Science.gov

Sample records for anomalous skin effect

  1. Anomalous Skin Effect for Anisotropic Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Gennady Shvets

    2004-02-19

    The anomalous skin effect in a plasma with a highly anisotropic electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) is very different from skin effect in a plasma with the isotropic EVDF. An analytical solution was derived for the electric field penetrated into plasma with the EVDF described as a Maxwellian with two temperatures Tx >> Tz, where x is the direction along the plasma boundary and z is the direction perpendicular to the plasma boundary. The skin layer was found to consist of two distinctive regions of width of order nTx/w and nTz/w, where nTx,z/w = (Tx,z/m)1/2 is the thermal electron velocity and w is the incident wave frequency.

  2. Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, G. Sarfraz, M.; Shah, H. A.

    2014-09-15

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

  3. Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, G.; Sarfraz, M.; Shah, H. A.

    2014-09-01

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

  4. Predicting molecular scale skin-effect in electrochemical impedance due to anomalous subdiffusion mediated adsorption phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushagra, Arindam

    2016-02-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion governs the processes which are not energetically driven, on a molecular scale. This paper proposes a model to predict the response of electrochemical impedance due to such diffusion process. Previous works considered the use of fractional calculus to predict the impedance behaviour in response to the anomalous diffusion. Here, we have developed an expression which predicts the skin-effect, marked by an increase in the impedance with increasing frequency, in this regime. Negative inductances have also been predicted as a consequence of the inertial response of adsorbed species upon application of frequency-mediated perturbations. It might help the researchers in the fields of impedimetric sensors to choose the working frequency and those working in the field of batteries to choose the parameters, likewise. This work would shed some light into the molecular mechanisms governing the impedance when exposed to frequency-based perturbations like electromagnetic waves (microwaves to ionizing radiations) and in charge storage devices like batteries etc.

  5. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Echániz, T.

    2014-09-07

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ε{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ε{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, λ{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1.

  6. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  7. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  8. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  9. Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  10. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  11. Effective actions for anomalous hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehl, Felix M.; Loganayagam, R.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2014-03-01

    We argue that an effective field theory of local fluid elements captures the constraints on hydrodynamic transport stemming from the presence of quantum anomalies in the underlying microscopic theory. Focussing on global current anomalies for an arbitrary flavour group, we derive the anomalous constitutive relations in arbitrary even dimensions. We demonstrate that our results agree with the constraints on anomaly governed transport derived hitherto using a local version of the second law of thermodynamics. The construction crucially uses the anomaly inflow mechanism and involves a novel thermofield double construction. In particular, we show that the anomalous Ward identities necessitate non-trivial interaction between the two parts of the Schwinger-Keldysh contour.

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in localization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Kai; Yue, Di; Tian, Yuan; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous Hall effect in the ultrathin film regime is investigated in Fe(001)(1-3 nm) films epitaxial on MgO(001). The logarithmic localization correction to longitudinal resistivity and anomalous Hall resistivity are observed at low temperature. We identify that the coefficient of skew scattering has a reduction from metallic to localized regime, while the contribution of side jump has inconspicuous change except for a small drop below 10 K. Furthermore, we discover that the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity decreases with the reduction of thickness below 2 nm. Our results provide unambiguous experimental evidence to clarify the problem of localization correction to the anomalous Hall effect.

  13. Anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, T; Niu, Qian; MacDonald, A H

    2002-05-20

    We present a theory of the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic (III, Mn)V semiconductors. Our theory relates the anomalous Hall conductance of a homogeneous ferromagnet to the Berry phase acquired by a quasiparticle wave function upon traversing closed paths on the spin-split Fermi surface. The quantitative agreement between our theory and experimental data in both (In, Mn)As and (Ga, Mn)As systems suggests that this disorder independent contribution to the anomalous Hall conductivity dominates in diluted magnetic semiconductors. The success of this model for (III, Mn)V materials is unprecedented in the longstanding effort to understand origins of the anomalous Hall effect in itinerant ferromagnets.

  14. Quantum theory of IR spectroscopy of dipole-forbidden vibrational modes of adsorbed molecules on the surface of a metal in the frequency range of the anomalous skin effect

    SciTech Connect

    Volokitin, A.I.; Persson, B.N.J.

    1995-09-01

    A completely quantum-mechanical calculation of the IR spectrum for the dipole-forbidden vibrational modes of adsorbed molecules on a metal surface is performed. IT is shown for broad-band metals with a simple band structure that the asymmetry of the line shape is determined by nonlocal effects, while the nonadiabaticity makes a small contribution. In the region of the limiting anomalous skin effect ({omega}/{omega}{sub 1}{much_lt} 1, where {omega} is the frequency of the IR radiation, {omega}{sub 1}={upsilon}{sub F}/{delta}, {upsilon}{sub F} is the Fermi velocity, {delta}=c/{omega}{sub p} is the depth of the skin layer, and {omega}{sub p} is the plasma frequency) the broad-band absorption spectrum caused by the adsorbed molecules has an asymptotic limit {omega}{sup O}. The theory is compared with new absolute measurements of the IR spectrum of the CO/Cu(100) system. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Multivariable scaling for the anomalous Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dazhi; Su, Gang; Tian, Yuan; Jin, Xiaofeng; Yang, Shengyuan A; Niu, Qian

    2015-05-29

    We derive a general scaling relation for the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic metals involving multiple competing scattering mechanisms, described by a quadratic hypersurface in the space spanned by the partial resistivities. We also present experimental findings, which show strong deviation from previously found scaling forms when different scattering mechanisms compete in strength but can be nicely explained by our theory.

  16. Anomalous Hall effect in Weyl superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednik, G.; Zyuzin, A. A.; Burkov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a theory of the anomalous Hall effect in a topological Weyl superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. Specifically, we consider a ferromagnetic Weyl metal with two Weyl nodes of opposite chirality near the Fermi energy. In the presence of inversion symmetry, such a metal experiences a weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer instability, with pairing of parity-related eigenstates. Due to the nonzero topological charge, carried by the Weyl nodes, such a superconductor is necessarily topologically nontrivial, with Majorana surface states coexisting with the Fermi arcs of the normal Weyl metal. We demonstrate that, surprisingly, the anomalous Hall conductivity of such a superconducting Weyl metal coincides with that of a nonsuperconducting one, under certain conditions, in spite of the nonconservation of charge in a superconductor. We relate this to the existence of an extra (nearly) conserved quantity in a Weyl metal, the chiral charge.

  17. Anomalous Hall effect in disordered multiband metals.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, Alexey A; Sinova, Jairo; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2010-07-16

    We present a microscopic theory of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in metallic multiband ferromagnets, which accounts for all scattering-independent contributions, i.e., both the intrinsic and the so-called side jump. For a model of Gaussian disorder, the AHE is expressed solely in terms of the material's electronic band structure. Our theory handles systematically the interband-scattering coherence effects. We demonstrate the method in the 2D Rashba and 3D ferromagnetic (III,Mn)V semiconductor models. Our formalism is directly amenable to ab initio treatments for a wide range of ferromagnetic metals.

  18. Crossover behavior of the anomalous Hall effect and anomalous nernst effect in itinerant ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Miyasato, T; Abe, N; Fujii, T; Asamitsu, A; Onoda, S; Onose, Y; Nagaosa, N; Tokura, Y

    2007-08-24

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) are experimentally investigated in a variety of ferromagnetic metals including pure transition metals, oxides, and chalcogenides, whose resistivities range over 5 orders of magnitude. For these ferromagnets, the transverse conductivity sigma{xy} versus the longitudinal conductivity sigma{xx} shows a crossover behavior with three distinct regimes in accordance qualitatively with a recent unified theory of the intrinsic and extrinsic AHE. We also found that the transverse Peltier coefficient alpha{xy} for the ANE obeys the Mott rule. These results offer a coherent and semiquantitative understanding of the AHE and ANE to an issue of controversy for many decades.

  19. THE ROLE OF PASSENGER LEUKOCYTES IN THE ANOMALOUS SURVIVAL OF NEONATAL SKIN GRAFTS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Wachtel, Stephen S.; Silvers, Willys K.

    1972-01-01

    The anomalous survival of neonatal C3H skin grafts on CBA mice is correlated with the emigration of passenger leukocytes from the graft vasculature. Thus, newborn homografts whose leukocyte populations are eliminated by X-irradiation or by transient sojourn on an intermediate adult C3H host, do not display prolonged survival. Moreover, the continued presence of the newborn grafts is not requisite to the maintenance of the unresponsive state, an observation consonant with the demonstration that CBA mice bearing long-term neonatal C3H skin grafts are leukocyte chimeras. In contrast, neonatal male C57 skin grafts may persist on C57 females after heavy irradiation of the donor, or after passage on an intermediate adult male host. In addition, tolerance is broken by removal of long-persistant newborn grafts from hitherto unresponsive females, and chimerism is not detectable in female C57 mice tolerant of infant male isografts. Finally, leukocytes of neonatal C3H origin, inoculated subcutaneously into CBA males, may occasionally render these animals unresponsive to subsequent adult C3H skin homografts, whereas those taken from infant C57 males usually sensitize their adult female hosts. Thus, passenger leukocytes are implicated in the extended survival of C3H neonatal homografts on CBA recipients, but not in the persistence of H-Y-incompatible neonatal skin isografts on C57 females. PMID:4551219

  20. Anomalous Hall effect in Weyl metals.

    PubMed

    Burkov, A A

    2014-10-31

    We present a theory of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in a doped Weyl semimetal, or Weyl metal, including both intrinsic and extrinsic (impurity scattering) contributions. We demonstrate that a Weyl metal is distinguished from an ordinary ferromagnetic metal by the absence of the extrinsic and the Fermi surface part of the intrinsic contributions to the AHE, as long as the Fermi energy is sufficiently close to the Weyl nodes. The AHE in a Weyl metal is thus shown to be a purely intrinsic, universal property, fully determined by the location of the Weyl nodes in the first Brillouin zone.

  1. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Kagome Ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Linda; Wicker, Christina; Suzuki, Takehito; Checkelsky, Joseph; Joseph Checkelsky Team

    The ferromagnetic kagome lattice is theoretically known to possess topological band structures. We have synthesized large single crystals of a kagome ferromagnet Fe3Sn2 which orders ferromagnetically well above room temperature. We have studied the electrical and magnetic properties of these crystals over a broad temperature and magnetic field range. Both the scaling relation of anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility show that the ferromagnetism of Fe3Sn2 is unconventional. We discuss these results in the context of magnetism in kagome systems and relevance to the predicted topological properties in this class of compounds. This research is supported by DMR-1231319.

  2. Quantum anomalous Hall effect with higher plateaus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Haijun; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2013-09-27

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in magnetic topological insulators is driven by the combination of spontaneous magnetic moments and spin-orbit coupling. Its recent experimental discovery raises the question if higher plateaus can also be realized. Here, we present a general theory for a QAH effect with higher Chern numbers and show by first-principles calculations that a thin film magnetic topological insulator of Cr-doped Bi2(Se,Te)3 is a candidate for the C=2 QAH insulator. Remarkably, whereas a higher magnetic field leads to lower Hall conductance plateaus in the integer quantum Hall effect, a higher magnetic moment leads to higher Hall conductance plateaus in the QAH effect.

  3. Linear magnetization dependence of the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Changgan; Yao, Yugui; Niu, Qian; Weitering, Hanno H

    2006-01-27

    The anomalous Hall effect is investigated experimentally and theoretically for ferromagnetic thin films of Mn5Ge3. We have separated the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the experimental anomalous Hall effect and calculated the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity from the Berry curvature of the Bloch states using first-principles methods. The intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity depends linearly on the magnetization, which can be understood from the long-wavelength fluctuations of the spin orientation at finite temperatures. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is remarkably good, not only near 0 K but also at finite temperatures, up to about approximately 240 K (0.8TC).

  4. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Patro, L N; Burghaus, O; Roling, B

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180  kV/cm. Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P_{6,6,6,14}][Cl] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models. PMID:27203333

  5. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patro, L. N.; Burghaus, O.; Roling, B.

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180 kV /cm . Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P6 ,6 ,6 ,14][Cl ] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models.

  6. Anomalous Nernst Effect with Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesman, Carlos; Costa Neto, Jose; Department of Physics-UFRN Team

    2014-03-01

    When a ferromagnetic material is submitted to a temperature gradient and the magnetic field generates voltage on the edges of the samples, this is called the Anomalous Nernst Effect (ANE). The Heusler alloys that currently exhibit this effect are the most promising for spintronics and spin caloritronics. In this study we perform a theoretical investigation of voltage curves associated to the ANE, when the material displays magnetocrystalline anisotropy for experimental results in two configurations, ANE versus applied magnetic field and planar angle variations of ANE. We analyzed three types of magnetocrystalline anisotropy: cubic anisotropy (100) with C4 symmetry, uniaxial anisotropy with C2 symmetry and cubic anisotropy (110). The aim was to prove that cubic anisotropy (110) is equivalent to anisotropy (100) combined with uniaxial anisotropy. Theoretical fitting of experimental ANE data demonstrates this total equivalence and that a new interpretation with the use of cubic anisotropy (110) may be due to the atomic arrangement of the so-called full-Heusler. Comparative analyses of Co2FeAl and Co2MnGe alloys will be presented. CNPq, CAPES, FAPERN.

  7. Linear Magnetization Dependence of the Intrinsic Anomalous Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C.; Yao, Y.; Niu, Q.; Weitering, Harm H

    2006-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect is investigated experimentally and theoretically for ferromagnetic thin films of Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}. We have separated the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the experimental anomalous Hall effect and calculated the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity from the Berry curvature of the Bloch states using first-principles methods. The intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity depends linearly on the magnetization, which can be understood from the long-wavelength fluctuations of the spin orientation at finite temperatures. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is remarkably good, not only near 0 K but also at finite temperatures, up to about -240 K (0.8T{sub c}).

  8. Large anomalous Nernst effect in a skyrmion crystal.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Yo Pierre; Ishii, Fumiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of a model skyrmion crystal were theoretically investigated, and it was found that its large anomalous Hall conductivity, corresponding to large Chern numbers induced by its peculiar spin structure leads to a large transverse thermoelectric voltage through the anomalous Nernst effect. This implies the possibility of finding good thermoelectric materials among skyrmion systems, and thus motivates our quests for them by means of the first-principles calculations as were employed in this study. PMID:27306142

  9. Large anomalous Nernst effect in a skyrmion crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Yo Pierre; Ishii, Fumiyuki

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric properties of a model skyrmion crystal were theoretically investigated, and it was found that its large anomalous Hall conductivity, corresponding to large Chern numbers induced by its peculiar spin structure leads to a large transverse thermoelectric voltage through the anomalous Nernst effect. This implies the possibility of finding good thermoelectric materials among skyrmion systems, and thus motivates our quests for them by means of the first-principles calculations as were employed in this study.

  10. Large anomalous Nernst effect in a skyrmion crystal

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, Yo Pierre; Ishii, Fumiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of a model skyrmion crystal were theoretically investigated, and it was found that its large anomalous Hall conductivity, corresponding to large Chern numbers induced by its peculiar spin structure leads to a large transverse thermoelectric voltage through the anomalous Nernst effect. This implies the possibility of finding good thermoelectric materials among skyrmion systems, and thus motivates our quests for them by means of the first-principles calculations as were employed in this study. PMID:27306142

  11. Phenomenological Spin Transport Theory Driven by Anomalous Nernst Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Several experimental efforts such as material investigation and structure improvement have been made recently to find a large anomalous Nernst effect in ferromagnetic metals. Here, we develop a theory of spin transport driven by the anomalous Nernst effect in a diffusive ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic multilayer. Starting from a phenomenological formula of a spin-dependent electric current, the theoretical formulas of electric voltage and spin torque generated by the anomalous Nernst effect are derived. The magnitude of the electric voltage generated from the spin current via the inverse spin Hall effect is on the order of 0.1 µV for currently available experimental parameter values. The temperature gradient necessary to switch the magnetization is quite larger than the typical experimental value. The separation of the contributions of the Seebeck and transverse spin Seebeck effects is also discussed.

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  13. Berry-phase effect in anomalous thermoelectric transport.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; Yao, Yugui; Fang, Zhong; Niu, Qian

    2006-07-14

    We develop a theory of the Berry-phase effect in anomalous transport in ferromagnets driven by statistical forces such as the gradient of temperature or chemical potential. Here a charge Hall current arises from the Berry-phase correction to the orbital magnetization rather than from the anomalous velocity, which does not exist in the absence of a mechanical force. A finite-temperature formula for the orbital magnetization is derived, which enables us to provide an explicit expression for the off-diagonal thermoelectric conductivity, to establish the Mott relation between the anomalous Nernst and Hall effects, and to reaffirm the Onsager relations between reciprocal thermoelectric conductivities. A first-principles evaluation of our expression is carried out for the material CuCr(2)Se(4-x)Br(x), obtaining quantitative agreement with a recent experiment.

  14. [Effects of anomalous rise of air temperature on population mortality].

    PubMed

    Chazov, E I; Boĭtsov, S A

    2012-01-01

    Global climate warming for the last 10 years actualized the problem of mortality rise in some European countries in anomalous summer heat. Russia faced this problem in July-August 2010 when extreme heat entailed a significant elevation of mortality in 31 regions of the country primarily due to coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases. The analysis of foreign researches has shown that old age and living in cities are leading risk factors of deat in anomalous heat. Experience of the European countries and USA evidences that stay in conditioned apartments and early referral for medical assistance are most effective death preventive measures in heat.

  15. Anomalous Hall Effect in a 2D Rashba Ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ado, I. A.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Titov, M.

    2016-07-01

    Skew scattering on rare impurity configurations is shown to dominate the anomalous Hall effect in a 2D Rashba ferromagnet. The mechanism originates in scattering on rare impurity pairs separated by distances of the order of the Fermi wavelength. The corresponding theoretical description goes beyond the conventional noncrossing approximation. The mechanism provides the only contribution to the anomalous Hall conductivity in the most relevant metallic regime and strongly modifies previously obtained results for lower energies in the leading order with respect to impurity strength.

  16. Anomalous tensoelectric effects in gallium arsenide tunnel diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, Z.M.; Vyatkin, A.P.; Krivorotov, N.P.; Shchegol', A.A.

    1988-02-01

    Anomalous tensoelectric phenomena induced in a tunnel p-n junction by a concentrated load and by hydrostatic compression were studied. The anomalous tensoelectric effects are caused by the action of concentrators of mechanical stresses in the vicinity of the p-n junction, giving rise to local microplastic strain. Under the conditions of hydrostatic compression prolate inclusions approx.100-200 A long play the role of concentrators. Analysis of irreversible changes in the current-voltage characteristics of tunnel p-n junctions made it possible to separate the energy levels of the defects produced with plastic strain of gallium arsenide.

  17. Fast plasma heating by anomalous and inertial resistivity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duijveman, A.; Hoyng, P.; Ionson, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Fast plasma heating by anomalous and inertial resistivity effects is described. A small fraction of the plasma contains strong currents that run parallel to the magnetic field and are driven by an exponentiating electric field. The anomalous character of the current dissipation is caused by the excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron and/or ion acoustic waves. The role of resistivity due to geometrical effects is considered. Through the use of a marginal stability analysis, equations for the average electron and ion temperatures are derived and numerically solved. The evolution of the plasma is described as a path in the drift velocity diagram, in which the drift velocity is plotted as a function of the electron to ion temperature ratio.

  18. Anomalous thermomagnetic effects in an epitaxial and irradiated graphene monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xingfei; Xu, Yafang; Jin, Guojun

    2015-12-01

    We study valley-dependent anomalous thermomagnetic effects, including the Nernst and Ettingshausen effects, in a graphene monolayer that is subjected to a staggered sublattice potential and off-resonant circularly polarized light. It is found that a topological phase transition in this system can significantly affect the signs of the Nernst conductivity as well as the Ettingshausen thermal conductivity, which provides an alternative method to characterize the phase transition between band and topological insulators. At the topological phase-transition point, pure valley-polarized electric and heat currents are generated. In contrast to traditional thermomagnetism, an anomalous thermomagnetic figure of merit is formulated and used to characterize conversion efficiency. The theoretical approach, including numerical calculations and analytical treatment, can also be used to study the same properties of other graphenelike materials.

  19. Anomalous magnetization reversal due to proximity effect of antiphase boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofin, R. G. S.; Wu, Han-Chun; Shvets, I. V.

    2011-12-01

    Here we report anomalous double switching hysteresis loop and high coercivity (˜0.1 T) in Fe3O4(110) thin films. Our analytical model based on spin chains confined within small antiphase boundary domains (APBDs) suggests a significant proximity effect of antiferromagnetic antiphase boundaries (APBs). Furthermore, the calculated domain size (D) follows the well-known scaling relation D=Ct. The results suggest that the interface exchange coupling between neighboring magnetic domains through antiferromagnetic APBs is responsible for the double switching hysteresis. Our findings could help advance the studies of anomalous properties of magnetic materials originating from growth defects. This effect can be utilized for the tunability of exchange bias in devices.

  20. Normal and anomalous Doppler effects in periodic waveguide cyclotron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Korol, M.; Jerby, E.

    1995-12-31

    A linear analysis of the periodic-waveguide cyclotron (PWC) maser shows that the PWC interaction with fast-waves possesses properties of the known anomalous Doppler resonance interaction if the wave impedance of the resonant spatial harmonic, Z{sub n}, is much smaller than the free space impedance, i.e. if Z{sub n} {much_lt} Z{sub 0}. The feasibility of a fast-wave PWC interaction in a low impedance waveguide is examined theoretically in this paper. A practical scheme of a slotted-waveguide PWC operating in the fundamental harmonic near cutoff is proposed for a future experiment. The possible advantages of the quasi-anomalous Doppler effect in the fast-wave-PWC operating regime are the alleviation of the initial electron rotation and a high-efficiency operation.

  1. Scaling of the anomalous Hall effect in lower conductivity regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, J.; Bordel, C.; Bouma, D. S.; de Lorimier-Farmer, A.; Lee, H. J.; Hellman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The scaling of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was investigated using amorphous and epitaxial Fe x Si1-x (0.43 < x < 0.71) magnetic thin films by varying the longitudinal conductivity (σxx) using two different approaches: modifying the carrier mean free path (l) with chemical or structural disorder while holding the carrier concentration (nh) constant or varying n h and keeping l constant. The anomalous Hall conductivity (σxy) , when suitably normalized by magnetization and n h , is shown to be independent of σxx for all samples. This observation suggests a primary dependence on an intrinsic mechanism, unsurprising for the epitaxial high conductivity films where the Berry phase curvature mechanism is expected, but remarkable for the amorphous samples. That the amorphous samples show this scaling indicates a local atomic level description of a Berry phase, resulting in an intrinsic AHE in a system that lacks lattice periodicity.

  2. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in stable dumbbell stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-02-01

    Topological property of the dumbbell (DB) stanene, more stable than the stanene with a honeycomb lattice, is investigated by using ab initio methods. The magnetic DB stanene demonstrates an exotic quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect due to inversion of the Sn spin-up px,y and spin-down pz states. The QAH gap is found to be opened at Γ point rather than the usual K and K' points, beneficial to observe the effect in experiments. When a 3% tensile strain is applied, a large nontrivial gap (˜50 meV) is achieved. Our results provide another lighthouse for realizing QAH effects in two-dimensional systems.

  3. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  4. Enhanced Thermoelectric Performance and Anomalous Seebeck Effects in Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Gan, Zhongxue; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Improving the thermoelectric figure of merit zT is one of the greatest challenges in material science. The recent discovery of topological insulators (TIs) offers new promise in this prospect. In this work, we demonstrate theoretically that zT is strongly size dependent in TIs, and the size parameter can be tuned to enhance zT to be significantly greater than 1. Furthermore, we show that the lifetime of the edge states in TIs is strongly energy dependent, leading to large and anomalous Seebeck effects with an opposite sign to the Hall effect. These striking properties make TIs a promising material for thermoelectric science and technology.

  5. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    SciTech Connect

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Siu, Z. B.

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  6. Intrinsic versus extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Shigeki; Sugimoto, Naoyuki; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2006-09-22

    A unified theory of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is presented for multiband ferromagnetic metals with dilute impurities. In the clean limit, the AHE is mostly due to extrinsic skew scattering. When the Fermi level is located around anticrossing of band dispersions split by spin-orbit interaction, the intrinsic AHE to be calculated ab initio is resonantly enhanced by its nonperturbative nature, revealing the extrinsic-to-intrinsic crossover which occurs when the relaxation rate is comparable to the spin-orbit coupling.

  7. Health effects of probiotics on the skin.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, M Rahmati; Karimi, R; Sohrabvandi, S; Mortazavian, A M

    2015-01-01

    Skin is the largest organ of the body and is constantly exposed to physical, chemical, bacterial, and fungal challenges. It is well known that probiotics are helpful for specific disorders and different clinical studies have indicated that probiotics have special effects in cutaneous apparatus directly or indirectly that can be considerable from versatile aspects. Probiotic bacteriotherapy can have great potential in preventing and treating the skin diseases including eczema, atopic dermatitis, acne, and allergic inflammation or in skin hypersensitivity, UV-induced skin damage, wound protection, and as a cosmetic product. The current paper comprehensively reviews the different health effects of probiotics on the skin.

  8. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Au multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Li, P.; Wen, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhang, J. W.; Manchon, A.; Mi, W. B.; Peng, Y.; Zhang, X. X.

    2016-07-01

    To understand the interfacial scattering effect on the anomalous Hall effect (AHE), we prepared multilayers of (Fe(36/n)nm/A u(12 /n )nm ) n using an e-beam evaporator. This structure design allowed us to investigate the effect of interfacial scattering on the AHE, while keeping the samples' thickness and composition unchanged. We measured the (magneto)transport properties of the samples in a wide temperature range (10-310 K) with magnetic fields up to 50 kOe. We found that the scaling between the anomalous Hall resistivity (ρAHE) and longitudinal resistivity (ρx x) can be roughly described by ρAHE˜ρxx γ with γ =2.65 ±0.10 and 1.90 ± 0.04 for samples from n =1 to n =4 and samples from n =4 to n =12 , respectively. Our quantitative analysis results showed that the interfacial scattering suppresses the contribution of the intrinsic mechanism and gives rise to a side-jump contribution.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics. PMID:26819223

  10. Nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung: Anomalous magnetic moment effects

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, R.G.E.; Penninga, T.D.; Gibson, B.F.; Liou, M.K.

    2006-03-15

    Background: Two soft-photon amplitudes, the two-u-two-t special (TuTts) amplitude and the Low amplitude, are known to produce quantitatively similar np{gamma} cross sections, but they predict quite different pp{gamma} cross sections for those kinematic conditions in which the nucleon scattering angles are small (less than 25 deg.). Purpose: These two amplitudes have been applied to systematically investigate three different nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung (NN{gamma}) processes: pp{gamma},np{gamma}, and nn{gamma}. The nn{gamma} process is explored for the first time. The primary focus of this work is to investigate the contribution of the proton and the neutron anomalous magnetic moments to all three NN{gamma} processes for projectile energies above 150 MeV and for laboratory scattering angles ({theta}{sub 1} and {theta}{sub 2}) lying between 8 deg. and 40 deg.. Method: A special soft-photon expansion in which the TuTts amplitude is expanded in terms of the Low amplitude plus additional amplitudes is utilized to explore the relationship between the TuTts and Low amplitudes and the reasons why they agree and disagree. We also used the TuTts amplitude to calculate the NN{gamma} cross section with and without the anomalous magnetic moment contributions to explore the importance of that element of the electromagnetic current. Results: The TuTts amplitude describes well the available pp{gamma} cross-section data. The anomalous magnetic moment contribution is (i) significant in the pp{gamma} process when each scattering angle is less than 25 deg. but insignificant when each scattering angle is 40 deg. or greater and (ii) insignificant in the np{gamma} process for all scattering angles. The nn{gamma} cross sections for the TuTts and Low amplitudes differ substantially for the kinematics investigated. Conclusions: In general, the Low amplitude agrees well with the TuTts amplitude when anomalous magnetic moment effects are not significant, but the two amplitudes can yield

  11. Anomalous photoelectric effect of a polycrystalline topological insulator film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbin; Yao, Jiandong; Shao, Jianmei; Li, Hai; Li, Shuwei; Bao, Dinghua; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2014-07-29

    A topological insulator represents a new state of quantum matter that possesses an insulating bulk band gap as well as a spin-momentum-locked Dirac cone on the surface that is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Photon-dressed surface states and light-induced surface photocurrents have been observed in topological insulators. Here, we report experimental observations of an anomalous photoelectric effect in thin films of Bi2Te3, a polycrystalline topological insulator. Under illumination with non-polarised light, transport measurements reveal that the resistance of the topological surface states suddenly increases when the polycrystalline film is illuminated. The resistance variation is positively dependent on the light intensity but has no relation to the applied electric field; this finding can be attributed to the gap opening of the surface Dirac cone. This observation of an anomalous photoelectric effect in polycrystalline topological insulators offers exciting opportunities for the creation of photodetectors with an unusually broad spectral range. Moreover, polycrystalline topological insulator films provide an attractive material platform for exploring the nature and practical application of topological insulators.

  12. Non-collinear antiferromagnets and the anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kübler, J.; Felser, C.

    2014-12-01

    The anomalous Hall effect is investigated theoretically by employing density functional calculations for the non-collinear antiferromagnetic order of the hexagonal compounds Mn3Ge and Mn3Sn using various planar triangular magnetic configurations as well as unexpected non-planar configurations. The former give rise to anomalous Hall conductivities (AHC) that are found to be extremely anisotropic. For the planar cases the AHC is connected with Weyl points in the energy-band structure. If this case were observable in Mn3Ge, a large AHC of about σzx≈ 900 (Ω \\text{cm})-1 should be expected. However, in Mn3Ge it is the non-planar configuration that is energetically favored, in which case it gives rise to an AHC of σxy≈ 100 (Ω \\text{cm})-1 . The non-planar configuration allows a quantitative evaluation of the topological Hall effect that is seen to determine this value of σxy to a large extent. For Mn3Sn it is the planar configurations that are predicted to be observable. In this case the AHC can be as large as σyz≈250 (Ω \\text{cm})-1 .

  13. Investigation of the Anomalous Hall Effect in Three Unusual Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales, Brian

    2007-03-01

    The Hall resistivity (ρxy), resistivity (ρxx), and magnetization of three metallic ferromagnets are investigated as a function of magnetic field and temperature [1]. The three ferromagnets, EuFe4Sb12 (Tc 84 K), Yb14MnSb11 (Tc 53 K), and Eu8Ga16Ge30 (Tc 36 K) are Zintl compounds with carrier concentrations between 1 x 10^21cm-3 and 3.5 x 10^21 cm-3. The relative decrease in ρxx below Tc [ρxx(Tc)/ρxx(2 K)] is 28, 6.5, and 1.3 for EuFe4Sb12, Yb14MnSb11, and Eu8Ga16Ge30 respectively. The low carrier concentrations coupled with low magnetic anisotropies allow a relatively clean separation between the anomalous (&'circ;xy), and normal contributions to the measured Hall resistivity. For each compound the anomalous contribution in the zero field limit is fit to aρxx+σxyρxx^2 for temperatures T anomalous Hall conductivity, σxy, is -220 ± 5 (φ-1 cm-1), -14.7 ± 1 (φ-1 cm-1), and 28 ± 3 (φ-1 cm-1) for EuFe4Sb12, Yb14MnSb11, and Eu8Ga16Ge30 respectively and is independent of temperature for T < Tc if the change in spontaneous magnetization (order parameter) with temperature is taken into account. These data appear to be consistent with recent theories of the anomalous Hall effect that suggest that even for stochiometric ferromagnetic crystals, such as those studied in this work, the intrinsic Hall conductivity is finite at T = 0, and is a ground state property that can be calculated from the electronic structure. New measurements on single crystals of the tetragonal compound Yb14MnSb11, however, indicate that the intrinsic Hall conductivity can change sign, depending on the direction of the current and magnetic field with respect to the crystallographic axes. These new results will also be discussed within the context of recent theories. Research was done in collaboration with Rongying Jin, David Mandrus and Peter Khalifah. [1] B. C. Sales et al. Phys. Rev. B 73 (2006) 224435.

  14. The quantum anomalous Hall effect in kagomé lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong

    2011-09-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in kagomé lattices is investigated in the presence of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling and an exchange field. In addition to the gap at the Dirac points as found in graphene, a new topological energy gap is opened at the Γ point. With the Fermi energy lying in the first gap, the Chern number 𝒞 = 2 as in graphene, whereas with it lying in the second one, 𝒞 = 1. The distribution of Berry curvature is obtained to reveal the nontrivial topological properties in momentum space. For stripes with ‘armchair’ and ‘zigzag’ edges, the topological characteristics of gapless edge states on the genus g = 2 Riemann surface are studied. The obtained nonzero winding numbers also demonstrate the QAH effect.

  15. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Graphene-based Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Yao, Yugui; Yang, Zhongqin

    2015-01-01

    Quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect, with potential applications in low-power-consumption electronics, is predicted in the heterostructure of graphene on the (001) surface of a real antiferromagnetic insulator RbMnCl3, based on density-functional theory and Wannier function methods. Due to the interactions from the substrate, a much large exchange field (about 280 meV) and an enhanced Rashba spin-orbit coupling are induced in graphene, leading to a topologically nontrivial QAH gap opened in the system. The avenues of enhancing the nontrivial gap are also proposed, from which nearly a gap one order large is achieved. Our work demonstrates that this graphene-based heterostructure is an appropriate candidate to be employed to experimentally observe the QAH effect and explore the promising applications.

  16. Effects of scale-free avalanche walks on anomalous diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    Effects of scale-free avalanche walks on anomalous diffusions have been studied by introducing simple non-Markovian walk models. The scale-free avalanche walk is realized as a walker goes to one direction consistently in a time interval, the distribution of which follows a power-law. And it is applied to the memory models, in which the entire history of a walk process is memorized or the memory for the latest step is enhanced with time. The power-law avalanche walk with memory effects strengthens the persistence between steps and thus makes the Hurst exponent be larger than the cases without avalanche walks, while does not affect the anti-persistent nature.

  17. Anomalous spin Hall effects in Dresselhaus (110) quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Hao; Chang, Ching-Ray

    2010-10-01

    Anomalous spin Hall effects that belong to the intrinsic type in Dresselhaus (110) quantum wells are discussed. For the out-of-plane spin component, antisymmetric current-induced spin polarization induces opposite spin Hall accumulation, even though there is no spin-orbit force due to Dresselhaus (110) coupling. A surprising feature of this spin Hall induction is that the spin accumulation sign does not change upon bias reversal. Contribution to the spin Hall accumulation from the spin Hall induction and the spin deviation due to intrinsic spin-orbit force as well as extrinsic spin scattering can be straightforwardly distinguished simply by reversing the bias. For the in-plane component, inclusion of a weak Rashba coupling leads to a new type of Sy intrinsic spin Hall effect solely due to spin-orbit-force-driven spin separation.

  18. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  19. Anomalous Nernst Effect of Perpendicularly Magnetic Anisotropy TbFeCo Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ryo; Komine, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) of perpendicularly magnetized TbFeCo thin films with various Tb content, and especially studied the relation between ANE and anomalous Hall effect. As a result, the hysteresis of anomalous Nernst coefficient showed the same behavior as that of anomalous Hall resistivity, and the sign of anomalous Nernst coefficient was consistent with that of anomalous Hall voltage in any Tb content, whereas the Seebeck coefficient and the resistivity were almost constant even if the applied magnetic field was varied. Taking into account of thermoelectric coefficient tensor, it was revealed that the off-diagonal thermopower corresponding to the ANE in TbFeCo thin films is the product of Hall angle and Seebeck coefficient.

  20. Anomalous Hall effect in magnetic disordered alloys: Effects of spin orbital coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Gao, W. B.; Zhou, S. M.; Shi, Z.; He, P.; Miao, J.; Jiang, Y.

    2013-12-28

    For disordered ternary Fe{sub 0.5}(Pd{sub 1−x}Pt{sub x}){sub 0.5} alloy films, the anomalous Hall effect obeys the conventional scaling law ρ{sub AH}=aρ{sub xx}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} with the longitudinal resistivity ρ{sub xx} and anomalous Hall resistivity ρ{sub AH}. Contributed by the intrinsic term and the extrinsic side-jump one, the scattering-independent anomalous Hall conductivity b increases with increasing Pt/Pd concentration. In contrast, the skew scattering parameter a is mainly influenced by the residual resistivity. The present results will facilitate the theoretical studies of the anomalous Hall effect in magnetic disordered alloys.

  1. Detecting topological phases in silicene by anomalous Nernst effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yafang; Zhou, Xingfei; Jin, Guojun

    2016-05-01

    Silicene undergoes various topological phases under the interplay of intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, perpendicular electric field, and off-resonant light. We propose that the abundant topological phases can be distinguished by measuring the Nernst conductivity even at room temperature, and their phase boundaries can be determined by differentiating the charge and spin Nernst conductivities. By modulating the electric and light fields, pure spin polarized, valley polarized, and even spin-valley polarized Nernst currents can be generated. As Nernst conductivity is zero for linear polarized light, silicene can act as an optically controlled spin and valley field-effect transistor. Similar investigations can be extended from silicene to germanene and stanene, and a comparison is made for the anomalous thermomagnetic figure of merits between them. These results will facilitate potential applications in spin and valley caloritronics.

  2. Origin of anomalous piezoresistive effects in VLS grown Si nanowires.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Karl; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2015-03-11

    Although the various effects of strain on silicon are subject of intensive research since the 1950s the physical background of anomalous piezoresistive effects in Si nanowires (NWs) is still under debate. Recent investigations concur in that due to the high surface-to-volume ratio extrinsic surface related effects superimpose the intrinsic piezoresistive properties of nanostructures. To clarify this interplay of piezoresistive effects and stress related surface potential modifications, we explored a particular tensile straining device (TSD) with a monolithic embedded vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown Si NW. Integrating the suspended NW in a gate all around (GAA) field effect transistor (FET) configuration with a transparent gate stack enables optical and field modulated electrical characterization under high uniaxial tensile strain applied along the ⟨111⟩ Si NW growth direction. A model based on stress-induced carrier mobility change and surface charge modulation is proposed to interpret the actual piezoresistive behavior of Si NWs. By controlling the nature and density of surface states via passivation the "true" piezoresistance of the NWs is found to be comparable with that of bulk Si. This demonstrates the indispensability of application-specific NW surface conditioning and the modulation capability of Si NWs properties for sensor applications.

  3. Origin of Anomalous Piezoresistive Effects in VLS Grown Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although the various effects of strain on silicon are subject of intensive research since the 1950s the physical background of anomalous piezoresistive effects in Si nanowires (NWs) is still under debate. Recent investigations concur in that due to the high surface-to-volume ratio extrinsic surface related effects superimpose the intrinsic piezoresistive properties of nanostructures. To clarify this interplay of piezoresistive effects and stress related surface potential modifications, we explored a particular tensile straining device (TSD) with a monolithic embedded vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) grown Si NW. Integrating the suspended NW in a gate all around (GAA) field effect transistor (FET) configuration with a transparent gate stack enables optical and field modulated electrical characterization under high uniaxial tensile strain applied along the ⟨111⟩ Si NW growth direction. A model based on stress-induced carrier mobility change and surface charge modulation is proposed to interpret the actual piezoresistive behavior of Si NWs. By controlling the nature and density of surface states via passivation the “true” piezoresistance of the NWs is found to be comparable with that of bulk Si. This demonstrates the indispensability of application-specific NW surface conditioning and the modulation capability of Si NWs properties for sensor applications. PMID:25651106

  4. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-25

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We presentmore » the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. Furthermore, we discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.« less

  5. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-25

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We present the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. Furthermore, we discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.

  6. Origin of anomalous inverse notch effect in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Zhou, H. F.; Wang, Z. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding notch-related failure is crucial for the design of reliable engineering structures. However, substantial controversies exist in the literature on the notch effect in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), and the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the apparent confusion is still poorly understood. Here we investigate the physical origin of an inverse notch effect in a Zr-based metallic glass, where the tensile strength of the material is dramatically enhanced, rather than decreased (as expected from the stress concentration point of view), by introduction of a notch. Our experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that the seemingly anomalous inverse notch effect is in fact caused by a transition in failure mechanism from shear banding at the notch tip to cavitation and void coalescence. Based on our theoretical analysis, the transition occurs as the stress triaxiality in the notched sample exceeds a material-dependent threshold value. Our results fill the gap in the current understanding of BMG strength and failure mechanism by resolving the conflicts on notch effects and may inspire re-interpretation of previous reports on BMG fracture toughness where pre-existing notches were routinely adopted.

  7. Origin of anomalous magnetocaloric effect in (Dy1-zErz)Al2 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, A. L.; Oliveira, I. S.; Gomes, A. M.; von Ranke, P. J.

    2002-05-01

    We report a theoretical description of the anomalous magnetocaloric peak in (Dy1-zErz)Al2 in the concentration range 0.15anomalous peak was investigated using a Hamiltonian that includes the crystalline electrical field effects.

  8. Proximity-Induced Anomalous Hall Effect in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Tang, Chi; Sachs, Raymond; Barlas, Yafis; Shi, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Pre-patterned graphene devices are transferred from SiO2/Si to atomically flat magnetic insulator thin films, yttrium iron garnet (YIG) deposited by a laser molecular beam epitaxial system on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrate. Room temperature Raman spectroscopy reveals both single-layer graphene and YIG characteristic peaks. In addition to the ordinary Hall effect, there is a clear non-linear Hall component correlated with the magnetization of the YIG films, which we attribute to the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The magnitude of AHE in graphene/YIG devices decreases as temperature increases. With device-to-device variations, in some devices, AHE persists to room temperature, indicating a strong proximity-induced exchange interaction. By sweeping top gate voltages, one can tune the carrier density across the Dirac point. We also find that the carrier mobility is not significantly different in graphene/YIG. As the graphene is tuned from the electron- to hole-type, the ordinary Hall changes the sign as expected, but the sign of the AHE contribution remains the same. It suggests that AHE does not simply originate from the carrier density change which is responsible for the ordinary Hall effect, but is related to the spin-orbit interaction in the system. This work was supported in part by DOE and NSF.

  9. Green tea and skin--anticarcinogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, H; Katiyar, S K; Agarwal, R

    1994-01-01

    Because of its special aroma, green tea is a popular beverage consumed by some human populations worldwide. In recent years, many laboratory studies have shown that in a variety of animal tumor bioassay systems the administration of green tea, specifically the polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea leaves (green tea polyphenols), affords protection against cancer induction. In mouse skin tumor bioassay systems, topical application of green tea polyphenols to skin has been shown to result in protection against a) 3-methylcholanthrene-induced skin tumorigenicity, b) 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced skin tumor initiation, c) 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and other tumor promoters caused tumor promotion in DMBA-initiated skin, and d) benzoyl peroxide- and 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide caused enhanced malignant progression of nonmalignant lesions. Green tea extract has also been shown to cause partial regression of established skin papillomas in mouse. Similarly, chronic oral feeding of green tea polyphenols or water extract of green tea has also been shown to result in the protection against both chemical carcinogen- and ultraviolet B radiation-induced skin tumorigenicity. Collectively these data suggest that green tea possesses significant chemopreventive effect against each stage of carcinogenesis, and that it may be useful against inflammatory responses associated with the exposure of skin to chemical tumor promoters as well as to solar radiation. Available data regarding the mechanism by which green tea affords these diversified effects is discussed.

  10. Competing-fluctuation-induced anomalous magnetocaloric effects in perovskite manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hideaki; Taguchi, Yasujiro; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2010-03-01

    A magnetocaloric (MC) effect refers to the isothermal entropy change induced by applying (or removing) a magnetic field to the materials, which is a performance index of the magnetic refrigeration technology. In this study, the variation of MC effects has been systematically investigated for colossal magnetoresistive manganites R0.6Sr0.4MnO3 (R=La-Gd) by controlling the R-dependent one-electron bandwidth. With decreasing the bandwidth, the temperature profile of entropy change exhibits a larger peak at the ferromagnetic transition temperature and a steeper drop below it, due to the first-order nature of the transition promoted by a competing charge-orbital ordering instability. For the smallest-bandwidth systems adjacent to the metal- insulator phase boundary, a rectangular-shaped profile for the entropy change emerges with an anomalously wide temperature range. Model calculations have indicated that the bicritical fluctuation enhanced in the phase-competing region has a strong impact on such MC features [1]. [1] H. Sakai et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 78, 113708 (2009).

  11. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effects and Topological Phase Transitions in Silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2013-03-01

    Silicene is a monolayer of silicon atoms forming a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, which is experimentally manufactured this year. The low energy theory is described by Dirac electrons, but they are massive due to a relatively large spin-orbit interaction. I will explain the following properties of silicene: 1) The band structure is controllable by applying an electric field. Silicene undergoes a phase transition from a topological insulator to a band insulator by applying external electric field. 2) The topological phase transition can be detected experimentally by way of diamagnetism. 3) There is a novel circular dichroism and spinvalley selection rules by way of photon absorption. 4) Silicene shows a quantum anomalous Hall effects when ferromagnet is attached onto silicone. 5) Silicene shows a photo-induced quantum Hall effects when we apply strong laser onto silicene. 6) Single Dirac cone state emerges when we apply photo-irradiation and electric field, where the gap is open at the K point and closed at the K' point.

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in granular ferromagnetic metals and effects of weak localization.

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, H.; Kharitonov, M. Yu.; Efetov, K. B.; Materials Science Division; Ruhr-Univ. Bochum

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the anomalous Hall effect in a system of dense-packed ferromagnetic grains in the metallic regime. Using the formalism recently developed for the conventional Hall effect in granular metals, we calculate the residual anomalous Hall conductivity {sigma}{sub xy} and resistivity {rho}{sub xy} and weak localization corrections to them for both skew-scattering and side-jump mechanisms. We find that the scaling relation between {rho}{sub xy} and the longitudinal resistivity {rho}{sub xx} of the array does not hold, regardless of whether it is satisfied for the specific resistivities of the grain material or not. The weak localization corrections, however, are found to be in agreement with those for homogeneous metals. We discuss recent experimental data on the anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline iron films in view of the obtained results.

  13. Anomalous Hall effect in Cr doped FeSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadam, Sankararao; Lakhani, Archana; Singh, Durgesh; Prasad, Rudra; Ganesan, V.

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of economically affordable bulk materials for the spin based electronics are in huge demand. In this direction, electrical and Hall transport properties of the polycrystalline Cr doped Kondo insulator FeSi, i.e Fe0.975Cr0.025Si is reported. Well agreement between temperature dependence of the Hall and linear resistivity are observed. The observed minimum at ~19K in the resistivity is attributed to the ferromagnetic transition temperature (TC). Anomalous Hall resistivity is seen in the itinerant ferromagnet, Fe0.975Cr0.025Si well below the TC. The obtained Hall resistivity is comparable with that of the spintronic material Fe0.9Co0.1Si. The present study proves that the electrical transport properties of bulk materials made by low cost elements such as Fe, Cr and Si exhibits large magnetic field effects and are useful for the spintronics applications, unlike spintronics material (Ga, Mn)As that demand higher costs.

  14. Field-effect modulation of anomalous Hall effect in diluted ferromagnetic topological insulator epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, CuiZu; Liu, MinHao; Zhang, ZuoCheng; Wang, YaYu; He, Ke; Xue, QiKun

    2016-03-01

    High quality chromium (Cr) doped three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) Sb2Te3 films are grown via molecular beam epitaxy on heat-treated insulating SrTiO3 (111) substrates. We report that the Dirac surface states are insensitive to Cr doping, and a perfect robust long-range ferromagnetic order is unveiled in epitaxial Sb2- x Cr x Te3 films. The anomalous Hall effect is modulated by applying a bottom gate, contrary to the ferromagnetism in conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs), here the coercivity field is not significantly changed with decreasing carrier density. Carrier-independent ferromagnetism heralds Sb2- x Cr x Te3 films as the base candidate TI material to realize the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. These results also indicate the potential of controlling anomalous Hall voltage in future TI-based magneto-electronics and spintronics.

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in the noncollinear antiferromagnet Mn5Si3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sürgers, Christoph; Kittler, Wolfram; Wolf, Thomas; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.

    2016-05-01

    Metallic antiferromagnets with noncollinear orientation of magnetic moments provide a playground for investigating spin-dependent transport properties by analysis of the anomalous Hall effect. The intermetallic compound Mn5Si3 is an intinerant antiferromagnet with collinear and noncollinear magnetic structures due to Mn atoms on two inequivalent lattice sites. Here, magnetotransport measurements on polycrstalline thin films and a single crystal are reported. In all samples, an additional contribution to the anomalous Hall effect attributed to the noncollinear arrangment of magnetic moments is observed. Furthermore, an additional magnetic phase between the noncollinear and collinear regimes above a metamagnetic transition is resolved in the single crystal by the anomalous Hall effect.

  16. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  17. Skin effect and interaction of short laser pulses with dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    1990-12-01

    Interaction of intense, subpicosecond laser pulses with plasmas is discussed. A self-consistent analytical model of the anomalous and normal skin effects in plasmas with steplike density profile is proposed. The heat transport is described by classical Spitzer conductivity with new boundary conditions accounting for laser absorption in the thin skin layer. Self-similar solutions for the heat-conduction problem are obtained, and the scaling laws for important plasma parameters are also discussed. Predictions are found to be consistent with recent experimental results.

  18. Cosmetotextiles with Gallic Acid: Skin Reservoir Effect

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Cristina; Martínez, Vanessa; Lis, Manel; de la Maza, Alfons; Parra, José L.; Coderch, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant gallic acid (GA) has been incorporated into cotton (CO) and polyamide (PA) through two different vehicles, that is, liposomes and mixed micelles, and their respective absorption/desorption processes have been studied. Moreover, in vitro percutaneous absorption tests of different cosmetotextiles have been performed to demonstrate antioxidant penetration within the layers of the skin. When GA was embedded into the cosmetotextiles, it always promoted a reservoir effect that was much more marked than that observed for polyamide. Similar penetration was observed in the textiles treated with GA in mixed micelles or liposomes in such compartments of the skin as the stratum corneum, epidermis, and even the dermis. GA was detected in receptor fluid only when CO was treated with MM. This methodology may be useful in verifying how encapsulated substances incorporated into textile materials penetrate human skin. Indeed, such materials can be considered strategic delivery systems that release a given active compound into the skin at specific doses. PMID:23691326

  19. Effects of visible light on the skin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Bassel H; Hexsel, Camile L; Hamzavi, Iltefat H; Lim, Henry W

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation has vast and diverse effects on human skin. Although photobiologic studies of sunlight date back to Sir Isaac Newton in 1671, most available studies focus on the UV radiation part of the spectrum. The effects of visible light and infrared radiation have not been, until recently, clearly elucidated. The goal of this review is to highlight the effects of visible light on the skin. As a result of advances in the understanding of skin optics, and comprehensive studies regarding the absorption spectrum of endogenous and exogenous skin chromophores, various biologic effects have been shown to be exerted by visible light radiation including erythema, pigmentation, thermal damage and free radical production. It has also been shown that visible light can induce indirect DNA damage through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, a number of photodermatoses have an action spectrum in the visible light range, even though most of the currently available sunscreens offer, if any, weak protection against visible light. Conversely, because of its cutaneous biologic effects, visible light is used for the treatment of a variety of skin diseases and esthetic conditions in the form of lasers, intense pulsed light and photodynamic therapy.

  20. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  1. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  2. Anomalous hall effect in the (in,mn)sb dilute magnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Mihály, G; Csontos, M; Bordács, S; Kézsmárki, I; Wojtowicz, T; Liu, X; Jankó, B; Furdyna, J K

    2008-03-14

    High magnetic field study of Hall resistivity in the ferromagnetic phase of (In,Mn)Sb allows one to separate its normal and anomalous components. We show that the anomalous Hall term is not proportional to the magnetization, and that it even changes sign as a function of magnetic field. We also show that the application of pressure modifies the scattering process, but does not influence the Hall effect. These observations suggest that the anomalous Hall effect in (In,Mn)Sb is an intrinsic property and supports the application of the Berry phase theory for (III,Mn)V semiconductors. We propose a phenomenological description of the anomalous Hall conductivity, based on a field-dependent relative shift of the heavy- and light-hole valence bands and the split-off band.

  3. Anomalous Hall effect on the surface of topological Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, E. J.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Dzero, M.; Levchenko, A.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the anomalous Hall conductivity σx y of the surface states in cubic topological Kondo insulators. We consider a generic model for the surface states with three Dirac cones on the (001) surface. The Fermi velocity, the Fermi momentum, and the Zeeman energy in different Dirac pockets may be unequal. The microscopic impurity potential mediates mixed intra- and interband extrinsic scattering processes. Our calculation of σx y is based on the Kubo-Streda diagrammatic approach. It includes diffractive skew scattering contributions originating from the rare two-impurity complexes. Remarkably, these contributions yield anomalous Hall conductivity that is independent of impurity concentration, and thus is of the same order as other known extrinsic side jump and skew scattering terms. We discuss various special cases of our results and the experimental relevance of our study in the context of the recent hysteretic magnetotransport data in SmB6 samples.

