are fully decoupled from substrates. We investigate the dynamics of a rotating micron-scale graphene particle that is levitated in high vacuum in a quadrupole ion trap and probed via optical scattering. The particle is spun to frequencies ranging from hundreds of kHz to above 50 MHz using a circularly polarized laser. We observe phase locking of particle rotation frequency to an applied RF electric field. The rotation frequency can be adjusted by changing the applied field frequency. We discuss prospects for measurements of particle properties enabled by this technique.

  3. Carrier sheet density constrained anomalous current saturation of graphene field effect transistors: kinks and negative differential resistances.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomu; Xu, Haitao; Min, Jie; Peng, Lian-Mao; Xu, Jian-Bin

    2013-04-07

    There has recently been a great deal of interest and excitement in applying graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) in digital and radio frequency (RF) circuits and systems. Peculiar output characteristics such as kinks and negative differential resistance (NDR) in a strong field are the unique transport properties of GFETs. Here we demonstrate that these unusual features are attributed to a carrier sheet density constrained transport framework. Simulation results based on a simple analytic model which includes the linear DOS structure are in very good agreement with experimental data. The kernel mechanism of NDR is ascribed to the fact that the total current increase of a channel with a high average carrier density is constrained by its minimum sheet density. Utilizing in situ Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), the principle which naturally distinguishes NDR from kinks is further verified by studying the spatially resolved surface potential distribution along the channel. The influence and potential application of GFETs' unique output characteristics in the digital and RF fields are also proposed.

  4. Computational electromagnetic analysis in a human head model with EEG electrodes and leads exposed to RF-field sources at 915 MHz and 1748 MHz.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Leonardo M; Bit-Babik, Giorgi; Chou, Chung-Kwang

    2010-07-01

    An electromagnetic analysis of a human head with EEG electrodes and leads exposed to RF-field sources was performed by means of Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations on a 1-mm(3) MRI-based human head model. RF-field source models included a half-wave dipole, a patch antenna, and a realistic CAD-based mobile phone at 915 MHz and 1748 MHz. EEG electrodes/leads models included two configurations of EEG leads, both a standard 10-20 montage with 19 electrodes and a 32-electrode cap, and metallic and high resistive leads. Whole-head and peak 10-g average SAR showed less than 20% changes with and without leads. Peak 1-g and 10-g average SARs were below the ICNIRP and IEEE guideline limits. Conversely, a comprehensive volumetric assessment of changes in the RF field with and without metallic EEG leads showed an increase of two orders of magnitude in single-voxel power absorption in the epidermis and a 40-fold increase in the brain during exposure to the 915 MHz mobile phone. Results varied with the geometry and conductivity of EEG electrodes/leads. This enhancement confirms the validity of the question whether any observed effects in studies involving EEG recordings during RF-field exposure are directly related to the RF fields generated by the source or indirectly to the RF-field-induced currents due to the presence of conductive EEG leads.

  5. Computational Electromagnetic Analysis in a Human Head Model with EEG Electrodes and Leads Exposed to RF-Field Sources at 915 MHz and 1748 MHz

    PubMed Central

    Angelone, Leonardo M.; Bit-Babik, Giorgi; Chou, Chung-Kwang

    2010-01-01

    An electromagnetic analysis of a human head with EEG electrodes and leads exposed to RF-field sources was performed by means of Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations on a 1-mm3 MRI-based human head model. RF-field source models included a half-wave dipole, a patch antenna, and a realistic CAD-based mobile phone at 915 MHz and 1748 MHz. EEG electrodes/leads models included two configurations of EEG leads, both a standard 10–20 montage with 19 electrodes and a 32-electrode cap, and metallic and high resistive leads. Whole-head and peak 10-g average SAR showed less than 20% changes with and without leads. Peak 1-g and 10-g average SARs were below the ICNIRP and IEEE guideline limits. Conversely, a comprehensive volumetric assessment of changes in the RF field with and without metallic EEG leads showed an increase of two orders of magnitude in single-voxel power absorption in the epidermis and a 40-fold increase in the brain during exposure to the 915 MHz mobile phone. Results varied with the geometry and conductivity of EEG electrodes/leads. This enhancement confirms the validity of the question whether any observed effects in studies involving EEG recordings during RF-field exposure are directly related to the RF fields generated by the source or indirectly to the RF-field-induced currents due to the presence of conductive EEG leads. PMID:20681803

  6. Effect of different waiting time processes with memory to anomalous diffusion dynamics in an external force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fu-Yao; Wang, Jun; Lv, Long-Jin; Pan, Hua; Qiu, Wei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the anomalous diffusion of a particle in an external force field whose motion is governed by nonrenewal continuous time random walks with memory. In our models, the waiting time involves Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative or Riemann-Liouville fractional integral. We obtain the systematic observation on the mean squared displacement, the Fokker-Planck-type dynamic equations and their stationary solutions. These processes obey a generalized Einstein-Stokes-Smoluchowski relation, and observe the second Einstein relation. The asymptotic behavior of waiting times and subordinations are of stretched Gaussian distributions. We also discuss the time averaged in the case of an external force field, and show that the process exhibits aging and ergodicity breaking.

  7. Zero-Field Dissipationless Chiral Edge Transport and the Nature of Dissipation in the Quantum Anomalous Hall State.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Zhao, Weiwei; Kim, Duk Y; Wei, Peng; Jain, J K; Liu, Chaoxing; Chan, Moses H W; Moodera, Jagadeesh S

    2015-07-31

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is predicted to possess, at a zero magnetic field, chiral edge channels that conduct a spin polarized current without dissipation. While edge channels have been observed in previous experimental studies of the QAH effect, their dissipationless nature at a zero magnetic field has not been convincingly demonstrated. By a comprehensive experimental study of the gate and temperature dependences of local and nonlocal magnetoresistance, we unambiguously establish the dissipationless edge transport. By studying the onset of dissipation, we also identify the origin of dissipative channels and clarify the surprising observation that the critical temperature of the QAH effect is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the Curie temperature of ferromagnetism.

  8. Closely-spaced double-row microstrip RF arrays for parallel MR imaging at ultrahigh fields.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinqiang; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2015-11-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) coil arrays with high count of elements, e.g., closely-spaced multi-row arrays, exhibit superior parallel imaging performance in MRI. However, it is technically challenging and time-consuming to build multi-row arrays due to complex coupling issues. This paper presents a novel and simple method for closely-spaced multi-row RF array designs. Induced current elimination (ICE) decoupling method has shown the capability of reducing coupling between microstrip elements from different rows. In this study, its capability for decoupling array elements from the same row was investigated and validated by bench tests, with an isolation improvement from -8.9 dB to -20.7 dB. Based on this feature, a closely-spaced double-row microstrip array with 16 elements was built at 7T. S21 between any two elements of the 16-channel closely-spaced was better than -14 dB. In addition, its feasibility and performance was validated by MRI experiments. No significant image reconstruction- related noise amplifications were observed for parallel imaging even when reduced factor (R) achieves 4. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed design might be a simple and efficient approach in fabricating closely-spaced multi-row RF arrays.

  9. Closely-spaced double-row microstrip RF arrays for parallel MR imaging at ultrahigh fields

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinqiang; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) coil arrays with high count of elements, e.g., closely-spaced multi-row arrays, exhibit superior parallel imaging performance in MRI. However, it is technically challenging and time-consuming to build multi-row arrays due to complex coupling issues. This paper presents a novel and simple method for closely-spaced multi-row RF array designs. Induced current elimination (ICE) decoupling method has shown the capability of reducing coupling between microstrip elements from different rows. In this study, its capability for decoupling array elements from the same row was investigated and validated by bench tests, with an isolation improvement from −8.9 dB to −20.7 dB. Based on this feature, a closely-spaced double-row microstrip array with 16 elements was built at 7T. S21 between any two elements of the 16-channel closely-spaced was better than −14 dB. In addition, its feasibility and performance was validated by MRI experiments. No significant image reconstruction- related noise amplifications were observed for parallel imaging even when reduced factor (R) achieves 4. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed design might be a simple and efficient approach in fabricating closely-spaced multi-row RF arrays. PMID:26508810

  10. Anomalous response of supported few-layer hexagonal boron nitride to DC electric fields: a confined water effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Camilla; Matos, Matheus; Mazzoni, Mário; Chacham, Hélio; Neves, Bernardo

    2013-03-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a two-dimensional compound from III-V family, with the atoms of boron and nitrogen arranged in a honeycomb lattice, similar to graphene. Unlike graphene though, h-BN is an insulator material, with a gap larger than 5 eV. Here, we use Electric Force Microscopy (EFM) to study the electrical response of mono and few-layers of h-BN to an electric field applied by the EFM tip. Our results show an anomalous behavior in the dielectric response for h-BN for different bias orientation: for a positive bias applied to the tip, h-BN layers respond with a larger dielectric constant than the dielectric constant of the silicon dioxide substrate; while for a negative bias, the h-BN dielectric constant is smaller than the dielectric constant of the substrate. Based on first-principles calculations, we showed that this anomalous response may be interpreted as a macroscopic consequence of confinement of a thin water layer between h-BN and substrate. These results were confirmed by sample annealing and also also by a comparative analysis with h-BN on a non-polar substrate. All the authors acknowledge financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono.

  11. Self-induced steady-state magnetic field in the negative ion sources with localized rf power deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shivarova, A.; Todorov, D. Lishev, St.

    2016-02-15

    The study is in the scope of a recent activity on modeling of SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) which is under development regarding the neutral beam injection heating system of ITER. The regime of non-ambipolarity in the source, established before, is completed here by introducing in the model the steady state magnetic field, self-induced in the discharge due to the dc current flowing in it. Strong changes in the discharge structure are reported.

  12. An investigation into the effectiveness of ELF protective clothing when exposed to RF fields between 65 MHz and 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, R. P.; Dimbylow, P. J.

    2012-05-01

    Protective garments are worn by electric power workers to shield the body against electromagnetic fields. This paper uses the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate SAR in the heterogeneous human voxel model NORMAN, clad in a protective suit and exposed to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields between 65 MHz and 3 GHz. The representation of the suit was produced for this work by the modelling and voxelization of a surface-rendered object, based on the dimensions of the male voxel phantom. The calculations showed that the peak-localized SAR in the head was higher than that calculated for a model without a protective suit for a number of exposure situations. These localized SAR values could be up to three times the values of those calculated for a model without a protective suit for a particular frequency. It is thought that the SAR hotspots in the head are caused by resonances in a cavity, which in this case is the conductive hood of the suit. This work shows that the increase in the peak-localized SAR in the head due to wearing the suit meant that, in certain situations, the ICNIRP and IEEE reference levels were no longer conservative. Therefore, it is important that power line workers exposed to RF fields wear the correct high-frequency protective suits with conducting visors.

  13. An investigation into the effectiveness of ELF protective clothing when exposed to RF fields between 65 MHz and 3 GHz.

    PubMed

    Findlay, R P; Dimbylow, P J

    2012-05-07

    Protective garments are worn by electric power workers to shield the body against electromagnetic fields. This paper uses the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate SAR in the heterogeneous human voxel model NORMAN, clad in a protective suit and exposed to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields between 65 MHz and 3 GHz. The representation of the suit was produced for this work by the modelling and voxelization of a surface-rendered object, based on the dimensions of the male voxel phantom. The calculations showed that the peak-localized SAR in the head was higher than that calculated for a model without a protective suit for a number of exposure situations. These localized SAR values could be up to three times the values of those calculated for a model without a protective suit for a particular frequency. It is thought that the SAR hotspots in the head are caused by resonances in a cavity, which in this case is the conductive hood of the suit. This work shows that the increase in the peak-localized SAR in the head due to wearing the suit meant that, in certain situations, the ICNIRP and IEEE reference levels were no longer conservative. Therefore, it is important that power line workers exposed to RF fields wear the correct high-frequency protective suits with conducting visors.

  14. Infrared thermography analysis of thermal diffusion induced by RF magnetic field on agar phantoms loaded with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, Jose; Macías, J. D.; Caballero-Aguilar, L.; Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several treatments for fighting malignant tumors have been designed. However these procedures have well known inconveniences, depending on their applicability, tumor size and side effects, among others. Magnetic hyperthermia is a safe, non-invasive method for cancer therapy. This treatment is applied via elevation of target tissue temperature by dissipation of heat from Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs), previously located within the tumor. The induction of heat causes cell death and therefore the removal of the tumor. In this work the thermal diffusion in phantoms of agar loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied using the infrared thermography technique, which is widely used in biology/medicine (e.g. skin temperature mapping). Agar is one of the materials used to simulate different types of body tissues, these samples are known as "phantoms". Agar is of natural origin, low cost and high degree of biocompatibility. In this work the agar gel was embedded with MNPs by coprecipitation and placed in an alternating magnetic field radiation. As a consequence, the energy from the radiation source is dissipated as heat and then transferred from the MNP to the gel, increasing its temperature. For the temperature analysis, the samples of agar gel were stimulated by RF magnetic field generated by coils. Heating was measured with infrared thermography using a Thermovision A20M infrared camera. Thermographic images allowed obtaining the dependence of thermal diffusion in the phantom as a function of the magnitude of the applied RF magnetic field and the load of magnetic particles.

  15. Effect of RF coil excitation on field inhomogeneity at ultra high fields: a field optimized TEM resonator.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, T S; Lee, R; Baertlein, B A; Abduljalil, A M; Zhu, H; Robitaille, P M

    2001-12-01

    In this work, computational methods were utilized to optimize the field produced by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) resonator in the presence of the human head at 8 Tesla. Optimization was achieved through the use of the classical finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and a TEM resonator loaded with an anatomically detailed human head model with a resolution of 2 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm. The head model was developed from 3D MR images. To account for the electromagnetic interactions between the coil and the tissue, the coil and the head were treated as a single system at all the steps of the model including, numerical tuning and excitation. In addition to 2, 3, 4, 6, and 10-port excitations, an antenna array concept was utilized by driving all the possible ports (24) of a 24-strut TEM resonator. The results show that significant improvement in the circularly polarized component of the transverse magnetic field could be obtained when using multiple ports and variable phase and fixed magnitude, or variable phase and variable magnitude excitations.

  16. The ANL experiment for a wake field accelerator using an rf structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1986-08-27

    Experiments are planned at ANL to study a new accelerating concept that has been developed during the last few years named the WAKEATRON. This requires a very special, simple configuration of the beams and of the rf structure involved. The basic concepts are explained. Like most proposed experimental work, this too was initiated by a considerable amount of computational work, both analytical and numerical, on which we would like to report. We will then describe details of the planned experiments we will carry out at ANL to check some of our predictions for this concept. These experiments concentrate on beam and cavity geometry applicable to the Wakeatron.

  17. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  18. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, B. P.; Reece, C. E.; Kelley, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0 K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  19. Modeling RF Fields in Hot Plasmas with Parallel Full Wave Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Andrew; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Zhao, Liangji; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-10-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a suite of full wave RF plasma codes. It is based on a meshless formulation in configuration space with adapted cloud of computational points (CCP) capability and using the hot plasma conductivity kernel to model the nonlocal plasma dielectric response. The conductivity kernel is calculated by numerically integrating the linearized Vlasov equation along unperturbed particle trajectories. Work has been done on the following calculations: 1) the conductivity kernel in hot plasmas, 2) a monitor function based on analytic solutions of the cold-plasma dispersion relation, 3) an adaptive CCP based on the monitor function, 4) stencils to approximate the wave equations on the CCP, 5) the solution to the full wave equations in the cold-plasma model in tokamak geometry for ECRH and ICRH range of frequencies, and 6) the solution to the wave equations using the calculated hot plasma conductivity kernel. We will present results on using a meshless formulation on adaptive CCP to solve the wave equations and on implementing the non-local hot plasma dielectric response to the wave equations. The presentation will include numerical results of wave propagation and absorption in the cold and hot tokamak plasma RF models, using DIII-D geometry and plasma parameters. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  20. Anomalous Spectral Shift of Near- and Far-Field Plasmonic Resonances in Nanogaps

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The near-field and far-field spectral response of plasmonic systems are often assumed to be identical, due to the lack of methods that can directly compare and correlate both responses under similar environmental conditions. We develop a widely tunable optical technique to probe the near-field resonances within individual plasmonic nanostructures that can be directly compared to the corresponding far-field response. In tightly coupled nanoparticle-on-mirror constructs with nanometer-sized gaps we find >40 meV blue-shifts of the near-field compared to the dark-field scattering peak, which agrees with full electromagnetic simulations. Using a transformation optics approach, we show such shifts arise from the different spectral interference between different gap modes in the near- and far-field. The control and tuning of near-field and far-field responses demonstrated here is of paramount importance in the design of optical nanostructures for field-enhanced spectroscopy, as well as to control near-field activity monitored through the far-field of nano-optical devices. PMID:27077075

  1. Anomalous Spectral Shift of Near- and Far-Field Plasmonic Resonances in Nanogaps.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Anna; Demetriadou, Angela; Weller, Lee; Andrae, Patrick; Benz, Felix; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2016-03-16

    The near-field and far-field spectral response of plasmonic systems are often assumed to be identical, due to the lack of methods that can directly compare and correlate both responses under similar environmental conditions. We develop a widely tunable optical technique to probe the near-field resonances within individual plasmonic nanostructures that can be directly compared to the corresponding far-field response. In tightly coupled nanoparticle-on-mirror constructs with nanometer-sized gaps we find >40 meV blue-shifts of the near-field compared to the dark-field scattering peak, which agrees with full electromagnetic simulations. Using a transformation optics approach, we show such shifts arise from the different spectral interference between different gap modes in the near- and far-field. The control and tuning of near-field and far-field responses demonstrated here is of paramount importance in the design of optical nanostructures for field-enhanced spectroscopy, as well as to control near-field activity monitored through the far-field of nano-optical devices.

  2. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging.

    PubMed

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G; Sandalidis, Harilaos G; Aletras, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R=0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rod-filter-field optimization of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second-stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Although rod-filter-field (RFF) is indispensable and one of the most beam performance dominative parameters for the RF-driven H{sup −} ion source with the internal-antenna, the procedure to optimize it is not established. In order to optimize the RFF and establish the procedure, the beam performances of the J-PARC source with various types of rod-filter-magnets (RFMs) were measured. By changing RFM’s gap length and gap number inside of the region projecting the antenna inner-diameter along the beam axis, the dependence of the H{sup −} ion beam intensity on the net 2MHz-RF power was optimized. Furthermore, the fine-tuning of RFM’s cross-section (magnetmotive force) was indispensable for easy operation with the temperature (T{sub PE}) of the plasma electrode (PE) lower than 70°C, which minimizes the transverse emittances. The 5% reduction of RFM’s cross-section decreased the time-constant to recover the cesium effects after an slightly excessive cesiation on the PE from several 10 minutes to several minutes for T{sub PE} around 60°C.

  4. Multi-slice parallel transmission three-dimensional tailored RF (PTX 3DTRF) pulse design for signal recovery in ultra high field functional MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hai; Zhao, Tiejun; Qian, Yongxian; Schirda, Claudiu; Ibrahim, Tamer S.; Boada, Fernando E.

    2013-03-01

    T2∗ weighted fMRI at high and ultra high field (UHF) is often hampered by susceptibility-induced, through-plane, signal loss. Three-dimensional tailored RF (3DTRF) pulses have been shown to be an effective approach for mitigating through-plane signal loss at UHF. However, the required RF pulse lengths are too long for practical applications. Recently, parallel transmission (PTX) has emerged as a very effective means for shortening the RF pulse duration for 3DTRF without sacrificing the excitation performance. In this article, we demonstrate a RF pulse design strategy for 3DTRF based on the use of multi-slice PTX 3DTRF to simultaneously and precisely recover signal with whole-brain coverage. Phantom and human experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method on three subjects using an eight-channel whole body parallel transmission system.

  5. Thermokinetic model of fracture of heterogeneous materials and peculiarities of its numerical realization under the action of RF electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzhulin, M. G.; Makhmudov, Kh. F.

    2017-07-01

    The fracture of rocks has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The model of evolution of micro- and macrocracking under the action of electromagnetic fields with the help of rf electrodes has been proposed. The calculation of the fields of temperature and thermoelastic stresses makes it possible to study the evolution of macrocracking and to establish the directions of evolution in the case of their 3D configuration. The mechanisms of the formation of a main crack for regions with different tensile stresses have been established. The main crack can evolve towards the range of tensile stresses lower than the ultimate tensile stress. The possibility of controlling the evolution of the main crack by selecting stresses over the length of the crack formed and the heating time has been demonstrated.

  6. Robust conversion of singlet spin order in coupled spin-1/2 pairs by adiabatically ramped RF-fields.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Kiryutin, Alexey S; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2016-12-01

    We propose a robust and highly efficient NMR technique to create singlet spin order from longitudinal spin magnetization in coupled spin-½ pairs and to perform backward conversion (singlet order)→magnetization. In this method we exploit adiabatic ramping of an RF-field in order to drive transitions between the singlet state and the T± triplet states of a spin pair under study. We demonstrate that the method works perfectly for both strongly and weakly coupled spin pairs, providing a conversion efficiency between the singlet spin order and magnetization, which is equal to the theoretical maximum. We anticipate that the proposed technique is useful for generating long-lived singlet order, for preserving spin hyperpolarization and for analyzing singlet spin order in nearly equivalent spin pairs in specially designed molecules and in low-field NMR studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. ON THE COMPUTATION OF PHASE AND ENERGY GAIN FOR A THIN-LENS RF GAP USING A GENERAL FIELD PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Christopher K

    2017-01-01

    The thin-lens representation for an RF accelerating gap has been well developed and is documented by Lapostolle [5], Weiss [6], Wangler [14], and others [9], [10]. These models assume that the axial electric field is both centered and symmetric so it has a cosine expansion. Presented here is a model that considers general axial fields. Both the cosine and sine transit time factors are required plus their Hilbert transforms. The combination yields a complex Hamiltonian rotating in the complex plane with the synchronous phase. The phase and energy gains are computed in the pre-gap and post-gap regions then aligned with asymptotic values of wave number. Derivations are outlined, examples are shown, and simulations presented.

  8. Strain and vector magnetic field tuning of the anomalous phase in Sr3Ru2O7

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Daniel O.; Barber, Mark E.; Bruin, Jan A. N.; Borzi, Rodolfo A.; Grigera, Santiago A.; Perry, Robin S.; Mackenzie, Andrew P.; Hicks, Clifford W.

    2017-01-01

    A major area of interest in condensed matter physics is the way electrons in correlated electron materials can self-organize into ordered states, and a particularly intriguing possibility is that they spontaneously choose a preferred direction of conduction. The correlated electron metal Sr3Ru2O7 has an anomalous phase at low temperatures that features strong susceptibility toward anisotropic transport. This susceptibility has been thought to indicate a spontaneous anisotropy, that is, electronic order that spontaneously breaks the point-group symmetry of the lattice, allowing weak external stimuli to select the orientation of the anisotropy. We investigate further by studying the response of Sr3Ru2O7 in the region of phase formation to two fields that lift the native tetragonal symmetry of the lattice: in-plane magnetic field and orthorhombic lattice distortion through uniaxial pressure. The response to uniaxial pressure is surprisingly strong: Compressing the lattice by ~0.1% induces an approximately 100% transport anisotropy. However, neither the in-plane field nor the pressure phase diagrams are qualitatively consistent with spontaneous symmetry reduction. Instead, both are consistent with a multicomponent order parameter that is likely to preserve the point-group symmetry of the lattice, but is highly susceptible to perturbation. PMID:28168216

  9. Anomalous spin-orbit torque switching due to field-like torque-assisted domain wall reflection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jungbum; Lee, Seo-Won; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jong Min; Son, Jaesung; Qiu, Xuepeng; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2017-04-01

    Spin-orbit torques (SOTs) allow the electrical control of magnetic states. Current-induced SOT switching of the perpendicular magnetization is of particular technological importance. The SOT consists of damping-like and field-like torques, and understanding the combined effects of these two torque components is required for efficient SOT switching. Previous quasi-static measurements have reported an increased switching probability with the width of current pulses, as predicted considering the damping-like torque alone. We report a decreased switching probability at longer pulse widths, based on time-resolved measurements. Micromagnetic analysis reveals that this anomalous SOT switching results from domain wall reflections at sample edges. The domain wall reflection was found to strongly depend on the field-like torque and its relative sign to the damping-like torque. Our result demonstrates a key role of the field-like torque in deterministic SOT switching and the importance of the sign correlation of the two torque components, which may shed light on the SOT switching mechanism.

