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Sample records for anorexia nervosa co-occurring

  1. Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerlage, Patricia A.

    The author traces the case histories of five anorexic female patients treated in the therapeutic milieu in a psychiatric inpatient unit. The history of anorexia nervosa is reviewed, incidence of the disorder is cited, and common characteristics are described. Case histories are presented in terms of events precipitating the weight loss, behavior…

  2. Osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Cleary, Barbara S; Gaudiani, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is common in anorexia nervosa. It places these patients at increased lifetime risk for fractures. Bone loss may never recover completely even once weight is restored. The strongest predictors of osteoporosis include low body weight and amenorrhea. Loss of bone density can occur rapidly and very early in the course of anorexia nervosa. The etiology of bone loss in the patient with anorexia nervosa is multifactorial. In addition to reduced estrogen and progesterone, excess cortisol levels and low levels of insulin growth factor (IGF-1), a correlate for bone formation, are observed. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry screening is important to assess bone density. However, successful treatments to reverse bone loss, in those with anorexia nervosa, are lacking. Early diagnosis and treatment of anorexia nervosa are paramount to prevent initial weight loss and subsequent loss of bone.

  3. Predisposition Factors in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, K. L.; Jones, Karen H.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature concerned with investigating psychiatric disturbances and genetic variables hypothesized as predisposing factors in etiology of anorexia nervosa. Gives particular emphasis to research which discusses association between anorexia nervosa and depression. Reviews psychopharmacological evidence and family genetics studies. Offers…

  4. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management. PMID:27166107

  5. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management.

  6. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews the literature on anorexia nervosa, with or without bulimia, and presents a comprehensive picture of this eating disorder, focusing on terminology, historical references, prevalence, prognosis, classification, diagnostic criteria, physical and psychological characteristics, evolution of the disability, etiology, treatment, and…

  7. Anorexia nervosa. A review.

    PubMed

    Tamburrino, M B; McGinnis, R A

    2002-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an illness characterized by significant weight loss, amenorrhea, distorted body image and a relentless pursuit of thinness. The disorder affects primarily young women between the ages of 13 and 20, and is more commonly seen in westernized countries. Although the incidence is relatively rare, affecting approximately 0.5 to 1.0% of younger women in the United States, medical complications can be severe, and long-term mortality rates may approach 20%. Recent studies indicate that subclinical eating disorders occur in at least 5% of women and up to 1/3 of females among special populations such as athletes and insulin-dependent diabetics. The etiology of eating disorders is not known, but there are psychosocial and biological influences. Malnutrition associated with anorexia nervosa can affect nearly every organ system in the body, with cardiac complications responsible for 50% of the deaths in anorexia nervosa. More recent brain studies suggest that grey matter volume deficits may persist after refeeding. Subclinical anorexia nervosa in athletes is associated with premature fractures and long-term osteopenia. Early complications, such as retinopathy, are increasingly seen in female diabetics who have disordered eating patterns. Well-designed empirical trials of treatment with psychotherapy and psychopharmacology are very limited. There is some evidence that family therapy may be more effective than individual therapy in younger anorectics who have been ill less than 3 years. The most promising finding in medication treatment suggests that fluoxetine may help prevent relapse in the weight restored anorectic. PMID:12434112

  8. Case 39: Anorexia nervosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anorexia nervosa is a disease affecting primarily young women who have distorted body images. Although their weight is less than 30 percent under ideal body weight, they see themselves as overweight. Anorectics often use diuretic and laxative agents to accomplish their weight loss. Patients with bul...

  9. [Pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Greetfeld, M; Cuntz, U; Voderholzer, U

    2012-01-01

    Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice for both anorexia nervosa and for bulimia nervosa. However, many patients are also treated by pharmaceutical drugs. For the clinician it is difficult to choose pharmacotherapy, because the drugs may not be licensed, because of pharmacodynamic problems due to underweight or purging behaviour, or because of comorbidity. The present review summarises the current knowledge on pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa considering the available guidelines. In general, the knowledge based on studies is insufficient for anorexia nervosa. Up to now, there is no proof of efficacy for any antidepressant or atypical antipsychotic with respect to weight gain; atypical antipsychotics may be helpful for ruminating or excessive motor hyperactivity. For bulimia nervosa antidepressants are the pharmacotherapy of first choice. Long-term effects, however, are still unknown.

  10. Psychobiology of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ploog, D W; Pirke, K M

    1987-11-01

    The psychobiology of anorexia nervosa is described and explained under four headings; (1) the psychopathology as related to the motivation for fasting; (2) metabolic and somatic consequences of starvation, including brain morphology; (3) endocrine abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and gonadal axis; and (4) the hunger drive and its possible perversions in terms of aspects of neuroethology and the reward system in the brain.

  11. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes.

  12. [Franz Kafka's anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Fichter, M M

    1988-07-01

    The evidence for the hypothesis that the poet Franz Kafka had suffered from an atypical anorexia nervosa is presented. Kafka was slim and underweight throughout his life and showed an ascetic attitude and abjuration of physical enjoyment and pleasure (fasting, vegetarianism, sexual abstinence, emphasis on physical fitness). The analysis is mainly based on Kafka's own descriptions in his letters, diaries, and literary work. Kafka was achievement oriented, reported many sadomasochistic fantasies, and had an anancastic (obsessive-compulsive) depressive personality. In addition there is evidence for a disturbed psychosexual and gender identity development. Our results concerning Kafka's psychopathology do not question his genius as a poet.

  13. Anorexia Nervosa: Sociocultural Factors and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jennifer

    This paper examines how the epidemiological findings of anorexia nervosa lead theorists to speculate a correlation between sociocultural factors and the development of anorexia nervosa. A section on the essential features of anorexia nervosa identifies five primary characteristics of anorexia: (1) severe weight loss; (2) a disturbance of body…

  14. Achalasia mimicking prepubertal anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Richterich, Andreas; Brunner, Romuald; Resch, Franz

    2003-04-01

    A 9-year-old girl presents for continuing weight loss of 10 kg over the course of 1 year. Medical history showed three episodes of pneumonia requiring hospital admission in the 6 months before presentation and 4 months of weekly psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa. A thorough history of eating behavior and a review of systems revealed not only typical aspects of prepubertal anorexia nervosa but also vomiting at night while asleep, difficulty drinking liquids, epigastric pain, and a frequent experience of "a lump in the throat"; these symptoms were not suggestive of a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa but rather of esophageal achalasia. The patient was transferred to the Department of Pediatrics, and a diagnosis of esophageal achalasia was made by chest x-ray and barium swallow. After dilatation and botulinum toxin application, the patient regained weight easily and was discharged in stable condition. In this case, esophageal achalasia mimicked prepubertal anorexia nervosa.

  15. Anorexia nervosa: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mendhekar, D N; Arora, K; Lohia, D; Aggarwal, A; Jiloha, R C

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a condition thought to be associated with the western culture. However, the recent publication of a case series from Asia suggests that it is a syndrome related to a changing culture. We present a detailed clinical form of this syndrome based on descriptive analysis of 2 cases of anorexia nervosa. Both these patients were adolescent, school-going girls from middle socioeconomic class of urban background. They were pre-morbidly non-obese and did not have any pressures to pursue slimness for beauty. However, there was an identifiable psychosocial stressor as a precipitant in both of them. Both the patients had symptoms of refusal to eat followed by weight loss. We could not identify any risk factor in our patients for anorexia nervosa. Our report illustrates the differences in developmental and psychodynamic issues related to the development of anorexia nervosa, though the clinical symptoms may be similar. PMID:20120991

  16. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders.

  17. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner.

  18. Adolescent Eating Disorder: Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muuss, Rolf E.

    1985-01-01

    Examines anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder seen with increasing frequency, especially among adolescent girls. Presents five theories about causation, discusses early characteristics, typical family patterns, physical and medical characteristics, social adjustment problems, and society's contribution to anorexia. Describes course of the…

  19. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Södersten, Per; Bergh, Cecilia; Zandian, Modjtaba; Ioakimidis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Brainstem and hypothalamic “orexigenic/anorexigenic” networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have shown that while a hypothalamic “orexigen” excites eating when food is abundant, it inhibits eating and stimulates foraging when food is in short supply. As the physical price of food approaches zero, eating and body weight increase without constraints. Conversely, in anorexia nervosa body weight is homeostatically regulated, the high level of physical activity in anorexia is displaced hoarding for food that keeps body weight constantly low. A treatment based on this point of view, providing patients with computerized mealtime support to re-establish normal eating behavior, has brought 75% of patients with eating disorders into remission, reduced the rate of relapse to 10%, and eliminated mortality. PMID:25147496

  20. Anorexia nervosa: a rogue hibernation?

    PubMed

    Scolnick, Barbara; Mostofsky, David I

    2014-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a puzzling and often tragic disorder which causes the individual to self starve and hyper-exercise. We present a speculative analysis of the disorder which begins by acknowledging and accepting the adaptation to flee famine theory. This theory holds that anorexia nervosa results from activation of an archaic pathway that functioned well during human's nomadic past. We advance this idea by suggesting that the faulty signal indicating there is a famine, arises from misalignment of the circadian/circannual oscillations. Entry and exit from hibernation is dependent on these cycles, and we draw an analogy between hibernation and anorexia nervosa. We offer ideas for testing the hypothesis, and targeting these faulty signals.

  1. Group Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polivy, Janet

    A variety of psychotherapeutic techniques have been used to treat anorexia nervosa with varying degrees of success. Group therapy has advantages to offer anorectic patients in the form of certain curative factors including consensual validation from other anorectic group members, models of coping, peer feedback, and active participation in the…

  2. Adolescent Boys and Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Felicia

    1994-01-01

    Notes that there has been steady increase in reported incidence of male adolescents with anorexia nervosa, from approximately 5% in 1985 to as much as 10% in 1987. Considers role of educators and counselors in early identification of this disorder, noting that young anorectic males have better prognosis for recovery if they receive treatment in…

  3. What People with Anorexia Nervosa Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Anorexia Nervosa Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page April 2016 What Is Anorexia Nervosa? Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized ...

  4. Treatments of medical complications of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Krantz, Mori J; Sachs, Katherine V

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are a plethora of medical complications which correlate with the severity of weight loss or the frequency and mode of purging. Yet, the encouraging fact is that most of these medical complications are treatable and reversible with definitive care and cessation of the eating-disordered behaviours. Herein, these treatments are described for both the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and those which are a result of bulimia nervosa.

  5. [Relapse prevention in anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Giel, Katrin; Leehr, Elisabeth; Becker, Sandra; Startup, Helen; Zipfel, Stephan; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2013-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa is characterised by high relapse rates and thus there is a need for strategies that reduce reoccurrence of illness. One way of achieving this is to integrate relapse prevention into treatment, but clearly this requires identification of risk and maintenance factors. The Maudsley Model of Anorexia Nervosa Treatment in Adults (MANTRA) by Schmidt & Treasure has 5 major treatment stages. These include an initial stage of motivation and dialogue about change, an individual relapse formulation, improvement of cognitive and socio-emotional skills, work on the patient's identity and eventually a final stage of ending and parting. These treatment stages are derived from a maintenance model of AN by Schmidt & Treasure and on evidence from recovered patients and part of their objective is to prevent relapse.

  6. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia: The Teenager's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, G. Sue

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are currently being studied with great intensity by the medical profession. Anorexia nervosa was first described in the medical literature in 1868, but was considered a rarity until the late 1930's. Bulimia was not identified in the medical literature until 1979. Recent studies suggest that approximately five percent…

  7. Action Monitoring and Perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieters, Guido L. M.; de Bruijn, Ellen R. A.; Maas, Yvonne; Hulstijn, Wouter; Vandereycken, Walter; Peuskens, Joseph; Sabbe, Bernard G.

    2007-01-01

    To study action monitoring in anorexia nervosa, behavioral and EEG measures were obtained in underweight anorexia nervosa patients (n=17) and matched healthy controls (n=19) while performing a speeded choice-reaction task. Our main measures of interest were questionnaire outcomes, reaction times, error rates, and the error-related negativity ERP…

  8. Anorexia Nervosa: Treatment in the Family Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Dana Heller

    2001-01-01

    One form of treatment for anorexia nervosa that continues to be developed is family therapy. In the following article, anorexia nervosa and its prevalence are defined, theories of its development are discussed, and family therapy interventions that have been applied to the treatment of the disorder are outlined. (Contains 15 references.) (GCP)

  9. Measuring Severity and Change in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Eugene; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes the State of Mind (SOM) Questionnaire, which measures severity and change of clinical state in anorexia nervosa. A study of 42 anorexia patients and 4 control groups showed a strong correlation between depression as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory and the Anorexia Scale, which comprise the SOM. (JAC)

  10. Anorexia Nervosa: A Lifestyle Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Yves

    1983-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a real lifestyle disorder. The apparent increase in frequency has been linked to the change of position of women in society. If families have an important role to play in the maintenance of the drama, they also hold the key to its resolution. The family physician in early contact with the anorectic patient is in an important position to involve the family in therapy and maximize the chances of recovery. The steps required are reframing, preparing the family involved for family therapy, exploring the benefits of change, and follow up. Imagesp555-a PMID:21283351

  11. New Insights in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gorwood, Philip; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Chartrel, Nicolas; Duclos, Jeanne; Dechelotte, Pierre; Hanachi, Mouna; Fetissov, Serguei; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Ramoz, Nicolas; Rovere-Jovene, Carole; Tolle, Virginie; Viltart, Odile; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is classically defined as a condition in which an abnormally low body weight is associated with an intense fear of gaining weight and distorted cognitions regarding weight, shape, and drive for thinness. This article reviews recent evidences from physiology, genetics, epigenetics, and brain imaging which allow to consider AN as an abnormality of reward pathways or an attempt to preserve mental homeostasis. Special emphasis is put on ghrelino-resistance and the importance of orexigenic peptides of the lateral hypothalamus, the gut microbiota and a dysimmune disorder of neuropeptide signaling. Physiological processes, secondary to underlying, and premorbid vulnerability factors-the "pondero-nutritional-feeding basements"- are also discussed.

  12. Taste responsiveness in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Simon, Y; Bellisle, F; Monneuse, M O; Samuel-Lajeunesse, B; Drewnowski, A

    1993-02-01

    Preferences for sugar/fat mixtures were examined in 12 anorectic females and in 14 normal-weight volunteer controls. The subjects, recruited at an eating-disorders clinic in Paris, were tested after an overnight fast and 2 hours after lunch. Anorectic patients disliked the taste of foods rich in fat more than did controls. Perceptions and preferences for sweet taste did not differ between anorectic females and controls. After lunch, taste preference ratings were equally reduced in both groups, suggesting that satiety aversion to sucrose is present even in anorexia nervosa.

  13. Case Report on Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Preeti; Chandrashekar, M.; Harish, Nikitha; Gowda, Mahesh R.; Durgoji, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by excessive restriction on food intake and irrational fear of gaining weight, often accompanied by a distorted body self-perception. It is clinically diagnosed more frequently in females, with type and severity varying with each case. The current report is a case of a 25-year-old female, married for 5 years, educated up to 10th standard, a homemaker, hailing from an upper social class Hindu (Marvadi) family, living with husband's family in Urban Bangalore; presented to our tertiary care centre with complaints of gradual loss of weight, recurrent episodes of vomiting, from a period of two years, menstrual irregularities from 1 year and amenorrhea since 6 months, with a probable precipitating factor being husband's critical comment on her weight. Diagnosis of atypical anorexia nervosa was made, with the body mass index (BMI) being 15.6. A multidisciplinary therapeutic approach was employed to facilitate remission. Through this case report the authors call for the attention of general practitioners and other medical practitioners to be aware of the symptomatology of eating disorders as most patients would overtly express somatic conditions similar to the reported case so as to facilitate early psychiatric intervention. PMID:25969616

  14. Jane: A Case Study in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    The article reports the case history of a 15-year-old Australian girl with anorexia nervosa. Information is also given on prevalence, causes, definitions, and treatments including hospitalization, co-therapy, psychotherapy, behavior modification, family therapy, and counseling. (DB)

  15. Anorexia Nervosa: Adolescent Starvation by Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Evelyn H.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses anorexia nervosa in terms of symptoms, characteristics of patients, family relationship, and modes of treatment. Suggests that a combination of psychological and medical treatment is more effective than behavior modification. (JAC)

  16. Adolescence, Sexual Conflict, and Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Felicia F.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests that the high incidence of anorexia nervosa in adolescent girls may be related to developmental sexual pressure. Symptoms appear with the onset of puberty and are related to physiological and psychological changes. (JAC)

  17. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Research Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1985-01-01

    The eating disorders called anorexia nervosa and bulimia are examined in terms of their symptomatology, etiology, and treatment, and in terms of how the extension home economist or teacher can help. Resources for additional information or help are listed. (CT)

  18. Treatment of Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Dilip R.; Pratt, Helen D.; Greydanus, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews research on the treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa, including the general approach, treatment setting, treatment of medical complications, nutritional management, psychopharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, treatment efficacy and outcome studies, comparison studies, and prevention programs. (EV)

  19. Anorexia Nervosa, Obesity and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and obesity are conditions at the extreme ends of the nutritional spectrum, associated with marked reductions versus increases respectively in body fat content. Both conditions are also associated with an increased risk for fractures. In anorexia nervosa, body composition and hormones secreted or regulated by body fat content are important determinants of low bone density, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength. In addition, anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in marrow adiposity and decreases in cold activated brown adipose tissue, both of which are related to low bone density. In obese individuals, greater visceral adiposity is associated with greater marrow fat, lower bone density and impaired bone structure. In this review, we discuss bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa and obesity in relation to adipose tissue distribution and hormones secreted or regulated by body fat content. PMID:24079076

  20. [Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Psychological considerations for its treatment].

    PubMed

    Barriguete Meléndez, J Armando; Rojo, Luis; Emmelhainz, Marisa

    2004-11-01

    It is presented the current perspectives in the study and treatment of the eating disorders, in specific: anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, epidemiology, and the interface among the different medical specialties, nutrition and sciences of the behavior, the diagnostic approaches, instruments and current therapeutic models.

  1. Biological Aspects of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Allan S.; Woodside, D. Blake

    1987-01-01

    Reviews biological factors relevant to the understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Considers the physical presentation of these disorders; the medical complications of starvation, binging, and purging; and the cognitive and behavioral effects of starvation. Reviews neurophysiological and neurochemical aspects of these illnesses and…

  2. Anorexia nervosa, seasonality, and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Scolnick, Barbara; Mostofsky, David I

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious neurobehavioral disorder marked by semistarvation, extreme fear of weight gain, frequently hyperactivity, and low body temperature. The etiology remains unknown. We present a speculation that a primary causative factor is that polyunsaturated fatty acids are skewed to prevent oxidative damage in phospholipid membranes. This causes a change in the trade off of oxidation protection vs homeoviscous adaptation to lower temperatures, which sets off a metabolic cascade that leads to the rogue state of anorexia nervosa.

  3. The Enigmatic Persistence of Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, B. Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this review, based on recent advances in cognitive neuroscience, the author presents a formulation in which the marked persistence of anorexia nervosa can be usefully understood as a well-ingrained maladaptive habit. Method The author reviewed the relevant literature on the development and course of anorexia nervosa and interpreted critical features in light of developments in cognitive neuroscience. Results Anorexia nervosa is a well characterized disorder with remarkable persistence both across history and among affected individuals. Food restriction, the salient behavioral feature of the disorder, often begins innocently but gradually takes on a life of its own. Over time, it becomes highly entrenched and resistant to change through either psychological or pharmacological treatment. Cognitive neuroscience has described two related but distinct processes that underlie the acquisition of new patterns of behavior, namely, action-outcome and stimulus-response learning. It is likely that both processes are engaged in the development of anorexia nervosa and that stimulus-response learning (that is, habit formation) is critical to the persistence of the dieting behavior. Conclusions The formulation of the dieting behavior characteristic of anorexia nervosa as a well-entrenched habit provides a basis for understanding the striking persistence of this disorder. This model helps explain the resistance of anorexia nervosa to interventions that have established efficacy in related disorders and implies that addressing the dieting behavior is critical, especially early in the course of the illness, before it has become ingrained. PMID:23429750

  4. New Insights in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gorwood, Philip; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Chartrel, Nicolas; Duclos, Jeanne; Dechelotte, Pierre; Hanachi, Mouna; Fetissov, Serguei; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Ramoz, Nicolas; Rovere-Jovene, Carole; Tolle, Virginie; Viltart, Odile; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is classically defined as a condition in which an abnormally low body weight is associated with an intense fear of gaining weight and distorted cognitions regarding weight, shape, and drive for thinness. This article reviews recent evidences from physiology, genetics, epigenetics, and brain imaging which allow to consider AN as an abnormality of reward pathways or an attempt to preserve mental homeostasis. Special emphasis is put on ghrelino-resistance and the importance of orexigenic peptides of the lateral hypothalamus, the gut microbiota and a dysimmune disorder of neuropeptide signaling. Physiological processes, secondary to underlying, and premorbid vulnerability factors-the "pondero-nutritional-feeding basements"- are also discussed. PMID:27445651

  5. New Insights in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Gorwood, Philip; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Chartrel, Nicolas; Duclos, Jeanne; Dechelotte, Pierre; Hanachi, Mouna; Fetissov, Serguei; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Ramoz, Nicolas; Rovere-Jovene, Carole; Tolle, Virginie; Viltart, Odile; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is classically defined as a condition in which an abnormally low body weight is associated with an intense fear of gaining weight and distorted cognitions regarding weight, shape, and drive for thinness. This article reviews recent evidences from physiology, genetics, epigenetics, and brain imaging which allow to consider AN as an abnormality of reward pathways or an attempt to preserve mental homeostasis. Special emphasis is put on ghrelino-resistance and the importance of orexigenic peptides of the lateral hypothalamus, the gut microbiota and a dysimmune disorder of neuropeptide signaling. Physiological processes, secondary to underlying, and premorbid vulnerability factors—the “pondero-nutritional-feeding basements”- are also discussed. PMID:27445651

  6. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importantly, this low bone mass is also associated with a seven-fold increased risk of fracture. Therefore, strategies to effectively prevent bone loss and increase bone mass are critical. We will review hormonal adaptations that contribute to bone loss in this population as well as promising new therapies that may increase bone mass and reduce fracture risk in AN.

  7. Bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed, chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical comorbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population.

  8. Endocrine Consequences of Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anorexia nervosa (AN) is prevalent in adolescents and young adults, and endocrine changes include hypothalamic amenorrhea, a nutritionally acquired growth hormone resistance with low insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), relative hypercortisolemia, decreases in leptin, insulin, amylin and incretins, and increases in ghrelin, PYY and adiponectin. These changes in turn have deleterious effects on bone, and may affect neurocognition, anxiety, depression and eating disorder psychopathology. Low bone density is particularly concerning; clinical fractures occur and changes in both bone microarchitecture and strength estimates have been reported. Recovery causes improvement of many, but not all, hormonal changes, and deficits in bone accrual may persist despite recovery. Physiologic, primarily transdermal, estrogen replacement increases bone density in adolescents, although catch-up is incomplete. In adults, oral estrogen co-administered with rhIGF-1 in one study, and bisphosphonates in another increased bone density, though not to normal. More studies are necessary to determine the optimal therapeutic approach in AN. PMID:24731664

  9. Anorexia nervosa: directions for future research. Study Group on Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    1995-04-01

    On September 27-29, 1993, the Study Group on Anorexia Nervosa (AN): Basic Mechanisms, Clinical Approaches and Treatment met in Geneva, Switzerland to discuss recent progress in research on anorexia nervosa, and to identify directions for future studies. Anorexia nervosa is a disorder of unknown etiology, without a specific curative treatment, affecting mostly individuals in adolescence and early adulthood, with significant morbidity and mortality, and having a major impact on psychosocial and vocational development. In anorexia nervosa there are severe disturbances in virtually every endocrine system, such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, the growth hormone (GH)/somatomedin C (IGF-1) system, and the central and peripheral arginine vasopressin (AVP) systems. Furthermore, classical neurotransmitter systems, such as the cholinergic noradrenergic, and serotonergic systems, are abnormally regulated in anorexia nervosa. New research data is also emerging on the abnormal regulation of immune function in this disorder. The Study Group concluded that even though several biological systems are abnormally regulated in anorexia nervosa, there is no biological test which is specific enough to make the diagnosis of the disorder. New directions for research in anorexia nervosa are identified and discussed in this report. Finally, the Study Group proposed future meetings to bring together clinical and pre-clinical (pharmacological, biochemical, and molecular) scientists studying topics, such as neuroendocrine function, which are important in the biology of anorexia nervosa.

  10. "Fasting Girls": Reflections on Writing the History of Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumberg, Joan Jacobs

    1986-01-01

    Reflects on the history of anorexia nervosa among adolescent ("fasting") girls, suggesting that its psychodynamics have changed over time. Focuses on the social and cultural processes by which anorexia nervosa became a disease. Argues for a conception of anorexia nervosa that incorporates culture as well as biomedical and psychological models.…

  11. Obesity and sexually selected anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lozano, George A

    2008-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa is diagnosed by drastic weight loss, a fear of gaining weight, a distorted body image, and, in women, three consecutive episodes of amenorrhea. It is often associated with a compulsive need for exercise, a bright outlook on life, and a high level of competitiveness. It afflicts primarily young women in higher socioeconomic strata who are highly competitive and otherwise overachievers. There are three adaptive explanations for anorexia nervosa: the reproductive suppression, the fleeing famine and the pseudo-female hypotheses. Here I present a novel hypothesis, the age-related obesity hypothesis. It posits that the otherwise normal tendency by women to seek a youthful appearance can become maladaptive and lead to anorexia nervosa in environments in which thinness becomes the primary indicator of youth, such as in modern industrialized societies. This hypothesis explains the aforementioned associated features of anorexia nervosa, and its increasing prevalence in western societies. The hypothesis generates several testable predictions: (1) Prevalence of anorexia nervosa across societies should be related to the degree to which thinness is an indicator of youth in a population. (2) Conversely, perceptions of the weight-age relationship should differ among populations depending on the prevalence of anorexia nervosa. (3) Anorectic individuals, or those with the propensity to develop the disease, should have a biased perception of the weight-age relationship. (4) Experimental manipulation of individuals' perception of the weight-age relationship should affect weight concerns, particularly among anorectic or at-risk individuals. Should the hypothesis be supported it might be used to screen at-risk individuals. Furthermore, it would call for more integrative public health programs that take a comprehensive approach encompassing both obesity and anorexia.

  12. Self-forgiveness in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michelle J; Lydecker, Janet A; Jobe, Rebecca L; Enright, Robert D; Gartner, Aubrey; Mazzeo, Suzanne E; Worthington, Everett L

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether low levels of self-forgiveness were associated with eating disorder symptomatology. Participating women (N = 51) had diagnoses of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or no eating disorder diagnosis. They completed 3 measures of self-forgiveness. Women with eating disorders had lower levels of self-forgiveness compared with control participants. Results suggest that incorporating self-forgiveness interventions into current eating disorder treatments should be evaluated in future research as they might enhance clinical outcomes.

  13. Verbal fluency in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Stedal, Kristin; Landrø, Nils Inge; Lask, Bryan

    2013-06-01

    Verbal fluency performance is commonly evaluated in clinical neuropsychology, in particular for assessment of executive functioning. Fluency is usually assessed by the person's ability to produce as many words as possible from a given cue within a specific timeframe. The cues are typically phonemic, e.g. words beginning with a specific letter, or semantic, e.g. words within a given category. Important components underlying fluency performance include clustering (the production of words within subcategories) and switching (the switch between clusters). Previous studies have demonstrated good performance on verbal fluency tasks in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), but have not investigated the underlying components of this performance. The aim of the present study was to compare phonemic fluency performance in patients with AN to healthy controls (HC) and to investigate the use of clustering and switching in the two groups. Fifty-two patients with AN were compared with 37 HC on a phonemic fluency task. The patient group produced more words in total but the results were not significantly different compared to the HC sample. There were no differences between the two groups with regard to clustering, but patients with AN performed significantly more switches. In addition, switching was significantly more related to total output score in the patient sample. In contrast with previous studies of other areas of cognitive flexibility in AN, patients with AN appear to have good verbal set-shifting skills.

  14. Cardiac arrest: first presentation of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Sian-Lee; Moynihan, Patricia C

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl collapsed in cardiac arrest in a hospital car park. Investigations revealed a potassium level of 1.8. Following a 5-day intensive care unit admission she described behaviours consistent with restrictive-purging type anorexia nervosa, which had been concealed from her parents and health professionals. Long-term management has been difficult due to poor patient engagement. Further, recurrent episodes of hypokalaemia continue to feature. Here we explore the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa and challenges with long-term management of this condition. PMID:24092611

  15. [Zinc in patients with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Røijen, S B; Worsaae, U; Zlotnik, G

    1991-03-01

    In a multicenter study, the relation between zinc status and anorexia nervosa was studied in 18 patients (15 females and 3 males in the age range of 11 to 25 years). Analysis of plasma zinc (by atomic absorption), plasma albumin (by electro-immuno diffusion method) and sense of taste (comparing quinine, zinc sulfate and water solutions), showed no significant abnormalities. Thus, the investigation does not support the hypothesis, that zinc status plays a significant role in the symptomatology of anorexia nervosa. PMID:2008719

  16. [Impaired theory of mind in anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Gál, Zita; Egyed, Katalin; Pászthy, Bea; Németh, Dezsö

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness, which is characterized by a continuously growing occurrence in the population and by the shift of the onset for earlier ages. The understanding of factors playing role in AN and the importance of effective prevention is an essential issue in science as well as in the society. AN also affects the social domain of life, patients with AN may exhibit impaired social interaction, social isolation, difficulties in emotion recognition and egocentric thinking in cognitive processing. Therefore, the aim of present study was to investigate the theory of mind (ToM) deficits is anorexia nervosa. Although previous studies have reported ToM deficits in autism and in schizophrenia, the number of studies investigating ToM functioning in eating disorders are particularly low. Even though ToM difficulties, such as the affective ToM impairments were found in AN, however, the evidence of cognitive ToM deficits in anorexia patients is still lacking. Twenty anorexia nervosa patients and 20 healthy control adolescent girls participated in the experiment. EDI, BAT, Fallon-Rozin Test and Anamoprhic Micro Body Image Assesment Programme questionnaires and body-image tests were applied to discriminate anorexia nervosa group from healthy control group. The Hungarian version of Faux Pas Recognition Test was applied to evaluate ToM functioning. Compared to healthy control group, impairment in ToM functioning was found in AN group, especially in affective mental state attribution. Our results can raise new aspects for research, therapy and prevention of anorexia nervosa.