  4. Higgs mechanism, phase transitions, and anomalous Hall effect in three-dimensional topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Flavio S.; Sudbø, Asle; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that the Higgs mechanism in three-dimensional topological superconductors exhibits unique features with experimentally observable consequences. The Higgs model we discuss has two superconducting components and an axionlike magnetoelectric term with the phase difference of the superconducting order parameters playing the role of the axion field. Due to this additional term, quantum electromagnetic and phase fluctuations lead to a robust topologically nontrivial state that holds also in the presence of interactions. In this sense, we show that the renormalization flow of the topologically nontrivial phase cannot be continuously deformed into a topologically nontrivial one. One consequence of our analysis of quantum critical fluctuations is the possibility of having a first-order phase transition in the bulk and a second-order phase transition on the surface. We also explore another consequence of the axionic Higgs electrodynamics, namely, the anomalous Hall effect. In the low-frequency London regime an anomalous Hall effect is induced in the presence of an applied electric field parallel to the surface. This anomalous Hall current is induced by a Lorentz-like force arising from the axion term, and it involves the relative superfluid velocity of the superconducting components. The anomalous Hall current has a negative sign, a situation reminiscent of but quite distinct in physical origin from the anomalous Hall effect observed in high-Tc superconductors. In contrast to the latter, the anomalous Hall effect in topological superconductors is nondissipative and occurs in the absence of vortices.

  5. Biological effects of rutin on skin aging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Jin; Lee, Sung-Nae; Kim, Karam; Joo, Da Hye; Shin, Shanghun; Lee, Jeongju; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jihyun; Kwon, Seung Bin; Kim, Min Jung; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Cha, Hwa Jun

    2016-07-01

    Rutin, a quercetin glycoside is a member of the bioflavonoid family which is known to possess antioxidant properties. In the present study, we aimed to confirm the anti‑aging effects of rutin on human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and human skin. We examined the effects of rutin using a cell viability assay, senescence-associated-β-galactosidase assay, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity in vitro. To examine the effects of rutin in vivo, rutin‑containing cream was applied to human skin. A double-blind clinical study was conducted in 40 subjects aged between 30-50 years and divided into control and experimental groups. The test material was applied for 4 weeks. After 2 and 4 weeks, dermal density, skin elasticity, the length and area of crow's feet, and number of under-eye wrinkles following the application of either the control or the rutin-containing cream were analyzed. Rutin increased the mRNA expression of collagen, type I, alpha 1 (COL1A1) and decreased the mRNA expression of matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1) in HDFs. We verified that ROS scavenging activity was stimulated by rutin in a dose‑dependent manner and we identified that rutin exerted protective effects under conditions of oxidative stress. Furthermore, rutin increased skin elasticity and decreased the length, area and number of wrinkles. The consequences of human aging are primarily visible on the skin, such as increased wrinkling, sagging and decreased elasticity. Overall, this study demonstrated the biological effects of rutin on ROS-induced skin aging. PMID:27220601

  6. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields.

  7. Separation of spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect in Co/Cu/YIG

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Dai; Li, Yufan; Qu, D.; Chien, C. L.; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-25

    The spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and Anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) have been observed in Co/Cu/YIG (yttrium iron garnet) multi-layer structure, where the ferromagnetic insulator YIG acts as the pure spin injector and the ferromagnetic metal Co layer acts as the spin current detector. With the insertion of 5 nm Cu layer, the two ferromagnetic layers are decoupled, thus allowing unambiguous separation of the SSE and ANE contributions under the same experimental conditions in the same sample.

  8. Effects of climate changes on skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Balato, Nicola; Megna, Matteo; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna; Napolitano, Maddalena; Patruno, Cataldo

    2014-02-01

    Global climate is changing at an extraordinary rate. Climate change (CC) can be caused by several factors including variations in solar radiation, oceanic processes, and also human activities. The degree of this change and its impact on ecological, social, and economical systems have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing CC as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Moreover, studies based on observations and predictive models show how CC could affect human health. On the other hand, only a few studies focus on how this change may affect human skin. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, it is not surprising that cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. The current review focuses on the effects of CC on skin diseases showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence, clinical pattern and natural course of some dermatoses. PMID:24404995

  9. Role of antioxidants in the skin: anti-aging effects.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Intracellular and extracellular oxidative stress initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) advance skin aging, which is characterized by wrinkles and atypical pigmentation. Because UV enhances ROS generation in cells, skin aging is usually discussed in relation to UV exposure. The use of antioxidants is an effective approach to prevent symptoms related to photo-induced aging of the skin. In this review, the mechanisms of ROS generation and ROS elimination in the body are summarized. The effects of ROS generated in the skin and the roles of ROS in altering the skin are also discussed. In addition, the effects of representative antioxidants on the skin are summarized with a focus on skin aging.

  10. Signal asymmetries in the anomalous Hall effect of bilayer magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, R. A.; Nutter, P. W.; Neumann, A.; Thönnißen, C.; Wilhelm, E.-S.; Thomson, T.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an interpretation for the signal asymmetry observed in anomalous Hall effect (AHE) transport measurements of magnetic nanostructures patterned from bilayer magnetic thin films. Experimental data and simulations demonstrate that the signal asymmetry observed in hysteresis loops arises due to a combination of the anomalous Hall effect together with a contribution from longitudinal giant magnetoresistance (GMR). The effect shows a high-sensitivity to nanoscale misalignments in Hall cross geometry. Consequently, the complex nature of the origin of electrical signals should be taken into account when undertaking any transport measurements on magnetic bilayer nanostructures, such as GMR or spintronic devices.

  11. Microwave thermal radiation effects on skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hargsoon; Song, Kyo D.; Lee, Uhn; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-10-01

    Microwave/RF energy has been used for wireless power transmission including many therapeutic applications, such as transurethral microwave therapy (TUMT). For safe uses of RF power, it is important to know how to deliver microwave energy on focused area and control the temperature changes not to drastically increase on adjacent areas. Graphical analysis of thermal loading factor is important to understand how to achieve effective transmission of microwave through the tissue. The loss mechanism while transmission often appears as thermal effects due to absorption of microwave, especially for materials such as human skin, muscles, and other organic parts including brain. In this paper, microwave thermal effects are investigated to measure temperatures, penetration depth through animal skins in terms of input power and various frequencies. This result will be compare with the case of human applications.

  12. Effect of interstitial low level laser stimulation in skin density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seulki; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Yu, Sungkon; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Hwang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Han A.; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    As the interest in skin was increased, number of studies on skin care also have been increased. The reduction of skin density is one of the symptoms of skin aging. It reduces elasticity of skin and becomes the reason of wrinkle formation. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as one of the effective therapeutic methods for skin aging as in hasten to change skin density. This study presents the effect of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) (wavelength: 660nm, power: 20mW) in skin density. Rabbits were divided into three groups. Group 1 didn't receive any laser stimulation as a control group. Group 2 and 3 as test groups were exposed to MILNS with energy of 8J and 6J on rabbits' dorsal side once a week, respectively. Skin density of rabbits was measured every 12 hours by using an ultrasound skin scanner.

  13. Spontaneous magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in an emergent Dice lattice

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Przysiężna, Anna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices serve as a tool to model different physical phenomena appearing originally in condensed matter. To study magnetic phenomena one needs to engineer synthetic fields as atoms are neutral. Appropriately shaped optical potentials force atoms to mimic charged particles moving in a given field. We present the realization of artificial gauge fields for the observation of anomalous Hall effect. Two species of attractively interacting ultracold fermions are considered to be trapped in a shaken two dimensional triangular lattice. A combination of interaction induced tunneling and shaking can result in an emergent Dice lattice. In such a lattice the staggered synthetic magnetic flux appears and it can be controlled with external parameters. The obtained synthetic fields are non-Abelian. Depending on the tuning of the staggered flux we can obtain either anomalous Hall effect or its quantized version. Our results are reminiscent of Anomalous Hall conductivity in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets. PMID:26057635

  14. Spontaneous magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in an emergent Dice lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Przysiężna, Anna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-06-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices serve as a tool to model different physical phenomena appearing originally in condensed matter. To study magnetic phenomena one needs to engineer synthetic fields as atoms are neutral. Appropriately shaped optical potentials force atoms to mimic charged particles moving in a given field. We present the realization of artificial gauge fields for the observation of anomalous Hall effect. Two species of attractively interacting ultracold fermions are considered to be trapped in a shaken two dimensional triangular lattice. A combination of interaction induced tunneling and shaking can result in an emergent Dice lattice. In such a lattice the staggered synthetic magnetic flux appears and it can be controlled with external parameters. The obtained synthetic fields are non-Abelian. Depending on the tuning of the staggered flux we can obtain either anomalous Hall effect or its quantized version. Our results are reminiscent of Anomalous Hall conductivity in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets.

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic semiconductors in the hopping transport regime.

    PubMed

    Burkov, A A; Balents, Leon

    2003-08-01

    We present a theory of the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As in the regime when conduction is due to phonon-assisted hopping of holes between localized states in the impurity band. We show that the microscopic origin of the anomalous Hall conductivity in this system can be attributed to a phase that a hole gains when hopping around closed-loop paths in the presence of spin-orbit interactions and background magnetization of the localized Mn moments. Mapping the problem to a random resistor network, we derive an analytic expression for the macroscopic anomalous Hall conductivity sigma(AH)(xy). We show that sigma(AH)(xy) is proportional to the first derivative of the density of states varrho(epsilon) and thus can be expected to change sign as a function of impurity band filling. We also show that sigma(AH)(xy) depends on temperature as the longitudinal conductivity sigma(xx) within logarithmic accuracy.

  16. Large-Chern-number quantum anomalous Hall effect in thin-film topological crystalline insulators.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chen; Gilbert, Matthew J; Bernevig, B Andrei

    2014-01-31

    We theoretically predict that thin-film topological crystalline insulators can host various quantum anomalous Hall phases when doped by ferromagnetically ordered dopants. Any Chern number between ±4 can, in principle, be reached as a result of the interplay between (a) the induced Zeeman field, depending on the magnetic doping concentration, (b) the structural distortion, either intrinsic or induced by a piezoelectric material through the proximity effect, and (c) the thickness of the thin film. We propose a heterostructure to realize quantum anomalous Hall phases with Chern numbers that can be tuned by electric fields. PMID:24580476

  17. Exploration of Anomalous Gravity Effects by rf-Pumped Magnetized High-T(c) Superconducting Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tony; Litchford, Ron; Peters, Randall; Thompson, Byran; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A number of anomalous gravitational effects have been reported in the scientific literature during recent years, but there has been no independent confirmation with regard to any of these claims. Therefore, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in response to the propulsion challenges specified by NASA's Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) program, proposed to explore the possibility of observing anomalous gravitation behavior through the manipulation of Josephson junction effects in magnetized high-Tc superconducting oxides. The technical goal was to critically test this revolutionary physical claim and provide a rigorous, independent, empirical confirmation (or refutation) of anomalous effects related to the manipulation of gravity by radio frequency (rf)-pumped magnetized type-2 superconductors. Because the current empirical evidence for gravity modification is anecdotal, our objective was to design, construct, and meticulously implement a discriminating experiment, which would put these observations on a more firm footing within the scientific community. Our approach is unique in that we advocate the construction of an extremely sensitive torsion balance with which to measure gravity modification effects by rf-pumped type-2 superconductor test masses. This paper reviews the anecdotal evidence for anomalous gravity effects, describes the design and development of a simplified torsion balance experiment for empirically investigating these claims, and presents the results of preliminary experiments.

  18. Effective anomalous Hall coefficient in an ultrathin Co layer sandwiched by Pt layers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Di; Jiang, Zhengsheng; Sang, Hai E-mail: haisang@nju.edu.cn; Lin, Weiwei E-mail: haisang@nju.edu.cn

    2014-02-14

    Anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pt multilayer is important to study the effect of interface with strong spin-orbit coupling. However, the shunting effect of the layers in such system and the circuit in the plane perpendicular to the injected current were overlooked in most works and thus, anomalous Hall coefficient in Co/Pt multilayer has not been determined accurately. Considering the shunting effect and the equivalent circuit, we show that the effective anomalous Hall coefficient of a 0.5 nm thick Co layer sandwiched by Pt layers R{sub S} is 0.29 ± 0.01 μΩ cm/T at the zero temperature limit and increases to about 0.73 μΩ cm/T at the temperature of 300 K. R{sub S} is one order larger than that in bulk Co film, indicating the large contribution of the Co/Pt interface. R{sub S} increases with the resistivity of Co as well as a resistivity independent contribution of −0.23 ± 0.01 μΩ cm/T. The equivalent anomalous Hall current in the Co layer has a maximum of 1.1% of the injected transverse current in the Co layer around the temperature of 80 K.

  19. The effects of skin disease on the penetration kinetics of hydrocortisone through canine skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Liisa A; Cross, Sheree E; Mills, Paul C

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of allergic skin disease on the penetration kinetics of hydrocortisone through canine skin in vitro. Full-thickness lesional and nonlesional (normal) skin was removed from the dorsal lumbosacral and dorsocaudal thoracic regions, respectively, of five canine cadavers. The dogs were suspected of having flea allergy dermatitis based on their distribution and types of skin lesions. Nonlesional skin was confirmed to be histologically normal, and the histopathology of the lesional skin was consistent with allergic dermatitis. Excised skin was clipped, mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells, and the transdermal penetration of a saturated, radiolabelled hydrocortisone solution was measured over 30 h. When the penetration data for all five dogs were pooled, a restricted (or residual) maximal likelihood mixed model predicted that the permeability coefficient and pseudosteady-state flux of hydrocortisone was more than twice as great (95% confidence interval 1.55-2.71 times as great; P < 0.0001) through lesional compared with nonlesional skin. There was no significant difference in the lag time for hydrocortisone penetration through lesional compared with nonlesional skin of the dogs. This study has confirmed that the transdermal penetration of hydrocortisone may be altered, typically increased twofold, but could be as high as 10-fold, through lesional compared with nonlesional skin of dogs with suspected flea allergy dermatitis. This is likely to be affected by variables such as disease severity, concurrent infections and interindividual differences in skin characteristics.

  20. Anomalous Hall effects in pseudo-single-crystal γ'-Fe4N thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Kokado, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effects (AHE) were investigated at various temperatures for the pseudo-single-crystal Fe4N films, deposited on MgO substrates with changing the degree of order (S) of the nitrogen site. Both the anomalous Hall resistivity and the longitudinal resistivity simply decrease with lowering temperature for all the specimens. The AHE of the Fe4N films is presumed to arise from an intrinsic mechanism because of the relationship between the anomalous Hall resistivity and longitudinal resistivity. The anomalous Hall conductivity, σAH, exhibits a specific behavior at low temperature. In the case of the film with S = 0.93, the σAH drastically drops below 50 K, while it simply increases with lowering temperature in the range of 50-300 K. This low-temperature anomaly decays with decreasing S of the film and nearly vanishes in the films with low S. The threshold temperature and the dependence on S of the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH well correspond to those of the anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in the Fe4N films, reported in the literatures. From these results, it is suggested that the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH originates from the crystal field effect which reflects the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry below 50 K and provides a modulation of the orbital angular momentum of the 3d orbitals at the Fermi level.

  1. Skin and bulk temperature difference at Lake Tahoe: A case study on lake skin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. Chris; Hook, Simon J.; Schneider, Philipp; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2013-09-01

    water, infrared radiometers on satellites measure radiation leaving from the surface skin layer and therefore the retrieved temperature is representative of the skin layer. This is slightly different from the bulk layer deeper in the water where various floating thermometers take temperature measurements to validate satellite measurements. The difference between the bulk and skin temperature (skin effect) must be understood to properly validate schemes that use surface skin temperature to infer bulk temperatures. Further skin temperatures retrieved over inland waters may show different patterns to those retrieved over oceans due to differences in conditions such as wind speed, aerosols, and elevation. We have analyzed the differences between the skin and bulk temperatures at four permanent monitoring stations (buoys) located on Lake Tahoe since 1999 and compared the results with similar studies over the ocean typically obtained from boat cruises. Skin effect distributions were found to be consistent across the buoys; however, the diurnal behavior of the skin effect was slightly different and shown to be related to wind speed measured at an individual buoy. When wind speed was less than 2 m s-1, the skin temperature osclillated and greatly increased the uncertainty in the skin effect reported over Lake Tahoe. When downwelling sky radiation was increased from clouds or high humidity, this led to nighttime skin temperatures that were warmer than bulk temperatures by as much as 0.5 K. The size of the warm skin effect is larger than other ocean studies that observed warm nighttime skin values around 0.1 K. The nighttime skin effect was seen to be more consistent with a smaller standard deviation compared to the daytime skin effect. The nighttime skin behavior had a mean and standard deviation that ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 K and between 0.3 and 0.4 K, respectively. In contrast, daytime skin effect was strongly influenced by direct solar illumination and typically had a

  2. The effect of Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser on the skin barrier of patients with rosacea.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe D

    2006-04-01

    A good skin care regimen is a critical part of rosacea treatment; however, care must be taken to choose nonirritating products because individuals with rosacea tend to have sensitive skin, and irritants can trigger a worsening of symptoms. This study examines the use of Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser (a nonalkaline nonirritating cleanser) in patients with rosacea. To eliminate the confounding effects of various treatments, the cleanser was studied for a 2-week period in the absence of rosacea therapy following a 2-week washout period in patients with mild to moderate rosacea. During the washout period, patients were asked to cleanse twice daily with Dove Sensitive Skin Bar. During the 2-week study period, patients were monitored for skin barrier function through transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneometry; patients also were monitored for rosacea severity. Thirty patients were enrolled. No significant increase in TEWL was demonstrated at any point during the study, indicating that the gentle skin cleanser did not damage the skin barrier. Additionally, the cleanser was shown to maintain skin hydration. Furthermore, a post hoc statistical analysis suggests there was a significant reduction (P<.05) in investigator-assessed rosacea severity on the cheeks, forehead, and nose at the end of week 1 and on the cheeks, forehead, and chin at the end of week 2 compared with the end of the washout period (after 2 weeks of cleansing with Dove Sensitive Skin Bar). The mild nonirritating action of the gentle skin cleanser was supported by the lack of adverse events and the tolerability shown in the study. There were no increases in erythema, scaling, dryness, stinging, burning, or lack of smoothness in the skin during the 2-week study period, despite the fact that patients were not being treated for their rosacea during the study. These results indicate that Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser may be a good choice for the cleansing part of a total rosacea skin care regimen.

  3. Effective Lagrangian approach to precision measurements: Anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    SciTech Connect

    Arzt, C.; Einhorn, M.B. Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 ); Wudka, J. )

    1994-02-01

    We investigate the use of effective Lagrangians to describe the effects on high-precision observables of physics beyond the standard model. Using the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon as an example, we detail the use of effective vertices in loop calculations. We then provide estimates of the sensitivity of new experiments measuring the muon's [ital g][minus]2 to the scale of physics underlying the standard model.

  4. Skin topographical analysis by means of Talbot effect technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma-Alejandro, K.; Can-Uc, B.; Méndez-Gamboa, J.; Pérez-Cortés, M.; De Coss-Gómez, M.

    2007-02-01

    Changes in the skin topography are early stage diagnosis tool for diseases and the skin response to medical and cosmetics treatment. The present work focuses on the applicability of the Talbot effect in the skin topography characterization in vivo. This work shows the design and the optical system mounting using Ronchy periodical grids for this characterization.

  5. Sun’s effect on skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer) layer are cells that contain the pigment melanin. Melanin protects skin from the sun's ultraviolet rays, which ... to sunlight causes the skin to produce more melanin and to darken. The tan fades as these ...

  6. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S. H.; Durham, W. B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.% ) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the

  7. Extraordinary Hall effect in Kondo-type systems: Contributions from anomalous velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, P. M.

    1988-10-01

    Kondo systems exhibit a relatively large extraordinary Hall effect which is due to asymmetric resonant scattering of conduction electrons. Theories based on the skew scattering mechanism account for data at high temperatures T>TK (the Kondo temperature) but are unable to explain the very-low-temperature variation of the Hall constant observed in heavy-fermion compounds. Aside from the ordinary Hall effect, caused by the Lorentz force and skew scattering (which makes the scattering probability antisymmetric with respect to interchange of scattering vectors), there exists an additional contribution to the Hall effect known as the anomalous-velocity contribution. This contribution is due to a change in the expression for the current operator in the presence of spin-orbit forces. We derive an expression for the anomalous velocity in terms of the T matrices describing conduction-electron scattering; it is not limited to weak spin-orbit scattering as were previous results. We use the Anderson model of local moments in metals to write this scattering in terms of the mixing interaction between local and conduction electrons, and the local state's Green's function. The transverse Hall current due to anomalous velocity is determined and evaluated in two limits. At high temperature, we use the weak-coupling form of the local state's Green's function; at T=0 K a phase-shift analysis is used, and we rely on the Friedel-Langreth sum rule to give us the phase shift at the Fermi surface. At high temperatures we find that the contribution from anomalous velocity to the Hall constant is quite small compared to that from skew scattering. On the contrary, at low temperatures the anomalous velocity makes the dominant contribution to the Hall constant in Kondo systems.

  8. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  9. Structure/effect studies of fatty acid isomers as skin penetration enhancers and skin irritants.

    PubMed

    Aungst, B J

    1989-03-01

    Comparisons were made of branched vs unbranched saturated fatty acids and cis vs trans unsaturated fatty acids as skin penetration enhancers and primary skin irritants. Skin penetration studies used naloxone base as the diffusant, propylene glycol as the vehicle, and human skin. Maximum naloxone flux was with C9-12-branched and unbranched fatty acids. For C5-14 fatty acids, branched and unbranched isomers had similar effects. One branched C18 fatty acid isomer (C16-branched isostearic acid) was more effective in enhancing skin penetration than a differently branched (C2-branched isostearic acid) or unbranched C18 isomer (stearic acid). There was no significant difference between cis and trans unsaturated C16-18 fatty acid isomers in their effects on naloxone flux, and all unsaturated fatty acids were more effective enhancers than the corresponding saturated isomers. Several of these fatty acid/propylene glycol vehicles were evaluated in a rabbit primary skin irritation test. Irritation indices were poorly correlated with the effectiveness of the vehicles in enhancing naloxone flux. It was possible to enhance naloxone skin penetration greatly with a vehicle with only minimal skin irritation potential.

  10. Understanding Engineered Nanomaterial Skin Interactions and the Modulatory Effects of UVR Skin Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jatana, Samreen; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of engineered nanomaterials for the development of technological applications, nanomedicine, and nano-enabled consumer products is an ever expanding discipline as is the concern over the impact of nanotechnology on human environmental health and safety. In this review we discuss the current state of understanding of nanomaterial skin interactions with a specific emphasis on the effects of ultra-violet radiation (UVR) skin exposure. Skin is the largest organ of the body and is typically exposed to UVR on a daily basis. This necessitates the need to understand how UVR skin exposure can influence nanomaterial skin penetration, alter nanomaterial systemic trafficking, toxicity, and skin immune function. We explore the unique dichotomy that UVR has in inducing both deleterious and therapeutic effects on skin. The subject matter covered in this review is broadly informative and will raise awareness of potential increased risks from nanomaterial skin exposure associated with specific occupational and life style choices. The UVR induced immunosuppressive response in skin raises intriguing questions that motivate future research directions in the nanotoxicology and nanomedicine fields. PMID:24123977

  11. Effect of Seasonal Variation of Anomalous Condition on Radio Propagation in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, Israel; Adeyemi, Babatunde; Ogolo, Emmanuel; Adediji, Adekunle

    Daily variation of effective earth radius factor and seasonal variation of refractivity gradients from surface to around 1000 m above ground level in the tropospheric layer are presented based on observation from the meteorological data obtain from ECMWF database. Thirty four years (1979 -2014) of data from surface and profile of Era Interim of the temperature and relative humidity are used to determine the surface anomalous propagation over some selected location I Nigeria. Estimation of anomalous propagation are observed for onset and peak of rainy and dry seasons. The occurrence of anomalous strongly depends on the local time and synoptic weather conditions which have an appreciable on the refractivity vertical profile, especially the seasonal north - south movement of inter tropical Convergence Zone (ITCD) which provide wet and dry seasonal variations of anomalous were also determined. Spatial distribution of refractivity gradient for both wet and dry seasons are also obtained. The highest occurrence of duct were noticed in the night and morning (00:00 UTC and 06:00UTC) across the country though it was low in the northern part of the country, while low or no occurrence of duct were observed in the afternoon and evening (12:00 UTC and 18:00 UTC). Also percentage occurrence of duct were also high and low during the wet and dry seasons respectively.

  12. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and tunable topological states in 3d transition metals doped silicene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Lan-Feng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Silicene is an intriguing 2D topological material which is closely analogous to graphene but with stronger spin orbit coupling effect and natural compatibility with current silicon-based electronics industry. Here we demonstrate that silicene decorated with certain 3d transition metals (Vanadium) can sustain a stable quantum anomalous Hall effect using both analytical model and first-principles Wannier interpolation. We also predict the quantum valley Hall effect and electrically tunable topological states could be realized in certain transition metal doped silicene where the energy band inversion occurs. Our findings provide new scheme for the realization of quantum anomalous Hall effect and platform for electrically controllable topological states which are highly desirable for future nanoelectronics and spintronics application. PMID:24105063

  13. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  14. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  15. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    PubMed Central

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  16. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  17. Effects of sunscreen on skin cancer and photoaging.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Green, Adèle C

    2014-01-01

    Application of sunscreen to the skin is widely used as an adjunct strategy, along with wearing protective clothing and seeking shade, to protect against skin cancer and photoaging that result from excessive sun exposure. Many epidemiological studies of case-control and cohort study design have studied the effects of sunscreen use on skin cancer, and more recently photoaging, but their findings have been mostly uninformative. This review of results of randomized controlled trials shows that the evidence, though limited, supports beneficial effects of sunscreen application on the occurrence of skin cancers and skin photoaging.

  18. Quantized anomalous Hall effect in two-dimensional ferromagnets: quantum Hall effect in metals.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Masaru; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2003-05-23

    We study the effect of disorder on the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in two-dimensional ferromagnets. The topological nature of the AHE leads to the integer quantum Hall effect from a metal, i.e., the quantization of sigma(xy) induced by the localization except for the few extended states carrying Chern numbers. Extensive numerical study on a model reveals that Pruisken's two-parameter scaling theory holds even when the system has no gap with the overlapping multibands and without the uniform magnetic field. Therefore, the condition for the quantized AHE is given only by the Hall conductivity sigma(xy) without the quantum correction, i.e., /sigma(xy)/>e(2)/(2h).

  19. Effect of Skin-To-Skin Contact on Preterm Infant Skin Barrier Function and Hospital-Acquired Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abouelfettoh, Amel; Ludington-Hoe, Susan M.; Burant, Chris J.; Visscher, Marty O.

    2011-01-01

    Background The preterm infants' skin is structurally and functionally immature at birth because of immature stratum corneum barrier function, leading to problems with fluid loses, thermoregulation, and infection. Two parameters of barrier function can be non-invasively assessed: Stratum Corneum Hydration (SCH) and Transepidermal Water Loss (TEWL). Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC) is the proposed independent variable that might affect barrier function by decreasing TEWL and increasing SCH, thereby improving stratum corneum barrier function and consequently decreasing the rate of infection. No study of SSC's effects on TEWL and SCH of preterm infants could be found. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of 5 daily Skin-to-Skin Contact sessions on infant skin hydration (SCH), transepidermal evaporated water loss (TEWL), and on SCH when TEWL was controlled, and on the presence of hospital acquired infection. Methods A one-group pretest-test-posttest design with 10 preterm infants (28 - 30 wks GA < 32 wks postmenstrual age, and no infection at entry). Test = 90 minutes of SSC; pre-test and post-test = 30 minutes each of prone positioning in an incubator. SCH and TEWL were taken on Days 1 and 5 at the beginning, middle and end of each period using Multi-Probe Adaptor. A 3 X 3 X 2 Repeated Measures Mixed Models Design, including a covariate, was used to analyze level of Skin Hydration. Specifically, the model tested comparisons in SCH made across repetitions, time, and days, as well as all possible interactions while controlling for TEWL. Descriptive statistics described the number of positive blood cultures during hospitalization and the presence of infections four weeks post-discharge. Results Significant differences in skin hydration were found across TIME (Pre-SSC, SSC, Post-SSC) (F = 21.86; p < 0.001). One infant had a positive blood culture during hospitalization; no infants had signs of infection by 4 weeks post-discharge. Conclusions The study has begun

  20. Skin-lightening cosmetics: frequent, potentially severe adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Skin-lightening cosmetics are used by many women and men around the world. The products contain a variety of substances, which are often unknown to the users. Most of these products include topical corticosteroids, hydroquinone and mercury salts. Many other substances may be added. Several surveys and cohort studies, including several thousand individuals, have shown that regular application of skin-lightening cosmetics to large surface areas can have irreversible cutaneous adverse effects, such as patchy hyper- or hypopigmentation, skin atrophy, stretch marks and delayed wound healing, and can also mask or, on the contrary, promote or reactivate skin infections. Cases of skin cancer have been attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics. A Senegalese cohort study of 147 women showed a statistically significant increase in the risk of hypertension and diabetes linked to the use of skin-lightening agents. Other systemic adverse effects attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics include Cushing's syndrome, adrenal insufficiency, nephrotic syndrome, neurological disorders, and ocular disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have also been attributed to these products. Many skin-lightening cosmetics contain substances that can harm the unborn child. For example, tretinoin is teratogenic while salicylic acid is feto-toxic. In practice, users are often unaware of the risk of severe adverse effects associated with skin-lightening cosmetics. Users should be informed of these adverse effects and encouraged to stop using these products, especially when skin disorders appear.

  1. Anomalous resistance overshoot in the integer quantum Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Kendirlik, E. M.; Sirt, S.; Kalkan, S. B.; Dietsche, W.; Wegscheider, W.; Ludwig, S.; Siddiki, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report on experiments performed on smooth edge-narrow Hall bars. The magneto-transport properties of intermediate mobility two-dimensional electron systems are investigated and analyzed within the screening theory of the integer quantized Hall effect. We observe a non-monotonic increase of Hall resistance at the low magnetic field ends of the quantized plateaus, known as the overshoot effect. Unexpectedly, for Hall bars that are defined by shallow chemical etching the overshoot effect becomes more pronounced at elevated temperatures. We observe the overshoot effect at odd and even integer plateaus, which favor a spin independent explanation, in contrast to discussion in the literature. In a second set of the experiments, we investigate the overshoot effect in gate defined Hall bar and explicitly show that the amplitude of the overshoot effect can be directly controlled by gate voltages. We offer a comprehensive explanation based on scattering between evanescent incompressible channels. PMID:24190162

  2. Anomalous resistance overshoot in the integer quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Kendirlik, E M; Sirt, S; Kalkan, S B; Dietsche, W; Wegscheider, W; Ludwig, S; Siddiki, A

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report on experiments performed on smooth edge-narrow Hall bars. The magneto-transport properties of intermediate mobility two-dimensional electron systems are investigated and analyzed within the screening theory of the integer quantized Hall effect. We observe a non-monotonic increase of Hall resistance at the low magnetic field ends of the quantized plateaus, known as the overshoot effect. Unexpectedly, for Hall bars that are defined by shallow chemical etching the overshoot effect becomes more pronounced at elevated temperatures. We observe the overshoot effect at odd and even integer plateaus, which favor a spin independent explanation, in contrast to discussion in the literature. In a second set of the experiments, we investigate the overshoot effect in gate defined Hall bar and explicitly show that the amplitude of the overshoot effect can be directly controlled by gate voltages. We offer a comprehensive explanation based on scattering between evanescent incompressible channels.

  3. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Kim, Dong-Jun; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Byong-Guk; Park, Seung-Young

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE011 resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage VISHE for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure VISHE and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage VAHE utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θISH, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θISH values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable VISHE value in bilayer systems are large θISH and low resistivity.

  4. Beam Kondo effect? — Possible anomalous penning deexcitation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, A.; Makoshi, K.

    1990-05-01

    It is shown that the Penning deexcitation spectrum of the triplet 2s excited helium atom beam at metal surfaces can have a threshold anomaly, which is the Kondo effect. The time-dependent Newns-Anderson model is used to analyze the transition rate of the deexcitation in the quasi-static approximation. The effect is due to the spin as well as potential scattering of conduction electrons by the He atom in the triplet excited state as the initial state interaction. Line shape of the Penning deexcitation spectrum is discussed, and clean surfaces of alkali metals are pointed out to be possible candidates to observe this many body effect.

  5. Anomalously large isotope effect in the glass transition of water

    PubMed Central

    Gainaru, Catalin; Agapov, Alexander L.; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Nelson, Helge; Köster, Karsten W.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Böhmer, Roland; Loerting, Thomas; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the discovery of an unusually large isotope effect in the structural relaxation and the glass transition temperature Tg of water. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of low-density as well as of vapor-deposited amorphous water reveal Tg differences of 10 ± 2 K between H2O and D2O, sharply contrasting with other hydrogen-bonded liquids for which H/D exchange increases Tg by typically less than 1 K. We show that the large isotope effect and the unusual variation of relaxation times in water at low temperatures can be explained in terms of quantum effects. Thus, our findings shed new light on water's peculiar low-temperature dynamics and the possible role of quantum effects in its structural relaxation, and possibly in dynamics of other low-molecular-weight liquids. PMID:25422420

  6. Anomalously large isotope effect in the glass transition of water

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gainaru, Catalin; Agapov, Alexander L.; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Nelson, Helge; Köster, Karsten W.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Böhmer, Roland; et al

    2014-11-24

    Here we present the discovery of an unusually large isotope effect in the structural relaxation and the glass transition temperature Tg of water. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of low-density as well as of vapor deposited amorphous water reveal Tg differences of 10±2K between H2O and D2O, sharply contrasting with other hydrogen bonded liquids for which H/D exchange increases Tg by typically less than 1K. We show that the large isotope effect and the unusual variation of relaxation times in water at low temperatures can be explained in terms of quantum effects. Thus, our findings shed new light on water's peculiar low-temperaturemore » dynamics and the possible role of quantum effects in its structural relaxation, and possibly in dynamics of other low molecular weight liquids.« less

  7. Anomalously large isotope effect in the glass transition of water

    SciTech Connect

    Gainaru, Catalin; Agapov, Alexander L.; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Nelson, Helge; Köster, Karsten W.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Böhmer, Roland; Loerting, Thomas; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2014-11-24

    Here we present the discovery of an unusually large isotope effect in the structural relaxation and the glass transition temperature Tg of water. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of low-density as well as of vapor deposited amorphous water reveal Tg differences of 10±2K between H2O and D2O, sharply contrasting with other hydrogen bonded liquids for which H/D exchange increases Tg by typically less than 1K. We show that the large isotope effect and the unusual variation of relaxation times in water at low temperatures can be explained in terms of quantum effects. Thus, our findings shed new light on water's peculiar low-temperature dynamics and the possible role of quantum effects in its structural relaxation, and possibly in dynamics of other low molecular weight liquids.

  8. Nicotine effects on skin: are they positive or negative?

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent

    2004-11-01

    The adverse effects of tobacco on the skin are well known but the role of nicotine is more controversial. Nicotinic receptors are expressed in the skin, on keratinocytes, fibroblasts and blood vessels. Nicotine induces vasoconstriction associated with local hyperaemia. It inhibits inflammation through effects on central and peripheral nervous system and through direct effect on immune cells. It delays wound healing and accelerates skin aging. The role of nicotine on skin diseases remains unclear. Therapeutic effects of nicotine could be possible and this a new stimulating field of research.

  9. Berry curvature on the fermi surface: anomalous Hall effect as a topological fermi-liquid property.

    PubMed

    Haldane, F D M

    2004-11-12

    The intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in metallic ferromagnets is shown to be controlled by Berry phases accumulated by adiabatic motion of quasiparticles on the Fermi surface, and is purely a Fermi-liquid property, not a bulk Fermi sea property like Landau diamagnetism, as has been previously supposed. Berry phases are a new topological ingredient that must be added to Landau Fermi-liquid theory in the presence of broken inversion or time-reversal symmetry.

  10. Anomalous Nernst effect in the ferromagnetic Kondo lattice Ce3RhSi3.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, M; Lipatov, A; Gribanov, A; Kaczorowski, D

    2013-07-01

    The ferromagnetic heavy fermion compound Ce3RhSi3 was studied by means of electrical resistivity, Hall effect, thermoelectric power and Nernst coefficient measurements. Below T ≈ 30 K, all the transport characteristics were found to behave anomalously as functions of temperature and magnetic field. In particular, the Hall and Nernst coefficients at low temperatures exhibit pronounced and strongly field-dependent maxima, likely possessing the same microscopic origin, which however cannot be captured by available theoretical models.

  11. Revisiting the Anomalous rf Field Penetration into a Warm Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Oleg V. Polomarov; Constantine E. Theodosiou

    2005-06-24

    Radio-frequency [rf] waves do not penetrate into a plasma and are damped within it. The electric field of the wave and plasma current are concentrated near the plasma boundary in a skin layer. Electrons can transport the plasma current away from the skin layer due to their thermal motion. As a result, the width of the skin layer increases when electron temperature effects are taken into account. This phenomenon is called anomalous skin effect. The anomalous penetration of the rf electric field occurs not only for transversely propagating to the plasma boundary wave (inductively coupled plasmas) but also for the wave propagating along the plasma boundary (capacitively coupled plasmas). Such anomalous penetration of the rf field modifies the structure of the capacitive sheath. Recent advances in the nonlinear, non-local theory of the capacitive sheath are reported. It is shown that separating the electric field profile into exponential and non-exponential parts yields an efficient qualitative and quantitative description of the anomalous skin effect in both inductively and capacitively coupled plasma.

  12. Giant Anomalous Hall Effect in the Chiral Antiferromagnet Mn3Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Naoki; Tomita, Takahiro; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    The external field control of antiferromagnetism is a significant subject both for basic science and technological applications. As a useful macroscopic response to detect magnetic states, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is known for ferromagnets, but it has never been observed in antiferromagnets until the recent discovery in Mn3Sn . Here we report another example of the AHE in a related antiferromagnet, namely, in the hexagonal chiral antiferromagnet Mn3Ge . Our single-crystal study reveals that Mn3Ge exhibits a giant anomalous Hall conductivity |σx z|˜60 Ω-1 cm-1 at room temperature and approximately 380 Ω-1 cm-1 at 5 K in zero field, reaching nearly half of the value expected for the quantum Hall effect per atomic layer with Chern number of unity. Our detailed analyses on the anisotropic Hall conductivity indicate that in comparison with the in-plane-field components |σx z| and |σz y|, which are very large and nearly comparable in size, we find |σy x| obtained in the field along the c axis to be much smaller. The anomalous Hall effect shows a sign reversal with the rotation of a small magnetic field less than 0.1 T. The soft response of the AHE to magnetic field should be useful for applications, for example, to develop switching and memory devices based on antiferromagnets.

  13. Anomalously increased effective thermal conductivities of ethylene glycol-based nanofluids containing copper nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J. A.; Choi, S. U. S.; Li, S.; Yu, W.; Thompson, L. J.

    2001-02-05

    It is shown that a ''nanofluid'' consisting of copper nanometer-sized particles dispersed in ethylene glycol has a much higher effective thermal conductivity than either pure ethylene glycol or ethylene glycol containing the same volume fraction of dispersed oxide nanoparticles. The effective thermal conductivity of ethylene glycol is shown to be increased by up to 40% for a nanofluid consisting of ethylene glycol containing approximately 0.3 vol% Cu nanoparticles of mean diameter <10 nm. The results are anomalous based on previous theoretical calculations that had predicted a strong effect of particle shape on effective nanofluid thermal conductivity, but no effect of either particle size or particle thermal conductivity.

  14. Anomalous Hall effect in NiPt thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golod, T.; Rydh, A.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2011-08-01

    We have studied the Hall effect in sputtered NixPt1-x thin films with different Ni concentrations. Temperature, magnetic field, and angular dependencies are analyzed and the phase diagram of NiPt thin films is obtained. It is found that films with sub-critical Ni concentration exhibit cluster-glass behavior at low temperatures with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy below the freezing temperature. Films with super-critical Ni concentration are ferromagnetic with parallel anisotropy. At the critical concentration the state of the film is strongly frustrated. Such films demonstrate canted magnetization with the easy axis rotating as a function of temperature. The magnetism appears via consecutive paramagnetic-cluster glass-ferromagnetic transitions, rather than a single second-order phase transition. But most remarkably, the extraordinary Hall effect changes sign at the critical concentration. We suggest that this is associated with a reconstruction of the electronic structure of the alloy at the normal metal-ferromagnet quantum phase transition.

  15. Chemical reaction at ferromagnet/oxide interface and its influence on anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Wei; Teng, Jiao E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xi; Li, Xu-Jing; Feng, Chun; Wang, Hai-Cheng; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Wu, Zheng-Long

    2014-09-08

    Chemical reactions at the ferromagnet/oxide interface in [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO and [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayers before and after annealing were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that Fe atoms at the Fe/MgO interface were completely oxidized in the as-grown state and significantly deoxidized after vacuum annealing. However, only some of the Fe atoms at the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interface were oxidized and rarely deoxidized after annealing. The anomalous Hall effect was modified by this interfacial chemical reaction. The saturation anomalous Hall resistance (R{sub xy}) was greatly increased in the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO multilayers after annealing and was 350% higher than that in the as-deposited film, while R{sub xy} of the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer only increased 10% after annealing.

  16. Ab initio theory of the scattering-independent anomalous Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Weischenberg, Jürgen; Freimuth, Frank; Sinova, Jairo; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2011-09-01

    We report on first-principles calculations of the side-jump contribution to the anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) directly from the electronic structure of a perfect crystal. We implemented our approach for a short-range scattering disorder model within the density functional theory and computed the full scattering-independent AHC in elemental bcc Fe, hcp Co, fcc Ni, and L1(0) FePd and FePt alloys. The full AHC thus calculated agrees systematically with experiment to a degree unattainable so far, correctly capturing the previously missing elements of side-jump contributions, hence paving the way to a truly predictive theory of the anomalous Hall effect and turning it from a characterization tool to a probing tool of multiband complex electronic band structures.

  17. Engineering the quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene with uniaxial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, G. S.; Guassi, M. R.; Qu, F.

    2013-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the manipulation of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in graphene by means of the uniaxial strain. The values of Chern number and Hall conductance demonstrate that the strained graphene in presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and exchange field, for vanishing intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, possesses non-trivial topological phase, which is robust against the direction and modulus of the strain. Besides, we also find that the interplay between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit couplings results in a topological phase transition in the strained graphene. Remarkably, as the strain strength is increased beyond approximately 7%, the critical parameters of the exchange field for triggering the quantum anomalous Hall phase transition show distinct behaviors—decrease (increase) for strains along zigzag (armchair) direction. Our findings open up a new platform for manipulation of the QAHE by an experimentally accessible strain deformation of the graphene structure, with promising application on novel quantum electronic devices with high efficiency.

  18. Effect of skin-transmitted vibration enhancement on vibrotactile perception.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Yuichiro; Sano, Akihito

    2015-06-01

    Vibration on skin elicited by the mechanical interaction of touch between the skin and an object propagates to skin far from the point of contact. This paper investigates the effect of skin-transmitted vibration on vibrotactile perception. To enhance the transmission of high-frequency vibration on the skin, stiff tape was attached to the skin so that the tape covered the bottom surface of the index finger from the periphery of the distal interphalangeal joint to the metacarpophalangeal joint. Two psychophysical experiments with high-frequency vibrotactile stimuli of 250 Hz were conducted. In the psychophysical experiments, discrimination and detection thresholds were estimated and compared between conditions of the presence or the absence of the tape (normal bare finger). A method of limits was applied for the detection threshold estimation, and the discrimination task using a reference stimulus and six test stimuli with different amplitudes was applied for the discrimination threshold estimation. The stimulation was given to bare fingertips of participants. Result showed that the detection threshold was enhanced by attaching the tape, and the discrimination threshold enhancement by attaching the tape was confirmed for participants who have relatively large discrimination threshold under normal bare finger. Then, skin-transmitted vibration was measured with an accelerometer with the psychophysical experiments. Result showed that the skin-transmitted vibration when the tape was attached to the skin was larger than that when normal bare skin. There is a correlation between the increase in skin-transmitted vibration and the enhancement of the discrimination threshold.

  19. Prediction of Near-Room-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect on Honeycomb Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binghai; Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun

    2015-03-01

    Recently, this long-sought quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in the magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (~ 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, which are found to be 2D topological insulators, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV, respectively. The ferromagnetic order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and consequently an ferromagnetic insulator with large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions. We thank the helpful discussions with C. Felser, S. Kanugo, C.-X. Liu, Z. Wang, Y. Xu, K. Wu, and Y. Zhou.

  20. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Ajaya K; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)(-1) at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)(-1) at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)(-1), comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect-based data storage devices.

  1. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Ajaya K; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)(-1) at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)(-1) at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)(-1), comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect-based data storage devices. PMID:27152355

  2. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  3. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajaya K.; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C.; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)−1 at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)−1 at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)−1, comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect–based data storage devices. PMID:27152355

  4. Skin moisturizing effects of panthenol-based formulations.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Flávio B; Gaspar, Lorena R; Maia Campos, Patrícia M B G

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the skin moisturizing efficacy of formulations containing different concentrations of panthenol. Formulations supplemented with or without 0.5%, 1.0%, or 5.0% panthenol were applied daily to the forearms of healthy subjects. Skin conditions in terms of moisture and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were analyzed before and after 15- and 30-day periods of application. The formulations were also applied after skin washing with sodium laureth sulphate (SLES) to evaluate the immediate effects on TEWL and skin moisture. Panthenol-containing formulations (1.0% and 5.0%) produced significant decreases in TEWL after 30-day applications. In skin washed with SLES, significant reduction of TEWL was evident two hours after application of formulations loaded with panthenol when compared with control and vehicle. It is concluded that skin integrity is maintained by the improved protective effect of 1.0% panthenol added to the formulation. PMID:21982351

  5. Anisotropic intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in ordered 3dPt alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2011-07-01

    By performing first-principles calculations, we investigate the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) and its anisotropy in ordered L10 FePt, CoPt, and NiPt ferromagnets and their intermediate alloys. We demonstrate that the AHC in this family of compounds depends strongly on the direction of the magnetization M in the crystal. We predict that such pronounced orientational dependence in combination with the general decreasing trend of the AHC when going from FePt to NiPt leads to a sign change of the AHC upon rotating the magnetization direction in the crystal of CoPt alloy. We also suggest that, for a range of concentration x in CoxNi1-xPt and FexCo1-xPt alloys, it is possible to achieve a complete quenching of the anomalous Hall current for a certain direction of the magnetization in the crystal. By analyzing the spin-resolved AHC in 3dPt alloys, we endeavor to relate the overall trend of the AHC in these compounds to the changes in their densities of d states around the Fermi energy upon varying the atomic number. Moreover, we show the generality of the phenomenon of anisotropic anomalous Hall effect by demonstrating its occurrence within the three-band tight-binding model.

  6. Anomalous coupling, top-mass and parton-shower effects in W + W - production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Plätzer, S.; Reuschle, C.; von Soden-Fraunhofen, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the process ppto {W}+{W}-to {e}+{ν}_e{μ}-{overline{ν}}_{μ } at NLO QCD, including also effective field theory (EFT) operators mediating the ggW + W - interaction, which first occur at dimension eight. We further combine the NLO and EFT matrix elements produced by G oS am with the H erwig7/M atchbox framework, which offers the possibility to study the impact of a parton shower. We assess the effects of the anomalous couplings by comparing them to top-mass effects as well as uncertainties related to variations of the renormalisation, factorisation and hard shower scales.

  7. Ice Ih anomalies: Thermal contraction, anomalous volume isotope effect, and pressure-induced amorphization.

    PubMed

    Salim, Michael A; Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Hirata, So

    2016-05-28

    Ice Ih displays several anomalous thermodynamic properties such as thermal contraction at low temperatures, an anomalous volume isotope effect (VIE) rendering the volume of D2O ice greater than that of H2O ice, and a pressure-induced transition to the high-density amorphous (HDA) phase. Furthermore, the anomalous VIE increases with temperature, despite its quantum-mechanical origin. Here, embedded-fragment ab initio second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theory in the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) is applied to the Gibbs energy of an infinite, proton-disordered crystal of ice Ih at wide ranges of temperatures and pressures. The quantum effect of nuclei moving in anharmonic potentials is taken into account from first principles without any empirical or nonsystematic approximation to either the electronic or vibrational Hamiltonian. MP2 predicts quantitatively correctly the thermal contraction at low temperatures, which is confirmed to originate from the volume-contracting hydrogen-bond bending modes (acoustic phonons). It qualitatively reproduces (but underestimates) the thermal expansion at higher temperatures, caused by the volume-expanding hydrogen-bond stretching (and to a lesser extent librational) modes. The anomalous VIE is found to be the result of subtle cancellations among closely competing isotope effects on volume from all modes. Consequently, even ab initio MP2 with the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets has difficulty reproducing this anomaly, yielding qualitatively varied predictions of the sign of the VIE depending on such computational details as the choice of the embedding field. However, the temperature growth of the anomalous VIE is reproduced robustly and is ascribed to the librational modes. These solid-state MP2 calculations, as well as MP2 Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, find a volume collapse and a loss of symmetry and long-range order in ice Ih upon pressure loading of 2.35 GPa or higher. Concomitantly, rapid softening of

  8. Ice Ih anomalies: Thermal contraction, anomalous volume isotope effect, and pressure-induced amorphization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Michael A.; Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Hirata, So

    2016-05-01

    Ice Ih displays several anomalous thermodynamic properties such as thermal contraction at low temperatures, an anomalous volume isotope effect (VIE) rendering the volume of D2O ice greater than that of H2O ice, and a pressure-induced transition to the high-density amorphous (HDA) phase. Furthermore, the anomalous VIE increases with temperature, despite its quantum-mechanical origin. Here, embedded-fragment ab initio second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theory in the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) is applied to the Gibbs energy of an infinite, proton-disordered crystal of ice Ih at wide ranges of temperatures and pressures. The quantum effect of nuclei moving in anharmonic potentials is taken into account from first principles without any empirical or nonsystematic approximation to either the electronic or vibrational Hamiltonian. MP2 predicts quantitatively correctly the thermal contraction at low temperatures, which is confirmed to originate from the volume-contracting hydrogen-bond bending modes (acoustic phonons). It qualitatively reproduces (but underestimates) the thermal expansion at higher temperatures, caused by the volume-expanding hydrogen-bond stretching (and to a lesser extent librational) modes. The anomalous VIE is found to be the result of subtle cancellations among closely competing isotope effects on volume from all modes. Consequently, even ab initio MP2 with the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets has difficulty reproducing this anomaly, yielding qualitatively varied predictions of the sign of the VIE depending on such computational details as the choice of the embedding field. However, the temperature growth of the anomalous VIE is reproduced robustly and is ascribed to the librational modes. These solid-state MP2 calculations, as well as MP2 Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, find a volume collapse and a loss of symmetry and long-range order in ice Ih upon pressure loading of 2.35 GPa or higher. Concomitantly, rapid softening of

  9. Target Neutron Skin Effect on Projectile Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforest, R.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D. J.; Winchester, E.; Delafield, R.; Guzman, S. J.; Yennello, S.

    1998-04-01

    Several experimental observables have concluded that projectile fragmentation occurs as a two step process, excitation followed by the sequential decay of the quasi-projectile. However, recent measurements [1] have shown that neutron rich fragments are emitted with smaller velocities than what is expected from the decay of the projectile. A direct breakup mechanism for projectile fragmentation was suggested to explain the data. This direct breakup component depends on the number of neutrons at the zone of contact between the target and the projectile. Experimental data from the reactions of ^28Si on ^112,124Sn targets at 50A MeV were used to study the effect of the neutron skin of the target on projectile fragmentation and on energy dissipation in peripheral collisions. The FAUST forward array was used to detect fragments in the angular range between 1.6 to 33.6 degrees. It is composed of 68 high resolution Si-Csi(Tl) telescopes that allows for isotope identification. It is seen that the neutron rich target yields more neutron rich fragments and a lower fragment multiplicity. This confirms the importance of the direct breakup component. Proton kinetic energy spectra were also different for the two targets. This experimental information can shed some light on the isospin dependence of the equation of state. [1] R. Charity et al., Phys. Rev. C52 (1995) 1.

  10. The framing effect and skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and to finally reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM) on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e., decision processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs) while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e., whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa. PMID:26300747

  11. The framing effect and skin conductance responses.

    PubMed

    Ring, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and to finally reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM) on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e., decision processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs) while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e., whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa. PMID:26300747

  12. Anomalous Josephson Effect in Junctions with Rashba Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Konstantin; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia

    2015-03-01

    We study two-dimensional double-barrier SINIS Josephson junctions in which the inversion symmetry in the normal part is broken by Rashba spin-orbit coupling. In the presence of a suitably oriented Zeeman field in the normal part, the system displays the anomalous Josephson effect: the current is nonzero even at zero phase difference between two superconductors. We investigate this effect by means of the Ginzburg-Landau formalism and microscopic Green's functions approach in the clean limit. This work was supported in part by the Grants No. ANR-12-BS04-0016-03 and an EU-FP7 Marie Curie IRG.