  10. Strain and vector magnetic field tuning of the anomalous phase in Sr3Ru2O7.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Daniel O; Barber, Mark E; Bruin, Jan A N; Borzi, Rodolfo A; Grigera, Santiago A; Perry, Robin S; Mackenzie, Andrew P; Hicks, Clifford W

    2017-02-01

    A major area of interest in condensed matter physics is the way electrons in correlated electron materials can self-organize into ordered states, and a particularly intriguing possibility is that they spontaneously choose a preferred direction of conduction. The correlated electron metal Sr3Ru2O7 has an anomalous phase at low temperatures that features strong susceptibility toward anisotropic transport. This susceptibility has been thought to indicate a spontaneous anisotropy, that is, electronic order that spontaneously breaks the point-group symmetry of the lattice, allowing weak external stimuli to select the orientation of the anisotropy. We investigate further by studying the response of Sr3Ru2O7 in the region of phase formation to two fields that lift the native tetragonal symmetry of the lattice: in-plane magnetic field and orthorhombic lattice distortion through uniaxial pressure. The response to uniaxial pressure is surprisingly strong: Compressing the lattice by ~0.1% induces an approximately 100% transport anisotropy. However, neither the in-plane field nor the pressure phase diagrams are qualitatively consistent with spontaneous symmetry reduction. Instead, both are consistent with a multicomponent order parameter that is likely to preserve the point-group symmetry of the lattice, but is highly susceptible to perturbation.

  11. Simultaneous use of Cs and Rb Rydberg atoms for dipole moment assessment and RF electric field measurements via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Matt T.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Holloway, Christopher L.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) with cesium (Cs) and rubidium (Rb) Rydberg atoms in the same vapor cell with coincident (overlapping) optical fields. Each atomic system can detect radio frequency (RF) electric (E) field strengths through the modification of the EIT signal (Autler-Townes (AT) splitting), which leads to a direct International System of Unit traceable RF E-field measurement. We show that these two systems can detect the same RF E-field strength simultaneously, which provides a direct in situ comparison of Rb and Cs RF measurements in Rydberg atoms. In effect, this allows us to perform two measurements of the same E-field strength, providing a relative comparison of the dipole moments of the two atomic species. This gives two measurements that help rule out systematic effects and uncertainties in this E-field metrology approach, which are important when establishing an international measurement standard for an E-field strength, and is a necessary step for this method to be accepted as a standard calibration technique. We use this approach to measure E-fields at 9.2 GHz, 11.6 GHz, and 13.4 GHz, which correspond to three different atomic states (different principal atomic numbers and angular momentums) for the two atom species.

  12. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  13. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  14. Efficiency enhancement of anomalous-Doppler electron cyclotron masers with tapered magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chao-Ran; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Kong, Ling-Bao E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Liu, Pu-Kun E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Du, Chao-Hai; Jin, Hai-Bo

    2014-02-15

    The efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) is usually low, thus limiting the practical applications. Here, a method of tapered magnetic field is introduced for the efficiency enhancement of the slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the tapered magnetic-field method can enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM significantly. The effect of beam electron velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread reduces the efficiency, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be obtained by the tapered magnetic field method.

  15. Anomalous electron diffusion across a magnetic field in a beam-plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, H.; Ono, M.; Armstrong, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    The diffusion of electrons across a magnetic field in the presence of a beam-plasma instability has been studied by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations. It is found that the beam electrons can diffuse much faster across the magnetic field than the thermal electrons. This can be explained by the fact that the electrons in the beam are in resonance with the waves excited by the beam-plasma instability so that they experience a nearly dc electric field, causing large cE x B/B/sup 2/ excursions. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Time dependant quantum efficiency and dark current measurements in an RF photocathode injector with a high quantum efficiency cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Edwards, H.; Hartung, W.; /Michigan State U., NSCL

    2005-05-01

    Studies of photo-emission and field emission behavior in an RF gun have been carried out. Unexpected phenomena were observed. In situ changes in the cathode's quantum efficiency and dark current with time were seen during operation of the photo-injector. These changes were correlated with the magnetostatic field at the cathode. In addition, multipacting has been observed under certain conditions. Recent measurements indicate a correlation between multipacting and anomalous photo- and field emission behavior.

  17. Anomalous QCD contribution to the Debye screening in an external field via holography

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Kopnin, P. N.; Krikun, A.

    2011-03-15

    In this paper we discuss the QCD contribution to the Abelian Debye and magnetic screening masses in a deconfined QCD plasma at finite temperature in the presence of an external magnetic field B. We use a holographic AdS/QCD setup in an AdS Schwarzschild black hole background and show that the electric screening mass has a form similar to the one-loop result in QED. Moreover, we calculate the corrections due to the magnetic field to all orders of B and demonstrate that in the case when the magnetic field is large the Debye mass grows linearly with B, while the magnetic screening mass vanishes. The whole effect of the magnetic field turns out to stem from the Chern-Simons action. We also discuss the zero temperature case in the chiral perturbation theory.

  18. Development of gas cluster ion beam surface treatments for reducing field emission and breakdown in RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, D R; Degenkolb, E; Wu, A T; Insepov, Z

    2006-11-01

    Sub-micron-scale surface roughness and contamination cause field emission that can lead to high voltage breakdown of electrodes, and these are limiting factors in the development of high gradient RF technology. We are studying various Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) treatments to smooth, clean, etch and/or chemically alter electrode surfaces to allow higher fields and accelerating gradients, and to reduce the time and cost of conditioning high voltage electrodes. For this paper, we have processed Nb, Stainless Steel, and Ti electrode materials using beams of Ar, O2, or NF3 +O2 clusters with accelerating potentials up to 35 kV. Using a Scanning Field Emission Microscope (SFEM), we have repeatedly seen a dramatic reduction in the number of field emission sites on Nb coupons treated with GCIB. Smoothing effects on Stainless steel and Ti substrates have been evaluated using AFM imaging and show that 200-nm wide polishing scratch marks are greatly attenuated. A 150-mm diameter GCIB treated stainless steel electrode has now shown virtually no DC field emission current at gradients over 20 MV/m.

  19. Anomalous self-generated electrostatic fields in nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lancia, L.; Antici, P.; Grech, M.; Weber, S.; Marques, J.-R.; Romagnani, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Bellue, A.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Grismayer, T.; Lin, T.; Nkonga, B.; Kodama, R.

    2011-03-15

    Electrostatic (E) fields associated with the interaction of a well-controlled, high-power, nanosecond laser pulse with an underdense plasma are diagnosed by proton radiography. Using a current three-dimensional wave propagation code equipped with nonlinear and nonlocal hydrodynamics, we can model the measured E-fields that are driven by the laser ponderomotive force in the region where the laser undergoes filamentation. However, strong fields of up to 110 MV/m measured in the first millimeter of propagation cannot be reproduced in the simulations. This could point to the presence of unexpected strong thermal electron pressure gradients possibly linked to ion acoustic turbulence, thus emphasizing the need for the development of full kinetic collisional simulations in order to properly model laser-plasma interaction in these strongly nonlinear conditions.

  20. Anomalous Magnetic Field Dependence of Charge Carrier Density in Ferromagnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuivalainen, P.; Sinkkonen, J.; Stubb, T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports calculations of temperature and magnetic field dependent thermal and optical activation energies of a shallow donor state and the energy of the conduction band edge in a ferromagnetic semiconductor. The formation of the bound magnetic polaron (BMP), i.e., a magnetically polarized cluster associated with the donor electron, is taken into account. The solution of a set of coupled equations for the energy of a donor electron and for the local non-uniform magnetization around the donor center indicates that the activation energies have their maxima near the Curie temperature and decrease with the application of a magnetic field. This decrease leads to a strong magnetic field dependence of the charge carrier density nc explains well the giant negative magnetoresistance of EuSe observed experimentally at low temperatures.

  1. Measurement of Frequency, Temperature, RF Field Dependence of Surface Resistance of Superconductors Using a Half Wave Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyekyoung; Delayen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    A theory of surface resistance of superconductor was rigorously formulated by Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer more than 50 years ago. Since then the accelerator community has been used the theory as a guideline to improve the surface resistance of the superconducting cavity. It has been observed that the surface resistance is dependent on frequency, temperature and rf field strength, and surface preparation. To verify these dependences, a well-controlled study is required. Although many different types of cavities have been tested, the typical superconducting cavities are built for specific frequencies of their application. They do not provide data other than at its own frequency. A superconducting half wave cavity is a cavity that enables us to collect the surface resistance data across frequencies of interest for particle accelerators and evaluate preparation techniques. This paper will present the design of the half wave cavity, its electromagnetic mode characteristics and experimental results. Research supported by NSF Award PHY-1416051.

  2. RF radiation from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation from lightning in the RF band from 3-300 MHz were monitored. Radiation in this frequency range is of interest as a potential vehicle for monitoring severe storms and for studying the lightning itself. Simultaneous measurements were made of RF radiation and fast and slow field changes. Continuous analogue recordings with a system having 300 kHz of bandwidth were made together with digital records of selected events (principally return strokes) at greater temporal resolution. The data reveal patterns in the RF radiation for the entire flash which are characteristic of flash type and independent of the frequency of observation. Individual events within the flash also have characteristic RF patterns. Strong radiation occurs during the first return strokes, but delayed about 20 micron sec with respect to the begining of the return stroke; whereas, RF radiation from subsequent return strokes tends to be associated with cloud processes preceding the flash with comparatively little radiation occurring during the return stroke itself.

  3. Anomalous Cross-Field Current and Fluctuating Equilibrium of Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, O.E.; Paulsen, J.

    1997-09-01

    It is shown by simple physical arguments and fluid simulations that electrostatic flute-mode fluctuations can sustain a substantial cross-field current in addition to mass and energy transport. The simulations show that this current determines essential features of the fluctuating plasma equilibrium, and explain qualitatively the experimental equilibria and the coherent flute-mode structures observed in a simple magnetized torus. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Anomalous Drain Voltage Dependence in Bias Temperature Instability Measurements on High-K Field Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Ez(Y), when V ds is not small and so the semiconductor surface potential becomes a function of distance along the inversion channel (y direction). In...generation models in which H2 diffusing through the oxide "cracks" on a positively charged center and de-passivates a silicon dangling bond [12]. That...devices. 3 1. Introduction Accurate detelmination of the susceptibility of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) to degradation

  5. Anomalous Geologic Setting of the Spencer-High Point Volcanic Field, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahashi, G. S.; Hughes, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The Spencer-High Point (SHP) volcanic field comprises an ~1700 sq km mafic volcanic rift zone located near Yellowstone in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). SHP lava flows are both similar to and distinct from typical olivine tholeiite lavas of the ESRP. SHP has unique physical volcanic features characterized by numerous cinder cones and short lava flows; whereas, spatter ramparts, fissures and longer flows dominate in other ESRP regions. Topography and aerial photos indicate that vents are generally aligned northwest- southeast, which is sub-parallel to adjacent Basin and Range faults in much of the ESRP. Yet individual vents and other structural elements in SHP where Basin and Range, ESRP and thrust-faulted mountain belts all intersect, are elongated in a more east-west direction. Distinct structural control is manifested in an overall southward slope over the entire volcanic field. Short lava flows tend to flow north or south off of a central topographically higher zone of overlapping lava flows and smaller vents. Several smaller vents appear to be parasitic cones adjacent to larger eruptive centers. Contrary to these relations, preliminary geochemical data by Leeman (1982) and Kuntz et al. (1992) suggest SHP lavas are typical ESRP olivine tholeiite basalts, which notably have coarsely diktytaxitic texture. The central and eastern sections of the SHP field contain lavas with large (3-8cm), clear, euhedral plagioclase phenocrysts but without diktytaxitic texture. Lava flows in the central and eastern sections of SHP volcanic field are pahoehoe. These also contain crustal xenoliths implying a prolonged crustal history. Geochemical whole rock and microprobe analyses are currently being processed for petrogenetic history.

  6. Anomalous power dependence in the zero-field resonance for the molecular nanomagnet Cr7Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, C. A.; Timco, G. A.; Winpenny, R. E. P.; Friedman, J. R.

    We report electron-spin resonance studies of the paramagnetic ring [(CH3)2NH2][Cr7MnF8((CH3)3CCOO)16] (''Cr7Mn''), a spin S=1 molecular nanomagnet with a large zero-field ground-state tunnel splitting of ~4 GHz. We perform parallel-mode electron-spin-resonance (ESR) spectroscopy with loop-gap resonators (LGRs) with resonance frequencies of 4-6 GHz. A crystal of Cr7Mn is placed on the loop of the LGR with the sample's easy axis parallel to the field. We observe an ESR peak at zero dc field. With increasing radiation power, a pronounced dip develops in the center of the resonance peak, indicating a decoupling of the sample from the resonator with increased power. The onset of this decoupling depends on both the temperature and the applied power, with greater power required to observe the dip at higher temperatures. By pulsing the radiation, we can rule out that the dip is related to sample heating or saturation of the resonance. Power, temperature, and frequency dependence of the decoupling will be presented, and possible explanations will be discussed.

  7. Beam Dynamics Enhancement due to Accelerating Field Symmetrization in the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.

    1997-05-01

    A 1.6 cell photocathode S-Band gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). One of the main features of this RF gun is the symmetrization of the RF coupling iris with a identical vacuum pumping port located in the full cell. The effects of the asymmetry caused by the RF coupling iris were experimentally investigated by positioning a metallic plunger at the back wall of the vacuum port iris. The higher order modes produced were studied using electron beamlets with n-fold symmetry. The n-fold beamlets were produced by masking the laser beam. These experimental results indicate that the integrated electrical center and the geometrical center of the gun are within 175 μm. Which is within the laser alignment tolerance of 250 μm. Comparing these results to previous generations of BNL type RF guns, there has been an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field components of the longitudinal accelerating field E_z. Low power RF cold tests measurements of the guns full cell are consistent with the experimental beam dynamics transport studies.

  8. A dual RF resonator system for high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, R; Bodgdanov, G; King, J; Allard, A; Ferris, C F

    2004-01-30

    A new apparatus has been developed that integrates an animal restrainer arrangement for small animals with an actively tunable/detunable dual radio-frequency (RF) coil system for in vivo anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals at 4.7 T. The radio-frequency coil features an eight-element microstrip line configuration that, in conjunction with a segmented outer copper shield, forms a transversal electromagnetic (TEM) resonator structure. Matching and active tuning/detuning is achieved through fixed/variable capacitors and a PIN diode for each resonator element. These components along with radio-frequency chokes (RFCs) and blocking capacitors are placed on two printed circuit boards (PCBs) whose copper coated ground planes form the front and back of the volume coil and are therefore an integral part of the resonator structure. The magnetic resonance signal response is received with a dome-shaped single-loop surface coil that can be height-adjustable with respect to the animal's head. The conscious animal is immobilized through a mechanical arrangement that consists of a Plexiglas body tube and a head restrainer. This restrainer has a cylindrical holder with a mouthpiece and position screws to receive and restrain the head of the animal. The apparatus is intended to perform anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging in conscious animals such as mice, rats, hamsters, and marmosets. Cranial images acquired from fully conscious rats in a 4.7 T Bruker 40 cm bore animal scanner underscore the feasibility of this approach and bode well to extend this system to the imaging of other animals.

  9. Non-mean-field theory of anomalously large double layer capacitance.

    PubMed

    Loth, M S; Skinner, Brian; Shklovskii, B I

    2010-07-01

    Mean-field theories claim that the capacitance of the double layer formed at a metal/ionic conductor interface cannot be larger than that of the Helmholtz capacitor, whose width is equal to the radius of an ion. However, in some experiments the apparent width of the double layer capacitor is substantially smaller. We propose an alternate non-mean-field theory of the ionic double layer to explain such large capacitance values. Our theory allows for the binding of discrete ions to their image charges in the metal, which results in the formation of interface dipoles. We focus primarily on the case where only small cations are mobile and other ions form an oppositely charged background. In this case, at small temperature and zero applied voltage dipoles form a correlated liquid on both contacts. We show that at small voltages the capacitance of the double layer is determined by the transfer of dipoles from one electrode to the other and is therefore limited only by the weak dipole-dipole repulsion between bound ions so that the capacitance is very large. At large voltages the depletion of bound ions from one of the capacitor electrodes triggers a collapse of the capacitance to the much smaller mean-field value, as seen in experimental data. We test our analytical predictions with a Monte Carlo simulation and find good agreement. We further argue that our "one-component plasma" model should work well for strongly asymmetric ion liquids. We believe that this work also suggests an improved theory of pseudocapacitance.

  10. Anomalous spin excitation spectrum of the Heisenberg model in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Syljuåsen, Olav F; Lee, Patrick A

    2002-05-20

    Making the assumption that high-energy fermions exist in the two dimensional spin- 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet, we present predictions based on the pi-flux ansatz for the dynamic structure factor when the antiferromagnet is subject to a uniform magnetic field. The main result is the presence of gapped excitations in a momentum region near (pi,pi) with energy lower than that at (pi,pi). This is qualitatively different from spin-wave theory predictions and may be tested by experiments or by quantum Monte Carlo.

  11. Anomalous mean-field behavior of the fully connected Ising model.

    PubMed

    Colonna-Romano, Louis; Gould, Harvey; Klein, W

    2014-10-01

    Although the fully connected Ising model does not have a length scale, we show that the critical exponents for thermodynamic quantities such as the mean magnetization and the susceptibility can be obtained using finite size scaling with the scaling variable equal to N, the number of spins. Surprisingly, the mean value and the most probable value of the magnetization are found to scale differently with N at the critical temperature of the infinite system, and the magnetization probability distribution is not a Gaussian, even for large N. Similar results inconsistent with the usual understanding of mean-field theory are found at the spinodal. We relate these results to the breakdown of hyperscaling and show that hyperscaling can be restored by increasing N while holding the Ginzburg parameter rather than the temperature fixed, or by doing finite size scaling at the pseudocritical temperature where the susceptibility is a maximum for a given value of N. We conclude that finite size scaling for the fully connected Ising model yields different results depending on how the mean-field limit is approached.

  12. Power density, field intensity, and carrier frequency determinants of RF-energy-induced calcium-ion efflux from brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Joines, W.T.; Blackman, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    To explain a carrier frequency dependence reported for radiofrequency (RF)-induced calcium-ion efflux from brain tissue, a chick-brain hemisphere bathed in buffer solution is modeled as a sphere within the uniform field of the incident electromagnetic wave. Calculations on a spherical model show that the average electric-field intensity within the sample remains the same at different carrier frequencies if the incident power density (Pi) is adjusted by an amount that compensates for the change in complex permittivity (epsilon *r) and the change of wavelength, as a function of carrier frequency. The resulting formula for transforming Pi is seen to follow the pattern of both positive and negative demonstrations of calcium-ion efflux that have been observed at carrier frequencies of 50, 147, and 450 MHz. Indeed, all results obtained at these three frequencies, when related by Pi's that produce the same average electric-field intensity within the sample, are seen to be in agreement; no prediction is contradicted by an experiment.

  13. A target field design of open multi-purpose RF coil for musculoskeletal MR imaging at 3T.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Diange; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Kefu; Zhang, Jue

    2016-10-01

    Musculoskeletal MR imaging under multi-angle situations plays an increasingly important role in assessing joint and muscle tissues system. However, there are still limitations due to the closed structures of most conventional RF coils. In this study, a time-harmonic target-field method was employed to design open multi-purpose coil (OMC) for multi-angle musculoskeletal MR imaging. The phantom imaging results suggested that the proposed OMC could achieve homogeneously distributed magnetic field and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 239.04±0.83 in the region of interest (ROI). The maximum temperature in the heating hazard test was 16°C lower than the standard regulation, which indicated the security of the designed OMC. Furthermore, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed OMC for musculoskeletal MR imaging, especially for multi-angle imaging, a healthy volunteer was examined for MR imaging of elbow, ankle and knee using OMC. The in vivo imaging results showed that the proposed OMC is effective for MR imaging of musculoskeletal tissues at different body parts, with satisfied B1 field homogeneity and SNR. Moreover, the open structure of the OMC could provide a large joint movement region. The proposed open multi-purpose coil is feasible for musculoskeletal MR imaging, and potentially, it is more suitable for the evaluation of musculoskeletal tissues under multi-angle conditions.

  14. Design and performance issues of RF coils utilized in ultra high field MRI: experimental and numerical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Kangarlu, Alayar; Chakeress, Donald W

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, two TEM resonators were evaluated experimentally and numerically at 8 tesla (T) (340 MHz for 1H imaging). The coils were constructed to be 21.2-cm long (standard) and 11-cm long (a proposed less claustrophobic design). The experimental evaluation was done on a single cadaver using an ultra high field, 8 T, whole-body magnet. The numerical modeling was performed using an in-house finite difference time domain packagethat treats the coil and the load (anatomically detailed human head model) as a single system. The coils were tested with quadrature excitation at different coil alignment positions with respect to human head. For head imaging at 8 T, the overall numerical and experimental results demonstrated that when compared to the longer coil, the shorter coil provides superior signal-to-noise ratio, coil sensitivity, and excite field in the biological regions that lie within both of the coils' structures. A study of the RF (excite/receive fields) homogeneity showed variations in the performance of both coils that are mostly dependant on the region of interest and the position of coil with respect to the head. As such, depending on the application, the shorter coil could be effectively utilized.

  15. Thermal conductivity of layered organic superconductor β-(BDA-TTP)2SbF6 in a parallel magnetic field: Anomalous effect of coreless vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanatar, M. A.; Ishiguro, T.; Toita, T.; Yamada, J.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal conductivity κ of the organic superconductor β-(BDA-TTP)2SbF6 was studied down to 0.3 K in magnetic fields H of varying orientation with respect to the superconducting plane. Anomalous plateau shape of the field dependence, κ vs H , is found for orientation of magnetic fields precisely parallel to the plane, in contrast to usual behavior observed in the perpendicular fields. We show that the lack of magnetic-field effect on the heat conduction results from coreless structure of vortices, causing both negligible scattering of phonons and constant in field electronic conduction up to the fields close to the upper critical field Hc2 . Usual behavior is recovered on approaching Hc2 and on slight field inclination from parallel direction, when normal cores are restored. This behavior points to the lack of bulk quasiparticle excitations induced by magnetic field, consistent with the conventional superconducting state.

  16. Detailed study of transient anomalous electric field vector focused by parabolic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunori; Uemoto, Mitsuharu; Takai, Mayuko; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides a detailed theoretical analysis of the unexpected transient divergent and rotational distributions of the focused electric field vector reported in Shibata et al (2015 Phys. Rev. A 92 053806). We reveal the physical origin of these distributions. More quantitatively, we derive the semi-analytic expressions and clarify how these distributions depend on the mirror size, offset angle, and the intensity distribution of the incident parallel light. We compare the formulas with numerical calculations and evaluate the area where linearity holds. If the wavelength and the mirror size are sufficiently shorter than the focal length, the radius of the linear area becomes longer than the wavelength. These formulas and evaluations are useful for studies, which require high spatio-temporal resolution.