  17. [Impaired theory of mind in anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Gál, Zita; Egyed, Katalin; Pászthy, Bea; Németh, Dezsö

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness, which is characterized by a continuously growing occurrence in the population and by the shift of the onset for earlier ages. The understanding of factors playing role in AN and the importance of effective prevention is an essential issue in science as well as in the society. AN also affects the social domain of life, patients with AN may exhibit impaired social interaction, social isolation, difficulties in emotion recognition and egocentric thinking in cognitive processing. Therefore, the aim of present study was to investigate the theory of mind (ToM) deficits is anorexia nervosa. Although previous studies have reported ToM deficits in autism and in schizophrenia, the number of studies investigating ToM functioning in eating disorders are particularly low. Even though ToM difficulties, such as the affective ToM impairments were found in AN, however, the evidence of cognitive ToM deficits in anorexia patients is still lacking. Twenty anorexia nervosa patients and 20 healthy control adolescent girls participated in the experiment. EDI, BAT, Fallon-Rozin Test and Anamoprhic Micro Body Image Assesment Programme questionnaires and body-image tests were applied to discriminate anorexia nervosa group from healthy control group. The Hungarian version of Faux Pas Recognition Test was applied to evaluate ToM functioning. Compared to healthy control group, impairment in ToM functioning was found in AN group, especially in affective mental state attribution. Our results can raise new aspects for research, therapy and prevention of anorexia nervosa. PMID:21502668

  18. Eco-Systemic Analysis of Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppy, Margarette I.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Tested eco-systemic approach to understanding of anorexia nervosa. Compared 30 anorexics and parents to 34 matched control subjects and parents. Found that, compared to controls, families of anorexics were less supportive, helpful, and committed to each other. Family interactions perceived by anorexics were characterized by overprotective,…

  19. Family Patterns Associated with Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigg, Darryl N.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Used family systems perspective to explore familial transactional patterns related to anorexia nervosa among 22 families with an anorexic child and 22 matched control families. Identified 7 family groups with unique family dynamics differentiating one from another. With no single family pattern characterizing families of anorexics, results…

  20. Personality and Treatment Effectiveness in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoog, Dagna K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared pre- and posttreatment Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory profiles of female inpatients (N=12) with anorexia nervosa. Results showed change after treatment, and found that pretreatment profiles obtained at a different hospital were remarkably similar, which suggests a common constellation of personality characteristics in…

  1. The Physical Educator and Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Felicia F.

    1984-01-01

    The physical education teacher is in an advantageous position to observe a student who may have anorexia nervosa. Severe weight loss, hyperactivity, body image delusion, and amenorrhea are symptoms of this behavior disorder. Implications for the physical education teacher and athletic coach are offered. (DF)

  2. Anorexia Nervosa: Its Symptoms and Possible Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingaman, David E.

    This document presents a definition and description of anorexia nervosa as a disorder that occurs predominantly in girls and that can affect 1 out of every 250 girls between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The existence of a distorted mental body image among anorexics is discussed and symptoms of the disorder are described, including amenorrhea…

  3. Anorexia Nervosa with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Pani, Adyapad; Santra, Gouranga; Biswas, Kali Das

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of an adolescent female, previously nonobese, belonging to educated average socioeconomic Muslim family. She stopped taking food, developed a perception of distorted body image with occasional episodes of binge eating and forced vomiting. She became amenorrheic and emaciated with loss of secondary sexual characters. She satisfied the criteria for anorexia nervosa with obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27608877

  4. Bulimia, anorexia nervosa, and diabetes. Deadly combinations.

    PubMed

    Hillard, J R; Hillard, P J

    1984-06-01

    Bulimia, anorexia nervosa, and diabetes often coexist, and eating disorders among diabetics frequently go unrecognized. This combination of conditions can have life-threatening effects. Consequently, diagnosis and the medical and psychological management of these patients is of critical importance. The authors outline the complex interactions among the biologic, psychological, and social factors involved in these disorders.

  5. Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, H. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

  6. Male Anorexia Nervosa: A New Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosscope-Happel, Cindy; Hutchins, David E.; Getz, Hildy G.; Hayes, Gerald L.

    2000-01-01

    Although anorexia nervosa affects over one million males yearly, it is often misdiagnosed or overlooked by mental health and medical practitioners. This article brings the problem to the forefront and outlines features that are unique to these males. Greater recognition of the disorder can lead to more accurate diagnoses and, subsequently, better…

  7. Dental aspects of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M W; Tylenda, C A

    1989-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are both psychosocial pathological eating disorders. An intense preoccupation with food, weight and a distorted body image coupled with a morbid fear of becoming obese are common elements in both syndromes. Self-starvation with extreme weight loss is associated with anorexia nervosa. Bulimia nervosa is characterized by unrestrained eating sprees followed by purging, fasting or vomiting. Approximately 50% of anorexia nervosa patients also practice bulimia. The impact of eating disorders on the oral soft and hard tissues depends upon the diet as well as the duration and frequency of binge-purge behavior. Erosion of the teeth due to frequent regurgitation of highly acidic stomach contents is a common finding. Dental caries development is less predictable and appears to be diet- and oral hygiene-dependent. Painless enlargement of the parotid salivary glands is a common sequela of chronic vomiting but the pathophysiological cause has not been firmly established. The dehydration of the oral soft tissues due to salivary gland impairment in addition to dietary deficiencies and poor oral hygiene can adversely impact the health of the periodontal tissues and oral mucosa. Initial dental care is focused on discouraging behavior that is destructive to the oral tissues. Improved oral hygiene, the use of gastric acid-neutralizing antacid rinses and the daily application of topical fluorides can be useful in reducing enamel erosion. Extensive restorative oral rehabilitation should be postponed until the underlying psychiatric components of the disorder are stabilized.

  8. Anorexia Nervosa in Chinese Adolescents: Does Culture Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Kelly Y. C.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on clinical and psychosocial characteristics of 16 Chinese adolescents from Hong Kong with anorexia nervosa. Over 80% of these patients expressed a fear of fatness. Against the background of increasing Westernization of Hong Kong society, anorexia is taking on a Western pattern, in congruence with the notion that anorexia nervosa is a…

  9. Steroids and neuroendocrine function in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Casanueva, F F; Borras, C G; Burguera, B; Muruais, C; Fernández, M; Devesa, J

    1987-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a primarily psychiatric syndrome of self-induced weight loss due to an intense fear of becoming obese. Numerous endocrine abnormalities occur in anorexia nervosa patients, and in many respects these alterations reflects the endocrinology of reduced energy intake. However, the basic mechanisms of those alterations are far from being understood. In an attempt to understand the disrupted mechanisms of the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism of the anorectic state, we studied 10 anorectic women in the acute phase of their illness; all met the DSM III criteria. On each patient, two tests were performed with either saline as control or infusion of the opioid antagonist naloxone, and both LH and FSH levels were measured. Four mg of naloxone as bolus was used, followed by a naloxone infusion of 2 mg/h for 4 h. Compared with the pattern of normal women, naloxone did not increase in the anorectic patients either LH or FSH levels nor pulsatility. This result suggests that endogenous opioid peptides are not implicated in the low gonadotropic situation of anorexia nervosa. An alternative explanation could be that the low estrogenic "milieu" of these patients could mask the opioid action. To test this second possibility, another group of 7 anorectic women after partial weight recovery were challenged with estrogen administration. Compared with the pattern of normal women volunteers, all the anorectic patients but one presented an abnormal response in both LH and FSH levels after estrogen administration. In fact, the negative feedback and the delayed positive feedback of LH after estrogen were absent in these patients. Interestingly enough, the only patient with near-normal LH response to estrogen was considered fully recovered by the Psychiatric Unit. Several alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has been reported in anorexia nervosa. Seven anorectic patients and 7 aged-matched women were challenged by ACTH 1-24, 250 micrograms (i.v.) and the ratio

  10. [Anorexia nervosa as differential diagnosis in underweight patients].

    PubMed

    Rapps, Nora; Skoda, Eva; Zipfel, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a differential diagnosis in underweight patients, especially in young underweight women. Diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa are self-induced weight loss due to restrictive eating or purging behaviour, intense fear of gaining weight and disturbance in the way in which one`s shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight on self-evaluation and persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the current low body weight. Anorexia nervosa is associated with numerous medical complications.

  11. The role of zinc in anorexia nervosa: etiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bakan, R

    1979-07-01

    Zinc deficiency may play a role in the etiology of anorexia nervosa. The symptoms of anorexia nervosa and zinc deficiency are similar in a number of respects, e.g., weight loss, loss of appetite, amenorrhea in females, impotence in males, nausea and skin lesions. In both conditions females under 25 are most at risk. Stress, estrogen and dietary habits may also be involved in the complex of factors which create or exacerbate a zinc deficiency and result in anorexia nervosa. It is proposed that effectiveness in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. PMID:514114

  12. [Drug treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. A review].

    PubMed

    Fichter, M M

    1993-01-01

    With the apparent increase in prevalence of anorexic and bulimic eating disorders, the search for effective treatments for these disorders has been intensified in recent years. In this review the results of psychopharmacological studies of patients with anorexia or bulimia nervosa are presented and analysed. The focus of this review is on controlled studies. Although a variety of psychopharmacological substances has been tested in patients with anorexia nervosa, the outcome of controlled studies has been generally disappointing. A possible differential therapy effect of cyproheptadine needs replication: in one study it enhanced body weight gain in non-bulimic anorexics, while it appeared to hinder weight gain in bulimic anorexics. The issue of prophylaxis of osteoporosis in chronic low-weight anorexics has received increasing attention in recent years, and pharmacological prophylaxis appears indicated in this patient group. The results of psychopharmacological treatment studies of patients with bulimia nervosa have overall been more favourable than those of anorexic patients. Statistically significant effects concerning the reduction of bulimic or depressive symptoms in bulimia nervosa has been demonstrated for tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine, desipramine), serotonergic agents (fluoxetine, d-fenfluramine), non-selective monoamine-oxydase-inhibitors (isocarboxazide, phenelzine) and trazodone. The antibulimic effect appears not to be associated with the antidepressant effect. Theoretical, methodological and practical issues concerning pharmacological treatment of anorexic and bulimic eating disorders are presented and discussed.

  13. Cell-mediated immunity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Norton, K R; Thompson, R P

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with anorexia nervosa were studied for cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens, lymphocyte transformation responses to T-cell mitogens, and numbers of circulating leucocytes and T-cell subpopulations. Compared to controls, all patients had reduced cutaneous reactions and four were anergic. There was a mild leucopenia in patients and both T4+ and T3+ numbers were slightly reduced. Mean peak transformation responses for patients were slightly lower than controls for phytohaemagglutinin, but not for concanavalin A; however, patients required greater doses of mitogens to elicit peak transformation responses. Plasmas from patients did not contain inhibitors of transformation responses. We conclude that there are functional cellular abnormalities associated with the under-nutrition of anorexia nervosa. PMID:3742879

  14. A neurodevelopmental model for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Connan, Frances; Campbell, Iain C; Katzman, Melanie; Lightman, Stafford L; Treasure, Janet

    2003-06-01

    This paper integrates genetic and biological data on aetiological risk for anorexia nervosa (AN) with cognitive and psychosocial explanatory models. We have reviewed clinical and basic science data from each of these domains and then used a developmental perspective to formulate a multifactorial threshold model. By positioning interpersonal stress as a central component of this model, psychological, social and biological conceptualisations of AN can be used to generate a data driven, neurodevelopmental hypothesis for the aetiology of this complex disorder. PMID:12818706

  15. Hypothalamic-endocrine dysfunction in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hurd, H P; Palumbo, P J; Gharib, H

    1977-11-01

    Multiple endocrine determinations were carried out on 101 patients with anorexia nervosa. Ninety-five percent of the patients studied were female, and in 94% of patients the anorexia nervosa began before 30 years of age. Evidence of gonadal dysfunction was the predominant manifestation, both clinically and by laboratory studies. Amenorrhea occurred before or concurrent with onset of weight loss in 65% of the women. The average weight loss was 28% of the weight before illness began. In an additional 11%, the disease began before menarche. The mean age of menarche in patients with secondary amenorrhea was 13 years. Urinary excretion of pituitary gonadotropin was undetectable in 44 of 65 patients and was below 19 rat units per 24 hours in the remaining patients. Serum luteinizing hormone level was below 8 microgram/dl in 15 of 27 patients studied and serum follicle-stimulating hormone was below 10 microgram/dl in 7 of 27 patients studied. Mean serum or urinary estrogens, or both, were low in more than 50% of the patients. Elevation of serum corticosteroids or loss or reversal of diurnal variation, or both, was noted in 50% of patients. Fasting serum growth hormone levels were elevated in 45% of the patients. Mean total and free serum thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and triiodothyronine levels were low. These hormonal alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in patients with anorexia nervosa probably represent adaptive and protective mechanisms for chronic starvation and weight loss.

  16. Refeeding Hypophosphatemia in Adolescents With Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Dasha

    2013-01-01

    The rate of adolescents presenting with anorexia nervosa (AN) is increasing. Medically unstable adolescents are admitted to the hospital for nutrition restoration. A lack of global consensus on appropriate refeeding practices of malnourished patients has resulted in inconsistent refeeding practices. Refeeding hypophosphatemia (RH) is the most common complication associated with refeeding the malnourished patient. This review sought to identify the range of refeeding rates adopted globally and the implication that total energy intake and malnutrition may have on RH while refeeding adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Studies were identified by a systematic electronic search of medical databases from 1980 to September 2012. Seventeen publications were identified, including 6 chart reviews, 1 observational study, and 10 case reports, with a total of 1039 subjects. The average refeeding energy intake was 1186 kcal/d, ranging from 125–1900 kcal/d, with a mean percentage median body mass index (% mBMI) of 78%. The average incidence rate of RH was 14%. A significant correlation between malnutrition (% mBMI) and post-refeeding phosphate was identified (R 2 = 0.6, P = .01). This review highlights the disparity in refeeding rates adopted internationally in treating malnourished adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Based on this review, the severity of malnutrition seems to be a marker for the development of RH more so than total energy intake. PMID:23459608

  17. Anorexia Nervosa: A Misdiagnosis of the Adolescent Male.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svec, Henry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses rarity of anorexia nervosa among male population with primary reference to differences from female symptomatology. Presents case which implies that anorexia nervosa in the male may be a marker for other more severe pathology. Presents findings which suggest a diagnostic strategy based on familial, behavioral, environmental, educational,…

  18. Anorexia nervosa: an increasing problem in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Halmi, Katherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Information from eating disorder clinics across five continents suggests that anorexia nervosa is becoming an increasing problem in children and young adolescents. There is some indication that anxiety disorders in childhood may be a major risk factor for the development of anorexia nervosa. Early recognition and family treatment for this disorder are essential to prevent chronic impairment. PMID:19432392

  19. Multimodal Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Holistic Approach to Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Edward J.; Castaldo, Christine

    1985-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa has received considerable attention lately because of its increased incidence, potential danger, and resistance to treatment. A review of the literature on anorexia nervosa suggests that, although it is characterized by complex interrelated psychological and physiological processes, it is often conceptualized and treated in…

  20. Death Related Themes in Anorexia Nervosa: A Practical Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Janice; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Explored death-related themes in psychodynamic etiology of anorexia nervosa by comparing anorexic adolescent patients (n=28) to age-matched controls (n=238). Results suggest that death-related themes are of significance in the understanding and management of anorexia nervosa. (Author/ABL)

  1. Special Issue: Outcome of Anorexia Nervosa with Teenage Onset.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Regina C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The articles of this special issue report on studies of the outcomes of treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa. These studies leave no doubt about the mortality risk and debilitating nature of chronic anorexia nervosa, but they do suggest that the prognosis, given expert treatment, is favorable for the most part. (SLD)

  2. Symptoms, Causes and Possible Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odebunmi, Akin

    This document provides research findings, a discussion of etiology, case studies, and treatment approaches for anorexia nervosa. The research findings classify the anorexic patient by sex, age, presenting characteristics, socioeconomic status, premorbid personality, and cultural and familial characteristics. The etiology of anorexia nervosa is…

  3. A longitudinal investigation of mortality in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Franko, Debra L; Keshaviah, Aparna; Eddy, Kamryn T; Krishna, Meera; Davis, Martha C; Keel, Pamela K; Herzog, David B

    2013-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Although anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate, our understanding of the timing and predictors of mortality in eating disorders is limited. The authors investigated mortality in a long-term study of patients with eating disorders. METHOD Beginning in 1987, 246 treatment-seeking female patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa were interviewed every 6 months for a median of 9.5 years to obtain weekly ratings of eating disorder symptoms, comorbidity, treatment participation, and psychosocial functioning. From January 2007 to December 2010 (median follow-up of 20 years), vital status was ascertained with a National Death Index search. RESULTS Sixteen deaths (6.5%) were recorded (lifetime anorexia nervosa, N=14; bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa, N=2). The standardized mortality ratio was 4.37 (95% CI=2.4-7.3) for lifetime anorexia nervosa and 2.33 (95% CI=0.3-8.4) for bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa. Risk of premature death among patients with lifetime anorexia nervosa peaked within the first 10 years of follow-up, resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 7.7 (95% CI=3.7-14.2). The standardized mortality ratio varied by duration of illness and was 3.2 (95% CI=0.9-8.3) for patients with lifetime anorexia nervosa for 0 to 15 years (4/119 died), and 6.6 (95% CI=3.2-12.1) for those with lifetime anorexia nervosa for >15 to 30 years (10/67 died). Multivariate predictors of mortality included alcohol abuse, low body mass index, and poor social adjustment. CONCLUSIONS These findings highlight the need for early identification and intervention and suggest that a long duration of illness, substance abuse, low weight, and poor psychosocial functioning raise the risk for mortality in anorexia nervosa.

  4. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: brains, bones and breeding.

    PubMed

    Starr, Taylor B; Kreipe, Richard E

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has modified both the conceptualization and treatment of eating disorders. New diagnostic criteria reducing the "not otherwise specified" category should facilitate the early recognition and treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Technology-based studies identify AN and BN as "brain circuit" disorders; epidemiologic studies reveal that the narrow racial, ethnic and income profile of individuals no longer holds true for AN. The major organs affected long term-the brain and skeletal system-both respond to improved nutrition, with maintenance of body weight the best predictor of recovery. Twin studies have revealed gene x environment interactions, including both the external (social) and internal (pubertal) environments of boys and of girls. Family-based treatment has the best evidence base for effectiveness for younger patients. Medication plays a limited role in AN, but a major role in BN. Across diagnoses, the most important medicine is food. PMID:24705938

  5. [Affective disorders in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Briukhin, A E; Onegina, E Iu

    2011-01-01

    Authors studied 109 patients with eating disorders, including 49 with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 60 with bulimia nervosa (BN), using psychopathological and experimental/psychological methods, psychometric scales and follow-up. Four variants (2 AN and 2 BN) of clinical presentations and dynamics of affective disorders were singled out. It has been shown that many features of their symptoms and responses of patients to the complex therapy (diet-, psycho- and pharmacotherapy) depend on the belonging of AN or BN to a group of borderline mental disorders or to endogenous diseases. Taking into account the revealed features of affective disorders, the authors have formulated recommendations for treatment tactics and prevention measures for these groups of patients.

  6. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: brains, bones and breeding.

    PubMed

    Starr, Taylor B; Kreipe, Richard E

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has modified both the conceptualization and treatment of eating disorders. New diagnostic criteria reducing the "not otherwise specified" category should facilitate the early recognition and treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Technology-based studies identify AN and BN as "brain circuit" disorders; epidemiologic studies reveal that the narrow racial, ethnic and income profile of individuals no longer holds true for AN. The major organs affected long term-the brain and skeletal system-both respond to improved nutrition, with maintenance of body weight the best predictor of recovery. Twin studies have revealed gene x environment interactions, including both the external (social) and internal (pubertal) environments of boys and of girls. Family-based treatment has the best evidence base for effectiveness for younger patients. Medication plays a limited role in AN, but a major role in BN. Across diagnoses, the most important medicine is food.

  7. Sexual function of women suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Kravvariti, Vasilliki; Varsou, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The cross-sectional study aimed at examining the sexual function of young adult women suffering from eating disorders. The authors interviewed 53 women (26 with anorexia nervosa and 27 with bulimia nervosa) and 58 female students. Each participant was administered the Female Sexual Function Index, the Eating Attitudes Test, the Body Shape Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Comparisons among the 3 groups showed that patients with anorexia nervosa scored lower in each Female Sexual Function Index subscale than did healthy controls. There was no significant difference between bulimia nervosa and healthy controls. Sexual functionality of patients with anorexia nervosa was correlated only with body mass index (r = 0.5, p =.01). Sexual functionality of patients with bulimia nervosa was correlated only with the Beck Depression Inventory (r = -0.4, p =.03) Patients with anorexia nervosa had more disturbed sexual function than did controls. Sexual function can be related to the level of starvation and symptoms of depression.

  8. Hematological abnormalities in severe anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Allison L; Gaudiani, Jennifer L; Statland, Barbara; Mehler, Philip S

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of hematologic abnormalities in adults with severe anorexia nervosa. We report the first major analysis of hematologic dysfunction in such patients. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 53 men and women with severe anorexia nervosa, admitted between October 2008 and December 2010 for medical stabilization to our center, which has a national referral base. Patients were predominantly female (89 %), with a median age of 28 years (range 17-65), and were hospitalized for a median duration of 15 days (I.Q.R. 9-29). Nadir body mass index during hospitalization was markedly low at 12.4 kg/m(2) (range 8.4-15.7), and the mean discharge BMI was 13.8 kg/m(2) (range 10.2-16.8). 83 % of patients were anemic (hematocrit <37 %), with only 3 (6 %) having iron deficiency. 79 % were leukopenic (WBC < 4.5 k/μL), 29 % were neutropenic (ANC < 1.0 k/μL), 25 % were thrombocytopenic (platelets < 150 k/μL), and 17 % of patients developed thrombocytosis (platelets > 400 k/μL) during their hospitalization. Eighty-nine percent of patients had resolved their neutropenia by discharge. Marked hematologic deficiencies are often present in patients with severe anorexia nervosa, generally attributed to starvation-mediated gelatinous marrow transformation which resolves with proper nutritional rehabilitation. Improved provider awareness of this association may reduce unnecessary testing and costly treatment interventions.

  9. [From pseudopregnancy to anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Demaret, A

    1991-01-01

    Translated in the primeval environment where humanization evolved during millions of years (man's environment of evolutionary adaptation, according to Bowlby), the characteristic behaviours of anorectics and bulimics do not look unfavourable but on the contrary adaptive, helping to the survival of the group or kinship (hyperactivity, altruistic feeding, etc.). Analogies, indeed homologies, exist in many animal species, distant or closely related to us (social insects, birds, mammals including primates) observed in nature. It concerns altruistic behaviours described among individuals, for the most part females, referred to as allomothers (aunts) or helpers (co-operative breeding) in ethological terms. From this evolutionary perspective, a biological genetic basis would exist in anorexia and bulimia, as a component of a phylogenetic inheritance of the K-selection strategy of reproduction. At the present time, anorexia would be a pathological extreme of this strategy, whereas pseudocyesis would be, on the contrary, one of the r-selection. Diverse and varying sociocultural and demographic conditions prevailing in modern world would revive either of these phylogenetic programs of reproductive strategies, leading as the case may be, to adaptive or pathological reproductive or helping behaviours.

  10. Anorexia nervosa: review of current treatment practices.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, W J; Ellinwood, E H; Dougherty, G G; Brodie, H K

    1982-09-01

    The etiology of anorexia nervosa has defied elucidation for over 100 years and no systematic treatment has yet been developed for the illness. We have reviewed some current findings that relate to both neuroendocrinologic and psychologic defects. Review of current treatment practices reveals that a variety of approaches are used, alone or in combination. Special attention is directed to the rationale for the use of certain neuropharmacologic agents that influence eating behavior. We advocate a flexible, multimodal approach to treatment of this illness, the understanding of which is still in its early stage.

  11. An overview of anorexia nervosa in males.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Tom; Lytle, Pauline Polly

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an integrative overview of existing research on anorexia nervosa (AN) in adolescent males. AN is commonly thought of as a female disorder. Even though as much as 25% of the clinical population is male, research on AN in males is limited. Additionally, most conceptualizations of male AN emphasize a single etiological factor and, therefore, produce treatments that fail to address it as a global phenomenon. In contrast, an integrative understanding that incorporates research on the familial, biological, cultural, and psychodynamic elements involved in male AN encourages treatment that comprehensively addresses the disorder.

  12. Micrographia and hypophonia in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Murali Krishnan; Arcelus, Jon; Palmer, Robert L

    2010-12-01

    Micrographia is a condition, in which the sufferers write with small handwriting. Hypophonia is described as low volume speech. Both conditions have been described in neurological conditions, such as lesions in the deep white matter of the brain, Parkinson's disease etc. In this case report, we are presenting a 22-years-old female patient with anorexia nervosa who suffered from both these conditions. The patient also suffered from epilepsy. The onset of these symptoms, progress, and current status provides scope for discussing both the possible biological and psychodynamic etiology for these symptoms in this young woman.

  13. Executive functions in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Introducción: Los mecanismos fisiopatológicos que explican el desarrollo y la persistencia de la anorexia nerviosa (AN) siguen sin estar claros. Con respecto al funcionamiento neuropsicológico, se han señalado alteraciones en las funciones ejecutivas, especialmente en la flexibilidad cognitiva y en los procesos de toma de decisiones. Objetivos: El objetivo de este trabajo fue revisar el estado actual de los estudios neuropsicológicos sobre anorexia nerviosa, especialmente los centrados en las funciones ejecutivas. Métodos: Se realizó un proceso de búsqueda con tres relevantes bases de datos electrónicas, así como una búsqueda adicional con las referencias incluidas en los documentos analizados. Finalmente hay que mencionar otras revisiones ya publicadas y una búsqueda manual de otras fuentes. Resultados y discusión: Los datos de comparación de pacientes y controles sanos siguen siendo controvertidos, así como la comparación entre los diferentes trastornos de la alimentación con respecto a la disfunción neuropsicológica. El papel de variables como depresión, ansiedad y obsesividad necesita ser aclarado. Parece que hay alguna base para afirmar que existen algunos puntos en común entre los llamados trastornos de peso extremo (anorexia, obesidad). El vínculo entre la disfunción neuropsicológica en AN y biomarcadores aún no está claro. El papel de los déficits neuropsicológicos en la AN, como factores iniciales o simplemente como meras consecuencias, tampoco está aclarado. La relación entre los trastornos de imagen corporal y la disfunción neuropsicológica debe asimismo aclararse. Los datos sobre las similitudes, en cuanto a la disfunción neuropsicológica, entre AN y otros trastornos mentales pueden ser considerados, hasta la fecha, como una mera aproximación. Lo mismo ocurre con la relación entre el rendimiento neuropsicológico de los pacientes con AN y la personalidad o el género.

  14. [Body and subjectivity: about anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Pereña Garcia, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    To start with the clinical description of anorexia nervosa is indicative of the difficulty involved not only with regard to its etiology (whether it is an endocrine, neurological or psychological disorder) but also with regard to its diagnosis (whether or not it is a hysterical disorder, whether or not it is a disease as such) and with regard to its treatment (the stubbornness of the symptom). The early-onset differential criterion is rejection. The subject's eating-related problem must be placed within the framework of the radical dependency the human organism has with regard to the mother's body, thus breaking the close connection between need and demand, which throws the instinctive life out of balance. Drive is the name given to this imbalance. Drived life must be controlled by wish. The transmitting of life is the transmitting of the innermost wish to live, without which the body fails or life and the body separate from one another. Rejection, which is the subjectivity-related aspect, then turns into anorexia in rejection of the body and in submission to bewildering ideals with which anorexic subjects attempt to find their bearings. Bulimia marks the most addictive aspect of impulsive imbalance. There is no ready answer to the question as to why anorexia occurs more among females than males. Female sexuality (the relationship with sexual wish and reproduction), as well as how in a aboundance society, women symbolize the trimming on the cake, an inert virtual figure. Anorexia nervosa can be taken as a pronouncement against an automated, devitalized family life and of a society characterized by commodity fetishism and cannibalism. PMID:18274356

  15. [A case of ammonium urate urinary stones with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Komori, K; Arai, H; Gotoh, T; Imazu, T; Honda, M; Fujioka, H

    2000-09-01

    A 27-year-old woman had been suffering from bulimia and habitual vomiting for about 7 years and was incidentally found to have right renal stones by computed tomography. She was referred to our hospital for the treatment of these caluculi. On admission, she presented with hypokalemia, hypochloremia and metabolic alkalosis and was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa. Following successful removal by percutaneous nephrolithotripsy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy the stones were found to consist of pure ammonium urate. Since the urine of an anorexia nervosa patient tends to be rich in uric acid and ammonium, anorexia nervosa seems to be associated with ammonium urate urinary stones.

  16. Perioperative management of severe anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Hirose, M; Tanaka, K; Kawahito, S; Tamaki, T; Oshita, S

    2014-02-01

    As the prevalence of anorexia nervosa (AN) increased, surgery in severe AN patients also increased in the 2000s. We experienced a surgical case of a patient with severe AN, showing an extremely low BMI of 8.6 kg m(-2). We investigated the problems associated with this case and propose criteria to manage severe AN. We endeavour to report on the perioperative management of rare and severe symptoms and surgical indications of severely malnourished patients. All published reports were identified through comprehensive searches using PubMed, BioMedLib, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society with the following terms and keywords: 'anorexia nervosa', 'eating disorder', 'hypoglycaemia', 'leucocytopaenia', 'gelatinous bone marrow', 'surgery', and 'operation'. In cases of AN with a BMI under 13 kg m(-2), marked hypoglycaemia, leucocytopaenia <3.0×10(9) litre(-1), or both, potentially fatal complications frequently occur. Accordingly, patients need strict nutritional support to avoid re-feeding syndrome until surgery. During the course of anaesthesia, careless loading of glucose or catecholamine may lead to disturbance of electrolytes or fatal arrhythmia. Intensive care and early feeding as soon as possible after surgery are important to prevent surgical site infection. Although not many perioperative cases of AN have been reported, clinicians must be aware of the danger and the causes of mortality in critical cases. Thus, the decision to undertake surgery must be taken carefully and close perioperative coordination among physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, anaesthesiologists, and intensivists is essential.