  13. Caffeine effects on resting-state electrodermal levels in AD/HD suggest an anomalous arousal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert J; Clarke, Adam R; McCarthy, Rory; Selikowitz, Mark; MacDonald, Brett; Dupuy, Franca E

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a single oral dose of caffeine was examined in a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled repeated-measures cross-over study. Eighteen children with AD/HD, aged between 8 and 13 years, were individually age- and gender-matched with a control group. All children participated in two sessions, one week apart. Skin conductance level (SCL) from a 3 min eyes-closed epoch, commencing 30 min after ingestion of caffeine or placebo, was examined. Across conditions, mean SCL was lower in the AD/HD group than controls, confirming hypoarousal in AD/HD. Caffeine produced an increase in SCL, and this increase did not differ between the groups. However, arousal increases were dose-dependent in controls, but not in AD/HD. Rather, caffeine-induced arousal increases in the AD/HD group were positively related to their hyperactivity/impulsivity levels. This suggests an anomalous arousal mechanism in AD/HD functionally related to impairment in one symptom dimension. PMID:22266163

  14. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young; Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  15. Extremely large magnetoresistance and magnetic logic by coupling semiconductor nonlinear transport effect and anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhong; Luo, Zhaochu

    Size limitation of silicon FET hinders the further scaling down of silicon based CPU. To solve this problem, spin based magnetic logic devices were proposed but almost all of them could not be realized experimentally except for NOT logic operation. A magnetic field controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic using InSb was reported. However, InSb is very expensive and not compatible with the silicon technology. Based on our Si based magnetoresistance (MR) device, we developed a Si based reconfigurable magnetic logic device, which could do all four Boolean logic operations including AND, OR, NOR and NAND. By coupling nonlinear transport effect of semiconductor and anomalous Hall effect of magnetic material, we propose a PMA material based MR device with a remarkable non local MR of >20000 % at ~1 mT. Based on this MR device, we further developed a PMA material based magnetic logic device which could do all four Boolean logic operations. This makes it possible that magnetic material does both memory and logic. This may result in a memory-logic integrated system leading to a non von Neumann computer

  16. Calendula extract: effects on mechanical parameters of human skin.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Naveed; Zaman, Shahiq Uz; Khan, Barkat Ali; Amir, Muhammad Naeem; Ebrahimzadeh, Muhammad Ali

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of newly formulated topical cream of Calendula officinalis extract on the mechanical parameters of the skin by using the cutometer. The Cutometer 580 MPA is a device that is designed to measure the mechanical properties of the skin in response to the application of negative pressure. This non-invasive method can be useful for objective and quantitative investigation of age related changes in skin, skin elasticity, skin fatigue, skin hydration, and evaluation of the effects of cosmetic and antiaging topical products. Two creams (base and formulation) were prepared for the study. Both the creams were applied to the cheeks of 21 healthy human volunteers for a period of eight weeks. Every individual was asked to come on week 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 and measurements were taken by using Cutometer MPA 580 every week. Different mechanical parameters of the skin measured by the cutometer were; R0, R1, R2, R5, R6, R7, and R8. These were then evaluated statistically to measure the effects produced by these creams. Using ANOVA, and t-test it was found that R0, and R6 were significant (p <0.05) whereas R1, R2, R5, R7, R8 were insignificant (p > 0.05). The instrumental measurements produced by formulation reflected significant improvements in hydration and firmness of skin.

  17. Nonadiabatic effects in ultracold molecules via anomalous linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts.

    PubMed

    McGuyer, B H; Osborn, C B; McDonald, M; Reinaudi, G; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2013-12-13

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold 88Sr2 molecules near the intercombination-line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to nearby opposite f-parity states and exhibit fourth-order corrections, providing a stringent test of a state-of-the-art ab initio model. PMID:24483652

  18. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-11

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. In conclusion, we propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  19. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-01

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. We propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  20. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low-temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. We suggest that both hysteretic MR and AHE arise from the formation of complex non-coplanar structures at magnetic domain walls. Current address: Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University.

  1. The Anomalous Zeeman Effect for the Hydrogen Atom in Noncommutative Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Willien O.; Souza, Andre M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Hamiltonian describing an anomalous Zeeman effect for the hydrogen atom on noncommutative space is studied using a Bopp's shift. Using first order perturbation theory, the correction to the energy is calculated for the case of a weak external magnetic field. We also obtained the orbital and spin g-factors in noncommutative space. We show that the experimental values for the orbital and spin g-factors put an upper bound on the magnitude of the parameter of noncommutativity of the order of, respectively, Θ≤(8 GeV)-2 and Θ≤(0.01 GeV)-2.

  2. Comparison of anomalous Doppler resonance effects with molybdenum and graphite limiters on HT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Gao, X.; Ling, B. L.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, S. B.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Li, E. Z.

    2012-03-01

    The material of limiter in HT-7 tokamak was changed from graphite to molybdenum in the last experimental campaign. The pitch angle scattering of runaway electrons due to anomalous Doppler resonance effects was observed. The experimental results agree very well with the stable boundary condition expected from the linear resistive theory but only agree with that from the nonlinear evolutionary of runaway-electron distribution theory in low electric field region. The current carried by runaway electrons is the same under different limiter conditions.

  3. Nonadiabatic effects in ultracold molecules via anomalous linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts.

    PubMed

    McGuyer, B H; Osborn, C B; McDonald, M; Reinaudi, G; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2013-12-13

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold 88Sr2 molecules near the intercombination-line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to nearby opposite f-parity states and exhibit fourth-order corrections, providing a stringent test of a state-of-the-art ab initio model.

  4. Global Constraints on Anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings in the Effective Field Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of LHC Higgs data (signal strengths) together with LEP-2 W W production measurements. To characterize possible deviations from the standard model (SM) predictions, we employ the framework of an effective field theory (EFT) where the SM is extended by higher-dimensional operators suppressed by the mass scale of new physics Λ . The analysis is performed consistently at the order Λ-2 in the EFT expansion keeping all the relevant operators. While the two data sets suffer from flat directions, together they impose stringent model-independent constraints on the anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  5. Comparison of anomalous Doppler resonance effects with molybdenum and graphite limiters on HT-7

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. M.; Gao, X.; Ling, B. L.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, S. B.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Li, E. Z.

    2012-01-01

    The material of limiter in HT-7 tokamak was changed from graphite to molybdenum in the last experimental campaign. The pitch angle scattering of runaway electrons due to anomalous Doppler resonance effects was observed. The experimental results agree very well with the stable boundary condition expected from the linear resistive theory but only agree with that from the nonlinear evolutionary of runaway-electron distribution theory in low electric field region. The current carried by runaway electrons is the same under different limiter conditions. PMID:22509090

  6. Global Constraints on Anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings in the Effective Field Theory Approach.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of LHC Higgs data (signal strengths) together with LEP-2 WW production measurements. To characterize possible deviations from the standard model (SM) predictions, we employ the framework of an effective field theory (EFT) where the SM is extended by higher-dimensional operators suppressed by the mass scale of new physics Λ. The analysis is performed consistently at the order Λ(-2) in the EFT expansion keeping all the relevant operators. While the two data sets suffer from flat directions, together they impose stringent model-independent constraints on the anomalous triple gauge couplings. PMID:26799011

  7. Sensory neuropeptide effects in human skin.

    PubMed

    Fuller, R W; Conradson, T B; Dixon, C M; Crossman, D C; Barnes, P J

    1987-12-01

    1 Neuropeptides released from sensory nerves may account for cutaneous flare and wheal following local trauma. In 28 normal subjects we have studied the effects of four sensory neuropeptides given by intradermal injection on the forearm or back. 2 All peptides caused a flare distant from the site of injection, presumably due to an axon reflex. Substance P (SP) was the most potent (geometric mean dose causing 50% of maximum flare, 4.2 pmol). Neurokinin A (NKA) was the next most potent with neurokinin B (NKB) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the least. The distant flare response to SP, NKA and NKB was maximal at 5 min and disappeared within 2 h. 3 CGRP caused a local erythema over the site of injection at doses above 0.5 pmol which at higher doses lasted for up to 12 h. 4 SP, NKA and NKB caused wheals at doses above 5 pmol with SP and NKB being the most potent. CGRP (up to 250 pmol) did not consistently cause wheal formation. There was no significant effect of coinjection of CGRP upon the response to SP although there was a tendency for an enhancement of the wheal response. 5 The H1-histamine antagonist terfenadine (60 mg orally) significantly inhibited the wheal and distant flare response to histamine (5 nmol) and NKA, but not that caused by NKB. The distant flare of CGRP was also reduced but the local erythema was unaltered. 6. Aspirin (600 mg orally) significantly inhibited the distant flare response to SP, NKA and CGRP, but not that caused by NKB or histamine; the local erythema induced by CGRP was unaffected by aspirin. Aspirin also inhibited the wheal formed by NKA but not the wheal induced by the other substances. 7. These results suggest that tachykinins cause a distant flare response partially via the release of histamine and cyclo-oxygenase products, but cause a wheal by a direct effect on the skin microvasculature. The order of potency SP > NKB > NKA suggests that an SPp or NK, receptor is involved in the wheal response. CGRP by contrast has a

  8. Quantum phase transitions and anomalous Hall effect in a pyrochlore Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grefe, Sarah; Ding, Wenxin; Si, Qimiao

    The metallic variant of the pyrochlore iridates Pr2Ir2O7 has shown characteristics of a possible chiral spin liquid state [PRL 96 087204 (2006), PRL 98, 057203 (2007), Nature 463, 210 (2010)] and quantum criticality [Nat. Mater. 13, 356 (2014)]. An important question surrounding the significant anomalous Hall response observed in Pr2Ir2O7 is the nature of the f-electron local moments, including their Kondo coupling with the conduction d-electrons. The heavy effective mass and related thermodynamic characteristics indicate the involvement of the Kondo effect in this system's electronic properties. In this work, we study the effects of Kondo coupling on candidate time-reversal-symmetry-breaking spin liquid states on the pyrochlore lattice. Representing the f-moments as slave fermions Kondo-coupled to conduction electrons, we study the competition between Kondo-singlet formation and chiral spin correlations and determine the zero-temperature phase diagram. We derive an effective chiral interaction between the local moments and the conduction electrons and calculate the anomalous Hall response across the quantum phase transition from the Kondo destroyed phase to the Kondo screened phase. We discuss our results' implications for Pr2Ir2O7 and related frustrated Kondo-lattice systems.

  9. The giant anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnet Fe3Sn2--a frustrated kagome metal.

    PubMed

    Kida, T; Fenner, L A; Dee, A A; Terasaki, I; Hagiwara, M; Wills, A S

    2011-03-23

    The kagome-bilayer material Fe(3)Sn(2) has recently been shown to be an example of a rare class of magnet-a frustrated ferromagnetic metal. While the magnetism of Fe(3)Sn(2) appears to be relatively simple at high temperature, with localized moments parallel to the c-axis (T(C) = 640 K), upon cooling the competing exchange interactions and spin frustration become apparent as they cause the moments to become non-collinear and to rotate towards the kagome plane, forming firstly a canted ferromagnetic structure and then a re-entrant spin glass (T(f) approximately equal 80 K). In this work we show that Fe(3)Sn(2) possesses an unusual anomalous Hall effect. The saturated Hall resistivity of Fe(3)Sn(2) is 3.2 µΩ cm at 300 K, almost 20 times higher than that of typical itinerant ferromagnets such as Fe and Ni. The anomalous Hall coefficient R(s) is 6.7 × 10(-9) Ω cm G(-1) at 300 K, which is three orders of magnitude larger than that of pure Fe, and obeys an unconventional scaling with the longitudinal resistivity, ρ(xx), of R(s) is proportional to ρ(xx)(3.15). Such a relationship cannot be explained by either the conventional skew or side-jump mechanisms, indicating that the anomalous Hall effect in Fe(3)Sn(2) has an extraordinary origin that is presumed to be related to the underlying frustration of the magnetism. These findings demonstrate that frustrated ferromagnets, whether based on bulk materials or on artificial nanoscale structures, can provide new routes to room temperature spin-dependent electron transport properties suited to application in spintronics.

  10. Drug cutaneous side effect: focus on skin ulceration.

    PubMed

    D'Epiro, S; Salvi, M; Luzi, A; Mattozzi, C; Luci, C; Macaluso, L; Marzocca, F; Salvo, V; Cantisani, C; Paolino, G; Calvieri, S; Richetta, A G

    2014-01-01

    Skin ulcers are defined as tissue loss interesting the deeper layers of the dermis and hypodermis, with low tendency to spontaneous healing. They cause disability related to pain, risk of infection and amputation, chronic management, requiring working absence with notably economic burden. The major cause is often related to underlying vascular disease, infections, tumors, autoimmunity, trauma, even if literature occasionally reported several cases of drug inducing skin ulceration. Most of drugs involved are chemotherapy agents and more recently molecular target therapies. Evidences supporting these drugs as the major cause of skin ulcers include delay of onset after therapy initiation, improvement after withdrawal of the drug, recurrence after its reintroduction and, sometimes, simultaneous occurrence of other skin lesions that have previously been reported to be associated with these agents. Attention should be reserved to patients undergoing antineoplastic agents, especially if previously affected by predisposing comorbidities, considering such side effect as possible differential diagnosis for skin ulceration in neoplastic patients. PMID:25203350

  11. Semiclassical wave packet study of anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-10-21

    We applied the semiclassical initial value representation method to calculate energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of scattering resonances in a two-dimensional potential for O+O2 collision. Such scattering states represent the metastable O3* species and play a central role in the process of ozone formation. Autocorrelation functions for scattering states were computed and then analyzed using the Prony method, which permits one to extract accurate energies and widths of the resonances. We found that the results of the semiclassical wave packet propagation agree well with fully quantum results. The focus was on the 16O16O18O isotopomer and the anomalous isotope effect associated with formation of this molecule, either through the 16O16O+18O or the 16O+16O18O channels. An interesting correlation between the local vibration mode character of the metastable states and their lifetimes was observed and explained. New insight is obtained into the mechanism by which the long-lived resonances in the delta zero-point energy part of spectrum produce the anomalously large isotope effect.

  12. Large anomalous Hall effect in Pt interfaced with perpendicular anisotropy ferrimagnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi; Sellappan, Pathikumar; Liu, Yawen; Garay, Javier; Shi, Jing; Shines Team

    We demonstrate the strain induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a ferrimagnetic insulator (FMI), Tm3Fe5O12 (TIG) and the first observation of large anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in TIG/Pt bilayers. Atomically flat TIG films were deposited by a laser molecular beam epitaxy system on (111)-orientated substituted gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. The strength of PMA could be effectively tuned by controlling the oxygen pressure during deposition. Sharp squared anomalous Hall hysteresis loops were observed in bilayers of TIG/Pt over a range of thicknesses of Pt, with the maximum AHE conductivity reaching 1 S/cm at room temperature. The AHE vanishes when a 5 nm Cu layer was inserted between Pt and TIG, strongly indicating the proximity-induced ferromagnetism in Pt. The large AHE in the bilayer structures demonstrates a potential use of PMA-FMI related heterostructures in spintronics. This work was supported as part of the SHINES, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # SC0012670.

  13. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Infrared Signature Suppression of Aircraft Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jian Wei; Wang, Qiang; Kwon, Oh Joon

    During typical supersonic cruising, the temperature of the aircraft skin rises above 300 K due to aerodynamic heating. In this situation, aircraft-skin infrared (IR) suppression, used to minimize the radiation contrast from the background is a crucial survival technology. In the present study, a technique to evaluate the effectiveness of IR suppression of aircraft skin is proposed. For this purpose, a synthetic procedure based on numerical simulations has been developed. In this procedure, the thermal status of aircraft skin is obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for complex aircraft geometries. An IR signature model is proposed using a reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) technique. The detection range and the IR contrast are adopted as the performance indicators for the evaluation of the aircraft IR suppression. The influence of these factors related to the aircraft-skin radiation, such as aircraft-skin emissivity, surface temperature distribution and flight speed, on the IR contrast and the detection range is also studied. As a test case, the effectiveness of various IR suppression schemes was analyzed for a typical air combat situation. Then, the method is applied to clarify the contribution of each aircraft component to the IR suppression of the overall IR radiation. The results show that aircraft-skin temperature control and emissivity control are effective means to reduce the IR radiation and to achieve lower detection. The results can be used as a practical guide for designing future stealth aircraft.

  14. Anomalous Hall effect in the prospective spintronic material Eu1-x Gd x O integrated with Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfenov, Oleg E.; Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-06-01

    Remarkable properties of EuO make it a versatile spintronic material. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies of EuO, little is known about the anomalous Hall effect in this ferromagnet. So far, the effect has not been observed in bulk EuO, though has been detected in EuO films with uncontrolled distribution of defects. In the present work doping is taken under control: epitaxial films of Gd-doped EuO are synthesized integrated with Si using molecular beam epitaxy and characterized with x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Nanoscale transport studies reveal the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnetic region for samples with different Gd concentration. The saturated anomalous Hall effect conductivity value of 5.0 S·cm-1 in Gd-doped EuO is more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported so far for Eu chalcogenides doped with anion vacancies.

  15. Radiation effects control: Eyes, skin. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, D.; Smathers, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Adverse effects on the lens of the eye and the skin due to exposure to proton radiation during manned space flight were evaluated. Actual proton irradiation which might be encountered in space was simulated. Irradiation regimes included single acute exposures, daily fractionated exposures, and weekly fractionated exposures. Animals were exposed and then maintained and examined periodically until data sufficient to meet the objective were obtained. No significant skin effects were noted and no serious sight impairment was exhibited.

  16. Effect of contraceptives on the skin.

    PubMed

    1988-10-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) affect the skin 3 different ways. They decrease the amount of androgenic hormones produced in the ovaries and adrenal gland. They also limit the quantity of biologically active circulating testosterone. Finally, estrogen markedly decreases oil production in the sebaceous glands. Physicians should prescribe to women with acne a COC that is low in progestogen and high in estrogen. A biphasic pill with no more than 500 mcg norethisterone/day meets these requirements. If a woman is taking systemic antibiotics to treat acne, however, the physician should prescribe a biphasic pill containing 50 mcg ethinyl estradiol. Even though many believe that using COCs causes hair loss, there is little evidence to support it. Nevertheless, if a woman has indeed experienced hair loss, she should take a COC with a high estrogen to progestogen ratio. As in some pregnant women, cholasma may occur in women taking COCs when not protected from sunlight. Physicians need to prescribe the lowest possible dose of hormones in these women and counsel them to shield their face from sunlight. To err on the side of safety, women who have had a malignant melanoma should not use a hormonal contraceptive. In addition, women who have experienced many bouts of skin candidiasis should use an alternative contraceptive. Other skin disorders that they have been found to be more prevalent in women taking COCs include erythema nodosum, accelerated systemic lupus erythematosus, porphyria cutanea tarda, herpes gestationis, spider naevus, and telangiectasia. There also exists an association between dermatitis and barrier methods and spermicides. Some articles have suggested that copper containing IUDs have also cause a variety of skin disorders. PMID:3240155

  17. Assessing the effects of timing irregularities on radio pulsars anomalous braking indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwude, A. E.; Chidi Odo, Finbarr

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the statistical effects of non-discrete timing irregularities on observed radio pulsar braking indices using correlations between the second derivative of the measured anomalous frequency (̈νobs) and some parameters that have been widely used to quantify pulsar timing fluctuations (the timing activity parameter (A), the amount of timing fluctuations absorbed by the cubic term (σR23) and a measure of pulsar rotational stability (σz)) in a large sample of 366 Jodrell Bank Observatory radio pulsars. The result demonstrates that anomalous braking indices are largely artifacts produced by aggregations of fluctuations that occur within or outside the pulsar system. For a subsample of 223 normal radio pulsars whose observed timing activity appeared consistent with instabilities in rotation of the underlying neutron stars (or timing noise) over timescales of ˜ 10 – 40 yr, |̈νobs| strongly correlates (with correlation coefficient |r| ˜ 0.80 – 0.90) with the pulsar timing activity parameters and spin-down properties. On the other hand, no meaningful correlations (r < 0.3) were found between ̈νobs and the timing activity diagnostics and spin-down parameters in the remaining 143 objects, whose timing activity appears significantly dominated by white noise fluctuations. The current result can be better understood if the timing noise in isolated pulsars originates from intrinsic spin-down processes of the underlying neutron stars, but white noise fluctuations largely arise from processes external to the pulsar system.

  18. Assessing the effects of timing irregularities on radio pulsars anomalous braking indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwude, A. E.; Chidi Odo, Finbarr

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the statistical effects of non-discrete timing irregularities on observed radio pulsar braking indices using correlations between the second derivative of the measured anomalous frequency (̈νobs) and some parameters that have been widely used to quantify pulsar timing fluctuations (the timing activity parameter (A), the amount of timing fluctuations absorbed by the cubic term (σR23) and a measure of pulsar rotational stability (σz)) in a large sample of 366 Jodrell Bank Observatory radio pulsars. The result demonstrates that anomalous braking indices are largely artifacts produced by aggregations of fluctuations that occur within or outside the pulsar system. For a subsample of 223 normal radio pulsars whose observed timing activity appeared consistent with instabilities in rotation of the underlying neutron stars (or timing noise) over timescales of ∼ 10 – 40 yr, |̈νobs| strongly correlates (with correlation coefficient |r| ∼ 0.80 – 0.90) with the pulsar timing activity parameters and spin-down properties. On the other hand, no meaningful correlations (r < 0.3) were found between ̈νobs and the timing activity diagnostics and spin-down parameters in the remaining 143 objects, whose timing activity appears significantly dominated by white noise fluctuations. The current result can be better understood if the timing noise in isolated pulsars originates from intrinsic spin-down processes of the underlying neutron stars, but white noise fluctuations largely arise from processes external to the pulsar system.

  19. Anomalous Hall effect in monodisperse CoO-coated Co nanocluster-assembled films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. B.; Mi, W. B.; Wang, L. S.; Zeng, D. Q.; Chen, Y. Z.; Peng, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    We have fabricated the uniform CoO-coated Co nanocluster-assembled films at various oxygen gas flow rates (fO) by using a plasma-gas-condensation method and studied their anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The longitudinal resistivity (ρxx) of all the films exhibits a minimum at a temperature of Tmin. With the increase of fO, Tmin shifts from 150 to 300 K and has no longer change when fO is up to 0.10 sccm. The saturated AHE resistivity (ρxyA) presents a near linear increase as fO rises. The anomalous Hall coefficient (Rs) at fO=0.20 sccm is 4.9×10-9 Ω cm G-1 at 300 K, which is almost three orders of magnitude larger than bulk Co. Moreover, at fO=0 and 0.05 sccm, the scaling exponents γ=1.2 and 1.24 in ρ,SUB>xyA ∝ ρxxγ are obtained in the region of 325-375 K; At fO=0.10, 0.15 and 0.20 sccm, ρxyA decreases with the increase of ρxx on a double-logarithmic scale, following a new scaling relation of log (ρxyA/ρxx) = a0 + b0 log ρxx in two temperature ranges of 5-300 K and 325-375 K.

  20. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Kostenko, M M

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝ δ(t-t')k(4-d-y), where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y. The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant.

  1. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Kostenko, M M

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝ δ(t-t')k(4-d-y), where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y. The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant. PMID:26651785

  2. Quantized topological magnetoelectric effect of the zero-plateau quantum anomalous Hall state

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-08-10

    The topological magnetoelectric effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator is a novel phenomenon, where an electric field induces a magnetic field in the same direction, with a universal coefficient of proportionality quantized in units of $e²/2h$. Here in this paper, we propose that the topological magnetoelectric effect can be realized in the zero-plateau quantum anomalous Hall state of magnetic topological insulators or a ferromagnet-topological insulator heterostructure. The finite-size effect is also studied numerically, where the magnetoelectric coefficient is shown to converge to a quantized value when the thickness of the topological insulator film increases. We further propose a device setup to eliminate nontopological contributions from the side surface.

  3. Quantized topological magnetoelectric effect of the zero-plateau quantum anomalous Hall state

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-08-10

    The topological magnetoelectric effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator is a novel phenomenon, where an electric field induces a magnetic field in the same direction, with a universal coefficient of proportionality quantized in units of $e²/2h$. Here in this paper, we propose that the topological magnetoelectric effect can be realized in the zero-plateau quantum anomalous Hall state of magnetic topological insulators or a ferromagnet-topological insulator heterostructure. The finite-size effect is also studied numerically, where the magnetoelectric coefficient is shown to converge to a quantized value when the thickness of the topological insulator film increases. We further propose a device setupmore » to eliminate nontopological contributions from the side surface.« less

  4. Anomalous memory effect in the breakdown of low-pressure argon in a long discharge tube

    SciTech Connect

    Meshchanov, A. V.; Korshunov, A. N.; Ionikh, Yu. Z.; Dyatko, N. A.

    2015-08-15

    The characteristics of breakdown of argon in a long tube (with a gap length of 75 cm and diameter of 2.8 cm) at pressures of 1 and 5 Torr and stationary discharge currents of 5–40 mA were studied experimentally. The breakdown was initiated by paired positive voltage pulses with a rise rate of ∼10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} V/s and duration of ∼1–10 ms. The time interval between pairs was varied in the range of Τ ∼ 0.1–1 s, and that between pulses in a pair was varied from τ = 0.4 ms to ≈Τ/2. The aim of this work was to detect and study the so-called “anomalous memory effect” earlier observed in breakdown in nitrogen. The effect consists in the dynamic breakdown voltage in the second pulse in a pair being higher than in the first pulse (in contrast to the “normal” memory effect, in which the relation between the breakdown voltages is opposite). It is found that this effect is observed when the time interval between pairs of pulses is such that the first pulse in a pair is in the range of the normal memory effect of the preceding pair (under the given conditions, Τ ≈ 0.1–0.4 s). In this case, at τ ∼ 10 ms, the breakdown voltage of the second pulse is higher than the reduced breakdown voltage of the first pulse. Optical observations of the ionization wave preceding breakdown in a long tube show that, in the range of the anomalous memory effect and at smaller values of τ, no ionization wave is detected before breakdown in the second pulse. A qualitative interpretation of the experimental results is given.

  5. UV doses and skin effects during psoriasis climate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Hernandez-Palacios, Julio; Lilleeng, Mila; Nilsen, Lill Tove; Krogstad, Anne-Lene

    2011-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common autoimmune disease with inflammatory symptoms affecting skin and joints. One way of dealing with psoriasis is by controlled solar UV exposure treatment. However, this treatment should be optimized to get the best possible treatment effect and to limit negative side effects such as erythema and an increased risk of skin cancer. In this study 24 patients at Valle Marina Treatment Center in Gran Canaria were monitored throughout a treatment period of three weeks starting at the beginning of November. The total UV dose to the location was monitored by UV-meters placed on the roof of the treatment centere, and the patients wore individual film dosimeters throughout the treatment period. Skin parameters were accessed by reflection spectroscopy (400-850nm). This paper presents preliminary findings from the skin measurements in the visible part of the spectrum, such as blood oxygenation, erythema and melanin indexes. Reflection spectroscopy was found to be a good tool for such treatment monitoring.

  6. Precise Quantization of the Anomalous Hall Effect near Zero Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Bestwick, A J; Fox, E J; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2015-05-01

    We report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10 000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1  Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration. PMID:26001016

  7. Anomalous Effect of Surface Diffusion on NMR Signal: Tracing the Fiber Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apalkov, Vadym; Edirisinghe, Neranjan; Cymbalyuk, Gennady

    2008-03-01

    We show the strong qualitative effect of the surface diffusion channel on the echo attenuation of the NMR signal from restricted geometry, e.g. fiber system. In some range of parameters of the system the residual echo signal, which is obtained by subtracting the background value, can have anomalous behavior, which means that the echo signal has a maximum value at some finite value of the magnitude of the gradient pulses. This fact can be used to enhance the accuracy of the measurements by studying the echo signal around the maximum value. Effect described here could be also used for tuning the MRI measurements to trace fibers with particular characteristic diameters or for timely detection of changes in the diffusion coefficients and fiber diameters.

  8. Anomalous electron heating effects on the E region ionosphere in TIEGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Oppenheim, Meers; Dimant, Yakov; Wiltberger, Michael; Merkin, Slava

    2016-03-01

    We have recently implemented a new module that includes both the anomalous electron heating and the electron-neutral cooling rate correction associated with the Farley-Buneman Instability (FBI) in the thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamics global circulation model (TIEGCM). This implementation provides, for the first time, a modeling capability to describe macroscopic effects of the FBI on the ionosphere and thermosphere in the context of a first-principle, self-consistent model. The added heating sources primarily operate between 100 and 130 km altitude, and their magnitudes often exceed auroral precipitation heating in the TIEGCM. The induced changes in E region electron temperature in the auroral oval and polar cap by the FBI are remarkable with a maximum Te approaching 2200 K. This is about 4 times larger than the TIEGCM run without FBI heating. This investigation demonstrates how researchers can add the important effects of the FBI to magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere models and simulators.

  9. Analog of the spin-orbit-induced anomalous Hall effect with quantized radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Jonas

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate how the term describing the interaction between a single two-level atom and two cavity field modes may attain a Rashba form. As an outcome, cavity QED provides a testbed for studies of phenomena reminiscent of the spin-orbit induced anomalous Hall effect. The effective magnetic field, deriving from the non-Abelian gauge potentials rendered by the Rashba coupling, induces a transverse force acting on the phase space distributions. Thereby, the phase space distributions build up a transverse motion manifesting itself in spiral trajectories, rather than circular ones obtained for a zero magnetic field as one would acquire for the corresponding Abelian gauge potentials. Utilizing realistic experimental parameters, the phenomenon is numerically verified, ascertain that it should be realizable with current techniques.

  10. Effect of liposomes and niosomes on skin permeation of enoxacin.

    PubMed

    Fang, J Y; Hong, C T; Chiu, W T; Wang, Y Y

    2001-05-21

    The skin permeation and partitioning of a fluorinated quinolone antibacterial agent, enoxacin, in liposomes and niosomes, after topical application, were elucidated in the present study. In vitro percutaneous absorption experiments were performed on nude mouse skin with Franz diffusion cells. The influence of vesicles on the physicochemical property and stability of the formulations were measured. The enhanced delivery across the skin of liposome and niosome encapsulated enoxacin had been observed after selecting the appropriate formulations. The optimized formulations could also reserve a large amount of enoxacin in the skin. A significant relationship between skin permeation and the cumulative amount of enoxacin in the skin was observed. Both permeation enhancer effect and direct vesicle fusion with stratum corneum may contribute to the permeation of enoxacin across skin. Formulation with niosomes demonstrated a higher stability after 48 h incubation compared to liposomes. The inclusion of cholesterol improved the stability of enoxacin liposomes according to the results from encapsulation and turbidity. However, adding negative charges reduced the stability of niosomes. The ability of liposomes and niosomes to modulate drug delivery without significant toxicity makes the two vesicles useful to formulate topical enoxacin.

  11. Effect of passive and iontophoretic skin pretreatments with terpenes on the in vitro skin transport of piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Doliwa, A; Santoyo, S; Ygartua, P

    2001-10-23

    The enhancing effect of several terpenes (thymol, menthone and 1,8-cineole) in the percutaneous permeation of piroxicam (Px), either passive or iontophoretically, was investigated. These terpenes were applied, on the skin membrane, as a passive and iontophoretic skin pretreatment. Px was delivered from carbopol gels containing hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (2% w/w Px). An increase in Px flux values, both passive and iontophoretic after skin pretreatment with 5% terpenes/50% EtOH, was found to be in the following order: thymol>menthone>1,8-cineole. Iontophoretic skin pretreatment with terpenes produced a slight increase in the passive flux of Px, in comparison with the passive skin pretreatment. This result indicated that iontophoresis could modify the skin morphology and consequently, increase the passive transport of Px. However, when Px was transported iontophoretically, passive skin pretreatment with terpenes, produced higher flux values than iontophoretic skin pretreatment. These results could be explained by the fact that with the iontophoretic pretreatment, terpenes could penetrate into the skin and limitate the movement of the ionized species, across the skin, during the iontophoretic experiments. The amount of Px retained in the skin after all experiments was related to flux values across skin. PMID:11604256

  12. Effect of reactive skin decontamination lotion on skin wound healing in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Thomas J; Kauvar, David S; Reeder, Joanna; Baer, David G

    2007-03-01

    Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) is a proposed replacement for the existing skin and equipment decontamination kit. Because RSDL may need to be used to decontaminate wounded personnel, we conducted an assessment of the effect of this agent on wound healing. A skin incision model using male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 19 rats/group) was used. A 7.0-cm incision was made through the skin, and RSDL was (experimental group) or was not (control group) applied to the open wound; the wound edges were then approximated with sutures. Seven days later, animals were euthanized and wound samples were taken. Healing was assessed by measuring mechanical strength, collagen content, and histological appearance. RSDL-treated wounds had 23% lower tensile strength (p < 0.05) and 11% lower collagen content (p < 0.05) than did the untreated control wounds. Histological assessments did not differ significantly between groups. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the application of RSDL directly to an open wound impairs wound strength and decreases collagen content in the early phases of wound healing. This may have clinical implications for the treatment and outcomes of chemical casualty combat trauma.

  13. Effect of reactive skin decontamination lotion on skin wound healing in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Thomas J; Kauvar, David S; Reeder, Joanna; Baer, David G

    2007-03-01

    Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) is a proposed replacement for the existing skin and equipment decontamination kit. Because RSDL may need to be used to decontaminate wounded personnel, we conducted an assessment of the effect of this agent on wound healing. A skin incision model using male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 19 rats/group) was used. A 7.0-cm incision was made through the skin, and RSDL was (experimental group) or was not (control group) applied to the open wound; the wound edges were then approximated with sutures. Seven days later, animals were euthanized and wound samples were taken. Healing was assessed by measuring mechanical strength, collagen content, and histological appearance. RSDL-treated wounds had 23% lower tensile strength (p < 0.05) and 11% lower collagen content (p < 0.05) than did the untreated control wounds. Histological assessments did not differ significantly between groups. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the application of RSDL directly to an open wound impairs wound strength and decreases collagen content in the early phases of wound healing. This may have clinical implications for the treatment and outcomes of chemical casualty combat trauma. PMID:17436779

  14. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect. PMID:27418293

  15. Anomalous effects of dopant distribution in Ge single crystals grown by FZ-technique aboard spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, A. V.; Kopeliovich, E. S.; Mil'vidskii, M. G.; Rakov, V. V.

    1999-09-01

    The gallium distribution in nine germanium single crystals, all grown with similar heat conditions using the floating zone (FZ) method aboard five unmanned "Photon" spacecrafts (SC), from melts doped from 1×10 18 to 1×10 20 at/cm 3 are studied. For the first time, the strong anomalous concentration dependence of the distribution coefficient (from 0.16 to 0.089, respectively), having no "earth" analogue, was revealed experimentally as a result of comparative studies of space-grown and reference crystals. It also was shown, that the revealed dependence can completely define the longitudinal dopant distribution profile in a single crystal. The hypothesis of the nature of the observed effect was proposed, which consists of an intensification of the mixing processes in the heavily doped molten zone, restricted by free surface, caused by an increase of the surface-active impurity content in reduced gravity.

  16. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  17. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect. PMID:27418293

  18. Anomalous Long-Range Proximity Effect in Template-Fabricated Single-Crystal Superconducting Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenhao; Liu, Haidong; Ye, Zuxin; Luo, Zhiping; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.

    2008-03-01

    We report an anomalous proximity effect observed in single-crystal nanowires of Zn, Sn, and Pb of length up to 60 μm. These nanowires were electrochemically deposited into the pores of anodic aluminum oxide membranes and polycarbonate membranes. Using an in situ self-contacting method, single nanowires were electrically contacted on both ends to a pair of macroscopic film electrodes of Au, Sn, and Pb pre-fabricated on both surfaces of the membranes. We observed that superconductivity in the nanowires was strongly suppressed when Au electrodes were used. When superconducting electrodes with higher transition temperatures were used, the nanowires became superconducting at the transition temperatures of the electrodes. We will present measurements of the sample resistance and the I-V characteristics at various temperatures and magnetic fields. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses of the structure and the composition of the nanowires will also be presented.

  19. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect.

  20. Observation of an anomalous decoherence effect in a quantum bath at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pu; Kong, Xi; Zhao, Nan; Shi, Fazhan; Wang, Pengfei; Rong, Xing; Liu, Ren-Bao; Du, Jiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    The decoherence of quantum objects is a critical issue in quantum science and technology. It is generally believed that stronger noise causes faster decoherence. Strikingly, recent theoretical work suggests that under certain conditions, the opposite is true for spins in quantum baths. Here we report an experimental observation of an anomalous decoherence effect for the electron spin-1 of a nitrogen-vacancy centre in high-purity diamond at room temperature. We demonstrate that, under dynamical decoupling, the double-transition can have longer coherence time than the single-transition even though the former couples to the nuclear spin bath as twice strongly as the latter does. The excellent agreement between the experimental and theoretical results confirms the controllability of the weakly coupled nuclear spins in the bath, which is useful in quantum information processing and quantum metrology. PMID:22146389

  1. Evidence of local effects in anomalous refraction and focusing properties of dodecagonal photonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gennaro, Emiliano; Miletto, Carlo; Savo, Salvatore; Andreone, Antonello; Morello, Davide; Galdi, Vincenzo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    We present the key results from a comprehensive study of the refraction and focusing properties of a two-dimensional dodecagonal photonic “quasicrystal” (PQC), which was carried out via both full-wave numerical simulations and microwave measurements on a slab made of alumina rods inserted in a parallel-plate waveguide. We observe an anomalous refraction and focusing in several frequency regions, which confirm some recently published results. However, our interpretation, which is based on numerical and experimental evidence, substantially differs from the one in terms of “effective negative refractive index” that was originally proposed. Instead, our study highlights the critical role played by short-range interactions associated with local order and symmetry.

  2. Anomalous Hall effect for the phonon heat conductivity in paramagnetic dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Yu; Maksimov, L A

    2008-04-11

    The theory of the anomalous Hall effect for the heat transfer in a parmagnetic dielectric, discovered by Strohm, Rikken, and Wyder [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 155901 (2005)]10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.155901, is developed. The appearance of the phonon heat flux normal to both the temperature gradient and the magnetic field is connected with the interaction of magnetic ions with the crystal field oscillations. In crystals with an arbitrary phonon spectrum this interaction creates the elliptical polarization of phonons. The kinetics related to phonon scattering induced by the spin-phonon interaction determines an origin of the off-diagonal phonon density matrix. The combination of both factors is decisive for the phenomenon under consideration.

  3. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. II. Kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    In Paper I [T. Lafleur et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 053502 (2016)], we demonstrated (using particle-in-cell simulations) the definite correlation between an anomalously high cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs), and the presence of azimuthal electrostatic instabilities leading to enhanced electron scattering. Here, we present a kinetic theory that predicts the enhanced scattering rate and provides an electron cross-field mobility that is in good agreement with experiment. The large azimuthal electron drift velocity in HETs drives a strong instability that quickly saturates due to a combination of ion-wave trapping and wave-convection, leading to an enhanced mobility many orders of magnitude larger than that expected from classical diffusion theory. In addition to the magnetic field strength, B0, this enhanced mobility is a strong function of the plasma properties (such as the plasma density) and therefore does not, in general, follow simple 1 /B02 or 1 /B0 scaling laws.

  4. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-07-15

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect.

  5. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in atomic crystal layers from in-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yafei; Zeng, Junjie; Deng, Xinzhou; Yang, Fei; Pan, Hui; Qiao, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that with in-plane magnetization, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) can be realized in two-dimensional atomic crystal layers with preserved inversion symmetry but broken out-of-plane mirror reflection symmetry. By taking the honeycomb lattice system as an example, we find that the low-buckled structure satisfying the symmetry criteria is crucial to induce QAHE. The topologically nontrivial bulk gap carrying a Chern number of C =±1 opens in the vicinity of the saddle points M , where the band dispersion exhibits strong anisotropy. We further show that the QAHE with electrically tunable Chern number can be achieved in Bernal-stacked multilayer systems, and the applied interlayer potential differences can dramatically decrease the critical magnetization to make the QAHE experimentally feasible.

  6. Magnetization, anomalous Barkhausen effect, and core loss of Supermendur under high temperature cycling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J. M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    The magnetization and core loss of Supermendur were measured up to 900 C under conditions of slow temperature cycling in vacuum. As a consequence of this heating, the coercivity at 25 C increased from 21 A/m to about 110 A/m. This increase is less than previously reported. A prominent anomalous Barkhausen effect, pinched-in hysteresis loops, and a magnetic viscosity field in excess of 20 A/m were observed in the range of 600 to 700 C. At 850 C, Supermendur had a coercivity of 23 A/m, a saturation induction exceeding 1.5 T, a core loss of 26 W/kg at 400 Hz, and a maximum induction of 1.5 T. Supermendur may be useful for high temperature soft magnetic material applications where some history dependence of properties and instability of minor loops at lower temperatures is acceptable.

  7. 3d Transition Metal Adsorption Induced the valley-polarized Anomalous Hall Effect in Germanene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P.; Sun, L. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Based on DFT + U and Berry curvature calculations, we study the electronic structures and topological properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atom (from Ti to Co) adsorbed germanene (TM-germanene). We find that valley-polarized anomalous Hall effect (VAHE) can be realized in germanene by adsorbing Cr, Mn, or Co atoms on its surface. A finite valley Hall voltage can be easily detected in their nanoribbon, which is important for valleytronics devices. Moreover, different valley-polarized current and even reversible valley Hall voltage can be archived by shifting the Fermi energy of the systems. Such versatile features of the systems show potential in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27312176

  8. Anomalous TWTA output power spikes and their effect on a digital satellite communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Brian D.; Kerczewski, Robert J.; Svoboda, James S.

    1992-01-01

    Several 30 GHz, 60 W traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTA) were manufactured for the NASA Lewis Research Center's High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal Project. An unusual operating problem characterized by anomalous nonperiodic output power spikes, common to all of the TWTAs proved during testing to significantly affect the performance of a digitally-modulated data transmission test system. Modifications made to the TWTAs significantly curtailed the problem and allowed acceptable system performance to be obtained. This paper presents a discussion of the TWTA output power spike problem, possible causes of the problem, and the solutions implemented by the manufacturer which improved the TWTA performance to an acceptable level. The results of the testing done at NASA Lewis on the TWTAs both before and after the improvement made by Hughes are presented, and the effects of the output power spikes on the performance of the test system are discussed.

  9. Anomalous Hall effect in a ferromagnetic Fe3Sn2 single crystal with a geometrically frustrated Fe bilayer kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Shanshan; Zhang, Xiao; Pang, Fei; Lei, Hechang

    2016-08-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is investigated for a ferromagnetic Fe3Sn2 single crystal with a geometrically frustrated kagome bilayer of Fe. The scaling behavior between anomalous Hall resistivity ρxy A and longitudinal resistivity ρx x is quadratic and further analysis implies that the AHE in the Fe3Sn2 single crystal should be dominated by the intrinsic Karplus-Luttinger mechanism rather than extrinsic skew-scattering or side-jump mechanisms. Moreover, there is a sudden jump of anomalous Hall conductivity σxy A appearing at about 100 K where the spin-reorientation transition from the c axis to the a b plane is completed. This change of σxy A might be related to the evolution of the Fermi surface induced by the spin-reorientation transition.

  10. Effect of skin wettedness on sweat gland response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the effect of skin wettedness upon sweating rate. Several techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the quantitative nature of this effect. The results include the finding that the evaporative power of the environment has a profound effect on the relationship between body temperature and sweating rate.

  11. Skin photoprotection by green tea: antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2003-09-01

    Because of a characteristic aroma and health benefits, green tea is consumed worldwide as a popular beverage. The epicatechin derivatives, commonly called polyphenols, present in green tea possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. The major and most highly chemopreventive constituent in green tea responsible for the biochemical or pharmacological effects is (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Epidemiological, clinical and biological studies have implicated that solar ultraviolet (UV) light is a complete carcinogen and repeated exposure can lead to the development of various skin disorders including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We and others have shown that topical treatment or oral consumption of green tea polyphenols (GTP) inhibit chemical carcinogen- or UV radiation-induced skin carcinogenesis in different laboratory animal models. Topical treatment of GTP and EGCG or oral consumption of GTP resulted in prevention of UVB-induced inflammatory responses, immunosuppression and oxidative stress, which are the biomarkers of several skin disease states. Topical application of GTP and EGCG prior to exposure of UVB protects against UVB-induced local as well as systemic immune suppression in laboratory animals, which was associated with the inhibition of UVB-induced infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes. Prevention of UVB-induced suppression of immune responses by EGCG was also associated with the reduction in immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 production at UV irradiated skin and draining lymph nodes, whereas IL-12 production was significantly enhanced in draining lymph nodes. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of green tea were also observed in human skin. Treatment of EGCG to human skin resulted in the inhibition of UVB-induced erythema, oxidative stress and infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes. We also showed that treatment of GTP to human skin prevents UVB-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

  12. Skin photoprotection by green tea: antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2003-09-01

    Because of a characteristic aroma and health benefits, green tea is consumed worldwide as a popular beverage. The epicatechin derivatives, commonly called polyphenols, present in green tea possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. The major and most highly chemopreventive constituent in green tea responsible for the biochemical or pharmacological effects is (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Epidemiological, clinical and biological studies have implicated that solar ultraviolet (UV) light is a complete carcinogen and repeated exposure can lead to the development of various skin disorders including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We and others have shown that topical treatment or oral consumption of green tea polyphenols (GTP) inhibit chemical carcinogen- or UV radiation-induced skin carcinogenesis in different laboratory animal models. Topical treatment of GTP and EGCG or oral consumption of GTP resulted in prevention of UVB-induced inflammatory responses, immunosuppression and oxidative stress, which are the biomarkers of several skin disease states. Topical application of GTP and EGCG prior to exposure of UVB protects against UVB-induced local as well as systemic immune suppression in laboratory animals, which was associated with the inhibition of UVB-induced infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes. Prevention of UVB-induced suppression of immune responses by EGCG was also associated with the reduction in immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 production at UV irradiated skin and draining lymph nodes, whereas IL-12 production was significantly enhanced in draining lymph nodes. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of green tea were also observed in human skin. Treatment of EGCG to human skin resulted in the inhibition of UVB-induced erythema, oxidative stress and infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes. We also showed that treatment of GTP to human skin prevents UVB-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

  13. Effects of a Skin Neuropeptide (Substance P) on Cutaneous Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Ramdani, Yasmina; Jaouen, Thomas; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Lati, Elian; Yvergnaux, Florent; Driouich, Azzedine; Lefeuvre, Luc; Farmer, Christine; Misery, Laurent; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin is the largest human neuroendocrine organ and hosts the second most numerous microbial population but the interaction of skin neuropeptides with the microflora has never been investigated. We studied the effect of Substance P (SP), a peptide released by nerve endings in the skin on bacterial virulence. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacillus cereus, a member of the skin transient microflora, was used as a model. Exposure to SP strongly stimulated the cytotoxicity of B. cereus (+553±3% with SP 10−6 M) and this effect was rapid (<5 min). Infection of keratinocytes with SP treated B. cereus led to a rise in caspase1 and morphological alterations of the actin cytoskeleton. Secretome analysis revealed that SP stimulated the release of collagenase and superoxide dismutase. Moreover, we also noted a shift in the surface polarity of the bacteria linked to a peel-off of the S-layer and the release of S-layer proteins. Meanwhile, the biofilm formation activity of B. cereus was increased. The Thermo unstable ribosomal Elongation factor (Ef-Tu) was identified as the SP binding site in B. cereus. Other Gram positive skin bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis also reacted to SP by an increase of virulence. Thermal water from Uriage-les-Bains and an artificial polysaccharide (Teflose®) were capable to antagonize the effect of SP on bacterial virulence. Conclusions/Significance SP is released in sweat during stress and is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of numerous skin diseases through neurogenic inflammation. Our study suggests that a direct effect of SP on the skin microbiote should be another mechanism. PMID:24250813

  14. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  15. Vacuum effects in magnetic field with with account for fermion anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnov, Andrey; Gubina, Nadezda; Zhukovsky, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We study vacuum polarization effects in the model of Dirac fermions with additional interaction of an anomalous magnetic moment with an external magnetic field and fermion interaction with an axial-vector condensate. The proper time method is used to calculate the one-loop vacuum corrections with consideration for different configurations of the characteristic parameters of these interactions.

  16. Effects of a new topical combination on sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Fauger, A; Lhoste, A; Chavagnac-Bonneville, M; Sayag, M; Jourdan, E; Ardiet, N; Perichaud, C; Trompezinski, S; Misery, L

    2015-01-01

    Using well-tolerated cosmetics or those with soothing effects is recommended to treat sensitive skin. However, we lack clinical studies. Two clinical trials were performed on sensitive skin in France and Thailand. The primary objective was to evaluate the preventive soothing effect. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the immediate soothing effect, product tolerance, and impact on quality of life. Evaluation methods included a stinging test and scoring erythema and stinging intensity. We also assessed tolerance, quality of life using the Dermatology Life Quality Index, and cosmetic qualities. The clinical trials were performed in France and Thailand to test efficacy in two different environments and on different ethnic skin. Interesting effects were observed in patients with sensitive skin in France and Thailand: a preventive soothing effect, a soothing effect on erythema, and an immediate soothing effect. In vivo biometrological, sodium lauryl sulfate, and capsaicin tests confirmed these data. A favorable effect on quality of life was also noted. The product was appreciated by volunteers for its efficacy, tolerance, and cosmetic qualities. A preliminary study on the effects on interleukin 8 was also included in the paper.

  17. Effect of glove occlusion on the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Daniel; Clausen, Maja Lisa; John, Swen Malthe; Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Kezic, Sanja; Agner, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Wet work tasks are the most common exposures leading to occupational irritant contact dermatitis. Use of liquid-proof gloves is recommended when performing wet work, however, gloves may also contribute to impairment of the skin barrier and development of irritant contact dermatitis. The aim of this study is to review the literature on the effects of glove occlusion on skin barrier function. The PubMed database was searched up to 1 February 2015 for articles on the association between glove occlusion and skin barrier function, including human studies only and in English. Only experimental studies including assessment of the skin barrier function were included in the data analysis. Thirteen articles were identified, 8 with focus on occlusion alone, 7 with focus on occlusion in combination with irritant exposure (some overlapping), and 2 field studies. In conclusion, data from the literature showed that the negative effect of occlusion in itself is limited, and that only extensive and long-term occlusion will cause barrier impairment. However, studies investigating combined effect of occlusion and exposure to soaps/detergents indicate that occlusion significantly enhances the skin barrier damage caused by detergents/soaps in a dose-response fashion. PMID:26364588

  18. Anisotropic Nanomechanics of Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Nanostructured "Skin" Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, KyeongJae

    2000-01-01

    The stiffness and plasticity of boron nitride nanotubes are investigated using generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics and ab-initio total energy methods. Due to boron-nitride BN bond buckling effects, compressed zigzag BN nanotubes are found to undergo novel anisotropic strain release followed by anisotropic plastic buckling. The strain is preferentially released towards N atoms in the rotated BN bonds. The tubes buckle anisotropically towards only one end when uniaxially compressed from both. A "skin-effect" model of smart nanocomposite materials is proposed which will localize the structural damage towards the 'skin' or surface side of the material.

  19. Effects of cilostazol lotion on blood flow in rabbit skin.

    PubMed

    Ono, I; Gunji, H; Suda, K; Kaneko, F

    1994-04-01

    Cilostazol (Cls) is a inhibitor of phosphodiesterase and increases cyclic AMP (cAMP) in platelets and also raises the vascular smooth muscle cell cAMP level causing vasodilation. Therefore, it was expected to increase local blood flow in the skin. Topical application of Cls may improve local blood flow without systemic effects in clinical situations. In this paper the effect of Cls lotion on skin blood flow was assessed in animal experiments. Application of this lotion allowed skin blood flow to remain at increased levels for about 60-90 min. Tissue assay of the Cls content revealed that Cls is absorbed percutaneously and retained, even in the inner tissue layer, for at least 180 min.

  20. Anomalous Hall effect sensors based on magnetic element doped topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yan; Zhang, Zhen; Nlebedim, Ikenna; Jiles, David

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is recently discovered in magnetic element doped topological insulators (TIs), which promises low power consumption highly efficient spintronics and electronics. This discovery broaden the family of Hall effect (HE) sensors. In this work, both HE and AHE sensor based on Mn and Cr doped Bi2Te3 TI thin films will be systematically studied. The influence of Mn concentration on sensitivity of MnxBi2-xTe3 HE sensors will be discussed. The Hall sensitivity increase 8 times caused by quantum AHE will be reported. AHE senor based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 TI thin films will also be studied and compared with Mn doped Bi2Te3 AHE sensor. The influence of thickness on sensitivity of CrxBi2-xTe3 AHE sensors will be discussed. Ultrahigh Hall sensitivity is obtained in Cr doped Bi2Te3. The largest Hall sensitivity can reach 2620 Ω/T in sensor which is almost twice higher than that of the normal semiconductor HE sensor. Our work indicates that magnetic element doped topological insulator with AHE are good candidates for ultra-sensitive Hall effect sensors.