  17. Anomalous Nuclear Reaction in Earth's Interior: a New Field in Physics Science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Songsheng; He, Ming

    2012-05-01

    Tritium (3H) in excess of the atmospheric values was found at volcanic Lakes Pavin (France), Laacher (Germany) and Nemrut (Turkey), as well as Kilauea Volcano at Hawaii (USA) and other volcanoes. Because 3H has a short half-life of 12.3 years, the tritium and the resulting 3He must have formed recently in the Earth. The result suggests that nuclear reactions may generate a significant amount of tritium in the interior of the Earth, although we have not yet learned what the reaction mechanism may be responsible. The nuclear reaction that can be responsible for tritium production in the Earth is probably a new research field in physics science. Nuclear reactions that generate tritium might be a source of “missing" energy (heat) in the interior of the Earth. Finding in-situ 3H in the mantle may exhibit an alternative explanation of 3He origin in the deep Earth.

  18. Simple coil-powering techniques for generating 10KA/m alternating magnetic field at multiple frequencies using 0.5KW RF power for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Sun, Tengfei; Ranjan, Ashish

    2017-02-01

    Alternating magnetic field (AMF) configurable at a range of frequencies is a critical need for optimization of magnetic nanoparticle based hyperthermia, and for their application in targeted drug delivery. Currently, most commercial AMF devices including induction heaters operate at one factory-fixed frequency, thereby limiting customized frequency configuration required for triggered drug release at mild hyperthermia (40-42°C) and ablations (>55°C). Most AMF devices run as an inductor-capacitor resonance network that could allow AMF frequencies to be changed by changing the capacitor bank or the coil looped with it. When developing AMF inhouse, the most expensive component is usually the RF power amplifier, and arguably the most critical step of building a strong AMF field is impedance-matched coupling of RF power to the coolant-cooled AMF coil. AMF devices running at 10KA/m strength are quite common, but generating AMF at that level of field strength using RF power less than 1KW has remained challenging. We practiced a few techniques for building 10KA/m AMFs at different frequencies, by utilizing a 0.5KW 80-800KHz RF power amplifier. Among the techniques indispensable to the functioning of these AMFs, a simple cost-effective technique was the tapping methods for discretely or continuously adjusting the position of an RF-input-tap on a single-layer or the outer-layer of a multi-layer AMF coil for maximum power coupling into the AMF coil. These in-house techniques when combined facilitated 10KA/m AMF at frequencies of 88.8 KHz and higher as allowed by the inventory of capacitors using 0.5KW RF power, for testing heating of 10-15nm size magnetic particles and on-going evaluation of drug-release by low-level temperature-sensitive liposomes loaded with 15nm magnetic nanoparticles.

  19. Consideration of the effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI: simulations for MRgFUS in the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuegang Xin, Sherman; Gu, Shiyong; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Collins, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the strong dependence of tissue electrical properties on temperature, it is important to consider the potential effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI, as can occur in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. In principle, changes of the RF electromagnetic fields could affect both efficacy of RF pulses, and the MRI-induced RF heating (SAR) pattern. In this study, the equilibrium temperature distribution in a whole-body model with 2 mm resolution before and during intense tissue heating up to 60 °C at the target region was calculated. Temperature-dependent electric properties of tissues were assigned to the model to establish a temperature-dependent electromagnetic whole-body model in a 3T MRI system. The results showed maximum changes in conductivity, permittivity, ≤ft|\\mathbf{B}1+\\right|, and SAR of about 25%, 6%, 2%, and 20%, respectively. Though the B1 field and SAR distributions are both temperature-dependent, the potential harm to patients due to higher SARs is expected to be minimal and the effects on the B1 field distribution should have minimal effect on images from basic MRI sequences.

  20. Consideration of the effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI: simulations for MRgFUS in the hip.

    PubMed

    Xin, Sherman Xuegang; Gu, Shiyong; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Collins, Christopher M

    2015-01-07

    Due to the strong dependence of tissue electrical properties on temperature, it is important to consider the potential effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI, as can occur in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. In principle, changes of the RF electromagnetic fields could affect both efficacy of RF pulses, and the MRI-induced RF heating (SAR) pattern. In this study, the equilibrium temperature distribution in a whole-body model with 2 mm resolution before and during intense tissue heating up to 60 °C at the target region was calculated. Temperature-dependent electric properties of tissues were assigned to the model to establish a temperature-dependent electromagnetic whole-body model in a 3T MRI system. The results showed maximum changes in conductivity, permittivity, [absolute value]B(1)(+)[absolute value] and SAR of about 25%, 6%, 2%, and 20%, respectively. Though the B1 field and SAR distributions are both temperature-dependent, the potential harm to patients due to higher SARs is expected to be minimal and the effects on the B1 field distribution should have minimal effect on images from basic MRI sequences.

  1. Interference stabilization and UV lasing in a plasma channel formed in gas by intense RF field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatskaya, A. V.; Popov, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of interference stabilization of Rydberg atoms in a high-intensity IR laser field is proposed to create a plasma channel with population inversion for conversion of the input laser energy into the VUV and XUV frequency band.

  2. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars.

    PubMed

    van Saders, Jennifer L; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Pinsonneault, Marc H; García, Rafael A; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R

    2016-01-14

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of 'gyrochronology' uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can--unlike existing models--reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.

  3. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; García, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R.

    2016-01-01

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of ‘gyrochronology’ uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can—unlike existing models—reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.

  4. SnTe field effect transistors and the anomalous electrical response of structural phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao Zhu, Hao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Qiliang; You, Lin; Kopanski, Joseph J.; Richter, Curt A.; Zhao, Erhai

    2014-07-07

    SnTe is a conventional thermoelectric material and has been newly found to be a topological crystalline insulator. In this work, back-gate SnTe field-effect transistors have been fabricated and fully characterized. The devices exhibit n-type transistor behaviors with excellent current-voltage characteristics and large on/off ratio (>10{sup 6}). The device threshold voltage, conductance, mobility, and subthreshold swing have been studied and compared at different temperatures. It is found that the subthreshold swings as a function of temperature have an apparent response to the SnTe phase transition between cubic and rhombohedral structures at 110 K. The abnormal and rapid increase in subthreshold swing around the phase transition temperature may be due to the soft phonon/structure change which causes the large increase in SnTe dielectric constant. Such an interesting and remarkable electrical response to phase transition at different temperatures makes the small SnTe transistor attractive for various electronic devices.

  5. Outlines and Dynamics of Eurarctic Ice Caps in Anomalous Gravity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, Aleksey; Nikolskiy, Dmitry

    2016-08-01

    The present investigation was aimed at studying spatial variability and directional dynamics of inland ice/snow fields in relation to lateral variations of surface gravity at the sub-regional scale of tens to hundreds of kilometres. The main goal was to evidence, both theoretically and empirically, the existence and significance of gravitational impacts and associated atmospheric effects on the status and fluctuations of Eurasia's northernmost insular ice caps using space- borne radar altimetry and interferometry data from the Earth Explorers and Sentinel missions in conjunction with GOCE satellite gradiometry, ground-based meteorological time series and glaciological observations. EO-based geodetic and cryospheric models describing the amount of solid precipitation, snow drift and accumulation, glacier elevation change and ice flow pattern were generated, homogenized and combined in the terrain-following reference frame. The models were then verified and applied to the diagnosis of glacioclimatic differences in arctic lowlands with strong gravity anomalies. It was ascertained that surface gravity gradients modulate the atmospheric circulation and stability thereby influencing the intensity of local precipitation and glacier growth and flow patterns in a cascade fashion.

  6. Resistively detected NMR in quantum Hall states: Investigation of the anomalous line shape near ν=1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, C. R.; Piot, B. A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Gervais, G.

    2008-03-01

    A study of the resistively detected nuclear magnetic resonance (RDNMR) lineshape in the vicinity of ν=1 was performed on a high-mobility 2D electron gas formed in GaAs/AlGaAs. In higher Landau levels, application of an RF field at the nuclear magnetic resonance frequency coincides with an observed minimum in the longitudinal resistance, as predicted by the simple hyperfine interaction picture. Near ν=1 however, an anomalous dispersive lineshape is observed where a resistance peak follows the usual minimum. In an effort to understand the origin of this anomalous peak we have studied the resonance under various RF and sample conditions. Interestingly, we show that the lineshape can be completely inverted by simply applying a DC current. We interpret this as evidence that the minima and maxima in the lineshape originate from two distinct mechanisms.

  7. Field emitter activation on cleaned crystalline niobium surfaces relevant for superconducting rf technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navitski, A.; Lagotzky, S.; Reschke, D.; Singer, X.; Müller, G.

    2013-11-01

    The influence of heat treatments at 122, 400, and 800°C on the field emission of large-grain and single-crystal high-purity niobium samples has been investigated. Buffered chemical polishing of 40μm and high pressure ultrapure water rinsing under clean-room conditions resulted in smooth surfaces with a linear surface roughness of 46 to 337 nm. By means of field emission scanning microscopy, an increasing number of emitters up to 40/cm2 with temperature were found at surface fields up to 160MV/m. Two different mechanisms of emitter activation were found, i.e. activation by the applied electric field and activation by temperature. Some emitters with an onset surface field of 50 to 100MV/m appeared already after the low-temperature bakeout. Correlated scanning-electron-microscopy/energy-dispersive-x-ray measurements revealed particles and surface defects as emitters. Their activation will be discussed with respect to the thickness of the insulating oxide layer.

  8. Precise SAR measurements in the near-field of RF antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, Bandar M.

    Wireless devices must meet specific safety radiation limits, and in order to assess the health affects of such devices, standard procedures are used in which standard phantoms, tissue-equivalent liquids, and miniature electric field probes are used. The accuracy of such measurements depend on the precision in measuring the dielectric properties of the tissue-equivalent liquids and the associated calibrations of the electric-field probes. This thesis describes work on the theoretical modeling and experimental measurement of the complex permittivity of tissue-equivalent liquids, and associated calibration of miniature electric-field probes. The measurement method is based on measurements of the field attenuation factor and power reflection coefficient of a tissue-equivalent sample. A novel method, to the best of the authors knowledge, for determining the dielectric properties and probe calibration factors is described and validated. The measurement system is validated using saline at different concentrations, and measurements of complex permittivity and calibration factors have been made on tissue-equivalent liquids at 900MHz and 1800MHz. Uncertainty analysis have been conducted to study the measurement system sensitivity. Using the same waveguide to measure tissue-equivalent permittivity and calibrate e-field probes eliminates a source of uncertainty associated with using two different measurement systems. The measurement system is used to test GSM cell-phones at 900MHz and 1800MHz for Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) compliance using a Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin phantom (SAM).

  9. Field emitter array RF amplifier development project. Phase 1: Cathode technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Bertram

    1993-05-01

    Process in research and development continues at all sites. MCNC's program continues at full speed with smooth transition of project personnel. Electrical testing of field emitter arrays fabricated at MCNC continues at all sites. Effects of anode proximity on emission current capture are being investigated. Two new processes for gate opening alignment are under development. Both eliminate the necessity of retaining the nitride caps on the field emitter tips through the entire processing sequence. One requires alignment during an additional photolithography step, the other is self-aligning. Refinements in processing continue. Better control of the anisotropic silicon etch for tip formation has been achieved. In-house chem-mechanical polishing is still under investigation as a method for wafer planarization. Other materials are being evaluated for use as the insulating layer between substrate and gate. Better methods for depositing evaporated oxides are being sought, and the oxides as deposited are being characterized. Vacuum bonder and test system is operational. The bonding chamber has been outfitted for DC testing to improve test throughput, with electrical feedthroughs rated for 700 V at 10 A. Failure analysis of field emitter arrays from two lots was completed. Five mechanisms in two classes were identified as contributors to device failures: those mechanisms that destroyed working emitters, and those that prevented emitters from working. In anticipation of continued ARPA funding for the field emitter amplifier project, revised budgetary and scheduling information was prepared. Design of the process and reticle set for the next generation of devices has already begun.

  10. Characterization of personal RF electromagnetic field exposure and actual absorption for the general public.

    PubMed

    Joseph, W; Vermeeren, G; Verloock, L; Heredia, Mauricio Masache; Martens, Luc

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, personal electromagnetic field exposure of the general public due to 12 different radiofrequency sources is characterized. Twenty-eight different realistic exposure scenarios based upon time, environment, activity, and location have been defined and a relevant number of measurements were performed with a personal exposure meter. Indoor exposure in office environments can be higher than outdoor exposure: 95th percentiles of field values due to WiFi ranged from 0.36 to 0.58 V m(-1), and for DECT values of 0.33 V m(-1) were measured. The downlink signals of GSM and DCS caused the highest outdoor exposures up to 0.52 V m(-1). The highest total field exposure occurred for mobile scenarios (inside a train or bus) from uplink signals of GSM and DCS (e.g., mobile phones) due to changing environmental conditions, handovers, and higher required transmitted signals from mobile phones due to penetration through windows while moving. A method to relate the exposure to the actual whole-body absorption in the human body is proposed. An application is shown where the actual absorption in a human body model due to a GSM downlink signal is determined. Fiftieth, 95th, and 99 th percentiles of the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) due to this GSM signal of 0.58 microW kg(-1), 2.08 microW kg(-1), and 5.01 microW kg(-1) are obtained for a 95th percentile of 0.26 V m(-1). A practical usable function is proposed for the relation between the whole-body SAR and the electric fields. The methodology of this paper enables epidemiological studies to make an analysis in combination with both electric field and actual whole-body SAR values and to compare exposure with basic restrictions.

  11. A Theory for the Comparative RF Surface Fields at Destructive Breakdown for Various Metels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Perry; /SLAC

    2006-03-20

    By destructive breakdown we mean a breakdown event that results in surface melting over large areas on the iris tip region of an accelerator structure. The melting is the result of the formation of macroscopic areas of plasma in contact with the surface. The plasma bombards the surface with an intense ion current ({approx}10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2}), which is equivalent to a pressure on the order of a thousand Atmospheres. A radial gradient in the pressure produces a ponderomotive force that causes molten copper to migrate away from the iris tip, resulting in a measurable change in the iris shape. This distortion in the iris shape in turn produces an error in the cell-to-cell phase shift of the accelerating wave with a consequent loss in synchronism with the electron beam and a reduction in the effective accelerating gradient. Assuming a long lifetime is desired for the structure, such breakdowns must be avoided or at least limited in number. The accelerating gradient at which these breakdowns begin to occur imposes, therefore, an absolute limit on an operationally attainable gradient. The destructive breakdown limit (DBL) on the accelerating gradient depends on a number of factors, such as the geometry of the irises and coupler, the accuracy of the cell-to-cell tuning (''field flatness''), and the properties of the metal used in the high E-field regions of the structure. In this note we consider only the question of the dependence of the DBL on the metal used in the high surface field areas of the structure. There are also various types of non-destructive breakdowns (NDB's) that occur during the ''processing'' period that, after the initial application of high power, is necessary to bring the gradient up to the desired operating level. During this period, as the input power and gradient are gradually increased, thousands of such NDB's occur. These breakdowns produce a collapse in the fields in the structure as energy stored in the fields is absorbed at the breakdown

  12. Microparticles in a Collisional Rf Plasma Sheath under Hypergravity Conditions as Probes for the Electric Field Strength and the Particle Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Dijk, J. van; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Ockenga, T.; Wolter, M.; Kersten, H.

    2011-03-18

    We used microparticles under hypergravity conditions, induced by a centrifuge, in order to measure nonintrusively and spatially resolved the electric field strength as well as the particle charge in the collisional rf plasma sheath. The measured electric field strengths demonstrate good agreement with the literature, while the particle charge shows decreasing values towards the electrode. We demonstrate that it is indeed possible to measure these important quantities without changing or disturbing the plasma.

  13. Effects of continuous and intermittent exposure to RF fields with a wide range of SARs on cell growth, survival, and cell cycle distribution.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yoshio; Hirose, Hideki; Koyama, Shin; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Taki, Masao; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2006-07-01

    To examine the biological effects of radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields in vitro, we have examined the fundamental cellular responses, such as cell growth, survival, and cell cycle distribution, following exposure to a wide range of specific absorption rates (SAR). Furthermore, we compared the effects of continuous and intermittent exposure at high SARs. An RF electromagnetic field exposure unit operating at a frequency of 2.45 GHz was used to expose cells to SARs from 0.05 to 1500 W/kg. When cells were exposed to a continuous RF field at SARs from 0.05 to 100 W/kg for 2 h, cellular growth rate, survival, and cell cycle distribution were not affected. At 200 W/kg, the cell growth rate was suppressed and cell survival decreased. When the cells were exposed to an intermittent RF field at 300 W/kg(pk), 900 W/kg(pk) and 1500 W/kg(pk) (100 W/kg(mean)), no significant differences were observed between these conditions and intermittent wave exposure at 100 W/kg. When cells were exposed to a SAR of 50 W/kg for 2 h, the temperature of the medium around cells rose to 39.1 degrees C, 100 W/kg exposure increased the temperature to 41.0 degrees C, and 200 W/kg exposure increased the temperature to 44.1 degrees C. Exposure to RF radiation results in heating of the medium, and the thermal effect depends on the mean SAR. Hence, these results suggest that the proliferation disorder is caused by the thermal effect.

  14. Evaluation of RF electromagnetic field exposure levels from cellular base stations in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Chan; Park, Seong-Ook

    2010-09-01

    This article presents the measurement results of human exposure to CDMA800 and CDMA1800 signals at locations in Korea where the general public has expressed concern. Measurements were performed at 50 locations across the country to compare the electromagnetic field levels with the general public exposure compliance limits. At each site, the distances between the nearest single or co-located base station and measurement positions were within a range of approximately 32-422 m. The measured exposure levels were very low compared with the international standard and the Korean human protection notice. The highest field level was 1.5 V/m, which corresponds to 0.15% of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines for human exposure. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Radio Frequency (RF) Trap for Confinement of Antimatter Plasmas Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Pearson, J. Boise

    2004-01-01

    Perturbations associated with a rotating wall electric field enable the confinement of ions for periods approaching weeks. This steady state confinement is a result of a radio frequency manipulation of the ions. Using state-of-the-art techniques it is shown that radio frequency energy can produce useable manipulation of the ion cloud (matter or antimatter) for use in containment experiments. The current research focuses on the improvement of confinement systems capable of containing and transporting antimatter.

  16. INTERCOMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE OF RF COIL GEOMETRIES FOR HIGH FIELD MOUSE CARDIAC MRI

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Angeli, S.; Gkagkarellis, S.; Cofer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-turn spiral surface coils are constructed in flat and cylindrical arrangements and used for high field (7.1 T) mouse cardiac MRI. Their electrical and imaging performances, based on experimental measurements, simulations, and MRI experiments in free space, and under phantom, and animal loading conditions, are compared with a commercially available birdcage coil. Results show that the four-turn cylindrical spiral coil exhibits improved relative SNR (rSNR) performance to the flat coil counterpart, and compares fairly well with a commercially available birdcage coil. Phantom experiments indicate a 50% improvement in the SNR for penetration depths ≤ 6.1 mm from the coil surface compared to the birdcage coil, and an increased penetration depth at the half-maximum field response of 8 mm in the 4-spiral cylindrical coil case, in contrast to 2.9 mm in the flat 4-turn spiral case. Quantitative comparison of the performance of the two spiral coil geometries in anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal regions of the murine heart yield maximum mean percentage rSNR increases of the order of 27–167% in vivo post-mortem (cylindrical compared to flat coil). The commercially available birdcage outperforms the cylindrical spiral coil in rSNR by a factor of 3–5 times. The comprehensive approach and methodology adopted to accurately design, simulate, implement, and test radiofrequency coils of any geometry and type, under any loading conditions, can be generalized for any application of high field mouse cardiac MRI. PMID:23204945

  17. Rapid and effective correction of RF inhomogeneity for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M S; DuBois, R M; Zeineh, M M

    2000-08-01

    The well-known variability in the distribution of high frequency electromagnetic fields in the human body causes problems in the analysis of structural information in high field magnetic resonance images. We describe a method of compensating for the purely intensity-based effects. In our simple and rapid correction algorithm, we first use statistical means to determine the background image noise level and the edges of the image features. We next populate all "noise" pixels with the mean signal intensity of the image features. These data are then smoothed by convolution with a gaussian filter using Fourier methods. Finally, the original data that are above the noise level are normalized to the smoothed images, thereby eliminating the lowest spatial frequencies in the final, corrected data. Processing of a 124 slice, 256 x 256 volume dataset requires under 70 sec on a laptop personal computer. Overall, the method is less prone to artifacts from edges or from sensitivity to absolute head position than are other correction techniques. Following intensity correction, the images demonstrated obvious qualitative improvement and, when subjected to automated segmentation tools, the accuracy of segmentation improved, in one example, from 35.3% to 84.7% correct, as compared to a manually-constructed gold standard.

  18. Anomalous scaling of passive scalar fields advected by the Navier-Stokes velocity ensemble: effects of strong compressibility and large-scale anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Kostenko, M M

    2014-12-01

    The field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to two models of passive scalar quantities (the density and the tracer fields) advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝δ(t-t')k(4-d-y), where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. The original stochastic problems are reformulated as multiplicatively renormalizable field theoretic models; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess infrared attractive fixed points. It is shown that various correlation functions of the scalar field, its powers and gradients, demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y. The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant. The validity of the one-loop approximation and comparison with Gaussian models are briefly discussed.

  19. Wireless hippocampal neural recording via a multiple input RF receiver to construct place-specific firing fields.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Bae; Manns, Joseph R; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports scientifically meaningful in vivo experiments using a 32-channel wireless neural recording system (WINeR). The WINeR system is divided into transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) parts. On the Tx side, we had WINeR-6, a system-on-a-chip (SoC) that operated based on time division multiplexing (TDM) of pulse width modulated (PWM) samples. The chip was fabricated in a 0.5-µm CMOS process, occupying 4.9 × 3.3 mm(2) and consuming 15 mW from ±1.5V supplies. The Rx used two antennas with separate pathways to down-convert the RF signal from a large area. A time-to-digital converter (TDC) in an FPGA converted the PWM pulses into digitized samples. In order to further increase the wireless coverage area and eliminate blind spots within a large experimental arena, two receivers were synchronized. The WINeR system was used to record epileptic activities from a rat that was injected with tetanus toxin (TT) in the dorsal hippocampus. In a different in vivo experiment, place-specific firing fields of place cells, which are parts of the hippocampal-dependent memory, were mapped from a series of behavioral experiments from a rat running in a circular track. Results from the same animal were compared against a commercial hard-wired recording system to evaluate the quality of the wireless recordings.

  20. Mini-RF PSR Observations: Water Ice or Rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, W.; Cai, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The enhanced CPRs in the interior of anomalous craters in Mini-RF images are most probably caused by meter-scale rocks, suggesting that ice deposits, if present, are not the only physical agent causing the enhanced CPR.

  1. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  2. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling. I. Kinetic equation and anomalous Hall and spin-Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, K.