  17. Diagnosed Anxiety Disorders and the Risk of Subsequent Anorexia Nervosa: A Danish Population Register Study.

    PubMed

    Meier, Sandra M; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mortensen, Preben B; Petersen, Liselotte

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa are frequently acknowledged to be highly comorbid conditions, but still, little is known about the clinical and aetiological cohesion of specific anxiety diagnoses and anorexia nervosa. Using the comprehensive Danish population registers, we aimed to determine the risk of anorexia nervosa in patients with register-detected severe anxiety disorders. We also explored whether parental psychopathology was associated with offspring's anorexia nervosa. Anxiety disorders increased the risk of subsequent anorexia nervosa, with the highest risk observed in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Especially, male anxiety patients were at an increased risk for anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, an increased risk was observed in offspring of fathers with panic disorder. A diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, specifically obsessive-compulsive disorder, constitutes a risk factor for subsequent diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. These observations support the notion that anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa share etiological mechanisms and/or that anxiety represents one developmental pathway to anorexia nervosa.

  18. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Multidimensional Group Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, P. Scott

    This paper defines the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimia nervosa, a bulimic subtype of anorexia nervosa. The diagnosis of these disorders is discussed and similarities and differences among the three disorders are reviewed. Etiological factors are considered and current trends in treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and…

  19. Anorexia Nervosa: Why Do Some People Starve Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, Chwee Lye

    1983-01-01

    Written for the school and/or community health professional, this article defines anorexia nervosa, discusses its prevalence, causes, symptoms, and treatment, and draws implications about health education's role in its prevention and treatment. (Author/CJ)

  20. Anorexia Nervosa: The More It Grows, the More It Starves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldis, Katherine O.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of books on anorexia nervosa that are appropriate for young adults. Includes fiction, autobiographies, informational books, and books on the related topics of bulimia, bulimarexia, and therapy. (EL)

  1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in anorexia nervosa: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van den Eynde, F; Guillaume, S; Broadbent, H; Campbell, I C; Schmidt, U

    2013-02-01

    The search for new treatments to improve outcome in people with anorexia nervosa continues. This pilot study investigated whether one session of high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reduces eating disorder related symptoms following exposure to visual and real food stimuli. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Ten right-handed people with anorexia nervosa underwent one session of rTMS. Subjective experiences related to the eating disorder (e.g. urge to restrict, feeling full etc.) were assessed before and after rTMS. Non-parametric repeated measures tests were used. rTMS was safe and well-tolerated, and resulted in reduced levels of feeling full, feeling fat and feeling anxious. Thus, rTMS may reduce core symptoms of anorexia nervosa. Future research should establish the therapeutic potential of rTMS in anorexia nervosa. PMID:21880470

  2. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  3. Severe anorexia nervosa in males: clinical presentations and medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Allison L; Rosen, Elissa; Mehler, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation and medical complications of severe anorexia nervosa among males were examined to further the understanding of this increasingly prevalent condition. Fourteen males were admitted to a medical stabilization unit over the study period. Males with severe anorexia nervosa were found to have a multitude of significant medical and laboratory abnormalities, which are in need of treatment via judicious, nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration to prevent additional morbidity and to facilitate transfer and admission to traditional eating disorder programs.

  4. [Anesthesia in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Zenker, J; Hagenah, U; Rossaint, R

    2010-03-01

    Eating disorders are typical diseases of adolescence and early adulthood. About 1-3% of female juveniles suffer from anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN). Today AN is still the psychiatric disease with the highest mortality rate. The peri-operative mortality rate of patients suffering from AN is in the range up to 15%. The beginning of AN is a lingering process and the majority of patients show increasingly restrictive eating habits ending in cachexia. Patients are obsessed by the predominant idea of being obese in spite of having a significant underweight. Patients suffering from bulimia break the strict regimen by eating enormous amounts of high calorie food. Such eating attacks are followed by weight reducing measures, mostly vomiting. Most of the physical changes caused by AN are due to starvation and loss of weight. The most significant medical complications are alterations of the cardiovascular system accompanied by decreasing contractility of the heart, bradycardia, electrocardiographic changes as well as disequilibrium of electrolytic and water balance. Most of these symptoms can be reversed by putting on weight.

  5. Initial evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Brian C; Jimerson, Michelle; Haxton, Christina; Jimerson, David C

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders are life-threatening conditions that are challenging to address; however, the primary care setting provides an important opportunity for critical medical and psychosocial intervention. The recently published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., includes updated diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa (e.g., elimination of amenorrhea as a diagnostic criterion) and for bulimia nervosa (e.g., criterion for frequency of binge episodes decreased to an average of once per week). In addition to the role of environmental triggers and societal expectations of body size and shape, research has suggested that genes and discrete biochemical signals contribute to the development of eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa occur most often in adolescent females and are often accompanied by depression and other comorbid psychiatric disorders. For low-weight patients with anorexia nervosa, virtually all physiologic systems are affected, ranging from hypotension and osteopenia to life-threatening arrhythmias, often requiring emergent assessment and hospitalization for metabolic stabilization. In patients with frequent purging or laxative abuse, the presence of electrolyte abnormalities requires prompt intervention. Family-based treatment is helpful for adolescents with anorexia nervosa, whereas short-term psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavior therapy, is effective for most patients with bulimia nervosa. The use of psychotropic medications is limited for anorexia nervosa, whereas treatment studies have shown a benefit of antidepressant medications for patients with bulimia nervosa. Treatment is most effective when it includes a multidisciplinary, teambased approach.

  6. [Eating disorders: anorexia nervosa, bulimia, binge eating].

    PubMed

    Langenbach, M; Huber, M

    2003-06-01

    We present an overview of three different eating disorders which seem to have an increasing prevalence, especially among young women between 12 and 20 years of age. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are "threshold disorders" which usually become manifest for the first time during the transition from childhood to early adult life. Eating disorders are chronic disorders and often take a course of 6 or more years. Remission, improvements and symptom change can be expected even after many years of the disorder. Psychiatric comorbidity which occurs in more than 50% of eating disordered patients is of prime importance for prognosis. Depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and personality disorders are most common. There is a variety of complex in- and outpatient treatments with different components which have to be chosen according to the individual case.

  7. Impaired social cognition in anorexia nervosa patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamatani, Sayo; Tomotake, Masahito; Takeda, Tomoya; Kameoka, Naomi; Kawabata, Masashi; Kubo, Hiroko; Tada, Yukio; Tomioka, Yukiko; Watanabe, Shinya; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of social cognition in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods Eighteen female patients with AN (mean age =35.4±8.6 years) and 18 female healthy controls (HC) (mean age =32.8±9.4 years) participated in the study. Their social cognition was assessed with the Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire (SCSQ). Results The results showed that total score of the SCSQ and scores of theory of mind and metacognition were significantly lower in AN group than those in HC group. Moreover, significant differences in theory of mind, metacognition, and total score of the SCSQ remained when the effects of depression, anxiety, and starvation were eliminated statistically. Conclusion These results suggest that patients with AN may have difficulty inferring other people’s intention and also monitoring and evaluating their own cognitive activities. Therefore, these features may explain some aspects of the pathology of AN. PMID:27785029

  8. Emotion recognition and regulation in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Amy; Sullivan, Sarah; Tchanturia, Kate; Treasure, Janet

    2009-01-01

    It is recognized that emotional problems lie at the core of eating disorders (EDs) but scant attention has been paid to specific aspects such as emotional recognition, regulation and expression. This study aimed to investigate emotion recognition using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RME) task and emotion regulation using the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) in 20 women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 20 female healthy controls (HCs). Women with AN had significantly lower scores on RME and reported significantly more difficulties with emotion regulation than HCs. There was a significant negative correlation between total DERS score and correct answers from the RME. These results suggest that women with AN have difficulties with emotional recognition and regulation. It is uncertain whether these deficits result from starvation and to what extent they might be reversed by weight gain alone. These deficits may need to be targeted in treatment.

  9. Cognitive-behavioral flexibility in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Herzog, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) patients are characterized by perfectionism and obsessional personality traits. This anorectic personality type is associated with an exaggerated cognitive control and impaired cognitive-behavioral flexibility. Neuropsychological studies addressing flexibility have supported an impaired cognitive set-shifting (i.e., concrete and rigid behaviors to changing rules) as well as an impaired behavioral response shifting (i.e., stereotyped or perseverative behaviors) in AN patients independent of nutritional status and body weight. Furthermore, impaired set-shifting was found in healthy sisters of AN patients suggesting that cognitive inflexibility is a trait marker in AN patients. Brain imaging studies have provided new insights in striatocortical circuit dysfunctions that may underlie both the clinical symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality traits and the neuropsychological observations of impaired cognitive-behavioral flexibility. The conceptualization of AN as a neurodevelopmental striatocortical disorder may help to develop new promising treatment approaches for this severe disorder.

  10. Genetic findings in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hinney, Anke; Scherag, Susann; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are complex disorders associated with disordered eating behavior. Heritability estimates derived from twin and family studies are high, so that substantial genetic influences on the etiology can be assumed for both. As the monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems are involved in eating disorders (EDs), candidate gene studies have centered on related genes; additionally, genes relevant for body weight regulation have been considered as candidates. Unfortunately, this approach has yielded very few positive results; confirmed associations or findings substantiated in meta-analyses are scant. None of these associations can be considered unequivocally validated. Systematic genome-wide approaches have been performed to identify genes with no a priori evidence for their relevance in EDs. Family-based scans revealed linkage peaks in single chromosomal regions for AN and BN. Analyses of candidate genes in one of these regions led to the identification of genetic variants associated with AN. Currently, an international consortium is conducting a genome-wide association study for AN, which will hopefully lead to the identification of the first genome-wide significant markers.

  11. [Hyperactivity and anorexia nervosa: behavioural and biological perspective].

    PubMed

    Kohl, M; Foulon, C; Guelfi, J-D

    2004-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder defined by a symptomatic triad, anorexia, emaciation and amenorrhoea. This disease mainly affects young women. Besides these three symptoms, hyperactivity is often associated with anorexia nervosa. Hyperactivity can be considered as a strategy to lose weight, but studies on animal models have shown that it could be explained by more complicated mechanisms. Hyperactivity is defined by an excess of physical activity, which can induce social, professional and family consequences. Hyperactivity can take different forms, most striking is the restless one. Patients with anorexia nervosa are not all hyperactive. Brewerton et al. have compared patients with anorexia nervosa and hyperactivity to patients without hyperactivity. Hyperactive patients are more dissatisfied by their body image, they use less means of purging (laxatives, vomiting), and they start starving earlier than patients without hyperactivity. Many factors can promote the emergence and maintenance of hyperactivity, especially social and cultural requirements, sports environment, family influences. Various models can explain the links between excessive exercise and anorexia nervosa. Epling and Pierce have exposed a behavioural model which shows how hyperactivity can lead to starvation, creating a self-maintained cycle. Eisler and Le Grande have described four models to explain the links between hyperactivity and anorexia nervosa. First, excessive exercise can be considered as a symptom of anorexia nervosa. It can also promote the development of eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa and hyperactivity can be a manifestation of an other psychiatric disorder. At least, hyperactivity can be a variant of anorexia nervosa, which has the same effects, as weight loss. Hyperactivity can also be considered as a kind of obsessive compulsive disorder. Hyperactivity and obsessive compulsive disorders actually share some clinical and neurochemical characteristics. An other model consists

  12. Anorexia nervosa among teenage girls: Emerging or prevalent?

    PubMed Central

    Hisam, Aliya; Rahman, Mahmood Ur; Mashhadi, Syed Fawad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To find out frequency of anorexia nervosa (AN) among teenage girls (TG) and to find out the knowledge and practice regarding anorexia nervosa among teenage girls. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at higher secondary public school, Rawalpindi from June 2013 till December 2013. A sample of 100 female students of the age group 13-19 years were inducted by systematic sampling technique. Mixed pretested questionnaire was filled after informed verbal consent. Data was entered and analysed using SPSS version 20. Results: Participants mean age was 15.81 ± 1.323 years. Mean weight, mean height and mean body mass index were found to be 50.34 ± 10.445 kg, 160.14 ± 7.846 cm and 19.675 ± 4.1477 kg/m2 respectively. Anorexia nervosa was found in 42 (42%) teenage girls while 58 (58%) were not having anorexia nervosa. Sufficient knowledge and positive practice were found to be present in 57 (57%) and 49 (49%) respectively. Statistically no significant association was found between KP and AN (p=0.73). Conclusion: Anorexia nervosa is an emerging health concern in Pakistan. Anorexia prevalent behaviour was observed in almost half of the teenage girls. PMID:26870084

  13. Wait Not, Want Not: Factors Contributing to the Development of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Trish

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine prevalence and incident rates of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. In addition, this article will review the psychological and sociological factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of an eating disorder. Finally, different treatment approaches will be discussed in…

  14. Total body water and total body potassium in anorexia nervosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, D.T.; Crosby, L.O.; Lusk, E.; Oberlander, J.L.; Pertschuk, M.J.; Mullen, J.L.

    1984-08-01

    In the ill hospitalized patient with clinically relevant malnutrition, there is a measurable decrease in the ratio of the total body potassium to total body water (TBK/TBW) and a detectable increase in the ratio of total exchangeable sodium to total exchangeable potassium (Nae/Ke). To evaluate body composition analyses in anorexia nervosa patients with chronic uncomplicated semistarvation, TBK and TBW were measured by whole body K40 counting and deuterium oxide dilution in 10 females with stable anorexia nervosa and 10 age-matched female controls. The ratio of TBK/TBW was significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in anorexia nervosa patients than controls. The close inverse correlation found in published studies between TBK/TBW and Nae/Ke together with our results suggest that in anorexia nervosa, Nae/Ke may be low or normal. A decreased TBK/TBW is not a good indicator of malnutrition in the anorexia nervosa patient. The use of a decreased TBK/TBW ratio or an elevated Nae/Ke ratio as a definition of malnutrition may result in inappropriate nutritional management in the patient with severe nonstressed chronic semistarvation.

  15. Altered orienting of attention in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Mario; Castelli, Luigi; Franchetti, Lorena; Carli, Lorenza; Todisco, Patrizia; Palomba, Daniela; Galfano, Giovanni

    2015-09-30

    The study of cognitive processes in anorexia nervosa (AN) is largely unexplored, although recent evidence suggests the presence of impairments in both social cognition and attention processing. Here we investigated AN patients' ability to orient attention in response to social and symbolic visual stimuli. AN patients and matched controls performed a task in which gaze and pointing gestures acted as social directional cues for spatial attention. Arrows were also included as symbolic cue. On each trial, a centrally-placed cue appeared oriented rightwards or leftwards. After either 200 or 700ms, a lateralized neutral target (a letter) requiring a discrimination response appeared in a location either spatially congruent or incongruent with the directional cue. Controls showed a reliable orienting irrespective of both temporal interval and cue type. AN patients showed a reliable orienting at both temporal intervals only in response to pointing gestures. Both gaze and arrow cues failed to orient attention at the short temporal interval, that is when attention is under reflexive control, whereas a reliable orienting emerged at the long temporal interval. These results provide preliminary evidence of altered reflexive orienting of attention in AN patients that does not extend to body-related cues such as pointing gestures.

  16. Resting state functional connectivity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry Allen; Castle, David Jonathan; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Nibbs, Richard Grant; Gurvich, Caroline; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2016-05-30

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric illness characterised by a disturbance in body image, a fear of weight gain and significantly low body weight. The factors involved in the genesis and maintenance of AN are unclear, though the potential neurobiological underpinnings of the condition are of increasing interest. Through the investigation of functional connectivity of the brain at rest, information relating to neuronal communication and integration of information that may relate to behaviours and cognitive symptoms can be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate functional connectivity of the default mode network, and sensorimotor and visual networks in AN. 26 females with AN and 27 healthy control participants matched for age, gender and premorbid intelligence underwent a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Default mode network functional connectivity did not differ between groups. AN participants displayed reduced functional connectivity between the sensorimotor and visual networks, in comparison to healthy controls. This finding is discussed in terms of differences in visuospatial processing in AN and the distortion of body image experienced by these individuals. Overall, the findings suggest that sensorimotor and visual network connectivity may be related to visuospatial processing in AN, though, further research is required. PMID:27111812

  17. Personality subtypes in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gazzillo, Francesco; Lingiardi, Vittorio; Peloso, Anna; Giordani, Silvia; Vesco, Serena; Zanna, Valeria; Filippucci, Ludovica; Vicari, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this study are to (1) empirically identify the personality subtypes of adolescents with anorexic disorders and (2) investigate the personality disorders, identity disturbances, and affective features associated with the different subtypes. We assessed 102 adolescent patients with Eating Disorders (anorexia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified) using three clinical instruments: the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure for Adolescents (SWAP-200-A) (Westen D, Shedler J, Durrett C, Glass S, Martens A. Personality diagnoses in adolescence: DSM-IV Axis II diagnoses and an empirically derived alternative. Am J Psychiatry 2003;160:952-966), the Affective Regulation and Experience Questionnaire (AREQ) (Zittel Conklin C, Bradley R, Westen D. Affect regulation in borderline personality disorder. J Nerv Ment Dis 2006;194:69-77), and the Identity Disorder Questionnaire (IDQ) (Wilkinson-Ryan T, Westen D. Identity disturbance in borderline personality disorder: An empirical investigation. Am J Psychiatry 2000;157:528-541). We performed a Q factor analysis of the SWAP-200-A descriptions of our sample to identify personality subtypes. We correlated these personality styles with AREQ and IDQ factors and explored the personality differences among individuals with the different types of ED. The Q factor analysis identified three personality subtypes: high-functioning/perfectionist, emotionally dysregulated, and overcontrolled/constricted. Each subtype showed specific identity and affective features, comorbidities with different personality disorders, and clinical implications. These results contribute to the understanding of adolescents with ED and seem to be relevant for treatment planning.

  18. Saccadic Eye Movements in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Phillipou, Andrea; Rossell, Susan Lee; Gurvich, Caroline; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Castle, David Jonathan; Nibbs, Richard Grant; Abel, Larry Allen

    2016-01-01

    Background Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has a mortality rate among the highest of any mental illness, though the factors involved in the condition remain unclear. Recently, the potential neurobiological underpinnings of the condition have become of increasing interest. Saccadic eye movement tasks have proven useful in our understanding of the neurobiology of some other psychiatric illnesses as they utilise known brain regions, but to date have not been examined in AN. The aim of this study was to investigate whether individuals with AN differ from healthy individuals in performance on a range of saccadic eye movements tasks. Methods 24 females with AN and 25 healthy individuals matched for age, gender and premorbid intelligence participated in the study. Participants were required to undergo memory-guided and self-paced saccade tasks, and an interleaved prosaccade/antisaccade/no-go saccade task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results AN participants were found to make prosaccades of significantly shorter latency than healthy controls. AN participants also made an increased number of inhibitory errors on the memory-guided saccade task. Groups did not significantly differ in antisaccade, no-go saccade or self-paced saccade performance, or fMRI findings. Discussion The results suggest a potential role of GABA in the superior colliculus in the psychopathology of AN. PMID:27010196

  19. The Significance of Bradycardia in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, Malka; Spitz, Marcelo; Sandler, Ludmila; Heno, Nawaf; Roguin, Nathan; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a life-threatening condition, with a significant risk for death, due to cardiovascular complications. It is characterized by abnormal eating behavior and has the highest mortality rate of all psychiatric disorders. It has been associated with bradycardia (a heart rate [HR] of less than 60 beats per minute) (up to 95%), hypotension, mitral valve prolapse, and heart failure. The diagnosis of AN can be elusive, and more than half of all cases are undetected. The purpose of this study was to raise and improve awareness to the possible diagnosis of AN in adolescent and young adult patients with weight loss displaying bradycardia and new cardiac disorders. Clinical characteristics, HR, and electrocardiographic data of 23 consecutive patients (20 females) with AN and of 10 young adults (8 females) without AN, between the years 2006 and 2009, were recorded and summarized. At presentation 16/23 (69.6%) showed HR < 50 bpm. The mean lowest HR of all patients was 44 ± 6 (range 26 to 68) bpm. No patient needed pacemaker therapy. Bradycardia in young adults, especially females with weight loss, should raise the possible diagnosis of AN, so it can be treated early in-time, and thus prevent premature death. PMID:24436590

  20. Altered Implicit Category Learning in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Shott, Megan E.; Filoteo, J. Vincent; Jappe, Leah M.; Pryor, Tamara; Maddox, W. Todd; Rollin, Michael D.H.; Hagman, Jennifer O.; Frank, Guido K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Recent research has identified specific cognitive deficits in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), including impairment in executive functioning and attention. Another such cognitive process, implicit category learning has been less studied in AN. This study examined whether implicit category learning is impaired in AN. Method Twenty-one women diagnosed with AN and 19 control women (CW) were administered an implicit category learning task in which they were asked to categorize simple perceptual stimuli (Gabor patches) into one of two categories. Category membership was based on a linear integration (i.e., an implicit task) of two stimulus dimensions (orientation and spatial frequency of the stimulus). Results AN individuals were less accurate on implicit category learning relative to age-matched CW. Model-based analyses indicated that, even when AN individuals used the appropriate (i.e., implicit) strategy they were still impaired relative to CW who also used the same strategy. In addition, task performance in AN patients was worse the higher they were in self-reported novelty seeking and the lower they were in sensitivity to punishment. Conclusions These results indicate that AN patients have implicit category learning deficits, and given this type of learning is thought to be mediated by striatal dopamine pathways, AN patients may have deficits in these neural systems. The finding of significant correlations with novelty seeking and sensitivity to punishment suggests that feedback sensitivity is related to implicit learning in AN. PMID:22201300

  1. Resting state functional connectivity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry Allen; Castle, David Jonathan; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Nibbs, Richard Grant; Gurvich, Caroline; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2016-05-30

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric illness characterised by a disturbance in body image, a fear of weight gain and significantly low body weight. The factors involved in the genesis and maintenance of AN are unclear, though the potential neurobiological underpinnings of the condition are of increasing interest. Through the investigation of functional connectivity of the brain at rest, information relating to neuronal communication and integration of information that may relate to behaviours and cognitive symptoms can be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate functional connectivity of the default mode network, and sensorimotor and visual networks in AN. 26 females with AN and 27 healthy control participants matched for age, gender and premorbid intelligence underwent a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Default mode network functional connectivity did not differ between groups. AN participants displayed reduced functional connectivity between the sensorimotor and visual networks, in comparison to healthy controls. This finding is discussed in terms of differences in visuospatial processing in AN and the distortion of body image experienced by these individuals. Overall, the findings suggest that sensorimotor and visual network connectivity may be related to visuospatial processing in AN, though, further research is required.

  2. Compulsivity in anorexia nervosa: a transdiagnostic concept

    PubMed Central

    Godier, Lauren R.; Park, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    The compulsive nature of weight loss behaviors central to anorexia nervosa (AN), such as relentless self-starvation and over-exercise, has led to the suggestion of parallels between AN and other compulsive disorders such as obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) and addictions. There is a huge unmet need for effective treatments in AN, which has high rates of morbidity and the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder, yet a grave paucity of effective treatments. Viewing compulsivity as a transdiagnostic concept, seen in various manifestations across disorders, may help delineate the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of AN, and aid treatment development. We explore models of compulsivity that suggest dysfunction in cortico-striatal circuitry underpins compulsive behavior, and consider evidence of aberrancies in this circuitry across disorders. Excessive habit formation is considered as a mechanism by which initially rewarding weight loss behavior in AN may become compulsive over time, and the complex balance between positive and negative reinforcement in this process is considered. The physiological effects of starvation in promoting compulsivity, positive reinforcement, and habit formation are also discussed. Further research in AN may benefit from a focus on processes potentially underlying the development of compulsivity, such as aberrant reward processing and habit formation. We discuss the implications of a transdiagnostic perspective on compulsivity, and how it may contribute to the development of novel treatments for AN. PMID:25101036

  3. Neurocircuitry of limbic dysfunction in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lipsman, Nir; Woodside, D Blake; Lozano, Andres M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric condition marked by firmly entrenched and maladaptive behaviors and beliefs about body, weight and food, as well as high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. The neural roots of AN are now beginning to emerge, and appear to be related to dysfunctional, primarily limbic, circuits driving pathological thoughts and behaviors. As a result, the significant physical symptoms of AN are increasingly being understood at least partially as a result of abnormal or dysregulated emotional processing. This paper reviews the nature of limbic dysfunction in AN, and how structural and functional imaging has implicated distinct emotional and perceptual neural circuits driving AN symptoms. We propose that top-down and bottom-up influences converge on key limbic modulatory structures, such as the subcallosal cingulate and insula, whose normal functioning is critical to affective regulation and emotional homeostasis. Dysfunctional activity in these structures, as is seen in AN, may lead to emotional processing deficits and psychiatric symptoms, which then drive maladaptive behaviors. Modulating limbic dysregulation may therefore be a potential treatment strategy in some AN patients.

  4. Subjective Experience of Sensation in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Nancy L.; Merwin, Rhonda M.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Moskovich, Ashley; Wildes, Jennifer; Groh, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The nature of disturbance in body experience in anorexia nervosa (AN) remains poorly operationalized despite its prognostic significance. We examined the relationship of subjective reports of sensitivity to and behavioral avoidance of sensory experience (e.g., to touch, motion) to body image disturbance and temperament in adult women currently diagnosed with AN (n=20), women with a prior history of AN who were weight restored (n=15), and healthy controls with no eating disorder history (n=24). Levels of sensitivity to sensation and attempts to avoid sensory experience were significantly higher in both clinical groups relative to healthy controls. Sensory sensitivity was associated with body image disturbance (r(56) = .51, p < .0001), indicating that body image disturbance increased with increased global sensitivity to sensation. Sensory sensitivity was also negatively and significantly correlated with lowest BMI (r2 = −.32, p < .001), but not current BMI (r2 = .03, p = .18), and to the temperament feature of harm avoidance in both clinical groups. We discuss how intervention strategies that address sensitization and habituation to somatic experience via conditioning exercises may provide a new manner in which to address body image disturbance in AN. PMID:23523866

  5. The occupational roles of women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Quiles-Cestari, Leila Maria; Ribeiro, Rosane Pilot Pessa

    2012-01-01

    This study's objective was to understand how occupational roles of individuals with anorexia nervosa are configured. The sample was composed of a control group and 11 adult women with anorexia nervosa being cared for by the Eating Disorders Care Group in a hospital in Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. Socio-demographic and anthropometric data were collected and the Role Checklist was applied. The results revealed a significant loss of roles for women with anorexia nervosa in relation to the performance of the roles worker, friend, and amateur/hobbyist, supporting the idea that psychosocial harm may arise from this eating disorder. The evaluation of occupational roles in the treatment of eating disorders is an important strategy for planning Occupational Therapy activities and supporting the creation of healthier spaces to enable individuals to resume occupational roles, and acquire independence and autonomy. PMID:22699719

  6. Psychopharmacotherapy of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, S; Kennedy, SH

    2000-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa is considered to be of limited efficacy. However, many studies suffer methodological limitations, and the utility of newer drugs in the treatment of anorexia has not been examined yet. Although there have been more fruitful investigations on the efficacy of medication in the management of bulimia nervosa, there are still many unresolved issues regarding the optimal management of partial remission during the acute treatment phase and the intensity and duration of pharmacotherapy to achieve optimal prophylaxis. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) control the binge urges in binge-eating disorder, but more trials are required to investigate the utility of SSRIs and other agents in maintenance treatment. We review the current status of psychopharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder and evaluate the merits of newer agents in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:11109300

  7. [Anorexia nervosa in German medical literature 1900 to 1945. The role of anorexia nervosa in the origin of psychosomatic medicine].

    PubMed

    Habermas, T

    1992-01-01

    German-language publications on anorexia nervosa and Simmonds' disease from between 1900 and 1945 are reviewed in order to trace factors inherent in medical thinking which have mostly hindered German-language medicine in understanding anorexia nervosa. It is demonstrated that a) the few German-language physicians who did describe central and possible characteristics of a.n. (weight-phobia, overactivity, bulimia, self-induced vomiting) were enabled to do so by valuing detailed clinical description, also of psychic characteristics, and an interest in the neuroses; b) the concept of anorexia nervosa was better known than previously assumed, though largely misunderstood; c) typical diagnostic misinterpretations led to typical biases in the description of the syndrome; d) in Germany more than in other countries a.n. was confounded with Simmonds' disease; and e) in addition to other factors, one reason for this lay in the 'holistic' ideal of psychosomatic medicine in the 1930s.

  8. Osteopenia and bone fractures in a man with anorexia nervosa and hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, N.A.; Neer, R.M.; Jameson, L.

    1986-07-18

    Women with anorexia nervosa have reduced skeletal mass. Both anorexia and osteopenia are less common in men. We describe a 22-year-old man with anorexia nervosa and severe osteopenia involving both cortical and trabecular bone who developed a pelvic fracture and multiple vertebral compression fractures. He was found to have secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism that was reversible with weight gain. This case illustrates the need to consider osteopenia as a potential complication of anorexia nervosa in males as well as females.

  9. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients. PMID:26682545

  10. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA–targeted RT–quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients. PMID:26682545

  11. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  12. Long-term consequences of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Meczekalski, Blazej; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Katulski, Krzysztof

    2013-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder that occurs mainly in female adolescents and young women. The obsessive fear of weight gain, critically limited food intake and neuroendocrine aberrations characteristic of AN have both short- and long-term consequences for the reproductive, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and skeletal systems. Neuroendocrine changes include impairment of gonadotropin releasing-hormone (GnRH) pulsatile secretion and changes in neuropeptide activity at the hypothalamic level, which cause profound hypoestrogenism. AN is related to a decrease in bone mass density, which can lead to osteopenia and osteoporosis and a significant increase in fracture risk in later life. Rates of birth complications and low birth weight may be higher in women with previous AN. The condition is associated with fertility problems, unplanned pregnancies and generally negative attitudes to pregnancy. During pregnancy, women with the condition have higher rates of hyperemesis gravidarum, anaemia and obstetric complications, as well as impaired weight gain and compromised intrauterine foetal growth. It is reported that 80% of AN patients are affected by a cardiac complications such as sinus bradycardia, a prolonged QT interval on electrocardiography, arrythmias, myocardial mass modification and hypotension. A decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) is one of the most important medical consequences of AN. Reduced BMD may subsequently lead to a three- to seven-fold increased risk of spontaneous fractures. Untreated AN is associated with a significant increase in the risk of death. Better detection and sophisticated therapy should prevent the long-term consequences of this disorder. The aims of treatment are not only recovery but also prophylaxis and relief of the long-term effects of this disorder. Further investigations of the long-term disease risk are needed. PMID:23706279

  13. Do girls with anorexia nervosa have elevated autistic traits?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with anorexia may have elevated autistic traits. In this study, we tested test whether patients with anorexia nervosa (anorexia) have an elevated score on a dimensional measure of autistic traits, the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ), as well as on trait measures relevant to the autism spectrum: the Empathy Quotient (EQ), and the Systemizing Quotient (SQ). Methods Two groups were tested: (1) female adolescents with anorexia: n = 66, aged 12 to 18 years; and (2) female adolescents without anorexia: n =1,609, aged 12 to 18 years. Both groups were tested using the AQ, EQ, and SQ, via the parent-report adolescent versions for patients aged 12 to 15 years old, and the self-report adult versions for patients aged over 16 years. Results As predicted, the patients with anorexia had a higher AQ and SQ. Their EQ score was reduced, but only for the parent-report version in the younger age group. Using EQ-SQ scores to calculate ‘cognitive types’, patients with anorexia were more likely to show the Type S profile (systemizing (S) better than empathy (E)), compared with typical females. Conclusions Females with anorexia have elevated autistic traits. Clinicians should consider if a focus on autistic traits might be helpful in the assessment and treatment of anorexia. Future research needs to establish if these results reflect traits or states associated with anorexia. PMID:23915495

  14. Humanistic Approaches to the Understanding and Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittmar, Helga; Bates, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes some attempts to understand the causes and consequent treatments of anorexia nervosa from the viewpoints of psychoanalytically informed, family, existential and feminist psychology. These perspectives, which focus on the individual experience of the anorexic, leave many questions unanswered, but provide fresh frameworks from which to…

  15. A Psychoeducational Group Approach for Individuals Recovering from Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Lisa

    Although in-depth, long-term group psychotherapy is a beneficial therapeutic experience for adolescent females suffering from anorexia nervosa, these clients are notoriously resistant to treatment and to long-term, open-ended group settings. This dissidence may stem from a motivational deficiency toward changing their eating patterns and…

  16. [Somatic care and complications of anorexia nervosa in adolescent girls].