  1. Anomalous Hall effect in Pt thin films induced by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Sunao; Takahashi, Kei S.; Hatano, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2014-03-01

    Pt is an exchange-enhanced paramagnetic material, in which the Stoner criterion for ferromagnetism is nearly satisfied and thus external stimuli may induce unconventional magnetic characteristics. For example, nano-structure formation such as particles[2] or wires[3] provides Pt with ferromagnetic-like properties even at room temperature. In this presentation, we report that a nonmagnetic perturbation in the form of a gate voltage applied through an ionic liquid induces a nonlinear Hall effect in Pt thin films,[4] which resembles the anomalous Hall effect induced by the contact to yttrium iron garnet.[5] Analysis of detailed temperature and magnetic field experiments indicates that the evolution of the nonlinear Hall effect can be explained in terms of large local moments. The applied electric field triggers an electrochemical reaction at the solid/liquid interface and induces magnetic moments as large as ~10 μB that follow the Langevin function. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSAP) through its `Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program)'.

  2. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in time-reversal-symmetry breaking topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Li, Mingda

    2016-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), the last member of Hall family, was predicted to exhibit quantized Hall conductivity {σyx}=\\frac{{{e}2}}{h} without any external magnetic field. The QAHE shares a similar physical phenomenon with the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE), whereas its physical origin relies on the intrinsic topological inverted band structure and ferromagnetism. Since the QAHE does not require external energy input in the form of magnetic field, it is believed that this effect has unique potential for applications in future electronic devices with low-power consumption. More recently, the QAHE has been experimentally observed in thin films of the time-reversal symmetry breaking ferromagnetic (FM) topological insulators (TI), Cr- and V- doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. In this topical review, we review the history of TI based QAHE, the route to the experimental observation of the QAHE in the above two systems, the current status of the research of the QAHE, and finally the prospects for future studies.

  3. Sunscreen effects in skin analyzed by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Anjos, F. H.; Rompe, P. C. B.; Mansanares, A. M.; da Silva, E. C.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) was employed to characterize samples of commercially available sunscreen (SPF15) and the system formed by sunscreen plus skin (topically applied sunscreen). Measurements were performed at 70Hz, in the wavelength range that corresponds to most of the ultraviolet (UV) radiation that reaches Earth. The absorption spectrum of sunscreen was obtained in vitro and in situ., showing that the sunscreen analyzed presents an effective absorption of the UV radiation After that, the PAS technique was used to monitor the absorption kinetics of sunscreen applied to human skin (abdomen) samples, characterizing alterations in the human skin after application of sunscreen. This was done by applying the sunscreen in a skin sample and recording the absorption spectra in regular time intervals, up to 90 minutes after application. Measurements show that light absorption by the system sunscreen plus skin stabilizes between 25 and 45 minutes after sunscreen application. This agrees with the instructions given by the producers about the need of applying the sunscreen at least 30 minutes before sun exposition. The requirement to periodically reapply the sunscreen is confirmed by the progressive decrease in the level of UV absorption as a function of time.

  4. Effects of graduated compression stockings on skin temperature after running.

    PubMed

    Priego Quesada, J I; Lucas-Cuevas, A G; Gil-Calvo, M; Giménez, J V; Aparicio, I; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, R M; Salvador Palmer, R; Llana-Belloch, S; Pérez-Soriano, P

    2015-08-01

    High skin temperatures reduce the thermal gradient between the core and the skin and they can lead to a reduction in performance and increased risk of injury. Graduated compression stockings have become popular among runners in the last years and their use may influence the athlete's thermoregulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of graduated compression stockings on skin temperature during running in a moderate indoor environment. Forty-four runners performed two running tests lasting 30min (10min of warm-up and 20min at 75% of their maximal aerobic speed) with and without graduated compressive stockings. Skin temperature was measured in 12 regions of interest on the lower limb by infrared thermography before and after running. Heart rate and perception of fatigue were assessed during the last minute of the running test. Compression stockings resulted in greater increase of temperature (p=0.002 and ES=2.2, 95% CI [0.11-0.45°C]) not only in the body regions in contact (tibialis anterior, ankle anterior and gastrocnemius) but also in the body regions that were not in contact with the garment (vastus lateralis, abductor and semitendinosus). No differences were observed between conditions in heart rate and perception of fatigue (p>0.05 and ES<0.8). In conclusion, running with graduated compression stockings produces a greater increase of skin temperature without modifying the athlete's heart rate and perception of fatigue.

  5. The foreign exchange market: return distributions, multifractality, anomalous multifractality and the Epps effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drożdż, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświȩcimka, Paweł; Rak, Rafał

    2010-10-01

    We present a systematic study of various statistical characteristics of high-frequency returns from the foreign exchange market. This study is based on six exchange rates forming two triangles: EUR-GBP-USD and GBP-CHF-JPY. It is shown that the exchange rate return fluctuations for all of the pairs considered are well described by the non-extensive statistics in terms of q-Gaussians. There exist some small quantitative variations in the non-extensivity q-parameter values for different exchange rates (which depend also on the time scales studied), and this can be related to the importance of a given exchange rate in the world's currency trade. Temporal correlations organize the series of returns such that they develop the multifractal characteristics for all of the exchange rates, with a varying degree of symmetry of the singularity spectrum f(α), however. The most symmetric spectrum is identified for the GBP/USD. We also form time series of triangular residual returns and find that the distributions of their fluctuations develop disproportionately heavier tails as compared to small fluctuations, which excludes description in terms of q-Gaussians. The multifractal characteristics of these residual returns reveal such anomalous properties as negative singularity exponents and even negative singularity spectra. Such anomalous multifractal measures have so far been considered in the literature in connection with diffusion-limited aggregation and with turbulence. Studying the cross-correlations among different exchange rates, we found that market inefficiency on short time scales leads to the occurrence of the Epps effect on much longer time scales, but comparable to the ones for the stock market. Although the currency market is much more liquid than the stock markets and has a much greater transaction frequency, the building up of correlations takes up to several hours—a duration that does not differ much from what is observed in the stock markets. This may suggest

  6. Modeling and analysis of cosmetic treatment effects on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunderstaedt, Reinhart A.; Hopermann, Hermann; Hillemann, Thomas

    2000-10-01

    In view of treatment effects of cosmetics, quality management becomes more and more important. Due to the efficiency reasons it is desirable to quantify these effects and predict them as a function of time. For this, a mathematical model of the skin's surface (epidermis) is needed. Such a model cannot be worked out purely analytically. It can only be derived with the help of measurement data. The signals of interest as output of different measurement devices consist of two parts: noise of high (spatial) frequencies (stochastic signal) and periodic functions (deterministic signal) of low (spatial) frequencies. Both parts can be separated by correlation analysis. The paper introduces in addition to the Fourier Transform (FT) with the Wavelet Transform (WT), a brand new, highly sophisticated method with excellent properties for both modeling the skin's surface as well as evaluating treatment effects. Its main physical advantage is (in comparison to the FT) that local irregularities in the measurement signal (e.g. by scars) remain at their place and are not represented as mean square values as it is the case when applying the FT. The method has just now been installed in industry and will there be used in connection with a new in vivo measurement device for quality control of cosmetic products. As texture parameter for an integral description of the human skin the fractal dimension D is used which is appropriate for classification of different skin regions and treatment effects as well.

  7. Health system costs of skin cancer and cost-effectiveness of skin cancer prevention and screening: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Louisa G; Rowell, David

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to review the literature for malignant melanoma, basal and squamous cell carcinomas to understand: (a) national estimates of the direct health system costs of skin cancer and (b) the cost-effectiveness of interventions for skin cancer prevention or early detection. A systematic review was performed using Medline, Cochrane Library and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Databases as well as a manual search of reference lists to identify relevant studies up to 31 August 2013. A narrative synthesis approach was used to summarize the data. National cost estimates were adjusted for country-specific inflation and presented in 2013 euros. The CHEERS statement was used to assess the quality of the economic evaluation studies. Sixteen studies reporting national estimates of skin cancer costs and 11 cost-effectiveness studies on skin cancer prevention or early detection were identified. Relative to the size of their respective populations, the annual direct health system costs for skin cancer were highest for Australia, New Zealand, Sweden and Denmark (2013 euros). Skin cancer prevention initiatives are highly cost-effective and may also be cost-saving. Melanoma early detection programmes aimed at high-risk individuals may also be cost-effective; however, updated analyses are needed. There is a significant cost burden of skin cancer for many countries and health expenditure for this disease will grow as incidence increases. Public investment in skin cancer prevention and early detection programmes show strong potential for health and economic benefits.

  8. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals.

    PubMed

    Panda, Manas K; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-01-01

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 238.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) and αc = -290.0 × 10(-6) K(-1), the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously. PMID:27403616

  9. Anomalously Large Polarization Effect Responsible for Excitonic Red Shifts in PbSe Quantum Dot Solids

    SciTech Connect

    A Wolcott; V Doyeux; C Nelson; R Gearba; K Lei; K Yager; A dolocan; K Williams; D Nguyen; X Zhu

    2011-12-31

    The formation of solid thin films from colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is often accompanied by red shifts in excitonic transitions, but the mechanisms responsible for the red shifts are under debate. We quantitatively address this issue using optical absorption spectroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of PbSe QDs with controlled inter-QD distance, which was determined by the length of alkanedithiol linking molecules. With decreasing inter-QD distance, the first and second exciton absorption peaks show increasing red shifts. Using thin films consisting of large and isolated QDs embedded in a matrix of small QDs, we determine that a dominant contribution to the observed red shift is due to changes in polarization of the dielectric environment surrounding each QD ({approx}88%), while electronic or transition dipole coupling plays a lesser role. However, the observed red shifts are more than 1 order of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions based on the dielectric polarization effect for spherical QDs. We attribute this anomalously large polarization effect to deviations of the exciton wave functions from eigenfunctions of the idealized spherical quantum well model.

  10. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Manas K.; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-07-01

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10‑6 K‑1, αb = 238.8 × 10‑6 K‑1 and αc = ‑290.0 × 10‑6 K‑1, the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously.

  11. Magnetism and anomalous Hall effect in Co-(La,Sr)TiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. X.; Yu, W.; Ogale, S. B.; Shinde, S. R.; Kundaliya, D. C.; Tse, Wang-Kong; Young, S. Y.; Higgins, J. S.; Salamanca-Riba, L. G.; Herrera, M.; Fu, L. F.; Browning, N. D.; Greene, R. L.; Venkatesan, T.

    2007-08-01

    A systematic study of the magnetic properties and the Hall effect was performed on pulsed laser deposited 5% cobalt doped (La,Sr)TiO3 thin films, especially grown at high substrate temperature. The system is found to be superparamagnetic in nature as evidenced by several protocols of magnetic measurements. Nevertheless, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is observed in the system, the profile of the measured Hall resistivity vs magnetic field being found to be identical to the magnetic hysteresis loops. This highlights the limitations of AHE as a tool to test the intrinsic nature of ferromagnetism in a diluted magnetic system, supporting our previous report for the Co:TiO2 case [S. R. Shinde , Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 166601 (2004)]. It is believed that the magnetic clusters polarize nearby electrons and the nonzero polarization leads to a net transverse current because of the spin dependent scattering, which gives rise to the observed AHE. We found that the magnitude of the AHE signal observed in the current extrinsic diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) is much lower (by a few orders of magnitude) than that found in the intrinsic long range ferromagnetic ordered DMS, which raises the possibility for using this magnitude, rather than the occurrence of AHE, as a criterion for intrinsic or extrinsic diluted magnetic system.

  12. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-young

    2014-05-07

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE{sub 011} cavity was larger than that in the TE{sub 102} cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE{sub 011} cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE{sub 011} cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE{sub 102} cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE{sub 011} cavity to decentering problem.

  13. Anomalous Hall effect in Y2Fe17-xCox single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Jolanta; Skokov, Konstantin

    2009-03-01

    We study experimentally the Hall resistivity of Y2Fe17-xCox single crystals (x<=8) for wide temperature and applied magnetic field ranges, and for various magnetic field orientations with respect to the easy-magnetization axis. We find a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE) anisotropy in this system for x<=2. The AHE resistivity ρxy, measured with an applied magnetic field Hc-axis, is nearly one order of magnitude larger than the one for H along the hard magnetization direction (Hc-axis). Furthermore, the former is very large and varies linearly with the longitudinal resistivity ρ, whereas the latter follows 2̂ for T < 150 K. We tentatively interpret the behavior of ρxy for Hc-axis in terms of an intrinsic effect related to the inter-orbital hopping between degenerate d-orbitals. Such hopping is allowed for high symmetry points at the crystallographic dumb-bell sites in this configuration. On the other hand, there is no inter-orbital hopping for Hc-axis. However, a huge amplitude of the AHE resistivity for this configuration, which follows from skew scattering, is puzzling. Both the AHE anisotropy and the large skew scattering go away as more Fe is substituted by Co. We attribute this to variations in the electronic structure of the Y2Fe17-xCox system when Co atoms start to occupy the dumb-bell crystallographic sites.

  14. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Manas K.; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-01-01

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10−6 K−1, αb = 238.8 × 10−6 K−1 and αc = −290.0 × 10−6 K−1, the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously. PMID:27403616

  15. In vitro photodynamic effect of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines on melanoma skin cancer and healthy normal skin cells.

    PubMed

    Maduray, K; Odhav, B; Nyokong, T

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a medical treatment that uses an inactive dye/drug and lasers as a light source to activate the dye/drug to produce a toxic form of oxygen that destroys the cancer cells. This study aimed at investigating the cytotoxic effects of different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines in its inactive and active state (laser induced) on melanoma skin cancer cells, healthy normal skin fibroblast and keratinocyte cells. Experimentally, 3 × 10⁴ cells/ml were seeded in 24-well plates before treatment with different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines. After 2h, cells were irradiated with a light dose of 4.5 J/cm². Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24h before cell viability was measured using the CellTiter-Blue Viability Assay. Results showed that aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at high concentrations were cytotoxic to melanoma cells in the absence of laser activation. In the presence of laser activation of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a concentration of 40 μg/ml decreased cell viability of melanoma cells to 45%, fibroblasts to 78% and keratinocytes to 73%. At this photosensitizing concentration of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines the efficacy of the treatment light dose 4.5 J/cm² and the cell death mechanism induced by photoactivated aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines was evaluated. A light dose of 4.5 J/cm² was more efficient in killing a higher number of melanoma cells and a lower number of fibroblast and keratinocyte cells than the other light doses of 2.5 J/cm², 7.5 J/cm² and 10.5 J/cm². Apoptosis features such as blebbing, nucleus condensation, nucleus fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies were seen in the photodynamic therapy treated melanoma skin cancer cells. This in vitro photodynamic therapy study concludes that using aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a photosensitizing concentration of 40 μg/ml in combination with a laser dose of 4.5 J/cm² was potentially lethal

  16. The effect of mother-infant skin-to-skin contact on infants' response to the Still Face Task from newborn to three months of age.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Ann E; Power, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    The effect of mother-infant skin-to-skin contact on infants' developing social expectations for maternal behavior was investigated longitudinally over infants' first 3 months. Infants with and without skin-to-skin contact engaged with their mothers in the Still Face Task at ages 1 week, 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months. Infants with skin-to-skin contact began responding to changes in their mothers' behavior with their affect at 1 month; infants without skin-to-skin contact did so at 2 months. At 3 months, infants with skin-to-skin contact increased their non-distress vocalizations during the still face phase, suggesting social bidding to their mothers. Skin-to-skin contact accelerated infants' social expectations for their mothers' behavior and enhanced infants' awareness of themselves as active agents in social interactions.

  17. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n-p Codoped Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S B; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-29

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n-p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb_{2}Te_{3} and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ∼2%  V and ∼1% I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ∼50  K, which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n-p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE.

  18. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mogi, M. Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Takahashi, K. S.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  19. Quantum anomalous Hall effect with field-tunable Chern number near Z2 topological critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Le Quy; Lin, Hsin; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Feng, Yuan Ping

    We study the practicability of achieving quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect with field-tunable Chern number in a magnetically doped, topologically trivial insulating thin film. Specifically in a candidate material, TlBi(S1-δSeδ)2, we demonstrate that the QAH phases with different Chern numbers can be achieved by means of tuning the exchange field strength or the sample thickness near the Z2 topological critical point. Our physics scenario successfully reduces the necessary exchange coupling strength for a targeted Chern number. This QAH mechanism differs from the traditional QAH picture with a magnetic topological insulating thin film, where the ``surface'' states must involve and sometimes complicate the realization issue. Furthermore, we find that a given Chern number can also be tuned by a perpendicular electric field, which naturally occurs when a substrate is present. High-Chern number QAH phase obtained from magnetically doped topological crystalline insulator thin films will also be discussed. Support by the Singapore National Research Foundation under NRF Award No. NRF-NRFF2013-03 is acknowledged.

  20. The anomalous mole fraction effect in calcium channels: a measure of preferential selectivity.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dirk; Boda, Dezso

    2008-09-15

    The cause of the anomalous mole fraction effect (AMFE) in calcium-selective ion channels is studied. An AMFE occurs when the conductance through a channel is lower in a mixture of salts than in the pure salts at the same concentration. The textbook interpretation of the AMFE is that multiple ions move through the pore in coordinated, single-file motion. Instead of this, we find that at its most basic level an AMFE reflects a channel's preferential binding selectivity for one ion species over another. The AMFE is explained by considering the charged and uncharged regions of the pore as electrical resistors in series: the AMFE is produced by these regions of high and low ion concentration changing differently with mole fraction due to the preferential ion selectivity. This is demonstrated with simulations of a model L-type calcium channel and a mathematical analysis of a simplistic point-charge model. The particle simulations reproduce the experimental data of two L-type channel AMFEs. Conditions under which an AMFE may be found experimentally are discussed. The resistors-in-series model provides a fundamentally different explanation of the AMFE than the traditional theory and does not require single filing, multiple occupancy, or momentum-correlated ion motion.

  1. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n-p Codoped Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S B; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-29

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n-p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb_{2}Te_{3} and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ∼2%  V and ∼1% I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ∼50  K, which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n-p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE. PMID:27517787

  2. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n -p Codoped Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D.; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S. B.; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n -p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb2 Te3 and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ˜2 % V and ˜1 % I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ˜50 K , which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n -p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE.

  3. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R.; Ji, H.; Cava, R. J.; Yao, N.; Clarke, J. J.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61 K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  4. Anomalous transport model study of chiral magnetic effects in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yifeng; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Using an anomalous transport model for massless quarks and antiquarks, we study the effect of a magnetic field on the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks in relativistic heavy ion collisions. With initial conditions from a blast wave model and assuming that the strong magnetic field produced in noncentral heavy ion collisions can last for a sufficiently long time, we obtain an appreciable electric quadrupole moment in the transverse plane of a heavy ion collision. The electric quadrupole moment subsequently leads to a splitting between the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks. The slope of the charge asymmetry dependence of the elliptic flow difference between positively and negatively charged particles is positive, which is expected from the chiral magnetic wave formed in the produced QGP and observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, only if the Lorentz force acting on the charged particles is neglected and the quark-antiquark scattering is assumed to be dominated by the chirality changing channel.

  5. Beer and beer compounds: physiological effects on skin health.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Becker, T; Qian, F; Ring, J

    2014-02-01

    Beer is one of the earliest human inventions and globally the most consumed alcoholic beverage in terms of volume. In addition to water, the 'German Beer Purity Law', based on the Bavarian Beer Purity Law from 1516, allows only barley, hops, yeasts and water for beer brewing. The extracts of these ingredients, especially the hops, contain an abundance of polyphenols such as kaempferol, quercetin, tyrosol, ferulic acid, xanthohumol/isoxanthohumol/8-prenylnaringenin, α-bitter acids like humulone and β-bitter acids like lupulone. 8-prenylnaringenin is the most potent phytoestrogen known to date. These compounds have been shown to possess various anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-angiogenic, anti-melanogenic, anti-osteoporotic and anti-carcinogenic effects. Epidemiological studies on the association between beer drinking and skin disease are limited while direct evidence of beer compounds in clinical application is lacking. Potential uses of these substances in dermatology may include treatment of atopic eczema, contact dermatitis, pigmentary disorders, skin infections, skin ageing, skin cancers and photoprotections, which require an optimization of the biostability and topical delivery of these compounds. Further studies are needed to determine the bioavailability of these compounds and their possible beneficial health effects when taken by moderate beer consumption. PMID:23802910

  6. Beer and beer compounds: physiological effects on skin health.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Becker, T; Qian, F; Ring, J

    2014-02-01

    Beer is one of the earliest human inventions and globally the most consumed alcoholic beverage in terms of volume. In addition to water, the 'German Beer Purity Law', based on the Bavarian Beer Purity Law from 1516, allows only barley, hops, yeasts and water for beer brewing. The extracts of these ingredients, especially the hops, contain an abundance of polyphenols such as kaempferol, quercetin, tyrosol, ferulic acid, xanthohumol/isoxanthohumol/8-prenylnaringenin, α-bitter acids like humulone and β-bitter acids like lupulone. 8-prenylnaringenin is the most potent phytoestrogen known to date. These compounds have been shown to possess various anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-angiogenic, anti-melanogenic, anti-osteoporotic and anti-carcinogenic effects. Epidemiological studies on the association between beer drinking and skin disease are limited while direct evidence of beer compounds in clinical application is lacking. Potential uses of these substances in dermatology may include treatment of atopic eczema, contact dermatitis, pigmentary disorders, skin infections, skin ageing, skin cancers and photoprotections, which require an optimization of the biostability and topical delivery of these compounds. Further studies are needed to determine the bioavailability of these compounds and their possible beneficial health effects when taken by moderate beer consumption.

  7. Enhancing skin radiance through the use of effect pigments.

    PubMed

    Funk, David; Kovarovic, Brandon; Uzunian, Gabriel; Litchauer, Jill; Daley-Bowles, Tricia; Hubschmitt, Amber

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the radiance contribution from formulating various pearlescent effect pigments into a skin cream was modeled using gloss map histograms created from digital photographs of clinical panelists. CIELab color data from the various pearlescent effect pigments applied to simulated skin tone drawdown cards was first collected to screen experimental candidates and to help select the concentration of pigment used in the formula. Optical microscopy was used to develop a simple coverage model to control for the differences in particle size and density of the effect pigments. In the subsequent in vivo study, panelists applied a weighed amount of cream containing various pearlescent effect pigments to the face and high-resolution digital photography images were collected on each panelist for image analysis. Gloss map histograms were developed through the software analysis of gray-scale images, which were used to describe the gloss, whiteness, and/or radiance contribution of each pearlescent effect pigment. The resulting gloss map histograms shared identifiable characteristics useful for statistical analysis and description. This methodology could serve as a novel way to investigate and describe the visual impact and benefit of formulating effect pigments in cosmetic creams intended for application on the skin.

  8. Intrinsic Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in the Kagome Lattice Cs2 LiMn3 F12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-10-01

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Moreover, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane d d σ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  9. Intrinsic Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in the Kagome Lattice Cs2 LiMn3 F12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Zhang's Group Team

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from the ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Moreover, a simplified tight binding model based on the inplane dd σ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  10. Stability and anomalous compressibility of Bose gases near resonance: The scale-dependent interactions and thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shao-Jian; Zhou, Fei

    2015-07-01

    The stability of Bose gases near resonance has been a puzzling problem in recent years. In this article, we demonstrate that in addition to generating thermal pressure, thermal atoms enhance the repulsiveness of the scale-dependent interactions between condensed atoms due to a renormalization effect and further stabilize the Bose gases. Consequently, we find that, as a precursor of instability, the compressibility develops an anomalous structure as a function of scattering length and is drastically reduced compared with the mean-field value. Furthermore, the density profile of a Bose gas in a harmonic trap is found to develop a flat top near the center. This is due to the anomalous behavior of compressibility and can be a potential smoking gun for probing such an effect.

  11. Intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the kagome lattice Cs2LiMn3F12

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-10-27

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Furthermore, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane ddσ antibondingmore » states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.« less

  12. Effect of Age on Tooth Shade, Skin Color and Skin-Tooth Color Interrelationship in Saudi Arabian Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental restoration or prosthesis in harmony with adjacent natural teeth color is indispensable part for the successful esthetic outcome. The studies indicate is existence of correlation between teeth and skin color. Teeth and skin color are changed over the aging process. The aim of the study was to explore the role of age on the tooth and skin color parameters, and to investigate the effect of ageing on teeth-skin color correlation. Materials and Methods: Total of 225 Saudi Arabian ethnic subjects was divided into three groups of 75 each. The groups were divided according to participant’s age. The participant’s age for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 18-29 years, 30-50 years, and above 50 years, respectively. The tooth color was identified by spectrophotometer in CIE Lab parameters. The skin color was registered with skin surface photography. The data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and correlation tests with SPSS 18 software. Results: The Group I had the highest ‘L’ value of 80.26, Group III recorded the least value of 76.66. The Group III had highest yellow value ‘b’ at 22.72, while Group I had 19.19. The skin ‘L’ value was highest in the young population; the elder population had the increased red value ‘a’ in comparison to younger subjects. The ‘L’ tooth color parameter had a strong positive linear correlation with skin color in young and adult subjects. While Group III teeth showed the strong positive correlation with ‘b’ parameter at malar region. Conclusion: The elder subjects had darker and yellow teeth in comparison with younger subjects. The reddening of the skin was observed as age-related skin color change. The age had a strong influence on the teeth-skin color correlation. PMID:26464536

  13. Studies of xenon ECR plasma: search for a better understanding of the gas-mixing and anomalous effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Mal, Kedar; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-12-01

    Pure and oxygen-mixed xenon plasmas were produced using 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The charge state distributions (CSDs) of highly abundant isotopes (129Xe, 131 Xe and 132 Xe) were studied by extracting the ions from the plasma and analyzed them in mass and energy using a large acceptance analyzer-switching dipole magnet. In earlier studies (Drentje 1992 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 2875, Kawai et al 2001 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 451), the CSD of oxygen and nitrogen ECR plasmas showed that isotopic intensity ratio of ions varies with the charge state (anomalous effect). The anomalous effect in the pure and oxygen-mixed xenon ECR plasma was absent up to +13 charge state. With oxygen, a very small positive gas-mixing effect on the charge state beyond +8 was observed. In this paper, we present CSDs of xenon isotopes with and without oxygen mixing (at optimized ion source parameters) and compare the intensity of isotopes for various charge states to shed light on the previously noticed anomalous effect in the ECR plasma.

  14. Effects of anomalous permittivity on the microwave heating of zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L.P.; Dadon, D.; Rosen, M.; Gershon, D.; Rybakov, K.I.; Birman, A.; Calame, J.P.; Levush, B.; Carmel, Y.; Hutcheon, R.

    1998-01-01

    Highly nonuniform heating has been observed in zinc oxide (ZnO) powder compacts exposed to 2.45 GHz microwaves in oxygen deficient atmospheres such as pure nitrogen or argon. This phenomenon manifests as a localized zone of rapid heating which propagates outward from the sample core, and is documented by real-time surface and core temperature measurements performed during the microwave exposure. Measurements of the complex permittivity, {epsilon}{double_prime}, during heating of identical ZnO samples in a conventional furnace and in a nitrogen atmosphere, demonstrated that {epsilon}{double_prime} experiences at least one significant maximum between 200 and 500{degree}C. Mass spectrometry results indicate that the peaks in {epsilon}{double_prime} correlate well with the rate of desorption of chemisorbed water from the surface of the ZnO powder. It was also noted that the nonuniform heating does not manifest when the microwave exposure is performed in air. Similarly, the anomalous peaks in {epsilon}{double_prime} are almost completely suppressed during heating in air. It is well known that oxygen adsorbs strongly to the surface of ZnO in the temperature range from room temperature to 300{degree}C, and that this adsorption results in a drastic decrease in the electrical conductivity and, thus, in {epsilon}{double_prime}. It is proposed, therefore, that the effect of water desorption upon the complex permittivity may be, in effect, counterbalanced by the adsorption oxygen from the atmosphere. The effect of this behavior may be significant during microwave processing, where nonuniform power absorption can result in extremely localized heating. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Effects of anomalous permittivity on the microwave heating of zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. P.; Dadon, D.; Rosen, M.; Gershon, D.; Rybakov, K. I.; Birman, A.; Calame, J. P.; Levush, B.; Carmel, Y.; Hutcheon, R.

    1998-01-01

    Highly nonuniform heating has been observed in zinc oxide (ZnO) powder compacts exposed to 2.45 GHz microwaves in oxygen deficient atmospheres such as pure nitrogen or argon. This phenomenon manifests as a localized zone of rapid heating which propagates outward from the sample core, and is documented by real-time surface and core temperature measurements performed during the microwave exposure. Measurements of the complex permittivity, ɛ″, during heating of identical ZnO samples in a conventional furnace and in a nitrogen atmosphere, demonstrated that ɛ″ experiences at least one significant maximum between 200 and 500 °C. Mass spectrometry results indicate that the peaks in ɛ″ correlate well with the rate of desorption of chemisorbed water from the surface of the ZnO powder. It was also noted that the nonuniform heating does not manifest when the microwave exposure is performed in air. Similarly, the anomalous peaks in ɛ″ are almost completely suppressed during heating in air. It is well known that oxygen adsorbs strongly to the surface of ZnO in the temperature range from room temperature to 300 °C, and that this adsorption results in a drastic decrease in the electrical conductivity and, thus, in ɛ″. It is proposed, therefore, that the effect of water desorption upon the complex permittivity may be, in effect, counterbalanced by the adsorption oxygen from the atmosphere. The effect of this behavior may be significant during microwave processing, where nonuniform power absorption can result in extremely localized heating.

  16. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Anomalous transmission of an ultrashort ionizing laser pulse through a thin foil.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, G; Zarcone, M; Uryupin, S A

    2003-08-22

    The formation of a highly anisotropic photoelectron velocity distribution as a result of the interaction of a powerful ultrashort laser pulse with a thin foil is found to yield a large skin-layer depth and an anomalous increase of the transmission coefficient. The physical reason for the effect is the influence of the incident wave magnetic field, through the Lorenz force, on the electron kinetics in the skin layer.

  18. Subdiffusion in an external potential: Anomalous effects hiding behind normal behavior.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Sergei; Korabel, Nickolay

    2015-04-01

    We propose a model of subdiffusion in which an external force is acting on a particle at all times not only at the moment of jump. The implication of this assumption is the dependence of the random trapping time on the force with the dramatic change of particles behavior compared to the standard continuous time random walk model in the long time limit. Constant force leads to the transition from non-ergodic subdiffusion to ergodic diffusive behavior. However, we show this behavior remains anomalous in a sense that the diffusion coefficient depends on the external force and on the anomalous exponent. For quadratic potential we find that the system remains non-ergodic. The anomalous exponent in this case defines not only the speed of convergence but also the stationary distribution which is different from standard Boltzmann equilibrium. PMID:25974444

  19. Effect of tap-water iontophoresis on sweat gland recruitment, skin temperature and skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kolkhorst, Fred W; DiPasquale, Dana M; Buono, Michael J

    2002-02-01

    Our interest was to quantify the role of sweat gland activation on the maintenance of skin temperature during mild exercise in the heat. Seven days of tap-water iontophoresis decreased the number of active sweat glands by 72% which significantly increased forearm skin temperature and blood flow during mild exercise (70 W) in the heat (32 degrees C). Skin temperature of the treated forearm was 0.5 degrees C warmer (P=0.049); skin blood flow in the treated forearm was 13% higher than the control arm (P=0.021). These results illustrate the importance of sweat evaporation on skin temperature and blood flow during exercise.

  20. Effect of tap-water iontophoresis on sweat gland recruitment, skin temperature and skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kolkhorst, Fred W; DiPasquale, Dana M; Buono, Michael J

    2002-02-01

    Our interest was to quantify the role of sweat gland activation on the maintenance of skin temperature during mild exercise in the heat. Seven days of tap-water iontophoresis decreased the number of active sweat glands by 72% which significantly increased forearm skin temperature and blood flow during mild exercise (70 W) in the heat (32 degrees C). Skin temperature of the treated forearm was 0.5 degrees C warmer (P=0.049); skin blood flow in the treated forearm was 13% higher than the control arm (P=0.021). These results illustrate the importance of sweat evaporation on skin temperature and blood flow during exercise. PMID:11858947

  1. Metal nanoparticles amplify photodynamic effect on skin cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Brigitte; Chen, Si; Käll, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Linda; Ericson, Marica B.

    2011-03-01

    We report on an investigation aimed to increase the efficiency of photodynamic therapy (PDT) through the influence of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR's) in metal nanoparticles. PDT is based on photosensitizers that generate singlet oxygen at the tumour site upon exposure to visible light. Although PDT is a well-established treatment for skin cancer, a major drawback is the low quantum yield for singlet-oxygen production. This motivates the development of novel methods that enhance singlet oxygen generation during treatment. In this context, we study the photodynamic effect on cultured human skin cells in the presence or absence of gold nanoparticles with well established LSPR and field-enhancement properties. The cultured skin cells were exposed to protoporphyrin IX and gold nanoparticles and subsequently illuminated with red light. We investigated the differences in cell viability by tuning different parameters, such as incubation time and light dose. In order to find optimal parameters for specific targeting of tumour cells, we compared normal human epidermal keratinocytes with a human squamous skin cancer cell line. The study indicates significantly enhanced cell death in the presence of nanoparticles and important differences in treatment efficiency between normal and tumour cells. These results are thus promising and clearly motivate further development of nanoparticle enhanced clinical PDT treatment.

  2. Anomalous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this composite image of spiral galaxy M106 (NGC 4258), optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey is shown as yellow, radio data from the Very Large Array appears as purple, X-ray data from Chandra is coded blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope appears red. Two anomalous arms, which aren't visible at optical wavelengths, appear as purple and blue emission.

  3. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation.

  4. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation. PMID:25070929

  5. The effect of various avocado oils on skin collagen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Werman, M J; Mokady, S; Nimni, M E; Neeman, I

    1991-01-01

    The effects of various avocado oils on collagen metabolism in skin were studied in growing rats fed diets containing 10% (w/w) of the tested oils. Rats fed the unrefined avocado oil extracted with hexane from the intact fruit, its unsaponifiables or the avocado seed oil, showed significant increases in soluble collagen content in skin, though total collagen content was not affected. The increased soluble collagen content appears to be a consequence of the inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity. The active factor was found to be present in the unrefined avocado oil and probably originated from the avocado seed, since collagen metabolism was affected only by fractions which contained lipids fraction from the seed. In comparison rats fed the refined or unrefined soybean oils showed no effects.

  6. Moisturizing effect of topical cosmetic products applied to dry skin.

    PubMed

    Polaskova, Jana; Pavlackova, Jana; Vltavska, Pavlina; Mokrejs, Pavel; Janis, Rahula

    2013-01-01

    One of the complications of "diabetes mellitus" is termed diabetic foot syndrome, the first symptoms of which include changes in the skin's condition and properties. The skin becomes dehydrated, dry, and prone to excessive formation of the horny layer, its barrier function becoming weakened. This function can be restored by applying suitable cosmetic excipients containing active substances. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of commercially available cosmetic products (CPs) designed for the care of diabetic foot, through a group of selected volunteers using noninvasive bioengineering methods. Statistical surveys (p < 0.05) evaluated these CPs as regards to their hydration effect and barrier properties. Special attention was devoted to CPs with the declared content of 10% urea, and that the influence of this preparation's ability to hydrate and maintain epidermal water in the epidermis was confirmed.

  7. Effects of skin stretching without joint movement on skin extensibility of rats

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka, Atsushi; Ono, Takeya; Ishikura, Hideki; Aihara, Kazuki; Sato, Yuta; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Morifuji, Takeshi; Oki, Sadaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the possibility of maintaining skin extensibility by stretching the skin involved in disuse joint contracture. [Subjects and Methods] The study was carried out using 18 male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly allocated to three groups. The control group received no intervention for the right ankle joint, the fixation group received one-week’s fixation of the right ankle joint in maximum plantar-flexion with a cast, and the stretching group received continuous stretching of the skin over the Achilles tendon for 30 min once daily for one week with the cast removed during the skin stretching, but the joint was not moved. On the final day, skin extensibility of the skin from the posterior aspect of the ankle joint was determined using a tensile strength tester and a length-tension curve. [Results] Statistical analysis of the data revealed significant differences in the skin extensibility among the three groups. The stretching group showed significantly greater improvement of skin extensibility than the fixation group. [Conclusion] Skin stretching without moving the joint was demonstrated to be useful for maintaining skin extensibility. PMID:27799714

  8. Effects of permafrost microorganisms on skin wound reparation.

    PubMed

    Kalenova, L F; Novikova, M A; Subbotin, A M

    2015-02-01

    Local application of ointment with Bacillus spp. strain MG8 (15,000-20,000 living bacterial cells), isolated from permafrost specimens, on the skin wound of about 60 mm(2) stimulated the reparation processes in experimental mice. A possible mechanism stimulating the regeneration of the damaged tissues under the effect of MG8 could be modulation of the immune system reactivity with more rapid switchover to humoral immunity anti-inflammatory mechanisms aimed at de novo synthesis of protein. PMID:25708330

  9. Some anomalous effects of sodium ions on the electrophoretic mobility and heteroaggregation of microgel particles.

    PubMed

    Routh, Alexander F; Vincent, Brian

    2004-05-15

    a cationic polystyrene latex sample, prepared with the same amidinium-based initiator. These experiments demonstrate the importance of soluble silicates, leached from glass storage vessels, particularly in the presence of sodium ions. Needless to say, the "anomalous" effects disappeared when plastic storage vessels were used in place of the glass ones.

  10. Effects of bathing on skin exposed to Cobalt-60 teletherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bohannan, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of this study was to determine the effects of bathing or not bathing on the degree of skin reaction occurring in patients receiving Cobalt-60 radiation therapy to the chest, back, or head and neck. A quasi experimental study was done using a 2 x 7 repeated measures design. Sixty-seven subjects receiving Cobalt-60 radiation therapy at the Moncrief Radiation Center in Fort Worth, Texas, were randomly assigned to an experimental group who did not bathe during therapy and a control group who did bathe with water during therapy. Observations were made after each 1000 rads of therapy and two weeks after the final treatment. Erythema and pigmentation measurements were taken using the Photovolt 670 and rates were assigned using the Baker-Leith Rating Scale. Findings from the study suggest that bathing the portal of entry with water during the treatment period does not influence the degree of skin response that occurs from Cobalt-60 teletherapy.

  11. Effective Treatment of Multiple Unresectable Skin Melanoma Metastases by Electrochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Snoj, Marko; Cemazar, Maja; Slekovec Kolar, Breda; Sersa, Gregor

    2007-01-01

    Multiple unresectable melanoma skin metastases pose a treatment problem, especially in centers where isolated limb perfusion is not available. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman who developed multiple small unresectable cutaneous melanoma metastases on the thigh after her lower limb was amputated. Electrochemotherapy with bleomycin resulted in good local control of the disease, with a complete response of the treated melanoma nodules (224 tumor nodules) after 4 treatment sessions. Comparison between electrochemotherapy using repetition frequency of the applied electric pulses of 1 Hz and 5 kHz demonstrated equal antitumor effectiveness. Electrochemotherapy with intravenous bleomycin can also be used as a treatment of choice for local control of multiple unresectable cutaneous melanoma skin metastases. PMID:17589984

  12. QSAR and Predictors of Eye and Skin Effects.

    PubMed

    Liew, Chin Yee; Yap, Chun Wei

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the ensemble of features and training samples was examined with a collection of support vector machines. The effects of data sampling methods, ratio of positive to negative compounds, and types of base models combiner to produce ensemble models were explored. The ensemble method was applied to produce four separate in silico models to classify the labels for eye/skin corrosion (H314), skin irritation (H315), serious eye damage (H318), and eye irritation (H319), which are defined in the "Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals". To the best of our knowledge, the training set used in this work is one of the largest (made of publicly available data) with acceptable prediction performances. These models were distributed via PaDEL-DDPredictor (http://padel.nus.edu.sg/software/padelddpredictor) that can be downloaded freely for public use.

  13. Effects of Cream Containing Ficus carica L. Fruit Extract on Skin Parameters: In vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, H.; Akhtar, N.; Ali, A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of cream containing Ficus carica L. fruit (Fig) extract on various skin parameters such as skin melanin, erythema, moisture content, trans-epidermal water loss and sebum. For this purpose, formulation with 4% concentrated extract of F. carica fruit and base without extract were developed. Base served as a control. Both base and formulation were applied to the cheeks of human volunteers for 8 weeks to investigate the effects on different skin parameters using non-invasive bioengineering instruments. Formulation decreased the skin melanin, trans-epidermal water loss and skin sebum significantly. Formulation increased the skin hydration significantly and insignificant effects on skin erythema. We concluded that a stable topical cream (w/o emulsion) containing F. carica fruit extract have effects on skin melanin, trans-epidermal loss, hydration values and sebum content and possibly could be used against for hyper pigmentation, acne, freckles and wrinkle. PMID:25593393

  14. Histologic evaluation of the effects of skin refrigerants in an animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, C.W.; O'Brian, J.J.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of a number of commonly used skin refrigerants were studied in controlled freezing experiments on guinea pig skin. Frigiderm and Fluro Ethyl produced very little effect on the skin compared to colder preparations such as Cryosthesia -30 degrees C and Cryosthesia -60 degrees C.

  15. The effect of various dietary fats on skin tumor initiation.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-01-01

    The type of dietary fat has been shown to modulate the initiation stage of mammary tumorigenesis, with saturated fat fed before and/or during carcinogen treatment resulting in increased tumor incidence. This study was designed to determine whether different types of dietary fat alter the initiation stage of skin carcinogenesis by use of the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model. Sencar mice were divided into three groups and maintained on one of the experimental diets. The AIN-76-based diets consisted of 10% total fat with various types of fat: 8.5% menhaden oil plus 1.5% corn oil, 8.5% coconut oil plus 1.5% corn oil, and 10% corn oil. After three weeks mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Two weeks later, all mice were switched to a diet containing 5% corn oil. Promotion began four weeks after initiation with twice-weekly application of 1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and continued for 12 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kilocalories of food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma incidence, yield, and size were not significantly different among the diet groups. In a parallel study, [3H]DMBA binding to epidermal DNA showed no dietary differences. Unlike the mammary carcinogenesis model, these data suggest that the type of fat fed during DMBA initiation had minimal effects on this stage of skin carcinogenesis.

  16. The effect of various dietary fats on skin tumor initiation.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-01-01

    The type of dietary fat has been shown to modulate the initiation stage of mammary tumorigenesis, with saturated fat fed before and/or during carcinogen treatment resulting in increased tumor incidence. This study was designed to determine whether different types of dietary fat alter the initiation stage of skin carcinogenesis by use of the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model. Sencar mice were divided into three groups and maintained on one of the experimental diets. The AIN-76-based diets consisted of 10% total fat with various types of fat: 8.5% menhaden oil plus 1.5% corn oil, 8.5% coconut oil plus 1.5% corn oil, and 10% corn oil. After three weeks mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Two weeks later, all mice were switched to a diet containing 5% corn oil. Promotion began four weeks after initiation with twice-weekly application of 1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and continued for 12 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kilocalories of food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma incidence, yield, and size were not significantly different among the diet groups. In a parallel study, [3H]DMBA binding to epidermal DNA showed no dietary differences. Unlike the mammary carcinogenesis model, these data suggest that the type of fat fed during DMBA initiation had minimal effects on this stage of skin carcinogenesis. PMID:1670290

  17. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  18. Laminar separation control effects of shortfin mako shark skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael Thomas

    Shark skin is investigated as a means of laminar flow separation control due to its preferential flow direction as well as the potential for scales to erect and obstruct low-momentum backflow resulting from an adverse pressure gradient acting on the boundary layer. In this study, the effect of the scales on flow reversal is observed in laminar flow conditions. This is achieved by comparing the flow over a pectoral fin from a shortfin mako shark to that over the same fin that is painted to neutralize the effect of the scales on the flow. The effect of the scales on flow reversal is also observed by comparing the flow over a smooth PVC cylinder to that over the same cylinder with samples of mako shark skin affixed to the entire circumference of the cylinder. These samples were taken from the flank region of the shark because the scales at this location have been shown to have the greatest angle of erection compared to the scales on the rest of the shark's body. Scales at this location have an average crown length of 220 microm with a maximum bristling angle of proximately 50 degrees. Because these scales have the highest bristling angle, they have the best potential for separation control. All data was taken using time-resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. The flow over the pectoral fin was analyzed at multiple angles of attack. It was found that the shark skin had the effect of decreasing the size of the separated region over both the pectoral fin and the cylinder as well as decreasing the magnitudes of the reversing flow found in these regions. For all Reynolds numbers tested, drag reduction over 28% was found when applying the sharkskin to the cylinder.

  19. Air pollution and skin diseases: Adverse effects of airborne particulate matter on various skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2016-05-01

    Environmental air pollution encompasses various particulate matters (PMs). The increased ambient PM from industrialization and urbanization is highly associated with morbidity and mortality worldwide, presenting one of the most severe environmental pollution problems. This article focuses on the correlation between PM and skin diseases, along with related immunological mechanisms. Recent epidemiological studies on the cutaneous impacts of PM showed that PM affects the development and exacerbation of skin diseases. PM induces oxidative stress via production of reactive oxygen species and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-8. In addition, the increased production of ROS such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical by PM exposure increases MMPs including MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9, resulting in the degradation of collagen. These processes lead to the increased inflammatory skin diseases and skin aging. In addition, environmental cigarette smoke, which is well known as an oxidizing agent, is closely related with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Also, ultrafine particles (UFPs) including black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the incidence of skin cancer. Overall, increased PM levels are highly associated with the development of various skin diseases via the regulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful for treating PM-induced skin diseases. PMID:27018067

  20. Release and skin permeation studies of Naproxen from hydrophillic gels and effect of terpenes as enhancers on its skin permeation.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Ghosal, S K

    2003-04-01

    The skin permeation parameters of Naproxen through albino mouse abdominal skin was investigated. Out of 5 formulations those prepared from carbomer gels showed promising results and were chosen for investigating enhancing effect of various terpene alcohol viz. Geraniol and Nerolidol and cyclic terpenes viz menthol and thymol on skin permeation of Naproxen. Out of the four terpenes studied Geraniol exhibited the highest enhancing effect with enhancement ratio 4.6, while Nerolidol had an enhancement ratio 4.2. The cyclic terpenes had less prompt enhancing effect compared to the alcohol terpenes, out of the two, methol showed the largest effect with an enhancement ratio of about 3.7 and thymol had an enhancement ratio of 3.5. PMID:12806832

  1. Protective effect of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from salmon skin on UV irradiation-induced photoaging of mice skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu; Lu, Jiaohan; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of gelatin (SG) isolated from salmon skin and its hydrolysate (SGH) on photoaging skin, and the mechanism responsible for anti-photoaging. The average molecular weights of SG and SGH were 65 kDa and 873 Da, respectively. The amino acid compositions of SG and SGH were similar. Both of them were abundant in hydrophobic amino acids. Twenty-five peptides were identified from SGH. SG and SGH could improve UV irradiation-induced pathological changes of macroscopical tissue texture and skin morphology. Hydroxyproline content is an indicator of matrix collagen content, SG and SGH could inhibit the decrease of hydroxyproline content in photoaging skin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, SG and SGH could alleviate UV irradiation-induced oxidative damages to skin by increasing the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), increasing the content of glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA). Moreover, SG and SGH could enhance immune regulation system by increasing the thymus index. Thus, the anti-photoaging mechanisms of SG and SGH were by inhibiting the depletion of antioxidant defense components, involving in the synthesis of collagen and enhancing the function of immune system. Besides, SGH showed a better result in protecting skin from photoaging than SG.

  2. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  3. Spin-orbit coupling and perpendicular Zeeman field for fermionic cold atoms: Observation of the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chuanwei

    2010-08-15

    We propose a scheme for generating Rashba spin-orbit coupling and a perpendicular Zeeman field simultaneously for cold fermionic atoms in a harmonic trap through the coupling between atoms and laser fields. The realization of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and a perpendicular Zeeman field provides opportunities for exploring many topological phenomena using cold fermionic atoms. We focus on the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and show that it may be observed through the response of atomic density to a rotation of the harmonic trap.

  4. [Effect of UV index in the skin exposure].

    PubMed

    Gerbaudo, Mabel; Dionisio de Cabalier, María E

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted from October 2003 to March 2005, collecting data through the measuring authorized volunteers measuring their photoexposition . It worked with the equipment (Safesun from Optix Tech, Inc.), available for measuring. The radiation impact of solar on the city of Cordoba, was chosen measurements for a clear spot on the terrace of the Observatory Environmental Laprida located at 854, in a position that excedes level approximately 30 meters from Piazza San Martin (centerhistoric city). It had two fixed radiation sensors total solar and ultraviolet A radiation sensor manual ultraviolet calibrated according to the erythemal response of skin measuring human ultraviolet index and the maximum exposure timer ecommended for different skin types (Safesun from Optix Tech, Inc.).The aim of this study was to measure the rate and exposure ultraviolet (UV) to evaluate the erythemal effect on most sensitive areas of the face and neck to noon fotoexposición solar in the four annual seasons, and thus promote extending protection regulations to prevent the effects harmful UV non-ionizing radiation. The analysis of the data, UV index values indicate that from the Winter season is observed to undergo the risk of exposure excessive radiation at noon solar day is measured with high Fall UV index is high in spring and high-very high and with days end in the Summer season daily with UV index very high and extreme. This risk remains in the four annual seasons and according to the criteria of the World Health Organization is need to perform significant work to develop measures, education campaigns and outreach, which tend to diminish the sun exposure, hours with the highest incidence of lightning ultraviolet in the four annual seasons. The global environmental degradation and thus destruction of the ozone layer, has been a direct cause of the increase in ultraviolet radiation on earth, which resulted increased rates of cancer incidence and prevalence skin, within the

  5. Evaluation of the effect of skin cleaning procedures on the dermal absorption of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Kilo, Sonja; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Drexler, Hans; Korinth, Gintautas

    2015-08-01

    To reduce the internal exposure, skin decontamination is the most important measure after dermal contact to chemicals. However, no harmonized skin cleaning procedure for experimental ex vivo studies is published. In our study, the impact of two skin cleaning techniques on dermal penetration kinetics and intradermal deposition of 1,4-dioxane, 5% hydrofluoric acid (HF, detected in terms of fluoride ions), and anisole was evaluated to develop a reliable ex vivo skin cleaning method using the diffusion cell technique. After exposure (duration: 3 min (HF); 1h (1,4-dioxane and anisole)) of excised human skin (n=6-8) decontamination was performed by (I) water-soaked cotton swabs or (II) direct application of water on the exposure area. The effect of skin cleaning was investigated by analysing the concentration time course of chemicals in the receptor fluid of diffusion cells and by determining the deposition in skin. Both skin cleaning procedures reduced the amount of fluoride in the skin compartments (p<0.05) and the receptor fluid (p<0.1). However, the effect of cleaning on the dermal absorption of the organic test compounds was not significant. The results demonstrate the suitability of the applied ex vivo protocol for investigating the effectiveness of skin cleaning measures following dermal exposure. In addition, data reveal that the determination of test compounds in both, skin compartments as well as receptor fluid as equivalent for the systemic uptake needs to be considered in studies assessing the effectiveness of skin decontamination procedures.

  6. The effect of skin fatty acids on Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Yvonne; Ohlsen, Knut; Donat, Stefanie; Engelmann, Susanne; Kusch, Harald; Albrecht, Dirk; Cartron, Michael; Hurd, Alexander; Foster, Simon J

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal of the human nose and skin. Human skin fatty acids, in particular cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C-6-H), have high antistaphylococcal activity and can inhibit virulence determinant production. Here, we show that sub-MIC levels of C-6-H result in induction of increased resistance. The mechanism(s) of C-6-H activity was investigated by combined transcriptome and proteome analyses. Proteome analysis demonstrated a pleiotropic effect of C-6-H on virulence determinant production. In response to C-6-H, transcriptomics revealed altered expression of over 500 genes, involved in many aspects of virulence and cellular physiology. The expression of toxins (hla, hlb, hlgBC) was reduced, whereas that of host defence evasion components (cap, sspAB, katA) was increased. In particular, members of the SaeRS regulon had highly reduced expression, and the use of specific mutants revealed that the effect on toxin production is likely mediated via SaeRS.