    2015-12-01

    The coupled kinetic equation for density and spin Wigner functions is derived including spin-orbit coupling, electric and magnetic fields, and self-consistent Hartree mean fields suited for SU(2) transport. The interactions are assumed to be with scalar and magnetic impurities as well as scalar and spin-flip potentials among the particles. The spin-orbit interaction is used in a form suitable for solid state physics with Rashba or Dresselhaus coupling, graphene, extrinsic spin-orbit coupling, and effective nuclear matter coupling. The deficiencies of the two-fluid model are worked out consisting of the appearance of an effective in-medium spin precession. The stationary solution of all these systems shows a band splitting controlled by an effective medium-dependent Zeeman field. The self-consistent precession direction is discussed and a cancellation of linear spin-orbit coupling at zero temperature is reported. The precession of spin around this effective direction caused by spin-orbit coupling leads to anomalous charge and spin currents in an electric field. Anomalous Hall conductivity is shown to consist of the known results obtained from the Kubo formula or Berry phases and a symmetric part interpreted as an inverse Hall effect. Analogously the spin-Hall and inverse spin-Hall effects of spin currents are discussed which are present even without magnetic fields showing a spin accumulation triggered by currents. The analytical dynamical expressions for zero temperature are derived and discussed in dependence on the magnetic field and effective magnetizations. The anomalous Hall and spin-Hall effect changes sign at higher than a critical frequency dependent on the relaxation time.

  3. RF-DC converter for HF RFID sensing applications powered by a near-field loop antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, R.; Pasca, M.; Catarinucci, L.; Tarricone, L.; D'Amico, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an RF-DC converter operating at 13.56 MHz (HF radio frequency identification (RFID) frequency band) is presented. Its architecture provides RF to load isolation, reducing the losses due to the reverse saturation current and improving the sensitivity. Fed by a loop antenna, the RF-DC converter is made by a Dickson's RF-DC rectifier and an additional Pelliconi's charge pump driven by a fully integrated 50 kHz ring oscillator realized using an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The input RF signal from the reader is converted to DC supply voltage and stored on a 1 μF capacitor. Mathematical model of the converter is developed and verified through measurements. Silicon prototypes of the ASIC have been realized in 350 nm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. Measurements have been done on 10 different samples showing an output voltage in the range of 0.5 V-3.11 V in correspondence of an RF input signal power in the range of -19 dBm-0 dBm. These output voltage levels are suitable to power HF RFID sensing platforms and sensor nodes of body sensor networks.

  4. Auxiliary coil controls temperature of RF induction heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Auxiliary coil controls the temperature of an RF induction furnace that is powered by a relatively unstable RF generator. Manual or servoed adjustments of the relative position of the auxiliary coil, which is placed in close proximity to the RF coil, changes the looseness of the RF coil and hence the corresponding heating effect of its RF field.

  5. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  6. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H- ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H- ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H- ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  7. Theory and simulation of high-brightness electron beam production from laser-irradiated photocathodes in the presence of dc and RF electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. E.; Peter, W.

    1986-05-01

    To take advantage of properties of laser-controlled photodiodes to produce electron beams, a new set of diode design criteria are needed. An analytical and numerical study of the geometrical and temporal factors that affect the design of high-brightness electron beams is presented. This study extends our previous work on this concept to include the effects of laser pulse shape, and emittance effects in the presence of RF fields. In general, the diode will not be space-charge limited. Therefore, the conventional Pierce electrode shapes are not appropriate. Furthermore, the finite temporal profile of the electron beams introduces a time-dependent space charge into the design problem. The approach taken here to minimize the emittance growth from the temporal profile of the space charge is to operate at low perveance. To obtain high currents, large electric fields are required. We exploit the fact that the electron emission is controlled by the laser and is independent of the voltage on the diode. The diode can then be driven by an rf field. In principle, operating at higher frequency al lows higher breakdown limits, so the perveance can be made very small. However, operating at too high an RF frequency introduces other detrimental effects.

  8. Spatial and temporal RF electromagnetic field exposure of children and adults in indoor micro environments in Belgium and Greece.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Günter; Markakis, Ioannis; Goeminne, Francis; Samaras, Theodoros; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-11-01

    Personal radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure, or exposimetry, is gaining importance in the bioelectromagnetics community but only limited data on personal exposure is available in indoor areas, namely schools, crèches, homes, and offices. Most studies are focused on adult exposure, whereas indoor microenvironments, where children are exposed, are usually not considered. A method to assess spatial and temporal indoor exposure of children and adults is proposed without involving the subjects themselves. Moreover, maximal possible daily exposure is estimated by combining instantaneous spatial and temporal exposure. In Belgium and Greece, the exposure is measured at 153 positions spread over 55 indoor microenvironments with spectral equipment. In addition, personal exposimeters (measuring EMFs of people during their daily activities) captured the temporal exposure variations during several days up to one week at 98 positions. The data were analyzed using the robust regression on order statistics (ROS) method to account for data below the detection limit. All instantaneous and maximal exposures satisfied international exposure limits and were of the same order of magnitude in Greece and Belgium. Mobile telecommunications and radio broadcasting (FM) were most present. In Belgium, digital cordless phone (DECT) exposure was present for at least 75% in the indoor microenvironments except for schools. Temporal variations of the exposure were mainly due to variations of mobile telecommunication signals. The exposure was higher during daytime than at night due to the increased voice and data traffic on the networks. Total exposure varied the most in Belgian crèches (39.3%) and Greek homes (58.2%).

  9. Effects of RF fields emitted from smart phones on cardio-respiratory parameters: a preliminary provocation study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Kyung; Nam, Ki Chang; Lee, Da Som; Jang, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Deok Won

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental setup for evaluating the physiological effects of radiofrequency (RF) emitted from a Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) module with a 24 dBm at 1950 MHz for specific absorption rate (SAR(1g)) of 1.57 W/kg. This provocation study was executed in a double-blind study of two volunteer groups of 10 self-reported electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) and 10 non-EHS subjects under both sham and real exposures in a randomly assigned and counter-balanced order. In the preliminary results, WCDMA RF exposure of 30 min did not have any effects on physiological changes in either group.

  10. 0.5 μm Silicon-on-Sapphire Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor for RF Power Amplifier Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Kenneth; Chen, Kevin J.; Lam, Sang; Chan, Mansun

    2003-08-01

    0.5 μm thin-film silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) are investigated for applications in RF power amplifiers. Detailed static and pulsed I-V characteristics are measured to distinguish between fully depleted and partially depleted SOS MOSFETs. We have performed the first detailed large-signal load-pull characterization of SOS MOSFETs at 2 GHz with a Maury load-pull system with automated tuners. The maximum output power (Pout) of 18 dBm, maximum gain (G) of 12.5 dB and maximum power-added efficiency (PAE) of 55% were achieved. Third-order intermodulation (IM3) and adjacent channel power ratio (ACPR) were measured to characterize the linearity of an SOS MOSFET power amplifier. For the optimum design of RF power amplifiers, impedance matching information is essential as revealed by the large-signal load-pull measurements.

  11. An international project to confirm Soviet-era results on immunological and teratological effects of RF field exposure in Wistar rats and comments on Grigoriev et al. [2010].

    PubMed

    Repacholi, Michael; Buschmann, Jochen; Pioli, Claudio; Sypniewska, Roza

    2011-05-01

    Results of key Soviet-era studies dealing with effects on the immune system and teratological consequences in rats exposed to radiofrequency (RF) fields serve, in part, as a basis for setting exposure limits in the USSR and the current RF standards in Russia. The World Health Organization's (WHO) International EMF Project considered these Soviet results important enough that they should be confirmed using more modern methods. Since the Soviet papers did not contain comprehensive details on how the results were obtained, Professor Yuri Grigoriev worked with Dr. Bernard Veyret to agree on the final study protocol and to conduct separate studies in Moscow and Bordeaux under the same protocol. The International Oversight Committee (IOC) provided oversight on the conduct of the studies and was the firewall committee that dealt with the sponsors and researchers. This paper gives the IOC comments and conclusions on the differing results between the two studies.

  12. Non-uniformity correction of human brain imaging at high field by RF field mapping of B1+ and B1-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Takaya, Nobuhiro; Mitsumori, Fumiyuki

    2011-10-01

    A new method of non-uniform image correction is proposed. Image non-uniformity is originated from the spatial distribution of RF transmission and reception fields, represented as B1+ and B1-, respectively. In our method, B1+ mapping was performed invivo by a phase method. In B1- mapping, images with multiple TEs were acquired with a multi-echo adiabatic spin echo (MASE) sequence which enables homogeneous excitation. By T2 fitting of these images an M0 map ( M0MASE) was obtained, in which signal intensity was expressed as the product of B1- and M0(1-e). The ratio of this M0MASE map to the B1+ map showed a similar spatial pattern in different human brains. These ratios of M0MASE to B1+ in 24 subjects were averaged and then fitted with a spatially polynomial function to obtain a ratio map of B1-/B1+(α). Uniform image was achieved in spin echo (SE), MASE and inversion recovery turboFLASH (IRTF) images using measured B1+ and calculated B1- by αB1+. Water fractions in gray and white matters obtained from the M0 images corrected by this method were in good agreement with previously reported values. From these experimental results, the proposed method of non-uniformity correction is validated at 4.7 T imaging.

  13. Enhanced responsivity resonant RF photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, R; Dev, S; Zhong, Y; Lu, R; Streyer, W; Allen, J W; Allen, M S; Wenner, B R; Gong, S; Wasserman, D

    2016-11-14

    The responsivity of room-temperature, semiconductor-based photodetectors consisting of resonant RF circuits coupled to microstrip buslines is investigated. The dependence of the photodetector response on the semiconductor material and RF circuit geometry is presented, as is the detector response as a function of the spatial position of the incident light. We demonstrate significant improvement in detector response by choice of photoconductive material, and for a given material, by positioning our optical signal to overlap with positions of RF field enhancement. Design of RF circuits with strong field enhancement are demonstrated to further improve detector response. The improved detector response demonstrated offers opportunities for applications in RF photonics, materials metrology, or single read-out multiplexed detector arrays.

  14. Normal and Anomalous Codeposition of Ni-Co-Fe-Zn Alloys from EMIC/EG in the Presence of an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Mehdi; Basirun, Wan J.; Alias, Yatimah; Mahmoudian, Mohammad R.

    2011-08-01

    The codeposition of Ni-Co-Fe-Zn alloys from a mixture of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIC)/ethylene glycol (EG) was studied using potentiostatic electrodeposition in the potential range of -1.10 and -1.30 V vs saturated calomel electrode (SCE), using a permanent parallel magnetic field (PPMF) of 9 T. The uniform magnetic field was aligned parallel to the cathode surface. It was found that both normal and anomalous codeposition occurred. Films with different elemental percentage and deposit morphology were obtained from a mixture of EMIC/EG solution at the applied potentials (-1.10 and -1.30 V) in the absence and presence of a PPMF. The influence of magnetic field on the nucleation and growth process is studied with respect to the magneto-hydrodynamic effect (MHD) and applied potentials.

  15. Electron's anomalous magnetic-moment effects on electron-hydrogen elastic collisions in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Elhandi, S.; Taj, S.; Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Oufni, L.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment on the relativistic electronic dressing for the process of electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions is investigated. We consider a laser field with circular polarization and various electric field strengths. The Dirac-Volkov states taking into account this anomaly are used to describe the process in the first order of perturbation theory. The correlation between the terms coming from this anomaly and the electric field strength gives rise to the strong dependence of the spinor part of the differential cross section (DCS) with respect to these terms. A detailed study has been devoted to the nonrelativistic regime as well as the moderate relativistic regime. Some aspects of this dependence as well as the dynamical behavior of the DCS in the relativistic regime have been addressed.

  16. Movable RF probe eliminates need for calibration in plasma accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. B.

    1967-01-01

    Movable RF antenna probe in plasma accelerators continuously maps the RF field both within and beyond the accelerator. It eliminates the need for installing probes in the accelerator walls. The moving RF probe can be used to map the RF electrical field under various accelerator conditions.

  17. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  18. A numerical investigation on the effect of RF coil feed variability on global and local electromagnetic field exposure in human body models at 64 MHz.

    PubMed

    Lucano, Elena; Liberti, Micaela; Lloyd, Tom; Apollonio, Francesca; Wedan, Steve; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2017-04-18

    This study aims to investigate how the positions of the feeding sources of the transmit radiofrequency (RF) coil, field orientation direction with respect to the patient, and patient dimensions affect the global and local electromagnetic exposure in human body models. Three RF coil models were implemented, namely a specific two-source (S2) feed and two multisource feed configurations: generic 32-source (G32) and hybrid 16-source (H16). Thirty-two feeding conditions were studied for the S2, whereas two were studied for the G32 and H16. The study was performed using five human body models. Additionally, for two of the body models, the case of a partially implanted lead was evaluated. The results showed an overall variation due to coil feeding conditions of the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) of less than 20%, but deviations up to 98% of the magnitude of the electric field tangential to a possible lead path. For the analysis with the partially implanted lead, a variation of local SAR at the tip of the lead of up to 60% was observed with respect to feed position and field orientation direction. The results of this study suggest that specific information about feed position and field orientation direction must be considered for an accurate evaluation of patient exposure. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Nd2Sn2O7 : An all-in-all-out pyrochlore magnet with no divergence-free field and anomalously slow paramagnetic spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, A.; Dalmas de Réotier, P.; Fâk, B.; Marin, C.; Yaouanc, A.; Forget, A.; Sheptyakov, D.; Frick, B.; Ritter, C.; Amato, A.; Baines, C.; King, P. J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We report measurements performed on a polycrystalline sample of the pyrochlore compound Nd2Sn2O7 . It undergoes a second order magnetic phase transition at Tc≈0.91 K to a noncoplanar all-in-all-out magnetic structure of the Nd3 + magnetic moments. The thermal behavior of the low temperature specific heat fingerprints excitations with linear dispersion in a three-dimensional lattice. The temperature independent spin-lattice relaxation rate measured below Tc and the anomalously slow paramagnetic spin dynamics detected up to ≈30 Tc are suggested to be due to magnetic short-range correlations in unidimensional spin clusters, i.e., spin loops. The observation of a spontaneous field in muon spin relaxation measurements is associated with the absence of a divergence-free field for the ground state of an all-in-all-out pyrochlore magnet as predicted recently.

  20. DC characteristics and analog/RF performance of novel polarity control GaAs-Ge based tunnel field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Kondekar, Pravin; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, for the first time, DC characteristics and analog/RF performance of polarity control GaAs-Ge hetero TFET (GaAs-Ge H-TFET) structure have been analysed, using electrically doped dynamically configurable concept. For this, we have considered a hetero structure with two distinctive gates (Control gate and Polarity gate). Polarity gate induces p+ region at the source side and n+ region at the drain side, instead of relying on the abrupt doping profile at the junctions. Therefore, the fabrication process of the proposed device avoids ion-implantation, photo masking and complicated thermal budget. Hence, it shows high immunity against process variations, doping control issues and random dopant fluctuations (RDF). In order to optimize the device performance, interfacing of III-V groups materials with IV group semiconductor is done for hetero-junction. The introduction of hetero-junction and band gap engineering offer higher ION/IOFF ratio (5.1 × 1012), steep sub-threshold slope (18 mV/decade) and significantly change in analog/RF performance. The analog/RF figures of merit are analysed in term of transconductance (gm), output conductance (gds), gate to source capacitance (Cgs), gate to drain capacitance (Cgd), cutoff frequency (fT) and gain bandwidth (GBW) product. The proposed work would be beneficial for low power high frequency applications. The simulation results presented in this paper were carried out by using 2-D ATLAS.

  1. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  2. Radiofrequency radiation at Stockholm Central Railway Station in Sweden and some medical aspects on public exposure to RF fields

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, Lennart; Koppel, Tarmo; Carlberg, Michael; Ahonen, Mikko; Hedendahl, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The Stockholm Central Railway Station in Sweden was investigated for public radiofrequency (RF) radiation exposure. The exposimeter EME Spy 200 was used to collect the RF exposure data across the railway station. The exposimeter covers 20 different radiofrequency bands from 88 to 5,850 MHz. In total 1,669 data points were recorded. The median value for total exposure was 921 μW/m2 (or 0.092 μW/cm2; 1 μW/m2=0.0001 μW/cm2) with some outliers over 95,544 μW/m2 (6 V/m, upper detection limit). The mean total RF radiation level varied between 2,817 to 4,891 μW/m2 for each walking round. High mean measurements were obtained for GSM + UMTS 900 downlink varying between 1,165 and 2,075 μW/m2. High levels were also obtained for UMTS 2100 downlink; 442 to 1,632 μW/m2. Also LTE 800 downlink, GSM 1800 downlink, and LTE 2600 downlink were in the higher range of measurements. Hot spots were identified, for example close to a wall mounted base station yielding over 95,544 μW/m2 and thus exceeding the exposimeter's detection limit. Almost all of the total measured levels were above the precautionary target level of 3–6 μW/m2 as proposed by the BioInitiative Working Group in 2012. That target level was one-tenth of the scientific benchmark providing a safety margin either for children, or chronic exposure conditions. We compare the levels of RF radiation exposures identified in the present study to published scientific results reporting adverse biological effects and health harm at levels equivalent to, or below those measured in this Stockholm Central Railway Station project. It should be noted that these RF radiation levels give transient exposure, since people are generally passing through the areas tested, except for subsets of people who are there for hours each day of work. PMID:27633090

  3. Radiofrequency radiation at Stockholm Central Railway Station in Sweden and some medical aspects on public exposure to RF fields.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Koppel, Tarmo; Carlberg, Michael; Ahonen, Mikko; Hedendahl, Lena

    2016-10-01

    The Stockholm Central Railway Station in Sweden was investigated for public radiofrequency (RF) radiation exposure. The exposimeter EME Spy 200 was used to collect the RF exposure data across the railway station. The exposimeter covers 20 different radiofrequency bands from 88 to 5,850 MHz. In total 1,669 data points were recorded. The median value for total exposure was 921 µW/m2 (or 0.092 µW/cm2; 1 µW/m2=0.0001 µW/cm2) with some outliers over 95,544 µW/m2 (6 V/m, upper detection limit). The mean total RF radiation level varied between 2,817 to 4,891 µW/m2 for each walking round. High mean measurements were obtained for GSM + UMTS 900 downlink varying between 1,165 and 2,075 µW/m2. High levels were also obtained for UMTS 2100 downlink; 442 to 1,632 µW/m2. Also LTE 800 downlink, GSM 1800 downlink, and LTE 2600 downlink were in the higher range of measurements. Hot spots were identified, for example close to a wall mounted base station yielding over 95,544 µW/m2 and thus exceeding the exposimeter's detection limit. Almost all of the total measured levels were above the precautionary target level of 3-6 µW/m2 as proposed by the BioInitiative Working Group in 2012. That target level was one-tenth of the scientific benchmark providing a safety margin either for children, or chronic exposure conditions. We compare the levels of RF radiation exposures identified in the present study to published scientific results reporting adverse biological effects and health harm at levels equivalent to, or below those measured in this Stockholm Central Railway Station project. It should be noted that these RF radiation levels give transient exposure, since people are generally passing through the areas tested, except for subsets of people who are there for hours each day of work.

  4. Similarity law for rf breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovskiy, V.; Booth, J.-P.; Landry, K.; Douai, D.; Cassagne, V.; Yegorenkov, V.

    2008-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that the similarity law for the rf gas breakdown has the form Urf=ψ(p·L,L/R,f·L)(where Urf is the rf breakdown voltage, p is the gas pressure, L and R are the length and diameter of the discharge tube, respectively, f is the frequency of the rf electric field). It means that two rf breakdown curves registered for narrow inter-electrode gaps or in geometrically similar tubes and depicted in the Urf(p·L) graph will coincide only when the condition f·L=const is met. This similarity law follows from the rf gas breakdown equation and it is well supported by the results of measurements.

  5. A Novel Gate Electrode Structure for Reduction of Gate Resistance of Sub-0.1 µm RF/Mixed-Signal Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Hirokazu; Tanabe, Akira; Umeda, Kyoko; Watanabe, Takashi; Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    To reduce noise and enhance gain for scaled-down metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), a novel gate electrode structure “direct finger contact (DFC)” is proposed. The DFC structure reduces the gate electrode resistance by 40%. NF50 (noise figure when the input impedance is 50 Ω) is reduced by 4% with the gate length L = 48 nm, the gate width Wfinger =1 µm, and the number of finger N =20. This structure is suitable for low-noise sub-0.1 µm RF/mixed-signal system on chips (SoCs).

  6. Anomalous Neutron Capture and Plastic Deformation of cu and pd Cathodes during Electrolysis in a Weak Thermalized Neutron Field:. Evidence of Nuclei-Lattice Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, A. G.; Miley, G. H.; Lipson, A. G.

    2006-02-01

    Anomalous neutron capture and plastic deformation in the hardened Cu and Pd cathodes has been established under combined action of electrolysis and a weak thermalized neutron field (WTNF) with a flux in the range of 180-400 n/s cm2. Experiments with these cathodes showed ~7.0% decrease in the 2224 keV n-D gamma peak accompanying thermalized neutron capture inside the PE cavity during electrolysis vs. experiments with annealed Cu and Pd as well as with the background runs (i.e., no electrolysis). The anomalous neutron capture and plastic deformation of Cu and Pd cathodes under combined action of electrolysis and WTNF may be explained energetically by assuming a selective radiationless thermalized neutron capture at high-internal strain concentration sites in the hardened cathodes. The results of these experiments provide straightforward (avoids the Coulomb barrier penetration issue) evidence that nuclei-lattice energy exchange can result in an increase in neutron capture probability and radiationless de-excitation of the resulting compound nuclei.

  7. Field Distribution and Coupling Investigation of an Eight-Channel RF Coil Consisting of Different Dipole Coil Elements for 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhichao; Solbach, Klaus; Erni, Daniel; Rennings, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    In this contribution, we investigate the [Formula: see text] distribution and coupling characteristics of a multichannel radio frequency (RF) coil consisting of different dipole coil elements for 7 T MRI, and explore the feasibility to achieve a compromise between field distribution and decoupling by combining different coil elements. Two types of dipole elements are considered here: the meander dipole element with a chip-capacitor-based connection to the RF shield which achieves a sufficient decoupling between the neighboring elements; and the open-ended meander dipole element which exhibits a broader magnetic field distribution. By nesting the open-ended dipole elements in between the ones with end-capacitors, the [Formula: see text] distribution, in terms of field penetration depth and homogeneity, is improved in comparison to the dipole coil consisting only of the elements with end-capacitors, and at the same time, the adjacent elements are less coupled to each other in comparison to the dipole coil consisting only of the open-ended elements. The proposed approach is validated by both full-wave simulation and experimental results.

  8. Photovoltaic properties of ferroelectric BaTiO3 thin films RF sputter deposited on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharmadhikari, V. S.; Grannemann, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroelectric thin films of BaTiO3 have been successfully deposited on n-type silicon substrates at temperatures above 500 C by RF sputtering in an O2/Ar atmosphere. Analysis by X-ray diffraction patterns show that films deposited at room temperature are amorphous. At temperatures above 500 C, crystalline BaTiO3 films with a tetragonal structure are obtained. The polarization-electric field (P-E) hysteresis loops and a broad peak in the dielectric constant versus temperature curve at Curie point indicate that the RF sputtered BaTiO3 films are ferroelectric. An anomalous photovoltaic effect is observed in these thin films which is related to the remanent polarization of the material. The results on open-circuit and short-circuit measurements provide an important basis for a better understanding of the role of photovoltaic field, photovoltaic current, and the pyroelectric properties in photoferroelectric domain switching.

  9. Investigation of the B1 field distribution and RF power deposition in a birdcage coil as functions of the number of coil legs at 4.7 T, 7.0 T, and 11.7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Han, Sang-Doc; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2015-06-01

    The proper design of birdcage (BC) coils plays a very important role in the acquisition of highresolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of small animals such as rodents. In this context, we investigate multiple-leg (8-, 16-, 32-, 64-, and 128-leg) BC coils operating at ultra-high fields (UHF) of 7.0 T and 11.7 T and a high-field (HF) of 4.7 T for rodent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Primarily, Our study comparatively examines the parameters of the radiofrequency (RF) transmission (|B1 +|)-field, the magnetic flux (|B1|)-field, and RF power deposition (RF-PD) as functions of the number of BC-coil legs via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations under realistic loading conditions with a biological phantom. In particular, the specific ratio |E/B1 +| is defined for predicting RF-PD values in different coil structures. Our results indicate that the optimal number of legs of the BC coil can be chosen for different resonance frequencies of 200 MHz, 300 MHz, and 500 MHz and that this choice can be lead to superior |B1 +|-field intensity and |B1|-field homogeneity and decreased RF-PD. We believe that our approach to determining the optimal number of legs for a BC coil can contribute to rodent MR imaging.