    PubMed

    Helfer, Jennifer; Favaro, Alexandra; Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a frequent condition that appears mainly during adolescence and may persist until adulthood. It can have serious consequences, which is why it must be quickly detected and treated. In this article, we describe the parameters to be followed in outpatient clinic, complications not to be missed and when a hospital treatment becomes necessary. PMID:27451511

  17. Anorexia nervosa in a 7-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Bostic, J Q; Muriel, A C; Hack, S; Weinstein, S; Herzog, D

    1997-10-01

    We report on a 7-year-old girl with anorexia nervosa and consider factors contributing to this early emergency. Cognitive differences in younger children can alter their understanding of this illness, so we chronicled this girl's treatment because it diverged from practices used with older patients. Accordingly, effective interventions in very young anorexics might require modifications of treatments used in postpubertal populations.

  18. Genetics and anorexia nervosa: a review of candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Gorwood, P; Bouvard, M; Mouren-Siméoni, M C; Kipman, A; Adès, J

    1998-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe disorder which seems likely to have a multifactorial aetiology. However, several studies have stressed that genetic factors play a significant role. Epidemiological studies have shown that the lifetime risk for first-degree relatives of a patient with an eating disorder is 6% compared to 1% among relatives of controls, and a twin study performed on 34 pairs of twins has shown a higher concordance rate in monozygotic twins (55%) compared to dizygotic twins (7%). The vulnerability component of anorexia nervosa that can be attributed to genetic influences has been estimated from twin studies to be around 70%. Despite this, few genetic studies have been performed testing the role of candidate genes which code for proteins potentially implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of the disorder. In this review, genes encoding components of the dopamine, serotonin, opiate, and noradrenaline systems are assessed for their role in anorexia nervosa. Attention is paid to psychological dimensions, clinical symptoms, co-morbidity frequency, pharmacological data, and biological measures that characterize anorexia nervosa.

  19. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  20. Striatal dopamine type 2 receptor availability in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Broft, Allegra; Slifstein, Mark; Osborne, Joseph; Kothari, Paresh; Morim, Simon; Shingleton, Rebecca; Kenney, Lindsay; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Attia, Evelyn; Martinez, Diana; Timothy Walsh, B

    2015-09-30

    The neurobiology of anorexia nervosa remains incompletely understood. Here we utilized PET imaging with the radiotracer [(11)C]raclopride to measure striatal dopamine type 2 (D2) receptor availability in patients with anorexia nervosa. 25 women with anorexia nervosa who were receiving treatment in an inpatient program participated, as well as 25 control subjects. Patients were scanned up to two times with the PET tracer [(11)C]raclopride: once while underweight, and once upon weight restoration. Control subjects underwent one PET scan. In the primary analyses, there were no significant differences between underweight patients (n=21) and control subjects (n=25) in striatal D2 receptor binding potential. Analysis of subregions (sensorimotor striatum, associative striatum, limbic striatum) did not reveal differences between groups. In patients completing both scans (n=15), there were no detectable changes in striatal D2 receptor binding potential after weight restoration. In this sample, there were no differences in striatal D2 receptor binding potential between patients with anorexia nervosa and control subjects. Weight restoration was not associated with a change in striatal D2 receptor binding. These findings suggest that disturbances in reward processing in this disorder are not attributable to abnormal D2 receptor characteristics, and that other reward-related neural targets may be of greater relevance.

  1. A Primary Prevention Program to Reduce Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullari, Salvatore; Redmon, William K.

    This paper presents a theoretical model for a primary prevention program for bulimia and anorexia nervosa to be used with adolescents and young women considered most at risk of developing these eating disorders. Characteristics of potential anorexics and bulimics are identified to aid in the selection of target groups for the program. It is…

  2. Depression and Anorexia Nervosa of Persons with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Ludwik S.; Biederman, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Manifestations of depression in three adults wth Down syndrome, one of whom also exhibited anorexia nervosa, are described. Overall findings indicate that major depression in Down syndrome may be more frequent than previously assumed and that it can be diagnosed with standard diagnostic criteria, modified according to the patient's developmental…

  3. Anorexia Nervosa: An Overview for the School Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nufrio, Ronald M.

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder which affects thousands of people every year. Ninety-five percent of all anorexics are females with the peak age of onset between 14 and 18. While anorexics fit into no specific stereotype, high-risk candidates are often perfectionists and model children who exhibit self-doubt, high conformity,…

  4. Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescence and Maudsley Family-Based Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Kim; Read, Shelly; Wallis, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder that usually occurs in adolescence. The course of the illness can be protracted. Current empirical evidence suggests that the Maudsley Family-Based Treatment (MFBT) is efficacious for adolescents. MFBT empowers parents as a crucial treatment resource to assist in their child's recovery. The…

  5. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: Questions and Answers for School Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallick, M. Joan

    1984-01-01

    School personnel can have a vital role in the early detection and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia by understanding certain signs and symptoms. This article provides specific information about early detection, approaches to use when confronting the student, and methods to facilitate treatment. (Author/DF)

  6. Directives in anorexia nervosa: use of the "Ulysses Agreement".

    PubMed

    Davidson, H; Birmingham, C L

    2003-09-01

    The course of anorexia nervosa frequently has episodes of exacerbation during which motivation and insight are reduced, cognition is impaired and treatment resistance is increased. Formalizing a directive to be used during these episodes when the patient has greater motivation and insight is one way of reducing treatment resistance. We describe a form of directive, called the "Ulysses Agreement".

  7. ["Family groups" for relatives of patients with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Brunswick, Astrid; Guy-Rubin, Aurore; Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa affects mainly young adults. During care, caregivers seek alliance with patients' friends and family to be able to relate to the patients' symptoms and also their environment. Collaborative work with families helps build confidence. The "family group" is an example of well-intended partnership.

  8. Anorexia Nervosa: Family Characteristics and Family Interaction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Susan Fellerman

    This literature review examines research issues in anorexia nervosa, including conceptual issues and methodological considerations. Research on the family's contribution to the disorder is reviewed. The demographic characteristics of social class, birth order, history of sexual abuse, and biological and genetic factors are examined. Individual…

  9. Striatal dopamine type 2 receptor availability in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Broft, Allegra; Slifstein, Mark; Osborne, Joseph; Kothari, Paresh; Morim, Simon; Shingleton, Rebecca; Kenney, Lindsay; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Attia, Evelyn; Martinez, Diana; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The neurobiology of anorexia nervosa remains incompletely understood. Here we utilized PET imaging with the radiotracer [11C]raclopride to measure striatal dopamine type 2 (D2) receptor availability in patients with anorexia nervosa. 25 women with anorexia nervosa who were receiving treatment in an inpatient program participated, as well as 25 control subjects. Patients were scanned up to two times with the PET tracer [11C]raclopride: once while underweight, and once upon weight restoration. Control subjects underwent one PET scan. In the primary analyses, there were no significant differences between underweight patients (n=21) and control subjects (n=25) in striatal D2 receptor binding potential. Analysis of subregions (sensorimotor striatum, associative striatum, limbic striatum) did not reveal differences between groups. In patients completing both scans (n=15), there were no detectable changes in striatal D2 receptor binding potential after weight restoration. In this sample, there were no differences in striatal D2 receptor binding potential between patients with anorexia nervosa and control subjects. Weight restoration was not associated with a change in striatal D2 receptor binding. These findings suggest that disturbances in reward processing in this disorder are not attributable to abnormal D2 receptor characteristics, and that other reward-related neural targets may be of greater relevance. PMID:26272038

  10. [New aspects in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent anorexia nervosa often takes a chronic and disabling course associated with reduced health-related quality of life in adulthood. The aim of this short review is to introduce new aspects on the somatic and psychotherapeutic treatment of AN, such as nutritional rehabilitation, prophylaxis of osteoporosis as well as new findings on the effect of treatment settings and new psychotherapeutic methods.

  11. Perceived Personality Traits of Individuals with Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Jessica E.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prior research has found evidence of a general negative personality stereotype for individuals who have anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods: This study examined the expected personality characteristics of individuals with AN using the Five-Factor Model of personality to allow identification of specific personality traits that are part of…

  12. Psychiatric Comorbidities among Female Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Lenz, Klaus; Simmendinger, Nicole; Klinkowski, Nora; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Pfeiffer, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated current comorbid Axis I diagnoses associated with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) in adolescents. The sample included 101 female adolescents treated at a psychiatric unit for primary DSM-IV diagnoses of AN. 73.3% of the AN patients were diagnosed as having a current comorbidity of at least one comorbid Axis I diagnosis, with no…

  13. Nutritional adequacy of dietary intake in women with anorexia nervosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Understanding nutrient intake of anorexia nervosa (AN) patients is essential for the establishment of dietary treatment. Design: Women, aged 19 to 30 years, with both restricting and binge purge types of AN, participating in an ecological momentary assessment study, completed three nonc...

  14. The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse in Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jacqueline C.; Bewell, Carmen; Blackmore, Elizabeth; Woodside, D. Blake

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) on clinical characteristics and premature termination of treatment in anorexia nervosa (AN). Method: The participants were 77 consecutive patients with AN admitted to an inpatient eating disorders unit. The patients were assessed in terms of eating disorder…

  15. Effectiveness of individualized, integrative outpatient treatment for females with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Cara; Jones, Rebecca A; Livingston, Genvieve; Goetsch, Virginia; Schaffner, Angela; Buchanan, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of an individualized outpatient program was investigated in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN). Participants included 151 females who received outpatient eating disorder treatment in the partial hospitalization program, the intensive outpatient program, or a combination of the two programs. Outcome measures included the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), frequency of binge eating and purging, and mean body weight. Findings included significant increases in weight for the AN group, reductions in binge eating frequency for the BN group, and reductions in EDI-2 and BDI-II scores and purging frequency for both groups. This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of a multimodal program for the treatment of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

  16. Readiness to Recover in Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: Prediction of Hospital Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ametller, L.; Castro, J.; Serrano, E.; Martinez, E.; Toro, J.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if motivation to change in anorexia nervosa during treatment is a predictor of hospitalisation in adolescent patients. Method: The Anorexia Nervosa Stages of Change Questionnaire (ANSOCQ), the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to a group of 70 anorexia nervosa…

  17. Outpatient management of electrolyte imbalances associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ann F

    2005-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa are eating disorders with significant morbidity that often go undetected. Nurses and primary care providers are encouraged to recognize the early signs and symptoms of these disorders and to intervene appropriately. Several case reports in this article describe patients with these disorders and various related electrolyte abnormalities. Understanding electrolyte imbalances associated with both disorders may lead to earlier effective intervention and overall improved health outcomes.

  18. Neurobiology of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Walter

    2008-04-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders of unknown etiology that most commonly begin during adolescence in women. AN and BN have unique and puzzling symptoms, such as restricted eating or binge-purge behaviors, body image distortions, denial of emaciation, and resistance to treatment. These are often chronic and relapsing disorders, and AN has the highest death rate of any psychiatric disorder. The lack of understanding of the pathogenesis of this illness has hindered the development of effective interventions, particularly for AN. Individuals with AN and BN are consistently characterized by perfectionism, obsessive-compulsiveness, and dysphoric mood. Individuals with AN tend to have high constraint, constriction of affect and emotional expressiveness, ahendonia and asceticism, whereas individuals with BN tend to be more impulsive and sensation seeking. Such symptoms often begin in childhood, before the onset of an eating disorder, and persist after recovery, suggesting they are traits that create a vulnerability for developing an ED. There is growing acknowledgement that neurobiological vulnerabilities make a substantial contribution to the pathogenesis of AN and BN. Considerable evidence suggests that altered brain serotonin (5-HT) function contributes to dysregulation of appetite, mood, and impulse control in AN and BN. Brain imaging studies, using 5-HT specific ligands, show that disturbances of 5-HT function occur when people are ill, and persist after recovery from AN and BN. It is possible that a trait-related disturbance of 5-HT neuronal modulation predates the onset of AN and contributes to premorbid symptoms of anxiety, obsessionality, and inhibition. This dysphoric temperament may involve an inherent dysregulation of emotional and reward pathways which also mediate the hedonic aspects of feeding, thus making these individuals vulnerable to disturbed appetitive behaviors. Restricting food intake may become powerfully

  19. [Adaptation of psychodrama in psychotherapy of patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Izydorczyk, Bernadetta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the article was an attempt to present selected theoretical motifs and moreover self experience in the adaptation of elements of psychodrama by Moreno in psychodynamic psychotherapy (individual and group psychotherapy) in a group of people with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Psychodrama through own creativity, spontaneity and taking action on the "here and now" stage helps to attain and intensify therapeutic aims which concern the consciousness of inner conflict of persons with anorexia and bulimia nervosa, which is translocated on their body.

  20. Goethe's Ottilie: an early 19th century description of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhanji, S; Jolles, F E; Jolles, R A

    1990-01-01

    The view that the prevalence of anorexia nervosa is influenced by social attitudes and customs is a popular one. Unfortunately the scarcity of medical accounts prior to the later decades of the last century make it difficult if not impossible to estimate the prevalence of anorexia nervosa at various periods in history. The authors present the history of one of Goethe's literary heroines and suggest that similar studies could throw some light on the epidemiology of anorexia nervosa in the past. PMID:2213809

  1. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa and their treatments: an update on some critical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carrie; Mehler, Philip S

    2015-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. Many of the deaths are attributable to medical complications which arise as the malnutrition and weight loss worsens. Every body system may be adversely affected by anorexia nervosa. Yet, remarkably, most of the medical complications of anorexia nervosa are treatable and reversible with optimal medical care, as part of a multidisciplinary team who are often involved in the care of these patients. Herein, we will describe the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and their treatments.

  2. Anorexia Nervosa: A Unified Neurological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Tasneem Fatema; Hasan, Hunaid

    2011-01-01

    The roles of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), opioid peptides, leptin and ghrelin in anorexia nervosa (AN) were discussed in this paper. CRF is the key mediator of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and also acts at various other parts of the brain, such as the limbic system and the peripheral nervous system. CRF action is mediated through the CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, with both HPA axis-dependent and HPA axis-independent actions, where the latter shows nil involvement of the autonomic nervous system. CRF1 receptors mediate both the HPA axis-dependent and independent pathways through CRF, while the CRF2 receptors exclusively mediate the HPA axis-independent pathways through urocortin. Opioid peptides are involved in the adaptation and regulation of energy intake and utilization through reward-related behavior. Opioids play a role in the addictive component of AN, as described by the “auto-addiction opioids theory”. Their interactions have demonstrated the psychological aspect of AN and have shown to prevent the functioning of the physiological homeostasis. Important opioids involved are β-lipotropin, β-endorphin and dynorphin, which interact with both µ and κ opioids receptors to regulate reward-mediated behavior and describe the higher incidence of AN seen in females. Moreover, ghrelin is known as the “hunger” hormone and helps stimulate growth hormone (GH) and hepatic insulin-like-growth-factor-1(IGF-1), maintaining anabolism and preserving a lean body mass. In AN, high levels of GH due to GH resistance along with low levels of IGF-1 are observed. Leptin plays a role in suppressing appetite through the inhibition of neuropeptide Y gene. Moreover, the CRF, opioid, leptin and ghrelin mechanisms operate collectively at the HPA axis and express the physiological and psychological components of AN. Fear conditioning is an intricate learning process occurring at the level of the hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septum and the dorsal raphe by

  3. Anorexia nervosa: a unified neurological perspective.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tasneem Fatema; Hasan, Hunaid

    2011-01-01

    The roles of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), opioid peptides, leptin and ghrelin in anorexia nervosa (AN) were discussed in this paper. CRF is the key mediator of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and also acts at various other parts of the brain, such as the limbic system and the peripheral nervous system. CRF action is mediated through the CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, with both HPA axis-dependent and HPA axis-independent actions, where the latter shows nil involvement of the autonomic nervous system. CRF1 receptors mediate both the HPA axis-dependent and independent pathways through CRF, while the CRF2 receptors exclusively mediate the HPA axis-independent pathways through urocortin. Opioid peptides are involved in the adaptation and regulation of energy intake and utilization through reward-related behavior. Opioids play a role in the addictive component of AN, as described by the "auto-addiction opioids theory". Their interactions have demonstrated the psychological aspect of AN and have shown to prevent the functioning of the physiological homeostasis. Important opioids involved are β-lipotropin, β-endorphin and dynorphin, which interact with both µ and κ opioids receptors to regulate reward-mediated behavior and describe the higher incidence of AN seen in females. Moreover, ghrelin is known as the "hunger" hormone and helps stimulate growth hormone (GH) and hepatic insulin-like-growth-factor-1(IGF-1), maintaining anabolism and preserving a lean body mass. In AN, high levels of GH due to GH resistance along with low levels of IGF-1 are observed. Leptin plays a role in suppressing appetite through the inhibition of neuropeptide Y gene. Moreover, the CRF, opioid, leptin and ghrelin mechanisms operate collectively at the HPA axis and express the physiological and psychological components of AN. Fear conditioning is an intricate learning process occurring at the level of the hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septum and the dorsal raphe by involving

  4. Uniting Couples (in the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa (UCAN)

    PubMed Central

    Bulik, Cynthia M; Baucom, Donald; Kirby, Jennifer; Pisetsky, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of a novel couple-based cognitive-behavioral intervention for adult anorexia nervosa (AN) called Uniting Couples (in the treatment of) Anorexia Nervosa (UCAN). Method We review the state of the science for the treatment of adult AN, the nature of relationships in AN, our model of couple functioning in AN, and the development of the UCAN intervention. Results We present the UCAN treatment for patients with AN and their partners and discuss important considerations in the delivery of the intervention. Discussion With further evaluation, we expect that UCAN will emerge to be an effective, acceptable, disseminable, and developmentally tailored intervention that will serve to improve both core AN pathology as well as couple functioning. PMID:20063308

  5. Acute liver damage and anorexia nervosa: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bridet, Lionel; Martin, Juan Jose Beitia; Nuno, Jose Luis Cabriada

    2014-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder predominantly affecting young women and characterized by an intense fear of gaining weight and becoming fat. Liver injury with mild elevation of hepatic enzymes is a frequent complication, and steatosis of the liver is thought to be the major underlying pathology. However, acute hepatic failure with transaminase levels over 1000 u/L is a very rare complication, and the precise mechanism of the liver injury is still unclear. We report a case of a 35-year-old woman with a history of anorexia nervosa who developed acute liver damage with deep coma in relation to profound hypoglycemia. The treatment was hydration, correction of electrolyte and fluid imbalance, and gradual nutritional support to prevent refeeding syndrome. Our patient's consciousness was significantly improved with the recovery of liver function and normalization of transaminase levels. Although the mechanism of pathogenesis is largely unknown, we discuss the two principal hypotheses: starvation-induced autophagy and acute hypoperfusion.

  6. The Disjointed Historical Trajectory of Anorexia Nervosa Before 1970.

    PubMed

    Court, John P M; Kaplan, Allan S

    2016-01-01

    Responses in pre-modern eras to anorexia nervosa (as now understood) varied widely, from religious piety and sanctity through fear and superstition. While noting briefly the limited conceptualizations from pre-modern history this article is primarily focused from the late 19th century, commencing with helpful but tentative formulations of anorexia nervosa for early-modern medicine that were laid out, consistently between themselves, by Lesègue, Gull and Osler. Yet that promising biomedical advent was superseded for more than a half-century by deep, internal divisions and bitter rifts that festered between three medical disciplines: neurology; Freudian psychotherapy; and Kraepelinian biological psychiatry. Mid-20th century developments preceded the 1960-1980s' improved understanding of suffering and movement toward effective remediation introduced by Dr. Hilde Bruch. PMID:26769199

  7. Prolonged QT interval in a man with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Macías-Robles, María Dolores; Perez-Clemente, Ana María; Maciá-Bobes, Carmen; Alvarez-Rueda, María Asunción; Pozo-Nuevo, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by the avoidance of food intake, which usually leads to a weight loss. Cardiac co-morbility is common and we can find sometimes a mass loss from the left ventricle, which can be seen by echocardiography. But the commonest complications are rhythm variations, typically bradycardia with a prolonged QT interval in up to a 40% of the cases, which altogether elevates ventricular tachycardia and sudden death risk. We present the case of a male who was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and developed asthenia, a long QT interval and also a severe both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia. We intend to discuss the pathogenic paths as well as prophylactic and therapeutic measures to this potentially-lethal pathology. PMID:19646241

  8. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dudova, Iva; Kocourkova, Jana; Koutek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases of an eleven-year-old girl and a five-and-a-half-year-old girl with comorbid eating disorders and Asperger syndrome.

  9. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dudova, Iva; Kocourkova, Jana; Koutek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases of an eleven-year-old girl and a five-and-a-half-year-old girl with comorbid eating disorders and Asperger syndrome. PMID:26170676

  10. Anorexia nervosa in an adolescent with early profound deafness.

    PubMed

    Touyz, S; O'Sullivan, B; Beumont, P J

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports a case of anorexia nervosa in a 15-year-old schoolgirl who had been profoundly deaf since birth. She was admitted to a specialized eating disorders unit following a dramatic reduction in her weight. Her deafness and limited communication skills posed significant problems with regard to her overall management on the unit. Her clinical presentation and difficulties in management are presented.

  11. Symptoms of psychosis in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Paola; Pollini, Barbara; Restaneo, Antonietta; Favaretto, Gerardo; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco B L; Preti, Antonio

    2010-02-28

    Despite evidence from case series, the comorbidity of eating disorders with psychosis is less investigated than their comorbidity with anxiety and mood disorders. We investigated the occurrence of symptoms of psychosis in 112 female patients diagnosed with DSM-IV eating disorders (anorexia nervosa=61, bulimia nervosa=51) and 631 high school girls in the same health district as the patients: the items of the SCL-90R symptom dimensions "paranoid ideation" and "psychoticism" were specifically examined. No case of co-morbid schizophrenia was observed among patients. Compared with controls, the patients with anorexia nervosa were more likely to endorse the item "Never feeling close to another person"; the patients with bulimia nervosa were more likely to endorse the item "Feeling others are to blame for your troubles". Both groups of patients were more likely than controls to endorse the item "Idea that something is wrong with your mind". The students who were identified by the EAT and the BITE as being "at risk" for eating disorders were more likely to assign their body a causative role in their problems. Symptoms of psychosis can be observed in patients with eating disorders, but these could be better explained within the psychopathology of the disorders rather than by assuming a link with schizophrenia.

  12. Testing the Hypothesis of the Multidimensional Model of Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Maureen; Chatoor, Irene; Atkins, Darlene; Silber, Tomas; Mosimann, James; Gray, James

    1997-01-01

    Tested six hypothesized risk factors of a model for anorexia nervosa. Results confirmed three of the risk factors: family history of depression, feelings of ineffectiveness, and poor interceptive awareness. Alcohol and drug abuse also figured prominently in the family history of patients with anorexia nervosa. (RJM)

  13. Locus of Control, Psychopathology, and Weight Gain in Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strober, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Based on a hypothesized disturbance in personal control and efficacy in anorexia nervosa, locus of control score in female adolescents with anorexia nervosa was compared to scores obtained from depressed and conduct-disordered controls and to adolescent female standardization norms. (Author/CL)

  14. Bulimics with and without Prior Anorexia Nervosa: A Comparison of Personality Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzman, Melanie A.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

    A controversial issue in the literature on eating disorders is whether or not bulimia is a disorder distinct from anorexia nervosa. To compare the personality and behavioral characteristics of bulimic women with and without prior anorexia nervosa, 14 female college students (mean age 19.6 years, 86 percent white) were divided into two groups…

  15. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia. LC Science Tracer Bullet, TB 85-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halasz, Hisako, Comp.

    This bibliography is intended to help readers locate material on anorexia nervosa and bulimia in the collections of the Library of Congress. A scope note briefly defines the terms "anorexia nervosa" and "bulimia" and discusses similarities and differences between the two eating disorders. Four references are included as introductions to the topic…

  16. Coming Together to Calm the Hunger: Group Therapy Program for Adults Diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponech, Heather; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on anorexia nervosa in female adults and concludes by offering 14 group therapy lesson plans for anorexia nervosa that therapists may use in their practice. There is a remarkable lack of research on the efficacy of treatment designed for individuals diagnosed with anorexia…

  17. Manualized Family-Based Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A Case Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, Daniel; Binford, Roslyn; Loeb, Katharine L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe a case series of children and adolescents (mean age = 14.5 years, SD = 2.3; range 9-18) with anorexia nervosa who received manualized family-based treatment for their eating disorder. Method: Forty-five patients with anorexia nervosa were compared pre- and post-treatment on weight and menstrual…

  18. A Comparison of Short- And Long-Term Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests that family treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa may be effective. This study was designed to determine the optimal length of such family therapy. Method: Eighty-six adolescents (12-18 years of age) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa were allocated at random to either a short-term (10 sessions over 6 months) or…

  19. A Developmental View of Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd-Guillory, Denise

    1988-01-01

    Conducted research, based on Erikson's theory of identity development, to examine anorexic's progression through early stages of development. Results support the view that the negative aspects of development are clearly present in the anorexic. Findings have implications for school counselors. Introductory questionnaire on anorexia is appended.…

  20. Association of CNR1 and FAAH endocannabinoid gene polymorphisms with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: evidence for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, P; Bifulco, M; Di Filippo, C; Gazzerro, P; Canestrelli, B; Monteleone, F; Proto, M C; Di Genio, M; Grimaldi, C; Maj, M

    2009-10-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate eating behavior; hence, endocannabinoid genes may contribute to the biological vulnerability to eating disorders. The rs1049353 (1359 G/A) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the gene coding the endocannabinoid CB1 receptor (CNR1) and the rs324420 (cDNA 385C to A) SNP of the gene coding fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the major degrading enzyme of endocannabinoids, have been suggested to have functional effects on mature proteins. Therefore, we explored the possibility that those SNPs were associated to anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia nervosa. The distributions of the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP and of the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP were investigated in 134 patients with anorexia nervosa, 180 patients with bulimia nervosa and 148 normal weight healthy controls. Additive effects of the two SNPs in the genetic susceptibility to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were also tested. As compared to healthy controls, anorexic and bulimic patients showed significantly higher frequencies of the AG genotype and the A allele of the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP. Similarly, the AC genotype and the A allele of the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP were significantly more frequent in anorexic and bulimic individuals. A synergistic effect of the two SNPs was evident in anorexia nervosa but not in bulimia nervosa. Present findings show for the first time that the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP and the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP are significantly associated to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and demonstrate a synergistic effect of the two SNPs in anorexia nervosa.

  1. Anorexia nervosa and dialysis: we have no time when the body is so damaged!

    PubMed

    Osório, Eva; Milheiro, Isabel; Brandão, Isabel; Roma Torres, António

    2013-01-17

    Anorexia nervosa remains challenging to treat and difficult to prevent. Nearly 5% of affected individuals die of this disease and 20% develop a chronic eating disorder. Anorexia nervosa may be associated with several medical complications of varying severity, including dysfunction of the renal system. Though there are some reports of renal failure in patients with anorexia nervosa, few reports are available concerning patients who required maintenance dialysis. We report a case of a patient with long-term untreated anorexia nervosa-binge eating/purging type who started psychiatric treatment when in a life-threatening situation (renal failure requiring dialysis), with unsuccessful weight recovery while on dialysis and died of septicaemia. The mechanisms that seem to be involved in the development of end-stage renal disease in this patient and the challenges associated with her treatment are reviewed. Patients with anorexia nervosa should be carefully monitored to discover the subtle manifestations of early renal failure.

  2. Sulphatoxy melatonin: an index of depression in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, S H; Brown, G M; Garfinkel, P E; McVey, G; Parienti, V

    1990-06-01

    Urinary excretion of the principal melatonin metabolite, sulphatoxy melatonin (aMT6s), was assessed both during the day and during the night in 38 female eating disorder patients (anorexia nervosa, n = 17; bulimia nervosa, n = 12; anorexia nervosa + bulimia nervosa, n = 9) and 14 female control subjects. Correlations between nocturnal serum melatonin and urinary aMT6s were also obtained. All patient groups and the controls showed a preservation of diurnal rhythm with elevated nocturnal urinary aMT6s values and no significant difference in amplitude between groups. However, patients with concurrent major depression had significantly lower levels of daytime and nighttime urinary aMT6s than the nondepressed group. Weight did not influence these findings. Correlations between nocturnal serum melatonin levels and urinary aMT6s were high for control subjects (r = 0.77) and moderate for the patient groups (r = 0.31). This may reflect differences in the rate of excretion of melatonin between patients and controls.

  3. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders. PMID:26903713

  4. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders. PMID:26903713

  5. Electrocortical processing of food and emotional pictures in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Blechert, Jens; Feige, Bernd; Joos, Andreas; Zeeck, Almut; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2011-06-01

    Objective To compare the electrocortical processing of food pictures in participants with anorexia nervosa (n = 21), bulimia nervosa (n = 22), and healthy controls (HCs) (n = 32) by measuring the early posterior negativity, an event-related potential that reflects stimulus salience and selective attention. Methods We exposed these three groups to a rapid stream of high- and low-calorie food pictures, as well as standard emotional and neutral pictures. Results Event-related potentials in the time range of 220 milliseconds to 310 milliseconds on posterior electrodes differed between groups: patients with eating disorders showed facilitated processing of both high- and low-calorie food pictures relative to neutral pictures, whereas HC participants did so only for the high-calorie pictures. Subjective palatability of the pictures was rated highest by patients with anorexia nervosa, followed by the HC and bulimia nervosa groups. Conclusions Patients with eating disorders show a generalized attentional bias for food images, regardless of caloric value. This might explain the persistent preoccupation with food in these individuals.