  7. The positive effect of skin transpiration in peach fruit growth.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Brunella; Manfrini, Luigi; Losciale, Pasquale; Zibordi, Marco; Corelli-Grappadelli, Luca

    2010-09-01

    The effect of fruit transpiration on the mechanisms driving peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) daily growth was investigated. In peach, fruit water losses increase during the season and might play a key role in determining fruit growth. Skin transpiration was reduced during the cell expansion stage by enclosing fruit in plastic bags fitted with holes. In the first year, diameter changes of bagged and control fruit were precisely monitored for 15 days, and percentage dry matter and soluble solids content were determined during the experiment and at harvest. In the second year, midday fruit water potential, daily patterns of fruit growth and of vascular and transpiration flows were monitored. Bagging reduced fruit daily growth on some days, and negatively affected both fruit dry matter percentage and soluble solids content. Fruit transpiration rate was reduced during the midday hours, thus increasing midday fruit water potential and lowering xylem inflows. In accordance with the Münch hypothesis on traslocation, these conditions likely decreased the necessary gradient needed for the transport of phloem sap to sink organs, as in the afternoon, bagged fruit showed lower phloem inflows. These data suggest that skin transpiration in peach has a positive effect on fruit growth, as it enhances fruit phloem import.

  8. The Photoprotective Effect of S-Methylmethionine Sulfonium in Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Serk; Seo, Hyun-Min; Kim, Wang-Kyun; Choi, Joon-Seok; Kim, Ikyon; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    S-Methylmethionine sulfonium (SMMS) was reported to have wound-healing effects; we therefore have investigated the photoprotective effect of SMMS in the present study. SMMS increased the viability of keratinocyte progenitor cells (KPCs) and human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) following ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, and reduced the UVB-induced apoptosis in these cells. SMMS increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and the inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly decreased the SMMS-induced viability of KPCs and hDFs. In addition, SMMS attenuated the UVB-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in KPCs and hDFs. SMMS induced the collagen synthesis and reduced the matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in UVB-irradiated hDFs. In animal studies, application of 5% and 10% SMMS before and after UVB-irradiation significantly decreased the UVB-induced erythema index and depletion of Langerhans cells. In summary, SMMS protects KPCs and hDFs from UVB irradiation, and reduces UVB-induced skin erythema and immune suppression. Therefore, SMMS can be used as a cosmetic raw material, and protect skin from UVB. PMID:26225962

  9. Effects of calcitriol on random skin flap survival in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai-liang; Zhang, Yi-hui; Lin, Ding-sheng; Tao, Xian-yao; Xu, Hua-zi

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol, a metabolite of vitamin D, is often used in osteoporosis clinics. However, the material has other bioactivities; for example, it accelerates angiogenesis, has anti-inflammatory properties, and inhibits oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of calcitriol in a random skin flap rat model. “McFarlane flap” models were established in 84 male Sprague Dawley rats, divided into two groups. One group received intraperitoneal injections of calcitriol (2 μg/kg/day) whereas control rats received intraperitoneal injections of saline. The percentage flap survival area and tissue water content were measured 7 days later, which showed that calcitriol improved flap survival area and reduced tissue edema. It also increased the mean vessel density and upregulated levels of VEGF mRNA/protein, both of which promote flap angiogenesis. Moreover, it decreased leukocyte and macrophage infiltration, reduced the inflammatory proteins IL1β and IL6, increased SOD activity, decreased MDA content, and upregulated the level of autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that calcitriol promotes skin flap survival by accelerating angiogenesis, having anti-inflammatory effects, reducing oxidative stress, and promoting autophagy. PMID:26732750

  10. The Photoprotective Effect of S-Methylmethionine Sulfonium in Skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Serk; Seo, Hyun-Min; Kim, Wang-Kyun; Choi, Joon-Seok; Kim, Ikyon; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2015-07-28

    S-Methylmethionine sulfonium (SMMS) was reported to have wound-healing effects; we therefore have investigated the photoprotective effect of SMMS in the present study. SMMS increased the viability of keratinocyte progenitor cells (KPCs) and human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) following ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, and reduced the UVB-induced apoptosis in these cells. SMMS increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and the inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly decreased the SMMS-induced viability of KPCs and hDFs. In addition, SMMS attenuated the UVB-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in KPCs and hDFs. SMMS induced the collagen synthesis and reduced the matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in UVB-irradiated hDFs. In animal studies, application of 5% and 10% SMMS before and after UVB-irradiation significantly decreased the UVB-induced erythema index and depletion of Langerhans cells. In summary, SMMS protects KPCs and hDFs from UVB irradiation, and reduces UVB-induced skin erythema and immune suppression. Therefore, SMMS can be used as a cosmetic raw material, and protect skin from UVB.

  11. Effects of calcitriol on random skin flap survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai-liang; Zhang, Yi-hui; Lin, Ding-sheng; Tao, Xian-yao; Xu, Hua-zi

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol, a metabolite of vitamin D, is often used in osteoporosis clinics. However, the material has other bioactivities; for example, it accelerates angiogenesis, has anti-inflammatory properties, and inhibits oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of calcitriol in a random skin flap rat model. "McFarlane flap" models were established in 84 male Sprague Dawley rats, divided into two groups. One group received intraperitoneal injections of calcitriol (2 μg/kg/day) whereas control rats received intraperitoneal injections of saline. The percentage flap survival area and tissue water content were measured 7 days later, which showed that calcitriol improved flap survival area and reduced tissue edema. It also increased the mean vessel density and upregulated levels of VEGF mRNA/protein, both of which promote flap angiogenesis. Moreover, it decreased leukocyte and macrophage infiltration, reduced the inflammatory proteins IL1β and IL6, increased SOD activity, decreased MDA content, and upregulated the level of autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that calcitriol promotes skin flap survival by accelerating angiogenesis, having anti-inflammatory effects, reducing oxidative stress, and promoting autophagy. PMID:26732750

  12. Quantum Anomalous Hall effect in a Topological Insulator coupled to a Skyrmion Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Tonmoy; Barlas, Yafis; Yin, Gen; Lake, Roger

    A Skyrmion is a topologically protected spin texture characterized by a topological charge that has been experimentally observed in both bulk B20 compounds and thin films. In a quantum anomalous Hall phase, a material develops a topologically nontrivial electronic structure giving rise to quantized hall conductivity without any external magnetic field. We predict that a conventional bulk topological insulating material (e.g. Bi2 Se3, Bi2 Te3 Sb2 Te3) in proximity with a Skyrmion crystal, with a weak exchange coupling, will be driven into an anomalous Hall insulating phase characterized by a nonzero integer chern number in the gap. We have calculated band structure, identified the gaps, and calculated the chern number at those gaps. The calculations show that the non trivial topological properties of the Skyrmion spin texture can be imprinted on the Dirac electrons of the topological insulator. Electronic structure calculations were supported by the NSF (ECCS-1408168). Micromagnetic simulations were supported by SHINES Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award #DE-SC0012670.

  13. Giant gap quantum spin Hall effect and valley-polarized quantum anomalous Hall effect in cyanided bismuth bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei-xiao; Zhang, Chang-wen; Ding, Meng; Zhang, Bao-min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ren, Miao-juan; Wang, Pei-ji; Zhang, Run-wu; Hu, Shu-jun; Yan, Shi-shen

    2016-08-01

    Bismuth (Bi) has attracted a great deal of attention for its strongest spin–orbit coupling (SOC) strength among main group elements. Although quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is predicted in half-hydrogenated Bi honeycomb monolayers Bi2H, the experimental results are still missing. Halogen atoms (X = F, Cl and Br) were also frequently used as modifications, but Bi2X films show a frustrating metallic character that masks the QAH effects. Here, first-principle calculations are performed to predict the full-cyanided bismuthene (Bi2(CN)2) as 2D topological insulator supporting quantum spin Hall state with a record large gap up to 1.10 eV, and more importantly, half-cyanogen saturated bismuthene (Bi2(CN)) as a Chern insulator supporting a valley-polarized QAH state, with a Curie temperature to be 164 K, as well as a large gap reaching 0.348 eV which could be further tuned by bi-axial strain and SOC strength. Our findings provide an appropriate and flexible material family candidate for spintronic and valleytronic devices.

  14. Giant gap quantum spin Hall effect and valley-polarized quantum anomalous Hall effect in cyanided bismuth bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei-xiao; Zhang, Chang-wen; Ding, Meng; Zhang, Bao-min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ren, Miao-juan; Wang, Pei-ji; Zhang, Run-wu; Hu, Shu-jun; Yan, Shi-shen

    2016-08-01

    Bismuth (Bi) has attracted a great deal of attention for its strongest spin-orbit coupling (SOC) strength among main group elements. Although quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is predicted in half-hydrogenated Bi honeycomb monolayers Bi2H, the experimental results are still missing. Halogen atoms (X = F, Cl and Br) were also frequently used as modifications, but Bi2X films show a frustrating metallic character that masks the QAH effects. Here, first-principle calculations are performed to predict the full-cyanided bismuthene (Bi2(CN)2) as 2D topological insulator supporting quantum spin Hall state with a record large gap up to 1.10 eV, and more importantly, half-cyanogen saturated bismuthene (Bi2(CN)) as a Chern insulator supporting a valley-polarized QAH state, with a Curie temperature to be 164 K, as well as a large gap reaching 0.348 eV which could be further tuned by bi-axial strain and SOC strength. Our findings provide an appropriate and flexible material family candidate for spintronic and valleytronic devices.

  15. On the anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potgieter, M. S.; Fisk, L. A.; Lee, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    The so-called anomalous cosmic ray component, which occurs at energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon and consists only of He, N, O, and Ne, has been a subject of interest for more than a decade. The origin of this component is generally considered to be interstellar neutral gas that is ionized and accelerated in the solar wind. The mechanism and the location for the acceleration, however, remains an unsolved problem. A model is used which includes the effects of gradient and curvature drifts and considers the implications of observed spatial gradients of the anomalous component for the location of the acceleration region. It is concluded that if drifts are important the acceleration region cannot lie at the solar poles. It is also concluded that there is no single region for the acceleration which can account for both the observed intensities and gradients in models which include drift effects.

  16. Anomalous rf magnetoresistance in copper at 4/degree/K

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Prodell, A.G.; Rogers, J.T.; De Panfilis, S.; Melissinos, A.C.; Moskowitz, B.E.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Wuensch, W.U.; Fowler, W.B.; Nezrick, F.A.

    1988-03-01

    We have measured the effect of a magnetic field on the surface resistance of polycrystalline Cu at f = 1.2 GHz and at 4.4/degree/K; under these conditions the surface resistance is well into the anomalous skin effect regime but has not reached its limiting value. We find that the transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance are an order of magnitude smaller than the DC magnetoresistance and depend quadratically on the field. At low fields we observe a decrease in surface resistance with increasing field which can be interpreted as a size effect of the TF surface current. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECTS OF VITAMIN D ON SKIN INFLAMMATION.

    PubMed

    Toniato, E; Spinas, E; Saggini, A; Kritas, S K; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Conti, P

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D has a major role in calcium absorption and maintenance of healthy bones. Vitamin D is also involved in cancer, cardiovascular system, allergic diseases, immune regulation and immune disor¬ders. Irradiation of food as well as animals produces vitamin D and more than 90% of previtamin D3 synthesis in the skin occurs in the epidermis. Vitamin D receptor has been found in many cells including T and B lymphocytes, macrophages, mast cells, NK cells and Tregs, and it selectively binds with high affinity to its ligand. Vitamin D binds its receptor VDR, resulting in transcription of a number of genes playing a role in inhibition of MAPK. Its effect may be also mediated by the direct activation of PKC. Vitamin D has the ability to suppress inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-1, IFN-gamma and IL-2; while it increases the generation of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. In B cells, vitamin D3 have also been shown to suppress IgE antibody class switch partly through the inhibition of NF-kB. Here we discuss the relationship between vitamin D, immunity and skin disorders.

  18. The effectiveness of a twice-daily skin-moisturising regimen for reducing the incidence of skin tears.

    PubMed

    Carville, Keryln; Leslie, Gavin; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Newall, Nelly; Lewin, Gill

    2014-08-01

    A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a twice-daily moisturising regimen as compared to 'usual' skin care for reducing skin tear incidence. Aged care residents from 14 Western Australian facilities (980 beds) were invited to participate. The facilities were sorted into pairs and matched in terms of bed numbers and whether they provided high or low care. One facility from each matched pair was randomised to the intervention group. Consenting residents in an intervention facility received a twice-daily application of a commercially available, standardised pH neutral, perfume-free moisturiser on their extremities. Residents in the control facilities received ad hoc or no standardised skin-moisturising regimen. Participant numbers were sufficient to detect a 5% difference in incidence rate between the two groups with 80% power and a significance level of P = 0·05, and the inter-cluster correlation coefficient was 0·034. Data were collected over 6 months. A total of 1396 skin tears on 424 residents were recorded during the study. In the intervention group, the average monthly incidence rate was 5·76 per 1000 occupied bed days as compared to 10·57 in the control group. The application of moisturiser twice daily reduced the incidence of skin tears by almost 50% in residents living in aged care facilities.

  19. Conflicting effects of DMSO on mouse skin tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacoby, W.T.; Weiss, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    A number of solvents, including dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), when substituted for acetone as the vehicle for the potent promoter phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) in the two-stage mouse skin cancer model, tend to inhibit tumorigenesis. DMSO was investigated further because the literature is ambiguous concerning its effect in both single and multi-stage carcinogenesis. As solvent for the complete carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene (BaP, 125 mg in 40 ..mu..l 2x/wk), tumor yield increased an avg of 245% (3 trials in C3H mice) compared to acetone/BaP. However, in the two-stage model (CD-1 mice initiated with 50-100 ..mu..g DMBA) DMSO as the vehicle for PMA (5 ..mu..g in 40 ..mu..l 2x/wk) reduced tumor yield to 34% of the PMA/acetone controls. To test whether the inhibition was an in vitro effect, 40 ..mu..l DMSO was applied at the initiation site, the back, up to one hr before PMA/acetone. In three trials tumor yield averaged 23% of controls. To determine whether the DMSO effect was directly on initiated cells or indirectly via the systemic circulation, 40 ..mu..l DMSO was applied prior to promotion at a site distant from initiation/promotion, the abdomen. In three trials, DMSO enhanced tumor yield by 194%. DMSO itself had no initiating or promotion effects. Thus, it appears that DMSO may either inhibit or enhance mouse skin tumorigenesis depending on its method of application.

  20. Noncontact dipole effects on channel permeation. III. Anomalous proton conductance effects in gramicidin

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, LR; Cole, CD; Hendershot, RJ; Cotten, M; Cross, TA; Busath, DD

    1999-01-01

    Proton transport on water wires, of interest for many problems in membrane biology, is analyzed in side-chain analogs of gramicidin A channels. In symmetrical 0.1 N HCl solutions, fluorination of channel Trp(11), Trp-(13), or Trp(15) side chains is found to inhibit proton transport, and replacement of one or more Trps with Phe enhances proton transport, the opposite of the effects on K(+) transport in lecithin bilayers. The current-voltage relations are superlinear, indicating that some membrane field-dependent process is rate limiting. The interfacial dipole effects are usually assumed to affect the rate of cation translocation across the channel. For proton conductance, however, water reorientation after proton translocation is anticipated to be rate limiting. We propose that the findings reported here are most readily interpreted as the result of dipole-dipole interactions between channel waters and polar side chains or lipid headgroups. In particular, if reorientation of the water column begins with the water nearest the channel exit, this hypothesis explains the negative impact of fluorination and the positive impact of headgroup dipole on proton conductance. PMID:20540928

  1. Effect of olive and sunflower seed oil on the adult skin barrier: implications for neonatal skin care.

    PubMed

    Danby, Simon G; AlEnezi, Tareq; Sultan, Amani; Lavender, Tina; Chittock, John; Brown, Kirsty; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Natural oils are advocated and used throughout the world as part of neonatal skin care, but there is an absence of evidence to support this practice. The goal of the current study was to ascertain the effect of olive oil and sunflower seed oil on the biophysical properties of the skin. Nineteen adult volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis were recruited into two randomized forearm-controlled mechanistic studies. The first cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm twice daily for 5 weeks. The second cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm and six drops of sunflower seed oil to the other twice daily for 4 weeks. The effect of the treatments was evaluated by determining stratum corneum integrity and cohesion, intercorneocyte cohesion, moisturization, skin-surface pH, and erythema. Topical application of olive oil for 4 weeks caused a significant reduction in stratum corneum integrity and induced mild erythema in volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis. Sunflower seed oil preserved stratum corneum integrity, did not cause erythema, and improved hydration in the same volunteers. In contrast to sunflower seed oil, topical treatment with olive oil significantly damages the skin barrier, and therefore has the potential to promote the development of, and exacerbate existing, atopic dermatitis. The use of olive oil for the treatment of dry skin and infant massage should therefore be discouraged. These findings challenge the unfounded belief that all natural oils are beneficial for the skin and highlight the need for further research.

  2. Calculations of the neutron skin and its effect in atomic parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. A.; Derevianko, A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-03-15

    We perform calculations for the neutron skin of nuclei and its contribution to atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) in many isotopes of Cs, Ba, Sm, Dy, Yb, Tl, Pb, Bi, Fr, and Ra. Three problems are addressed: (i) neutron-skin-induced errors to single-isotope PNC, (ii) the possibility of measuring neutron skin using atomic PNC, and (iii) neutron-skin-induced errors for ratios of PNC effects in different isotopes. In the latter case the correlations in the neutron skin values for different isotopes lead to cancellations of the errors; this makes the isotopic ratio method a competitive tool in a search for new physics beyond the standard model.

  3. Skin tears.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, S

    2001-08-01

    Skin tears are a serious, painful problem for older patients. Find out how your staff can recognize patients at risk, what they can do to prevent skin tears, and how to manage them effectively if they occur.

  4. Emerging magnetism and anomalous Hall effect in iridate-manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Nichols, John; Gao, Xiang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L; Freeland, John W; Lauter, Valeria; Yi, Di; Liu, Jian; Haskel, Daniel; Petrie, Jonathan R; Guo, Er-Jia; Herklotz, Andreas; Lee, Dongkyu; Ward, Thomas Z; Eres, Gyula; Fitzsimmons, Michael R; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-01-01

    Strong Coulomb repulsion and spin-orbit coupling are known to give rise to exotic physical phenomena in transition metal oxides. Initial attempts to investigate systems, where both of these fundamental interactions are comparably strong, such as 3d and 5d complex oxide superlattices, have revealed properties that only slightly differ from the bulk ones of the constituent materials. Here we observe that the interfacial coupling between the 3d antiferromagnetic insulator SrMnO3 and the 5d paramagnetic metal SrIrO3 is enormously strong, yielding an anomalous Hall response as the result of charge transfer driven interfacial ferromagnetism. These findings show that low dimensional spin-orbit entangled 3d-5d interfaces provide an avenue to uncover technologically relevant physical phenomena unattainable in bulk materials. PMID:27596572

  5. Emerging magnetism and anomalous Hall effect in iridate-manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Nichols, John; Gao, Xiang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L; Freeland, John W; Lauter, Valeria; Yi, Di; Liu, Jian; Haskel, Daniel; Petrie, Jonathan R; Guo, Er-Jia; Herklotz, Andreas; Lee, Dongkyu; Ward, Thomas Z; Eres, Gyula; Fitzsimmons, Michael R; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-09-06

    Strong Coulomb repulsion and spin-orbit coupling are known to give rise to exotic physical phenomena in transition metal oxides. Initial attempts to investigate systems, where both of these fundamental interactions are comparably strong, such as 3d and 5d complex oxide superlattices, have revealed properties that only slightly differ from the bulk ones of the constituent materials. Here we observe that the interfacial coupling between the 3d antiferromagnetic insulator SrMnO3 and the 5d paramagnetic metal SrIrO3 is enormously strong, yielding an anomalous Hall response as the result of charge transfer driven interfacial ferromagnetism. These findings show that low dimensional spin-orbit entangled 3d-5d interfaces provide an avenue to uncover technologically relevant physical phenomena unattainable in bulk materials.

  6. Emerging magnetism and anomalous Hall effect in iridate–manganite heterostructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nichols, John; Gao, Xiang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Freeland, John W.; Lauter, Valeria; Yi, Di; Liu, Jian; Haskel, Daniel; Petrie, Jonathan R.; et al

    2016-09-06

    We know strong Coulomb repulsion and spin–orbit coupling to give rise to exotic physical phenomena in transition metal oxides. Initial attempts to investigate systems, where both of these fundamental interactions are comparably strong, such as 3d and 5d complex oxide superlattices, have revealed properties that only slightly differ from the bulk ones of the constituent materials. Furthermore, we observe that the interfacial coupling between the 3d antiferromagnetic insulator SrMnO3 and the 5d paramagnetic metal SrIrO3 is enormously strong, yielding an anomalous Hall response as the result of charge transfer driven interfacial ferromagnetism. Our findings show that low dimensional spin–orbit entangledmore » 3d–5d interfaces provide an avenue to uncover technologically relevant physical phenomena unattainable in bulk materials.« less

  7. When Chiral Photons Meet Chiral Fermions: Photoinduced Anomalous Hall Effects in Weyl Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lee, Patrick A; Burch, Kenneth S; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    2016-01-15

    The Weyl semimetal is characterized by three-dimensional linear band touching points called Weyl nodes. These nodes come in pairs with opposite chiralities. We show that the coupling of circularly polarized photons with these chiral electrons generates a Hall conductivity without any applied magnetic field in the plane orthogonal to the light propagation. This phenomenon comes about because with all three Pauli matrices exhausted to form the three-dimensional linear dispersion, the Weyl nodes cannot be gapped. Rather, the net influence of chiral photons is to shift the positions of the Weyl nodes. Interestingly, the momentum shift is tightly correlated with the chirality of the node to produce a net anomalous Hall signal. Application of our proposal to the recently discovered TaAs family of Weyl semimetals leads to an order-of-magnitude estimate of the photoinduced Hall conductivity which is within the experimentally accessible range. PMID:26824561

  8. When Chiral Photons Meet Chiral Fermions: Photoinduced Anomalous Hall Effects in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lee, Patrick A.; Burch, Kenneth S.; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The Weyl semimetal is characterized by three-dimensional linear band touching points called Weyl nodes. These nodes come in pairs with opposite chiralities. We show that the coupling of circularly polarized photons with these chiral electrons generates a Hall conductivity without any applied magnetic field in the plane orthogonal to the light propagation. This phenomenon comes about because with all three Pauli matrices exhausted to form the three-dimensional linear dispersion, the Weyl nodes cannot be gapped. Rather, the net influence of chiral photons is to shift the positions of the Weyl nodes. Interestingly, the momentum shift is tightly correlated with the chirality of the node to produce a net anomalous Hall signal. Application of our proposal to the recently discovered TaAs family of Weyl semimetals leads to an order-of-magnitude estimate of the photoinduced Hall conductivity which is within the experimentally accessible range.

  9. High-beta effects and anomalous diffusion in plasmas expanding into magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    A metallic laser-produced plasma is allowed to expand transversely into an applied magnetic field, under conditions where the typical ion cyclotron radius is much larger, and the electron cyclotron radius much smaller, than the experimental dimensions. A stationary background plasma may also be present. Initially, the flow energy density exceeds (B squared/8 times pi), where B is the ambient magnetic field. Magnetic coil probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave diagnostics are used to study the plasma-field interaction. Field compression at the leading edge and field exclusion within the expanding plasma are seen. The diagnostic measurements and comparison with a theoretical model demonstrate plasma turbulence and anomalously high diffusion of field into the expanding plasma.

  10. Emerging magnetism and anomalous Hall effect in iridate-manganite heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, John; Gao, Xiang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Freeland, John W.; Lauter, Valeria; Yi, Di; Liu, Jian; Haskel, Daniel; Petrie, Jonathan R.; Guo, Er-Jia; Herklotz, Andreas; Lee, Dongkyu; Ward, Thomas Z.; Eres, Gyula; Fitzsimmons, Michael R.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-09-01

    Strong Coulomb repulsion and spin-orbit coupling are known to give rise to exotic physical phenomena in transition metal oxides. Initial attempts to investigate systems, where both of these fundamental interactions are comparably strong, such as 3d and 5d complex oxide superlattices, have revealed properties that only slightly differ from the bulk ones of the constituent materials. Here we observe that the interfacial coupling between the 3d antiferromagnetic insulator SrMnO3 and the 5d paramagnetic metal SrIrO3 is enormously strong, yielding an anomalous Hall response as the result of charge transfer driven interfacial ferromagnetism. These findings show that low dimensional spin-orbit entangled 3d-5d interfaces provide an avenue to uncover technologically relevant physical phenomena unattainable in bulk materials.

  11. Emerging magnetism and anomalous Hall effect in iridate–manganite heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, John; Gao, Xiang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Freeland, John W.; Lauter, Valeria; Yi, Di; Liu, Jian; Haskel, Daniel; Petrie, Jonathan R.; Guo, Er-Jia; Herklotz, Andreas; Lee, Dongkyu; Ward, Thomas Z.; Eres, Gyula; Fitzsimmons, Michael R.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-01-01

    Strong Coulomb repulsion and spin–orbit coupling are known to give rise to exotic physical phenomena in transition metal oxides. Initial attempts to investigate systems, where both of these fundamental interactions are comparably strong, such as 3d and 5d complex oxide superlattices, have revealed properties that only slightly differ from the bulk ones of the constituent materials. Here we observe that the interfacial coupling between the 3d antiferromagnetic insulator SrMnO3 and the 5d paramagnetic metal SrIrO3 is enormously strong, yielding an anomalous Hall response as the result of charge transfer driven interfacial ferromagnetism. These findings show that low dimensional spin–orbit entangled 3d–5d interfaces provide an avenue to uncover technologically relevant physical phenomena unattainable in bulk materials. PMID:27596572

  12. Topological insulators in silicene: Quantum hall, quantum spin hall and quantum anomalous hall effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2013-12-04

    Silicene is a monolayer of silicon atoms forming a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, which shares almost every remarkable property with graphene. The low energy dynamics is described by Dirac electrons, but they are massive due to relatively large spin-orbit interactions. I will explain the following properties of silicene: 1) The band structure is controllable by applying an electric field. 2) Silicene undergoes a phase transition from a topological insulator to a band insulator by applying external electric field. 3) The topological phase transition can be detected experimentally by way of diamagnetism. 4) There is a novel valley-spin selection rules revealed by way of photon absorption. 5) Silicene yields a remarkably many phases such as quantum anomalous Hall phase and valley polarized metal when the exchange field is additionally introduced. 6) A silicon nanotubes can be used to convey spin currents under an electric field.

  13. Effect of Electron Temperature Fluctuations on the Anomalous Particle Flux inferred by Electrostatic Triple Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2010-11-01

    Plasma anomalous transport severely reduces the economical attractiveness of any possible fusion energy reactor based on magnetically confined thermonuclear plasma. Understanding the major mechanisms of this transport, mainly due to the anomalous particles losses, is vital to ameliorate the potential of such reactor, and plasma edge is a key area for this research. We reported here data of a 4-pin triple probe at TCABR tokamak [R=0.615m, a=0.18m, BT=1.15T, Ip<=120kA, ne(bar)<=4x10^19m-3, Te(0)<=600eV, Ti(0)<=400eV, 100ms, circular limiter]. Plasma density (ne), potential (Vp), electron temperature (Te), and respectively fluctuations, all were simultaneously measured or inferred with high spatial(˜3mm) and temporal (1μs) resolution. Corrections in the fluctuation driven particle flux(γ) via the poloidal electrical field (Eθ) and ne are used: real geometry of the tips; Vp (instead of floating potential) between the two tips for inferring Eθ; a correction on ne due to the finite electrical sheath formed at the probe ion collecting area via an analytical formula based on the Hutchinson model for collisionless plasma. The role of Te fluctuations in γ is analyzed and the results are correlated with the dynamic of the global plasma parameters on discharges under auxiliary heating via RF injection (4MHz, 30kW, Alfvén Wave scheme) in which confinement improvement has been observed.

  14. Transmission of phototherapy through human skin: dosimetry adjustment for effects of skin color, body composition, wavelength, and light coupling to skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, Ethne L.; Van Zuylen, Jeff

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To examine factors that affect penetration of phototherapy. Methods: Age, sex, height, and weight were recorded; skin color, skinfold thickness, and light transmission through a skinfold were measured over biceps and triceps muscles, and at the anterior waistline. Light was generated using two 23-diode LED arrays at 840 nm and 660 nm with surface area of 7 cm2. Photon irradiation was measured using an Optical Power Meter consisting of a 1x1-cm2 light detector placed in the centre of the illuminated 7 cm2 spot. Transmission was measured using three skin-diode coupling conditions. Results: Penetration of LED irradiation increased when diodes were coupled to skin with pressure. Red light attenuated more rapidly than infrared light and the attenuation of red light increased as skin color darkened. Penetration of red and infrared light decreased as the amount of subcutaneous fat increased. There were gender effects on penetration of infrared light at normal and low BMI values. Conclusions: When using divergent light sources for phototherapy, radiant exposure should take into account individual physical characteristics, irradiation wavelength and diode configuration of the laser therapy system.

  15. Nonstochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig skin.

    PubMed

    Peel, D M; Hopewell, J W; Wells, J; Charles, M W

    1984-08-01

    Circular areas of pig skin from 1- to 40-mm diameter were irradiated with beta emitters of high, medium, and low energies, 90Sr, 170Tm, and 147Pm, respectively. The study provides information for radiological protection problems of localized skin exposures. During the first 16 weeks after irradiation 90Sr produced a first reaction due to epithelial cell death followed by a second reaction attributable to damage to the dermal blood vessels. 170Tm and 147Pm produced the epithelial reaction only. The epithelial dose response varied as a function of beta energy. The doses required to produce moist desquamation in 50% of 15- to 22.5-mm fields (ED50) were 30-45 Gy from 90Sr, approximately 80 Gy from 170Tm, and approximately 500 Gy from 147Pm. A model involving different methods of epithelial repopulation is proposed to explain this finding. An area effect was observed in the epithelial response to 90Sr irradiation. The ED50 for moist desquamation ranged from approximately 25 Gy for a 40-mm source to approximately 450 Gy for a 1-mm source. The 5-, 9-, and 19-mm 170Tm sources all produced an ED50 of approximately 80 Gy, while the value for the 2-mm source was approximately 250 Gy. It is also suggested that the area effects could be explained by different modes of epithelial repopulation after irradiation. After high energy beta irradiation repopulation would be mainly from the field periphery, while after lower energy irradiation repopulation from hair follicle epithelium would predominate.

  16. Development and validation of a tokamak skin effect transformer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, J. A.; Moret, J.-M.; Coda, S.; Felici, F.; Garrido, I.

    2012-02-01

    A lumped parameter, state space model for a tokamak transformer including the slow flux penetration in the plasma (skin effect transformer model) is presented. The model does not require detailed or explicit information about plasma profiles or geometry. Instead, this information is lumped in system variables, parameters and inputs. The model has an exact mathematical structure built from energy and flux conservation theorems, predicting the evolution and non-linear interaction of plasma current and internal inductance as functions of the primary coil currents, plasma resistance, non-inductive current drive and the loop voltage at a specific location inside the plasma (equilibrium loop voltage). Loop voltage profile in the plasma is substituted by a three-point discretization, and ordinary differential equations are used to predict the equilibrium loop voltage as a function of the boundary and resistive loop voltages. This provides a model for equilibrium loop voltage evolution, which is reminiscent of the skin effect. The order and parameters of this differential equation are determined empirically using system identification techniques. Fast plasma current modulation experiments with random binary signals have been conducted in the TCV tokamak to generate the required data for the analysis. Plasma current was modulated under ohmic conditions between 200 and 300 kA with 30 ms rise time, several times faster than its time constant L/R ≈ 200 ms. A second-order linear differential equation for equilibrium loop voltage is sufficient to describe the plasma current and internal inductance modulation with 70% and 38% fit parameters, respectively. The model explains the most salient features of the plasma current transients, such as the inverse correlation between plasma current ramp rates and internal inductance changes, without requiring detailed or explicit information about resistivity profiles. This proves that a lumped parameter modelling approach can be used to

  17. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices. PMID:26020492

  18. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices.

  19. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices. PMID:26020492

  20. Metallic transport and large anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xi; Shigematsu, Kei; Chikamatsu, Akira Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-08-18

    We report the electrical transport properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N (001) epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The Mn{sub 4}N thin films were tetragonally distorted with a ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane lattice constants of 0.987 and showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with an effective magnetic anisotropy constant of 0.16 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is comparable with that of a recently reported molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown film. The thin films exhibited metallic transport with a room temperature resistivity of 125 μΩ cm in addition to a large anomalous Hall effect with a Hall angle tangent of 0.023.

  1. Anomalous degradation of low-field mobility in short-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, Kenji; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kakushima, Kuniyuki

    2015-12-01

    The anomalous degradation of the low-field mobility observed in short-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors is analyzed by collating various reported data in experiments and simulations. It is inferred that the degradation is not caused by the channel scattering of the carriers. The origin is proposed to be the backscattering of channel carriers on injection into the drain. The expression of the low-field mobility, including the backscattering effect, is derived. The inverse of the low-field mobility is a linear function of the inverse of channel length, the expression of which reproduces that empirically derived by Bidal's group. By fitting the expression to simulated as well as experimental data, we can estimate the value of parameters related to the channel scattering and also to the backscattering from the drain. We find that these values are in reasonable magnitude.

  2. Effect of intense THz pulses on expression of genes associated with skin cancer and inflammatory skin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim K.; Purschke, David; Golubov, Andrey; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Woycicki, Rafal; Hegmann, Frank A.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-03-01

    The growing experimental evidence suggests that broadband, picosecond-duration THz pulses may influence biological systems and functions. While the mechanisms by which THz pulse-induced biological effects are not yet known, experiments using in vitro cell cultures, tissue models, as well as recent in vivo studies have demonstrated that THz pulses can elicit cellular and molecular changes in exposed cells and tissues in the absence of thermal effects. Recently, we demonstrated that intense, picosecond THz pulses induce phosphorylation of H2AX, indicative of DNA damage, and at the same time activate DNA damage response in human skin tissues. We also find that intense THz pulses have a profound impact on global gene expression in human skin. Many of the affected genes have important functions in epidermal differentiation and have been implicated in skin cancer and inflammatory skin conditions. The observed THzinduced changes in expression of these genes are in many cases opposite to disease-related changes, suggesting possible therapeutic applications of intense THz pulses.

  3. Anomalous Hall effect in ZnxFe3-xO4: Universal scaling law and electron localization below the Verwey transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrecy, N.; Hamieh, M.; Hebert, C.; Escudier, M.; Becerra, L.; Perriere, J.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the well-established universal scaling σxyAHE ˜ σxx1.6 between anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities in the low conductivity regime (σxx < 104 Ω-1 cm-1) transforms into the scaling σxyAHE ˜ σxx2 at the onset of strong electron localization. The crossover between the two relations is observed in magnetite-derived ZnxFe3-xO4 thin films where an insulating/hopping regime follows a bad metal/hopping regime below the Verwey transition temperature Tv. Our results demonstrate that electron localization effects come into play in the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) modifying significantly the scaling exponent. In addition, the thermal evolution of the anomalous Hall resistivity suggests the existence of spin polarons whose size would decrease below Tv.

  4. Anomalous Diffusion Near Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Synchro-betatron resonances can lead to emittance growth and the loss of luminosity. We consider the detailed dynamics of a bunch near such a low order resonance driven by crossing angles at the collision points. We characterize the nature of diffusion and find that it is anomalous and sub-diffusive. This affects both the shape of the beam distribution and the time scales for growth. Predictions of a simplified anomalous diffusion model are compared with direct simulations. Transport of particles near resonances is still not a well understood phenomenon. Often, without justification, phase space motion is assumed to be a normal diffusion process although at least one case of anomalous diffusion in beam dynamics has been reported [1]. Here we will focus on the motion near synchro-betatron resonances which can be excited by several means, including beams crossing at an angle at the collision points as in the LHC. We will consider low order resonances which couple the horizontal and longitudinal planes, both for simplicity and to observe large effects over short time scales. While the tunes we consider are not practical for a collider, nonetheless the transport mechanisms we uncover are also likely to operate at higher order resonances.

  5. Effect of microwaves at X-band on guinea-pig skin in tissue culture: 3. Effect of pulsed microwaves on skin respiration and biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Carney, S. A.; Lawrence, J. C.; Ricketts, C. R.

    1970-01-01

    Carney, S. A., Lawrence, J. C., and Ricketts, C. R. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 72-76. Effect of microwaves at X-band on guinea-pig skin in tissue culture. 3. Effect of pulsed microwaves on skin respiration and biochemistry. Small pieces of guinea-pig skin were exposed to known power densities of pulsed microwaves at X-band (9·6 GHz). The pulse duration was 0·25 microsecond and the pulse repetition frequency 4 KHz. The peak power was thus 1,000 times the mean power. Otherwise conditions were closely comparable with those of previous experiments using continuous microwaves. After exposure the skin was maintained on a nutrient medium in vitro. The respiration of the skin and the uptake of 35S-sulphate, 32P-phosphate, and 14C-L-proline into skin constituents were reduced by exposure. The reduction was very similar to that observed after exposure to the same mean power density of continuous microwaves. The effects are believed to be attributable to heating of the skin. PMID:5418922

  6. Wet decontamination-induced stratum corneum hydration--effects on the skin barrier function to diethylmalonate.

    PubMed

    Loke, W K; U, S H; Lau, S K; Lim, J S; Tay, G S; Koh, C H

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination of chemical agents from the skin uses both dry and wet decontamination processes. Recent studies have shown that wet decontamination frequently results in stratum corneum hydration. To evaluate the hydration effect of wet decontamination on the skin barrier function and hence on the decontamination efficiency, a series of comparative studies were carried out on human skin contaminated with the nerve agent simulant diethylmalonate, using decontamination media having different salinity and surfactants. The results showed that, compared to non-decontaminated skin, remnant diethylmalonate on decontaminated skin penetrated at an accelerated rate in the immediate 2 h following decontamination. This transient enhancement effect, ranging from 20 to 98%, was depended on the nature of the decontamination media used and was more obvious in skin samples that were decontaminated 1 h postexposure. All decontamination media exhibited this effect, with the greatest enhancement observed in the following order: anionic surfactant > cationic surfactant > non-ionic surfactant > deionized water > 0.9% saline > 9% saline.

  7. Effect of seasonal and geographical differences on skin and effect of treatment with an osmoprotectant: Sorbitol.

    PubMed

    Muizzuddin, Neelam; Ingrassia, Michael; Marenus, Kenneth D; Maes, Daniel H; Mammone, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Human skin maintains an optimal permeability barrier function in a terrestrial environment that varies considerably in humidity. Cells cultured under hyperosmotic stress accumulate osmolytes including sorbitol. Epidermal keratinocytes experience similar high osmolality under dry environmental conditions because of increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and concomitant drying of the skin. This study was designed to determine if epidermal keratinocytes, in vitro, could be protected from high osmotic stress, with the exogenous addition of sorbitol. In addition, we evaluated the effect of a formulation containing topical sorbitol on skin barrier and moisturization of subjects living in arid and humid regions in summer as well as in winter. Results from in vitro experiments showed that 50 mM sorbitol protected epidermal keratinocytes from osmotic toxicity induced by sodium chloride. Clinical studies indicated that skin chronically exposed to hot, dry environment appeared to exhibit stronger skin barrier and a lower baseline TEWL. In addition, skin barrier was stronger in summer than in winter. Sorbitol exhibited significant improvement in both barrier repair and moisturization, especially in individuals subjected to arid environmental conditions.

  8. Measurement of the nucleation and domain depinning field in a single Co/Pt multilayer dot by Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delalande, M.; de Vries, J.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Co/Pt multilayer dots with perpendicular anisotropy and with diameters of 250 and 350 nm were fabricated on top of a Hall cross configuration. The angular dependence of the magnetic reversal of the individual dot was investigated by Anomalous Hall effect measurements. At near in-plane angles (85° with the magnetic easy axis) the dot switches partially into a stable two-domain state. This allows for separate analysis of the angular dependence of both the field required for nucleation of a reversed domain, and the field required for depinning of the domain wall. The angular dependence of the depinning field fits accurately to a 1/cos(θ) behavior, whereas the angular dependence of the nucleation field shows a minimum close to 45°. The latter dependency can be accurately fitted to the modified Kondorsky model proposed by Schumacher [1].

  9. Effect of spin-orbit nuclear charge density corrections due to the anomalous magnetic moment on halonuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, A.; Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we consider the contribution of the anomalous magnetic moments of protons and neutrons to the nuclear charge density. We show that the spin-orbit contribution to the mean-square charge radius, which has been neglected in recent nuclear calculations, can be important in light halonuclei. We estimate the size of the effect in helium, lithium, and beryllium nuclei. It is found that the spin-orbit contribution represents a approx2% correction to the charge density at the center of the {sup 7}Be nucleus. We derive a simple expression for the correction to the mean-square charge radius due to the spin-orbit term and find that in light halonuclei it may be larger than the Darwin-Foldy term and comparable to finite size corrections. A comparison of experimental and theoretical mean-square radii including the spin-orbit contribution is presented.

  10. High-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect in honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan; Wan, Jian-Guo; Ge, Gui-Xian; Song, Feng-Qi; Wang, Guang-Hou

    2015-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is predicted to be realized at high temperature in a honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene (Au2-SVG) based on the first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that the ferromagnetic state in the Au2-SVG can be maintained up to 380 K. The combination of spatial inversion symmetry and the strong SOC introduced by the Au atoms causes a topologically nontrivial band gap as large as 36 meV and a QAHE state with Chern number C = −2. The analysis of the binding energy proved that the honeycomb bilayer is stable and feasible to be fabricated in experiment. The QAHEs in Ta2-SVG and other TM2-SVGs are also discussed. PMID:26574924

  11. Micro-instabilities and anomalous transport effects in collisionless guide field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio Alejandro; Büchner, Jörg; Kilian, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    It is often the case that magnetic reconnection takes place in collisionless plasmas with a current aligned guide magnetic field, such as in the Solar corona. The general characteristics of this process have been exhaustively analyzed with theory and numerical simulations, under different approximations, since some time ago. However, some consequences and properties of the secondary instabilities arising spontaneously -other than tearing instability-, and their dependence on the guide field strength, have not been completely understood yet. For this sake, we use the results of fully kinetic 2D PIC numerical simulations of guide field reconnection. By using a mean field approach for the Generalized Ohm's law that explains the balance of the reconnected electric field, we find that some of the cross-streaming and gradient driven instabilities -in the guide field case- produce an additional anomalous transport term. The latter can be interpreted as a result of the enhanced correlated electromagnetic fluctuations, leading to a slow down of the current carriers and kinetic scale turbulence. We characterize these processes on dependence on the guide field strength, and explore the causal relation with the source of free energy driving the mentioned instabilities. Finally, we show the main consequences that a fully 3D approach have on all those phenomena in contrast to the reduced 2D description.

  12. Step-wise switching of anomalous Hall effect in a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lukas; Chen, Zhiyi; Korzhovska, Inna; Zhao, Shihua; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Konczykowski, Marcin

    Surfaces of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) have emerged as one of the most remarkable states of condensed quantum matter where exotic charge and spin phases of Dirac particles could arise. The main challenge to finding these phases comes from a non-vanishing conductivity of the bulk. Recently we have demonstrated that we can access 2D surface transport and reach the charge neutrality point (CNP) by compensating intrinsically p-type TIs using high energy electron beams, and increase bulk resistivity by orders of magnitude. Here we report a discovery of anomalous Hall signal (AHE) at the CNP in Bi2Te3 of unprecedented appearance; it shows regions of plateaus on sweeping the temperature, where Hall resistivity is flat in temperature, and has sharp (nearly discontinuous) `steps' in-between the plateaus. The height of the steps increases on cooling, consistently following the ratio of 1:3 with each step. We will show by electrostatically tuning gated structures how this macroscopic switching of spins evolves in the vicinity of CNP and discuss the phenomenon of step-wise AHE in the context of charge inhomogeneities (puddles) and correlations between the localized bulk spins and Dirac spins. Supported by NSF-DMR-1420634, NSF-DMR-1312483-MWN, and DOD-W911NF-13-1-0159.

  13. Persistent random walk of cells involving anomalous effects and random death.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Sergei; Tan, Abby; Zubarev, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to implement a random death process into a persistent random walk model which produces sub-ballistic superdiffusion (Lévy walk). We develop a stochastic two-velocity jump model of cell motility for which the switching rate depends upon the time which the cell has spent moving in one direction. It is assumed that the switching rate is a decreasing function of residence (running) time. This assumption leads to the power law for the velocity switching time distribution. This describes the anomalous persistence of cell motility: the longer the cell moves in one direction, the smaller the switching probability to another direction becomes. We derive master equations for the cell densities with the generalized switching terms involving the tempered fractional material derivatives. We show that the random death of cells has an important implication for the transport process through tempering of the superdiffusive process. In the long-time limit we write stationary master equations in terms of exponentially truncated fractional derivatives in which the rate of death plays the role of tempering of a Lévy jump distribution. We find the upper and lower bounds for the stationary profiles corresponding to the ballistic transport and diffusion with the death-rate-dependent diffusion coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations confirm these bounds. PMID:25974455

  14. Valley-polarized metals and quantum anomalous Hall effect in silicene.

    PubMed

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2012-08-01

    Silicene is a monolayer of silicon atoms forming a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, which shares almost every remarkable property with graphene. The low-energy structure of silicene is described by Dirac electrons with relatively large spin-orbit interactions due to its buckled structure. The key observation is that the band structure is controllable by applying electric field to silicene. We explore the phase diagram of silicene together with exchange field M and by applying electric field E(z). A quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) insulator, valley polarized metal (VPM), marginal valley polarized metal (M-VPM), quantum spin Hall insulator, and band insulator appear. They are characterized by the Chern numbers and/or by the edge modes of a nanoribbon. It is intriguing that electrons have been moved from a conduction band at the K point to a valence band at the K' point for E(z) > 0 in the VPM. We find in the QAH phase that almost flat gapless edge modes emerge and that spins form a momentum-space Skyrmion to yield the Chern number. It is remarkable that a topological quantum phase transition can be induced simply by changing electric field in a single silicene sheet.

  15. Effect of microneedle geometry and supporting substrate on microneedle array penetration into skin.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Jaspreet Singh; Quek, Ten Cheer; Soon, Wei Jun; Choi, Jaewoong; Zou, Shui; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-11-01

    Microneedles are being fast recognized as a useful alternative to injections in delivering drugs, vaccines, and cosmetics transdermally. Owing to skin's inherent elastic properties, microneedles require an optimal geometry for skin penetration. In vitro studies, using rat skin to characterize microneedle penetration in vivo, require substrates with suitable mechanical properties to mimic human skin's subcutaneous tissues. We tested the effect of these two parameters on microneedle penetration. Geometry in terms of center-to-center spacing of needles was investigated for its effect on skin penetration, when placed on substrates of different hardness. Both hard (clay) and soft (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) substrates underneath rat skin and full-thickness pig skin were used as animal models and human skins were used as references. It was observed that there was an increase in percentage penetration with an increase in needle spacing. Microneedle penetration with PDMS as a support under stretched rat skin correlated better with that on full-thickness human skin, while penetration observed was higher when clay was used as a substrate. We showed optimal geometries for efficient penetration together with recommendation for a substrate that could better mimic the mechanical properties of human subcutaneous tissues, when using microneedles fabricated from poly(ethylene glycol)-based materials.

  16. Effect of microneedle geometry and supporting substrate on microneedle array penetration into skin.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Jaspreet Singh; Quek, Ten Cheer; Soon, Wei Jun; Choi, Jaewoong; Zou, Shui; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-11-01

    Microneedles are being fast recognized as a useful alternative to injections in delivering drugs, vaccines, and cosmetics transdermally. Owing to skin's inherent elastic properties, microneedles require an optimal geometry for skin penetration. In vitro studies, using rat skin to characterize microneedle penetration in vivo, require substrates with suitable mechanical properties to mimic human skin's subcutaneous tissues. We tested the effect of these two parameters on microneedle penetration. Geometry in terms of center-to-center spacing of needles was investigated for its effect on skin penetration, when placed on substrates of different hardness. Both hard (clay) and soft (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) substrates underneath rat skin and full-thickness pig skin were used as animal models and human skins were used as references. It was observed that there was an increase in percentage penetration with an increase in needle spacing. Microneedle penetration with PDMS as a support under stretched rat skin correlated better with that on full-thickness human skin, while penetration observed was higher when clay was used as a substrate. We showed optimal geometries for efficient penetration together with recommendation for a substrate that could better mimic the mechanical properties of human subcutaneous tissues, when using microneedles fabricated from poly(ethylene glycol)-based materials. PMID:24027112

  17. Anomalous Hall effect in the Co-based Heusler compounds Co2FeSi and Co2FeAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imort, I.-M.; Thomas, P.; Reiss, G.; Thomas, A.

    2012-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the Heusler compounds Co2FeSi and Co2FeAl is studied in dependence of the annealing temperature to achieve a general comprehension of its origin. We have demonstrated that the crystal quality affected by annealing processes is a significant control parameter to tune the electrical resistivity ρxx as well as the anomalous Hall resistivity ρahe. Analyzing the scaling behavior of ρahe in terms of ρxx points to a temperature-dependent skew scattering as the dominant mechanism in both Heusler compounds.

  18. Anomalous conductivity in Hall thrusters: Effects of the non-linear coupling of the electron-cyclotron drift instability with secondary electron emission of the walls

    SciTech Connect

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2013-08-15

    With the help of an implicit particle-in-cell code, we have shown in a previous paper that the electron-cyclotron drift instability was able to induce anomalous conductivity as well as anomalous heating. As such it can be a major actor among the mechanisms involved in the operation of Hall thrusters. However, experimental results show that the nature of wall material has a significant effect on the behavior of the thruster. The purpose of this paper is to study the plasma-wall interaction in the case where the plasma is heated self-consistently by electrostatic fluctuations induced by the electron-cyclotron drift instability.

  19. The effect of skin aging on the percutaneous penetration of chemicals through human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Roskos, K.V.

    1989-01-01

    Despite much research into the mechanisms of cutaneous aging and the identification of significant age-associated biological and biophysical changes within the skin, the question how does aging affect percutaneous absorption (PA) in vivo remains unanswered. The author has made in vivo measurements of PA in young (18-40 years) and old (> 65 years) subjects. Standard radiotracer methodology was employed and PA was quantified from the urinary excretion profiles of {sup 14}C radiolabel (corrected for incomplete renal elimination). Testosterone (TST), estradiol (EST), hydrocortisone (HC), benzoic acid (BA), acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and caffeine (CAFF) have been studied. Penetration of HC, BA, ASA, and CAFF were significantly lower in aged subjects whereas TST and EST absorption were not distinguishable from the young controls. Thus it appears that aging can affect PA in vivo and that relatively hydrophilic compounds may be most sensitive. Work was done to elucidate whether the observations were related to documented skin aging changes. Cutaneous microcirculation efficiency suspected to decline with increasing age, could not be correlated with the observed penetration changes. However, in vivo infrared spectroscopic studies of aged stratum corneum (SC) reveal a decreased amount of epidermal lipid. The diminished lipid content implies a diminished dissolution medium for compounds administered to the skin surface. They hypothesize that the compounds most affected by a loss of SC lipids would be those compounds whose overall solubility is lowest (compounds with lower octanol-water partition coefficients, eg., HC, BA, ASA and CAFF). Conversely, a diminished lipid content may not affect dissolution into the SC of highly lipophilic compounds (e.g., TST and EST).

  20. The skin-lightening effects of artocarpin on UVB-induced pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro; Sakai, Kokki; Takeda, Norio; Nagahata, Tetsuji

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of the prenylated flavonol artocarpin from the heartwood of Artocarpus incisus on ultraviolet (UV)-induced hyperpigmentation of guinea pig skin. An efficient lightening effect was observed following topical application of artocarpin to UV-stimulated hyperpigmented dorsal skins of brownish guinea pigs.

  1. Effect of microplasma irradiation on skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tran, An N.; Blajan, Marius

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the feasibility of atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma irradiation (AAMI) to promote percutaneous absorption. A hairless Yucatan micropig skin was used for this ex vivo study. After AAMI, the disturbance in the stratum corneum (SC) lipids was observed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also, an increase in transepidermal water loss and no physical damage on pig skins were confirmed by microscopic observation. These results of AAMI were compared with those of a plasma jet irradiation (PJI) and a tape stripping test (TST) leading to the conclusion that AAMI reduces the barrier function of the skin and could also enhance the transdermal absorption of drugs.

  2. Effect of plasma flow on regeneration of skin wounds and on reactivity of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Stupin, I.V.; Mikaelyan, N.P.; Ul'yanov, M.I.; Belous, G.G.

    1987-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to provide more research data on the behavior of the plasma scalpel, a surgical tool based on the use of the energy flow of ionized gases for the treatment of skin wounds. The effect of the ionized gas flow on wound skin wound healing was tested on three series of six rabbits. Experimental methods and results are given for the biochemical interaction of the skin with the plasma.