  10. A Conceptual Model to Link Anomalously High Temperature Gradients in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field to Regional Flow in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, E. J.; Keller, S. N.; McCullough, K. R.; Watters, J.; Weitering, B.; Wilce, A. M.; Folsom, M.; Kelley, S.; Pellerin, L.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature-depth well data along with electromagnetic (EM) data were collected by students of the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE) 2015 field season in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico. The data from this year, in addition to data acquired since 2013, were used to construct a conceptual east-west cross-section of the Espanola Basin and the adjacent highlands in order to evaluate the regional flow system. Vertical geothermal gradients from several monitoring wells were measured using a thermistor. Anomalously warm geothermal gradients were mapped in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field in the basin just east of the Rio Grande. Temperature gradients are up to 70℃/km, while the background geothermal gradients in the Rio Grande rift zone generally show 28℃-35℃/km. This anomaly extends to the Buckman well field, which supplies water to the city of Santa Fe. Overpumping of this well field has led to subsidence in the past. However, discharge temperature plots indicate that the temperature gradients of the Buckman field may be rebounding as pumping is reduced. Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were acquired in the vicinity of three monitoring wells. TEM and AMT methods complement each other with the former having depths of investigation of less than ten to hundreds of meters and AMT having depths of investigation comparable to the wells deeper than 500m. These datasets were used collectively to image the subsurface stratigraphy and, more specifically, the hydrogeology related to shallow aquifers. The EM data collected at these wells showed a trend indicating a shallow aquifer with a shallower resistive layer of approximately 100 ohm-m at 70-100 meters depth. Beneath this resistive layer we resolved a more conductive, clay-rich layer of 10 ohm-m. These resistivity profiles compliment the electrical logs provided by Jet West, which indicate shallower sandstone interbedded with silt on top of more silt-dominant layers. Our

  11. Anomalous diffusion in the evolution of soccer championship scores: Real data, mean-field analysis, and an agent-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Roberto; Vainstein, Mendeli H.; Gonçalves, Sebastián; Paula, Felipe S. F.

    2013-08-01

    Statistics of soccer tournament scores based on the double round robin system of several countries are studied. Exploring the dynamics of team scoring during tournament seasons from recent years we find evidences of superdiffusion. A mean-field analysis results in a drift velocity equal to that of real data but in a different diffusion coefficient. Along with the analysis of real data we present the results of simulations of soccer tournaments obtained by an agent-based model which successfully describes the final scoring distribution [da Silva , Comput. Phys. Commun.CPHCBZ0010-465510.1016/j.cpc.2012.10.030 184, 661 (2013)]. Such model yields random walks of scores over time with the same anomalous diffusion as observed in real data.

  12. Using a cross-coil to reduce RF heating by an order of magnitude in triple-resonance multinuclear MAS at high fields.

    PubMed

    Doty, F David; Kulkarni, Jatin; Turner, Christopher; Entzminger, George; Bielecki, Anthony

    2006-10-01

    Four different coil designs for use with MAS in triple-resonance multi-nuclear experiments at high fields are compared, using a combination of finite element analysis (FEA) software and NMR experiments, with respect to RF field strength per unit power and relative sample heating, as governed by mean E/B(1) within the sample region. A commercial FEA package, Microwave Studio 5.1 by Computer Simulation Technology (CST) is shown to obtain remarkably accurate agreement with the experiments in Q(L), L, B, E, and mode frequencies in all cases. A simplified treatment of RF heating in NMR MAS samples is derived and shown to agree with the NMR experimental results within about 10% for two representative stator designs. The coil types studied include: (1) a variable-pitch solenoid outside a ceramic coilform, (2) a conventional solenoid very closely spaced to the MAS rotor, (3) a scroll coil, and (4) a segmented saddle cross coil (XC) for (1)H with an additional solenoid over it for the two lower-frequency channels. The XC/solenoid is shown to offer substantial advantages in reduced decoupler heating, improved S/N, and improved compatibility with multinuclear tuning and high-power decoupling. This seems largely because the division of labor between two orthogonal coils allows them each, and their associated circuitry, to be separately optimized for their respective regimes.

  13. Anomalous field-symmetric Nernst signal in striped cuprate La2-xBaxCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, N. Phuan; Li, Lu; Tranquada, J. M.; Gu, Genda

    2011-03-01

    Starting at the structural transition temperature Td 2 = 54 K, the striped cuprate La 2-x Ba x Cu O4 (x =1/8 ) displays a remarkable cascade of transitions 1 at the characteristic temperatures Td 2 >T1* * >TBKT >Tc , beforesettlingdownto 3 Dsuperconductivitywithlong - rangecoherenceat Tc = 5 K . TheNernstsignal eN andthermopower S havebeeninvestigatedindetailinthesemultiplestates . AsinpureLaSrCuO , theNernstcoefficient N =limB --> 0eN / B (initiallynegative) acquiresapositivevortexcontributionat 120 Kthatgrowsrapidly . However , here , N saturatesintheinterval T d2 (54 K) to T1* * (34 K) . Asthevortexliquidbecomesincreasinglystabilizedbelow T1** , N resumesincreasingatanevensteeperrate . Surprisingly , below 34 K , eN acquiresa B - symmetriccomponentthatisverylargeandoscillatoryin B . Wehaveexcluded S and quasiparticles as the source of the anomalous term. We will discuss various origins including the possibility of vortex formation mechanisms that break time-reversal invariance. 1) J. M. Tranquada et al., Phys. Rev. B 78, 174529 (2008). Supported by NSF-DMR 0819860 (at Princeton) and US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 (at BNL).

  14. Evaluation of the RF field uniformity of a double-tuned 31P/1H birdcage RF coil for spin-echo MRI/MRS of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Greenman, Robert L; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate the B1 field uniformity of a double-tuned birdcage coil designed for (31)P/(1)H MRI/MRS spin-echo (SE) imaging of the metatarsal head region of the foot in neuropathic diabetic patients. A low-pass double-tuned (31)P/(1)H RF birdcage coil was constructed to fit over the adult forefoot. Flip angle (FA) maps were created from B1 data acquired at the 3T (31)P (four normal subjects) and (1)H (five normal subjects) frequencies. T2-weighted (T2-W) (1)H images, (31)P rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) images, and composite SE pulse CSI data were acquired to demonstrate the uniformity of the resulting images and data. The means and standard deviations (SDs) of the range of FAs across the feet of the volunteer subjects indicated good uniformity (the maximum coefficients of variation (CVs) for all of the (31)P and (1)H FA maps were 7.6% and 7.3%, respectively). The FA values across the metatarsal head region indicated a maximum signal intensity variation of +/-3% in a RARE image acquired using an echo train length of 32. A (31)P/(1)H birdcage coil constructed for MRI/MRS studies of the human forefoot provided sufficient signal uniformity of SE data to facilitate accurate (31)P concentration measurements in muscle. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Influence of the configuration of the magnetic filter field on the discharge structure in the RF driven negative ion source prototype for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    The study provides results for the influence of the filter field topology on the plasma parameters in the RF prototype negative ion source for ITER NBI. A previously developed 2D fluid plasma model of the prototype source was extended towards accounting for the particles and energy losses along the magnetic field lines and the presence of a magnetic field in the driver which is the case at the BATMAN and ELISE test-beds. The effect of the magnetic field in the driver is shown for the magnetic field configuration of the prototype source (i.e. a magnetic field produced by an external magnet frame) by comparison of plasma parameters without and with the magnetic field in the driver and for different axial positions of the filter. Since the ELISE-like magnetic field (i.e. a magnetic field produced by a current flowing through the plasma grid) is a new feature planned to be installed at the BATMAN test-bed, its effect on the discharge structure was studied for different strengths of the magnetic field. The obtained results show for both configurations of the magnetic filter the same main features in the patterns of the plasma parameters in the expansion chamber: a strong axial drop of the electron temperature and the formation of a groove accompanied with accumulation of electrons in front of the plasma grid. The presence of a magnetic field in the driver has a local impact on the plasma parameters: the formation of a second groove of the electron temperature in the case of BATMAN (due to the reversed direction of the filter field in the driver) and a strong asymmetry of the electron density. Accounting for the additional losses in the third dimension suppresses the drifts across the magnetic field and, thus, the variations of the electron density in the expansion chamber are less pronounced.

  16. Radio-frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure levels in different European outdoor urban environments in comparison with regulatory limits.

    PubMed

    Urbinello, Damiano; Joseph, Wout; Huss, Anke; Verloock, Leen; Beekhuizen, Johan; Vermeulen, Roel; Martens, Luc; Röösli, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Concerns of the general public about potential adverse health effects caused by radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) led authorities to introduce precautionary exposure limits, which vary considerably between regions. It may be speculated that precautionary limits affect the base station network in a manner that mean population exposure unintentionally increases. The objectives of this multicentre study were to compare mean exposure levels in outdoor areas across four different European cities and to compare with regulatory RF-EMF exposure levels in the corresponding areas. We performed measurements in the cities of Amsterdam (the Netherlands, regulatory limits for mobile phone base station frequency bands: 41-61 V/m), Basel (Switzerland, 4-6 V/m), Ghent (Belgium, 3-4.5 V/m) and Brussels (Belgium, 2.9-4.3 V/m) using a portable measurement device. Measurements were conducted in three different types of outdoor areas (central and non-central residential areas and downtown), between 2011 and 2012 at 12 different days. On each day, measurements were taken every 4s for approximately 15 to 30 min per area. Measurements per urban environment were repeated 12 times during 1 year. Arithmetic mean values for mobile phone base station exposure ranged between 0.22 V/m (Basel) and 0.41 V/m (Amsterdam) in all outdoor areas combined. The 95th percentile for total RF-EMF exposure varied between 0.46 V/m (Basel) and 0.82 V/m (Amsterdam) and the 99th percentile between 0.81 V/m (Basel) and 1.20 V/m (Brussels). All exposure levels were far below international reference levels proposed by ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection). Our study did not find indications that lowering the regulatory limit results in higher mobile phone base station exposure levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analog/RF performance of L- and U-shaped channel tunneling field-effect transistors and their application as digital inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianqiong; Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Li, Wei; Chen, Shupeng

    2017-06-01

    The inverter performance comparisons of L- and U-shaped channel tunneling field-effect transistors (LTFET and UTFET) are investigated by using Sentaurus TCAD tool. The RF figures of merit for these two TFETs are analyzed in terms of transconductance (g m), output conductance (g ds), gate capacitance (C gg), gate-to-source capacitance (C gs), gate-to-drain capacitance (C gd), unit-gain cut-off frequency (f T), the maximum frequency of oscillation (f MAX) and gain bandwidth product (GBW). The simulation results reveal that LTFET and UTFET have the similar DC characteristic due to the identical tunneling process. And the better RF performance LTFET provides due to it has the much smaller C gd than UTFET. Meanwhile, this work uses mixed device-circuit simulations to predict the performance of inverter circuit implemented with LTFET and UTFET for the first time. And the calculated results demonstrate LTFET is more optimization for inverter circuit design in the novel generation transistors. And all the simulation results in this paper can be used as a reference to choose the characteristic parameters of novel TFETs for inverter applications.

  18. Anomalous effect of doping on the superconducting state of CeCoIn5 in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokiwa, Y.; Movshovich, R.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Bianchi, A. D.; Fisk, Z.; Thompson, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the effect of electron and hole doping on the high-field low-temperature superconducting state in CeCoIn5 by measuring specific heat of CeCo(In1-xMx)5 with M=Sn , Cd, and Hg and x up to 0.33% at temperatures down to 0.1 K and fields up to 14 T. Although both Cd and Hg doping (hole doping) suppresses the zero-field Tc monotonically, Hc2 increases with small amounts of doping and has a maximum around x=0.2% (M=Cd) . On the other hand, with Sn doping (electron doping) both zero-field Tc and Hc2 decrease monotonically. The critical temperature for the high-field low-temperature superconducting state correlates with Hc2 and Tc , which we interpret in support of the superconducting origin of this state.

  19. RF Pulsed Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  20. Lossless anomalous dispersion and an inversionless gain doublet via dressed interacting ground states

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherall, James Owen; Search, Christopher P.

    2010-02-15

    Transparent media exhibiting anomalous dispersion have been of considerable interest since Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu [Nature 406, 277 (2000)] first observed light propagate with superluminal and negative group velocities without absorption. Here, we propose an atomic model exhibiting these properties, based on a generalization of amplification without inversion in a five-level dressed interacting ground-state system. The system consists of a {Lambda} atom prepared as in standard electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), with two additional metastable ground states coupled to the {Lambda} atom ground states by two rf-microwave fields. We consider two configurations by which population is incoherently pumped into the ground states of the atom. Under appropriate circumstances, we predict a pair of new gain lines with tunable width, separation, and height. Between these lines, absorption vanishes but dispersion is large and anomalous. The system described here is a significant improvement over other proposals in the anomalous dispersion literature in that it permits additional coherent control over the spectral properties of the anomalous region, including a possible 10{sup 4}-fold increase over the group delay observed by Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu.

  1. Dynamic 31P MR spectroscopy of plantar flexion: influence of ergometer design, magnetic field strength (3 and 7 T), and RF-coil design.

    PubMed

    Šedivý, Petr; Kipfelsberger, Monika Christina; Dezortová, Monika; Krššák, Martin; Drobný, Miloslav; Chmelík, Marek; Rydlo, Jan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Hájek, Milan; Valkovič, Ladislav

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P MRS) during and after acute exercise enables the noninvasive in vivo determination of the mitochondrial capacity of skeletal muscle. Nevertheless, the lack of standardization in experimental setups leads to significant variations in published values of maximal aerobic capacity, even in the population of healthy volunteers. Thus, in this study, we aimed to assess the impact of the ergometer type (pneumatic and mechanical resistance construction), radiofrequency (RF)-coil diameter, and different magnetic field strengths (3 and 7 T) on the metabolic parameters measured by dynamic (31)P MRS during a plantar flexion isotonic exercise protocol within the same group of healthy volunteers. Dynamic (31)P MRS measurements of the calf muscle in 11 volunteers (mean age, 36  ±  13 yrs; mean BMI, 23.5 ± 2.5 kg/m(2)), on a 3 T MR system with a custom-made mechanical ergometer in the first research laboratory (RL1) and on 3 and 7 T MR systems equipped with a commercial pneumatic ergometer in the second research laboratory (RL2), were performed at three different workloads. RF-coils differed slightly between the sites and MR systems used. The repeatability of the experimental protocol was tested in every setup. The basal concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr), exercise-induced depletion of PCr (ΔPCr), initial PCr resynthesis rate (VPCr), and mitochondrial capacity (Qmax) were calculated and compared between the research sites and field strengths. High repeatability of the measurement protocol was found in every experimental setup. No significant differences at any workload were found in these metabolic parameters assessed at different magnetic field strengths (3 T vs 7 T), using the same ergometer (in RL2) and a similar RF-coil. In the inter-research laboratory comparison at the same field strength (3 T), but with using different ergometers and RF-coils, differences were found in the concentration of PCr measured at

  2. Effect of Anomalous Ion Inertia and Oblique Ion Viscosity on the Radial Electric Field in FT-2 Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkul, S.I.; Popov, A.Yu.

    2004-12-15

    Results are presented from numerical simulations that show that, in a plasma with well-developed turbulence, the radial electric field can be positive in the region where the gradients of the plasma parameters are steep. In a plasma in which the turbulence is suppressed (as is the case with auxiliary lower hybrid heating), the radial electric field is found to exhibit a nearly neoclassical behavior during the formation of a transport barrier and transition to the H-mode.

  3. Anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheverry, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    This article is concerned with the relativistic Vlasov equation, for collisionless axisymmetric plasmas immersed in a strong magnetic field, like in tokamaks. It provides a consistent kinetic treatment of the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics. It shows that the turbulent transport can be completely described through WKB expansions.

  4. The Boring Volcanic Field of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: tectonically anomalous forearc volcanism in an urban setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 small volcanoes are scattered throughout the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. These volcanoes constitute the Boring Volcanic Field, which is centered in the Neogene Portland Basin and merges to the east with coeval volcanic centers of the High Cascade volcanic arc. Although the character of volcanic activity is typical of many monogenetic volcanic fields, its tectonic setting is not, being located in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system well trenchward of the volcanic-arc axis. The history and petrology of this anomalous volcanic field have been elucidated by a comprehensive program of geologic mapping, geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and paleomag-netic studies. Volcanism began at 2.6 Ma with eruption of low-K tholeiite and related lavas in the southern part of the Portland Basin. At 1.6 Ma, following a hiatus of ~0.8 m.y., similar lavas erupted a few kilometers to the north, after which volcanism became widely dispersed, compositionally variable, and more or less continuous, with an average recurrence interval of 15,000 yr. The youngest centers, 50–130 ka, are found in the northern part of the field. Boring centers are generally monogenetic and mafic but a few larger edifices, ranging from basalt to low-SiO2 andesite, were also constructed. Low-K to high-K calc-alkaline compositions similar to those of the nearby volcanic arc dominate the field, but many centers erupted magmas that exhibit little influence of fluids derived from the subducting slab. The timing and compositional characteristics of Boring volcanism suggest a genetic relationship with late Neogene intra-arc rifting.

  5. Field induced anomalous spreading, oscillation, ejection, spinning, and breaking of oil droplets on a strongly slipping water surface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Sarma, Bhaskarjyoti; Dasmahapatra, Ahsok Kumar; Dalal, Amaresh; Basu, Dipankar Narayan; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2017-07-01

    Application of an electric field on an oil droplet floating on the surface of a deionized water bath showed interesting motions such as spreading, oscillation, and ejection. The electric field was generated by connecting a pointed platinum cathode at the top of the oil droplet and a copper anode coated with polymer at the bottom of the water layer. The experimental setup mimicked a conventional electrowetting setup with the exception that the oil was spread on a soft and deformable water isolator. While at relatively lower field intensities we observed spreading of the droplet, at intermediate field intensities the droplet oscillated around the platinum cathode, before ejecting out at a speed as high as ∼5 body lengths per second at even stronger field intensities. The experiments suggested that when the electric field was ramped up abruptly to a particular voltage, any of the spreading, oscillation, or ejection motions of the droplet could be engendered at lower, intermediate and higher field intensities, respectively. However, when the field was ramped up progressively by increasing by a definite amount of voltage per unit time, all three aforementioned motions could be generated simultaneously with the increase in the field intensity. Interestingly, when the aforementioned setup was placed on a magnet, the droplet showed a rotational motion under the influence of the Lorentz force, which was generated because of the coupling of the weak leakage current with the externally applied magnetic field. The spreading, oscillation, ejection, and rotation of the droplet were found to be functions of the oil-water interfacial tension, viscosity, and size of the oil droplet. We developed simple theoretical models to explain the experimental results obtained. Importantly, rotating at a higher speed broke the droplet into a number of smaller ones, owing to the combined influence of the spreading due to the centripetal force and the shear at the oil-water interface. While

  6. The Bipolar Field-Effect Transistor: VII. The Unipolar Current Mode for Analog-RF Operation (Two-MOS-Gates on Pure-Base)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binbin, Jie; Chih-Tang, Sah

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports the DC steady-state current-voltage and conductance-voltage characteristics of a Bipolar Field-Effect Transistor (BiFET) under the unipolar (electron) current mode of operation, with bipolar (electron and hole) charge distributions considered. The model BiFET example presented has two MOS-gates on the two surfaces of a thin pure silicon base layer with electron and hole contacts on both edges of the thin base. The hole contacts on both edges of the thin pure base layer are grounded to give zero hole current. This 1-transistor analog-RF Basic Building Block nMOS amplifier circuit, operated in the unipolar current mode, complements the 1-transistor digital Basic Build Block CMOS voltage inverter circuit, operated in the bipolar-current mode just presented by us.

  7. An Analysis of the Temperature and Field Dependence of the RF Surface Resistance of Nitrogen-Doped Niobium SRF Cavities with Respect to Existing Theoretical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Charles E.; Palczewski, Ari D.; Xiao, Binping

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress with the reduction of rf surface resistance (Rs) of niobium SRF cavities via the use of high temperature surface doping by nitrogen has opened a new regime for energy efficient accelerator applications. For particular doping conditions one observes dramatic decreases in Rs with increasing surface magnetic fields. The observed variations as a function of temperature may be analyzed in the context of recent theoretical treatments in hopes of gaining insight into the underlying beneficial mechanism of the nitrogen treatment. Systematic data sets of Q0 vs. Eacc vs. temperature acquired during the high Q0 R&D work of the past year will be compared with theoretical model predictions..

  8. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramonov, V.; Philipp, S.; Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A.; Stephan, F.

    2017-05-01

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  9. Design and evaluation of a hybrid radiofrequency applicator for magnetic resonance imaging and RF induced hyperthermia: electromagnetic field simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and proof-of-concept at 7.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm(3) iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX

  10. Design and Evaluation of a Hybrid Radiofrequency Applicator for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and RF Induced Hyperthermia: Electromagnetic Field Simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and Proof-of-Concept at 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm3 iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX

  11. Anomalous Shocks on the Measured Near-Field Pressure Signatures of Low-Boom Wind-Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Unexpected shocks on wind-tunnel-measured pressure signatures prompted questions about design methods, pressure signature measurement techniques, and the quality of measurements in the flow fields near lifting models. Some of these unexpected shocks were the result of component integration methods. Others were attributed to the three-dimension nature of the flow around a lifting model, to inaccuracies in the prediction of the area-ruled lift, or to wing-tip stall effects. This report discusses the low-boom model wind-tunnel data where these unexpected shocks were initially observed, the physics of the lifting wing/body model's flow field, the wind-tunnel data used to evaluate the applicability of methods for calculating equivalent areas due to lift, the performance of lift prediction codes, and tip stall effects so that the cause of these shocks could be determined.

  12. Exposure to GSM RF fields does not affect calcium homeostasis in human endothelial cells, rat pheocromocytoma cells or rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Rodney P; Madison, Steve D; Leveque, Philippe; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Bootman, Martin D

    2010-07-27

    exposure on Ca2+ signals. Our data indicate that 900 MHz GSM fields do not affect either basal Ca2+ homeostasis or provoked Ca2+ signals. Even at the highest field strengths applied, which exceed typical phone exposure levels, we did not observe any changes in cellular Ca2+ signals. We conclude that under the conditions employed in our experiments, and using a highly-sensitive assay, we could not detect any consequence of RF exposure.

  13. Exposure to GSM RF Fields Does Not Affect Calcium Homeostasis in Human Endothelial Cells, Rat Pheocromocytoma Cells or Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Rodney P.; Madison, Steve D.; Leveque, Philippe; Roderick, H. Llewelyn; Bootman, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    exposure on Ca2+ signals. Our data indicate that 900 MHz GSM fields do not affect either basal Ca2+ homeostasis or provoked Ca2+ signals. Even at the highest field strengths applied, which exceed typical phone exposure levels, we did not observe any changes in cellular Ca2+ signals. We conclude that under the conditions employed in our experiments, and using a highly-sensitive assay, we could not detect any consequence of RF exposure. PMID:20676401

  14. Optical/near-infrared polarization survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic fields, dense cloud fragmentations, and anomalous dust grain sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Fábio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Reis, Wilson; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G. E-mail: franco@fisica.ufmg.br E-mail: roman@dfuls.cl

    2014-03-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, Two Micron All Sky Survey data, and images from the Digitized Sky Survey and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outward, piling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value (≈400 μG) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak A{sub V} between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of 24 μm point-like sources indicates possible newborn stars inside this dense environment. A statistical analysis of the angular dispersion function revealed areas where field lines are aligned in a well-ordered pattern, seemingly due to compression effects from the H II region expansion. Finally, Serkowski function fits were used to study the ratio of the total-to-selective extinction, revealing a dual population of anomalous grain particle sizes. This trend suggests that both effects of coagulation and fragmentation of interstellar grains are present in the region.