  6. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders.

  7. Dissociated conditional-associative learning in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Roy; Nutzinger, Detlev O; Paul, Thomas; Leplow, Bernd

    2002-04-01

    This study assessed the acquisition of conditional-associations using neutral and individually threatening nouns in 16 females with anorexia nervosa (AN), 16 females with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 16 normal controls (NC). Groups did not differ in terms of age, sex, handedness, depression, intelligence, verbal memory and verbal fluency measures. Furthermore, patients and controls were widely comparable on any test assessing neuropsychological functioning. In the conditional-associative learning (CAL) task, anorexic patients displayed an impaired performance with neutral material but not with individually threatening material. Such a deficit was not evident in bulimics or in normal controls. Only anorexics showed a dissociation in the CAL of material with different emotional valence. These findings support the assumptions from functional neuroimaging investigations in AN and justify the assignment of this disorder to the obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders.

  8. Can Family-Based Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Be Manualized?

    PubMed Central

    Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The authors report on the development of a manual for treating adolescents with anorexia nervosa modeled on a family-based intervention originating at the Maudsley Hospital in London. The manual provides the first detailed account of a clinical approach shown to be consistently efficacious in randomized clinical trials for this disorder. Manualized family therapy appears to be acceptable to therapists, patients, and families. Preliminary outcomes are comparable to what would be expected in clinically supervised sessions. These results suggest that through the use of this manual a valuable treatment approach can now be tested more broadly in controlled and uncontrolled settings. PMID:11696652

  9. Psychological inflexibility and symptom expression in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Merwin, Rhonda M; Timko, C Alix; Moskovich, Ashley A; Ingle, Krista Konrad; Bulik, Cynthia M; Zucker, Nancy L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to outline a model of anorexia nervosa (AN) as a disorder of psychological inflexibility, motivated by an insatiable desire for prediction and control with related intolerance for uncertainty. We describe preliminary data that provide initial support for this conceptualization and point to the ways in which mindfulness and acceptance-based strategies might be particularly useful for treating AN. This article is not intended to be an exhaustive literature review, rather a conceptual framework to guide future research and treatment development.

  10. Dying to be thin: attachment to death in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Latzer, Yael; Hochdorf, Zipora

    2005-09-29

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) usually follows a prolonged course accompanied by significant morbidity and high mortality. AN patients have been found to have elevated and attempted suicide rates, with suicide being the second most common cause of death in AN after the complications of the disorder itself. The suicide risk in AN is similar to that in major depression or conduct disorder and linked mainly to longer duration of illness, lower weight, bingeing and purging, impulsivity-related manifestations, comorbid substance abuse, and affective disorder. This paper reviews suicidal tendency and disturbed body image, death and eating disorders, and attachment and death with clinical implications related to AN. PMID:16200328

  11. Motivated to survive: high cooperativeness in severe anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Susan L; Gaudiani, Jennifer L; Brinton, John T; Mehler, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the personality of severely ill patients with anorexia nervosa, restricting (AN-R) and binge-purge subtypes (AN-BP), during hospitalization for medical stabilization. Participants (N = 37) completed the Temperament and Character Inventory, Revised. Personality domains were similar between AN-R and AN-BP with the exception of cooperativeness. AN-R patients scored higher on this dimension, suggesting that individuals with restricting anorexia may be more tolerant of treatment during early medical stabilization. Future research is needed to further elucidate this novel finding in order to identify the point at which body mass index predicts a decline in cooperativeness and the potential need for new intervention strategies.

  12. How much should I eat? Estimation of meal portions in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Milos, Gabriella; Kuenzli, Cornelia; Soelch, Chantal Martin; Schumacher, Sonja; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Pathological concern regarding one's weight and weight gain is a crucial feature of anorexia nervosa. Consequently, anorexia nervosa patients often claim that they are uncertain regarding the amount of food they should eat. The present study investigated whether individuals with anorexia nervosa show an altered estimation of meal portion sizes and whether this estimation is modulated by an intent-to-eat instruction (where patients are asked to imagine having to eat the presented meal), meal type and meal portion size. Twenty-four women with anorexia nervosa and 27 healthy women estimated, using a visual analogue scale, the size of six different portions of three different meals, with and without intent-to-eat instructions. Subjects with anorexia nervosa estimated the size of small and medium meal portions (but not large meal servings) as being significantly larger, compared to estimates of healthy controls. The overestimation of small meal portions by anorexia nervosa subjects was significantly greater in the intent-to-eat, compared to general, condition. These findings suggest that disturbed perceptions associated with anorexia nervosa not only include interoceptive awareness (i.e., body weight and shape), but also extend to external disorder-related objects such as meal portion size. Specific therapeutic interventions, such as training regarding meal portion evaluation, could address these difficulties.

  13. Prediction error and somatosensory insula activation in women recovered from anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K.W.; Collier, Shaleise; Shott, Megan E.; O’Reilly, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous research in patients with anorexia nervosa showed heightened brain response during a taste reward conditioning task and heightened sensitivity to rewarding and punishing stimuli. Here we tested the hypothesis that individuals recovered from anorexia nervosa would also experience greater brain activation during this task as well as higher sensitivity to salient stimuli than controls. Methods Women recovered from restricting-type anorexia nervosa and healthy control women underwent fMRI during application of a prediction error taste reward learning paradigm. Results Twenty-four women recovered from anorexia nervosa (mean age 30.3 ± 8.1 yr) and 24 control women (mean age 27.4 ± 6.3 yr) took part in this study. The recovered anorexia nervosa group showed greater left posterior insula activation for the prediction error model analysis than the control group (family-wise error– and small volume–corrected p < 0.05). A group × condition analysis found greater posterior insula response in women recovered from anorexia nervosa than controls for unexpected stimulus omission, but not for unexpected receipt. Sensitivity to punishment was elevated in women recovered from anorexia nervosa. Limitations This was a cross-sectional study, and the sample size was modest. Conclusion Anorexia nervosa after recovery is associated with heightened prediction error–related brain response in the posterior insula as well as greater response to unexpected reward stimulus omission. This finding, together with behaviourally increased sensitivity to punishment, could indicate that individuals recovered from anorexia nervosa are particularly responsive to punishment. The posterior insula processes somatosensory stimuli, including unexpected bodily states, and greater response could indicate altered perception or integration of unexpected or maybe unwanted bodily feelings. Whether those findings develop during the ill state or whether they are biological traits requires

  14. Literature Review of Cognitive Neuroscience and Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Reville, Marie-Claire; O'Connor, Lorna; Frampton, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Studies published between the beginning of 2013 and May 2015 on the neuropsychological functioning of patients with anorexia nervosa compared with healthy participants framed in the context of the Research Domain Criteria matrix identifies evidence for functional differences in three domains: Negative Valance Systems-negative attentional biases and lack of neural responsivity to hunger; Cognitive Systems-limited congruence between clinical and cognitive performance, poorer non-verbal than verbal performance, altered attentional styles to disorder related stimuli, perceptual processing impairment in discriminating body images, weaknesses in central coherence, set shifting weaknesses at low weight status, decision-making weaknesses, and greater neural resources required for working memory; Systems for Social Processes-patients appear to have a different attentional response to faces, and perception and understanding of self and others. Hence, there is evidence to suggest that patients with anorexia nervosa have a specific neuropsychological performance style across tasks in three domains of functioning. Some current controversies and areas for future development are identified.

  15. Anorexia nervosa: hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M T; Argente, J

    2002-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a chronic illness that involves a reduction in caloric intake, loss of weight and amenorrhoea, either primary or secondary. In addition to prolonged amenorrhoea, osteopenia and osteoporosis are the most frequent complications. Patients exhibit an alteration in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which is responsible for the menstrual disorders. The increase in gonadotrophin secretion that can be observed after ponderal recuperation suggests that malnutrition could be the most important mechanism involved in the decrease in gonadotrophin secretion. The loss of fat tissue, as a consequence of the restriction of nutrients, has been associated with hypoleptinaemia, abnormal secretion of peptides implicated in food control (neuropeptide Y, melanocortins and corticotrophin-releasing hormone, among others) and diminution of the amount of total body fat. Despite oestrogen therapy, the severe loss of bone mass may progress. Other factors such as weight loss, duration of amenorrhoea and low insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels could contribute to the loss of bone mass in women with anorexia nervosa. The recuperation of weight and, in particular, the amount of total body fat could lead to the spontaneous recuperation of menstruation.

  16. Literature Review of Cognitive Neuroscience and Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Reville, Marie-Claire; O'Connor, Lorna; Frampton, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Studies published between the beginning of 2013 and May 2015 on the neuropsychological functioning of patients with anorexia nervosa compared with healthy participants framed in the context of the Research Domain Criteria matrix identifies evidence for functional differences in three domains: Negative Valance Systems-negative attentional biases and lack of neural responsivity to hunger; Cognitive Systems-limited congruence between clinical and cognitive performance, poorer non-verbal than verbal performance, altered attentional styles to disorder related stimuli, perceptual processing impairment in discriminating body images, weaknesses in central coherence, set shifting weaknesses at low weight status, decision-making weaknesses, and greater neural resources required for working memory; Systems for Social Processes-patients appear to have a different attentional response to faces, and perception and understanding of self and others. Hence, there is evidence to suggest that patients with anorexia nervosa have a specific neuropsychological performance style across tasks in three domains of functioning. Some current controversies and areas for future development are identified. PMID:26797860

  17. The socio-emotional processing stream in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Oldershaw, A; Hambrook, D; Stahl, D; Tchanturia, K; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U

    2011-01-01

    The significance of socio-emotional factors in development and maintenance of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has been noted, but the literature is poorly integrated without clear models guiding research or treatment. This systematic review retrieved experimental studies of social-cognitive or affective processing in AN and categorised them using Ochsner's "Social-Emotional Processing Stream." Ochsner's "Processing Stream", based on healthy data, comprises five constructs: (1) acquisition of and (2) recognition and response to social-affective stimuli, (3) low-level and (4) high-level mental state inference and (5) context-sensitive emotion regulation. Thirty-seven experimental studies in Anorexia Nervosa were identified, mapping on to four of the five constructs (not Construct 3). A meta-analysis of nine affect recognition studies was conducted. AN patients demonstrated impairments in each of the four domains with preliminary reports that some difficulties are trait-like, and others ameliorate following recovery. Socio-emotional data was integrated with previous reports of neural abnormalities to generate an AN specific model of socio-emotional processing. Additional research is required for further definition and to translate experimental findings into clinical practice.

  18. Investigation of Oxytocin Secretion in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: Relationships to Temperament Personality Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Volpe, Umberto; Di Maso, Virginia; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2016-01-01

    Published studies suggested an implication of oxytocin in some temperament characteristics of personality. Therefore, we measured oxytocin secretion in 23 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), 27 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 19 healthy controls and explored the relationships between circulating oxytocin and patients' personality traits. Plasma oxytocin levels were significantly reduced in AN women but not in BN ones. In healthy women, the attachment subscale scores of the reward dependence temperament and the harm avoidance (HA) scores explained 82% of the variability in circulating oxytocin. In BN patients, plasma oxytocin resulted to be negatively correlated with HA, whereas no significant correlations emerged in AN patients. These findings confirm a dysregulation of oxytocin production in AN but not in BN and show, for the first time, a disruption of the associations between hormone levels and patients' temperament traits, which may have a role in certain deranged behaviours of eating disorder patients.

  19. Trail making task performance in inpatients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Vall, Eva; Wade, Tracey D

    2015-07-01

    Set-shifting inefficiencies have been consistently identified in adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). It is less clear to what degree similar inefficiencies are present in those with bulimia nervosa (BN). It is also unknown whether perfectionism is related to set-shifting performance. We employed a commonly used set-shifting measure, the Trail Making Test (TMT), to compare the performance of inpatients with AN and BN with a healthy control sample. We also investigated whether perfectionism predicted TMT scores. Only the BN sample showed significantly suboptimal performance, while the AN sample was indistinguishable from controls on all measures. There were no differences between the AN subtypes (restrictive or binge/purge), but group sizes were small. Higher personal standards perfectionism was associated with better TMT scores across groups. Higher concern over mistakes perfectionism predicted better accuracy in the BN sample. Further research into the set-shifting profile of individuals with BN or binge/purge behaviours is needed.

  20. Towards a physiologically based diagnosis of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Kent A; Spangler, Diane L; Backus, Elizabeth M; Balagna, Jonathan T; Burns, Keven S; Guzman, Brooke S; Hubbard, Matthew J; Lindblad, Stephanie L; Roeder, Beverly L; Ryther, Natalie E; Seawright, Max A; Tyau, Jaymie N; Williams, Dustin

    2007-11-01

    Diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), while including such physiological data as weight and the reproductive status of the individual, are primarily based on questionnaires and interviews that rely on self-report of both body-related concerns and eating-related behaviors. While some key components of eating disorders are psychological and thus introspective in nature, reliance on self-report for the assessment of eating-related behaviors and nutritional status lacks the objectivity that a physiologically based measure could provide. The development of a more physiologically informed diagnosis for AN and BN would provide a more objective means of diagnosing these disorders, provide a sound physiological basis for diagnosing subclinical disorders and could also aid in monitoring the effectiveness of treatments for these disorders. Empirically supported, physiologically based methods for diagnosing AN and BN are reviewed herein as well as promising physiological measures that may potentially be used in the diagnosis of AN and BN.

  1. Anorexia nervosa complicated by diabetes mellitus: the case for permissive hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carrie; Mehler, Philip S

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and anorexia nervosa results in an increased incidence of known diabetic complications such as retinopathy and nephropathy, presumably because blood glucose is difficult to control within the throes of comorbid anorexia nervosa. In addition, even when a diabetic patient with anorexia nervosa has committed to resolving his or her eating disorder, glucose control is again difficult and fraught with complexity and peril as will be highlighted in the following case report. Prudence dictates that strict glucose control is not indicated for the relatively short period of time that constitutes the early stage of refeeding in a patient with severe anorexia nervosa. Rather, "permissive hyperglycemia" may be the more optimal course to pursue, as a clinical strategy which is considerate of both the criticality of the refeeding treatment plan and of the long-term nature of the diabetic illness. PMID:24719247

  2. Anorexia nervosa complicated by diabetes mellitus: the case for permissive hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carrie; Mehler, Philip S

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and anorexia nervosa results in an increased incidence of known diabetic complications such as retinopathy and nephropathy, presumably because blood glucose is difficult to control within the throes of comorbid anorexia nervosa. In addition, even when a diabetic patient with anorexia nervosa has committed to resolving his or her eating disorder, glucose control is again difficult and fraught with complexity and peril as will be highlighted in the following case report. Prudence dictates that strict glucose control is not indicated for the relatively short period of time that constitutes the early stage of refeeding in a patient with severe anorexia nervosa. Rather, "permissive hyperglycemia" may be the more optimal course to pursue, as a clinical strategy which is considerate of both the criticality of the refeeding treatment plan and of the long-term nature of the diabetic illness.

  3. Neural responses to emotional faces in women recovered from anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Cowdrey, Felicity A; Harmer, Catherine J; Park, Rebecca J; McCabe, Ciara

    2012-03-31

    Impairments in emotional processing have been associated with anorexia nervosa. However, it is unknown whether neural and behavioural differences in the processing of emotional stimuli persist following recovery. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural processing of emotional faces in individuals recovered from anorexia nervosa compared with healthy controls. Thirty-two participants (16 recovered anorexia nervosa, 16 healthy controls) underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Participants viewed fearful and happy emotional faces and indicated the gender of the face presented. Whole brain analysis revealed no significant differences between the groups to the contrasts of fear versus happy and vice versa. Region of interest analysis demonstrated no significant differences in the neural response to happy or fearful stimuli between the groups in the amygdala or fusiform gyrus. These results suggest that processing of emotional faces may not be aberrant after recovery from anorexia nervosa.

  4. Avoiding medical complications during the refeeding of patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Katherine; Andersen, Debbie; Sommer, Jennifer; Winkelman, Amy; Mehler, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration are key underpinnings of the treatment protocol for patients with anorexia nervosa. While their inherent state of malnutrition and weight loss is certainly not a healthy one, ironically, the very essence of the refeeding process, if done injudiciously, can also be unsafe for patients with anorexia nervosa. In this article we will provide a review of the major complications that may arise during refeeding, how best to avoid them, and how to treat them.

  5. [Personality disorders and psychiatric comorbidity in obsessive-compulsive disorder and anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Müller, B; Wewetzer, C; Jans, T; Holtkamp, K; Herpertz, S C; Warnke, A; Remschmidt, H; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to examine the course of adolescent anorexia nervosa and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria) to compare psychiatric comorbidity and personality disorders of both groups. Because anorexia nervosa patients are mainly female, we compared them only with female OCD patients. Ten years after discharge the whole sample (32 female patients; 100%) of a group of 39 (32 female; 7 male) anorexia nervosa patients could be reexamined personally. 25 (61%) female patients of a group of 116 patients (41 female; 75 male) with obsessive-compulsive disorder were also reexamined. The anorexia nervosa patients were interviewed using the Structured Interview for Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa (SIAB [39]) to assess eating disorder symptomatology. To examine comorbid psychiatric disorders we used the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, WHO [44] and SCID-II [45] for personality disorders. One fourth of the patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 20% of the patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder had a personality disorder according to DSM-III-R. Most of them were "Cluster C"-personality disorders (AN: 28%; OCD: 20%). In the group of the female OCD patients 8% schizoid, 4% schizotype and 12% paranoid personality disorders were observed. The most prevalent psychiatric disorders were anxiety (AN: 28%; OCD: 20%) and affective disorders (AN: 16%; OCD: 16%). Our results support the view that in the course of anorexia nervosa and in obsessive-compulsive disorder there is a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity and "Cluster C"-personality disorders according to DSM-III-R. These results might confirm a model of a high vulnerability of the serotonergic neurotransmitter system in patients with anorexia nervosa or OCD.

  6. Anorexia

    MedlinePlus

    Eating disorder - anorexia nervosa ... include: Being more worried about, or paying more attention to, weight and shape Having an anxiety disorder as a child Having a negative self-image Having eating problems during infancy or early childhood Having certain ...

  7. Mental capacity to consent to treatment in anorexia nervosa: explorative study

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Unna N.; Hoek, Hans W.; van Elburg, Annemarie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mental capacity to consent to treatment in anorexia nervosa is a neglected area in clinical decision-making. Aims To examine clinical and neuropsychological parameters associated with diminished mental capacity in anorexia nervosa. Method An explorative study was conducted in 70 adult female patients with severe anorexia nervosa. Mental capacity to consent to treatment was assessed by experienced psychiatrists. Further measurements included the MacCAT-T (to assess mental capacity status), a range of clinical measures (body mass index (BMI) and comorbidity) and neuropsychological tests assessing decision-making, central coherence and set-shifting capacity. Results Diminished mental capacity occurs in a third of patients with severe anorexia nervosa and is associated with a low BMI, less appreciation of illness and treatment, previous treatment for anorexia nervosa, low social functioning and poor set shifting. Conclusions Assessment of diminished mental capacity in anorexia nervosa requires careful evaluation of not only BMI, but also the degree of appreciation of illness and treatment, history and the tendency to have a rigid thinking style. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  8. Unusual presentation of uncommon disease: anorexia nervosa presenting as wernicke-korsakoff syndrome-a case report from southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Raheel; Shoib, Sheikh; Shah, Tabindah; Bhat, Mudasir; Singh, Randhir; Mushtaq, Sahil

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa by mental health professionals can prevent development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  9. Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa among Adolescents: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Miller, Alec L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group.…

  10. An Adolescent Boy with Comorbid Anorexia Nervosa and Hashimoto Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Pehlivantürk Kızılkan, Melis; Kanbur, Nuray; Akgül, Sinem; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Low triiodothyronine syndrome is a physiological adaptation encountered in anorexia nervosa (AN) and generally improves with sufficient weight gain. However, when a primary thyroid pathology accompanies AN, both the evaluation of thyroid hormone levels and the management of the co-morbid disease become more challenging. Hashimoto thyroiditis could complicate the management of AN by causing hyper- or hypothyroidism. AN could also negatively affect the treatment of Hashimoto thyroiditis by altering body weight and metabolic rate, as well as by causing drug non-compliance. We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with comorbid AN restrictive sub-type and Hashimoto thyroiditis. In this case report, we aimed to draw attention to the challenges that could be encountered in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with AN when accompanied by Hashimoto thyroiditis. PMID:26757948

  11. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; El Ghoch, Marwan; Sartirana, Massimiliano; Calugi, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anorexia nervosa (AN), based on Beck's cognitive theory, was developed in a "generic" form in the early eighties. In recent years, however, improved knowledge of the mechanisms involved in maintaining eating disorder psychopathology has led to the development of a "specific" form of CBT, termed CBT-E (E = enhanced), designed to treat all forms of eating disorders, including AN, from outpatient to inpatient settings. Although more studies are required to assess the relative effectiveness of CBT-E with respect to other available treatments, the data indicate that in outpatient settings it is both viable and promising for adults and adolescents with AN. Encouraging results are also emerging from inpatient CBT-E, particularly in adolescents, and clinical services offering CBT-E at different levels of care are now offered in several countries around the world. However, CBT-E requires dissemination in order to become widely available to patients.

  12. [Anorexia nervosa in a worker: a case report].

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Díaz-Garrido, Ramón; Reyes-García, Rocío; Fernández-Fernández, Miguel; Garrido-Astray, María-Concepción; Muñoz-Ruipérez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    We describe the management of a case of anorexia nervosa (body mass index, -BMI-, 13,6 Kg/m2) in a bank teller. The case was detected through routine occupational health surveillance. After being evaluated by different specialists (general practitioner, psychiatrist and endocrinologist) and being closely monitored (by psychology, nursing, and occupational medicine), the worker regained weight to a near normal BMI (17 Kg/m2) in less than a year and a half. Eating disorders are a common pathology (non-occupationally related), but their high prevalence (5% of the population over a lifetime) and social and job-related impact (affecting more than 20% of cases), make them a necessary focus of attention for health promotion in the workplace. Health prevention, promotion and surveillance may be also reinforced at the workplace.

  13. Gut microeukaryotes during anorexia nervosa: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have focused on eukaryote community in the human gut. Here, the diversity of microeukaryotes in the gut microbiota of an anorexic patient was investigated using molecular and culture approaches. Case presentation A 21-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted in an intensive care unit for severe malnutrition in anorexia nervosa. One stool specimen was collected from the anorexic patient, culture and polymerase chain reaction-based explorations yielded a restricted diversity of fungi but four microeukaryotes Tetratrichomonas sp., Aspergillus ruber, Penicillium solitum and Cladosporium bruhnei previously undescribed in the human gut. Conclusions Establishing microeukaryote repertoire in gut microbiota contributes to the understanding of its role in human health. PMID:24418238

  14. Cognitive functioning, weight change and therapy in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Green, M W; Elliman, N A; Wakeling, A; Rogers, P J

    1996-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is associated with impairments in cognitive function which have been hypothesized to be fundamentally attentional in nature. The current study investigated whether therapy and weight gain affect these impairments. A group of anorexics (N = 12) completed a battery of cognitive performance tasks and self-report measures of psychopathology on three occasions, over the course of 12 weeks of in-patient treatment. A non-clinical control population (N = 17) completed the same measures. The anorexics improved on all measures of psychopathology and affective state as a result of therapy. Anorexics displayed poorer recall, reaction times, and motor speed than the control subjects. Although there was a gain in weight over the course of therapy, there was no corresponding improvement in cognitive performance. Impaired task performance in anorexics was not directly related to their psychopathology or affective state. PMID:8923343

  15. Anorexia nervosa and gender dysphoria in two adolescents.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Jennifer; Pindiprolu, Bharadwaj; Findlay, Sheri; Johnson, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Little has been published about the co-occurrence of gender dysphoria (GD) and eating disorders (ED) in adults, with no cases described in the adolescent population. The emphasis on body shape in both conditions suggests that there may be some overlap in symptomatology. We report two adolescent cases initially diagnosed with anorexia nervosa who later met criteria for GD. The drive for thinness for the 16-year-old male was associated with a wish to achieve a feminine physique whereas there was an emphasis for stunted breast growth and a desire for muscularity in the 13-year-old female. Complexities in presentation, evolution of symptoms over time, and the treatment of the two cases are discussed. Clinicians should inquire about sexual issues in the presentation of ED and should monitor for symptoms of GD, not only at initial presentation, but throughout treatment, especially as weight gain progresses.

  16. An Adolescent Boy with Comorbid Anorexia Nervosa and Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Pehlivantürk Kızılkan, Melis; Kanbur, Nuray; Akgül, Sinem; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer

    2016-03-01

    Low triiodothyronine syndrome is a physiological adaptation encountered in anorexia nervosa (AN) and generally improves with sufficient weight gain. However, when a primary thyroid pathology accompanies AN, both the evaluation of thyroid hormone levels and the management of the co-morbid disease become more challenging. Hashimoto thyroiditis could complicate the management of AN by causing hyper- or hypothyroidism. AN could also negatively affect the treatment of Hashimoto thyroiditis by altering body weight and metabolic rate, as well as by causing drug non-compliance. We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with comorbid AN restrictive sub-type and Hashimoto thyroiditis. In this case report, we aimed to draw attention to the challenges that could be encountered in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with AN when accompanied by Hashimoto thyroiditis.

  17. [Anorexia nervosa in a worker: a case report].

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Díaz-Garrido, Ramón; Reyes-García, Rocío; Fernández-Fernández, Miguel; Garrido-Astray, María-Concepción; Muñoz-Ruipérez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    We describe the management of a case of anorexia nervosa (body mass index, -BMI-, 13,6 Kg/m2) in a bank teller. The case was detected through routine occupational health surveillance. After being evaluated by different specialists (general practitioner, psychiatrist and endocrinologist) and being closely monitored (by psychology, nursing, and occupational medicine), the worker regained weight to a near normal BMI (17 Kg/m2) in less than a year and a half. Eating disorders are a common pathology (non-occupationally related), but their high prevalence (5% of the population over a lifetime) and social and job-related impact (affecting more than 20% of cases), make them a necessary focus of attention for health promotion in the workplace. Health prevention, promotion and surveillance may be also reinforced at the workplace. PMID:25584877

  18. Severe and enduring anorexia nervosa (SEED-AN): a qualitative study of patients with 20+ years of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul H; Kukucska, Roza; Guidetti, Giulia; Leavey, Gerard

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about how patients with long-term eating disorders manage their clinical problems. We carried out a preliminary qualitative study (using Thematic Analysis) of patients with severe and enduring anorexia nervosa (SEED-AN) in which we undertook recorded interviews in eight participants whose conditions had lasted 20-40 years. We found 15 principle features in physical, psychological, social, family, occupational and treatment realms. Psychological and social realms were most affected. Severe physical problems were reported. They described feelings of unworthiness, frugality regarding money and obsessive time-keeping. Persisting with negligible social networks, participants described depression and hopelessness, while somehow achieving a sense of pride at their endurance and survival in spite of the eating disorder. They emphasized the importance of professional help in managing their care. The severe and enduring description, often reserved for people with psychotic illness, is appropriately applied to SEED-AN, which has major impacts in all realms.

  19. Anorexia nervosa: the diagnosis. A postmodern ethics contribution to the bioethics debate on involuntary treatment for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Sacha

    2014-03-01

    This paper argues that there is a relationship between understandings of anorexia nervosa (AN) and how the ethical issues associated with involuntary treatment for AN are identified, framed, and addressed. By positioning AN as a construct/discourse (hereinafter "AN: the diagnosis") several ethical issues are revealed. Firstly, "AN: the diagnosis" influences how the autonomy and competence of persons diagnosed with AN are understood by decision-makers in the treatment environment. Secondly, "AN: the diagnosis" impacts on how treatment and treatment efficacy are defined and the ethical justifiability of paternalism. Thirdly, "AN: the diagnosis" can limit the opportunity for persons with AN to construct an identity that casts them as a competent person. "AN: the diagnosis" can thus inherently affirm professional knowledge and values. Postmodern professional ethics can support professionals in managing these issues by highlighting the importance of taking responsibility for professional knowledge, values, and power and embracing moral uncertainty.

  20. Severity of eating disorder symptoms related to oxytocin receptor polymorphisms in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Summer F.; Valencia, Celeste; Lutter, Michael; McAdams, Carrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone important for social behavior, and differences in psychological traits have been associated with variants of the oxytocin receptor gene in healthy people. We examined whether small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) correlated with clinical symptoms in women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and healthy comparison (HC) women. Subjects completed clinical assessments and provided DNA for analysis. Subjects were divided into four groups: HC, subjects currently with anorexia nervosa (AN-C), subjects with a history of anorexia nervosa but in long-term weight recovery (AN-WR), and subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). Five SNPs of the oxytocin receptor were examined. Minor allele carriers showed greater severity in most of the psychiatric symptoms. Importantly, the combination of having had anorexia and carrying either of the A alleles for two SNPS in the OXTR gene (rs53576, rs2254298) was associated with increased severity specifically for ED symptoms including cognitions and behaviors associated both with eating and appearance. A review of psychosocial data related to the OXTR polymorphisms examined is included in the discussion. OXTR polymorphisms may be a useful intermediate endophenotype to consider in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa. PMID:26106053

  1. Severity of eating disorder symptoms related to oxytocin receptor polymorphisms in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Summer F.; Valencia, Celeste; Lutter, Michael; McAdams, Carrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone important for social behavior, and differences in psychological traits have been associated with variants of the oxytocin receptor gene in healthy people. We examined whether small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) correlated with clinical symptoms in women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and healthy comparison (HC) women. Subjects completed clinical assessments and provided DNA for analysis. Subjects were divided into four groups: HC, subjects currently with anorexia nervosa (AN-C), subjects with a history of anorexia nervosa but in long-term weight recovery (AN-WR), and subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). Five SNPs of the oxytocin receptor were examined. Minor allele carriers showed greater severity in most of the psychiatric symptoms. Importantly, the combination of having had anorexia and carrying either of the A alleles for two SNPS in the OXTR gene (rs53576, rs2254298) was associated with increased severity specifically for ED symptoms including cognitions and behaviors associated both with eating and appearance. A review of psychosocial data related to the OXTR polymorphisms examined is included in the discussion. OXTR polymorphisms may be a useful intermediate endophenotype to consider in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa. PMID:26106053

  2. Severity of eating disorder symptoms related to oxytocin receptor polymorphisms in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Summer F; Valencia, Celeste; Lutter, Michael; McAdams, Carrie J

    2015-08-30

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone important for social behavior and differences in psychological traits have been associated with variants of the oxytocin receptor gene in healthy people. We examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) correlated with clinical symptoms in women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and healthy comparison (HC) women. Subjects completed clinical assessments and provided DNA for analysis. Subjects were divided into four groups: HC, subjects currently with anorexia nervosa (AN-C), subjects with a history of anorexia nervosa but in long-term weight recovery (AN-WR), and subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). Five SNPs of the oxytocin receptor were examined. Minor allele carriers showed greater severity in most of the psychiatric symptoms. Importantly, the combination of having had anorexia and carrying either of the A alleles for two SNPS in the OXTR gene (rs53576, rs2254298) was associated with increased severity specifically for ED symptoms including cognitions and behaviors associated both with eating and appearance. A review of psychosocial data related to the OXTR polymorphisms examined is included in the discussion. OXTR polymorphisms may be a useful intermediate endophenotype to consider in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa.