  3. [In vitro percutaneous absorption of chromium powder and the effect of skin cleanser].

    PubMed

    D'Agostin, F; Crosera, M; Adami, G; Malvestio, A; Rosani, R; Bovenzi, M; Maina, G; Filon, F Larese

    2007-01-01

    Occupational chromium dermatitis occurs frequently among cement and metal workers, workers dealing with leather tanning and employees in the ceramic industry. The present study, using an in-vitro system, evaluated percutaneous absorption of chromium powder and the effect of rapid skin decontamination with a common detergent. Experiments were performed using the Franz diffusion cell method with human skin. Physiological solution was used as receiving phase and a suspension of chromium powder in synthetic sweat was used as donor phase. The tests were performed without or with decontamination using the cleanser 30 minutes after the start of exposure. The amount of chromium permeated through the skin was analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Electro Thermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Speciation analysis and measurements of chromium skin content were also performed. We calculated a permeation flux of 0.843 +/- 0.25 ng cm(-2) h(-1) and a lag time of 1.1 +/- 0.7 h. The cleaning procedure significantly increased chromium skin content, whereas skin passage was not increased. These results showed that chromium powder can pass through the skin and that skin decontamination did not decrease skin absorption. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent skin contamination when using toxic agents.

  4. In vitro percutaneous absorption of chromium powder and the effect of skin cleanser.

    PubMed

    Larese Filon, Francesca; D'Agostin, Flavia; Crosera, Matteo; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Maina, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    The present study tried to investigate, using a synthetic sweat at pH 4.5, whether metallic chromium can pass through the skin (in vitro) and the effect of rapid skin decontamination with a common detergent. A suspension of chromium powder in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 was prepared and shaken with a stirring plate at room temperature for 30 min. Human skin membranes were set up in Franz-diffusion cells and 1 ml of the freshly made suspension was applied to the outer surface of the skin for 24h. The tests were performed without and with decontamination using the cleanser 30 min after the start of exposure. The appearance of metal ions in the aqueous receptor phase was quantified by Electro Thermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (ETAAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Speciation analysis and measurements of chromium skin content were also performed. Chromium skin permeation was demonstrated in in vitro experiments using the Franz cell system, giving a permeation flux of 0.84+/-0.25 ng cm(-2)h(-1) and a lag time of 1.1+/-0.7h. The cleaning procedure stop Cr permeation but its concentration into the skin significantly increased (Mann-Whitney U test P<0.03). The results revealed that chromium applied as powder can pass through the skin and that decontamination, done after 30 min of exposure, prevent Cr skin permeation but increase Cr content into the skin.

  5. Effectiveness Evaluation of Skin Covers against Intravascular Brachytherapy Sources Using VARSKIN3 Code

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, H R; Nazempour, A R; Aghamiri, S M R; Hosseini Daghigh, S M; Mowlavi, A A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: The most common intravascular brachytherapy sources include 32P, 188Re, 106Rh and 90Sr/90Y. In this research, skin absorbed dose for different covering materials in dealing with these sources were evaluated and the best covering material for skin protection and reduction of absorbed dose by radiation staff was recognized and recommended. Method: Four materials including polyethylene, cotton and two different kinds of plastic were proposed as skin covers and skin absorbed dose at different depths for each kind of the materials was calculated separately using the VARSKIN3 code. Results: The results suggested that for all sources, skin absorbed dose was minimized when using polyethylene. Considering this material as skin cover, maximum and minimum doses at skin surface were related to 90Sr/90Y and 106Rh, respectively. Conclusion: polyethylene was found the most effective cover in reducing skin dose and protecting the skin. Furthermore, proper agreement between the results of VARSKIN3 and other experimental measurements indicated that VRASKIN3 is a powerful tool for skin dose calculations when working with beta emitter sources. Therefore, it can be utilized in dealing with the issue of radiation protection. PMID:25505758

  6. Iontophoresis of monomeric insulin analogues in vitro: effects of insulin charge and skin pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Langkjaer, L; Brange, J; Grodsky, G M; Guy, R H

    1998-01-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of association state and net charge of human insulin analogues on the rate of iontophoretic transport across hairless mouse skin, and the effect of different skin pretreatments on said transport. No insulin flux was observed with anodal delivery probably because of degradation at the Ag/AgCl anode. The flux during cathodal iontophoresis through intact skin was insignificant for human hexameric insulin, and only low and variable fluxes were observed for monomeric insulins. Using stripped skin on the other hand, the fluxes of monomeric insulins with two extra negative charges were 50-100 times higher than that of hexameric human insulin. Introducing three additional charges led to a further 2-3-fold increase in flux. Wiping the skin gently with absolute alcohol prior to iontophoresis resulted in a 1000-fold increase in transdermal transport of insulin relative to that across untreated skin, i.e. to almost the same level as stripping the skin. The alcohol pretreatment reduced the electrical resistance of the skin, presumably by lipid extraction. In conclusion, monomeric insulin analogues with at least two extra negative charges can be iontophoretically delivered across hairless mouse skin, whereas insignificant flux is observed with human, hexameric insulin. Wiping the skin with absolute alcohol prior to iontophoresis gave substantially improved transdermal transport of monomeric insulins resulting in clinically relevant delivery rates for basal treatment.

  7. Analysis of anomalous electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability effects using a frequency domain controlled-source electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Kyubo; Oh, Seokmin; Seol, Soon Jee; Lee, Ki Ha; Byun, Joongmoo

    2016-03-01

    We present a series of processes for understanding and analysing controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) responses for a conductive and permeable earth. To realize the CSEM response, a new 3-D CSEM forward modelling algorithm based on an edge finite element method for both electrically conductive and magnetically permeable heterogeneities is developed. The algorithm shows highly accurate results in validation tests against a semi-analytic solution for stratified earth and an integral form of the scattered field. We describe the vector behaviour of an anomalous magnetic field originating from a conductive and permeable anomaly when the loop sources are deployed over a conductive half-space. The CSEM response of the conductive and permeable anomaly is classified into three effects originating from: conductivity perturbations, permeability perturbations and the coupling of these two effects. The separated individual results and the corresponding integral equation form of the anomalous field help to better understand the physical behaviour. We confirm the characteristic features of the CSEM response from the conductive and permeable anomaly, for example, (1) the general dominance of the induction effect in the out-of-phase response accompanied by a non-negligible magnetization effect from the magnetic anomaly in a conductive half-space and (2) the dominance of near frequency-independent magnetization effects in the in-phase response at relatively low frequencies and change in ruling part of the in-phase response into the induction effect as the frequency increases. We also demonstrate the effect of coupling mode and show that its maximum contribution is limited to a few per cent level of other two modes, induction and magnetization mode, even when the heterogeneity of our model is strong. In our synthetic survey, using examples of land-based profiling surveys of low induction number and intermediate regime, we find that the effect of magnetization can be used as an

  8. [Effect of social interaction on skin temperature in mice].

    PubMed

    Hishimura, Yutaka; Itoh, Kana

    2009-06-01

    We investigated physiological and behavioral characteristics of socially stressed animals in a resident-intruder paradigm. ICR male mice (resident, n = 14) were exposed individually to a novel male conspecific (intruder, n = 14) in their homecage for 30 min. Along with behavioral analyses, the skin temperatures of both the resident and the intruder were measured simultaneously using a multipoint radiation thermometer. There were no significant differences between the resident and intruder in the amount of locomotion, flight and aggressive behaviors. The mean skin temperature of the residents during the interaction was higher than before the interaction. In addition, the skin temperatures of the intruders were consistently higher than the residents. The results suggest that social stress causes elevation in skin temperature as well as stress-induced hyperthermia in core temperature. Moreover, infrared radiation thermometers may provide an alternative means of measuring physiological parameters of two (or more) subjects simultaneously in the study of animal social behavior. PMID:19637832

  9. Sunscreen effects in skin analyzed by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos, Fernanda H.; Rompe, Paula C. B.; Batista, Roberta R.; Martin, Airton A.; Mansanares, Antonio M.; da Silva, Edson C.; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel; Barja, Paulo R.

    2004-06-01

    In the photoacoustic technique, the signal is proportional to the heat produced in a sample as a consequence of modulated light absorption. This technique allows the spectroscopic characterization of multilayer systems: as the thermal diffusion length varies with the light modulation frequency, one can obtain the depth profile of the sample by analyzing the frequency-dependence of the signal. As the photoacoustic signal depends on thermal and optical properties of the sample, structural changes in the system under analysis account for signal variations in time. In this work, photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to characterize samples of sunscreen and the system formed by sunscreen plus skin. We used photoacoustic spectroscopy to monitor the absorption kinetics of sunscreen applied to samples of human skin, characterizing alterations in the human skin after application of sunscreen. Measurements used 250W Xe arc lamp as light source, for wavelengths between 240nm and 400nm. This range corresponds to most of the UV radiation that reaches Earth. Skin samples were about 0,5cm diameter. The absorption spectra of sunscreen was obtained. Finally, photoacoustics was employed to monitor the absorption kinetics of the sunscreen applied to skin samples. This was done by applying sunscreen in a skin sample and recording the photoacoustic spectra in regular time intervals, up to 90 minutes after application. According to measurements, light absorption by the system sunscreen plus skin stabilizes between 25 and 45 minutes after sunscreen application. Results show that this technique can be utilized to monitor drug delivery and farmacokinetics in skin samples.

  10. Effects of hair removal alexandrite laser on biometric parameters of the skin.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Shiva; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali

    2016-04-01

    The effects of alexandrite laser (AL) on skin parameters such as melanin content, skin layer depth, elasticity, and density have not been investigated through biometric methods. We aim to assess the effect of AL on the skin parameters through biometric devices to determine whether it has positive effects on treated region. In this pretest-posttest study, we recruited patients who attended Laser Clinic of Skin and Stem Cell Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, from January through December 2014. Patients had to be free of any dermatologic conditions and lesion at the site of treatment or any contraindication to laser therapy. Baseline measurements were performed and patients received four sessions of AL therapy (spot size, 12 mm; fluence, 12 J/cm(2); and pulse width, 5 Hz) with 4-week intervals. Four weeks after the last treatment session, the same parameters were assessed that included skin color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), dermis and epidermis density and depth (through skin ultrasonography), melanin content, erythema intensity, and skin elasticity. Biometric parameters of 33 patients (27 females [81.8%]), with mean (SD) age of 35.7 (9.5) years were evaluated. The mean percent changes of skin parameters were as follows: skin color, 5.88% through Visioface and by 56.8% through Colorimeter devices (became lighter); melanin content, -15.95%; TEWL, -2.96%; elasticity, +14.88%; dermis depth -19.01%; and dermis density, +1580.11% (P < 0.001 for changes in each parameter). AL could decrease melanin content of the skin and make the skin thinner while it could increase elasticity and density of epidermis and dermis, which might indicate increased collagen content of skin.

  11. Effects of hair removal alexandrite laser on biometric parameters of the skin.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Shiva; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali

    2016-04-01

    The effects of alexandrite laser (AL) on skin parameters such as melanin content, skin layer depth, elasticity, and density have not been investigated through biometric methods. We aim to assess the effect of AL on the skin parameters through biometric devices to determine whether it has positive effects on treated region. In this pretest-posttest study, we recruited patients who attended Laser Clinic of Skin and Stem Cell Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, from January through December 2014. Patients had to be free of any dermatologic conditions and lesion at the site of treatment or any contraindication to laser therapy. Baseline measurements were performed and patients received four sessions of AL therapy (spot size, 12 mm; fluence, 12 J/cm(2); and pulse width, 5 Hz) with 4-week intervals. Four weeks after the last treatment session, the same parameters were assessed that included skin color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), dermis and epidermis density and depth (through skin ultrasonography), melanin content, erythema intensity, and skin elasticity. Biometric parameters of 33 patients (27 females [81.8%]), with mean (SD) age of 35.7 (9.5) years were evaluated. The mean percent changes of skin parameters were as follows: skin color, 5.88% through Visioface and by 56.8% through Colorimeter devices (became lighter); melanin content, -15.95%; TEWL, -2.96%; elasticity, +14.88%; dermis depth -19.01%; and dermis density, +1580.11% (P < 0.001 for changes in each parameter). AL could decrease melanin content of the skin and make the skin thinner while it could increase elasticity and density of epidermis and dermis, which might indicate increased collagen content of skin. PMID:26861986

  12. The Effect of an Emollient Containing Urea, Ceramide NP, and Lactate on Skin Barrier Structure and Function in Older People with Dry Skin.

    PubMed

    Danby, Simon G; Brown, Kirsty; Higgs-Bayliss, Tim; Chittock, John; Albenali, Lujain; Cork, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Xerosis affects up to 75% of older people and develops as a result of a skin barrier defect. Emollients are widely used to treat xerosis; however, there is limited understanding of the differences between them and their effects on the skin barrier in older people. This study aimed to compare the effect of a commercially available emollient containing 5% urea, ceramide NP and lactate (test emollient) to an alternative emollient without these additives (control emollient) on the properties of the skin barrier in older people. Two cohorts of 21 volunteers aged >60 years with dry skin were recruited. The first applied the test emollient to one forearm and no treatment to the other for 28 days. The second compared the test emollient to the control emollient observing the same parameters. Effects on the skin barrier were determined by measuring skin barrier function, hydration, skin surface pH and by analysing Fourier transform infrared spectra before and after treatment. A third cohort of 6 young adults was recruited to investigate the effect of a single treatment with the test emollient on the molecular structure of the skin barrier at greater depths by employing the tape-stripping technique. The test emollient hydrated the skin to a significantly greater extent and for a longer period of time compared to the control emollient, an effect associated with a significant elevation of carboxylate groups (a marker of natural moisturizing factor content) within the stratum corneum. Furthermore, the test emollient imparted additional benefits to the structure and function of the skin barrier not exhibited by the control emollient. In conclusion, the test emollient addressed the pathological features of xerotic aged skin, supporting its use as first-line therapy for xerotic skin conditions in this population.

  13. Proinflammatory Effects of Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticles on Scleroderma Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mastrofrancesco, A.; Alfè, M.; Rosato, E.; Gargiulo, V.; Beatrice, C.; Di Blasio, G.; Zhang, B.; Su, D. S.; Picardo, M.; Fiorito, S.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of unknown etiology thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to verify whether environmental pollution from diesel engine exhaust nanoparticulate (DEP) of actually operating vehicles could play a role in the development of a rare immune-mediated disease, systemic sclerosis (SSc), in which the pathogenetic role of environment has been highlighted. The effects of carbon-based nanoparticulate collected at the exhaust of newer (Euro 5) and older (Euro 4) diesel engines on SSc skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts were evaluated in vitro by assessing the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and fibroblast chemical mediators (metalloproteases 2, 3, 7, 9, and 12; collagen types I and III; VEGF). DEP was shown to stimulate cytokine gene expression at a higher extent in SSc keratinocytes versus normal cells. Moreover, the mRNA gene expression of all MMPs, collagen types, and VEGF genes was significantly higher in untreated SSc fibroblasts versus controls. Euro 5 particle exposure increased the mRNA expression of MMP-2, -7, and -9 in SSc fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner and only at the highest concentration in normal cells. We suggest that environmental DEP could trigger the development of SSc acting on genetically hyperreactive cell systems. PMID:24982919

  14. Effect of chicken skin on the quality characteristics of semi-dried restructured jerky.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Han, Doo-Jeong; Choi, Ji-Hun; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of skin on the textural properties of semi-dried jerky produced with different acid treatments. Jerky was prepared with no skin (control) or with 1, 3, or 5% chicken skin. After hand mixing (for 3 min) and tumbling (for 30 min) to distribute the curing ingredients, the cured meats were dried for 180 min at 55°C, for 180 min at 65°C, and finally for 60 min at 75°C. The presence of skin was shown to result in a higher fat content, TBA value, and metmyoglobin due to the high fat content of the skin. In contrast, acid treatment decreased the TBA value and metmyoglobin in jerky relative to samples that were not subjected to acid treatment. The presence of skin also improved the moisture contents, processing yields, and mechanical tenderness.

  15. Preventive effect of antihistaminics on mouse skin photosensitization with hematoporphyrin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Nai-wu; Yan, Li-xue

    1993-03-01

    Beta-carotene 100 mg/kg per day or vitamin C 50 mg/kg per day was administered orally for two days and did not prevent mouse skin photosensitization caused by hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD). However, (beta) -carotene 100 mg/kg per day administered intramuscularly for two days prevented mouse skin reaction. Cimetidine and benadryl 10 mg/kg per day, P.O.X 2, effectively prevented mouse skin reaction. This suggests histamine may be involved in skin photoreaction induced by HpD.

  16. The effects of narrowbands of visible light upon some skin disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Greaves, A J

    2016-08-01

    This review article focuses on clinical studies published in the fields of (i) photorejuvenation and anti-ageing, (ii) oily or acne-prone skin and related imperfections, (iii) skin pigmentation and lightening, (iv) dandruff and other Malassezia-related skin disorders and (v) prevention and reversal of hair loss using non-thermal, non-ablative devices (principally light-emitting diodes). It mainly focuses on clinical proof of performance and also on in vitro studies that support the clinical findings. The mode of action of narrowbands of visible light upon the skin is only briefly discussed since their biological effects have been previously reviewed. PMID:26708128

  17. Spontaneous anomalous and spin Hall effects due to spin-orbit scattering of evanescent wave functions in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Vedyayev, A; Ryzhanova, N; Strelkov, N; Dieny, B

    2013-06-14

    We theoretically investigated the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin Hall effect (SHE) transversal to the insulating spacer I, in magnetic tunnel junctions of the form F/I/F where the F's are ferromagnetic layers and I represents a tunnel barrier. We considered the case of purely ballistic (quantum mechanical) transport. These effects arise because of the asymmetric scattering of evanescent wave functions due to the spin-orbit interaction in the tunnel barrier. The AHE and SHE we investigated have a surface nature due to the proximity effect. Their amplitude is of first order in the scattering potential. This contrasts with ferromagnetic metals wherein these effects are of second (side-jump scattering) and third (skew scattering) order in these potentials. The value of the AHE current in the insulating spacer may be much larger than that in metallic ferromagnetic electrodes. For the antiparallel orientation of the magnetizations in the two F electrodes, a spontaneous Hall current exists even at zero applied voltage. PMID:25165958

  18. Shining Light on Skin Pigmentation: The Darker and the Brighter Side of Effects of UV Radiation†

    PubMed Central

    Maddodi, Nityanand; Jayanthy, Ashika; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2012-01-01

    The term barrier function as applied to human skin often connotes the physical properties of this organ that provide protection from its surrounding environment. This term does not generally include skin pigmentation. However, skin pigmentation, which is the result of melanin produced in melanocytes residing the basal layer of the skin and exported to the keratinocytes in the upper layers, serves equally important protective function. Indeed, changes in skin pigmentation are often the most readily recognized indicators of exposure of skin to damaging agents, especially to natural and artificial radiation in the environment. Several recent studies have shed new light on a) the mechanisms of involved in selective effects of subcomponents of UV radiation on human skin pigmentation and b) the interactive influences between keratinocytes and melanocytes, acting as ‘epidermal melanin unit’, that manifest as changes in skin pigmentation in response to exposure to various forms of radiation. This article provides a concise review of our current understanding of the effects of the non-ionizing solar radiation, at cellular and molecular levels, on human skin pigmentation. PMID:22404235

  19. Photo- and gas-tuned, reversible thermoelectric properties and anomalous photo-thermoelectric effects of platinum-loaded tungsten trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenta; Watanabe, Takuya; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We report the photo- and gas-controllable properties of platinum-loaded tungsten trioxide (Pt/WO3), which is of interest for developing practical applications of WO3 as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a Pt/WO3 thin film generated a thermoelectric power due to the ultraviolet-light-induced band-gap excitation (photochromic (PC) reaction) and/or dark storage in formic acid vapor (gaschromic (GC) reaction) in the absence of O2, resulting from the generation of W5+ ions. After such chromic reactions, the electrical conductivity (σ) is increased, whereas the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient (S) is decreased. The changes in σ and S and their rate of change for consistency increased in the order of: during the PC reaction < during the GC reaction < during simultaneous PC and GC reactions. The opposite behaviors, a decrease in σ and an increase in S, were exhibited by Pt/WO3 in the presence of O2 after dark storage or visible-light irradiation. This reversible cycle could be repeated. Moreover, anomalous, nontrivial photo-thermoelectric effects (a photoconductive effect (photoconductivity, σphoto) and a photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, Sphoto)) were also detected in response to the visible-light irradiation of Pt/WO3 in the absence of O2 after chromic reactions. Under visible-light irradiation, both σphoto and the absolute value of Sphoto are increased. After the irradiation, both values were decreased, that is, σ and the absolute value of S were smaller than σphoto and the absolute value of Sphoto, respectively. These effects are likely to be due to the photoinduced charge carriers and the accumulated electrons in Pt contributing to the increase in σphoto. In addition, electrons are extracted from the W5+ state, decreasing the number of W5+ in HxWO3 and thus contributing to the increase in Sphoto. After light irradiation, the accumulated electrons in Pt are returned to the energetically favorable W

  20. Effects of tretinoin on wound healing in aged skin.

    PubMed

    de Campos Peseto, Danielle; Carmona, Erica Vilaça; Silva, Kellyn Cristina da; Guedes, Flavia Roberta Valente; Hummel Filho, Fernando; Martinez, Natalia Peres; Pereira, José Aires; Rocha, Thalita; Priolli, Denise Gonçalves

    2016-03-01

    Aged and adult populations have differences in the structural, biological, and healing properties of skin. Comparative studies of healing under the influence of retinoids in both these populations are very important and, to the best of our knowledge, have not been performed to date. The purpose of this study was to compare the activities of topical tretinoin in aged and adult animal models of wound healing by secondary intention. Male aged rats (24 months old, n = 7) and adult rats (6 months old, n = 8) were used. The rats were assigned to the following groups according to the dates on which wound samples were excised (day 14 or 21 after model creation): treated group, control group, and naive group. Topical application of tretinoin cream was used only on the proximal wound and was applied daily for 7 days. Wound healing areas were measured using metal calipers, and morphological analysis was performed. Slides were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin, Masson's trichrome, and periodic acid-Schiff stains. Statistical analysis adopted a 5% coefficient for rejection of the null hypothesis. Although aged animals showed skin repair, complete reepithelialization was found on day 21 in some animals of both groups (treated and control). In aged rats, the wound area was significantly smaller in treated wounds than in untreated wounds, resulting in a larger scar area compared with the adult group. When treated wounds were compared, no differences were found between the wound areas in adult and aged rats. As expected, the collagen concentration was higher in normal skin from adult rats than in normal skin from aged animals, but there was no difference when aged skin was treated with tretinoin. These results indicate that tretinoin increases collagen synthesis in aged skin and returns the healing process to a normal state of skin healing. PMID:26834030

  1. β-irradiation (166Ho patch)-induced skin injury in mini-pigs: effects on NF-κB and COX-2 expression in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Rhim, Kyung-Jin; Jang, Won-Seok; Lee, Sun-Joo; Son, Yeonghoon; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the detrimental effect of β-emission on pig skin was evaluated. Skin injury was modeled in mini-pigs by exposing the animals to 50 and 100 Gy of β-emission delivered by 166Ho patches. Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical changes in exposed skin were monitored for 18 weeks after β-irradiation. Radiation induced desquamation at 2~4 weeks and gradual repair of this damage was evident 6 weeks after irradiation. Changes in basal cell density and skin depth corresponded to clinically relevant changes. Skin thickness began to decrease 1 week after irradiation, and the skin was thinnest 4 weeks after irradiation. Skin thickness increased transiently during recovery from irradiation-induced skin injury, which was evident 6~8 weeks after irradiation. Epidermal expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) differed significantly between the untreated and irradiated areas. One week after irradiation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression was mostly limited to the basal cell layer and scattered among these cells. High levels of COX-2 expression were detected throughout the full depth of the skin 4 weeks after irradiation. These findings suggest that NF-κB and COX-2 play roles in epidermal cell regeneration following β-irradiation of mini-pig skin. PMID:24962420

  2. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure

    PubMed Central

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gate-control of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHE in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured. PMID:26596472

  3. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-11-24

    In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gatecontrol of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHE in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured.

  4. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-11-24

    In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gatecontrol of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHEmore » in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured.« less

  5. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    PubMed

    Oveshnikov, L N; Kulbachinskii, V A; Davydov, A B; Aronzon, B A; Rozhansky, I V; Averkiev, N S; Kugel, K I; Tripathi, V

    2015-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gate-control of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHE in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured. PMID:26596472

  6. Effectiveness of an employee skin cancer screening program for secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Ugur; Hees, Felix; Winnik, Eva; Uter, Wolfgang; Sticherling, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Incidences of UV-induced skin cancer are continuously increasing. For this reason, early diagnosis is becoming more important. In this study, 783 employees of a technical company participated in an employee skin cancer screening program, which consisted of a physical examination for benign and malignant skin lesions and premalignant conditions. To ensure the quality of the examinations, screening was only performed by 5 trained dermatologists. Participants also were asked to complete a standardized questionnaire prior to examination. A total of 661 skin lesions were diagnosed among 48% of participants; 12.8% of participants exhibited 50 or more melanocytic nevi and the risk for developing skin cancer was categorized as at least moderate for 64.9%. Additionally, 84.4% of participants with at least 1 skin lesion were advised to have a checkup within 1 year. The high rate of suspicious nevi detected in this study suggested that employee skin cancer screening programs are effective and also should be recommended at companies where employees are not at increased risk for developing skin cancer due to the nature of their work (eg, those who work outdoors). Despite the comparatively selective and young study population, these examinations provide evidence of the importance of skin cancer screening for the wider population. PMID:27622254

  7. Effects of postmilking teat treatment on the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus on chapped teat skin.

    PubMed

    Fox, L K; Nagy, J A; Hillers, J K; Cronrath, J D; Ratkowsky, D A

    1991-06-01

    Sixteen Holstein cows were used to test the effect of postmilking teat treatment on colonization and intramammary infection by Staphylococcus aureus on chapped teats. Treatments were (1) chapping the teat and using 1% I2/10% glycerin postdip solution, (2) 1% I2/10% glycerin postdip solution on nonchapped teats, (3) chapping the teat and using 10% glycerin postdip solution, (4) chapping the teat and not using a postdip solution. All mammary glands were free of S aureus teat skin colonization and intramammary infection at the start of the study. Teats selected for chapping were dipped in 1N NaOH prior to 3 applications of S aureus broth culture; cultures were applied at 12-hour intervals on all teats. Treatments were applied after each milking for 30 days and were initiated after the second broth dip. Teat skin swab specimens and milk samples were collected before treatment application. Teat skin condition was scored daily. Nonchapped teats (treatment 2) did not support skin or orifice colonization by S aureus. Treatment-1 teats healed most rapidly and supported less colonization in skin and orifice than did treatment-3 and -4 teats. Teat skin scores and skin colonization were lower for treatment-3 than treatment-4 teats. A correlation between teat skin colonization and teat skin conditions was found. Two intramammary infections were found in treatment-4 quarters and 1 in a treatment-3 quarter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1883082

  8. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis To Estimate Antibacterial Treatment Effect in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Jordan E.; Li, Gang; Mundy, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate the antibacterial treatment effect for linezolid and ceftaroline to inform on the design of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) noninferiority trials. The primary endpoints included an early clinical treatment response (ECTR) defined as cessation of lesion spread at 48 to 72 h postrandomization and the test-of-cure (TOC) response defined as total resolution of the infection at 7 to 14 days posttreatment. The systematic review identified no placebo-controlled trials in ABSSSI, 4 placebo-controlled trials in uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infection as a proxy for placebo in ABSSSI, 12 linezolid trials in ABSSSI, 3 ceftaroline trials in ABSSSI, and 2 trials for nonantibacterial treatment. The ECTR rates at 48 to 72 h and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 78.7% (95% CI, 61.1 to 96.3%) for linezolid, 74.0% (95% CI, 69.7 to 78.3%) for ceftaroline, and 59.0% (95% CI, 52.8 to 65.3%) for nonantibacterial treatment. The early clinical treatment effect could not be estimated, given no available placebo or proxy for placebo data for this endpoint. Clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity influenced the selection of trials for the meta-analysis of the TOC treatment effect estimation. The pooled estimates of the TOC treatment response were 31.0% (95% CI, 6.2 to 55.9%) for the proxy for placebo, 88.1% (95% CI, 81.0 to 95.1%) for linezolid, and 86.1% (95% CI, 83.7 to 88.6%) for ceftaroline. The TOC clinical treatment effect estimation was 25.1% for linezolid and 27.8% for ceftaroline. The antibacterial treatment effect estimation at TOC will inform on the design and analysis of future noninferiority ABSSSI clinical trials. PMID:25987628

  9. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and a nontrivial spin-texture in ultra-thin films of magnetic topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Duong, Le Quy; Das, Tanmoy; Feng, Y. P.; Lin, Hsin

    2015-05-07

    We study the evolution of quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect for a Z{sub 2} topological insulator (TI) thin films in a proximity induced magnetic phase by a realistic layered k·p model with interlayer coupling. We examine three different magnetic configurations in which ferromagnetic (FM) layer(s) is added either from one side (FM-TI), from both sides (FM-TI-FM), or homogeneously distributed (magnetically doped) in a TI slab. We map out the thickness-dependent topological phase diagram under various experimental conditions. The critical magnetic exchange energy for the emergence of QAH effect in the latter two cases decreases monotonically with increasing number of quintuple layers (QLs), while it becomes surprisingly independent of the film thickness in the former case. The gap size of the emergent QAH insulator depends on the non-magnetic “parent” gap of the TI thin film and is tuned by the FM exchange energy, opening a versatile possibility to achieve room-temperature QAH insulator in various topological nanomaterials. Finally, we find that the emergent spin-texture in the QAH effect is very unconventional, non-“hedgehog” type; and it exhibits a chiral out-of-plane spin-flip texture within the same valence band which is reminiscent of dynamical “skyrmion” pattern, except our results are in the momentum space.

  10. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chou, Wu-Ching E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Chang, Ting-Chang E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Chen, Hua-Mao; Tai, Ya-Hsiang; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Hung, Pei-Hua; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan; Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Yeh, Bo-Liang

    2014-10-21

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast I{sub D}-V{sub G} and modulated peak/base pulse time I{sub D}-V{sub D} measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  11. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Wu-Ching; Chen, Hua-Mao; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan; Hung, Pei-Hua; Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Tai, Ya-Hsiang; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Yeh, Bo-Liang

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast ID-VG and modulated peak/base pulse time ID-VD measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  12. Orally administered ethanol: transepidermal pathways and effects on the human skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Ute; Bartoll, Jens; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with a variety of skin diseases. The aim of the present study was (1) to identify the pathways of release of orally administered ethanol through the skin, and (2) to investigate the effects of a single oral dose of ethanol on the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin. Ethanol evaporation via the skin was measured using the new technique of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin surface temperature were simultaneously measured before and after ethanol consumption. Measurements were performed on skin sites with different stratum corneum (SC) thickness, and density of follicles and sweat glands. These appendages were selectively sealed to investigate their participation in ethanol evaporation. The penetration of a topically applied UV filter substance was studied before and after ethanol consumption after removing the SC with adhesive tape. Ethanol evaporation was measured within 5 min of consumption, while the skin surface temperature remained nearly constant. The sealing of the appendages did not have a significant effect on ethanol evaporation. On the forehead, a higher TEWL value was measured than on the forearm. On both skin sites, an increase in TEWL was observed after ethanol ingestion. No influence of orally administered ethanol on the penetration of the topically applied UV filter substance was observed. The results indicate that ethanol evaporation occurs via the lipid layers without a significant effect on the penetration of the topically applied substance.

  13. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Giardullo, Paola; Pasquali, Emanuela; Tanori, Mirella; De Stefano, Ilaria; Casciati, Arianna; Naus, Christian C.; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1{sup +/−}) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1{sup +/−} and Cx43{sup +/−} mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1{sup +/−} mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases.

  14. Electrical measurement of moisturizing effect on skin hydration and barrier function in psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Rim, J H; Jo, S J; Park, J Y; Park, B D; Youn, J I

    2005-07-01

    Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in psoriatic skin lesions seems to be related to the severity of the psoriasis, and the electrical capacitance and conductance of the skin are indicators of the hydration level of the stratum corneum. We compared the characteristics of these electrical measurements, in assessing the persistent effect of a moisturizing cream on skin hydration and barrier function in psoriasis patients. Seventeen Korean psoriasis patients were recruited. Their right leg was treated with the moisturizer twice daily for 6 weeks, while their left leg was used as the control site. For each patient, one psoriatic plaque on each leg was selected as the involved psoriatic lesion. Uninvolved psoriatic skin was regarded as the apparently healthy looking skin 4-5 cm away from the periphery of the psoriatic lesion. The TEWL, electrical capacitance and conductance were measured, in order to evaluate the barrier function and hydration level of the stratum corneum. The clinical and biophysical data for each patient were recorded at the start of the study and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The degree of skin dryness at the applied area improved progressively. The electrical capacitance at the treated psoriatic lesion increased significantly after 2 weeks, and this improvement was maintained during the entire study period. However, no noticeable change was observed in the electrical conductance. The TEWL showed an inverse pattern to that of the skin capacitance, decreasing during the study period. The skin capacitance and TEWL exhibited good correlation with the visual assessment of skin dryness, but the skin conductance did not. Our data suggest that electrical capacitance and TEWL may be useful in the evaluation of the effect of a moisturizer on the hydration status and barrier function of psoriatic skin. PMID:15953083

  15. The inverse skin effect in the Z-pinch and plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, P. L.; Gaganov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The inverse skin effect and its influence on the dynamics of high-current Z-pinch and plasma focus discharges in deuterium are analyzed. It is shown that the second compression responsible for the major fraction of the neutron yield can be interpreted as a result of the inverse skin effect resulting in the axial concentration of the longitudinal current density and the appearance of a reversed current in the outer layers of plasma pinches. Possible conditions leading to the enhancement of the inverse skin effect and accessible for experimental verification by modern diagnostics are formulated.

  16. Effects of micronutrient supplements on u.v.-induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Jackson, M J; McArdle, F; Storey, A; Jones, S A; McArdle, A; Rhodes, L E

    2002-05-01

    Development of an orally-administered systemic agent that could reduce the effects of u.v. exposure on skin could potentially have a major effect on the incidence of skin cancers and photo-ageing. A number of micronutrients have been suggested to have metabolic properties that could induce this protection, and our data indicate that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are particularly effective in this role. The mechanisms of action of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids appear to depend on their anti-inflammatory properties, acting to reduce the u.v.-induced release of cytokines and other mediators from a variety of skin cell types.

  17. Anomalous Structural Transition and Electrical Transport Behaviors in Compressed Zn2SnO4: Effect of Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiwa; Ke, Feng; Li, Yan; Wang, Li; Liu, Cailong; Zeng, Yi; Yao, Mingguang; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Gao, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    The interface effect is one of the most important factors that strongly affect the structural transformations and the properties of nano-/submicro-crystals under pressure. However, characterization of the granular boundary changes in materials is always challenging. Here, using tetrakaidecahedral Zn2SnO4 microcrystals as an example, we employed alternating current impedance, X-ray diffraction methods and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the effect of the interface on the structure and electrical transport behavior of the Zn2SnO4 material under pressure. We clearly show that grain refinement of the initial microcrystals into nanocrystals (approximately 5 nm) occurs at above 12.5 GPa and is characterized by an anomalous resistance variation without a structural phase transition. A new phase transition pathway from the cubic to hexagonal structure occurs at approximately 29.8 GPa in Zn2SnO4. The unexpected grain refinement may explain the new structural transition in Zn2SnO4, which is different from the previous theoretical prediction. Our results provide new insights into the link between the structural transition, interface changes and electrical transport properties of Zn2SnO4.

  18. Anomalous Structural Transition and Electrical Transport Behaviors in Compressed Zn2SnO4: Effect of Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiwa; Ke, Feng; Li, Yan; Wang, Li; Liu, Cailong; Zeng, Yi; Yao, Mingguang; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Gao, Chunxiao

    2015-09-01

    The interface effect is one of the most important factors that strongly affect the structural transformations and the properties of nano-/submicro-crystals under pressure. However, characterization of the granular boundary changes in materials is always challenging. Here, using tetrakaidecahedral Zn2SnO4 microcrystals as an example, we employed alternating current impedance, X-ray diffraction methods and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the effect of the interface on the structure and electrical transport behavior of the Zn2SnO4 material under pressure. We clearly show that grain refinement of the initial microcrystals into nanocrystals (approximately 5 nm) occurs at above 12.5 GPa and is characterized by an anomalous resistance variation without a structural phase transition. A new phase transition pathway from the cubic to hexagonal structure occurs at approximately 29.8 GPa in Zn2SnO4. The unexpected grain refinement may explain the new structural transition in Zn2SnO4, which is different from the previous theoretical prediction. Our results provide new insights into the link between the structural transition, interface changes and electrical transport properties of Zn2SnO4.

  19. Trait Positive Affect Buffers the Effects of Acute Stress on Skin Barrier Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Theodore F.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Pressman, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examines the role of self-reported trait positive affect (PA) on skin barrier recovery after skin disruption, and whether the role of trait PA in wound healing is consistent with the direct effects model or the stress-buffering model of PA and health. Design Sixty healthy participants (mean age 22.7 ± 3.9 years) completed a self-report measure of trait positive and negative affect, underwent a “tape-stripping” procedure that disrupts normal skin barrier function, and were randomly assigned to a Stress (Trier Social Stress Test) or No Stress (reading task) condition. Main Outcome Measures Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 hr after skin disruption. Results Multilevel modeling indicated that greater trait PA was related to faster skin barrier recovery (p < .05). The effects of PA on skin barrier recovery were independent of levels of trait NA. Conclusion These findings suggest that trait PA may influence skin barrier recovery following a brief stressor. In addition, these results provide additional evidence that trait PA can positively impact objective health outcomes. PMID:19450044

  20. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products. PMID:22790172

  1. Landau Damping and Anomalous Skin Effect in Low-pressure Gas Discharges: Self-consistent Treatment of Collisionless Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Oleg V. Polomarov; Constantine E. Theodosiou

    2004-01-30

    In low-pressure discharges, where the electron mean free path is larger or comparable with the discharge length, the electron dynamics is essentially nonlocal. Moreover, the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) deviates considerably from a Maxwellian. Therefore, an accurate kinetic description of the low-pressure discharges requires knowledge of the nonlocal conductivity operator and calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. The previous treatments made use of simplifying assumptions: a uniform density profile and a Maxwellian EEDF. In the present study a self-consistent system of equations for the kinetic description of nonlocal, nonuniform, nearly collisionless plasmas of low-pressure discharges is reported. It consists of the nonlocal conductivity operator and the averaged kinetic equation for calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. This system was applied to the calculation of collisionless heating in capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. In particular, the importance of accounting for the nonuniform plasma density profile for computing the current density profile and the EEDF is demonstrated. The enhancement of collisionless heating due to the bounce resonance between the electron motion in the potential well and the external radio-frequency electric field is investigated. It is shown that a nonlinear and self-consistent treatment is necessary for the correct description of collisionless heating.

  2. Clinical effects of an oral supplement rich in antioxidants on skin radiance in women

    PubMed Central

    Dumoulin, Marion; Gaudout, David; Lemaire, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental factors impact the skin aging resulting in decrease of skin radiance. Nutrition and particularly antioxidants could help to fight against skin degradation. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an oral supplement rich in specific antioxidants, SkinAx2TM, on the improvement of the skin radiance in women. Methods The open-label clinical study enrolled 35 women, aged 40–70, with facial dull complexion. Subjects were supplemented orally with a daily dosage of 150 mg of an antioxidant-rich formulation containing superoxide dismutase-rich melon concentrate, grape seed extract rich in monomers of flavanols, vitamin C, and zinc for 8 weeks. Each subject served as her own control. The C.L.B.T.™ test has been used to evaluate facial skin coloring (C), luminosity (L), brightness (B), and transparency (T) involved in skin radiance. Facial skin imperfections have been assessed by clinical assessment. Firmness has been evaluated by clinical assessment and cutometer measurement. Finally, an auto-questionnaire has been carried out in order to evaluate the satisfaction of the subjects concerning different parameters involved in skin radiance and the global efficacy of the supplement. Results Skin “red pink” and “olive” colors were significantly improved after supplementation (P<0.0001). Luminosity was increased by 25.9% (P<0.0001) whereas brightness and transparency were not affected by the supplementation. Facial skin imperfections were significantly reduced after the antioxidant-rich formulation intake (global reduction: −18.0%; P<0.0001). Indeed, dark circles, redness, and spots significantly diminished after oral treatment. Firmness and elasticity have been shown to be improved. Subjects were globally satisfied by the product (82.4%) and have found improvements on their facial skin. Furthermore, 64.7% reported to look better at the end of the supplementation. Conclusion The oral supplement containing the

  3. Effect of fatty acid on the accumulation of thiamine disulfide in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Komata, Y; Kaneko, A; Fujie, T

    1994-05-01

    The effect of long chain fatty acid (FA) and its analogs on the accumulation of thiamine disulfide (TDS) in rat skin using propylene glycol as a vehicle was studied in vitro. Lauric acid (12:0) increased the accumulation of TDS in skin, while myristic acid and stearic acid caused a slight decrease in accumulation. Lauryl alcohol and lauric acid methyl ester did not change the accumulation of TDS in the skin. The ratio of the amount of TDS accumulated in skin to the solubility of TDS in the vehicle increased dependent on the concentration of 12:0 added in the vehicle. It was suggested that the increase in the permeability coefficient of TDS by 12:0 results from the enhanced transport of TDS from the vehicle to skin.

  4. Shedding light on the laser wavelength effect in Raman analysis of skin epidermises.

    PubMed

    Tfaili, Sana; Josse, Gwendal; Gobinet, Cyril; Angiboust, Jean-François; Manfait, Michel; Piot, Olivier

    2012-09-21

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is a promising technique which enables measuring the molecular composition of the skin layers, non-destructively and without extrinsic markers. The Raman approach is increasingly used in skin research but with various experimental conditions. In addition to the different skin types, one of the varying parameters is the wavelength of laser excitation. This parameter contributes strongly in the skin Raman response. The present work aimed to evaluate this effect for 3 different wavelengths, 532, 633 and 785 nm, on pig ear skin models. The Raman signal was assessed in the spectral fingerprint region. According to the Raman response for stability, repeatability, variability and fluorescence contribution, the 785 nm excitation wavelength was shown to be the most suitable for epidermis depth profiling in the fingerprint region.

  5. Evaluation of sunscreen safety by in vitro skin permeation studies: effects of vehicle composition.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, L; Puglisi, G

    2013-01-01

    For sunscreens to be safe and effective, the lowest possible UV-filter percutaneous absorption should be achieved. In this paper, we evaluated in vitro release and permeation through human skin of two UV-filters, octyl methoxycinnammate (OMC) and butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (BMBM) from six commercial O/W emulsions and we estimated their margin of safety (MoS). OMC and BMBM in vitro release and skin permeation were investigated in Franz-type diffusion cells and permeation data were used to calculate MoS. OMC in vitro skin permeation depended on both its concentration and vehicle composition while BMBM skin permeation depended on its release from the vehicle. MoS values were well beyond the lowest limit accepted for safe products. Although sunscreen skin permeation may depend on many factors, the commercial products investigated are safe under normal "in use" conditions.

  6. Effect of rice starch as a bath additive on the barrier function of healthy but SLS-damaged skin and skin of atopic patients.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Kristien; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Vanpee, Els; Roseeuw, Diane; Rogiers, Vera

    2002-01-01

    Rice starch added to bath water was studied for its possible beneficial effects on impaired barrier function as evaluated by transepidermal water loss measurements. The forearm skin of healthy volunteers was irritated by sodium lauryl sulphate. Exposure to rice-starch-containing bath water--twice daily for 15 min--led to a 20% improvement on the healing capacity of damaged skin. The beneficial effect was also observed for a rice-starch-containing lipid-free bath formulation, and an oil-in-water bath lotion enriched with evening primrose oil. Skin barrier function in patients with atopic dermatitis also improved after the addition of starch powder to bath water. Rice starch in powder or formulated in a bath product can therefore be recommended as a skin repair bathing additive for barrier damaged skin, particularly in the case of atopic dermatitis patients.

  7. Safety and effectiveness of skin-to-skin contact in the NICU to support neurodevelopment in vulnerable preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Carbasse, Aurélia; Kracher, Sylvie; Hausser, Martine; Langlet, Claire; Escande, Benoît; Donato, Lionel; Astruc, Dominique; Kuhn, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a cornerstone of neurodevelopmentally supportive and family-oriented care for very low-birth-weight preterm infants (VPIs). However, performing SSC with unstable and/or ventilated VPIs remains challenging for caregiving teams and/or controversial in the literature. We first aimed to assess the safety and effectiveness of SSC with vulnerable VPIs in a neonatal intensive care unit over 12 months. Our second aim was to evaluate the impact of the respiratory support (intubation or not) and of the infant's weight (above or below 1000 g) on the effects of SSC. Vital signs, body temperature, and oxygen requirement data were prospectively recorded by each infant's nurse before (baseline), during (3 time points), and after their first or first 2 SSC episodes. We compared the variations of each parameter from baseline (analysis of variance for repeated measures with post hoc analysis when appropriate). We studied 141 SSCs in 96 VPIs of 28 (24-33) weeks' gestational age, at 12 (0-55) days of postnatal age, and at a postmenstrual age of 30.5 (±1.5) weeks. During SSC, there were statistically significant increases in oxygen saturation (Sao2) (P < .001) with decreases in oxygen requirement (P = .043), a decrease in heart rate toward stability (P < .01) but a transient and moderate decrease in mean axillary temperature following the transfer from bed to mother (P < .05). Apneas/bradycardias requiring minor intervention occurred in 19 (13%) SSCs, without need for SSC termination. These variations were similar for intubated newborns (18%) as compared with newborns on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (52%) or breathing room air (30%). However, ventilated infants exhibited a significant increase in transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (TcPco2) (P = .01), although remaining in a clinically acceptable range, and a greater decrease in oxygen requirements during SSC (P < .001) than nonventilated infants. Skin-to-skin contact in the

  8. Investigation of jewelry powders radiating far-infrared rays and the biological effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, B H; Park, C M; Oh, T J; Han, S H; Kang, H H; Chang, I S

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared rays have certain kinds of effects on the human body, especially on skin, blood circulation, and skin cell vitalizing. Some jewelry powders radiate far-infrared rays. Jade has powerful far-infrared ray radiation, and tourmaline has pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties and radiated far-infrared rays. The jewelry powders (fine powdered jade and tourmaline powders) were screened by far-infrared rays for radiation properties and tested for the effects of far-infrared rays on the human skin by temperature observation using an infrared thermal analyzer. PMID:12053208

  9. Investigation of jewelry powders radiating far-infrared rays and the biological effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, B H; Park, C M; Oh, T J; Han, S H; Kang, H H; Chang, I S

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared rays have certain kinds of effects on the human body, especially on skin, blood circulation, and skin cell vitalizing. Some jewelry powders radiate far-infrared rays. Jade has powerful far-infrared ray radiation, and tourmaline has pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties and radiated far-infrared rays. The jewelry powders (fine powdered jade and tourmaline powders) were screened by far-infrared rays for radiation properties and tested for the effects of far-infrared rays on the human skin by temperature observation using an infrared thermal analyzer.

  10. Disorder-induced WAL-WL transition and anomalous Hall effect in undoped thin Sb2Te3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzhovska, Inna; Deshko, Yury; Zhao, Lukas; Chen, Zhiyi; Krusin-Ebaum, Lia; Raoux, Simone

    We examine the effects of disorder on charge transport in thin (20-50 nm) films of topological insulator (TI) Sb2Te3, where, uniquely, structural disorder can be controllably tuned over a huge range - from amorphous to crystalline - by a suitable annealing schedule. We report on the observation of disorder-induced transition from weak localization-like state (WL-like) to weak anti-localization (WAL), at which conductance changes its character from 3D in the WL-like state to 2D in the WAL (crystalline) state. Near the transition, the conductance is G ~e2 / h , suggestive of the transport through a surface channel that is decoupled from the bulk by disorder. Quite remarkably, the onset of the WL state (where bulk transport is of variable range hopping type) is found to be concurrent with the appearance of anomalous Hall signal (AHE) which grows with increased disorder, with Hall resistivity ρxy scaling as the longitudinal resistivity squared, ρxy ~ρxx2 . The nature of spin correlations (probed directly by the arrays of micro Hall sensors) responsible for AHE in disordered TI films in the absence of magnetic dopants will be discussed. Supported by NSF-DMR-1420634, NSF-DMR-1312483-MWN, and DOD-W911NF-13-1-0159.

  11. Theory of the Dirac half metal and quantum anomalous Hall effect in Mn-intercalated epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanchang; West, Damien; Huang, Huaqing; Li, Jia; Zhang, S. B.; Duan, Wenhui

    2015-11-01

    The prospect of a Dirac half metal, a material which is characterized by a band structure with a gap in one spin channel but a Dirac cone in the other, is of both fundamental interest and a natural candidate for use in spin-polarized current applications. However, while the possibility of such a material has been reported based on model calculations [H. Ishizuka and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.237207], it remains unclear what material system might realize such an exotic state. Using first-principles calculations, we show that the experimentally accessible Mn-intercalated epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) transits to a Dirac half metal when the coverage is >1 /3 monolayer. This transition results from an orbital-selective breaking of quasi-two-dimensional inversion symmetry, leading to symmetry breaking in a single spin channel which is robust against randomness in the distribution of Mn intercalates. Furthermore, the inclusion of spin-orbit interaction naturally drives the system into the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. Our results thus not only demonstrate the practicality of realizing the Dirac half metal beyond a toy model, but also open up an avenue to the realization of the QAH effect.

  12. Synthetic nanopores as a test case for ion channel theories: the anomalous mole fraction effect without single filing.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dirk; Boda, Dezso; He, Yan; Apel, Pavel; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2008-07-01

    The predictions of a theory for the anomalous mole fraction effect (AMFE) are tested experimentally with synthetic nanopores in plastic. The negatively charged synthetic nanopores under consideration are highly cation selective and 50 A in diameter at their smallest point. These pores exhibit an AMFE in mixtures of Ca(2+) and monovalent cations. An AMFE occurs when the conductance through a pore is lower in a mixture of salts than in the pure salts at the same concentration. For ion channels, the textbook interpretation of the AMFE is that multiple ions move through the pore in coordinated, single-file motion. However, because the synthetic nanopores are so wide, their AMFE shows that single filing is not necessary for the AMFE. It is shown that the AMFE in the synthetic nanopores is explained by a theory of preferential ion selectivity. The unique properties of the synthetic nanopores allow us to experimentally confirm several predictions of this theory. These same properties make synthetic nanopores an interesting new platform to test theories of ion channel permeation and selectivity in general.

  13. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. I. Insights from particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    Using a 1D particle-in-cell simulation with perpendicular electric, E0, and magnetic, B0, fields, and modelling the azimuthal direction (i.e., the E0 × B0 direction), we study the cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs). For low plasma densities, the electron transport is found to be well described by classical electron-neutral collision theory, but at sufficiently high densities (representative of typical HETs), a strong instability is observed to significantly enhance the electron mobility, even in the absence of electron-neutral collisions. This instability is associated with correlated high-frequency (of the order of MHz) and short-wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and the plasma density, which are shown to be the cause of the anomalous transport. Saturation of the instability is observed to occur due to a combination of ion-wave trapping in the E0 × B0 direction, and convection in the E0 direction.

  14. Anomalous enhancement and suppression of ionization induced by an effective few-cycle pulse in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, David; Lin, Yingda; Hill, Wendell T., III

    2015-05-01

    In a recent set of coherent control experiments, an anomalous sinusoidal variation of the ionization yield was observed in Xe when ionized by a pairs of phase-locked, many-cycle 800 nm pulses. Compared with the signal of a single transform limited pulse, both enhancement and suppression was possible, which depended on the temporal separation and relative phase of the pulses. In the time domain, the control can be viewed as a temporal Young's double slit experiment - two coherent electron wavepackets interfering. In the frequency domain, the photoelectron spectrum is given by the modulus squared of the Fourier transform of the field, which is a few-cycle squared sinusodial function. In analogy to a few-cycle pulse where the carrier phase dictates the ejection direction of rescattered electrons, enhancement (suppression) occurs when the effective carrier waveform is cos[w-w0]2 (sin[w-w0]2). The contrast decreased with increasing pulse separation and decreasing multiphoton order. Detailed results and a model simulation will be presented.