  15. Optical/Near-infrared Polarization Survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic Fields, Dense Cloud Fragmentations, and Anomalous Dust Grain Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fábio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Reis, Wilson; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.

    2014-03-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, Two Micron All Sky Survey data, and images from the Digitized Sky Survey and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outward, piling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value (≈400 μG) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak AV between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of 24 μm point-like sources indicates possible newborn stars inside this dense environment. A statistical analysis of the angular dispersion function revealed areas where field lines are aligned in a well-ordered pattern, seemingly due to compression effects from the H II region expansion. Finally, Serkowski function fits were used to study the ratio of the total-to-selective extinction, revealing a dual population of anomalous grain particle sizes. This trend suggests that both effects of coagulation and fragmentation of interstellar grains are present in the region. Based on observations collected at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (CTIO, Chile) and Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA/MCT, Brazil).

  16. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Hasanato, Rana Muhammed

    2015-11-13

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12-16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12-17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5-6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Muhammed Hasanato, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12–16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12–17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5–6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26580639

  18. Anomalous behaviour of critical fields near a superconducting quantum critical point in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzke, C.; Carrington, A.; Walmsley, P.; Malone, L.; Fletcher, J. D.; See, P.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; Kasahara, S.; Mazukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2014-03-01

    BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 presents one of the cleanest and clearest systems in which to study the influence of quantum critical fluctuations on high temperature superconductivity. In this material a sharp maximum in the magnetic penetration depth has been found at the quantum critical point (QCP x = 0 . 3) where Tc is maximal1. Specific heat and de Haas-van Alphen effect measurements2 show that this peak is driven by a corresponding increase in the quasiparticle effective mass. Based on these previous results a simple one-band theory would suggest that at the QCP we should expect a large increase in Hc 2 and a corresponding dip in Hc 1 . Actual measurements of these critical fields, which we present here, shows quite different behavior which we suggest is caused by an anomalous enhancement in the vortex core energy close to the QCP. 1 K.Hashimoto et.al., Science 336, 1554 (2012) 2 P.Walmsley, C.Putzke et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 257002 (2013) This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, EuroMagNET II, and KAKENHI from JSPS.

  19. Anomalous zones (domal)

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, D.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Each zone contains several anomalous salt properties (anomalous features). Zones cannot be characterized by any single property Zones are highly variable, lenticular, and discontinuous in detail; however, once established, they commonly have a predictable trend. The individual anomalous features can occur alone (locally in pairs) over areas of various sizes and shapes. These alone occurrences are not anomalous zones. Anomalous zones may be of any origin, and origin is not part of the definition. Typical origins include: primary (sedimentary), external sheath zone, separating two spines of salt, or caused by toroidal flow. The major importance of an anomalous zone is that it consists of various anomalous features distributed discontinuously along the zone. Thus, if three or more anomalous properties are observed together, one should look for others. The anomalous zones observed in the Gulf Coast thus far are vertical, linear, and semicontinuous. Most are reasonably straight, but some bend sharply, end abruptly, or coalesce. Textures in salt involve grain size, color (white to dark gray), grain shape, or grain distribution of the salt. Typical anomalous textures are coarse-grain, poikiloblastic, and friability. A change in color is commonplace and seldom anomalous. Structural anomalous features, broadly defined, account for most of the rest of the anomalous features. Not uncommonly they cause mining problems. Among the structural anomalous features: INCLUSIONS: Sediments, hydrocarbons, brine, gases. Common gases are air (as N{sub 2}), CH-compounds, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S. STRUCTURES: Sheared salt, undue stabbing or jointing, voids (crystal-lined pockets), permeability, increased porosity COMPOSITION: High anhydrite content, visible anhydrite as grains or boudins, very black salt = disseminated impurities such as clay.

  20. The MUCOOL RF Program

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Norris, B.; Qian, Z.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Sandstrom, R.; /Geneva U.

    2006-06-26

    Efficient muon cooling requires high RF gradients in the presence of high (3T) solenoidal fields. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) also requires that the x-ray production from these cavities is low, in order to minimize backgrounds in the particle detectors that must be located near the cavities. These cavities require thin Be windows to ensure the highest fields on the beam axis. In order to develop these cavities, the MUCOOL RF Program was started about 6 years ago. Initial measurements were made on a six-cell cavity and a single-cell pillbox, both operating at 805 MHz. We have now begun measurements of a 201 MHz pillbox cavity. This program has led to new techniques to look at dark currents, a new model for breakdown and a general model of cavity performance based on surface damage. The experimental program includes studies of thin Be windows, conditioning, dark current production from different materials, magnetic-field effects and breakdown.

  1. Anomalous optical diffraction by a phase grating induced by a local field effect in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumori, Yasuyoshi; Watanuki, Tetsuya; Sato, Yuki; Edamatsu, Keiichi; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of laser-induced phase gratings to control the emission characteristics of self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots. The microscopic Coulomb interaction between the photoinduced charge densities in a dot, referred to as the local field effect, affects the macroscopic optical properties of a dot ensemble even with inhomogeneous broadening, and forms a phase grating by spatially modulating the exciton resonant frequency. In the low excitation regime, the diffracted light intensity (observed using photon echoes) gradually rose with time delay—a result very different from the conventional instantaneous response to pulse excitation. With increasing excitation intensity, the response of the diffracted signal became more immediate and exhibited a biexponential decay. The change in the temporal profile can be systematically explained by analyzing the dynamics of the phase grating. Our findings suggest an optical switching mechanism using this intrinsic property of semiconductor quantum dots.

  2. Anomalous effect in a hydrogenic impurity in a spherical quantum dot under the influence of parallel electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Lin, Y. C.; Sahoo, S.

    2004-03-01

    We will present calculations for the energy levels and the resonance widths of the quasi-bound states of a confined hydrogenic impurity in an isolate quantum dot subjected to external electric and magnetic fields in parallel directions. A method of complex absorbing potential [1] is used in our present investigation. Resonance positions and widths are reported for a wide range of dot sizes to demonstrate that Stark resonances in a confined hydrogen atom leads to a new phenomenon as a consequence of the quantum confinement of the atom, contrary to the Stark effect on a free atom. * This work was supported by the National Science Council of ROC. [1] S. Sahoo and Y. K. Ho, Chin. J. Phys. 38, 127 (2000); J. Phys. B 33, 2195 (2000); J. Phys. B 33, 5151 (2000); Phys. Rev. A 65, 015403 (2001);

  3. Gyromagnetic RF source for interdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Romanchenko, I V; Rostov, V V; Gunin, A V; Konev, V Yu

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a source of high power nanosecond RF pulses based on gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line. The source is designed to explore the exposure of different biological objects to strong RF fields in an air filled rectangular waveguide loaded onto ethanol RF load. The RF pulse amplitude can be varied by 52 dB, reaching a maximum value of nearly 40 kV/cm and decreasing to tens of V/cm. The RF pulse amplitude is controlled by decreasing the incident pulse amplitude from the high voltage driver. The duration of RF pulses lies in the range from 4 to 25 ns and the frequency from 0.6 to 1.0 GHz.

  4. Design Considerations for the LCLS RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, R.

    2005-01-31

    The LCLS rf gun design requires several modifications from existing S-band rf guns. The modifications that have the largest impact on the design of the gun are a dual rf feed and additional cooling capacity for 120 Hz operation. A list of electrical and mechanical specifications have been developed to produce the desired rf field. The simulation code ANSYS was used to study the steady state thermal properties of a 120 Hz gun. It was determined that four cooling channels at appropriate locations could be used to maintain the gun at a nearly constant frequency. The gun body stresses were all at or below the yield strength of Cu except for at the rf apertures. The stress at the apertures is over twice the yield strength and additional work is necessary to reduce the stress and still produce the desired rf coupling coefficient. Only steady state temperatures were calculated and no pulsed heating effects were considered in this study.

  5. Gyromagnetic RF source for interdisciplinary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanchenko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Gunin, A. V.; Konev, V. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a source of high power nanosecond RF pulses based on gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line. The source is designed to explore the exposure of different biological objects to strong RF fields in an air filled rectangular waveguide loaded onto ethanol RF load. The RF pulse amplitude can be varied by 52 dB, reaching a maximum value of nearly 40 kV/cm and decreasing to tens of V/cm. The RF pulse amplitude is controlled by decreasing the incident pulse amplitude from the high voltage driver. The duration of RF pulses lies in the range from 4 to 25 ns and the frequency from 0.6 to 1.0 GHz.

  6. Anomalous ballistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1986-07-01

    We introduce a novel two-component random network. Unit resistors are placed at random along the bonds of a pure superconducting linear chain, with the distance l between successive resistors being chosen from the distribution P(l)~l-(α+1) where α>0 is a tunable parameter. We study the transport exponents dw and ζ~ defined by ~t2/dw and ρ~Lζ~, where is the mean-square displacement, ρ the resistivity, and L the system size. We find that for α>=1 both dw and ζ~ stick at their value for a nonzero concentration of resistors. For α<1 they vary continuously with α: dw=2α and ζ~=α. In the presence of a bias field, we find dw=α. This is the first exactly soluble model displaying ``anomalous ballistic diffusion,'' which we interpret physically in terms of a Lévy-flight random walk on a linear chain lattice.

  7. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  8. Classification of personal exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) for epidemiological research: Evaluation of different exposure assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Frei, Patrizia; Mohler, Evelyn; Bürgi, Alfred; Fröhlich, Jürg; Neubauer, Georg; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Röösli, Martin

    2010-10-01

    The use of personal exposure meters (exposimeters) has been recommended for measuring personal exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from environmental far-field sources in everyday life. However, it is unclear to what extent exposimeter readings are affected by measurements taken when personal mobile and cordless phones are used. In addition, the use of exposimeters in large epidemiological studies is limited due to high costs and large effort for study participants. In the current analysis we aimed to investigate the impact of personal phone use on exposimeter readings and to evaluate different exposure assessment methods potentially useful in epidemiological studies. We collected personal exposimeter measurements during one week and diary data from 166 study participants. Moreover, we collected spot measurements in the participants' bedrooms and data on self-estimated exposure, assessed residential exposure to fixed site transmitters by calculating the geo-coded distance and mean RF-EMF from a geospatial propagation model, and developed an exposure prediction model based on the propagation model and exposure relevant behavior. The mean personal exposure was 0.13 mW/m(2), when measurements during personal phone calls were excluded and 0.15 mW/m(2), when such measurements were included. The Spearman correlation with personal exposure (without personal phone calls) was 0.42 (95%-CI: 0.29 to 0.55) for the spot measurements, -0.03 (95%-CI: -0.18 to 0.12) for the geo-coded distance, 0.28 (95%-CI: 0.14 to 0.42) for the geospatial propagation model, 0.50 (95%-CI: 0.37 to 0.61) for the full exposure prediction model and 0.06 (95%-CI: -0.10 to 0.21) for self-estimated exposure. In conclusion, personal exposure measured with exposimeters correlated best with the full exposure prediction model and spot measurements. Self-estimated exposure and geo-coded distance turned out to be poor surrogates for personal exposure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All

  9. RF gun emittance correction using unsymmetrical RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, L.; Rivolta, R.; Terzoli, L.; Pagani, C.

    1992-07-01

    The beam dynamics in RF guns is characterized by an optimum injection phase which minimizes the RF-field-induced emittance blowup: such a condition corresponds to a vanishing first order term in the phase dependence of the exit transverse momentum. Away from the optimum phase, a sharp increase of the emittance is found. In this paper we analyze the possibility of compensating for both the first and second order terms, in order to recover the minimum emittance value even at phases different from the optimum one. Our scheme is based on the use of an unsymmetrical RF cavity, added downstream of the gun cavity and fully uncoupled from it, in order to be independently phased. At the exit of this cavity the minimum emittance value can be recovered, the injection phase being a free parameter to be independently optimized. In this way higher injection phases can be exploited, where the longitudinal rms emittance displays a minimum, and long bunches extracted from the gun can be magnetically compressed more efficiently, achieving a significant beam brightness increase with respect to conventionally optimized RF guns. An analytical study of the beam dynamics inside the unsymmetrical RF cavity is presented, together with the results of some numerical simulations performed with the PIC code ITACA [L. Serafini and C. Pagani, Proc. 1st EPAC, Rome, June 1988 (Word Scientific) p. 866].

  10. An investigation of the effects of TETRA RF fields on intracellular calcium in neurones and cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Green, A C; Scott, I R; Gwyther, R J; Peyman, A; Chadwick, P; Chen, X; Alfadhl, Y; Tattersall, J E H

    2005-12-01

    This study aimed to determine whether Terrestrial Trunked Radio (TETRA) fields can affect intracellular calcium signalling in excitable cells. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2 +) ](i)) was measured in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells and cardiac myocytes during exposure to TETRA fields (380.8875 MHz pulse modulated at 17.6 Hz, 25% duty cycle). [Ca(2 +) ](i) was measured as fura-PE3, fluo-3 or fluo-4 fluorescence by digital image analysis. Granule cells exposed at specific absorption rates (SARs) of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 400 mW x kg(-1) showed no significant changes in resting [Ca(2 +) ](i). Increases in [Ca(2 +) ](i) in response to potassium-induced depolarization were significantly different from sham controls in TETRA-exposed cells, but the majority of the difference was attributable to initial biological variation between cell cultures. No difference was found between fura-PE3 (UV excitation) and fluo-3 (visible light excitation) measurements in these cells. Exposure to TETRA (50 or 400 mW x kg(-1)) had no significant effect on either the rate or amplitude of spontaneous Ca(2 +) transients in cardiac myocytes. The cells showed normal responses to salbutamol (50 microM) and acetylcholine (10 microM). Overall, these results showed no evidence of any consistent or biologically relevant effect of TETRA fields on [Ca(2 + )](i) in granule cells and cardiac myocytes at any of the SAR tested.

  11. Sources of the strongest RF radiation from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments performed at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida during TRIP-78 identified sources of the strongest RF radiation from lightning in the HF-VHF frequency range. Measurements were made of electric field changes associated with RF radiation using a field change system triggered on the output of an RF detector. The field changes associated with the strongest RF radiation are very fast (10 - 20 microseconds), bipolar pulses having an initial negative going half-cycle followed by a positive overshoot. These fast pulses consistently produced more RF radiation than was associated with return strokes, and their shape was remarkably consistent, independent of frequency.

  12. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  13. Diamond field-effect transistors for RF power electronics: Novel NO2 hole doping and low-temperature deposited Al2O3 passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasu, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Diamond possesses a combination of exceptional physical properties and is expected to be used as a semiconductor material in high-efficiency and high-power electronic devices. In this study, hole doping was observed when using NO2 molecules on a H-diamond surface. The activation energy of hole concentration in NO2/H-diamond was measured as 0.006 eV, and holes were fully activated at room temperature. A thermal stabilization of the hole channel was realized by passivation with an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer. The passivation method enabled the realization of a thermally stable high-performance diamond field-effect transistor (FET), which exhibited high-performance DC and RF characteristics. NO2 hole-doping and Al2O3-passivation technologies enabled reproducible measurements of MOS structure electric properties. Such technologies also facilitated observations of two-dimensional holes at the MOS interface and type-II band alignment of Al2O3/NO2/H-diamond. Additionally, the band diagram under various gate bias conditions was proposed on the basis of capacitance-voltage measurements and analysis using Poisson’s equations.

  14. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb/sub 3/Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb/sub 3/Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown.

  15. The Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is defined as a quantized Hall effect realized in a system without an external magnetic field. The quantum anomalous Hall effect is a novel manifestation of topological structure in many-electron systems and may have potential applications in future electronic devices. In recent years, the quantum anomalous Hall effect was proposed theoretically and realized experimentally. In this review article, we provide a systematic overview of the theoretical and experimental developments in this field.

  16. Reduction of RF sheaths potentials by compensation or suppression of parallel RF currents on ICRF antennae

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, A.; Colas, L.; Vulliez, K.; Argouarch, A.; Milanesio, D.

    2009-11-26

    Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths are suspected to limit the performance of present-day Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antennae over long pulses and should be minimized in future Fusion devices. Within the simplest models, RF sheath effects are quantified by the integral V{sub RF} {integral}E{sub ||}{center_dot}dl where the parallel RF field E{sub ||} is linked with the slow wave. On 'long open field lines' with large toroidal extension on both sides of the antenna it was shown that V{sub RF} is excited by parallel RF currents j{sub ||} flowing on the antenna structure. We thus propose two ways to reduce |V{sub RF}| by acting on j{sub ||} on the antenna front face. The first method, more adapted for protruding antennae, consists in avoiding the j{sub ||} circulation on the antenna structure, by slotting the antenna frame on its horizontal edges and by cutting partially the Faraday screen rods. The second method, well suited for recessed antennae, consists in compensating j{sub ||} of opposite signs along long flux tubes, with parallelepiped antennae aligned with tilted flux tubes. The different concepts are assessed numerically on a 2-strap Tore Supra antenna phased [0, {pi}] using near RF fields from the antenna code TOPICA. Simulations stress the need to suppress all current paths for j{sub ||} to reduce substantially |V{sub RF}| over the whole antenna height.

  17. SNS LINAC RF control system.

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, A. H.; Kwon, S. I.; Prokop, M. S.; Rohlev, T. S.; Thomson, D. W.; Ma, H.

    2002-01-01

    The SNS linac RF control system (RFCS) is currently in development. A system is being installed in a superconducting test stand at Jefferson Laboratory presently. Two systems will soon be installed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and more are due to be installed early next year. The RF control system provides field control for the entire SNS linac, including an RFQ and 6 DTL cavities at 402.5 MHz as well as three different types of cavities at of 805 MHz: 4 CCL cavities, 36 medium beta superconducting (SRF) cavities, and 45 high beta superconducting cavities. In addition to field control, it provides cavity resonance control, and incorporates high power protect functions. This paper will discuss the RFCS design to date, with emphasis on the challenges of providing a universal digital system for use on each of the individual cavity types. The RF control system hardware has been designed to minimize the amount of changes for all of the applications. Through software/firmware modification and changing a couple of frequency-dependent filters, the same control system design can be used for all five cavity types. The SNS is the first to utilize SRF cavities for a pulsed high-current proton accelerator, thereby making RF control especially challenging.

  18. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  19. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  20. Anomalous Thermalization in Ergodic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitz, David J.; Bar Lev, Yevgeny

    2016-10-01

    It is commonly believed that quantum isolated systems satisfying the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) are diffusive. We show that this assumption is too restrictive since there are systems that are asymptotically in a thermal state yet exhibit anomalous, subdiffusive thermalization. We show that such systems satisfy a modified version of the ETH ansatz and derive a general connection between the scaling of the variance of the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators, written in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian, and the dynamical exponent. We find that for subdiffusively thermalizing systems the variance scales more slowly with system size than expected for diffusive systems. We corroborate our findings by numerically studying the distribution of the coefficients of the eigenfunctions and the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators of the random field Heisenberg chain, which has anomalous transport in its thermal phase. Surprisingly, this system also has non-Gaussian distributions of the eigenfunctions, thus, directly violating Berry's conjecture.

  1. Anomalous Thermalization in Ergodic Systems.

    PubMed

    Luitz, David J; Bar Lev, Yevgeny

    2016-10-21

    It is commonly believed that quantum isolated systems satisfying the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) are diffusive. We show that this assumption is too restrictive since there are systems that are asymptotically in a thermal state yet exhibit anomalous, subdiffusive thermalization. We show that such systems satisfy a modified version of the ETH ansatz and derive a general connection between the scaling of the variance of the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators, written in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian, and the dynamical exponent. We find that for subdiffusively thermalizing systems the variance scales more slowly with system size than expected for diffusive systems. We corroborate our findings by numerically studying the distribution of the coefficients of the eigenfunctions and the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators of the random field Heisenberg chain, which has anomalous transport in its thermal phase. Surprisingly, this system also has non-Gaussian distributions of the eigenfunctions, thus, directly violating Berry's conjecture.

  2. Magnetoplasmonic RF mixing and nonlinear frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firby, C. J.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design of a magnetoplasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulator facilitating radio-frequency (RF) mixing and nonlinear frequency generation. This is achieved by forming the MZI arms from long-range dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides containing bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG). The magnetization of the Bi:YIG can be driven in the nonlinear regime by RF magnetic fields produced around adjacent transmission lines. Correspondingly, the nonlinear temporal dynamics of the transverse magnetization component are mapped onto the nonreciprocal phase shift in the MZI arms, and onto the output optical intensity signal. We show that this tunable mechanism can generate harmonics, frequency splitting, and frequency down-conversion with a single RF excitation, as well as RF mixing when driven by two RF signals. This magnetoplasmonic component can reduce the number of electrical sources required to generate distinct optical modulation frequencies and is anticipated to satisfy important applications in integrated optics.

  3. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper.

  4. Magnetoplasmonic RF mixing and nonlinear frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Firby, C. J. Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-07-04

    We present the design of a magnetoplasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulator facilitating radio-frequency (RF) mixing and nonlinear frequency generation. This is achieved by forming the MZI arms from long-range dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides containing bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG). The magnetization of the Bi:YIG can be driven in the nonlinear regime by RF magnetic fields produced around adjacent transmission lines. Correspondingly, the nonlinear temporal dynamics of the transverse magnetization component are mapped onto the nonreciprocal phase shift in the MZI arms, and onto the output optical intensity signal. We show that this tunable mechanism can generate harmonics, frequency splitting, and frequency down-conversion with a single RF excitation, as well as RF mixing when driven by two RF signals. This magnetoplasmonic component can reduce the number of electrical sources required to generate distinct optical modulation frequencies and is anticipated to satisfy important applications in integrated optics.

  5. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  6. Progress on Quantitative Modeling of rf Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; Kohno, H.; Wright, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    A new quantitative approach for computing the rf sheath potential is described, which incorporates plasma dielectric effects and the relative geometry of the magnetic field and the material boundaries. The new approach uses a modified boundary condition ("rf sheath BC") that couples the rf waves and the sheaths at the boundary. It treats the sheath as a thin vacuum region and matches the fields across the plasma-vacuum boundary. When combined with the Child-Langmuir Law (relating the sheath width and sheath potential), the model permits a self-consistent determination of the sheath parameters and the rf electric field at the sheath-plasma boundary. Semi-analytic models using this BC predict a number of general features, including a sheath voltage threshold, a dimensionless parameter characterizing rf sheath effects, and the existence of sheath plasma waves with an associated resonance. Since the sheath BC is nonlinear and dependent on geometry, computing the sheath potential numerically is a challenging computational problem. Numerical results will be presented from a new parallel-processing finite-element rf wave code for the tokamak scrape-off layer (called "rfSOL"). The code has verified the physics predicted by analytic theory in 1D, and extended the solutions into model 2D geometries. The numerical calculations confirm the existence of multiple roots and hysteresis effects, and parameter studies have been carried out. Areas for future work will be discussed.

  7. Anomalous Transport Effects in Auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasperse, J. R.; Basu, B.; Lund, E. J.; Grossbard, N.