  3. What can we learn from the history of male anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengyuan

    2014-01-01

    The eating disorders literature has focussed on females and little is known of the male experience. The overall image this has generated suggests a young woman in conflict with socio-cultural pressures which associate thinness with beauty. Historical studies have examined anorexia nervosa from an entirely female focus while ignoring how diagnostic categories have shaped approaches to the male body. This paper will track the case of the male with anorexia nervosa through changing theories of causation and treatment approaches, from when the condition first emerged in 1873 to the present. In doing so, we gain a valuable new insight into how anorexia nervosa has been historically gendered and the far-reaching implications this has had for diagnosis and treatment of the male sufferer. Similarities between the sexes helped to establish male anorexia as a distinct category. However, this shifted focus away from important differences, which have yet unexplored implications in the assessment, diagnosis and management of disordered eating. Throughout history, there has been constant pressure to give a precise definition to anorexia nervosa, despite being fraught with medical uncertainties. This has resulted in inevitably harmful generalisations rooted in the dominant epidemiology. This paper reveals that anorexia nervosa is a truly global phenomenon which cannot be adequately constructed through exclusive studies of the female. There is consequently a pressing need to address the dearth of research examining eating disorders in males. PMID:25671131

  4. Hypoleptinaemia in patients with anorexia nervosa and in elite gymnasts with anorexia athletica.

    PubMed

    Matejek, N; Weimann, E; Witzel, C; Mölenkamp, G; Schwidergall, S; Böhles, H

    1999-10-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob-gene, is specifically released by adipocytes. In addition to its metabolic function it seems to affect the feedback-mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal-axis. We studied 13 female juvenile elite gymnasts with anorexia athletica (AA) and 9 female patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) regarding the relation between leptin, fat stores, and the reproductive hormone levels. Leptin levels in females with anorexia nervosa (Tanner stage B4 [median]; mean age: 17.8 +/- 1.7 years) were low (2.9 +/- 2.7 microg/L), and were related to body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.71; p = 0.03) and percentage body fat mass (r = 0.78; p = 0.01). Leptin levels of the elite gymnasts were even more decreased (1.2 +/- 0.8 microg/L) caused by the low amount of fat stores. Leptin correlated with BMI (r= 0.77; p = 0.004) and the percentage body fat mass (r = 0.6; p = 0.04). In elite gymnasts leptin levels correlated with CA showing an age-dependent increase (r= 0.59; p = 0.04). Oestradiol was secreted at a low level in both groups (AN: 25.6 +/- 17.4 microg/L; AA: 24.4 +/- 13.5 microg/L). A delay in menarche and a retarded bone maturation occurred in AA. Our results clearly show that leptin levels are low in restrained eaters. Leptin levels represent the fat stores in the body and play a permissive role for female pubertal development. There is evidence that the mechanisms leading to a dysregulation of the reproductive-axis in patients with AN are comparable with those leading to delayed puberty in juvenile elite gymnasts with AA. This implies that AN and AA are overlapping groups and AA can lead to the development of AN.

  5. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive – running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals’ wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity. PMID:26555618

  6. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-10-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive - running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals' wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity.

  7. Phobic memory and somatic vulnerabilities in anorexia nervosa: a necessary unity?

    PubMed Central

    Myslobodsky, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a clinically significant illness that may be associated with permanent medical complications involving almost every organ system. The paper raises a question whether some of them are associated with premorbid vulnerability such as subcellular ion channel abnormalities ('channelopathy') that determines the clinical expression of the bodily response to self-imposed malnutrition. Aberrant channels emerge as a tempting, if rather speculative alternative to the notion of cognitively-driven neurotransmitter modulation deficit in anorexia nervosa. The concept of channelopathies is in keeping with some characteristics of anorexia nervosa, such as a genetically-based predisposition to hypophagia, early onset, cardiac abnormalities, an appetite-enhancing efficacy of some antiepileptic drugs, and others. The purpose of this article is to stimulate further basic research of ion channel biophysics in relation to restrictive anorexia. PMID:16144551

  8. Partially restored resting-state functional connectivity in women recovered from anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Ilka; Geisler, Daniel; Tam, Friederike; King, Joseph A.; Ritschel, Franziska; Seidel, Maria; Bernardoni, Fabio; Murr, Julia; Goschke, Thomas; Calhoun, Vince D.; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background We have previously shown increased resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in the frontoparietal network (FPN) and the default mode network (DMN) in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Based on these findings we investigated within-network rsFC in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa to examine whether these abnormalities are a state or trait marker of the disease. To extend the understanding of functional connectivity in patients with anorexia nervosa, we also estimated rsFC between large-scale networks. Methods Girls and women recovered from anorexia nervosa and pair-wise, age- and sex-matched healthy controls underwent a resting-state fMRI scan. Using independent component analyses (ICA), we isolated the FPN, DMN and salience network. We used standard comparisons as well as a hypothesis-based approach to test the findings of our previous rsFC study in this recovered cohort. Temporal correlations between network time-course pairs were computed to investigate functional network connectivity (FNC). Results Thirty-one patients recovered from anorexia nervosa and 31 controls participated in our study. Standard group comparisons revealed reduced rsFC between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the FPN in the recovered group. Using a hypothesis-based approach we extended the previous finding of increased rsFC between the angular gyrus and the FPN in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa. No group differences in FNC were revealed. Limitations The study design did not allow us to conclude that the difference found in rsFC constitutes a scar effect of the disease. Conclusion This study suggests that some abnormal rsFC patterns found in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa normalize after long-term weight restoration, while distorted rsFC in the FPN, a network that has been associated with cognitive control, may constitute a trait marker of the disorder. PMID:27045551

  9. An Adolescent Case of Citrin Deficiency With Severe Anorexia Mimicking Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satsuki; Yazaki, Masahide; Yamada, Shinji; Fukuyama, Tetsuhiro; Inui, Akio; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2015-08-01

    We report a 12-year-old female citrin-deficient patient presenting with severe anorexia and body weight loss, mimicking the restricting type of anorexia nervosa (AN). She showed normal development until age 10 years when she started to play volleyball at school. She then became gradually anorexic, and her growth was stunted. At age 12, she was admitted to hospital because of severe anorexia and thinness. She was first thought to have AN, and drip infusion of glucose solution and high-calorie drinks were given, but her condition deteriorated further. She had a history of neonatal hepatitis and was therefore suspected to have citrin deficiency (CD). Genetic analysis of SLC25A13 revealed that she was compound heterozygous for 851del4 and IVS16ins3kb, and a diagnosis of CD was made. A low-carbohydrate diet with oral intake of arginine and ursodeoxycholic acid was started, and her condition gradually improved. The clinical features in our patient were similar to those of AN, and therefore AN may also be an important clinical sign in adolescent patients with CD.

  10. Interleukin-7 Plasma Levels in Human Differentiate Anorexia Nervosa, Constitutional Thinness and Healthy Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Natacha; Viltart, Odile; Loyens, Anne; Bruchet, Céline; Nadin, Katia; Wolowczuk, Isabelle; Estour, Bruno; Galusca, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine involved in energy homeostasis as demonstrated in rodents. Anorexia nervosa is characterized by restrained eating behavior despite adaptive orexigenic regulation profile including high ghrelin plasma levels. Constitutional thinness is a physiological condition of resistance to weight gain with physiological anorexigenic profile including high Peptide YY plasma level. Healthy obesity can be considered as a physiological state of resistance to weight loss with opposite appetite regulating profile to constitutional thinness including low Peptide YY plasma level. No studies in IL-7 are yet available in those populations. Therefore we evaluated circadian plasma levels of IL-7 in anorexia nervosa compared to constitutional thinness, healthy obese and control females. Materials and Methods 10 restrictive-type anorexia nervosa women, 5 bingeing/purging anorexia nervosa woman, 5 recovered restrictive anorexia nervosa women, 4 bulimic females, 10 constitutional thinness women, 7 healthy obese females, and 10 normal weight women controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, performed in endocrinology unit and academic laboratory. Twelve-point circadian profiles of plasma IL-7 levels were measured in each subject. Results 24h mean IL-7 plasma levels (pg/ml, mean±SEM) were decreased in restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (123.4±14.4, p<0.0037), bingeing/purging anorexia nervosa (24.2±5.6, p<0.001), recovered restrictive anorexia nervosa (64.2±16.1, p = 0.01) and healthy obese patients (51±3.2, p<0.001) compared to controls (187.7±28.6). Bulimic patients (197.4±42.7) and constitutional thinness patients (264.3±35.8) were similar to controls. Conclusions Low IL-7 is part of the adaptive profile in restrictive-type anorexia nervosa, confirming its difference with constitutional thinness. Healthy obesity, with low IL-7, is once again in mirror image of constitutional thinness with normal high IL-7. PMID:27611669

  11. Anorexia nervosa as a case of complex instrumental conditioning.

    PubMed

    Wyrwicka, W

    1984-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) can be considered a result of complex instrumental conditioning. It is postulated that in healthy nonsatiated individuals, the sight and smell of the preferred food, acting as a conditioned stimulus (food CS), activates a memory pattern of associations "eating--desirable sensory input" (approach pattern). This leads to the instrumental reaction of eating which is reinforced by sensory satisfaction. In victims of AN, in addition to the approach pattern the food CS activates another pattern of associations consisting of such components as "eating--obesity--failure" and " noneating --thinness--success" (avoidance pattern). The establishment of the avoidance pattern depends on such factors as social preferences and pressures to be slim, inborn dispositions, and personal psychological problems. If the activation of the avoidance pattern prevails over the activation of the approach pattern, the individual refrains from eating. The refusal to eat is here an instrumental avoidance reaction; its performance is reinforced by satisfaction derived from successful self-control and losing weight. A prolonged activation of the avoidance pattern leads to malnutrition and ultimately to death. In cases in which the approach pattern and the avoidance pattern are frequently activated simultaneously to the same degree, a neural conflict may develop. In a variation called "bulimia nervosa," an activation of the approach pattern alternates with the activation of the avoidance pattern. First, overeating takes place; it is reinforced by oral-gastric satisfaction. Then, the avoidance reaction of self-induced vomiting or purging follows; it is reinforced by satisfaction derived from preventing weight gain.

  12. Dying on the Inside: What Every Teacher Needs to Know About Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and the Individual Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Marc

    This document provides teachers with information on the identifying features of anorexia nervosa and bulimia and suggests steps which teachers can take to encourage individual children in more positive behavior. The paper makes clear distinctions between anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimarexia, describing the symptoms of each disorder. It is…

  13. The inversion of the fall: on identity construction in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sollberger, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa can be comprehended as an illness in the broader context of Western culture. The myth of the Fall, narrating a forbidden act of eating, provides a symbolic background of a philosophical-anthropological comprehension of the identity of man, which frames a clinically relevant point of view of anorexia nervosa. The formation of identity in its broader anthropological sense and particularly with people suffering from anorexia nervosa is subjected to a philosophical and psychological analysis consulting the relevant philosophical, sociological and psychodynamic literature. The order of eating in terms of interdiction and disobedience anthropologically constitutes the identity of men: by ignoring the divine taboo, men can reach consciousness and culture. Philosophy and psychoanalytical theory have focused on this process regarding an emerging capacity to symbolize and on its relation to emancipation and the pursuit of autonomy. Under postmodern conditions with a decline of stable cultural value systems and traditional structures the process of an emancipatory identity construction becomes critical. Surrogates replace missing values; thus, injunctions such as to enjoy substitute interdictions. This paper sheds light on the impact of these cultural conditions and their postmodern changes on the identity construction of anorexia nervosa. Moreover, implications for psychotherapeutic treatment are outlined. Besides the medico-scientific models, a multifaceted understanding of anorexia nervosa has to consider cultural contexts and symbolic processes that matter in the disorder in order to provide a broader background for the treatment approach of the anorectic patient. PMID:24457444

  14. [An anorexia nervosa case and an approach to this case with pharmacotherapy and psychodrama techniques].

    PubMed

    Ozdel, Osman; Ateşci, Figen; Oğuzhanoğlu, Nalan K

    2003-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa in an eating disorder that primarily affects female adolescents and is more commonly seen in westernized countries. Although it is a sociocultural problem of developed societies, nowadays it is also increasing rapidly in developing cultures such as Turkey. Difficulties in the treatment of anorexia nervosa have directed clinicians to understand the disorder better. Although it is well known that various factors play a role in the etiology of anorexia nervosa, psychodynamic factors also have considerable importance. In addition, social and familial interactions contribute to the development of anorexia nervosa. In the light of these facts, treatment with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy might be used to cure this disorder. In this article, the definitive features and process of anorexia nervosa along with its psychodynamics were discussed on the basis of a case. In the treatment of the patient, psychodrama techniques with drugs were thought to be useful. The patient became aware of the unfavourable relationship and improved by the use of this method. Thus she gained emotional-cognitive insight.

  15. Understanding the Relation between Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa in a Swedish National Twin Sample

    PubMed Central

    Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura; Root, Tammy L.; Pisetsky, Emily M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Background We present a bivariate twin analysis of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) to determine the extent to which shared genetic and environmental factors contribute to liability to these disorders. Method Focusing on females from the Swedish Twin study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) (N=7000), we calculated heritability estimates for narrow and broad AN and BN and estimated their genetic correlation. Results In the full model, the heritability estimate for narrow AN was (a2 = .57; 95% CI: .00, .81) and for narrow BN (a2 = .62; 95% CI: .08, .70) with the remaining variance accounted for by unique environmental factors. Shared environmental factors estimates were (c2 = .00; 95% CI: .00, .67) for AN and (c2 = .00; 95% CI: .00, .40) for BN. Moderate additive genetic (.46) and unique environmental (.42) correlations between AN and BN were observed. Heritability estimates for broad AN were lower (a2 = .29; 95% CI: .04, .43) than for narrow AN, but estimates for broad BN were similar to narrow BN. The genetic correlation for broad AN and BN was .79 and the unique environmental correlation was .44. Conclusions We highlight the contribution of additive genetic factors to both narrow and broad AN and BN and demonstrate a moderate overlap of both genetic and unique environmental factors that influence the two conditions. Common concurrent and sequential comorbidity of AN and BN can in part be accounted for by shared genetic and environmental influences on liability although independent factors also operative. PMID:19828139

  16. Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder in Midlife and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Elran-Barak, Roni; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Benyamini, Yael; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Hill, Laura L; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    We examined eating disorders in midlife and beyond by comparing frequency of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED) among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals and younger controls. We also compared demographic and eating disorder-related characteristics across diagnoses and age groups. Participants included 2,118 treatment-seeking adults who self-reported their eating-related symptoms on the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Results showed that percent of patients with BN was significantly lower whereas percent of patients with BED and OSFED was significantly higher among midlife relative to younger patients. Percent of patients with AN did not differ between midlife and younger patients. Additionally, midlife and younger patients with BED and OSFED differed on several demographic (e.g., marital status) and eating disorder-related characteristics (e.g., BMI, compulsive exercising). This study suggests that BN is less common whereas BED and OSFED are more common among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals relative to younger controls. In addition, AN and BN present fairly similarly whereas BED and OSFED present fairly differently among midlife patients relative to younger controls. Attention to these differences and similarities is necessary to understand eating disorders in midlife.

  17. Quantitative evidence for distinct cognitive impairment in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Zakzanis, Konstantine K; Campbell, Zachariah; Polsinelli, Angelina

    2010-03-01

    It is generally agreed that at least some aspects of abnormal eating behaviour is indeed due in part to disordered cognition. The accumulated literature illustrates cognitive impairment in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Yet beyond being inconsistent, these independent studies also do not reveal the magnitude of impairment within and across studies and fail to give due consideration to the magnitude of impairment so as to understand the severity and breadth of impairment and/or differences in cognitive profiles between patients with AN and BN. Hence, the present review on the subject sought to articulate the magnitude of cognitive impairment in patients with AN and BN by quantitatively synthesizing the existing literature using meta-analytic methodology. The results demonstrate modest evidence of cognitive impairment specific to AN and BN that is related to body mass index in AN in terms of its severity, and is differentially impaired between disorders. Together, these results suggest that disturbed cognition is figural in the presentation of eating disorders and may serve to play an integral role in its cause and maintenance. Implications of these findings with respects to future research are discussed.

  18. Functional and effective connectivity of anterior insula in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Ran; Ku, Jeonghun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Hyeongrae; Jung, Young-Chul

    2012-07-19

    The anterior insula has been proposed to play a crucial role in eating disorders. However, it is still poorly understood how the anterior insula is involved in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), which are characterized by opposite motivational responses to food. We applied a cue-reactivity paradigm using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging in women with AN (N=18) and BN (N=20) and age-matched healthy controls (N=20). We defined the left anterior insula as a region-of-interest and performed seed-based functional connectivity and effective connectivity MRI analysis. In response to food images compared to non-food images, both the AN group and BN group demonstrated increased activity in the left anterior insula. In the AN group, the left anterior insula demonstrated significant interactions with the right insula and right inferior frontal gyrus. In the BN group, the left anterior insula demonstrated significant interactions with the medial orbitofrontal cortex. The distinct patterns of functional and effective connectivity of the anterior insula may contribute to the different clinical features of AN and BN.

  19. Nutritional Adequacy of Dietary Intake in Women with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Raatz, Susan K.; Jahns, Lisa; Johnson, LuAnn K.; Crosby, Ross; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott; Peterson, Carol; Le Grange, Daniel; Wonderlich, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nutrient intake of anorexia nervosa (AN) patients is essential for the treatment. Therefore, estimates of total energy and nutrient consumption were made in a group of young women (19 to 30 years) with restricting and binge purge subtypes of AN participating in an ecological momentary assessment study. Participants completed three nonconsecutive 24-hour diet recalls. Mean nutrient intakes were stratified by subtype and by quartiles of energy intake and compared to the age specific Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) levels, as well as to the reported intakes from the What We Eat In America (WWEIA) dietary survey 2011–2012. Reported intake was determined for energy, macronutrients, and micronutrients. The mean body mass index (BMI) for all participants was 17.2 ± 0.1 kg/m2. Reported nutrient intake was insufficient for participants in quartiles 1–3 of both AN subtypes when compared to the DRIs. Intake reported by participants in quartile 4 of both subgroups met requirements for most nutrients and even met or exceeded estimated energy needs. Counseling of AN patients should be directed to total food consumption to improve energy intake and to reduce individual nutritional gaps. PMID:25988761

  20. Altered social attention in anorexia nervosa during real social interaction.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Mario; Castelli, Luigi; Scatturin, Pietro; Carli, Lorenza; Todisco, Patrizia; Palomba, Daniela; Galfano, Giovanni

    2016-03-17

    The capacity to devote attentional resources in response to body-related signals provided by others is still largely unexplored in individuals with Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Here, we tested this capacity through a novel paradigm that mimics a social interaction with a real partner. Healthy individuals (Experiment 1) and individuals with AN (Experiment 2) completed a task with another person which consisted in performing, alternatively, rapid aiming movements to lateralised targets. Generally, this task leads to a form of Inhibition of Return (IOR), which consists of longer reaction times when an individual has to respond to a location previously searched by either himself (individual IOR) or by the partner (social IOR) as compared to previously unexplored locations. IOR is considered as an important attentional mechanism that promotes an effective exploration of the environment during social interaction. Here, healthy individuals displayed both individual and social IOR that were both reliable and of the same magnitude. Individuals with AN displayed a non-significant individual IOR but a reliable social IOR that was also significantly stronger than individual IOR. These results suggest the presence of a reduced sensitivity in processing body-related stimuli conveyed by oneself in individuals with AN which is reflected in action-based attentional processes.

  1. Perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa: Novel Performance Based Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Samantha; Yiend, Jenny; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tchanturia, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Existing research into perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is limited by a reliance upon self-report measures. This study used novel performance based measures to investigate whether there is behavioural evidence for elevated perfectionism in AN. 153 participants took part in the study – 81 with a diagnosis of AN and 72 healthy controls (HCs). Participants completed two performance based tasks assessing perfectionism – a text replication task and a bead sorting task – along with self-report measures of perfectionism. Significant group differences were observed on both tasks. In the text replication task the AN group took significantly longer compared with healthy controls (p = 0.03, d = 0.36) and produced significantly higher quality copies (p = <0.01, d = 0.45). In the bead sorting task, there was a trend towards more participants in the AN group choosing to check their work compared with the HC group (p = 0.07, d = 0.30) and the AN group took significantly longer checking than those in the HC group (p = <0.01, d = 0.45). Only copy quality uniquely predicted scores on self report measures of perfectionism. This study provides empirically tested evidence of elevated performance based perfectionism in AN compared with a healthy control group. PMID:25360690

  2. Altered social attention in anorexia nervosa during real social interaction

    PubMed Central

    Dalmaso, Mario; Castelli, Luigi; Scatturin, Pietro; Carli, Lorenza; Todisco, Patrizia; Palomba, Daniela; Galfano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to devote attentional resources in response to body-related signals provided by others is still largely unexplored in individuals with Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Here, we tested this capacity through a novel paradigm that mimics a social interaction with a real partner. Healthy individuals (Experiment 1) and individuals with AN (Experiment 2) completed a task with another person which consisted in performing, alternatively, rapid aiming movements to lateralised targets. Generally, this task leads to a form of Inhibition of Return (IOR), which consists of longer reaction times when an individual has to respond to a location previously searched by either himself (individual IOR) or by the partner (social IOR) as compared to previously unexplored locations. IOR is considered as an important attentional mechanism that promotes an effective exploration of the environment during social interaction. Here, healthy individuals displayed both individual and social IOR that were both reliable and of the same magnitude. Individuals with AN displayed a non-significant individual IOR but a reliable social IOR that was also significantly stronger than individual IOR. These results suggest the presence of a reduced sensitivity in processing body-related stimuli conveyed by oneself in individuals with AN which is reflected in action-based attentional processes. PMID:26984784

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in anorexia nervosa and bulimia.

    PubMed

    Devlin, M J; Walsh, B T; Katz, J L; Roose, S P; Linkie, D M; Wright, L; Vande Wiele, R; Glassman, A H

    1989-04-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) exhibit neuroendocrine abnormalities that may result solely from emaciation or may reflect defective endocrine mechanisms which are intrinsic to disordered eating even in the absence of starvation. To distinguish these possibilities, we have studied indices of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) function in 9 patients with AN, 12 normal weight patients with bulimia and recent or current oligomenorrhea, and 8 normal weight controls. Measurement of 24-hour luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion with 30-min sampling revealed significantly fewer LH secretory spikes and a trend toward lower mean 24-hour LH levels in both bulimic and anorectic patients than in controls. Stimulation with gonadotropin releasing hormone produced elevated LH responses in the bulimic group and blunted LH responses in the anorectic group. Stimulation with estradiol revealed diminished LH augmentative responses and a trend toward diminished follicle stimulating hormone augmentative responses among bulimic as well as AN patients compared to controls. In each instance, the bulimic group tended to show within-group heterogeneity, with some individuals falling within the AN range. These findings suggest that HPG axis abnormalities in eating disordered patients cannot entirely be attributed to emaciation and that factors other than subnormal weight contribute to disturbed hypothalamic-pituitary functioning in these patients.

  4. Neuropsychological impairments in anorexia nervosa: a spanish sample pilot study.

    PubMed

    Oltra-Cucarella, Javier; Espert, Raul; Rojo, Luís; Jacas, Carlos; Guillén, Verónica; Moreno, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed at obtaining a profile of neuropsychological impairments in young Spanish participants with anorexia nervosa (AN) to demonstrate that right-hemisphere and frontal capacity impairments are present not only in the acute phase but also after weight recovery in a Spanish sample compared with a healthy control group. Twelve patients with AN in the acute phase (body mass index [BMI] < 17) were compared both to 16 healthy control subjects and 12 weight-recovered AN participants (BMI ≥ 17) matched by age, IQ, and educational level by utilizing a wide neuropsychological battery. Differences were found between AN groups only for long-term verbal memory, which worsens as BMI increases. Among participants with AN as a group, results showed differences in speed of information processing, working memory, visual memory, and inhibition, unrelated to attentional capabilities. We cannot support the hypothesis of a specific right cerebral dysfunction in patients with AN. A general cognitive dysfunction, primarily in information processing, working memory, visual and verbal memory, as well as frontal impairments such as impulsivity and poor behavioral control, appeared unrelated to BMI. We support previous works affirming that neuropsychological impairments in AN are not a consequence of the illness but a risk factor for it to develop. PMID:25084841

  5. Resting Energy Expenditure in Anorexia Nervosa: Measured versus Estimated

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Alberti, Marta; Capelli, Carlo; Calugi, Simona; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study was to compare the resting energy expenditure (REE) measured by the Douglas bag method with the REE estimated with the FitMate method, the Harris-Benedict equation, and the Müller et al. equation for individuals with BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 in a severe group of underweight patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods. 15 subjects with AN participated in the study. The Douglas bag method and the FitMate method were used to measure REE and the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry to assess body composition after one day of refeeding. Results. FitMate method and the Müller et al. equation gave an accurate REE estimation, while the Harris-Benedict equation overestimated the REE when compared with the Douglas bag method. Conclusion. The data support the use of the FitMate method and the Müller et al. equation, but not the Harris-Benedict equation, to estimate REE in AN patients after short-term refeeding. PMID:21941638

  6. Role of the ventral striatum in developing anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Fladung, A-K; Schulze, U M E; Schöll, F; Bauer, K; Grön, G

    2013-01-01

    Functional imaging data in adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) support a dysfunctional signal in the ventral striatum as neural signature of AN. In the present study, development of this signal was investigated with the prediction that a characteristic pattern of ventral–striatal signalling will be shown in response to cues associated with food restriction that reflects the evolvement of starvation dependence over time. The signal was assessed in adolescent patients with AN, whose duration of illness was about five times shorter relative to the adult sample. During functional magnetic resonance imaging subjects were required to estimate weights of body images (underweight, normal weight, overweight) and to process each stimulus in a self-referring way. Relative to age-matched, young healthy controls, underweight stimuli were already associated with greater activity of the ventral striatum, and processing of normal-weight stimuli elicited already reduced signalling. Subjective preferences showed exactly the same pattern of results. Relative to adult AN, the present data reveal a developing dysfunctional signal that, if untreated, will essentially contribute to the maintenance of AN. We discuss putative mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the development of AN, and also deduce new hypotheses about the involvement of the midbrain dopamine system, of which illness-related alterations may contribute to the development of AN. PMID:24150224

  7. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for anorexia nervosa: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Galsworthy-Francis, Lisa; Allan, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of psychological therapies for anorexia nervosa (AN) is inconsistent. There have been no systematic reviews solely on the effectiveness for Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for AN. This review aimed to synthesise and appraise the recent evidence for CBT as a treatment for AN. Using specific search criteria, 16 relevant articles were identified which evaluated CBT alone or as part of a broader randomised/non-randomised trial. Various formats of CBT were utilised in the reviewed papers. Studies were evaluated using established quality criteria. The evidence reviewed suggested that CBT demonstrated effectiveness as a means of improving treatment adherence and minimising dropout amongst patients with AN. While CBT appeared to demonstrate some improvements in key outcomes (body mass index, eating-disorder symptoms, broader psychopathology), it was not consistently superior to other treatments (including dietary counselling, non-specific supportive management, interpersonal therapy, behavioural family therapy). Numerous methodological limitations apply to the available evidence. Further research and ongoing review is needed to evaluate the settings, patient groups and formats in which CBT may be effective as a treatment for AN.

  8. Nutritional adequacy of dietary intake in women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Raatz, Susan K; Jahns, Lisa; Johnson, LuAnn K; Crosby, Ross; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott; Peterson, Carol; Le Grange, Daniel; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2015-05-15

    Understanding nutrient intake of anorexia nervosa (AN) patients is essential for the treatment. Therefore, estimates of total energy and nutrient consumption were made in a group of young women (19 to 30 years) with restricting and binge purge subtypes of AN participating in an ecological momentary assessment study. Participants completed three nonconsecutive 24-hour diet recalls. Mean nutrient intakes were stratified by subtype and by quartiles of energy intake and compared to the age specific Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) levels, as well as to the reported intakes from the What We Eat In America (WWEIA) dietary survey 2011-2012. Reported intake was determined for energy, macronutrients, and micronutrients. The mean body mass index (BMI) for all participants was 17.2 ± 0.1 kg/m2. Reported nutrient intake was insufficient for participants in quartiles 1-3 of both AN subtypes when compared to the DRIs. Intake reported by participants in quartile 4 of both subgroups met requirements for most nutrients and even met or exceeded estimated energy needs. Counseling of AN patients should be directed to total food consumption to improve energy intake and to reduce individual nutritional gaps.