  15. Ultrahigh sensitivity of anomalous Hall effect sensor based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 topological insulator thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ni, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Jiles, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was recently discovered in magnetic element-doped topological insulators (TIs), which promises low power consumption and high efficiency spintronics and electronics. This discovery broadens the family of Hall sensors. In this paper, AHE sensors based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 topological insulator thin films are studied with two thicknesses (15 and 65 nm). It is found, in both cases, that ultrahigh Hall sensitivity can be obtained in Cr-doped Bi2Te3. Hall sensitivity reaches 1666 Ω/T in the sensor with the 15 nm TI thin film, which is higher than that of the conventional semiconductor HE sensor. The AHE of 65more » nm sensors is even stronger, which causes the sensitivity increasing to 2620 Ω/T. Furthermore, after comparing Cr-doped Bi2Te3 with the previously studied Mn-doped Bi2Te3 TI Hall sensor, the sensitivity of the present AHE sensor shows about 60 times higher in 65 nm sensors. Furthermore, the implementation of AHE sensors based on a magnetic-doped TI thin film indicates that the TIs are good candidates for ultrasensitive AHE sensors.« less

  16. Hairy skin exposure to VX in vitro: effectiveness of delayed decontamination.

    PubMed

    Rolland, P; Bolzinger, M-A; Cruz, C; Josse, D; Briançon, S

    2013-02-01

    The chemical warfare agents such as VX represent a threat for both military and civilians, which involves an immediate need of effective decontamination systems. Since human scalp is usually unprotected compared to other body regions covered with clothes, it could be a preferential site of exposure in case of terrorist acts. The purpose of this study was to determine if skin decontamination could be efficient when performed more than 1h after exposure. In addition, the impact of hairs in skin contamination was investigated. By using in vitro skin models, we demonstrated that about 75% of the applied quantity of VX was recovered on the skin surface 2h after skin exposition, which means that it is worth decontaminating even if contamination occurred 2h before. The stratum corneum reservoir for VX was quickly established and persistent. In addition, the presence of hairs modified the percutaneous penetration of the nerve agent by binding of VX to hairs. Hair shaft has thus to be taken into account in the decontamination process. Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) and Fuller's Earth (FE) were active in the skin decontamination 45min post-exposure, but RSDL was more efficient in reducing the amount of VX either in the skin or in the hair.

  17. Hairy skin exposure to VX in vitro: effectiveness of delayed decontamination.

    PubMed

    Rolland, P; Bolzinger, M-A; Cruz, C; Josse, D; Briançon, S

    2013-02-01

    The chemical warfare agents such as VX represent a threat for both military and civilians, which involves an immediate need of effective decontamination systems. Since human scalp is usually unprotected compared to other body regions covered with clothes, it could be a preferential site of exposure in case of terrorist acts. The purpose of this study was to determine if skin decontamination could be efficient when performed more than 1h after exposure. In addition, the impact of hairs in skin contamination was investigated. By using in vitro skin models, we demonstrated that about 75% of the applied quantity of VX was recovered on the skin surface 2h after skin exposition, which means that it is worth decontaminating even if contamination occurred 2h before. The stratum corneum reservoir for VX was quickly established and persistent. In addition, the presence of hairs modified the percutaneous penetration of the nerve agent by binding of VX to hairs. Hair shaft has thus to be taken into account in the decontamination process. Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) and Fuller's Earth (FE) were active in the skin decontamination 45min post-exposure, but RSDL was more efficient in reducing the amount of VX either in the skin or in the hair. PMID:22926045

  18. Intrinsic quantum spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects in h-Sb/Bi epitaxial growth on a ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-05-01

    Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large band gap quantum spin Hall state and a nearly quantized anomalous Hall state which can be tuned by adjusting the Fermi level. Our findings provide an efficient way to realize both quantized intrinsic spin Hall conductivity and anomalous Hall conductivity in a single material.Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large

  19. Wound tension in rhytidectomy. Effects of skin-flap undermining and superficial musculoaponeurotic system suspension.

    PubMed

    Burgess, L P; Casler, J D; Kryzer, T C

    1993-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of skin-flap undermining and superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) suspension on wound-closing tension. Nine sides from five fresh-frozen cadavers were used, with closing tension measured at the two main anchor points, anteriorly (A) and posteriorly (P), with and without SMAS plication for minimal (MIN), intermediate (INT), and maximal (MAX) skin-flap undermining. Results indicated that closing tension was significantly decreased with SMAS plication, both A and P, for all three levels of skin undermining. The average decrease in closing tension with SMAS plication was: A-MIN 191 g, A-INT 95 g, A-MAX 83 g, P-MIN 235 g, P-INT 68 g, and P-MAX 70 g (P < .001 for all). Considering the effect of skin-flap undermining alone, closing tension decreased with wider skin-flap undermining, both with and without SMAS plication. The tension-reducing effect of SMAS plication was decreased with wider skin-flap undermining. Regression analysis determined a second-order exponential curve relating closing tension to skin excision.

  20. Parabens inhibit human skin estrogen sulfotransferase activity: possible link to paraben estrogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J; Harville, Heather M; Zhang, Yanhua; Ackermann, Chrisita; Voorman, Richard L

    2007-04-11

    Parabens (p-hydroxybenzoate esters) are a group of widely used preservatives in topically applied cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Parabens display weak associations with the estrogen receptors in vitro or in cell based models, but do exhibit estrogenic effects in animal models. It is our hypothesis that parabens exert their estrogenic effects, in part, by elevating levels of estrogens through inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferases (SULTs) in skin. We report here the results of a structure-activity-relationship of parabens as inhibitors of estrogen sulfation in human skin cytosolic fractions and normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Similar to reports of paraben estrogenicity and estrogen receptor affinity, the potency of SULT inhibition increased as the paraben ester chain length increased. Butylparaben was found to be the most potent of the parabens in skin cytosol, yielding an IC(50) value of 37+/-5 microM. Butylparaben blocked the skin cytosol sulfation of estradiol and estrone, but not the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone. The parabens were also tested as inhibitors of SULT activity in a cellular system, with normal human epidermal keratinocytes. The potency of butylparaben increased three-fold in these cells relative to the IC(50) value from skin cytosol. Overall, these results suggest chronic topical application of parabens may lead to prolonged estrogenic effects in skin as a result of inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferase activity. Accordingly, the skin anti-aging benefits of many topical cosmetics and pharmaceuticals could be derived, in part, from the estrogenicity of parabens.

  1. DeoxyArbutin: a novel reversible tyrosinase inhibitor with effective in vivo skin lightening potency.

    PubMed

    Boissy, Raymond E; Visscher, Marty; DeLong, Mitchell A

    2005-08-01

    Modulation of melanogenesis in the melanocytes can be achieved using chemicals that share structural homologies with the substrate tyrosine and as thus competitively inhibit the catalytic function of tyrosinase. We have developed a new tyrosinase inhibitor, deoxyArbutin (dA), based on this premise. DeoxyArbutin demonstrates effective inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase in vitro with a Ki that is 10-fold lower that hydroquinone (HQ) and 350-fold lower than arbutin. In a hairless, pigmented guinea pig model, dA demonstrated rapid and sustained skin lightening that was completely reversible within 8 weeks after halt in topical application. In contrast, HQ induced a short but unsustained skin lightening effect whereas kojic acid and arbutin exhibit no skin lightening effect. Results from a panel of safety tests supported the overall establishment of dA as an actionable molecule. In a human clinical trial, topical treatment of dA for 12 weeks resulted in a significant or slight reduction in overall skin lightness and improvement of solar lentigines in a population of light skin or dark skin individuals, respectively. These data demonstrate that dA has potential tyrosinase inhibitory activity that can result in skin lightening and may be used to ameliorate hyperpigmentary lesions. PMID:16026582

  2. DeoxyArbutin: a novel reversible tyrosinase inhibitor with effective in vivo skin lightening potency.

    PubMed

    Boissy, Raymond E; Visscher, Marty; DeLong, Mitchell A

    2005-08-01

    Modulation of melanogenesis in the melanocytes can be achieved using chemicals that share structural homologies with the substrate tyrosine and as thus competitively inhibit the catalytic function of tyrosinase. We have developed a new tyrosinase inhibitor, deoxyArbutin (dA), based on this premise. DeoxyArbutin demonstrates effective inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase in vitro with a Ki that is 10-fold lower that hydroquinone (HQ) and 350-fold lower than arbutin. In a hairless, pigmented guinea pig model, dA demonstrated rapid and sustained skin lightening that was completely reversible within 8 weeks after halt in topical application. In contrast, HQ induced a short but unsustained skin lightening effect whereas kojic acid and arbutin exhibit no skin lightening effect. Results from a panel of safety tests supported the overall establishment of dA as an actionable molecule. In a human clinical trial, topical treatment of dA for 12 weeks resulted in a significant or slight reduction in overall skin lightness and improvement of solar lentigines in a population of light skin or dark skin individuals, respectively. These data demonstrate that dA has potential tyrosinase inhibitory activity that can result in skin lightening and may be used to ameliorate hyperpigmentary lesions.

  3. Constituents from the roots of Taraxacum platycarpum and their effect on proliferation of human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Warashina, Tsutomu; Umehara, Kaoru; Miyase, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    A MeOH extract from the roots of Taraxacum platycarpum has shown significant effects on the proliferation of normal human skin fibroblasts. Chemical analysis of the extract resulted in the isolation of 26 compounds, including eight new triterpenes, one new sesquiterpene glycoside, and seventeen known compounds. The structure of each new compound was established using NMR spectroscopy. Some triterpenes had a significant effect on the proliferation of normal human skin fibroblasts.

  4. Effects of femtosecond laser radiation on the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogov, P. Yu; Bespalov, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    A mathematical model of linear and nonlinear processes is presented occurring under the influence of femtosecond laser radiation on the skin. There was held an analysis and the numerical solution of an equation system describing the dynamics of the electron and phonon subsystems were received. The results can be used to determine the maximum permissible levels of energy generated by femtosecond laser systems and the establishment of Russian laser safety standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  5. Cutting fluids. Their use and effects on the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zugerman, C.

    1986-04-01

    Metalworking fluids are liquids that flow or are sprayed over metal that is being altered mechanically or physically. Cutting fluids tend to be alkaline and are often soap-like. As such they denature keratin, defat the skin, and remove water from it, causing dryness, fissures, and frank eczematization. Cutting oil dermatitis is a difficult problem for the involved worker who must continue to support his family despite the presence of this progressive, pruritic, and painful eruption. 25 references.

  6. Discriminating between Z Prime -boson effects and effects of anomalous gauge couplings in the double production of W{sup {+-}} bosons at a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Vasili V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2013-06-15

    The potential of the International Linear electron-positron Collider (ILC) for seeking, in the annihilation production of W{sup {+-}}-boson pairs, signals induced by new neutral gauge bosons predicted by models belonging to various classes and featuring an extended gauge sector is studied. Limits that will be obtained at ILC for the parameters and masses of Z Prime bosons are compared with present-day and future data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The possibility of discriminating between the effects of Z-Z Prime mixing and signals induced by anomalous gauge couplings (AGC) is demonstrated within theoretically motivated trilinear gauge models involving several free anomalous parameters. It is found that the sensitivity of ILC to the effects of Z-Z Prime mixing in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and its ability to discriminate between these two new-physics scenarios, Z Prime and AGC, become substantially higher upon employing polarized initial (e{sup +}e{sup -}) and final (W{sup {+-}}) states.

  7. The biodisposition and hypertrichotic effects of bimatoprost in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Woodward, David F; Tang, Elaine S-H; Attar, Mayssa; Wang, Jenny W

    2013-02-01

    Studies on bimatoprost were performed with two objectives: (i) to determine whether bimatoprost possesses hair growth-stimulating properties beyond eyelash hypertrichosis and (ii) to investigate the biodisposition of bimatoprost in skin for the first time. Bimatoprost, at the dose used clinically for eyelash growth (0.03%) and given once daily for 14 days, increased pelage hair growth in C57/black 6 mice. This occurred as a much earlier onset of new hair growth in shaved mice and the time taken to achieve complete hair regrowth, according to photographic documentation and visual assessment. Bimatoprost biodisposition in the skin was determined at three concentrations: 0.01%, 0.03% and 0.06%. Dose-dependent C(max) values were obtained (3.41, 6.74, 12.3 μg/g tissue), and cutaneous bimatoprost was well maintained for 24 h following a single dose. Bimatoprost was recovered from the skin only as the intact molecule, with no detectable levels of metabolites. Thus, bimatoprost produces hypertrichosis as the intact molecule.

  8. Effect of phorbol esters on guniea pig skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M C; Delescluse, C; Fürstenberger, G; Marks, F; Schweizer, J; Klein-Szanto, A J; Prunieras, M

    1982-01-01

    When topically applied to guniea pig ear skin the tumor promoting phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced inflammation and epidermal hyperproliferation which could be inhibited by indomethacin. This inhibition could be reversed both by prostaglandins E and F. Five minutes after TPA treatment an increase in the level of prostaglandin E but not of prostaglandin F was observed in the epidermis. The non-promoting phorbol ester 4-O-methyl-TPA also stimulated epidermal cell proliferation but this stimulation was not inhibited by indomethacin. The above results are in agreement with those already reported in the mouse system with these two compounds. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity has been evaluated in the epidermis of guniea pig ear after topical application of 20 nmol of TPA. No increase was noted. This is in contrast with the well documented activation of ODC in mouse skin treated with TPA. Since TPA acts as a promoter in the mouse whereas both croton oil and TPA have no promoting action in the guinea pig, the above result supports the view that ODC activationis related to promotion, and provides a possible explanation for the resistance of this animal species to promotion. This resistance is further documented by the fact that no "dark cells" were found in guinea pig ear skin.

  9. Radiation effect in mouse skin: Dose fractionation and wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Gorodetsky, R.; Mou, X.D.; Fisher, D.R.; Taylor, J.M.; Withers, H.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Radiation induced dermal injury was measured by the gain in the physical strength of healing wounds in mouse skin. A sigmoid dose response for the inhibition of wound healing 14 days after surgery was found for single doses of X rays. The sparing of dermal damage from fractionation of the X-ray dose was quantified in terms of the alpha/beta ratio in the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, at a wide range of doses per fraction reaching as low as about 1 Gy. The fit and the appropriateness of the LQ model for the skin wound healing assay was examined with the use of the Fe-plot in which inverse total dose is plotted versus dose per fraction for wound strength isoeffects. The alpha/beta ratio of the skin was about 2.5 Gy (95% confidence of less than +/- 1 Gy) and was appropriate over a dose range of 1 Gy to about 8 Gy. The low alpha/beta value is typical for a late responding tissue. This assay, therefore, has the advantage of measuring and forecasting late radiation responses of the dermis within a short time after irradiation.

  10. The effect of saline iontophoresis on skin integrity in human volunteers. I. Methodology and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Camel, E; O'Connell, M; Sage, B; Gross, M; Maibach, H

    1996-08-01

    This study, conducted in 36 human volunteers, was an evaluation of the effects of saline iontophoresis on skin temperature, irritation, and barrier function. The major objectives were to assess the effects of low-level ionic currents, to validate the proposed methodology of assessment, and to establish reproducibility in repeated saline iontophoresis applications. This was the first of a multistage study designed to assess the safety of 24-hr saline iontophoresis episodes at selected currents and current densities. Since an iontophoresis patch challenges the skin barrier both by occluding the skin surface and by passing ionic current through the skin, the experimental protocol was designed to permit measurement of the contribution of each of these processes to the overall response. In this first stage we investigated the effect of 10 min of current delivery, at 0.1 mA/cm2 on a 1-cm2 area patch and 0.2 mA/cm2 on a 6.5-cm2 area patch compared to unpowered control patches. Twelve subjects were tested under each condition on two separate occasions to examine reproducibility of the response variable measurements. A further 12 subjects were tested once under the 0.2 mA/cm2, 6.5-cm2 condition. Skin irritation was evaluated via repeated measurements of transepidermal water loss, capacitance, skin temperature, skin color, and a visual scoring system, before the iontophoresis episode and after patch removal. No damage to skin barrier function in terms of skin-water loss or skin-water content was detected. Slight, subclinical, short-lasting erythema was observed for both conditions. Assessment of correlation coefficients showed highly statistically significant indications of reproducibility for all five response variables measured. The experimental design, in combination with a repeated measures analysis, provided clear separation of the occlusion and ionic current components of the iontophoretic patch challenge. Further, the repeated measures analysis gave a highly sensitive

  11. The effect of repeated laser stimuli to ink-marked skin on skin temperature—recommendations for a safe experimental protocol in humans

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Victoria J.; Catley, Mark J.; Grabherr, Luzia; Mazzola, Francesca; Shohag, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nd:YAP laser is widely used to investigate the nociceptive and pain systems, generating perpetual and laser-evoked neurophysiological responses. A major procedural concern for the use of Nd:YAP laser stimuli in experimental research is the risk of skin damage. The absorption of Nd:YAP laser stimuli is greater in darker skin, or in pale skin that has been darkened with ink, prompting some ethics boards to refuse approval to experimenters wishing to track stimulus location by marking the skin with ink. Some research questions, however, require laser stimuli to be delivered at particular locations or within particular zones, a requirement that is very difficult to achieve if marking the skin is not possible. We thoroughly searched the literature for experimental evidence and protocol recommendations for safe delivery of Nd:YAP laser stimuli over marked skin, but found nothing. Methods. We designed an experimental protocol to define safe parameters for the use of Nd:YAP laser stimuli over skin that has been marked with black dots, and used thermal imaging to assess the safety of the procedure at the forearm and the back. Results. Using thermal imaging and repeated laser stimulation to ink-marked skin, we demonstrated that skin temperature did not increase progressively across the course of the experiment, and that the small change in temperature seen at the forearm was reversed during the rest periods between blocks. Furthermore, no participant experienced skin damage due to the procedure. Conclusion. This protocol offers parameters for safe, confident and effective experimentation using repeated Nd:YAP laser on skin marked with ink, thus paving the way for investigations that depend on it. PMID:26793428

  12. Intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the kagome lattice Cs2LiMn3F12

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-10-27

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Furthermore, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane ddσ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  13. Numerical simulation of filling a magnetic flux tube with a cold plasma: Anomalous plasma effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Leung, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale models of plasmaspheric refilling have revealed that during the early stage of the refilling counterstreaming ion beams are a common feature. However, the instability of such ion beams and its effect on refilling remain unexplored. In order to learn the basic effects of ion beam instabilities on refilling, we have performed numerical simulations of the refilling of an artificial magnetic flux tube. (The shape and size of the tube are assumed so that the essential features of the refilling problem are kept in the simulation and at the same time the small scale processes driven by the ion beams are sufficiently resolved.) We have also studied the effect of commonly found equatorially trapped warm and/or hot plasma on the filling of a flux tube with a cold plasma. Three types of simulation runs have been performed.

  14. Nanostructured polymer and lipid carriers for sunscreen. Biological effects and skin permeation.

    PubMed

    Marcato, P D; Caverzan, J; Rossi-Bergmann, B; Pinto, E F; Machado, D; Silva, R A; Justo, G Z; Ferreira, C V; Durán, N

    2011-03-01

    The interest in developing new sunscreens is increasing due to the harmful effects of UV radiation on the skin, such as erythema, accelerated skin ageing (photoageing) and the induction of skin cancer. However, many molecular sunscreens penetrate into the skin causing photoallergies, phototoxic reactions and skin irritation. Thus, the aim of this work was the preparation and characterization of polymeric and solid lipid nanoparticles to act carriers of benzophenone-3 (BZ3), aiming to improve the safety of sunscreen products by increasing the sun protection factor (SPF), decreasing BZ3 skin penetration and decreasing BZ3 concentration in sunscreen formulation. BZ3 was encapsulated in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanoparticles by the nanoprecipitation method and in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) by the hot high pressure homogenization method. The particles were stable for 40 days. The BZ3 encapsulated in PCL nanoparticles was released faster than BZ3 encapsulated in SLN. The sun protection factor increased when BZ3 was encapsulated in both nanostructures. However, BZ3 encapsulated in PCL nanoparticles decreased its skin permeation more than SLN-BZ3. Furthermore, BZ3 encapsulated in SLN did not exhibit cytotoxic or phototoxic effects in human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) and BABL/c 3T3 fibroblasts, whereas PCL nanoparticles with BZ3 showed phototoxic potential in HaCaT cells. Nevertheless, BZ3 free and encapsulated in PCL nanoparticles or in SLN did not show allergic reactions in mice. Our results suggest that these nanostructures are interesting carriers for sunscreen.

  15. The effect of dietary and/or cosmetic argan oil on postmenopausal skin elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qiraouani Boucetta, Kenza; Charrouf, Zoubida; Aguenaou, Hassan; Derouiche, Abdelfattah; Bensouda, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Background During menopause, the decrease of estrogenic secretion induces the disruption of skin functioning, thus causing the decline in skin elasticity characteristic of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin elasticity. Materials and methods Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention period: the treatment group of 30 participants received dietary argan oil, the control group of 30 participants received olive oil, and both groups applied cosmetic argan oil in the left volar forearm during a 60-day period. Assessments of skin elasticity parameters, ie, the three R-parameters (R2 or gross-elasticity of the skin, R5 or net elasticity of the skin, and R7 or biological elasticity), and the resonance running time (RRT) at both volar forearms of the two groups were performed during three visits: before starting oils consumption and application, after 30 days of oils consumption and application, and after 60 days of oils consumption and application. Results The consumption of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2) (P<0.001), net elasticity of the skin (R5) (P<0.001), biological elasticity (R7) (P<0.001), and a significant decrease of RRT (P=0.002). The application of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2) (P<0.001), net elasticity of the skin (R5) (P<0.001), biological elasticity (R7) (P=0.001), and a significant decrease of RRT (P<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that the daily consumption and/or topical application of argan oil have an anti-aging effect on the skin demonstrated by the improvement of skin elasticity, characterized by an increase of R-parameters (R2, R5, and R7) and a decrease of RRT. PMID:25673976

  16. Anomalous Global Effects Induced by "Blind" Distractors in Visual Hemifield Defects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Stigchel, S.; Nijboer, T. C. W.; Bergsma, D. P.; Abegg, M.; Barton, J. J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that a stimulus presented in the blind visual field of participants with visual hemifield defects can evoke oculomotor competition, in the absence of awareness. Here we studied three cases to determine whether a distractor in a blind hemifield would be capable of inducing a "global effect", a shift of saccade…

  17. Effects of skin blood flow and temperature on skin--electrode impedance and offset potential: measurements at low alternating current density.

    PubMed

    Smith, D C

    1992-01-01

    Skin--electrode impedance was determined at 100 Hz and 1 kHz between two disposable electrodes, 5 cm apart, at current densities < 65 microA.cm-2. Measurements were made on the volar skin of the forearm during cooling on cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the dorsum of the foot in the absence of skin blood flow during aortic aneurysm repair. Both the resistive and reactive components of the skin-electrode impedence showed an inverse linear relationship to temperature between 26 and 36 degrees C. The magnitude of the impedance change was different for each patient studied; resistance changes ranged from 0.03 to 23.2 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 100 Hz and from 0.03 to 2.7 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 1 kHz, while reactance changes ranged from 0.4 to 2.1 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 100 Hz and from 0.04 to 0.18 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 1 kHz. Changes in skin-electrode impedance were not due to changes in skin blood flow. There was no consistent change in offset potential with temperature. Although the skin-electrode impedance increases as temperature falls, it is concluded that temperature effects at the skin-electrode interface are not responsible for the observed failure of evoked electromyography during clinical monitoring of neuromuscular function.

  18. Effects of skin blood flow and temperature on skin--electrode impedance and offset potential: measurements at low alternating current density.

    PubMed

    Smith, D C

    1992-01-01

    Skin--electrode impedance was determined at 100 Hz and 1 kHz between two disposable electrodes, 5 cm apart, at current densities < 65 microA.cm-2. Measurements were made on the volar skin of the forearm during cooling on cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the dorsum of the foot in the absence of skin blood flow during aortic aneurysm repair. Both the resistive and reactive components of the skin-electrode impedence showed an inverse linear relationship to temperature between 26 and 36 degrees C. The magnitude of the impedance change was different for each patient studied; resistance changes ranged from 0.03 to 23.2 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 100 Hz and from 0.03 to 2.7 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 1 kHz, while reactance changes ranged from 0.4 to 2.1 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 100 Hz and from 0.04 to 0.18 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 1 kHz. Changes in skin-electrode impedance were not due to changes in skin blood flow. There was no consistent change in offset potential with temperature. Although the skin-electrode impedance increases as temperature falls, it is concluded that temperature effects at the skin-electrode interface are not responsible for the observed failure of evoked electromyography during clinical monitoring of neuromuscular function. PMID:1404312

  19. The Effect of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Full-Thickness Skin Grafts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Hao, Haojie; Huang, Hong; Chen, Deyun; Han, Yan; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ASCs on full-thickness skin grafts. Specifically, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ASCs that are mediated via regulation of the phenotypes of activated macrophages. Methods. ASCs were isolated, cultured, and injected under full-thickness skin grafts in 15 rats (ASC group). An additional 15 rats served as controls (PBS group). Skin graft survival assessment and vascularization detection were assessed with H&E staining and laser Doppler blood flowmetry (LDF). The effects of ASCs on angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, collagen accumulation-promoting, and antiscarring were assessed. Results. We found that the skin graft survival rate was significantly increased in the ASC group. The neovascularization, collagen deposition, collagen type I to type III ratio, and levels of VEGF and TGF-β3 in the ASC group were markedly higher than those in the PBS group at day 14. Additionally, in the ASC group, the levels of iNOS, IL-1β, and TNF-α were remarkably decreased, whereas the levels of IL-10 and Arg-1 were substantially increased. Conclusions. Our results confirm that ASCs transplantation can effectively improve full-thickness skin graft survival. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory role of ASCs may indirectly contribute to skin graft survival via its effect on macrophage polarization. PMID:27413735

  20. The Effect of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Full-Thickness Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haojie; Huang, Hong; Chen, Deyun; Han, Yan; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ASCs on full-thickness skin grafts. Specifically, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ASCs that are mediated via regulation of the phenotypes of activated macrophages. Methods. ASCs were isolated, cultured, and injected under full-thickness skin grafts in 15 rats (ASC group). An additional 15 rats served as controls (PBS group). Skin graft survival assessment and vascularization detection were assessed with H&E staining and laser Doppler blood flowmetry (LDF). The effects of ASCs on angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, collagen accumulation-promoting, and antiscarring were assessed. Results. We found that the skin graft survival rate was significantly increased in the ASC group. The neovascularization, collagen deposition, collagen type I to type III ratio, and levels of VEGF and TGF-β3 in the ASC group were markedly higher than those in the PBS group at day 14. Additionally, in the ASC group, the levels of iNOS, IL-1β, and TNF-α were remarkably decreased, whereas the levels of IL-10 and Arg-1 were substantially increased. Conclusions. Our results confirm that ASCs transplantation can effectively improve full-thickness skin graft survival. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory role of ASCs may indirectly contribute to skin graft survival via its effect on macrophage polarization. PMID:27413735

  1. The water barrier function of the skin in relation to the water content of stratum corneum, pH and skin lipids. The effect of alkaline soap and syndet on dry skin in elderly, non-atopic patients.

    PubMed

    Thune, P; Nilsen, T; Hanstad, I K; Gustavsen, T; Lövig Dahl, H

    1988-01-01

    Clinical dryness of the skin is a common problem among elderly, dermatological patients. In the present investigation, hydration, surface lipids, skin pH and water barrier function as expressed by the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were studied in both dry and normal skin. Using these parameters, a comparison of the local effects of acid and alkaline cleansing products was made. In non-atopic elderly patients with dry skin, the TEWL values were lower than in the younger control group but higher than in the older controls. Following one week's topical therapy, the TEWL values in the patient group decreased further and approached the lower values of the older control group. At the same time the skin hydration values increased, indicating a beneficial effect on the skin barrier. An inverse relationship was demonstrated between TEWL and skin hydration. The study indicates that high TEWL values are frequently correlated with high pH, low hydration of the stratum corneum and reduced skin surface lipid content. Despite the intensive use of an acid syndet and lotion, the pH-readings increased but were still within the 'confidence limits' of the control groups.

  2. Quantum Oscillations without a Fermi Surface and the Anomalous de Haas-van Alphen Effect.

    PubMed

    Knolle, Johannes; Cooper, Nigel R

    2015-10-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect (dHvAE), describing oscillations of the magnetization as a function of magnetic field, is commonly assumed to be a definite sign for the presence of a Fermi surface (FS). Indeed, the effect forms the basis of a well-established experimental procedure for accurately measuring FS topology and geometry of metallic systems, with parameters commonly extracted by fitting to the Lifshitz-Kosevich (LK) theory based on Fermi liquid theory. Here we show that, in contrast to this canonical situation, there can be quantum oscillations even for band insulators of certain types. We provide simple analytic formulas describing the temperature dependence of the quantum oscillations in this setting, showing strong deviations from LK theory. We draw connections to recent experiments and discuss how our results can be used in future experiments to accurately determine, e.g., hybridization gaps in heavy-fermion systems.

  3. Effect of structural defects on anomalous ultrasound propagation in solids during second-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Prudnikov, P. V. Prudnikov, V. V.; Nosikhin, E. A.

    2008-05-15

    The effect of structural defects on the critical ultrasound absorption and ultrasound velocity dispersion in Ising-like three-dimensional systems is studied. A field-theoretical description of the dynamic effects of acoustic-wave propagation in solids during phase transitions is performed with allowance for both fluctuation and relaxation absorption mechanisms. The temperature and frequency dependences of the scaling functions of the absorption coefficient and the ultrasound velocity dispersion are calculated in a two-loop approximation for homogeneous and structurally disordered systems, and their asymptotic behavior in hydrodynamic and critical regions is separated. As compared to a homogeneous system, the presence of structural defects in it is shown to cause a stronger increase in the sound absorption coefficient and the sound velocity dispersion even in the hydrodynamic region as the critical temperature is reached. As compared to homogeneous analogs, structurally disordered systems should exhibit stronger temperature and frequency dependences of the acoustic characteristics in the critical region.

  4. Quantum Oscillations without a Fermi Surface and the Anomalous de Haas-van Alphen Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knolle, Johannes; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2015-10-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect (dHvAE), describing oscillations of the magnetization as a function of magnetic field, is commonly assumed to be a definite sign for the presence of a Fermi surface (FS). Indeed, the effect forms the basis of a well-established experimental procedure for accurately measuring FS topology and geometry of metallic systems, with parameters commonly extracted by fitting to the Lifshitz-Kosevich (LK) theory based on Fermi liquid theory. Here we show that, in contrast to this canonical situation, there can be quantum oscillations even for band insulators of certain types. We provide simple analytic formulas describing the temperature dependence of the quantum oscillations in this setting, showing strong deviations from LK theory. We draw connections to recent experiments and discuss how our results can be used in future experiments to accurately determine, e.g., hybridization gaps in heavy-fermion systems.

  5. The role of the skin barrier in modulating the effects of common skin microbial species on the inflammation, differentiation and proliferation status of epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin resident microbial species are often thought of either as pathogenic or commensal. However, little is known about the role of the skin barrier in modulating their potential for causing disease. To investigate this question we measured the effects of three microbial species commonly found on the skin (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Propionibacterium acnes) on a reconstructed human epidermal model by either applying the bacteria on the model surface (intact barrier) or adding them to the culture medium (simulating barrier breach). Results When added to the medium, all of the tested species induced inflammatory responses and keratinocyte cell death with species-specific potency. P. acnes and S. epidermidis induced specific alterations in the expression of keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation markers, suggesting a barrier reparation response. S. aureus induced complete keratinocyte cell death. On the contrary, topically applied S. epidermidis and P. acnes caused no inflammatory response even when tested at high concentrations, while topical S. aureus induced a weak reaction. None of the tested species were able to alter the expression of keratinocyte differentiation or expression markers, when applied topically. Conclusions We show that the skin barrier prevents the effects of common skin bacteria on epidermal keratinocyte inflammation, differentiation and proliferation and highlight the importance of skin barrier in defending against the pathogenic effects of common skin bacteria. PMID:24245826

  6. Anomalous effective magnetoconductivity in disordered bipolar semiconductors: Theory and experimental simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, Isaak; Alperovich, Leonid; Gurvich, Yuri; Melnikov, Andrey; Biryukov, Sergey

    2002-05-01

    We present the results of measuring transverse conductivity α⊥c of bipolar heterogeneous semiconductors in classical strong magnetic fields. A stochastic distribution of current carriers (electrons and holes) was created by interband illumination through special masks. The main parameters of crystalline p-Si:B placed in liquid He were the concentrations of the main and compensating impurities, 7×1015 and 4×1012 cm-3, respectively; and the mobilities of electrons and holes, 1×106 and 5×104 cm2/V s, respectively. An anomaly in α⊥c was observed: the ratio of α⊥c for heterogeneous and homogeneous samples depended on magnetic field in a nonmonotonic way, i.e., alternation of increasing and decreasing regions of relative α⊥c for H=0-10 kGs and monotonic growth for H=10-40 kGs. To explain this effect, a theory is presented which is a development of the α⊥c theory for heterogeneous semiconductors with one kind of carrier. It is shown that the effect is due to the redistribution of roles of electrons and holes in magnetoconductivity of homogeneous semiconductors. This effect has high sensitivity to degree of disorder and can be used for detection of small irregularities and as a diagnostic of semiconductor purity.

  7. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J.; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of

  8. Anomalous Doppler-effect and polariton-mediated cooling of two-level atoms.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Peter; Vukics, András; Ritsch, Helmut

    2004-03-12

    We consider an atom moving in a near resonant laser field with its dipole strongly coupled to a resonator field mode. As compared to the standard Doppler shift, we find a substantially different and counterintuitive linear velocity dependence of the light scattering properties. The mechanical force of the laser field exhibits strong velocity selectivity at a polariton resonance, which gives rise to an enhanced friction force and Doppler cooling even in the directions perpendicular to the resonator axis. This effect allows for sub-Doppler cooling of atoms even with a nondegenerate ground state.

  9. The subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with dermocosmetics use by patients with skin disturbances

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis and different constellations and the severity of symptoms that not meet the criteria for this diagnosis are a common skin disturbances. An important component of the treatment of these diseases and the proper care of sensitive and dry skin is local dermocosmetics use. Aim To assess the frequency of skin disturbances and the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use as well as the source of information about these products. Material and methods A questionnaire survey about the type of skin disturbances, the subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use and source of information about these products was performed by 787 general practitioners, internists, pediatricians, dermatologists, allergists and pulmonologists and 252 pharmacists in a group of 51 085 subjects with skin disturbances. Results In the group interviewed by doctors, the most common skin problem was atopic dermatitis (52.5%) and in the group interviewed by pharmacists, pruritus (70.0%). In both groups, respondents after Atoperal products use most frequently reported improving of the skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In both groups, over 90.0% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with Atoperal products use. In the group surveyed by doctors, 75.5% of respondents obtained information about these products from doctors and 17.4% from pharmacists, while in the group surveyed by pharmacists, 48.9% from pharmacists and 36.1% from doctors. Conclusions Atopic dermatitis was most frequently diagnosed in a group surveyed by doctors. The main skin disturbance that occurred in a group surveyed by pharmacists was skin pruritus. The main effect of Atoperal products use, independent of the place of the survey, included improving of skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In a study population, there was a high level of satisfaction from the use of Atoperal products. Doctors

  10. Origin of the anomalous Hall effect in the overdoped n -type superconductor Pr2-xCexCuo4 : Current-vertex corrections due to antiferromagnetic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, G. S.; Schmadel, D. C.; Bach, P. L.; Greene, R. L.; Béchamp-Laganière, X.; Roberge, G.; Fournier, P.; Kontani, Hiroshi; Drew, H. D.

    2010-01-01

    The anomalous magnetotransport properties in electron doped ( n -type) cuprates were investigated using Hall measurements at THz frequencies. The complex Hall angle was measured in overdoped Pr2-xCexCuO4 samples ( x=0.17 and 0.18) as a continuous function of temperature above Tc at excitation energies 5.24 and 10.5 meV. The results, extrapolated to low temperatures, show that inelastic scattering introduces electronlike contributions to the Hall response. First-principle calculations of the Hall angle that include current-vertex corrections (CVC) induced by electron interactions mediated by magnetic fluctuations in the Hall conductivity reproduce the temperature, frequency, and doping dependence of the experimental data. These results show that Fermi-liquid CVC effects are the source of the anomalous Hall transport properties in overdoped n -type cuprates.

  11. Anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial ferrimagnetic anti-perovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Zhou, W. Q.; Ren, L. Z.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-08-07

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) has been studied for ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The introduction of Dy changes the AHE dramatically, even changes its sign, while the variations in magnetization are negligible. Two sign reversals of the AHE (negative-positive-negative) are ascribed to the variation of charge carriers as a result of Fermi surface reconstruction. We further demonstrate that the AHE current J{sub AH} is dissipationless (independent of the scattering rate), by confirming that anomalous Hall conductivity, σ{sub AH}, is proportional to the carrier density n at 5 K. Our study may provide a route to further utilize antiperovskite manganese nitrides in spintronics.

  12. Effects of eight vehicles on transdermal lidocaine penetration in sheep skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bayldon, W; Narishetty, S; De Rose, G; Rothwell, J; Mills, P C

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of vehicles on penetration and retention of lidocaine applied to sheep skin in vitro. Thoracic skin from two sheep was clipped of wool and stored at -20 °C, until used. Skin samples were defrosted and mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells, and then one of the following formulations, each saturated with lidocaine, was added: sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) 0.5% in water, SLS 1% in water, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) 50% in water (wt/wt), DMSO 100%, isopropyl myristate 100% (IPM), water alone, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) 50% in water (wt/wt) and DGME 100%. The penetration of lidocaine in each skin sample was measured over 8 h. Significantly greater lidocaine skin concentrations and flux (J(SS)) were achieved with the nonaqueous vehicles, DMSO 100% (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively), followed by DGME 100% and IPM (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The lag time (t(lag)) for lidocaine penetration in the DMSO 100% vehicle was significantly shorter (P < 0.01) compared with all other vehicles except water. Improved transdermal penetration of lidocaine in the DMSO 100% vehicle was likely due to skin barrier disruption, as determined by differences in pre- and post-treatment transepidermal water loss (TEWL). This study has shown that nonaqueous vehicles enhanced penetration of lidocaine in sheep skin to a greater extent than aqueous vehicles, which has implications for topically applied local anaesthesia in sheep.

  13. Effect of skin hydration on the dynamics of fingertip gripping contact

    PubMed Central

    André, T.; Lévesque, V.; Hayward, V.; Lefèvre, P.; Thonnard, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of fingertip contact manifest themselves in the complex skin movements observed during the transition from a stuck state to a fully developed slip. While investigating this transition, we found that it depended on skin hydration. To quantify this dependency, we asked subjects to slide their index fingertip on a glass surface while keeping the normal component of the interaction force constant with the help of visual feedback. Skin deformation inside the contact region was imaged with an optical apparatus that allowed us to quantify the relative sizes of the slipping and sticking regions. The ratio of the stuck skin area to the total contact area decreased linearly from 1 to 0 when the tangential force component increased from 0 to a maximum. The slope of this relationship was inversely correlated to the normal force component. The skin hydration level dramatically affected the dynamics of the contact encapsulated in the course of evolution from sticking to slipping. The specific effect was to reduce the tendency of a contact to slip, regardless of the variations of the coefficient of friction. Since grips were more unstable under dry skin conditions, our results suggest that the nervous system responds to dry skin by exaggerated grip forces that cannot be simply explained by a change in the coefficient of friction. PMID:21490002

  14. Effects of some terpenes on the in vitro permeation of LHRH through newborn pig skin.

    PubMed

    Songkro, S; Rades, T; Becket, G

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of oxygen containing terpenes (carvacrol, menthol and carvone) at 5%w/v in hydroalcoholic mixtures (40% ethanol) on the permeation of LHRH across newborn pig skin in vitro. In addition, the amount of LHRH retained in the skin after 24 h of diffusion was determined. It was found that the passive permeation of LHRH was very limited. Although percutaneous absorption of LHRH improved in the presence of the enhancers, a significant enhancement was observed only with carvacrol, an aromatic terpene. The rank order of enhancement ratio for skin permeation was found to be carvacrol > carvone > menthol. The enhancers also affected the retention of LHRH in the skin. The rank order of enhancement ratio for skin retention was carvone > carvacrol > menthol. The results of the in vitro skin metabolism study of LHRH using fresh newborn pig skin showed that the degradation products were detected and the amount of the degraded LHRH increased with increasing duration of incubation time. PMID:19320284

  15. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  16. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  17. Strong Quantum Size Effects in Pb(111) Thin Films Mediated by Anomalous Friedel Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yu; Wu, Biao; Li, Chong; Einstein, T. L.; Weitering, H. H.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we study Friedel oscillations (FOs) in the electron density at different metal surfaces and their influence on the lattice relaxation and stability of ultrathin metal films. We show that the FOs at the Pb(111) surface decay as 1/x with the distance x from the surface, different from the conventional 1/x2 power law at other metal surfaces. The underlying physical reason for this striking difference is tied to the strong nesting of the two different Fermi sheets along the Pb(111) direction. The interference of the strong FOs emanating from the two surfaces of a Pb(111) film, in turn, not only results in superoscillatory interlayer relaxations around the center of the film, but also determines its stability in the quantum regime. As a simple and generic picture, the present findings also explain why quantum size effects are exceptionally robust in Pb(111) films.

  18. Effect of pore blockage on adsorption isotherms and dynamics: Anomalous adsorption of iodine on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, S.K.; Liu, F.; Arvind, G.

    2000-04-18

    Isotherm hysteresis and pore-clocking effects of trapped molecules on adsorption dynamics is studied here, using the iodine-carbon system in the 300--343 K temperature range. It is found that a portion of the iodine is strongly adsorbed, and does not desorb, even over very long time scales, while the remainder adsorbs reversibly as a homogeneous monolayer with a Langmuirian isotherm in mesopores. The strongly adsorbed iodine appears to adsorb in micropores and at the mesopore mouths, hindering uptake of the reversible iodine. The uptake data for the adsorption and desorption dynamics of the reversible part is found to be best explained by means of a pore mouth resistance control mechanism. it is concluded that the dynamics of the adsorption and desorption at the pore mouth is important at early stages of the process.

  19. Strong Quantum Size Effects in Pb(111) Thin Films Mediated by Anomalous Friedel Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yu; Wu, Biao; Li, Chong; Eguiluz, Adolfo G; Weitering, Hanno; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we study Friedel oscillations (FOs) in the electron density at different metal surfaces and their influence on the lattice relaxation and stability of ultrathin metal films.We show that the FOs at the Pb(111) surface decay as 1=x with the distance x from the surface, different from the conventional 1=x2 power law at other metal surfaces. The underlying physical reason for this striking difference is tied to the strong nesting of the two different Fermi sheets along the Pb(111) direction. The interference of the strong FOs emanating from the two surfaces of a Pb(111) film, in turn, not only results in superoscillatory interlayer relaxations around the center of the film, but also determines its stability in the quantum regime. As a simple and generic picture, the present findings also explain why quantum size effects are exceptionally robust in Pb(111) films.

  20. Anomalous diffusion, localization, aging, and subaging effects in trap models at very low temperature.

    PubMed

    Monthus, Cécile

    2003-09-01

    We study in detail the dynamics of the one-dimensional symmetric trap model via a real-space renormalization procedure which becomes exact in the limit of zero temperature. In this limit, the diffusion front in each sample consists of two delta peaks, which are completely out of equilibrium with each other. The statistics of the positions and weights of these delta peaks over the samples allows to obtain explicit results for all observables in the limit T-->0. We first compute disorder averages of one-time observables, such as the diffusion front, the thermal width, the localization parameters, the two-particle correlation function, and the generating function of thermal cumulants of the position. We then study aging and subaging effects: our approach reproduces very simply the two different aging exponents and yields explicit forms for scaling functions of the various two-time correlations. We also extend the real-space renormalization group method to include systematic corrections to the previous zero temperature procedure via a series expansion in T. We then consider the generalized trap model with parameter alpha in [0,1] and obtain that the large scale effective model at low temperature does not depend on alpha in any dimension, so that the only observables sensitive to alpha are those that measure the "local persistence," such as the probability to remain exactly in the same trap during a time interval. Finally, we extend our approach at a scaling level for the trap model in d=2 and obtain the two relevant time scales for aging properties.

  1. Cytotoxic Effects of the Ethanol Bane Skin Extract in Human Prostate Cancer Pc3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Maryam; Kazerouni, Faranak; Namaki, Saeed; Darbandi Tamijani, Hassan; Rahimipour, Hooman; Boroumand, Nasrin; Barghi, Siyamak; Ebrahimi, Nazanin; Gheibi Hayat, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is extensively supposed that vegetarian diet could affect cancer progress and increase the influence of formal chemotherapy. Objectives: The present study was designed to determine the effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract against chemo resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells. Materials and Methods: PC3 and L929 cells were cultivated and then incubated in the ethanol Bane skin extract with various concentrations of 0.78, 1.5, 3.13, 6.25, 12.5 mg/mL in 3 times 24, 48, 72 hours. Cytotoxic effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract on PC3 and L929 cells was examined by MTT assay after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Morphology of PC3 cells was evaluated by Gimsa staining. Results: The ethanol Bane skin extract inhibited proliferation and caused cell death with IC50 values of 2.8 mg/mL on PC3 cells and the IC50 was 6.1 mg/mL on l929 cells. Morphological changes and apoptotic bodies were observed in PC3 cells faced with the ethanol Bane skin extract by staining with Gimsa. Conclusions: The ethanol Bane skin extract could repress the growth of PC3 cell line. This inhibitory effect of the Bane extract depended on the dose and the time on PC3. The result of this study shows that the ethanol Bane skin extract includes photochemical and inhibitory function against proliferation and inducer of apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC3 cells and also has less cytotoxic effect on l929 than PC3 cells. The ethanol Bane skin extract might be a good candidate for the new herbal anticancer drug. PMID:27482333

  2. Intrinsic quantum spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects in h-Sb/Bi epitaxial growth on a ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-06-01

    Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large band gap quantum spin Hall state and a nearly quantized anomalous Hall state which can be tuned by adjusting the Fermi level. Our findings provide an efficient way to realize both quantized intrinsic spin Hall conductivity and anomalous Hall conductivity in a single material. PMID:27181160

  3. Initial Reaction Mechanism of Platinum Nanoparticle in Methanol-Water System and the Anomalous Catalytic Effect of Water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuangming; Yang, Qingying; Wang, Huanhuan; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Jiong; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Ye, Qing; Song, Li

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the detailed reaction mechanism in the early stage of noble metal nanoparticles is very critical for controlling the final crystal's size, morphology, and properties. Here, we report a systematic study on the initial reaction mechanism of Pt nanoparticles in methanol-water system and demonstrate an anomalous catalytic effect of H2O on the reduction of H2PtCl6 to Pt nanoparticles using a combination of UV-vis, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS), and first-principles calculation methods. The observations reveal the transformation route [PtCl6](2-) → [PtCl5(CH3O)](2-) → [PtCl4](2-) → [PtCl3(CH3O)](2-) → [PtCl2](2-) and finally to form Pt nanoparticles in a pure CH3OH solution. With 10 vol % water adding in the CH3OH solution, a new and distinct chemical reduction pathway is found in which the precursors change from [PtCl6](2-) to [PtCl5(CH3O)(H2O)](2-) to [PtCl4](2-) to [PtCl3(CH3O)(H2O)](2-) to [PtCl2](2-) and to Pt nanoparticles. Notably, the supernumerary water molecular can significantly accelerate the rate of chemical reduction and greatly shorten the reaction time. This work not only elucidates the initial reaction mechanism of Pt nanoparticles but also highlights the pronounced influence of H2O on the reaction pathway, which will provide useful insights for understanding the formation mechanism of noble metal nanoparticles and open up a high efficient way to synthesize new functional nanomaterial.

  4. Voltage-gated calcium channels: direct observation of the anomalous mole fraction effect at the single-channel level.

    PubMed Central

    Friel, D D; Tsien, R W

    1989-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca channels are very efficient pores: even while exhibiting strong ionic selectivity, they are highly permeant to divalent cations. Studies of the mechanism of selectivity and ion permeation have demonstrated that whole-cell Ca channel current in mixtures of Ca and Ba ions can be smaller than with equimolar concentrations of either ion alone. This anomalous mole fraction effect (AMFE) has provided an important impetus for proposed mechanisms of ion selectivity and permeation that invoke multiple ion binding sites. However, recordings of unitary L-type Ca currents did not demonstrate the AMFE [Marban, E. & Yue, D.T. (1988) Biophys. J. 55, 594a (abstr.)], raising doubts about whether it is an expression of ion permeation through open Ca channels. We have made patch-clamp recordings from single L-type Ca channels in PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells. Our results demonstrate a significant AMFE at the single-channel level but also indicate that the AMFE can only be found under restrictive conditions of permeant ion concentration and membrane potential. While the AMFE is clear at 0 mV when permeant ions are present at 10 mM, it is not evident when the divalent cation concentration is increased to 110 mM or the membrane potential is hyperpolarized to -40 mV. We compared our experimental observations with predictions of a single-file, two-binding-site model of the Ca channel. The model accounts for our experimental results. It predicts an AMFE under conditions that favor ion-ion interactions, as long as the outer binding site is not saturated due to high permeant ion concentration or negative membrane potential. PMID:2544893

  5. Calcipotriol delivery into the skin as emulgel for effective permeation

    PubMed Central

    Naga Sravan Kumar Varma, V.; Maheshwari, P.V.; Navya, M.; Reddy, Sharath Chandra; Shivakumar, H.G.; Gowda, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to formulate and evaluate an emulgel containing calcipotriol for treatment of psoriasis. Emulgels have emerged as a promising drug delivery system for the delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Isopropyl alcohol and polyethylene glycol have been employed as permeation enhancers. Formulation chart is made with seven formulations, evaluated for physical parameters, drug content, viscosity, thixotropy, spreadability, extrudability, mucoadhesion, diffusion studies, skin irritation test along with short term stability studies. Carbopolis is reported to have a direct influence on appearance and viscosity of final formulation. The photomicroscopic evaluations showed the presence of spherical globules in size range of 10–15 μm. Rheograms revealed that all the formulations exhibited pseudoplastic flow. Optimized formulation (F6) had shown 86.42 ± 2.0% drug release at the end of 8 h study. The release rate through dialysis membrane and rat skin is higher when compared to commercial calcipotriol ointment. Hence it is concluded that calcipotriol can be delivered topically with enhanced penetration properties when formulated as emulgel. PMID:25561873

  6. SnTe field effect transistors and the anomalous electrical response of structural phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao Zhu, Hao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Qiliang; You, Lin; Kopanski, Joseph J.; Richter, Curt A.; Zhao, Erhai

    2014-07-07

    SnTe is a conventional thermoelectric material and has been newly found to be a topological crystalline insulator. In this work, back-gate SnTe field-effect transistors have been fabricated and fully characterized. The devices exhibit n-type transistor behaviors with excellent current-voltage characteristics and large on/off ratio (>10{sup 6}). The device threshold voltage, conductance, mobility, and subthreshold swing have been studied and compared at different temperatures. It is found that the subthreshold swings as a function of temperature have an apparent response to the SnTe phase transition between cubic and rhombohedral structures at 110 K. The abnormal and rapid increase in subthreshold swing around the phase transition temperature may be due to the soft phonon/structure change which causes the large increase in SnTe dielectric constant. Such an interesting and remarkable electrical response to phase transition at different temperatures makes the small SnTe transistor attractive for various electronic devices.

  7. Tocopheryl acetate nanoemulsions stabilized with lipid-polymer hybrid emulsifiers for effective skin delivery.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoon Sung; Kim, Jin-Woong; Park, Jaeyoon; Shim, Jongwon; Lee, Jong Suk; Han, Sang Hoon

    2012-06-01

    Tocopheryl acetate is used as the oil component of nanoemulsions using a mixture of unsaturated phospholipids and polyethylene oxide-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL). This study investigates the effects of the lipid-polymer composition on the size and surface charge of nanoemulsions, microviscosity of the interfacial layer, and skin absorption of tocopheryl acetate. The lipid-polymer hybrid system exhibits excellent colloidal dispersion stability, which is comparable to that of polymer-based nanoemulsions. If lipids are used as emulsifiers, nanoemulsions show poor dispersion stability despite a good skin absorption enhancing effect. The amount of tocopheryl acetate absorbed by the skin increases with an increased lipid-to-polymer ratio, as determined using the hairless guinea pig skin loaded in a Franz-type diffusion cell. An 8:2 (w/w) mixture of unsaturated phospholipids and PEO-b-PCL exhibits the most efficient delivery of tocopheryl acetate into the skin. Our results show that tocopheryl acetate is absorbed almost twice as fast by the lipid-polymer hybrid system than the nanoemulsions stabilized with PEO-b-PCL. This study suggests that the lipid-polymer hybrid system can be used as an effective means of optimizing nanoemulsions in terms of dispersion stability and skin delivery capability.