    2011-12-01

    The physical processes that determine the fluid quantities and the self-consistent, electric field (Epar) parallel to the magnetic field have been an unresolved problem in magnetospheric physics for over forty years. Recently, we have published a new kinetic and multimoment fluid theory for inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized plasma with temperature anisotropy and applied the theory to solve for the quasi steady state in the long-range potential region of a downward Birkeland current sheet when electrostatic ion cyclotron turbulence was dominant. See Jasperse et al. [2006a, 2006b, 2010a, 2010b, and 2011]. We find that the turbulence produces an enhancement in the magnitude of Epar by nearly a factor of forty compared to the case when it is absent. Anomalous momentum transfer (anomalous resistivity) by itself has a very small effect on Epar; however, the presence of the turbulence and the anomalous energy transfers (anomalous heating and cooling) that result have a very large effect on the entire solution. In the electron and ion momentum-balance equations for Epar, the turbulence enhances the magnitude of Epar by reducing the effect of the generalized parallel pressure gradients and thereby enhancing the effect of the mirror forces. A new, nonlinear formula for the current-voltage relation in downward current regions is also given which is different from the Knight relation for upward currents. Jasperse et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 072903 [2006a], Phys. Plasmas 13, 112902 [2006b], Phys. Plasmas 17, 062903 [2010a], Phys. Plasmas 17, 062904 [2010b], and J. Geophys. Res., in press [2011].

  8. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE PAGES

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  9. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  10. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present calculations of the performance of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters (FADOF) on IR transitions indicate that such filters may furnish high transmission, narrow-pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth under optimum operating conditions. A FADOF consists of an atomic vapor cell between crossed polarizers that are subject to a dc magnetic field along the optical path; when linearly polarized light travels along the direction of the magnetic field through the dispersive atomic vapor, a polarization rotation occurs. If FADOF conditions are suitably adjusted, a maximum transmission with very narrow bandwidth is obtained.

  11. Minimal model for anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2017-01-01

    A random walk model with a local probability of removal is solved exactly and shown to exhibit subdiffusive behavior with a mean square displacement the evolves as ˜t1 /2 at late times. This model is shown to be well described by a diffusion equation with a sink term, which also describes the evolution of a pressure or temperature field in a leaky environment. For this reason a number of physical processes are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion. The presence of the sink term is shown to change the late time behavior of the field from 1 /t1 /2 to 1 /t3 /2 .

  12. Bi-exponential proton transverse relaxation rate (R2) image analysis using RF field intensity-weighted spin density projection: potential for R2 measurement of iron-loaded liver.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul R; Chua-anusorn, Wanida; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2003-06-01

    A bi-exponential proton transverse relaxation rate (R(2)) image analysis technique has been developed that enables the discrimination of dual compartment transverse relaxation behavior in systems with rapid transverse relaxation enhancement. The technique is particularly well suited to single spin-echo imaging studies where a limited number of images are available for analysis. The bi-exponential R(2) image analysis is facilitated by estimation of the initial proton spin density signal within the region of interest weighted by the RF field intensities. The RF field intensity-weighted spin density map is computed by solving a boundary value problem presented by a high spin density, long T(2) material encompassing the region for analysis. The accuracy of the bi-exponential R(2) image analysis technique is demonstrated on a simulated dual compartment manganese chloride phantom system with relaxation rates and relative population densities between the two compartments similar to the bi-exponential transverse relaxation behavior expected of iron loaded liver. Results from analysis of the phantoms illustrate the potential of bi-exponential R(2) image analysis with RF field intensity-weighted spin density projection for quantifying transverse relaxation enhancement as it occurs in liver iron overload.

  13. High Q at Low and Medium Field

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2004-09-22

    The surface resistance of a bulk niobium superconducting rf cavity as function of the surface magnetic field is often characterized by three peculiar dependencies at low, medium and high field. Understanding the causes and the physics behind these anomalous behaviors is important to improve the performance of superconducting cavities used in particle accelerators. In this paper attention will be focused on low and medium field regions by presenting experimental results of several cavity test series and reviewing the models that try to explain these non-linearities of the surface resistance.

  14. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  15. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  16. Anomalous diffraction approximation limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Chýlek, Petr

    It has been reported in a recent article [Liu, C., Jonas, P.R., Saunders, C.P.R., 1996. Accuracy of the anomalous diffraction approximation to light scattering by column-like ice crystals. Atmos. Res., 41, pp. 63-69] that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) accuracy does not depend on particle refractive index, but instead is dependent on the particle size parameter. Since this is at odds with previous research, we thought these results warranted further discussion.

  17. Electric-field manipulation of coercivity in FePt/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 heterostructures investigated by anomalous Hall effect measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingfeng; Hao, Liang; Jin, Tianli; Cao, Jiangwei; Bai, Jianmin; Wu, Dongping; Wang, Ying; Wei, Fulin

    2015-06-01

    The effect of electric field (E-field) on the magnetism of FePt thin films in FePt/0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) heterostructures was investigated by anomalous Hall effect measurement. For FePt films of different thicknesses, the coercivity vs E-field curves show a typical butterfly-like loop behavior. Further results indicate that the coercivity variation is composed of the volatile symmetrical butterfly-like loop and nonvolatile hysteresis loop-like parts, which originate from the volatile and nonvolatile strains induced by the E-field in the PMN-PT(001) substrate, respectively. No significant difference has been observed after inserting a 2 nm W interlayer, suggesting that the charge-mediated coercivity variation is negligible in FePt/PMN-PT heterostructures.

  18. RF Power and HOM Coupler Tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B

    2003-10-28

    Radio frequency (RF) couplers are used on superconducting cavities to deliver RF power for creating accelerating fields and to remove unwanted higher-order mode power for reducing emittance growth and cryogenic load. RF couplers in superconducting applications present a number of interdisciplinary design challenges that need to be addressed, since poor performance in these devices can profoundly impact accelerator operations and the overall success of a major facility. This paper will focus on critical design issues for fundamental and higher order mode (HOM) power couplers, highlight a sampling of reliability-related problems observed in couplers, and discuss some design strategies for improving performance.

  19. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  20. RF-sheath assessment of ICRF Faraday Screens

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.

    2007-09-28

    The line-integrated parallel RF electric field {delta}V{sub RF} is studied on 'long field lines' radially in front of an ICRF antenna closed by a Faraday screen (FS). Several issues are addressed analytically and numerically. To what extent is a FS necessary to shield {delta}V{sub RF} in presence of magnetized plasma, depending on strap phasing? How efficient is it as a function of FS misalignment on tilted magnetic field? Can a FS attenuate {delta}V{sub RF} produced on antenna frame?.

  1. Measurements of the rf surface resistance of high- Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program is being conducted to assess the applicability of high-{Tc} superconductors for use in high power rf and microwave devices. The program involves the measurement of the rf surface resistance of high-{Tc} samples at frequencies between 0.15 and 40 GHz and rf surface magnetic fields as high as 640 gauss. Polycrystalline samples were found to have surface resistances which increase monotonically with rf-field amplitude, saturating at high field at a few percent of the normal-state surface resistance just above {Tc}. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Electric field and radio frequency measurements for rocket engine health monitoring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenti, Elizabeth L.

    1992-01-01

    Electric-field (EF) and radio-frequency (RF) emissions generated in the exhaust plumes of the diagnostic testbed facility thruster (DTFT) and the SSME are examined briefly for potential applications to plume diagnostics and engine health monitoring. Hypothetically, anomalous engine conditions could produce measurable changes in any characteristic EF and RF spectral signatures identifiable with a 'healthly' plumes. Tests to determine the presence of EF and RF emissions in the DTFT and SSME exhaust plumes were conducted. EF and RF emissions were detected using state-of-the-art sensors. Analysis of limited data sets show some apparent consistencies in spectral signatures. Significant emissions increases were detected during controlled tests using dopants injected into the DTFT.

  3. Rotating frame RF current density imaging.

    PubMed

    Scott, G C; Joy, M L; Armstrong, R L; Henkelman, R M

    1995-03-01

    RF current density imaging (RF-CDI) is a new MRI technique for imaging the Larmor frequency current density parallel to B0 in electrolytic media. To extend the use of RF-CDI to biological tissue for generating conductivity contrast, the sensitivity must be increased and the data requirements reduced. A rotating frame approach, in which a large B1 field is applied simultaneously as a rotary echo with RF current, is proposed to meet these requirements. Rotating frame magnetic fields are encoded in the phase of an MRI image. Trials have now been performed with this sequence in a three-compartment cylindrical phantom containing doped water or mineral oil for detecting displacement, conduction and fringe field currents. In a postmortem rat study, 85.56 MHz RF currents injected by implanted electrodes created tissue dependent contrast because of the electrical properties of tissue. A sensitivity and artifact analysis was also performed. The sensitivity of this method is determined by the maximum RF pulse duration. SAR limits pose an upper bound on this time and B1, whereas the avoidance of phase artifacts imposes a lower bound on B1.

  4. Field induced domain switching as the origin of anomalous lattice strain along non-polar direction in rhombohedral BiScO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} close to the morphotropic phase boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Lalitha, K. V.; Ranjan, Rajeev; Fancher, Chris M.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2015-08-03

    The lattice strain and domain switching behavior of xBiScO{sub 3}–(1-x)PbTiO{sub 3} (x = 0.40) was investigated as a function of cyclic field and grain orientation by in situ X-ray diffraction during application of electric fields. The electric field induced 200 lattice strain was measured to be five times larger than the 111 lattice strain in pseudorhombohedral xBiScO{sub 3}–(1-x)PbTiO{sub 3} (x = 0.40). It is shown that the anomalous 200 lattice strain is not an intrinsic phenomenon, but arises primarily due to stress associated with the reorientation of the 111 domains in dense polycrystalline ceramic.

  5. The formation of anomalous Hall effect depending on W atoms in ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, Musa Mutlu; Shah, S. Ismat; Fırat, Tezer

    2014-06-01

    This article investigates the effects of intrinsic point defects and extrinsic W atoms on magneto electrical properties in the ZnO lattice. The analyses were accomplished for ∼0.5% W including ZnO thin films, grown using a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system. The polarized spin current dependent magnetic formation was investigated by longitudinal and transverse magneto electrical measurements in a temperature range of 5 K to 300 K. The positive magneto resistivity (PMR) ratios reached 28.8%, 12.7%, and 17.6% at 5 K for thin films, having different post-deposition annealing conditions as a consequence of ionic W dependent defects in the lattice. Furthermore, an anomalous Hall effect, originating from polarized spin currents, was understood from the split in Hall resistance versus magnetic field (Rxy(H)) curves for the thin film with high amount of Zn2+ and W6+ ionic defects.

  6. Drag suppression in anomalous chiral media

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We study a heavy impurity moving longitudinal with the direction of an external magnetic field in an anomalous chiral medium. Such system would carry a non-dissipative current of chiral magnetic effect associated with the anomaly. We show, by generalizing Landau's criterion for super fluidity, that the "anomalous component" which gives rise to the anomalous transport will not contribute to the drag experienced by an impurity. We argue on a very general basis that those systems with a strong magnetic field would exhibit an interesting transport phenomenon$-$the motion of the heavy impurity is frictionless, in analogy to the case of a super fluid. Finally, we demonstrate and confirm our general results with two complementary examples: weakly coupled chiral fermion gases and strongly interacting chiral liquids.

  7. Drag suppression in anomalous chiral media

    DOE PAGES

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We study a heavy impurity moving longitudinal with the direction of an external magnetic field in an anomalous chiral medium. Such system would carry a non-dissipative current of chiral magnetic effect associated with the anomaly. We show, by generalizing Landau's criterion for super fluidity, that the "anomalous component" which gives rise to the anomalous transport will not contribute to the drag experienced by an impurity. We argue on a very general basis that those systems with a strong magnetic field would exhibit an interesting transport phenomenon$-$the motion of the heavy impurity is frictionless, in analogy to the case of amore » super fluid. Finally, we demonstrate and confirm our general results with two complementary examples: weakly coupled chiral fermion gases and strongly interacting chiral liquids.« less

  8. Drag suppression in anomalous chiral media

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We study a heavy impurity moving longitudinal with the direction of an external magnetic field in an anomalous chiral medium. Such system would carry a non-dissipative current of chiral magnetic effect associated with the anomaly. We show, by generalizing Landau's criterion for super fluidity, that the "anomalous component" which gives rise to the anomalous transport will not contribute to the drag experienced by an impurity. We argue on a very general basis that those systems with a strong magnetic field would exhibit an interesting transport phenomenon$-$the motion of the heavy impurity is frictionless, in analogy to the case of a super fluid. Finally, we demonstrate and confirm our general results with two complementary examples: weakly coupled chiral fermion gases and strongly interacting chiral liquids.

  9. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  10. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-01

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W-683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  11. The Use of RF Waves in Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, Edgar A., III; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Squire, Jared

    2004-01-01

    This paper will review the ways in which RF and microwave radiation may be used in the design of electric propulsion systems for spacecraft. RF power has been used or proposed in electric propulsion systems to ionize, to heat, and to accelerate the propellant, or to produce plasma used to inflate a magnetic field for solar sail purposes. Direct RF propulsion using radiation pressure or ponderomotive forces is impractical owing to efficiency considerations. Examples of various systems that have been developed or proposed will be reviewed. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) uses RF for producing, heating and accelerating plasma. Inductive RF and microwave ion thruster schemes use e-m waves to ionize the plasma, which is then accelerated by use of dc grids. The details of the VASIMR, an inductive RF thruster, and a microwave ion thruster are discussed and contrasted with related RF systems.

  12. The Use of RF Waves in Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, Edgar A., III; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Squire, Jared

    2004-01-01

    This paper will review the ways in which RF and microwave radiation may be used in the design of electric propulsion systems for spacecraft. RF power has been used or proposed in electric propulsion systems to ionize, to heat, and to accelerate the propellant, or to produce plasma used to inflate a magnetic field for solar sail purposes. Direct RF propulsion using radiation pressure or ponderomotive forces is impractical owing to efficiency considerations. Examples of various systems that have been developed or proposed will be reviewed. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) uses RF for producing, heating and accelerating plasma. Inductive RF and microwave ion thruster schemes use e-m waves to ionize the plasma, which is then accelerated by use of dc grids. The details of the VASIMR, an inductive RF thruster, and a microwave ion thruster are discussed and contrasted with related RF systems.

  13. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM/sub 010/ caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 ..mu..s) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible.

  14. The RF Design of an HOM Polarized RF Gun for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Miller, R.A.; Lewellen, J.W.; /Argonne

    2006-11-15

    The ILC requires a polarized electron beam. While a highly polarized beam can be produced by a GaAs-type cathode in a DC gun of the type currently in use at SLAC, JLAB and elsewhere, the ILC injector system can be simplified and made more efficient if a GaAs-type cathode can be combined with a low emittance RF gun. Since this type of cathode is known to be extremely sensitive to vacuum contamination including back bombardment by electrons and ions, any successful polarized RF gun must have a significantly improved operating vacuum compared to existing RF guns. We present a new RF design for an L-Band normal conducting (NC) RF gun for the ILC polarized electron source. This design incorporates a higher order mode (HOM) structure, whose chief virtue in this application is an improved conductance for vacuum pumping on the cathode. Computer simulation models have been used to optimize the RF parameters with two principal goals: first to minimize the required RF power; second to reduce the peak surface field relative to the field at the cathode in order to suppress field emitted electron bombardment. The beam properties have been simulated initially using PARMELA. Vacuum and other practical issues for implementing this design are discussed.

  15. Quantization of anomalous gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Wotzasek, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the quantization of Anomalous Gauge Theories (AGT) both in the context of functional integration and canonical Hamiltonian approach. The Wess-Zumino term (WZT), which repairs gauge symmetry in the AGT is discussed and its derivation is presented in the canonical approach as a consequence of the restoration of the first-class nature of the gauge constraints. He applied this technique in a few quantum field theories like the chiral Schwinger model, chiral bosons and massive electrodynamics. This construction of the WZT is intended to contrast with the one derived by functional methods with the use of the Faddeev-Popov trick. To shed some light into the physical significance of the WZ field he discusses a simple quantum mechanical model, the amputated planar rotor.' In the context the WZ field presents itself as a topological charge for the model. Possible generalizations are discussed.

  16. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  17. RF synchronized short pulse laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Yasuhiro Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Tongu, Hiromu; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Okamura, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi

    2016-02-15

    A laser ion source that produces shortly bunched ion beam is proposed. In this ion source, ions are extracted immediately after the generation of laser plasma by an ultra-short pulse laser before its diffusion. The ions can be injected into radio frequency (RF) accelerating bucket of a subsequent accelerator. As a proof-of-principle experiment of the ion source, a RF resonator is prepared and H{sub 2} gas was ionized by a short pulse laser in the RF electric field in the resonator. As a result, bunched ions with 1.2 mA peak current and 5 ns pulse length were observed at the exit of RF resonator by a probe.

  18. High-{Tc} rf SQUID magnetometers

    SciTech Connect

    Mueck, M.

    1994-12-31

    The discovery of high temperature superconductors has revived the interest in rf SQUIDS, which, in the case of conventional superconductors had been surpassed in performance by the dc SQUID. Several advantages are offered by the rf SQUID, like the requirement for only a single weak link and a low 1/f noise. With high bias frequencies (> 100 MHz) it is possible to obtain flux noise values comparable to dc SQUIDS. At present, HTS rf SQUIDs offer a field sensitivity of less than 100 fT/{radical}Hz ({at} 1 Hz). This is already sufficient for a number of serious applications. This paper reviews recent developments towards practical rf SQUIDs made of high-{Tc} superconductors.

  19. Single frequency RF powered ECG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.; Hynecek, J.; Homa, J.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a radio frequency magnetic field can be used to power implanted electronic circuitry for short range telemetry to replace batteries. A substantial reduction in implanted volume can be achieved by using only one RF tank circuit for receiving the RF power and transmitting the telemetered information. A single channel telemetry system of this type, using time sharing techniques, was developed and employed to transmit the ECG signal from Rhesus monkeys in primate chairs. The signal from the implant is received during the period when the RF powering radiation is interrupted. The ECG signal is carried by 20-microsec pulse position modulated pulses, referred to the trailing edge of the RF powering pulse. Satisfactory results have been obtained with this single frequency system. The concept and the design presented may be useful for short-range long-term implant telemetry systems.

  20. New developments in RF power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.

    1994-06-01

    The most challenging rf source requirements for high-energy accelerators presently being studied or designed come from the various electron-positron linear collider studies. All of these studies except TESLA (the superconducting entry in the field) have specified rf sources with much higher peak powers than any existing tubes at comparable high frequencies. While circular machines do not, in general, require high peak power, the very high luminosity electron-positron rings presently being designed as B factories require prodigious total average rf power. In this age of energy conservation, this puts a high priority on high efficiency for the rf sources. Both modulating anodes and depressed collectors are being investigated in the quest for high efficiency at varying output powers.

  1. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  2. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  3. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  4. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  5. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-11-24

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a {pi} mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note [1].

  6. Arbitrary order transfer maps for RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    van Zeijts, J.

    1995-12-31

    Current modeling of transfer maps for superconducting RF cavities at CEBAF includes only linear effects. Here we extend the transfer mapping modeling capability to include arbitrary order field information generated from the MAFIA field data. We include coupler kicks, normal and skew quadrupole focussing and higher order effects.

  7. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of anomalous coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anitha; Keegan, Jennifer; Pennell, Dudley J

    2005-09-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of anomalous coronary arteries is a class I indication. The term anomalous coronary artery encompasses those with an abnormal origin (from the incorrect sinus, too-high or too-low from the correct sinus, or from the pulmonary artery) and/or number of ostia. Their clinical significance results from the increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death associated with those traversing an interarterial course between the aorta and main pulmonary artery/right ventricular outflow tract. In this article, we review the role and practice of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in this field.

  8. Anomalous mass dimension in multiflavor QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doff, A.; Natale, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Models of strongly interacting theories with a large mass anomalous dimension (γm) provide an interesting possibility for the dynamical origin of the electroweak symmetry breaking. A laboratory for these models is QCD with many flavors, which may present a nontrivial fixed point associated to a conformal region. Studies based on conformal field theories and on Schwinger-Dyson equations have suggested the existence of bounds on the mass anomalous dimension at the fixed points of these models. In this note we discuss γm values of multiflavor QCD exhibiting a nontrivial fixed point and affected by relevant four-fermion interactions.

  9. Effect of low temperature baking on the RF properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2004-03-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some ''anomalous'' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' bake under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from ''anomalous'' losses (so-called ''Q-drop'') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37 K-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6 K-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models

  10. Breakdown phenomena in rf windows

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y.

    1995-07-05

    The multipactor and flashover phenomena of alumina rf windows used in high-power klystrons have been investigated. Multipactoring due to the high yield of secondary electron emission takes place during rf operation. A spectrum analysis of the luminescence due to multipactoring shows that multipactor electron bombardment causes an F-center of alumina, thus leading to surface melting. From the results of a high-power examination of rf windows with several kinds of alumina ceramics, it was found that an alumina material with a crystallized grain-boundary and without any voids between the boundaries, thus having a low loss-tangent value, is not liable to F-centers, even under multipactoring. Flashovers in a tree-like pattern of alumina luminescence occasionally take place on a TiN-coated surface. From the results of surface-charging measurements and high-power examinations of annealed alumina disks, the flashover phenomenon is considered to be an avalanche of electrons which have been trapped in mechanically introduced defects. The effectivenesses of multipactor-suppressing coatings and of a field-reduced window structure were also examined. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. X-Band RF Gun Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-06-22

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  12. Rf power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  13. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  14. Status of Nb-Pb superconducting RF-gun cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Sekutowicz; J. Iversen; D. Klinke; D. Kostin; W. Möller; A. Muhs; P. Kneisel; J. Smedley; T. Rao; P. Strzyżewski; Z. Li; K. Ko; L. Xiao; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski; M. Ferrario

    2007-06-01

    We report on the progress in the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at 2K and the RF-performance of three half-cell niobium cavities with the lead spot exposed to high electric fields are reported in this contribution.

  15. Simulations of S-band RF gun with RF beam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. M.; Levichev, A. E.; Maltseva, M. V.; Nikiforov, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The RF gun with RF control is discussed. It is based on the RF triode and two kinds of the cavities. The first cavity is a coaxial cavity with cathode-grid assembly where beam bunches are formed, the second one is an accelerating cavity. The features of such a gun are the following: bunched and relativistic beams in the output of the injector, absence of the back bombarding electrons, low energy spread and short length of the bunches. The scheme of the injector is shown. The electromagnetic field simulation and longitudinal beam dynamics are presented. The possible using of the injector is discussed.

  16. Anomalous Growth of Aging Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a discrete-time population dynamics with age-dependent structure. At every time step, one of the alive individuals from the population is chosen randomly and removed with probability q_k depending on its age, whereas a new individual of age 1 is born with probability r. The model can also describe a single queue in which the service order is random while the service efficiency depends on a customer's "age" in the queue. We propose a mean field approximation to investigate the long-time asymptotic behavior of the mean population size. The age dependence is shown to lead to anomalous power-law growth of the population at the critical regime. The scaling exponent is determined by the asymptotic behavior of the probabilities q_k at large k. The mean field approximation is validated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)˜ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3-2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  18. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Oliver; Winter, Lukas; Dieringer, Matthias A; Els, Antje; Oezerdem, Celal; Rieger, Jan; Kuehne, Andre; Cassara, Antonino M; Pfeiffer, Harald; Wetterling, Friedrich; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation. Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated. Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit. Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants.