  9. Impaired processing of self-face recognition in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hirot, France; Lesage, Marine; Pedron, Lya; Meyer, Isabelle; Thomas, Pierre; Cottencin, Olivier; Guardia, Dewi

    2016-03-01

    Body image disturbances and massive weight loss are major clinical symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN). The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of body changes and eating attitudes on self-face recognition ability in AN. Twenty-seven subjects suffering from AN and 27 control participants performed a self-face recognition task (SFRT). During the task, digital morphs between their own face and a gender-matched unfamiliar face were presented in a random sequence. Participants' self-face recognition failures, cognitive flexibility, body concern and eating habits were assessed with the Self-Face Recognition Questionnaire (SFRQ), Trail Making Test (TMT), Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) and Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), respectively. Subjects suffering from AN exhibited significantly greater difficulties than control participants in identifying their own face (p = 0.028). No significant difference was observed between the two groups for TMT (all p > 0.1, non-significant). Regarding predictors of self-face recognition skills, there was a negative correlation between SFRT and body mass index (p = 0.01) and a positive correlation between SFRQ and EDI-2 (p < 0.001) or BSQ (p < 0.001). Among factors involved, nutritional status and intensity of eating disorders could play a part in impaired self-face recognition. PMID:26420298

  10. [Nursing intervention in the family treatment plan for anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Torralbas-Ortega, Jordi; Puntí-Vidal, Joaquim; Arias-Núñez, Eloisa; Naranjo-Díaz, M Carmen; Palomino-Escrivá, Jezabel; Lorenzo-Capilla, Angel

    2011-01-01

    One of the main nursing interventions in the treatment of eating disorders is family psycho-education, an essential aspect of mental health treatment. This article describes and analyses the difficulties families expressed in the performance of a treatment plan for patients hospitalised for anorexia nervosa (AN) in the adolescent Day Hospital of Mental Health, of the Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí, during 2009. Data was also collected data on professional interventions, performed by the nurse assigned to this unit, in order to group and categorise them, and as an aid to nursing intervention. A total of 10 families of the 10 patients admitted with a diagnosis of AN were included in the study period. In all cases, the patients were young women who had received treatment before in an Outpatient Unit, with partial or no response to the treatment. The difficulties expressed by the families were grouped into five categories from content analysis: problems in preparing a balanced diet, problems as they are unable to handle the behaviour and emotions of the patient, problems because as there are no previous family eating habits, problems because there is no family control or supervision, and problems with the established guidelines. Specific individualised interventions are proposed for developing and promoting a nursing care plan, and assessing the results.

  11. Contemporary views on the genetics of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shih, Pei-an Betty; Woodside, D Blake

    2016-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious mental illness characterized by severe dietary restriction that leads to high rates of morbidity, chronicity, and mortality. Unfortunately, effective treatment is lacking and few options are available. High rates of familial aggregation and significant heritability suggested that the complex etiology of AN is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. In this paper, we review studies that reported common and rare genetic variation that influence susceptibility of AN through candidate gene studies, genome-wide association studies, and sequencing-based studies. We also discuss gene expression, methylation, imaging genetics, and pharmacogenetics to demonstrate that these studies have collectively advanced our knowledge of how genetic variation contributes to AN susceptibility and clinical course. Lastly, we highlight the importance of gene by environment interactions (G×E) and share our enthusiasm for the use of nutritional genomic approaches to elucidate the interaction among nutrients, metabolic intermediates, and genetic variation in AN. A deeper understanding of how nutrition alters genome stability, how genetic variation influences uptake and metabolism of nutrients, and how response to food components affects disordered eating, will lead to personalized dietary interventions and effective nutraceutical and pharmacological treatments for AN. PMID:26944296

  12. The perception of affective touch in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Crucianelli, Laura; Cardi, Valentina; Treasure, Janet; Jenkinson, Paul M; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2016-05-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by restricted eating, fears of gaining weight, and body image distortions. The etiology remains unknown; however impairments in social cognition and reward circuits contribute to the onset and maintenance of the disorder. One possibility is that AN is associated with reduced perceived pleasantness during social interactions. We therefore examined the perception of interpersonal, 'affective touch' and its social modulation in AN. We measured the perceived pleasantness of light, dynamic stroking touches applied to the forearm of 25 AN patients and 30 healthy controls using C Tactile (CT) afferents-optimal (3cm/s) and non-optimal (18cm/s) velocities, while simultaneously displaying images of faces showing rejecting, neutral and accepting expressions. CT-optimal touch, but not CT non-optimal touch, elicited significantly lower pleasantness ratings in AN patients compared with healthy controls. Pleasantness ratings were modulated by facial expressions in both groups in a similar fashion; namely, presenting socially accepting faces increased the perception of touch pleasantness more than neutral and rejecting faces. Our findings suggest that individuals with AN have a disordered, CT-based affective touch system. This impairment may be linked to their weakened interoceptive perception and distorted body representation. PMID:27137964

  13. Functional connectivity correlates of response inhibition impairment in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Collantoni, Enrico; Michelon, Silvia; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Titton, Francesca; Manara, Renzo; Clementi, Maurizio; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by high levels of cognitive control and behavioral perseveration. The present study aims at exploring inhibitory control abilities and their functional connectivity correlates in patients with AN. Inhibitory control - an executive function that allows the realization of adaptive behavior according to environmental contingencies - has been assessed by means of the Stop-Signal paradigm. The study involved 155 patients with lifetime AN and 102 healthy women. A subsample underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and was genotyped for COMT and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. AN patients showed an impaired response inhibition and a disruption of the functional connectivity of the ventral attention circuit, a neural network implicated in behavioral response when a stimulus occurs unexpected. The 5-HTTLPR genotype appears to significantly interact with the functional connectivity of ventral attention network in explaining task performance in both patients and controls, suggesting a role of the serotoninergic system in mechanisms of response selection. The disruption of the ventral attention network in patients with AN suggests lower efficiency of bottom-up signal filtering, which might be involved in difficulties to adapt behavioral responses to environmental needs. Our findings deserve further research to confirm their scientific and therapeutic implications.

  14. Cognitive Profile of Children and Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Kjaersdam Telléus, Gry; Jepsen, Jens Richardt; Bentz, Mette; Christiansen, Eva; Jensen, Signe O W; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2015-01-01

    Objective Few studies of cognitive functioning in children and adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) have been conducted. The aim of this study was to examine the neurocognitive and intelligence profile of this clinical group. Method The study was a matched case–control (N = 188), multi-centre study including children and adolescents with AN (N = 94) and healthy control participants (N = 94). Results The results suggest that Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III/Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III) in this patient group is close to the normal population mean of 100. Individuals with AN exhibited significantly worse performance in nonverbal intelligence functions (i.e. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III/Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Perceptual Organization Index) and in verbal memory (Test of Memory and Learning—Second Edition, Memory for Stories) and motor speed (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery, Simple and Choice Reaction Time) compared with healthy control participants. No significant difference in set-shifting ability (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery, Intra-Extra Dimensional Set Shift and Trail Making Test B) was found. Conclusions Inefficiency in nonverbal intelligence functions and in specific cognitive functions was found in this study of children and adolescents with AN. © 2014 The Authors. European Eating Disorders Review published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25504443

  15. An investigation of habit learning in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Godier, Lauren R; de Wit, Sanne; Pinto, Anthony; Steinglass, Joanna E; Greene, Ashley L; Scaife, Jessica; Gillan, Claire M; Walsh, B Timothy; Simpson, Helen-Blair; Park, Rebecca J

    2016-10-30

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterised by compulsive behaviour, such as self-starvation and excessive exercise, which develop in the pursuit of weight-loss. Recent theory suggests that once established, compulsive weight-loss behaviours in AN may become habitual. In two parallel studies, we measured whether individuals with AN showed a bias toward habits using two outcome-devaluation tasks. In Study 1, 23 women with AN (restrictive and binge/purge subtypes), and 18 healthy controls (HC) completed the slips-of-action paradigm, designed to assess reward-based habits. In Study 2, 13 women with restrictive AN, 14 women recovered from restrictive AN, and 17 female HC participants completed the slips-of-action paradigm, and an avoidance paradigm, designed to assess aversive habits. AN participants showed no deficit relative to HCs in the ability to use feedback to respond correctly to stimuli. Following devaluation of outcomes, all groups in both studies were equally able to withhold inappropriate responses, suggesting no deficit in the balance between goal-directed and habitual control of behaviour in these tasks in AN. These results suggest that individuals with AN do not show a generalised tendency to rely on habits in two outcome-devaluation tasks. Future research is needed to investigate the potential role of disorder-specific habits in the maintenance of behaviour in AN. PMID:27497292

  16. Postmortem Diagnosis of Anorexia Nervosa: An Endocrinological and Immunohistochemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Akiko; Tokunaga, Itsuo; Nishimura, Akiyoshi; Kubo, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    A female in her 30s was found dead after a fire. She was severely emaciated and had been diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN) about 5 years ago, but had not been treated recently. Therefore, we investigated not only her cause of death but also her condition of AN. Some of her organs weighed less than normal although no clear lesions were observed. In the pituitary gland, the number of follicle-stimulating hormone-immunopositive cells was markedly decreased although a normal number of thyroid-stimulating hormone-positive cells were detected. A histological examination of the ovary suggested that she had been suffering from amenorrhea. The thyroid gland was atrophic, and marked variations in follicle size were observed. Because we could not obtain enough volume of her blood for endocrinological examinations, we tried to investigate her endocrinological condition by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical staining detected decreased triiodothyronine immunoreactivity and normal thyroxine immunoreactivity. The adrenal glands were also atrophic. Based on these findings, it was considered that she had been suffering from AN at the time of her death. The autopsy and other findings revealed that she had died of burning with carbon monoxide intoxication. J. Med. Invest. 63: 305-309, August, 2016. PMID:27644577

  17. Executive functioning in anorexia nervosa patients and their unaffected relatives.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Elisa; Fadda, Emma; Cavallini, Maria Cristina; Martoni, Riccardo Maria; Erzegovesi, Stefano; Bellodi, Laura

    2013-08-15

    Formal genetic studies suggested a substantial genetic influence for anorexia nervosa (AN), but currently results are inconsistent. The use of the neurocognitive endophenotype approach may facilitate our understanding of the AN pathophysiology. We investigated decision-making, set-shifting and planning in AN patients (n=29) and their unaffected relatives (n=29) compared to healthy probands (n=29) and their relatives (n=29). The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), the Tower of Hanoi (ToH) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) were administered. Concordance rates and heritability indices were also calculated in probands/relatives. Impaired performance on the IGT and the WCST were found in both AN probands and their relatives, although planning appeared to be preserved. The IGT heritability index suggested the presence of genetic effects that influence this measure. No evidence for genetic effects was found for the WCST. The results suggest the presence of a shared dysfunctional executive profile in women with AN and their unaffected relatives, characterized by deficient decision-making and set-shifting. Concordance analysis strongly suggests that these impairments aggregate in AN families, supporting the hypothesis that they may constitute biological markers for AN. Decision-making impairment presents a moderate heritability, suggesting that decision-making may be a candidate endophenotype for AN. PMID:23122554

  18. The functional significance of shyness in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Winecoff, Amy A; Ngo, Lawrence; Moskovich, Ashley; Merwin, Rhonda; Zucker, Nancy

    2015-07-01

    The defining features of anorexia nervosa (AN) include disordered eating and disturbance in the experience of their bodies; however, many women with AN also demonstrate higher harm avoidance (HA), lower novelty seeking, and challenges with interpersonal functioning. The current study explored whether HA and novelty seeking could explain variation in disordered eating and social functioning in healthy control women ( n = 18), weight-restored women with a history of AN (n = 17), and women currently-ill with AN (AN; n = 17). Our results indicated that clinical participants (AN + weight-restored women) reported poorer social skills than healthy control participants. Moreover, the relationship between eating disorder symptoms and social skill deficits was mediated by HA. Follow-up analyses indicated that only the 'shyness with strangers' factor of HA independently mediated this relationship. Collectively, our results suggest a better understanding of shyness in many individuals with eating disorders could inform models of interpersonal functioning in AN.

  19. Gyrification brain abnormalities as predictors of outcome in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Angela; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Manara, Renzo; Santonastaso, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Gyrification brain abnormalities are considered a marker of early deviations from normal developmental trajectories and a putative predictor of poor outcome in psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to explore cortical folding morphology in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). A MRI brain study was conducted on 38 patients with AN, 20 fully recovered patients, and 38 healthy women. Local gyrification was measured with procedures implemented in FreeSurfer. Vertex-wise comparisons were carried out to compare: (1) AN patients and healthy women; (2) patients with a full remission at a 3-year longitudinal follow-up assessment and patients who did not recover. AN patients exhibited significantly lower gyrification when compared with healthy controls. Patients with a poor 3-year outcome had significantly lower baseline gyrification when compared to both healthy women and patients with full recovery at follow-up, even after controlling for the effects of duration of illness and gray matter volume. No significant correlation has been found between gyrification, body mass index, amount of weight loss, onset age, and duration of illness. Brain gyrification significantly predicted outcome at follow-up even after controlling for the effects of duration of illness and other clinical prognostic factors. Although the role of starvation in determining our findings cannot be excluded, our study showed that brain gyrification might be a predictor of outcome in AN. Further studies are needed to understand if brain gyrification abnormalities are indices of early neurodevelopmental alterations, the consequence of starvation, or the interaction between both factors.

  20. Disruption of Spatial Task Performance in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Guardia, Dewi; Carey, Aurélie; Cottencin, Olivier; Thomas, Pierre; Luyat, Marion

    2013-01-01

    In anorexia nervosa (AN), body distortions have been associated with parietal cortex (PC) dysfunction. The PC is the anatomical substrate for a supramodal reference framework involved in spatial orientation constancy. Here, we sought to evaluate spatial orientation constancy and the perception of body orientation in AN patients. In the present study, we investigated the effect of passive lateral body inclination on the visual and tactile subjective vertical (SV) and body Z-axis in 25 AN patients and 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed visual- and tactile-spatial judgments of axis orientations in an upright position and tilted 90° clockwise or counterclockwise. We observed a significant deviation of the tactile and visual SV towards the body (an A-effect) under tilted conditions, suggesting a multisensory impairment in spatial orientation. Deviation of the Z-axis in the direction of the tilt was also observed in the AN group. The greater A-effect in AN patients may reflect reduced interoceptive awareness and thus inadequate consideration of gravitational inflow. Furthermore, marked body weight loss could decrease the somatosensory inputs required for spatial orientation. Our study results suggest that spatial references are impaired in AN. This may be due to particular integration of visual, tactile and gravitational information (e.g. vestibular and proprioceptive cues) in the PC. PMID:23349990

  1. Liver Autophagy in Anorexia Nervosa and Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kheloufi, Marouane; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Durand, François

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates' survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m2 or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed. PMID:25250330

  2. Perfectionism in anorexia nervosa: novel performance based evidence.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Samantha; Yiend, Jenny; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tchanturia, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Existing research into perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is limited by a reliance upon self-report measures. This study used novel performance based measures to investigate whether there is behavioural evidence for elevated perfectionism in AN. 153 participants took part in the study--81 with a diagnosis of AN and 72 healthy controls (HCs). Participants completed two performance based tasks assessing perfectionism--a text replication task and a bead sorting task--along with self-report measures of perfectionism. Significant group differences were observed on both tasks. In the text replication task the AN group took significantly longer compared with healthy controls (p = 0.03, d = 0.36) and produced significantly higher quality copies (p = <0.01, d = 0.45). In the bead sorting task, there was a trend towards more participants in the AN group choosing to check their work compared with the HC group (p = 0.07, d = 0.30) and the AN group took significantly longer checking than those in the HC group (p = <0.01, d = 0.45). Only copy quality uniquely predicted scores on self report measures of perfectionism. This study provides empirically tested evidence of elevated performance based perfectionism in AN compared with a healthy control group. PMID:25360690

  3. Anorexia nervosa and nutritional assessment: contribution of body composition measurements.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Lama; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean Claude; Pichard, Claude

    2011-06-01

    The psychiatric condition of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) is affected by their nutritional status. An optimal assessment of the nutritional status of patients is fundamental in understanding the relationship between malnutrition and the psychological symptoms. The present review evaluates some of the available methods for measuring body composition in patients with AN. We searched literature in Medline using several key terms relevant to the present review in order to identify papers. Only articles in English or French were reviewed. A brief description is provided for each body composition technique, with its applicability in AN as well as its limitation. All methods of measuring body composition are not yet validated and/or feasible in patients with AN. The present review article proposes a practical approach for selecting the most appropriate methods depending on the setting, (i.e. clinical v. research) and the goal of the assessment (initial v. follow-up) in order to have a more personalised treatment for patients suffering from AN.

  4. Radionuclide gastric emptying studies in patients with anorexia nervosa

    SciTech Connect

    Domstad, P.A.; Shih, W.J.; Humphries, L.; DeLand, F.H.; Digenis, G.A.

    1987-05-01

    To evaluate gastric emptying in anorexia nervosa patients, 26 patients (17 females, two males, ranging in age from 13 to 40 yr) with upper GI symptoms ingested 150-200 microCi (/sup 99m/Tc)triethelenetetraamine polysterene resin in cereal and were imaged in the supine position. Data were accumulated at 5 min intervals to obtain the gastric emptying time (GET). The results of the studies were divided into three categories: prolonged, 13 patients; rapid, 11; and normal 3. Twelve of 13 patients with prolonged GET were given 10 mg metoclopramide i.v. injections; nine of the 12 patients had a good response and three had no response. Five of the nine patients underwent metoclopramide therapy and four of the patients showed benefit from the therapy. One patient discontinued metoclopramide therapy because of somnolence. Although all patients had subjective symptoms of gastric dysfunction, our results indicated only 50% had objectively prolonged GET, and another 50% showed normal or even rapid GET. Therefore, this radionuclide study enables quantitatively objective documentation of gastric emptying, separation of those patients with rapid or normal GET from those with prolonged GET, thereby avoiding the possible side effects from metoclopramide medication, and prediction of effectiveness of metoclopramide therapy in patients with prolonged GET.

  5. Therapeutic potential of ghrelin in restricting-type anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Mari; Ohwada, Rina; Akamizu, Takashi; Shibasaki, Tamotsu; Kangawa, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by a decrease in caloric intake and malnutrition. It is associated with a variety of medical morbidities as well as significant mortality. Nutritional support is of paramount importance to prevent impaired quality of life later in life in affected patients. Some patients with restricting-type AN who are fully motivated to gain body weight cannot increase their food intake because of malnutrition-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. Chronicity of AN prevents participation in social activities and leads to increased medical expenses. Therefore, there is a pressing need for effective appetite-stimulating therapies for patients with AN. Ghrelin is the only orexigenic hormone that can be given intravenously. Intravenous infusion of ghrelin is reported to increase food intake and body weight in healthy subjects as well as in patients with poor nutritional status. Here, we introduce the results of a pilot study that investigated the effects of ghrelin on appetite, energy intake, and nutritional parameters in five patients with restricting-type AN, who are fully motivated to gain body weight but could not increase their food intake because of malnutrition-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  6. Cerebral perfusion differences in women currently with and recovered from anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Min; Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Thomas, Binu P.; McAdams, Carrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder characterized by restricted eating, a pursuit of thinness, and altered perceptions of body shape and size. Neuroimaging in anorexia nervosa has revealed morphological and functional alterations in the brain. A better understanding of physiological changes in anorexia nervosa could provide a brain-specific health marker relevant to treatment and outcomes. In this study, we applied several advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to quantify regional and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 25 healthy women (HC), 23 patients currently with anorexia (AN-C) and 19 patients in long-term weight recovery following anorexia (AN-WR). Specifically, CBF was measured with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) MRI and then verified by a different technique, phase contrast (PC) MRI. Venous T2 values were determined by T2 relaxation under spin tagging (TRUST) MRI, and were used to corroborate the CBF results. These novel techniques were implemented on a standard 3T MRI scanner without any exogenous tracers, and the total scan duration was less than 10 min. Voxel-wise comparison revealed that the AN-WR group showed lower CBF in bilateral temporal and frontal lobes than the AN-C group. Compared with the HC group, the AN-C group also showed higher CBF in the right temporal lobe. Whole-brain-averaged CBF was significantly decreased in the AN-WR group compared with the AN-C group, consistent with the PC-MRI results. Venous T2 values were lower in the AN-WR group than in the AN-C group, consistent with the CBF results. A review of prior work examining CBF in anorexia nervosa is included in the discussion. This study identifies several differences in the cerebral physiological alterations in anorexia nervosa, and finds specific differences relevant to the current state of the disorder. PMID:25795596

  7. [Prevention and Treatment of Eating Disorders: The Health Care Network Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Weigel, Angelika; Gumz, Antje; Kästner, Denise; Romer, Georg; Wegscheider, Karl; Löwe, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    The "Health care network anorexia and bulimia nervosa", a subproject of psychenet - the Hamburg network for mental health - aims to decrease the incidence of eating disorders as well as the risk for chronic illness courses. One focal project, therefore, evaluates a school-based prevention manual in a randomized controlled trial. The other one examines the impact of a systemic public health intervention on early treatment initiation in anorexia nervosa. The present article provides an overview about study design and interventions in both focal projects as well as preliminary results.

  8. Underweight subjects with anorexia nervosa have an enhanced salivary cortisol response not seen in weight restored subjects with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Serino, Ismene; Amodio, Roberta; Monaco, Francesco; Maj, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The cortisol response to awakening (CAR) has been reported to be enhanced in symptomatic patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, it has been not established whether the dysregulation of CAR was a primary phenomenon or a change secondary to malnutrition. Therefore, we aimed to explore the salivary CAR in both underweight and weigh-restored women with AN. Fifty-nine women volunteered for the study. They were 18 underweight AN women, 15 weight-restored AN women and 26 normal-weight healthy women. Saliva samples were collected in the morning, immediately on awakening and after 15, 30 and 60min to measure saliva levels of cortisol. Participants' anxiety levels in the morning of sampling were measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. As compared to control women, underweight AN patients showed an enhanced CAR whereas weight-restored patients had a normal CAR. These results could be not explained by group differences in body mass index or levels of anxiety. These findings show, for the first time, that the enhanced CAR occurring in the acute phase of AN is not seen in weight-recovered patients, suggesting that the dysregulated activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of symptomatic AN patients is a state-dependent phenomenon.

  9. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  10. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Slof-Op t Landt, Margarita CT; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O’Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10−7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10−6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10−6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10−6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P= 4×10−6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:21079607

  11. Self-reported and behavioural impulsivity in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry Allen; Castle, David Jonathan; Gurvich, Caroline; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine how self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are related in anorexia nervosa (AN). METHODS Twenty-four females with AN and 25 healthy controls (HC) participant in the study. Self-reported impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The scale yields three second-order factors: Attentional, motor and non-planning. Behavioural impulsivity was investigated with the continuous performance test (CPT), a computer-based task of sustained attention in which numbers are flashed briefly on screen and participants are required to click the mouse when the same number appears consecutively. The rate of commission and omission errors can be used a measure of behavioural imulsivity. RESULTS AN participants self-reported increased attentional [AN: 20.67 (3.64), HC: 13.88 (2.91), P = 0.001] and reduced motor impulsivity [AN: 11.55 (2.28), HC: 14.08 (2.78), P = 0.002]. The rate of omission or commission errors on the CPT did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). BIS-11 and CPT measures did not significantly correlate, but attentional impulsivity was related to negative mood states in AN (depression: r = 0.52, P = 0.010, anxiety: r = 0.55, P = 0.006, stress: r = 0.57, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION The discrepancy between self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are discussed in terms of perfectionism in AN. Furthermore, it is suggested that improving negative mood states may resolve this inconsistency in AN. PMID:27679774

  12. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field.

  13. Self-reported and behavioural impulsivity in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry Allen; Castle, David Jonathan; Gurvich, Caroline; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine how self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are related in anorexia nervosa (AN). METHODS Twenty-four females with AN and 25 healthy controls (HC) participant in the study. Self-reported impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The scale yields three second-order factors: Attentional, motor and non-planning. Behavioural impulsivity was investigated with the continuous performance test (CPT), a computer-based task of sustained attention in which numbers are flashed briefly on screen and participants are required to click the mouse when the same number appears consecutively. The rate of commission and omission errors can be used a measure of behavioural imulsivity. RESULTS AN participants self-reported increased attentional [AN: 20.67 (3.64), HC: 13.88 (2.91), P = 0.001] and reduced motor impulsivity [AN: 11.55 (2.28), HC: 14.08 (2.78), P = 0.002]. The rate of omission or commission errors on the CPT did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). BIS-11 and CPT measures did not significantly correlate, but attentional impulsivity was related to negative mood states in AN (depression: r = 0.52, P = 0.010, anxiety: r = 0.55, P = 0.006, stress: r = 0.57, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION The discrepancy between self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are discussed in terms of perfectionism in AN. Furthermore, it is suggested that improving negative mood states may resolve this inconsistency in AN.

  14. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  15. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Travis, Katherine E; Golden, Neville H; Feldman, Heidi M; Solomon, Murray; Nguyen, Jenny; Mezer, Aviv; Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1), an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4) were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3). We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18) and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total). Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA) and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN.

  16. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Travis, Katherine E; Golden, Neville H; Feldman, Heidi M; Solomon, Murray; Nguyen, Jenny; Mezer, Aviv; Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1), an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4) were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3). We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18) and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total). Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA) and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN. PMID:26740918

  17. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Katherine E.; Golden, Neville H.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Solomon, Murray; Nguyen, Jenny; Mezer, Aviv; Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1), an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4) were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3). We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18) and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total). Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA) and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN. PMID:26740918

  18. Is deep brain stimulation a treatment option for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder with high rates of morbidity, comorbidity and mortality, which in a subset of patients (21%) takes on a chronic course. Since an evidence based treatment for AN is scarce, it is crucial to investigate new treatment options, preferably focused on influencing the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of AN. The objective of the present paper was to review the evidence for possible neurobiological correlates of AN, and to hypothesize about potential targets for Deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for chronic, therapy-refractory AN. One avenue for exploring new treatment options based on the neurobiological correlates of AN, is the search for symptomatologic and neurobiologic parallels between AN and other compulsivity- or reward-related disorders. As in other compulsive disorders, the fronto-striatal circuitry, in particular the insula, the ventral striatum (VS) and the prefrontal, orbitofrontal, temporal, parietal and anterior cingulate cortices, are likely to be implicated in the neuropathogenesis of AN. In this paper we will review the few available cases in which DBS has been performed in patients with AN (either as primary diagnosis or as comorbid condition). Given the overlap in symptomatology and neurocircuitry between reward-related disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and AN, and the established efficacy of accumbal DBS in OCD, we hypothesize that DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and other areas associated with reward, e.g. the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), might be an effective treatment for patients with chronic, treatment refractory AN, providing not only weight restoration, but also significant and sustained improvement in AN core symptoms and associated comorbidities and complications. Possible targets for DBS in AN are the ACC, the ventral anterior limb of the capsula interna (vALIC) and the VS. We suggest conducting larger efficacy studies that also explore the

  19. Family functioning in two treatments for adolescent anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ciao, Anna C.; Accurso, Erin C.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Family functioning impairment is widely reported in the eating disorders literature, yet few studies have examined the role of family functioning in treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN). This study examined family functioning in two treatments for adolescent AN from multiple family members’ perspectives. Method Participants were 121 adolescents with AN ages 12–18 from a randomized-controlled trial comparing family-based treatment (FBT) to individual adolescent-focused therapy (AFT). Multiple clinical characteristics were assessed at baseline. Family functioning from the perspective of the adolescent and both parents was assessed at baseline and after one year of treatment. Full remission from AN was defined as achieving both weight restoration and normalized eating disorder psychopathology. Results In general, families dealing with AN reported some baseline impairment in family functioning, but average ratings were only slightly elevated compared to published impaired functioning cutoffs. Adolescents’ perspectives on family functioning were the most impaired and were generally associated with poorer psychosocial functioning and greater clinical severity. Regardless of initial level of family functioning, improvements in several family functioning domains were uniquely related to full remission at the end of treatment in both FBT and AFT. However, FBT had a more positive impact on several specific aspects of family functioning compared to AFT. Discussion Families seeking treatment for adolescent AN report some difficulties in family functioning, with adolescents reporting the greatest impairment. While FBT may be effective in improving some specific aspects of family dynamics, remission from AN was associated with improved family dynamics, regardless of treatment type. PMID:24902822

  20. Comprehensive neurocognitive assessment of patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Phillipou, Andrea; Gurvich, Caroline; Castle, David Jonathan; Abel, Larry Allen; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To utilise a comprehensive cognitive battery to gain a better understanding of cognitive performance in anorexia nervosa (AN). METHODS: Twenty-six individuals with AN and 27 healthy control participants matched for age, gender and premorbid intelligence, participated in the study. A standard cognitive battery, the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia Consensus Cognitive Battery, was used to investigate performance on seven cognitive domains with the use of 10 different tasks: speed of processing [Brief Assessment Of Cognition In Schizophrenia: Symbol Coding, Category Fluency: Animal Naming (Fluency) and Trail Making Test: Part A], attention/vigilance [Continuous Performance Test - Identical Pairs (CPT-IP)], working memory [Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS®-III): Spatial Span, and Letter-Number Span (LNS)], verbal learning [Hopkins Verbal Learning Test - Revised], visual learning [Brief Visuospatial Memory Test - Revised], reasoning and problem solving [Neuropsychological Assessment Battery: Mazes], and social cognition [Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test: Managing Emotions]. Statistical analyses involved the use of multivariate and univariate analyses of variance. RESULTS: Analyses conducted on the cognitive domain scores revealed no overall significant difference between groups nor any interaction between group and domain score [F(1,45) = 0.73, P = 0.649]. Analyses conducted on each of the specific tasks within the cognitive domains revealed significantly slower reaction times for false alarm responses on the CPT-IP task in AN [F(1,51) = 12.80, P < 0.01, Cohen’s d = 0.982] and a trend towards poorer performance in AN on the backward component of the WMS®-III Spatial Span task [F(1,51) = 5.88, P = 0.02, Cohen’s d = -0.665]. The finding of slower reaction times of false alarm responses is, however, limited due to the small number of false alarm responses for either group. CONCLUSION: The findings are discussed

  1. Epidemiology of Anorexia Nervosa in Men: A Nationwide Study of Finnish Twins

    PubMed Central

    Raevuori, Anu; Hoek, Hans W.; Susser, Ezra; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Background To examine the epidemiology of anorexia nervosa in men, we screened Finnish male twins born in 1975–79. Methods and Findings Men (N = 2122) from FinnTwin16 birth cohorts were screened for lifetime eating disorders by a questionnaire. The screen positives (N = 18), their male co-twins (N = 10) and those with lifetime minimum BMI≤17.5 (N = 21) were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV anorexia nervosa. The incidence rate of anorexia nervosa for the presumed peak age of risk (10–24y) was 15.7 per 100 000 person-years; its lifetime prevalence was 0.24%. All probands had recovered from eating disorders, but suffered from substantial psychiatric comorbidity, which also manifested in their co-twins. Additionally, male co-twins displayed significant dissatisfaction with body musculature, a male-specific feature of body dysmorphic disorder. Conclusions Anorexia nervosa in males in the community is more common, transient and accompanied by more substantial comorbidity than previously thought. PMID:19204790

  2. Locus of Control as a Measure of Ineffectiveness in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Using a multidimensional locus of control scale, scores of female anorexia nervosa patients (N=54) were compared to norms. Younger anorexic patients demonstrated higher internal control compared to norms on times related to fatalism and social-system control. Scores for older patients could not be differentiated from the norms. (Author)

  3. How Schools Can Help Combat Student Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael P.

    This book presents a comprehensive review of anorexia nervosa and bulimia and the roles that schools can have in preventing, identifying, and treating these disorders. Chapter 1 provides an overview of student eating disorders and presents a case study of a high school student with an eating disorder. Chapter 2 discusses the nature of anorexia…

  4. Anorexia nervosa in a girl of Chinese origin: psychological, somatic and transcultural factors.

    PubMed

    Demarque, Mélissa; Guzman, Gabriela; Morrison, Elodie; Ahovi, Jonathan; Moro, Marie Rose; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne

    2015-04-01

    The increased prevalence of anorexia nervosa reported in non-Western societies inevitably raises the issue of the influence of cultural factors in the genesis and the patterns of this disorder. Anorexia nervosa is not a straightforward Western culture-bound syndrome, although an influence of Western ideals of thinness does exist. The illness seems more related to rapid cultural shifts, either societal or individual, such as those occurring in the migratory process. Migrants and their children have to face the acculturation process and may experience a culture-clash. The pathology can also fulfil a positive acculturative function. This is a case study concerning a second-generation Chinese girl born in France presenting with anorexia nervosa. This case leads us to raise the issue of the choice of diagnostic criteria in relation to cultural background. We will also discuss the impact of the family's migratory history on the construction of identity in adolescence. Finally we will explore the specific features of care provision for anorexia nervosa in a transcultural setting. PMID:24363225

  5. Familial Contributions to the Etiology and Course of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strober, Michael; Humphrey, Laura Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Discusses familial influences in anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Reviews descriptions of family interaction, familial correlates of course and phenomenology of symptoms, and studies of familial transmission. Concludes that certain personality factors, possibly genetically determined, predispose the individual to greater sensitivity and vulnerability…

  6. Assessment and Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia in School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Carole; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are major concerns for high school students, especially females. These syndromes interfere with normal functioning and social development and can be life-threatening. Definitions, characteristics, symptoms, and treatment approaches for these two eating disorders are discussed, and suggestions for involvement of the…

  7. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa Treated with Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; Couturier, Jennifer; Agras, W. Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the relative effectiveness of a short versus long course of family-based therapy (FBT) for adolescent anorexia nervosa at long-term follow-up. Method: This study used clinical and structured interviews to assess psychological and psychosocial outcomes of adolescents (ages 12-18 years at baseline) who were previously treated…

  8. [Behavior therapy and communication theory as treatment for inpatients with anorexia nervosa (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brand, J; Gensicke, P

    1980-01-01

    A staged program for inpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa is presented. This program integrates behaviour-therapeutic and interactional models. Results show that five of seven patients completed the program successfully and maintained their stable condition after an average catamnestic period of 16 months. The necessity of integrating both models and the practical difficulties in a clinical setting are discussed.