  8. Effects of infrared radiation and heat on human skin aging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soyun; Shin, Mi Hee; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Seo, Jo-Eun; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2009-08-01

    Sunlight damages human skin, resulting in a wrinkled appearance. Since natural sunlight is polychromatic, its ultimate effects on the human skin are the result of not only the action of each wavelength separately, but also interactions among the many wavelengths, including UV, visible light, and infrared (IR). In direct sunlight, the temperature of human skin rises to about 40 degrees C following the conversion of absorbed IR into heat. So far, our knowledge of the effects of IR radiation or heat on skin aging is limited. Recent work demonstrates that IR and heat exposure each induces cutaneous angiogenesis and inflammatory cellular infiltration, disrupts the dermal extracellular matrix by inducing matrix metalloproteinases, and alters dermal structural proteins, thereby adding to premature skin aging. This review provides a summary of current research on the effects of IR radiation and heat on aging in human skin in vivo.Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings (2009) 14, 15-19; doi:10.1038/jidsymp.2009.7.

  9. Effect of compositions in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) on skin hydration and occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Loo, CH; Basri, M; Ismail, R; Lau, HLN; Tejo, BA; Kanthimathi, MS; Hassan, HA; Choo, YM

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of varying lipid concentrations, lipid and oil ratio, and the addition of propylene glycol and lecithin on the long-term physical stability of nanostructured lipid nanocarriers (NLC), skin hydration, and transepidermal water loss. Methods The various NLC formulations (A1–A5) were prepared and their particle size, zeta potential, viscosity, and stability were analyzed. The formulations were applied on the forearms of the 20 female volunteers (one forearm of each volunteer was left untreated as a control). The subjects stayed for 30 minutes in a conditioned room with their forearms uncovered to let the skin adapt to the temperature (22°C ± 2°C) and humidity (50% ± 2%) of the room. Skin hydration and skin occlusion were recorded at day one (before treatment) and day seven (after treatment). Three measurements for skin hydration and skin occlusion were performed in each testing area. Results NLC formulations with the highest lipid concentration, highest solid lipid concentration, and additional propylene glycol (formulations A1, A2, and A5) showed higher physical stability than other formulations. The addition of propylene glycol into an NLC system helped to reduce the particle size of the NLC and enhanced its long-term physical stability. All the NLC formulations were found to significantly increase skin hydration compared to the untreated controls within 7 days. All NLC formulations exhibited occlusive properties as they reduced the transepidermal water loss within 7 days. This effect was more pronounced with the addition of propylene glycol or lecithin into an NLC formulation, whereby at least 60% reduction in transepidermal water loss was observed. Conclusion NLCs with high lipid content, solid lipid content, phospholipid, and lecithin are a highly effective cosmetic delivery system for cosmetic topical applications that are designed to boost skin hydration. PMID:23293516

  10. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  11. Anomalous Extracellular Diffusion in Rat Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  12. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  13. Comparison of skin effects of immediate treatment modalities in experimentally induced hydrofluoric acid skin burns.

    PubMed

    Songur, Meltem K; Akdemir, Ovunc; Lineaweaver, William C; Cavusoglu, Turker; Ozsarac, Murat; Aktug, Huseyin; Songur, Ecmel; Tiftikcioglu, Yigit O

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) burns cause immediate damage and painful long-term sequellae. Traditionally, chelating agents have been used as the initial treatment for such burns. We have introduced epidermal growth factor (EGF) into an HF model to compare EGF with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) treatments; 40 Sprague Dawley rats were divided into five groups. Each rat suffered a 6 × 4 cm(2) burn induced by 40% HF. Group 1 had no treatment, group 2 had saline injected beneath the burn, group 3 received magnesium sulphate injections, group 4 received calcium gluconate and group 5 received EGF. Specimens were evaluated via planimetry and biopsy at intervals of 4, 8, 24 and 72 hours. Fluid losses were significantly less in the Mg(2+) and EGF groups. The EGF group had the smallest burn area, least oedema, least polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) infiltration, most angiogenesis and highest fibroblast proliferation of any group (P < 0·005). EGF limited HF damage morphologically and histologically more effectively than Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). This finding indicates that HF treatment via growth factors may be an improvement over chelation therapy.

  14. Time and dose-response effects of honokiol on UVB-induced skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Ruth F; Chilampalli, Chandeshwari; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zeman, David; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2012-06-01

    Honokiol has shown chemopreventive effects in chemically-induced and UVB-induced skin cancer in mice. In this investigation, we assessed the time-effects of a topical low dose of honokiol (30 μg), and then the effects of different honokiol doses (30, 45, and 60 μg) on a UVB-induced skin cancer model to find an optimal dose and time for desirable chemopreventive effects. UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm(2), 5 days/week for 25 or 27 weeks) was used to induce skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. For the time-response experiment 30 μg honokiol in acetone was applied topically to the animals before the UVB exposure (30 min, 1 h, and 2 h) and after the UVB exposure (immediately, 30 min, and 1 h). Control groups were treated with acetone. For the dose-response study, animals were treated topically with acetone or honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) one hour before the UVB exposure. In the time-response experiment, honokiol inhibited skin tumor multiplicity by 49-58% while reducing tumor volumes by 70-89%. In the dose-response study, honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) significantly decreased skin tumor multiplicity by 36-78% in a dose-dependent manner, while tumor area was reduced by 76-94%. Honokiol (60 μg) significantly reduced tumor incidence by 40% as compared to control group. Honokiol applied in very low doses (30 μg) either before or after UVB radiation shows chemopreventive effects. Honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) prevents UVB-induced skin cancer in a dose-dependent manner. Honokiol can be an effective chemopreventive agent against skin cancer.

  15. Synchronization of skin ablation and microjet injection for an effective transdermal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hun-jae; Yeo, Seonggu; Yoh, Jack J.

    2016-04-01

    An Er:YAG laser with 2940-nm wavelength and 150-µs pulse duration was built for the purpose of combined ablation and microjet injection. A shorter pulse duration compared to common erbium lasers in dentistry is desirable for a synchronization of skin ablation and subsequent microjet injection into target skin for transdermal injection of liquid dose. A single laser beam is split into two for an optimal energy of pre-ablation of skin and the residual energy allocated to a microjet ejection. A newly designed injector consists of an L-shaped chamber and a parabolic mirror in a single unit, and the handheld laser is a part of an integrated system requiring no optical fiber. Through various injection tests using the porcine skin, the effectiveness of the new delivery system is herein evaluated.

  16. Effect of Tension and Curvature of Skin on Insertion Characteristics of Microneedle Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Takano, Naoki; Nishiyabu, Kazuaki; Miki, Norihisa; Ami, Yoshimichi

    Recent MEMS (micro electro mechanical system) fabrication techniques have made it possible to produce painless microneedles precisely enough to be inserted into epidermis layer penetrating the stratum corneum of human skin. This paper presents a testing procedure to evaluate the insertion characteristics of microneedle array using cultured human skin considering the tension and the curvature. First, the biaxial strain applied to the cultured human skin was measured by optical technique with image processing. It was found that almost constant strain could be successfully given within a certain area and that error factors in the experiment except the thickness variation of the cultured skin were negligible. Next, using a microneedle square array for brain machine interface (BMI) application, the effects of biaxial tension and the curvature on insertion characteristics were discussed. Within the above mentioned area with high strain, the needles were successfully inserted.

  17. Acute effects of cigarette smoke exposure on experimental skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Kurihara, K.; Schultz, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Random vascular patterned caudally based McFarlane-type skin flaps were elevated in groups of Fischer 344 rats. Groups of rats were then acutely exposed on an intermittent basis to smoke generated from well-characterized research filter cigarettes. Previously developed smoke inhalation exposure protocols were employed using a Maddox-ORNL inhalation exposure system. Rats that continued smoke exposure following surgery showed a significantly greater mean percent area of flap necrosis compared with sham-exposed groups or control groups not exposed. The possible pathogenesis of this observation as well as considerations and correlations with chronic human smokers are discussed. Increased risks of flap necrosis by smoking in the perioperative period are suggested by this study.

  18. Effects of magnesium deficiency--more than skin deep.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Navin Chandrakanth; Weir, Christopher; Alfraji, Sumaya; Grice, Jeff; Roberts, Michael S; Barnard, Ross T

    2014-10-01

    Dead Sea and magnesium salt therapy are two of the oldest forms of treatment for skin disease and several other disorders, supported by a body of largely anecdotal evidence. In this paper we review possible pathways for penetration of magnesium ions through the epidermis to reach the circulation, in turn replenishing cellular magnesium levels. We also discuss mechanisms for intercellular movement of magnesium ions and possible mechanisms for the interaction between magnesium ions and inflammatory mediators. Upon addition of magnesium ions in vitro, the expression of inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and nuclear factor κβ (NFκβ) is down regulated. Dysregulation of these and other inflammatory mediators has been linked to several inflammatory disorders, including asthma, arthritis, atherosclerosis and neuroinflammation.

  19. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling. I. Kinetic equation and anomalous Hall and spin-Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, K.

    2015-12-01

    The coupled kinetic equation for density and spin Wigner functions is derived including spin-orbit coupling, electric and magnetic fields, and self-consistent Hartree mean fields suited for SU(2) transport. The interactions are assumed to be with scalar and magnetic impurities as well as scalar and spin-flip potentials among the particles. The spin-orbit interaction is used in a form suitable for solid state physics with Rashba or Dresselhaus coupling, graphene, extrinsic spin-orbit coupling, and effective nuclear matter coupling. The deficiencies of the two-fluid model are worked out consisting of the appearance of an effective in-medium spin precession. The stationary solution of all these systems shows a band splitting controlled by an effective medium-dependent Zeeman field. The self-consistent precession direction is discussed and a cancellation of linear spin-orbit coupling at zero temperature is reported. The precession of spin around this effective direction caused by spin-orbit coupling leads to anomalous charge and spin currents in an electric field. Anomalous Hall conductivity is shown to consist of the known results obtained from the Kubo formula or Berry phases and a symmetric part interpreted as an inverse Hall effect. Analogously the spin-Hall and inverse spin-Hall effects of spin currents are discussed which are present even without magnetic fields showing a spin accumulation triggered by currents. The analytical dynamical expressions for zero temperature are derived and discussed in dependence on the magnetic field and effective magnetizations. The anomalous Hall and spin-Hall effect changes sign at higher than a critical frequency dependent on the relaxation time.

  20. A study of the human skin-whitening effects of resveratryl triacetate.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ja Hyun; Seok, Jin Kyung; An, Sang Mi; Baek, Ji Hwoon; Koh, Jae Sook; Boo, Yong Chool

    2015-04-01

    Resveratrol has a variety of bioactivities that include its anti-melanogenic effects, but its use in cosmetics has been challenging partly because of its chemical instability. Resveratryl triacetate (RTA) is a prodrug that can enhance stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the skin safety and whitening effects of RTA in human subjects. The primary skin irritation potentials of RTA and resveratrol were tested at 0.1 and 0.5 % on human subjects. Resveratrol at a concentration of 0.5 % induced weak skin irritation, whereas RTA did not induce any skin responses. The skin-whitening efficacy of a cosmetic formulation containing 0.4 % RTA was evaluated in two different test models. In the artificial tanning model, the test product and the control product were applied twice daily to the skin of the forearms of 22 human subjects after pigmentation induction by ultraviolet irradiation. Applying the test and the control products to the artificial tanning model for 8 weeks increased the individual topology angles (ITA°) by 17.06 and 13.81 %, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.05). In the hyperpigmentation model, the test product and the control product were applied twice daily to the faces of 21 human subjects. The averaged intensity of the hyperpigmented spots decreased by 2.67 % in the test group and 1.46 % in the control group, a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Therefore, RTA incorporated into cosmetic formulations can whiten human skin without inducing skin irritation. PMID:25750159

  1. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (< 0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles as produced in the work environments of nuclear reactors. Hanford mini-pigs were exposed, both on a slightly off the skin, to localized replicate doses from 0.31 to 64 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70 {mu}m depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC{sub 2} isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs.

  2. The effects of using a moldable skin barrier on peristomal skin condition in persons with an ostomy: results of a prospective, observational, multinational study.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Maria Teresa; Majewska, Grazyna; Cabral, Mary V; Hölzel-Piontek, Karin

    2014-12-01

    Peristomal skin problems are the most commonly experienced physical complication following ostomy surgery and often are caused by leakage or a poorly fitting skin barrier. A prospective, multicenter, observational evaluation of persons with a colostomy, ileostomy, or urostomy was conducted to assess the incidence of peristomal lesions and level of patient satisfaction with moldable skin barriers. Peristomal skin was assessed using the Studio Alterazoni Cutanee Stomale (SACS™) scale, and patients were asked to rate barrier application and usage variables. During a period of 12 months, and using convenience sampling, 561 patients from 90 centers in 3 countries were enrolled: 28 in Germany, 48 in Poland, and 14 in the United States. Participants included 277 new stoma patients (average time since surgery 0.3 months; average age 64.7 ± 12.86 years) who had a colostomy (174), ileostomy (72), or urostomy (10); and 284 patients with an existing stoma (average time since surgery 18.2 months; average age 66 ± 12.62 years) who had a colostomy (174), ileostomy (88), or urostomy (22) who experienced skin complications using a traditional skin barrier (ie, a solid or flexible barrier with precut opening or one requiring cutting an opening to accommodate the stoma). All patients were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 2 months. In the patients with a new stoma, 225 (90.4%) had intact skin at baseline, 239 (95.6%) had intact skin after 2 months, and 98% rated overall satisfaction with the barrier as good or excellent. In the patients with an existing stoma, intact skin was observed in 103 patients (39.5%) at baseline and 225 (86.2%) after 2 months, with 96.5% of patients rating overall satisfaction with the barrier as good or excellent. In this group, the proportion of patients who used accessory products (eg, belt, deodorants, powder) was 73% at baseline and 64.2% at the 2-month follow-up. The moldable skin barriers evaluated were effective in preventing and healing

  3. Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Casting Skin -- Evaluation, Effect on Fatigue Strength and Elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonmee, Sarum

    Compacted graphite (CG) iron features a good combination of tensile strength, impact resistance, thermal conductivity and damping capacity. This combination makes CG iron a material of choice for various applications, especially for the automobile industry. The mechanical properties of CG iron listed in the standards (i.e. ASTM) are for machined specimens. However, since most iron castings retain the original casting surface (a.k.a. casting skin), the actual performance of the part could be significantly different from that of the machined specimens. Recent studies have shown the negative effect of the casting skin, but little quantification of its effect on mechanical properties is available. Further, the understanding of its mechanism of formation is at best incomplete. In this research, the effect of the casting skin on mechanical properties in CG and ductile irons (DI) is explored. The differences in tensile and fatigue properties between as-cast and machined samples were quantified and correlated to the casting skin features. It was found that the presence of the casting skin was accountable for 9% reduction of tensile strength and up to 32% reduction of fatigue strength (for CG iron with 40% nodularity). Several mechanisms of the casting skin formation are proposed in this research. The formation of ferritic and pearlitic rims is explained by decarburizing/carburizing reactions at the mold/metal interface. Mg depletion and solidification kinetics effect were identified as the formation mechanisms of the graphite degradation. A 2-D thermal diffusion model was formulated based on Mg depletion theory. The model can be used to predict the casting skin thickness when Mg depletion is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using the asymmetric Fe-Gr phase diagram, some instances of casting skin formation were explained based on solidification kinetics theory. The experimental microstructural evidence and the theoretical progress were conducive to the development of

  4. Skin health promotion effects of natural beta-glucan derived from cereals and microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    Du, Bin; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Xu, Baojun

    2014-02-01

    β-Glucans are natural cell wall polysaccharides found in yeast, fungi (including mushrooms), some bacteria, seaweeds and cereals. Natural β-glucans possess many health promotion effects on human health, such as anti-tumor, anti-diabetes, anti-infection, lowering blood cholesterol and immune-modulating properties. These effects have been reviewed previously. However, skin health promotion of β-glucan derived from cereals and microorganisms has received little attention. This review focuses on antioxidant activity, anti-wrinkle activity, anti-ultraviolet light, wound healing, and moisturizing effect and skin permeation absorption of β-glucan. Furthermore, applications of β-glucan in cosmetics are also discussed.

  5. Effects of subcutaneous expansion on the mechanical properties of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Belkoff, S M; Naylor, E C; Walshaw, R; Lanigan, E; Colony, L; Haut, R C

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of conventional and intraoperative tissue expansion on the biomechanical properties of skin. Two 200-cc silicone tissue expanders were inserted subcutaneously in each of six young pigs. One expander was inflated conventionally (4 weeks) and the other intraoperatively (three times within 1 hr). A skin specimen was excised from each expansion site and each contralateral control site and tested under tension to failure. The sites were closed and allowed to heal for 4 weeks at which time another biopsy specimen was taken from each site. Histological observations and biochemical analyses were conducted. Also, tangent modulus and ultimate stress were determined from the mechanical response of each specimen. Results indicated an initial decrease in stiffness and ultimate strength for conventionally expanded skin. The mechanism for this decrease could not be explained via our current biochemical and histological techniques. Mechanical properties for conventionally expanded skin, after healing, were not significantly different than controls. The mechanical properties for intraoperatively expanded skin were not significantly altered with respect to controls, either at initial expansion or after 4 weeks of healing. The tissue "generated" as a result of intraoperative expansion in the porcine model is likely tissue recruited from the surrounding skin.

  6. Effect of topically applied tocopherol on ultraviolet radiation-mediated free radical damage in skin.

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, B A; Bissett, D L; Buettner, G R

    1995-04-01

    Previously, we demonstrated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy that ultraviolet radiation induces free-radical formation in Skh-1 hairless mouse skin. Because free-radical oxidative stress is thought to play a principal role in skin photoaging and cancer, oxidative stress and subsequent photodamage should be decreased by supplementation of skin with antioxidants. Using both the ascorbate free radical and an EPR spin-trapping system to detect short-lived radicals, we evaluated the effect of the topically applied antioxidants tocopherol sorbate, alpha-tocopherol, and tocopherol acetate on ultraviolet radiation-induced free-radical formation. We show that tocopherol sorbate significantly decreases the ultraviolet radiation-induced radical flux in skin. With our chronically exposed mouse model, tocopherol sorbate was also found to be significantly more protective against skin photoaging than alpha-tocopherol and tocopherol acetate. These results extend our previous observations of ultraviolet radiation-induced free-radical generation in skin and indicate the utility of tocopherol sorbate as an antioxidant in providing significant protection against ultraviolet radiation-induced oxidative damage.

  7. Effect of Colorspace Transformation, the Illuminance Component, and Color Modeling on Skin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, S; Schmugge, S; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-03-22

    Skin detection is an important preliminary process in human motion analysis. It is commonly performed in three steps: transforming the pixel color to a non-RGB colorspace, dropping the illumination component of skin color, and classifying by modeling the skin color distribution. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of these three steps on the skin detection performance. The importance of this study is a new comprehensive colorspace and color modeling testing methodology that would allow for making the best choices for skin detection. Combinations of nine colorspaces, the presence of the absence of the illuminance component, and the two color modeling approaches are compared. The performance is measured by using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve on a large dataset of 805 images with manual ground truth. The results reveal that (1) the absence of the illuminance component decreases performance, (2) skin color modeling has a greater impact than colorspace transformation, and (3) colorspace transformations can improve performance in certain instances. We found that the best performance was obtained by transforming the pixel color to the SCT, HSI, or CIELAB colorspaces, keeping the illuminance component, and modeling the color with the histogram approach.

  8. Evaluation of the effectiveness of wet ice, dry ice, and cryogenic packs in reducing skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, R B; Odam, S J; Hubley-Kozey, C

    1987-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate and compare the ability of wet ice (WI), dry ice (DI), and cryogenic packs (CGPs) to reduce and maintain the reduction of skin temperature directly under the cooling agent and to determine whether the cooling effect on skin extended beyond the surface area in contact with the cooling agent. Ten female volunteers participated in the study, and each of the three cold modalities was applied randomly to the skin overlying the right triceps surae muscle. After 15 minutes of cold application, mean skin temperatures recorded under WI, DI, and CGP decreased 12 degrees, 9.9 degrees, and 7.3 degrees C, respectively. The only significant differences in cooling were between WI and DI and between WI and CGP. Fifteen minutes after removal of the cold modalities, no significant differences were found in mean skin temperature between WI, DI, and CGP. The residual mean decrease in skin temperature between the pretreatment rest interval (time 0) and 15 minutes after removal of the cold modality (time 30) was significant for WI only. No cooling was demonstrated 1 cm proximal or distal to any of the cooling agents after 15 minutes of cold application. These findings provide valuable information for the use of cryotherapy in the clinical setting.

  9. Ultraviolet-radiation and skin cancer. Effect of an ozone layer depletion.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, T; Dahlback, A; Larsen, S H; Moan, J

    1990-05-01

    The effect of changes in the ozone layer on the incidence of skin cancer was explored using data for Norway. Attempts were made to arrive at a relationship between the "environmental effective UV-dose" and the skin cancer incidence. Norway is well suited for this purpose because of the large variation in the annual UV-dose from north to south. Furthermore we have a well developed cancer registry and a homogeneous population with regard to skin type. Four different regions of the country, each with a broadness of 1 degree in latitude (approximately 111 km), were selected (located around 69.5, 63.5, 60 and 58.5 degrees N). The annual effective UV-doses for these regions were calculated, assuming normal ozone conditions throughout the year and the action spectrum proposed by CIE, which extends up to 400 nm. The incidence rate (in the period 1970-1980) of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (mainly basal cell carcinoma) increased with the annual environmental UV-doses. For both these types of cancer a quadratic dose-effect relationship seems to be valid to a first approximation. The present data indicate that the incidence of skin cancer would increase by approximately 2% for each percent ozone reduction.

  10. Childhood exposure to ultraviolet radiation and harmful skin effects: Epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Green, Adèle C.; Wallingford, Sarah C.; McBride, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    We review the general amount and patterns of exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation that children and teenagers experience and the spectrum of UV-related skin damage that can occur as a result. Data about the amount of solar UV received by children and teenagers are relatively few but suggest that around 40–50% of total UV to age 60 occurs before age 20. Among white children, those with the palest complexions suffer the most damage. Comparisons of prevalence and incidence of outcomes in children and teenagers sharing common ancestry, but living at different latitudes, show that prevalence rates of photoaging and melanocytic naevi are higher in Australian compared with British children, and similarly for melanoma. Genetic risk for the majority of the melanomas in teens is a function of genes controlling naevus propensity and pigmentation in the skin. High numbers of naevi and freckles, red hair, blue eyes, inability to tan, as well as a family history are the primary determinants of melanoma among adolescents. Beyond the signs of skin damage seen in children are the latent effects observed later in adulthood. Childhood is believed to be a susceptible window for long-term harmful effects of UV, as evidenced by clear differences in skin cancer risk between child and adult migrants from high to low latitudes. Effective UV radiation protection from childhood is necessary to control both immediate and long-term harmful effects on children’s skin. PMID:21907230

  11. Cytotoxic effects of five commonly abused skin toning (bleaching) creams on Allium cepa root tip mitosis.

    PubMed

    Udengwu, O S; Chukwujekwu, J C

    2008-09-15

    The Allium test was used to study the cytotoxic effects of five commonly abused skin toning creams--Ikb, Tura, Top gel, Dorot and Mililo. These creams are commonly used by some black skinned people (especially the females) as skin lightening (bleaching) agents. The results showed that all the five bleaching creams were mito-depressive in action. They exhibited both chromatoclassic and mitoclassic effects. Their depressive effects were found to increase with duration of treatment. The induced abnormalities included chromosome contraction, spindle breakages, c-metaphase, star anaphase, chromosome stickiness and sticky bridges, precocious chromosome movement as well as endomitosis. It is suggested that since all eukaryotic cells are basically the same, these observed abnormalities could be similar to the effects these chemicals have on human skin when they are applied. Some of these are known to cause alteration in melanin formation as well as the biosynthesis of the enzyme tyrosinase. Furthermore, since certain points on the chromosomes called fragile sites have been implicated in oncogenesis, the observed abnormalities may be part of (or include) the switching on mechanisms of such genes, which could be responsible for the transformation of normal skin cells to malignant cells in those who abuse these creams. PMID:19137826

  12. The effects of an alpha hydroxy acid (glycolic acid) on hairless guinea pig skin permeability.

    PubMed

    Hood, H L; Kraeling, M E; Robl, M G; Bronaugh, R L

    1999-11-01

    The barrier integrity of hairless guinea pig skin after treatment with an alpha hydroxy acid was assessed through in vivo topical application of an oil-in-water emulsion containing 5 or 10% glycolic acid at pH 3.0. The control was a commercial moisturizing lotion, pH 7.8. A dosing regimen for the glycolic acid formulations that was tolerated by the hairless guinea pigs and significantly decreased stratum corneum turnover time was determined using the dansyl chloride staining technique. Once-daily dosing of hairless guinea pig skin for 3 weeks with the glycolic acid formulations resulted in approximately a 36-39% decrease in stratum corneum turnover time compared with the control lotion. After this treatment, hairless guinea pigs were sacrificed for the in vitro measurement of the percutaneous absorption of [14C]hydroquinone and [14C]musk xylol. No significant differences in the 24-hour absorption of either test compound were found for skin treated with the control lotion or the glycolic acid formulations. There were also no significant differences found in the absorption of [3H]water through skin from the different treatment groups. Although no increase in skin penetration occurred after treatment with the glycolic acid formulations, histology revealed approximately a twofold increase in epidermal thickness. Also the number of nucleated cell layers nearly doubled in skin treated with 5% and 10% glycolic acid compared with the control lotion and untreated skin. These studies demonstrate that substantial changes in the structure of hairless guinea pig epidermis can occur without significant effect on skin permeability of two model compounds.

  13. Insights into bacterial colonization of intensive care patients' skin: the effect of chlorhexidine daily bathing.

    PubMed

    Cassir, N; Papazian, L; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D; La Scola, B

    2015-05-01

    Skin is a major reservoir of bacterial pathogens in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this study was to assess the skin bacterial richness and diversity in ICU patients and the effect of CHG daily bathing on skin microbiota. Twenty ICU patients were included during an interventional period with CHG daily bathing (n = 10) and a control period (n = 10). At day seven of hospitalization, eight skin swab samples (nares, axillary vaults, inguinal creases, manubrium and back) were taken from each patient. The bacterial identification was performed by microbial culturomics. We used the Shannon index to compare the diversity. We obtained 5,000 colonies that yielded 61 bacterial species (9.15 ± 3.7 per patient), including 15 (24.5 %) that had never been cultured from non-pathological human skin before, and three (4.9 %) that had never been cultured from human samples before. Notably, Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from all sites. In the water-and-soap group, there was a higher risk of colonization with Gram-negative bacteria (OR = 6.05, 95 % CI [1.67-21.90]; P = 0.006). In the CHG group, we observed more patients colonized by sporulating bacteria (9/10 vs. 3/10; P = 0.019) with a reduced skin bacterial richness (P = 0.004) and lower diversity (0.37, 95 % CI [0.33; 0.42] vs. 0.50, 95 % CI [0.48; 0.52]). Gram-negative bacteria are frequent and disseminated components of the transient skin flora in ICU patients. CHG daily bathing is associated with a reduction in Gram-negative bacteria colonization together with substantial skin microbiota shifts.

  14. Skin alterations induced by long-term exposure to uranium and their effect on permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ubios, A.M.; Marzorati, M.; Cabrini, R.L.

    1997-05-01

    The skin is a probable route of incorporation of uranium by percutaneous absorption. The changes in epidermal thickness and their effect on skin permeability after uranium exposure are reported herein. Two experiments (A and B) were performed in Wistar rats weighing 60 g. In experiment A the animals were exposed to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (0.012 g d{sup - 1}) in 30 daily topical applications. In experiment B the animals were treated as in experiment A, followed by a period of non-exposure of 60 d. Samples of the treated area of skin were taken for histologic studies and for the study of the skin permeability. The epidermal thickness was measured on the histological sections. Epidermis was thinner in experimental than in control animals in both experiments. The values in the control groups were 41.05 {+-} 14.03 {mu}m (A) and 38.92 {+-} 16.50 {mu}m (B) and 21.35 {+-} 10.29 {mu}m (A) and 24.06 {+-} 16.50 {mu}m (B) in the experimental groups, the differences being statistically significant. Skin permeability was measured placing skin samples in a diffusion cell, in which the upper compartment was filled with a staining solution. The determinations were made with a spectrophotometer. The results revealed that the skin permeability in both experimental groups was higher than in the respective controls, 65% in experiment A and 77% in experiment B. The results revealed that a long term uranium exposure leads to an epidermal atrophy which in turn results in an increased permeability of the skin. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Insights into bacterial colonization of intensive care patients' skin: the effect of chlorhexidine daily bathing.

    PubMed

    Cassir, N; Papazian, L; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D; La Scola, B

    2015-05-01

    Skin is a major reservoir of bacterial pathogens in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this study was to assess the skin bacterial richness and diversity in ICU patients and the effect of CHG daily bathing on skin microbiota. Twenty ICU patients were included during an interventional period with CHG daily bathing (n = 10) and a control period (n = 10). At day seven of hospitalization, eight skin swab samples (nares, axillary vaults, inguinal creases, manubrium and back) were taken from each patient. The bacterial identification was performed by microbial culturomics. We used the Shannon index to compare the diversity. We obtained 5,000 colonies that yielded 61 bacterial species (9.15 ± 3.7 per patient), including 15 (24.5 %) that had never been cultured from non-pathological human skin before, and three (4.9 %) that had never been cultured from human samples before. Notably, Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from all sites. In the water-and-soap group, there was a higher risk of colonization with Gram-negative bacteria (OR = 6.05, 95 % CI [1.67-21.90]; P = 0.006). In the CHG group, we observed more patients colonized by sporulating bacteria (9/10 vs. 3/10; P = 0.019) with a reduced skin bacterial richness (P = 0.004) and lower diversity (0.37, 95 % CI [0.33; 0.42] vs. 0.50, 95 % CI [0.48; 0.52]). Gram-negative bacteria are frequent and disseminated components of the transient skin flora in ICU patients. CHG daily bathing is associated with a reduction in Gram-negative bacteria colonization together with substantial skin microbiota shifts. PMID:25604707

  16. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  17. Partial wave analysis of scattering with the nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm effect and the anomalous cross section induced by quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.-H.

    2004-05-01

    Partial wave theory of a three dimensional scattering problem for an arbitrary short range potential and a nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux is established. The scattering process of a 'hard sphere'-like potential and the magnetic flux is examined. An anomalous total cross section is revealed at the specific quantized magnetic flux at low energy which helps explain the composite fermion and boson model in the fractional quantum Hall effect. Since the nonlocal quantum interference of magnetic flux on the charged particles is universal, the nonlocal effect is expected to appear in a quite general potential system and will be useful in understanding some other phenomena in mesoscopic physics.

  18. Effect of diaper cream and wet wipes on skin barrier properties in infants: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Lünnemann, Lena; Stroux, Andrea; Kottner, Jan; Serrano, José; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different diaper care procedures on skin barrier function in infants has been minimally investigated and may be assessed using objective methods. In a single-center, prospective trial, 89 healthy 9-month-old infants (±8 wks) were randomly assigned to three diaper care regimens: group I used water-moistened washcloths at diaper changes (n = 30), group II additionally applied diaper cream twice daily (n = 28), and group III used wet wipes and diaper cream twice daily (n = 31). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration (SCH), skin pH, interleukin 1α (IL-1α) levels, and microbiologic colonization were measured in diapered skin (upper outer quadrant of the buttocks), nondiapered skin (upper leg), and if diaper dermatitis (DD) occurred, using the most affected skin area at day 1 and weeks 4 and 8. Skin condition was assessed utilizing a neonatal skin condition score and diaper rash grade. On diapered skin, SCH decreased in groups II and III, whereas TEWL values were reduced in group II only. Skin pH increased in groups II and III. In general, SCH, skin pH, and IL-1α levels were higher in healthy diapered skin than in nondiapered skin. The incidence and course of DD was comparable in all groups. Areas with DD had greater TEWL and skin pH than unaffected skin areas. Infants who received diaper cream had lower SCH and TEWL and higher pH levels in the diapered area than on nondiapered skin. No correlation with the occurrence of DD was found.

  19. Skin effect mitigation in laser processed multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Keramatnejad, K.; Zhou, Y. S.; Gao, Y.; Rabiee Golgir, H.; Wang, M.; Lu, Y. F.; Jiang, L.; Silvain, J.-F.

    2015-10-21

    In this study, laser-processed multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Cu conductors are introduced as potential passive components to mitigate the skin effect of Cu at high frequencies (0–10 MHz). Suppressed skin effect is observed in the MWCNT/Cu conductors compared to primitive Cu. At an AC frequency of 10 MHz, a maximum AC resistance reduction of 94% was observed in a MWCNT/Cu conductor after being irradiated at a laser power density of 189 W/cm{sup 2}. The reduced skin effect in the MWCNT/Cu conductors is ascribed to the presence of MWCNT channels which are insensitive to AC frequencies. The laser irradiation process is observed to play a crucial role in reducing contact resistance at the MWCNT-Cu interfaces, removing impurities in MWCNTs, and densifying MWCNT films.

  20. New derivation method and simulation of skin effect in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qianxiang; Liu, Zhongqi; Xie, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Based on the electrical properties of biological tissues, bioimpedance measurement technology can be employed to collect physiologic and pathologic information by measuring changes in human bioimpedance. When an alternating current (AC) is applied as a detection signal to a tissue, the current field distribution, which is affected by skin effect, is related to both the bioimpedance of the tissue and the AC frequency. These relations would possibly reduce the accuracy and reliability of the measurement. In this study, an electromagnetic theory-based method, in which cylindrical conductor were divided into layers, was used to obtain current field distribution models of human limbs. Model simulations were conducted in MATLAB. The skin effect phenomenon and its characteristics in human tissues at different frequencies were observed, thus providing essential data on skin effect, which are useful in the development of bioimpedance measurement technology. PMID:26406033

  1. The Effect of the iBEAM Evo Carbon Fiber Tabletop on Skin Sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, John B. Godwin, Guy A.

    2011-10-01

    Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

  2. Effects of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) on Skin Health: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Branum, Amy; Sivamani, Raja K

    2016-08-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a commonly used spice throughout the world, has been shown to exhibit antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-neoplastic properties. Growing evidence shows that an active component of turmeric, curcumin, may be used medically to treat a variety of dermatologic diseases. This systematic review was conducted to examine the evidence for the use of both topical and ingested turmeric/curcumin to modulate skin health and function. The PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched for clinical studies involving humans that examined the relationship between products containing turmeric, curcumin, and skin health. A total of 234 articles were uncovered, and a total of 18 studies met inclusion criteria. Nine studies evaluated the effects of ingestion, eight studies evaluated the effects of topical, and one study evaluated the effects of both ingested and topical application of turmeric/curcumin. Skin conditions examined include acne, alopecia, atopic dermatitis, facial photoaging, oral lichen planus, pruritus, psoriasis, radiodermatitis, and vitiligo. Ten studies noted statistically significant improvement in skin disease severity in the turmeric/curcumin treatment groups compared with control groups. Overall, there is early evidence that turmeric/curcumin products and supplements, both oral and topical, may provide therapeutic benefits for skin health. However, currently published studies are limited and further studies will be essential to better evaluate efficacy and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effects of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) on Skin Health: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Branum, Amy; Sivamani, Raja K

    2016-08-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a commonly used spice throughout the world, has been shown to exhibit antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-neoplastic properties. Growing evidence shows that an active component of turmeric, curcumin, may be used medically to treat a variety of dermatologic diseases. This systematic review was conducted to examine the evidence for the use of both topical and ingested turmeric/curcumin to modulate skin health and function. The PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched for clinical studies involving humans that examined the relationship between products containing turmeric, curcumin, and skin health. A total of 234 articles were uncovered, and a total of 18 studies met inclusion criteria. Nine studies evaluated the effects of ingestion, eight studies evaluated the effects of topical, and one study evaluated the effects of both ingested and topical application of turmeric/curcumin. Skin conditions examined include acne, alopecia, atopic dermatitis, facial photoaging, oral lichen planus, pruritus, psoriasis, radiodermatitis, and vitiligo. Ten studies noted statistically significant improvement in skin disease severity in the turmeric/curcumin treatment groups compared with control groups. Overall, there is early evidence that turmeric/curcumin products and supplements, both oral and topical, may provide therapeutic benefits for skin health. However, currently published studies are limited and further studies will be essential to better evaluate efficacy and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27213821

  4. Protective effects of black rice bran against chemically-induced inflammation of mouse skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of black rice (cv. LK1-3-6-12-1-1) bran against 12-O-tetradecanolylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin edema and 2,4-dinitroflurobenzene (DNFB)-induced allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in inflammatory mouse models. We also determined the effects of the bran...

  5. Fermi surface versus Fermi sea contributions to intrinsic anomalous and spin Hall effects of multiorbital metals in the presence of Coulomb interaction and spin-Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin Hall effect (SHE) are fundamental phenomena, and their potential for application is great. However, we understand the interaction effects unsatisfactorily, and should have clarified issues about the roles of the Fermi sea term and Fermi surface term of the conductivity of the intrinsic AHE or SHE of an interacting multiorbital metal and about the effects of spin-Coulomb drag on the intrinsic SHE. Here, we resolve the first issue and provide the first step about the second issue by developing a general formalism in the linear response theory with appropriate approximations and using analytic arguments. The most striking result is that even without impurities, the Fermi surface term, a non-Berry-curvature term, plays dominant roles at high or slightly low temperatures. In particular, this Fermi surface term causes the temperature dependence of the dc anomalous Hall or spin Hall conductivity due to the interaction-induced quasiparticle damping and the correction of the dc spin Hall conductivity due to the spin-Coulomb drag. Those results revise our understanding of the intrinsic AHE and SHE. We also find that the differences between the dc anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities arise from the difference in the dominant multiband excitations. This not only explains why the Fermi sea term such as the Berry-curvature term becomes important in clean and low-temperature case only for interband transports, but also provides the useful principles on treating the electron-electron interaction in an interacting multiorbital metal for general formalism of transport coefficients. Several correspondences between our results and experiments are finally discussed.

  6. Finite element analysis of skin effect resistance in submillimeter wave Schottky barrier diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. S.; Wrixon, G. T.

    1982-05-01

    The skin effect resistance of GaAs Schottky barrier diodes, operating at high frequency, has been obtained using a specially developed finite element computer program. The devices were analyzed as multiplane finite element models entailing curved high-order numerically integrated isoparametric elements. These models coped easily with complexity of shape and with the near singularity associated with the geometry of the anode. A parametric study entailing twenty-six analyses was carried out, from which it was concluded that the skin effect resistance can be minimized by the correct choice of topographical features such as the extent of the ohmic contact and the anode shape.

  7. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  8. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. PMID:25791923

  9. Vitamin E delivery to human skin by a rinse-off product: penetration of alpha-tocopherol versus wash-out effects of skin surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake-Mudiyanselage, S; Tavakkol, A; Polefka, T G; Nabi, Z; Elsner, P; Thiele, J J

    2005-01-01

    alpha-Tocopherol, the major biologically active form of vitamin E, represents a frequently added lipophilic compound of skin care products. Despite its emerging use in rinse-off formulations, little is known on its efficacy with respect to its deposition or its antioxidant potential in human skin. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the single use of an alpha-tocopherol-enriched rinse-off product provides effective deposition of alpha-tocopherol on human stratum corneum. To test this, forearm skin of 13 volunteers was washed either with an alpha-tocopherol-enriched rinse-off product (test product, TP) or with an alpha-tocopherol-free vehicle control (control product, CP) (contralateral arm) using a standardized wash protocol. Thereafter, skin surface lipids were extracted with pure ethanol after the wash procedure as well as after 24 h. Additionally, one group of volunteers was subjected to irradiation of their forearms with low-dose UVA (8 J/cm(2)) prior to lipid extraction. Skin lipid extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography using electrochemical detection for vitamin E and UV detection for squalene (SQ) and squalene monohydroperoxide. The results of this in vivo study demonstrated that (1) while CP treatment lowers, TP treatment strongly increases alpha-tocopherol levels of skin barrier lipids; (2) increased vitamin E deposition levels were maintained for a period of at least 24 h, and (3) TP treatment significantly inhibited photooxidation of SQ. In conclusion, the use of alpha-tocopherol-enriched rinse-off products may help to maintain the integrity of the skin barrier by providing protection against photooxidative stress at the level of skin surface lipids.

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) skin biopsies to assess the effects of emerging contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Denise; Abelli, Luigi; Panti, Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Mancia, Annalaura

    2016-03-01

    Chemicals discovered in water at levels that may be significantly different than expected are referred to as contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) because the risk to environmental health posed by their occurrence/frequency is still unknown. The worldwide distributed compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and bisphenol A (BPA) may fall into this category due to effects on endocrine receptors. We applied an ex vivo assay using small slices of bioptic skin from the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, cultured and treated for 24 h with different PFOA or BPA concentrations to analyze global gene expression. RNA was labeled and hybridized to a species-specific oligomicroarray. The skin transcriptome held information on the contaminant exposure, potentially predictive about long-term effects on health, being the genes affected involved in immunity modulation, response to stress, lipid homeostasis, and development. The transcriptomic signature of dolphin skin could be therefore relevant as classifier for a specific contaminant. PMID:26794494

  11. Iatrogenic effects of photoprotection recommendations on skin cancer development, vitamin D levels, and general health.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kavitha K; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an established carcinogen that causes skin cancers and other cutaneous photodamage. Vitamin D is produced in the skin after UV exposure and may also be obtained from dietary and supplemental sources. The effect of recommendations for UV protection, as well as for very large vitamin D supplements, and possible adverse effects of both are explored. Current evidence supports the conclusion that protection from UV radiation reduces the incidence of skin cancers and photodamage, but generally does not compromise vitamin D status or lead to iatrogenic disease. Conversely, risks of maintaining very high vitamin D levels have not been adequately studied. Vitamin D obtained from diet and supplements is functionally identical to that produced after UV exposure, and is a more reliable and quantifiable source of the vitamin.

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) skin biopsies to assess the effects of emerging contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Denise; Abelli, Luigi; Panti, Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Mancia, Annalaura

    2016-03-01

    Chemicals discovered in water at levels that may be significantly different than expected are referred to as contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) because the risk to environmental health posed by their occurrence/frequency is still unknown. The worldwide distributed compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and bisphenol A (BPA) may fall into this category due to effects on endocrine receptors. We applied an ex vivo assay using small slices of bioptic skin from the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, cultured and treated for 24 h with different PFOA or BPA concentrations to analyze global gene expression. RNA was labeled and hybridized to a species-specific oligomicroarray. The skin transcriptome held information on the contaminant exposure, potentially predictive about long-term effects on health, being the genes affected involved in immunity modulation, response to stress, lipid homeostasis, and development. The transcriptomic signature of dolphin skin could be therefore relevant as classifier for a specific contaminant.

  13. Separation of the inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Nernst effect in a single ferromagnetic metal using on-chip spin Seebeck devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen; Hoffman, Jason; Pearson, John; Bhattacharya, Anand

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect is measured on the ferromagnetic insulator Fe3O4 with the ferromagnetic metal Co0.2Fe0.6B0.2 (CoFeB) as the spin detector in a micro-patterned device structure using an on-chip heater. By using a non-magnetic spacer material between the two materials (Ti), it is possible to decouple the two ferromagnetic materials and directly observe pure spin flow from Fe3O4 into CoFeB. It is shown, that in a single ferromagnetic metal the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) can occur simultaneously with opposite polarity. Using this and the large difference in the coercive fields between the two magnets, it is possible to unambiguously separate the contributions of the spin Seebeck effect from the ANE and observe the degree to which each effect contributes to the total response within a single experiment. Additionally, by using the spin detector layer as a thermometer, an accurate value for the thermal gradient across the device can be measured. These results match well with thermal simulations of our device structure. All authors acknowledge support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  14. Gender-specific protective effect of hemoglobin on arsenic-induced skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Breton, Carrie V; Houseman, E Andres; Kile, Molly L; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Christiani, David C

    2006-05-01

    Chronic arsenic poisoning remains a public health crisis in Bangladesh. As arsenic has been shown to bind to human hemoglobin (Hb), hematologic mechanisms may play a role in the pathway through which arsenic exerts its toxicity. Two separate studies, a case-control and a cohort, were conducted to investigate the role of Hb in the development of arsenic-induced skin lesions. In the first, conditional logistic regression was used to investigate the effect of Hb on skin lesions among 900 case-control pairs from Pabna, Bangladesh, in which individuals were matched on gender, age, and location. In the second, mixed linear regression models were used to examine the association between toenail arsenic, urinary arsenic, and Hb within a cohort of 184 individuals from 50 families in the same region who did not have arsenic-induced skin lesions. Hb was significantly associated with skin lesions but this association was gender specific. In males, a 40% reduction in the odds of skin lesions occurred for every 1 g/dL increase in Hb (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.73). No effect was observed for females (odds ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.46). In the cohort of 184 individuals, no associations between toenail arsenic or urinary arsenic species and Hb levels were observed. Low Hb levels may exacerbate the detrimental health effects of chronic arsenic poisoning. Whereas providing clean water remains the optimal solution to Bangladesh's problem of arsenic poisoning, improving nutrition and reducing iron-deficiency anemia may ameliorate negative health effects, such as skin lesions in individuals who have been exposed.

  15. Effects of TPA on short-circuit current across frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, T.; O'Brien, T.G.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) is an effective tumor promoter that affects a variety of ion transport processes. To examine the relationship between effects on transport and growth and differentiation, the authors have been studying the actions of TPA on frog skin, a particularly well-characterized epithelium. They have reported that high concentrations of TPA stimulate base-line short-circuit current (I/sub SC/) and inhibit the subsequent natriferic action of vasopressin. The current study of 89 preparations extends those findings. The K/sub m/ of the stimulatory effect of TPA is approx. 3 nM; this high affinity indicates that the transport phenomenon does not simply reflect a nonspecific interaction of phorbol ester with the plasma membranes. TPA acts largely or entirely at the mucosal surface of both split and whole skins; thus the sidedness of the effect does not arise from adsorption onto the underlying connective tissue when TPA is applied to the serosal surface of whole skin. Amiloride, an inhibitor of apical Na entry, abolishes I/sub SC/ across frog skins pretreated with TPA. The phorbol ester also increases I/sub SC/ across split skins, preparations which do not produce net Cl transport. The present results indicate that frog skin is highly responsive to TPA at concentrations known to activate protein kinase C in broken-cell preparations. The actions on I/sub SC/ appear to reflect changes in transepithelial Na transport modulated at the apical membranes. The full biochemical events triggered by TPA remain to be clarified; in part, TPA's actions may be mediated by leukotrienes produced by activation of the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism.

  16. Fabrication and local laser heating of freestanding Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} bridges with Pt contacts displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, F.; Grundler, D.

    2014-04-28

    In spin caloritronics, ferromagnetic samples subject to relatively large in-plane temperature gradients ∇T have turned out to be extremely interesting. We report on a preparation technique that allows us to create freely suspended permalloy/Pt hybrid structures where a scanning laser induces ∇T on the order of a few K/μm. We observe both the anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature and the magnetic field dependent anomalous Nernst effect under laser heating. The technique is promising for the realization of device concepts considered in spin caloritronics based on suspended ferromagnetic nanostructures with electrical contacts.

  17. Scaling of the anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial antiperovskite Mn3.5Dy0.5N involving multiple competing scattering mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X.; Zhou, W. Q.; Li, S. W.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) has been studied for ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn3.5Dy0.5N film grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Reflective high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate the high quality of the film. We have used a scaling involving multiple competing scattering mechanisms to distinguish variations of contributions to the AHE by heavily doped Dy. The scaling analysis revealed that the heavily doped Dy has dramatically modified the skew scattering part of the AHE in Mn4N and Mn3.5Dy0.5N has a totally different scattering mechanism from an undoped film.

  18. Effect of a lipid-rich emollient containing ceramide 3 in experimentally induced skin barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kucharekova, M; Schalkwijk, J; Van De Kerkhof, P C M; Van De Valk, P G M

    2002-06-01

    In the present study we compared the effect of a ceramide 3-containing emollient (Locobase(R) Repair) with a control emollient (vaselinum album/cremor lanette ana) and untreated damaged skin using clinical, bioengineering and immunohistochemical methods in two different models of experimentally induced skin barrier dysfunction. In model A (n = 13) skin barrier dysfunction was inflicted at three investigation sites by tape stripping. In model B (n = 13) the volunteers were patch tested at three investigation sites with sodium dodecyl sulphate (0.2%) for 4 h a day for 4 consecutive days. The investigation sites were treated once a day with the above-mentioned agents. Irritant reaction was assessed daily by erythema scoring and measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). After 5D, punch biopsies were taken from all sites. Immunohistochemical assessment was carried out with respect to epidermal proliferation, epidermal differentiation and Langerhans cells. Tape stripping resulted in an erythematous reaction and an increase of TEWL associated with up-regulation of cycling cells, involucrin and expression of cytokeratin 16. At day 4, ceramide 3-containing emollient significantly decreased (p < 0.03) the erythema score, TEWL and cycling cells in comparison with the untreated site. Repetitive exposure to SDS induced a variable degree of erythema, gradual increase of TEWL, an increase of cycling cells, and up-regulation of involucrin, E-FABP and SKALP. The treatment with the control emollient significantly prevented erythema, increase of TEWL and cycling cells at day 4 compared to the untreated site. In summary, the present study demonstrated that both tested emollients improve skin barrier in different conditions compared to the untreated skin. There is some indication that formulations containing skin-related lipids might be of benefit in barrier disruption following tape stripping. Different models and clinical trials are needed to establish the usefulness in

  19. Skin cooling aids cerebrovascular function more effectively under severe than moderate heat stress.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rebekah A I; Ainslie, Philip N; Fan, Jui-Lin; Wilson, Luke C; Thomas, Kate N; Cotter, James D

    2010-05-01

    Skin surface cooling has been shown to improve orthostatic tolerance; however, the influence of severe heat stress on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to skin cooling remains unknown. Nine healthy males, resting supine in a water-perfusion suit, were heated to +1.0 and +2.0 degrees C elevation in body core temperature (T (c)). Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial pressure (MAP; photoplethysmography), stroke volume (SV; Modelflow), total peripheral resistance (TPR; Modelflow), heart rate (HR; ECG) and the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) were measured continuously during 1-min baseline and 3-min lower body negative pressure (LBNP, -15 mm Hg) when heated without and again with skin surface cooling. Nine participants tolerated +1 degrees C and six participants reached +2 degrees C. Skin cooling elevated (P = 0.004) MAP ~4% during baseline and LBNP at +1 degrees C T (c). During LBNP, skin cooling increased SV (9%; P = 0.010) and TPR (0.9 mm Hg L(-1) min, P = 0.013) and lowered HR (13 b min(-1), P = 0.012) at +1 degrees C T (c) and +2 degrees C T (c) collectively. At +2 degrees C T (c), skin cooling elevated P(ET)CO(2) ~4.3 mm Hg (P = 0.011) and therefore reduced cerebral vascular resistance ~0.1 mm Hg cm(-1) s at baseline and LBNP (P = 0.012). In conclusion, skin cooling under severe heating and mild orthostatic stress maintained cerebral blood flow more effectively than it did under moderate heating, in conjunction with elevated carbon dioxide pressure, SV and arterial resistance.

  20. Effect of ultrafiltration on thermal variables, skin temperature, skin blood flow, and energy expenditure during ultrapure hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    van der Sande, Frank M; Rosales, Laura M; Brener, Zohar; Kooman, Jeroen P; Kuhlmann, Martin; Handelman, Garry; Greenwood, Roger N; Carter, Mary; Schneditz, Daniel; Leunissen, Karel M; Levin, Nathan W

    2005-06-01

    The cause of the increase in core temperature (CT) during hemodialysis (HD) is still under debate. It has been suggested that peripheral vasoconstriction as a result of hypovolemia, leading to a reduced dissipation of heat from the skin, is the main cause of this increase in CT. If so, then it would be expected that extracorporeal heat flow (Jex) needed to maintain a stable CT (isothermic; T-control = 0, no change in CT) is largely different between body temperature control HD combined with ultrafiltration (UF) and body temperature control HD without UF (isovolemic). Consequently, significant differences in DeltaCT would be expected between isovolemic HD and HD combined with UF at zero Jex (thermoneutral; E-control = 0, no supply or removal of thermal energy to and from the extracorporeal circulation). During the latter treatment, the CT is expected to increase. In this study, changes in thermal variables (CT and Jex), skin blood flow, energy expenditure, and cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and IL-6) were compared in 13 patients, each undergoing body temperature control (T-control = 0) HD without and with UF and energy-neutral (E-control = 0) HD without and with UF. CT increased equally during energy-neutral treatments, with (0.32 +/- 0.16 degrees C; P = 0.000) and without (0.27 +/- 0.29 degrees C; P = 0.006) UF. In body temperature control treatments, the relationship between Jex and UF tended to be significant (r = -0.51; P = 0.07); however, there was no significant difference in cooling requirements regardless of whether treatments were done without (-17.9 +/- 9.3W) or with UF (-17.8 +/- 13.27W). Changes in energy expenditure did not differ among the four treatment modes. There were no significant differences in pre- and postdialysis levels of cytokines within or between treatments. Although fluid removal has an effect on thermal variables, no single mechanism seems to be responsible for the increased heat accumulation during HD.