  19. Hydrogen-filled RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    CHARLES, Ankenbrandt

    2009-04-17

    Ionization cooling requires low-Z energy absorbers immersed in a strong magnetic field and high-gradient, large-aperture RF cavities to be able to cool a muon beam as quickly as the short muon lifetime requires. RF cavities that operate in vacuum are vulnerable to dark-current- generated breakdown, which is exacerbated by strong magnetic fields, and they require extra safety windows that degrade cooling, to separate RF regions from hydrogen energy absorbers. RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas will be developed that use the same gas volume to provide the energy absorber and the RF acceleration needed for ionization cooling. The breakdown suppression by the dense gas will allow the cavities to operate in strong magnetic fields. Measurements of the operation of such a cavity will be made as functions of external magnetic field and charged particle beam intensity and compared with models to understand the characteristics of this technology and to develop mitigating strategies if necessary.

  20. RF heating of nanoclusters for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Letfullin, Alla R.; George, Thomas F.

    2015-03-01

    Nanodrugs selectively delivered to a tumor site can be activated by radiation for drug release, or nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as a drug themselves by producing biological damage in cancer cells through thermal, mechanical ablations or charged particle emission. Radio-frequency (RF) waves have an excellent ability to penetrate into the human body without causing healthy tissue damage, which provides a great opportunity to activate/heat NPs delivered inside the body as a contrast agent for diagnosis and treatment purposes. However the heating of NPs in the RF range of the spectrum is controversial in the research community because of the low power load of RF waves and low absorption of NPs in the RF range. To resolve these weaknesses in the RF activation of NPs and dramatically increase absorption of contrast agents in tumor, we suggest aggregating the nanoclusters inside or on the surface of the cancer cells. We simulate space distribution of temperature changes inside and outside metal and dielectric nanopraticles/nanoclusters, determine the number of nanoparticles needed to form a cluster, and estimate the thermal damage area produced in surrounding medium by nanopraticles/nanoclusters heated in the RF field.

  1. Control electronics of the PEP RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of the major components used for controlling the phase and field level of the PEP RF cavities is described. The control electronics of one RF station is composed of several control loops: each cavity has a tuners' servo loop which maintains the frequency constant and also keeps the fields of each cavity balanced; the total gap voltage developed by a pair of cavities is regulated by a gap voltage controller; finally, the phase variation along the amplification chain, the klystron and the cavities are compensated by a phase lock loop. The design criteria of each loop are set forth and the circuit implementation and test results are presented.

  2. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Anlage, Steven

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  3. Fractional Order Analysis of Sephadex Gel Structures: NMR Measurements Reflecting Anomalous Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L; Akpa, Belinda S; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-(bD)(α)], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4,000 s-mm(-2)). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  4. Numerical simulation of SAR induced around Co-Cr-Mo hip prostheses in situ exposed to RF fields associated with 1.5 and 3 T MRI body coils.

    PubMed

    Powell, John; Papadaki, Annie; Hand, Jeff; Hart, Alister; McRobbie, Donald

    2012-09-01

    When patients with metallic prosthetic implants undergo an MR procedure, the interaction between the RF field and the prosthetic device may lead to an increase in specific absorption rate (SAR) in tissues surrounding the prosthesis. In this work, the distribution of SAR(10g) around bilateral CoCrMo alloy hip prostheses in situ in anatomically realistic voxel models of an adult male and female due to RF fields from a generic birdcage coil driven at 64 or 128 MHz are predicted using a time-domain finite integration technique. Results indicate that the spatial distribution and maximum values of SAR(10g) are dependent on body model, frequency, and the position of the coil relative to the body. Enhancement of SAR(10g) close to the extremities of a prosthesis is predicted. Values of SAR(10g) close to the prostheses are compliant with recommended limits if the prostheses are located outside the coil. However, caution is required when the prostheses are within the coil since the predicted SAR(10g) close to an extremity of a prosthesis exceeds recommended limits when the whole body averaged SAR is 2 W kg(-1) . Compliance with recommended limits is likely to require a reduction in the time averaged input power. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Continuous emission of keV x-rays from low-pressure, low-field, low-power-RF plasma columns and significance to mirror confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandovitz, P.; Swanson, C.; Glasser, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on observations of a continuous stream of 0.8-6.0 keV x-rays emitted from cool (bulk Te 4 eV), tenuous (ne 1010 cm-3), 4-cm-diameter hydrogen or argon plasma columns generated in an axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio, tandem mirror machine heated in one end cell by an external RF (27 MHz) antenna operating at low power, 20-600 W. The continuous emission of x-rays is evidence of the steady production of energetic electrons. The source appears to be ion-induced secondary electron emission from a floating carbon cup in the vacuum system about 2 cm from the RF antenna. The cup is charged to a high negative potential, perhaps by other secondary electrons emitted from the self-biased Pyrex vessel under the antenna. X-ray emission in the central cell increases as the mirror ratio increases, an effect we attribute to increased trapping of passing particles due to non-adiabatic scattering at the midplane of the central cell. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Sampling and Characterization of 618-2 Anomalous Material

    SciTech Connect

    A.E. Zacharias

    2006-04-27

    Excavation of the 618-2 Burial Ground has produced many items of anomalous waste. Prior to temporary packaging and/or storage, these items have been characterized in the field to identify radiological and industrial safety conditions.

  7. FLASH Beam-Off RF Measurements and Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Shilun; Adolphsen, Chris; Carwardine, John; /Argonne

    2009-03-31

    The FLASH L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting accelerator facility at DESY has a Low Level RF (LLRF) system that is similar to that envisioned for ILC. This system has extensive monitoring capability and was used to gather performance data relevant to ILC. In particular, waveform data were recorded with beam off for three, 8-cavity cryomodules to evaluate the input rf stability, perturbations to the SC cavity frequencies and the rf overhead required to achieve constant gradient during the 800-s pulses. In this paper, we discuss the measurements and data analysis procedures and present key findings on the pulse-to-pulse input rf and cavity field stability.

  8. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  9. Design of a variable X-band RF power splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Syratchev, Igor; Gudkov, Dmitry; Grudiev, Alexej

    2017-07-01

    This work presents the design of a novel X-band RF power splitter for high-power consumption. The RF power division ratio is adjusted by mechanically changing the position of a special RF short circuit piston, which is mounted on a step-motor to provide precise linear movement. The RF splitter is well matched at any division ratio with less than -40 dB reflection from the input port. The geometry of the splitter is optimized to obtain a compact (less than 12 cm) and large bandwidth (370 MHz) design. The surface electrical field throughout the design is minimized to transmit high RF power. The power splitter can also combine two inlet RF power units of any amplitude. A prototype of the power splitter is manufactured and will be used in high-power test stands at CERN.

  10. EM modeling of RF drive in DTL tank 4

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2012-06-19

    A 3-D MicroWave Studio model for the RF drive in the LANSCE DTL tank 4 has been built. Both eigensolver and time-domain modeling are used to evaluate maximal fields in the drive module and RF coupling. The LANSCE DTL tank 4 has recently been experiencing RF problems, which may or may not be related to its replaced RF coupler. This situation stimulated a request by Dan Rees to provide EM modeling of the RF drive in the DTL tank 4 (T4). Jim O'Hara provided a CAD model that was imported into the CST Microwave Studio (MWS) and after some modifications became a part of a simplified MWS model of the T4 RF drive. This technical note describes the model and presents simulation results.

  11. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  12. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  13. Low-level RF control for the AFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Plato, J.

    1994-09-01

    A limiting factor in the performance of the Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser (AFEL) is the stability of the RF accelerating field. A high-performance low-level RF control system has been implemented that uses analog feedback and digital feed forward to regulate the RF field. This low-level RF control system has achieved long-term amplitude and phase stabilities better than {+-}0.25% and {+-}0.33{degree} respectively. In order to improve the RF field stability further, a detailed system analysis and design is proceeding. Subsystem measurements are being used to model the system performance, predict the performance-limiting components, and determine possible improvements. Results to-date, modeling analyses, and suggested future improvements are presented.

  14. Limitation of linear colliders from transverse rf deflections

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Offaxis beam trajectories in a linear collider produce transverse wakefield and chromatic effects which cause emittance enlargement. One cause for non-centered trajectories in the accelerating structures is radial rf fields which produce transverse deflections. Static deflections can be compensated by static dipole magnetic fields. However, fluctuations of the rf fields cause variations in the deflections which must be managed or limited. Given the level of fluctuation of the phase and amplitude of an rf system, a limit on the allowable rf deflection can be calculated. Parameters, such as the beam emittance, lattice design, rf wavelength and the initial and final beam energies, influence the tolerances. Two tolerances are calculated: (1) one assumes that the wakefields are completely controlled, and that chromatic effects are the only enlarging mechanism (optimistic), and (2) the other assumes the limit is due to transverse wakefields without the aid of Landau damping (pessimistic).

  15. Cold Test Measurements on the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Gierman, S.M.

    2010-12-03

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Based on longitudinal phase space measurements showing a correlated energy spread the gun was removed and re-characterized in 2002. The low power RF measurements performed on the gun are described below. Perturbative bead measurements were performed to determine the field ratio in the two-cell gun, and network analyzer measurements were made to characterize the mode structure. A second probe was installed to monitor the RF field in the first cell, and a diagnostic was developed to monitor the high-power field ratio. Calibration of the RF probes, a model for analyzing RF measurements, and Superfish simulations of bead and RF measurements are described.

  16. Proposal for high pressure RF cavity test in the MTA

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of high pressure hydrogen gas filled RF (HPRF) cavities for muon ionization cooling, an HPRF cavity must be tested with a high intensity charged beam. When an HPRF cavity is irradiated with an intense beam each incident particle generates about 1000 electrons and ions per cubic centimeter in a high pressure cavity via ionization. These ionization electrons are influenced by the RF field and the RF quality factor goes down. This Q factor reduction will be a problem with a multi bunch beam, e.g., a muon beam for a muon collider consists of a 12 to 20 bunch train beam with 5 ns timing gap. Thus, the RF field must recover in few nano seconds. We propose to use a 400 MeV proton beam in the MTA and measure a beam loading effect in the HPRF cavity and study the recovery mechanism of the RF field.

  17. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  18. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  19. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    A. S. Hofler; P. Evtushenko; M. Krasilnikov

    2007-08-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. RF and SRF gun design is further complicated because the bunches are space charge dominated and require additional emittance compensation. A genetic algorithm has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs for Cornell* and Jefferson Lab**, and we propose studying how the genetic algorithm techniques can be applied to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize gun designs that have been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  20. Assessment of equivalence of adipose tissue treatment with a noncontact field RF system delivering 200 W for 30 min and 300 W for 20 min: An in vivo porcine study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Kim, Jong Hwan; Joon, Seok; Mun, Seok Kyun; Kim, Chan Woong; Kim, Beom Joon

    2017-03-31

    Abdominal circumferential reduction with noncontact high frequency apoptosis-inducing field RF (AiRF) is becoming very popular. The present study compared the treatment results from two different sets of parameters giving the same dose from the same system in an in vivo porcine model. Two 10 cm × 10 cm areas were symmetrically marked on both sides of the midline (total of 4 areas) over the rectus abdominis muscle of two anesthetized female micropigs. In Animal A (G1), 27.12 MHz AiRF treatment was given at 200 W for 30 min, and 300 W for 20 min in Animal B (G2). Four sessions were performed at weekly intervals. Gross observation by a veterinary specialist was performed on a daily basis. Temperature measurements (fat and skin), clinical photography and ultrasound imaging were carried out at each session. In addition, blood chemistry was performed before each session to check lipid levels, any adverse changes in markers for liver damage in addition to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for raised levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. Biopsies were taken and routinely processed for hematoxylin and eosin, Toluidine blue and oil red O stains to examine for tissue damage at baseline and after each treatment. TUNEL assays were performed to check of apoptotic-related DNA damage. Follow-up assessments included photography, ultrasound, ELISA tests and biopsies which were taken regularly up to 90 days after the final treatment. The maximum adipose tissue temperatures at and over the apoptotic threshold of 43°C were reached and maintained in both G1 and G2. The skin surface temperature was slightly higher in G2 after 20 min than in G1 after 30 min, but was still below 43°C. Gross and magnified observation revealed no appreciable differences or thermally-mediated damage between the skin of either of the two groups after the treatments or during the 90-day follow-up period. No lasting erythema or any other adverse event was seen in either group. The liver enzyme markers

  1. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    DOEpatents

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  2. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdoğan, E. K.; Şavklıyıldız, İ.; Biçer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Zhong, Z.; Tsakalakos, T.

    2013-06-01

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 °C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 °C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 °C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm3. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 °C and 905 °C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 °C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains (ɛ) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are ɛ(112) = 0.05% and ɛ(211) = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths (β) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 °C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {β(112)/β(211)} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 °C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the superposition of mass fluxes due to Fickian diffusion, thermodiffusion (Soret effect), and electromigration, which in turn are a consequence of a superposition of chemical

  3. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Akdogan, E. K.; Savkl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, I.; Bicer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Tsakalakos, T.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-06-21

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 Degree-Sign C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 Degree-Sign C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 Degree-Sign C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm{sup 3}. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 Degree-Sign C and 905 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 Degree-Sign C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains ({epsilon}) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are {epsilon}{sub (112)} = 0.05% and {epsilon}{sub (211)} = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths ({beta}) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 Degree-Sign C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {l_brace} {beta}{sub (112)}/{beta}{sub (211)}{r_brace} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 Degree-Sign C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the

  4. Anomalous temperature relaxation and particle transport in a strongly non-unifrom, fully in ionized Plasma in a stromg mangnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øien, Alf H.

    1995-02-01

    In classical kinetic and transport theory for a fully ionized plasma in a magnetic field, collision integrals from a uniform theory without fields are used. When the magnetic field is so strong that electrons may gyrate during electron—electron and electron—ion interactions, the form of the collision integrals will be modified. Another modification will stem from strong non-uniformities transverse to the magnetic field B. Using collision terms that explicitly incorporate these effects, we derive in particular the temperature relaxation between electrons and ions and the particle transport transverse to the magnetic field. In both cases collisions between gyrating electrons, which move along the magnetic field, and non-gyrating ions, which move in arbitrary directions at a distance transverse to B from the electrons larger than the electron Larmor radius but smaller than the Debye length, give rise to enhancement factors in the corresponding classical expressions of order In (mion/mel).

  5. Initial measurements of the UCLA rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, S. C.; Barov, N.; Pellegrini, C.; Park, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Travish, G.; Zhang, R.; Clayton, C.; Davis, P.; Everett, M.; Joshi, C.; Hairapetian, G.

    1994-02-01

    The 1.5 cell standing wave rf photoinjector has been operated for the past several months using a copper cathode. The photoinjector drive laser produces sub 2 ps pulses of UV (λ = 266 nm) light with up to 200 μJ/pulse which generates up to 3 nC of charge. The emittance of the photoinjector was measured as a function of charge, rf launching phase, and peak accelerating field. Also, the quantum efficiency and pulse lengths of the laser beam and the electron beam were measured.

  6. Broken current anomalous dimensions, conformal manifolds, and renormalization group flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashmakov, Vladimir; Bertolini, Matteo; Raj, Himanshu

    2017-03-01

    We consider deformations of a conformal field theory that explicitly break some global symmetries of the theory. If the deformed theory is still a conformal field theory, one can exploit the constraints put by conformal symmetry to compute broken currents anomalous dimensions. We consider several instances of this scenario, using field theory techniques and also holographic ones, where necessary. Field theoretical methods suffice to discuss examples of symmetry-breaking deformations of the O (N ) model in d =4 -ɛ dimensions. Holography is instrumental, instead, for computing current anomalous dimensions in β -deformed superconformal field theories and in a class of supersymmetric renormalization group flows at large N .

  7. RF shielded connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, A.; Clatterbuck, C.

    1974-01-01

    Gap, where cable joins connector housing, is shielded effectively by composite RF shielding made from suitable potting resin material (fumed silica, thixotropic prepolymer composition), conductive coating (silver-filled, flexible, polyurethane resin), and protective jacket (wax coated housing formed around another wax form having contours shaped to match configuration).

  8. Improved RF Isolation Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. L.; Macconnell, J.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit has high reverse isolation and wide bandwidth. Wideband isolation amplifier has low intermodulation distortion and high reverse isolation. Circuit does not require selected or matched components or directional coupling device. Circuit used in applications requiring high reverse isolation such as receiver intermediate-frequency (IF) strips and frequency distribution systems. Also applicable in RF and video signaling.

  9. Oxide Films RF Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER SKOWRONSKI , Marek 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING...Report Title: Oxide Films RF applications University: Carnegie Mellon University PIs: M. Skowronski & P. Salvador Agency: Office of Naval Research Award

  10. Space Shuttle and Space Station Radio Frequency (RF) Exposure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Loh, Yin-Chung; Sham, Catherine C.; Kroll, Quin D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the modeling techniques and important parameters to define a rigorous but practical procedure that can verify the compliance of RF exposure to the NASA standards for astronauts and electronic equipment. The electromagnetic modeling techniques are applied to analyze RF exposure in Space Shuttle and Space Station environments with reasonable computing time and resources. The modeling techniques are capable of taking into account the field interactions with Space Shuttle and Space Station structures. The obtained results illustrate the multipath effects due to the presence of the space vehicle structures. It's necessary to include the field interactions with the space vehicle in the analysis for an accurate assessment of the RF exposure. Based on the obtained results, the RF keep out zones are identified for appropriate operational scenarios, flight rules and necessary RF transmitter constraints to ensure a safe operating environment and mission success.

  11. Prospects for Advanced RF Theory and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.

    1999-04-12

    This paper represents an attempt to express in print the contents of a rather philosophical review talk. The charge for the talk was not to summarize the present status of the field and what we can do, but to assess what we will need to do in the future and where the gaps are in fulfilling these needs. The objective was to be complete, covering all aspects of theory and modeling in all frequency regimes, although in the end the talk mainly focussed on the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). In choosing which areas to develop, it is important to keep in mind who the customers for RF modeling are likely to be and what sorts of tasks they will need for RF to do. This occupies the first part of the paper. Then we examine each of the elements of a complete RF theory and try to identify the kinds of advances needed.

  12. A Two-Frequency RF Photocathode Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.

    2004-11-05

    In this paper we resurrect an idea originally proposed by Serafini[1] in 1992 for an RF photocathode gun capable of operating simultaneously at the fundamental frequency and a higher frequency harmonic. Driving the gun at two frequencies with the proper field ratio and relative phase produces a beam with essentially no rf emittance and a linear longitudinal phase space distribution. Such a gun allows a completely new range of operating parameters for controlling space charge emittance growth. In addition, the linear longitudinal phase space distribution aids in bunch compression. This paper will compare results of simulations for the two-frequency gun with the standard rf gun, and the unique properties of the two-frequency gun will be discussed.

  13. VHF Injector Pumping Slot RF Shielding Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, John

    2007-08-08

    The effectiveness of the shielding of the pumping slots is calculated for two radial depths of the slots with Mafia-2 and compared to a simple recipe that calculates the RF attenuation in a slot. CBP Technical Note 378 describes the pumping configuration of the 100 MHz VHF photoinjector. The cavity is surrounded by 36 slots, 4.9 cm wide, separated by bars, also 4.9 cm wide. The radial depth of the bars controls the attenuation of the RF from the cavity proper to the annular plenum outside the bars where the getter pumps are located. This note describes calculations of the level of RF fields in the plenum for two different values of the radial depth of the bars and two different values of the spacing between the outer dimension of the bars and the outer plenum wall.

  14. Prospects for advanced RF theory and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, D. B.

    1999-09-01

    This paper represents an attempt to express in print the contents of a rather philosophical review talk. The charge for the talk was not to summarize the present status of the field and what we can do, but to assess what we will need to do in the future and where the gaps are in fulfilling these needs. The objective was to be complete, covering all aspects of theory and modeling in all frequency regimes, although in the end the talk mainly focussed on the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). In choosing which areas to develop, it is important to keep in mind who the customers for RF modeling are likely to be and what sorts of tasks they will need for RF to do. This occupies the first part of the paper. Then we examine each of the elements of a complete RF theory and try to identify the kinds of advances needed.

  15. Focusing properties of discrete RF quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zhi-Jun

    2017-08-01

    The particle motion equation for a Radio Frequency (RF) quadrupole is derived. The motion equation shows that the general transform matrix of a RF quadrupole with length less than or equal to 0.5βλ (β is the relativistic velocity of particles and λ is wavelength of radio frequency electromagnetic field) can describe the particle motion in an arbitrarily long RF quadrupole. By iterative integration, the general transform matrix of a discrete RF quadrupole is derived from the motion equation. The transform matrix is in form of a power series of focusing parameter B. It shows that for length less than βλ, the series up to the 2nd order of B agrees well with the direct integration results for B up to 30, while for length less than 0.5βλ, the series up to 1st order is already a good approximation of the real solution for B less than 30. The formula of the transform matrix can be integrated into linac or beam line design code to deal with the focusing of discrete RF quadrupoles. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375122, 11511140277) and Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03020705)

  16. RF and Plasma Modeling for VASIMR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Moore, R. D.; Ilin, A. V.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.

    2004-11-01

    Present experiments for the VASIMR concept rely exclusively on RF power in an electrode-less system. A helicon discharge in the 10-30 MHz range is used for the plasma source while a lower frequency is used to accelerate the ions in the plasma jet using an ion cyclotron interaction. At both frequencies, the wavelength is comparable with the plasma size, requiring full wave methods to accurately calculate the RF-plasma response. In the plasma source, the generation of the plasma is nonlinear in that plasma transport, neutral gas transport, and RF deposition should be self-consistent. The plasma target for the ion acceleration must also be consistent with the source, and nonlinear wave-particle interactions must be considered. Strong inhomogeneities exist in both the radial and axial directions for all of these processes. In this paper, we present results from a model based on the EMIR4 code, (M. D. Carter et al., Phys. Plasmas 9), 5097 (2002). which has been upgraded to iterate a 3D RF solution with a two-dimensional magnetized diffusive transport model based on frictional ions in an ambipolar potential. We also discuss nonlinear ion orbits in the resulting RF fields.

  17. Time-shaped RF brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.; Vannasse, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    One RF generator is controlled from two independent work stations with aid of RF switch and simple control boxes. Brazing may be stopped manually or automatically by external brazing-temperature controller or timer in RF switch housing. Switch is air-operated with water-cooled contacts. If switch loses air pressure, generator stops transmitting power. Time-shared outlet increases utilization and productivity of costly RF generator.

  18. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  19. Thermoregulatory responses to RF energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Adair, Eleanor R; Black, David R

    2003-01-01

    This white paper combines a tutorial on the fundamentals of thermoregulation with a review of the current literature concerned with physiological thermoregulatory responses of humans and laboratory animals in the presence of radio frequency (RF) and microwave fields. The ultimate goal of research involving whole body RF exposure of intact organisms is the prediction of effects of such exposure on human beings. Most of the published research on physiological thermoregulation has been conducted on laboratory animals, with a heavy emphasis on laboratory rodents. Because their physiological heat loss mechanisms are limited, these small animals are very poor models for human beings. Basic information about the thermoregulatory capabilities of animal models relative to human capability is essential for the appropriate evaluation and extrapolation of animal data to humans. In general, reliance on data collected on humans and nonhuman primates, however fragmentary, yields a more accurate understanding of how RF fields interact with humans. Such data are featured in this review, including data from both clinic and laboratory. Featured topics include thermal sensation, human RF overexposures, exposures attending magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), predictions based on simulation models, and laboratory studies of human volunteers. Supporting data from animal studies include the thermoregulatory profile, response thresholds, physiological responses of heat production and heat loss, intense or prolonged exposure, RF effects on early development, circadian variation, and additive drug-microwave interactions. The conclusion is inescapable that humans demonstrate far superior thermoregulatory ability over other tested organisms during RF exposure at, or even above current human exposure guidelines. Published 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop(reg. sign), copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110 C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10 x 10{sup 6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.