  9. Comorbid Depression and Anxiety in Childhood and Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: Prevalence and Implications for Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Elizabeth K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Comorbid conditions are common in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and can raise issues for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. Methods: First, reported prevalence rates for depression and anxiety in children and adolescents with AN were reviewed. Diagnostic issues and current understanding of the temporal onset and…

  10. Perceived Treatment Effectiveness of Family Therapy for Chinese Patients Suffering from Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Lai, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Although family therapy has become highly acceptable in the West, its applicability and acceptability for Chinese adolescents and young women with anorexia nervosa (AN) remains unknown. In this article, we report the results of a qualitative study using post-treatment in-depth interviews to understand the subjective perceptions of sufferers of AN…

  11. The Importance of Emotional Insight in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Adolescent Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupa, Megha; Girimaji, Satish; Muthuswamy, Selvi; Jacob, Preeti; Ravi, Malavika

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a rare but sever psychiatric disorder in adolescence, with chronicity and death being the most feared consequence. Emotional Insight into one's problem is considered a key determinant of success in therapy. The following case study of a 14-year-old client, describes the process of therapy as it unfolded across 45 sessions. An…

  12. Childhood Risk Factors for Lifetime Anorexia Nervosa by Age 30 Years in a National Birth Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Dasha E.; Viner, Russell M.

    2009-01-01

    Whether previously identified childhood risk factors for anorexia nervosa (AN) predict self-reported lifetime AN by age 30 is examined. The cohort confirmed four risk and two protective factors out of the 22 suggested risk factors. The study used data from the 1970 British Cohort Study.

  13. The Clinical Utility of Personality Subtypes in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildes, Jennifer E.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Crosby, Ross D.; Ringham, Rebecca M.; Dapelo, Marcela Marin; Gaskill, Jill A.; Forbush, Kelsie T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Elucidation of clinically relevant subtypes has been proposed as a means of advancing treatment research, but classifying anorexia nervosa (AN) patients into restricting and binge-eating/purging types has demonstrated limited predictive validity. This study aimed to evaluate whether an approach to classifying eating disorder patients on…

  14. Anorexia Nervosa and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Guided Investigation of Social Cognitive Endophenotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Nancy L.; Losh, Molly; Bulik, Cynthia M.; LaBar, Kevin S.; Piven, Joseph; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2007-01-01

    Death by suicide occurs in a disproportionate percentage of individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN), with a standardized mortality ratio indicating a 57-fold greater risk of death from suicide relative to an age-matched cohort. Longitudinal studies indicate impaired social functioning increases risk for fatal outcomes, while social impairment…

  15. Skill Acquisition in Ski Instruction and the Skill Model's Application to Treating Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duesund, Liv; Jespersen, Ejgil

    2004-01-01

    The Dreyfus skill model has a wide range of applications to various domains, including sport, nursing, engineering, flying, and so forth. In this article, the authors discuss the skill model in connection with two different research projects concerning ski instruction and treating anorexia nervosa. The latter project has been published but not in…

  16. Theory of Mind and the Brain in Anorexia Nervosa: Relation to Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte-Ruther, Martin; Mainz, Verena; Fink, Gereon R.; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Converging evidence suggests deficits in theory-of-mind (ToM) processing in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). The present study aimed at elucidating the neural mechanisms underlying ToM-deficits in AN. Method: A total of 19 adolescent patients with AN and 21 age-matched controls were investigated using functional magnetic resonance…

  17. When Does the "Duty to Protect" Apply with a Client Who has Anorexia Nervosa?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Wright, Kimberly S.; Archambault, Rita J.; Bardash, Rebekah, J.

    2003-01-01

    Individuals with eating disorders, especially those with anorexia nervosa, have the potential to experience significant harm and even death as a result of behaviors related to their condition. Because of this risk, the authors argue that there is a duty to protect (i.e., an obligation to take some action when a person is engaging or considering…

  18. Is Family Therapy Useful for Treating Children with Anorexia Nervosa? Results of a Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; le Grange, Daniel; Forsberg, Sarah; Hewell, Kristen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests that family-based treatment (FBT) is an effective treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN). This retrospective case series was designed to examine its usefulness with younger children. Method: Data were abstracted from medical records of 32 children with a mean age of 11.9 years (range 9.0-12.9) meeting…

  19. Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: A Promising Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that anorexia nervosa is a debilitating disorder with serious psychological and medical sequelae, few psychological treatments have been studied. Of these, interventions that involve the parents of the adolescent have proved to be most promising. This is especially true for those cases with a short duration of illness (less than 3…

  20. Anticipation of Body-Scaled Action Is Modified in Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardia, Dewi; Lafargue, Gilles; Thomas, Pierre; Dodin, Vincent; Cottencin, Olivier; Luyat, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa frequently believe they are larger than they really are. The precise nature of this bias is not known: is it a false belief related to the patient's aesthetic and emotional attitudes towards her body? Or could it also reflect abnormal processing of the representation of the body in action? We tested this latter…

  1. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition intervention in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition intervention, including nutritional counseling, by a registered dietitian (RD) is an essential component of the team treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders during assessment and treatment across the continuum of care. Diagnostic criteria for eating disorders provide important guidelines for identification and treatment. However, it is thought that a continuum of disordered eating may exist that ranges from persistent dieting to subthreshold conditions and then to defined eating disorders, which include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Understanding the complexities of eating disorders, such as influencing factors, comorbid illness, medical and psychological complications, and boundary issues, is critical in the effective treatment of eating disorders. The nature of eating disorders requires a collaborative approach by an interdisciplinary team of psychological, nutritional, and medical specialists. The RD is an integral member of the treatment team and is uniquely qualified to provide medical nutrition therapy for the normalization of eating patterns and nutritional status. RDs provide nutritional counseling, recognize clinical signs related to eating disorders, and assist with medical monitoring while cognizant of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy that are cornerstones of eating disorder treatment. Specialized resources are available for RDs to advance their level of expertise in the field of eating disorders. Further efforts with evidenced-based research must continue for improved treatment outcomes related to eating disorders along with identification of effective primary and secondary interventions.

  2. Rapid remission of anorexia nervosa and unconscious communication.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Bart J

    2010-04-01

    An alternate framework for thinking about anorexia treatment is presented with a treatment approach that results in prompt remission of anorexia symptoms. Prior treatment of eating disorders using hypnosis is reviewed. A case example illustrating the method is followed by a discussion. The process is described for teaching clients how to nullify the anorexia symptom complex when it is reactivated.

  3. The DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa may change its population prevalence and prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Mustelin, Linda; Silén, Yasmina; Raevuori, Anu; Hoek, Hans W; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The definition of anorexia nervosa was revised for the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5). We examined the impact of these changes on the prevalence and prognosis of anorexia nervosa. In a nationwide longitudinal study of Finnish twins born 1975-1979, the women (N = 2825) underwent a 2-stage screening for eating disorders at mean age 24. Fifty-five women fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for lifetime anorexia nervosa. When we recoded the interviews using DSM-5 criteria, we detected 37 new cases. We contrasted new DSM-5 vs. DSM-IV cases to assess their clinical characteristics and prognosis. We also estimated lifetime prevalences and incidences and tested the association of minimum BMI with prognosis. We observed a 60% increase in the lifetime prevalence of anorexia nervosa using the new diagnostic boundaries, from 2.2% to 3.6%. The new cases had a later age of onset (18.8 y vs. 16.5, p = 0.002), higher minimum BMI (16.9 vs. 15.5 kg/m(2), p = 0.0004), a shorter duration of illness (one year vs. three years, p = 0.002), and a higher 5-year probability or recovery (81% vs. 67%, p = 0.002). Minimum BMI was not associated with prognosis. It therefore appears that the substantial increase in prevalence of anorexia nervosa is offset by a more benign course of illness in new cases. Increased diagnostic heterogeneity underscores the need for reliable indicators of disease severity. Our findings indicate that BMI may not be an ideal severity marker, but should be complemented by prognostically informative criteria. Future studies should focus on identifying such factors in prospective settings. PMID:27014849

  4. The DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa may change its population prevalence and prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Mustelin, Linda; Silén, Yasmina; Raevuori, Anu; Hoek, Hans W; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The definition of anorexia nervosa was revised for the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5). We examined the impact of these changes on the prevalence and prognosis of anorexia nervosa. In a nationwide longitudinal study of Finnish twins born 1975-1979, the women (N = 2825) underwent a 2-stage screening for eating disorders at mean age 24. Fifty-five women fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for lifetime anorexia nervosa. When we recoded the interviews using DSM-5 criteria, we detected 37 new cases. We contrasted new DSM-5 vs. DSM-IV cases to assess their clinical characteristics and prognosis. We also estimated lifetime prevalences and incidences and tested the association of minimum BMI with prognosis. We observed a 60% increase in the lifetime prevalence of anorexia nervosa using the new diagnostic boundaries, from 2.2% to 3.6%. The new cases had a later age of onset (18.8 y vs. 16.5, p = 0.002), higher minimum BMI (16.9 vs. 15.5 kg/m(2), p = 0.0004), a shorter duration of illness (one year vs. three years, p = 0.002), and a higher 5-year probability or recovery (81% vs. 67%, p = 0.002). Minimum BMI was not associated with prognosis. It therefore appears that the substantial increase in prevalence of anorexia nervosa is offset by a more benign course of illness in new cases. Increased diagnostic heterogeneity underscores the need for reliable indicators of disease severity. Our findings indicate that BMI may not be an ideal severity marker, but should be complemented by prognostically informative criteria. Future studies should focus on identifying such factors in prospective settings.

  5. [The possibility or coercion treatment? Anorexia nervosa--legal regulations. A case report].

    PubMed

    Tylec, Aneta; Olajossy, Marcin; Dubas-Slemp, Halina; Spychalska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is diagnosed on the basis of well-defined diagnostic criteria and requires treatment, as it is associated with the highest mortality rate of all mental illnesses. In Poland, anorexia nervosa is not considered a mental illness, although the opinion of researchers and clinicians are divided. To reduce the death rate of AN correct and early diagnosis, appropriate treatment starting immediately and the appropriate regulations to allow people to take the AN treatment against their will are necessary. In our work, we presented the treatment of patients with severe mental anorexia with a predominance of restrictive behavior as well as the issue of regulations relating to the compulsory treatment of people with eating disorders.

  6. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in anorexia nervosa: links with plasma tryptophan and serotonin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Claire; Hassler, Christine; Mattar, Lama; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Steiger, Howard; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Falissard, Bruno; Berthoz, Sylvie; Mourier-Soleillant, Virginie; Lang, François; Delorme, Marc; Pommereau, Xavier; Gerardin, Priscille; Bioulac, Stephanie; Bouvard, Manuel; Godart, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Depressive, anxiety and obsessive symptoms frequently co-occur with anorexia nervosa (AN). The relationship between these clinical manifestations and the biological changes caused by starvation is not well understood. It has been hypothesised that reduced availability of tryptophan (TRP) could reduce serotonin activity and thus trigger these comorbid symptoms. The aim of this study, during re-feeding in individuals with AN, was to analyse covariations across measures of nutritional status, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and peripheral serotonin markers. Depressive and anxiety symptoms, nutritional status and serotonin markers--whole blood serotonin content, plasma TRP and the ratio between TRP and large neutral amino acids--were assessed for 42 AN participants at admission to inpatient treatment and after re-feeding. Biological measures were compared to those obtained in 42 non-eating disordered subjects. For those with AN, psychological, nutritional and biological parameters improved significantly during hospitalisation. Levels of serotonin markers were significantly lower in the AN group compared to the control group, at admission and at discharge. Increase in the TRP/LNAA ratio was correlated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. In addition, there was a positive correlation between serotonin levels and symptoms of both anxiety and depression at discharge. We speculate that enhanced TRP availability during re-feeding, as a result of the increase in the TRP/LNAA ratio, could restore serotonin neurotransmission and lead to a decrease in depressive symptoms. The association between serotonin and anxiety and depressive symptoms would be consistent with numerous observations indicating abnormal functioning of the serotoninergic system in AN. PMID:24135616

  7. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in anorexia nervosa: links with plasma tryptophan and serotonin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Claire; Hassler, Christine; Mattar, Lama; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Steiger, Howard; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Falissard, Bruno; Berthoz, Sylvie; Mourier-Soleillant, Virginie; Lang, François; Delorme, Marc; Pommereau, Xavier; Gerardin, Priscille; Bioulac, Stephanie; Bouvard, Manuel; Godart, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Depressive, anxiety and obsessive symptoms frequently co-occur with anorexia nervosa (AN). The relationship between these clinical manifestations and the biological changes caused by starvation is not well understood. It has been hypothesised that reduced availability of tryptophan (TRP) could reduce serotonin activity and thus trigger these comorbid symptoms. The aim of this study, during re-feeding in individuals with AN, was to analyse covariations across measures of nutritional status, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and peripheral serotonin markers. Depressive and anxiety symptoms, nutritional status and serotonin markers--whole blood serotonin content, plasma TRP and the ratio between TRP and large neutral amino acids--were assessed for 42 AN participants at admission to inpatient treatment and after re-feeding. Biological measures were compared to those obtained in 42 non-eating disordered subjects. For those with AN, psychological, nutritional and biological parameters improved significantly during hospitalisation. Levels of serotonin markers were significantly lower in the AN group compared to the control group, at admission and at discharge. Increase in the TRP/LNAA ratio was correlated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. In addition, there was a positive correlation between serotonin levels and symptoms of both anxiety and depression at discharge. We speculate that enhanced TRP availability during re-feeding, as a result of the increase in the TRP/LNAA ratio, could restore serotonin neurotransmission and lead to a decrease in depressive symptoms. The association between serotonin and anxiety and depressive symptoms would be consistent with numerous observations indicating abnormal functioning of the serotoninergic system in AN.

  8. A comparison of eating, exercise, shape, and weight related symptomatology in males with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart B; Rieger, Elizabeth; Hildebrandt, Tom; Karlov, Lisa; Russell, Janice; Boon, Evelyn; Dawson, Robert T; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the lack of nosological clarity surrounding muscle dysmorphia, this paper aims to compare the symptomatic profile of muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa in males whilst using measures sensitive to indexing male body image concerns. Twenty-one male muscle dysmorphia patients, 24 male anorexia nervosa patients, and 15 male gym-using controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Muscle Dysmorphia Disorder Inventory, the Compulsive Exercise Test, and a measure of appearance-enhancing substance use. Men with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa demonstrated widespread symptomatic similarities spanning the domains of disturbed body image, disordered eating, and exercise behaviour, whilst differences were consistent with the opposing physiques pursued in each condition. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed significant associations between scores on muscle dysmorphia and eating disorder measures. The present findings provide moderate support for the notion that muscle dysmorphia may be nosologically similar to anorexia nervosa.

  9. A comparison of eating, exercise, shape, and weight related symptomatology in males with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart B; Rieger, Elizabeth; Hildebrandt, Tom; Karlov, Lisa; Russell, Janice; Boon, Evelyn; Dawson, Robert T; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the lack of nosological clarity surrounding muscle dysmorphia, this paper aims to compare the symptomatic profile of muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa in males whilst using measures sensitive to indexing male body image concerns. Twenty-one male muscle dysmorphia patients, 24 male anorexia nervosa patients, and 15 male gym-using controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Muscle Dysmorphia Disorder Inventory, the Compulsive Exercise Test, and a measure of appearance-enhancing substance use. Men with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa demonstrated widespread symptomatic similarities spanning the domains of disturbed body image, disordered eating, and exercise behaviour, whilst differences were consistent with the opposing physiques pursued in each condition. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed significant associations between scores on muscle dysmorphia and eating disorder measures. The present findings provide moderate support for the notion that muscle dysmorphia may be nosologically similar to anorexia nervosa. PMID:22391410

  10. Cancer and Anorexia Nervosa in the Adolescence: A Family-Based Systemic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetta, Gabriella; Bolognini, Ida; D'Ovidio, Silvia; Pinto, Antonello

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Anorexia nervosa is difficult to diagnose in cancer patients since weight loss, aversion for food, and eating disturbances are frequent in patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, efforts are mandatory to recognize and manage this condition which may occur also in cancer patients with a special regard to adolescents. Methods. Through the clinical history of Anna, a 15-year-old adolescent with advanced cancer, we describe the effectiveness of a family-based systemic intervention to manage anorexia nervosa occurring in concomitance to osteosarcoma. Results. Through a two-year psychotherapy period involving different techniques applied to the whole family such as family genogram, family collage, and sculpture of family time, Anna was relieved from her condition. Conclusions. Upon early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, anorexia nervosa can be effectively approached in adolescent cancer patients. The presence of a life-threatening medical condition such as cancer may provide motivation for a patient to control disordered eating behavior in the context of an appropriate family-based systemic intervention. The general frame of anorexia occurring in cancer-bearing adolescents is reviewed and discussed. PMID:22295193

  11. Neural responses to kindness and malevolence differ in illness and recovery in women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Carrie J; Lohrenz, Terry; Montague, P Read

    2015-12-01

    In anorexia nervosa, problems with social relationships contribute to illness, and improvements in social support are associated with recovery. Using the multiround trust game and 3T MRI, we compare neural responses in a social relationship in three groups of women: women with anorexia nervosa, women in long-term weight recovery from anorexia nervosa, and healthy comparison women. Surrogate markers related to social signals in the game were computed each round to assess whether the relationship was improving (benevolence) or deteriorating (malevolence) for each subject. Compared with healthy women, neural responses to benevolence were diminished in the precuneus and right angular gyrus in both currently-ill and weight-recovered subjects with anorexia, but neural responses to malevolence differed in the left fusiform only in currently-ill subjects. Next, using a whole-brain regression, we identified an office assessment, the positive personalizing bias, that was inversely correlated with neural activity in the occipital lobe, the precuneus and posterior cingulate, the bilateral temporoparietal junctions, and dorsal anterior cingulate, during benevolence for all groups of subjects. The positive personalizing bias is a self-report measure that assesses the degree with which a person attributes positive experiences to other people. These data suggest that problems in perceiving kindness may be a consistent trait related to the development of anorexia nervosa, whereas recognizing malevolence may be related to recovery. Future work on social brain function, in both healthy and psychiatric populations, should consider positive personalizing biases as a possible marker of neural differences related to kindness perception.

  12. Abnormal functional global and local brain connectivity in female patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Daniel; Borchardt, Viola; Lord, Anton R.; Boehm, Ilka; Ritschel, Franziska; Zwipp, Johannes; Clas, Sabine; King, Joseph A.; Wolff-Stephan, Silvia; Roessner, Veit; Walter, Martin; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous resting-state functional connectivity studies in patients with anorexia nervosa used independent component analysis or seed-based connectivity analysis to probe specific brain networks. Instead, modelling the entire brain as a complex network allows determination of graph-theoretical metrics, which describe global and local properties of how brain networks are organized and how they interact. Methods To determine differences in network properties between female patients with acute anorexia nervosa and pairwise matched healthy controls, we used resting-state fMRI and computed well-established global and local graph metrics across a range of network densities. Results Our analyses included 35 patients and 35 controls. We found that the global functional network structure in patients with anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in both characteristic path length (longer average routes between nodes) and assortativity (more nodes with a similar connectedness link together). Accordingly, we found locally decreased connectivity strength and increased path length in the posterior insula and thalamus. Limitations The present results may be limited to the methods applied during preprocessing and network construction. Conclusion We demonstrated anorexia nervosa–related changes in the network configuration for, to our knowledge, the first time using resting-state fMRI and graph-theoretical measures. Our findings revealed an altered global brain network architecture accompanied by local degradations indicating wide-scale disturbance in information flow across brain networks in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Reduced local network efficiency in the thalamus and posterior insula may reflect a mechanism that helps explain the impaired integration of visuospatial and homeostatic signals in patients with this disorder, which is thought to be linked to abnormal representations of body size and hunger. PMID:26252451

  13. [Anorexia nervosa with refeeding syndrome: prevention and treatment of RS].

    PubMed

    Kasai, Makiko; Okajima, Yoshirou; Takano, Eisuke; Kato, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RS), seen in the early stages of anorexia nervosa (AN) treatment, has not been paid sufficient attention regarding its strong association with poor outcomes. This report describes a case of AN restriction type (AN-R) with sequent RS appearance despite the introduction of progressive and careful low-calorie nutrition, and discusses RS treatment. The patient was a 16-year-old female. She was first diagnosed with AN at the age of 14 when she went on a diet, admitted into pediatrics, and recovered: however, AN recurred after she started high school, and her weight decreased to 31.8 kg. She was admitted to pediatrics again, refused to receive treatment, discharged from the hospital, and introduced to our department. Soon after she came to us, her weight went down to 29.6 kg, and continued to decrease to 26.8 kg. She was recommended to receive inpatient care, but she firmly refused. A few days later, her experience of loss of consciousness made her agree to receive inpatient care. At this time, she was already weakened and had difficulty performing voluntary body movements as well as excretion. She was treated carefully and placed on 125 kcal/day. On the 6th day of treatment, severe liver damage was observed, her serum phosphorus level went down to 2.0 mg/dL, and she was diagnosed with RS. The lowest concentration of serum phosphorus observed was 1.3 mg/dL with blood abnormality and delirium; however, our strict management with intravascular phosphorus administration supported her increased dietary intake, and the patient was able to leave the hospital on the 54th day after admission. Based on this experience, the pathogenesis of RS was overviewed, and RS prevention as well as treatment was discussed. It has been reported that low phosphorus levels are observed in approximately one quarter of AN patients, and, thus, immediate action and treatment of hypophosphatemia are necessary when considering RS occurrence. In this study, the observed serum

  14. A Comparison of the Psychological Evaluation of Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa and of Adolescents with Conduct Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Donna P.; And Others

    While the descriptive features of anorexia nervosa are well known and agreed upon, the level of personality organization and the character style of anorexia patients is more controversial. To study and compare the cognitive style and personality functioning of anorectic patients with that of conduct disordered patients, 20 adolescent females (10…

  15. A Cross-Sectional and Follow-Up Functional MRI Study with a Working Memory Task in Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Caldu, Xavier; Andres-Perpina, Susana; Lazaro, Luisa; Bargallo, Nuria; Falcon, Carles; Plana, Maria Teresa; Junque, Carme

    2010-01-01

    Structural and functional brain abnormalities have been described in anorexia nervosa (AN). The objective of this study was to examine whether there is abnormal regional brain activation during a working memory task not associated with any emotional stimuli in adolescent patients with anorexia and to detect possible changes after weight recovery.…

  16. Circadian pattern of large neutral amino acids, glucose, insulin, and food intake in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, W; Schweiger, U; Werner, D; Brunner, G; Tuschl, R J; Laessle, R G; Krieg, J C; Fichter, M M; Pirke, K M

    1991-05-01

    Insulin, glucose, and large neutral amino acids (LNAA) were studied in 10 patients with anorexia nervosa, 13 patients with bulimia nervosa, and 15 healthy controls. Blood samples were collected at hourly intervals during the day and at two-hour intervals during the night over a 24-hour period. Ad libitum caloric and relative carbohydrate intake was significantly reduced in the anorectic and bulimic patients. Elevated concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) were seen in the bulimic group, and low triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations in the anorectic group. Mean plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were significantly lowered in both groups. The tryptophan (Trp) to LNAA ratio was reduced in anorectic, but not in bulimic patients. These findings suggest that Trp influx into the brain is reduced in anorectic patients, possibly impairing central serotonergic function.

  17. Central and peripheral peptides regulating eating behaviour and energy homeostasis in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Tortorella, Alfonso; Brambilla, Francesca; Fabrazzo, Michele; Volpe, Umberto; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Mastromo, Daniele; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2014-09-01

    A large body of literature suggests the occurrence of a dysregulation in both central and peripheral modulators of appetite in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), but at the moment, the state or trait-dependent nature of those changes is far from being clear. It has been proposed, although not definitively proved, that peptide alterations, even when secondary to malnutrition and/or to aberrant eating behaviours, might contribute to the genesis and the maintenance of some symptomatic aspects of AN and BN, thus affecting the course and the prognosis of these disorders. This review focuses on the most significant literature studies that explored the physiology of those central and peripheral peptides, which have prominent effects on eating behaviour, body weight and energy homeostasis in patients with AN and BN. The relevance of peptide dysfunctions for the pathophysiology of eating disorders is critically discussed.

  18. To be or not be a woman: anorexia nervosa, normative gender roles, and feminism.

    PubMed

    Mahowald, M B

    1992-04-01

    This paper reviews the characteristics of anorexia nervosa described in the DSM-III-R, relates them to normative gender roles and adolescent development, and critiques those roles on feminist grounds. Two apparently contradictory explanations for the irrational pursuit of thinness are considered: a) the anorexic thus attempts to conform to a socially defined feminine ideal; b) the anorexic thus attempts to avoid the appearance and consequences of mature womanhood. I propose that both explanations are applicable, together emplifying the ambiguity that Simone de Beauvoir considers characteristic of female experience. Because both explanations suggest a gender identity disorder, I question the fact that the DSM-III-R fails to indicate this linkage. I argue further that therapeutic considerations require efforts to alter the socialization factors that are implicative in anorexia nervosa.

  19. Rectal prolapse associated with anorexia nervosa: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is one of a few mental health diagnoses that affects every organ system. Patients with AN often present with multiple secondary effects of starvation at the time of first assessment, including gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. In extreme cases, severe GI complications such as rectal prolapse may be encountered as a consequence of the illness although formal studies investigating the frequency of such occurrences are lacking. We present the case of a 16 year old female previously diagnosed with anorexia nervosa that developed a rectal prolapse as a consequence of her disease as well as a detailed literature review investigating the frequency and prevalence of such occurrences in this population. PMID:24999417

  20. Problematic Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa: Testing Potential Risk Factors against Different Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Melissa; Lalanne, Christophe; Berthoz, Sylvie; Kern, Laurence; Godart, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    “Hyperactivity” has a wide prevalence range of 31% to 80% in the anorexia nervosa literature that could be partly due to the plethora of definitions provided by researchers in this field. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) To assess the variance across prevalence rates of problematic exercise encountered in patients with anorexia nervosa, in relation to seven different definitions found in the literature. 2) To examine how core eating disorder symptoms and the dimensions of emotional profile are associated with these different definitions and the impact of these definitions on the assessment of patients’ quality of life. Exercise was evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, type and compulsion using a semi-structured questionnaire administered to 180 women suffering from severe anorexia nervosa. Seven different definitions of problematic exercise were identified in the literature: three entailing a single dimension of problematic exercise (duration, compulsion or intensity) and four combining these different dimensions. Emotional profile scores, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, eating disorder symptomatology, worries and concerns about body shape, self-esteem and quality of life were assessed using several established questionnaires. The prevalence of problematic exercise varied considerably from, 5% to 54%, depending on the number of criteria used for its definition. The type and level of eating disorder symptomatology was found to be associated with several definitions of problematic exercise. Surprisingly, a better self-reported quality of life was found among problematic exercisers compared to non-problematic exercisers in three of the definitions. The different definitions of problematic exercise explain the broad prevalence ranges and the conflicting associations generally reported in the literature between problematic exercise and eating disorder-related psychological parameters. There is an urgent need for a valid consensus on the definition

  1. Complications of emergency refeeding in anorexia nervosa: case series and review.

    PubMed

    Webb, G J; Smith, K; Thursby-Pelham, F; Smith, T; Stroud, M A; Da Silva, A N

    2011-01-01

    The refeeding syndrome is common among patients with anorexia nervosa. It may be lethal and has many manifestations. We report a case series of 14 anorexic patients admitted for feeding to a single British centre. There was a high prevalence of the refeeding syndrome, with three cases requiring higher dependency unit support and one death. We present a review of the refeeding syndrome in anorectics and highlight our impression that infection among such patients may be serious and under-recognised.

  2. The Use of Animal Models to Decipher Physiological and Neurobiological Alterations of Anorexia Nervosa Patients

    PubMed Central

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies were performed to decipher the mechanisms regulating feeding due to the worldwide obesity pandemy and its complications. The data obtained might be adapted to another disorder related to alteration of food intake, the restrictive anorexia nervosa. This multifactorial disease with a complex and unknown etiology is considered as an awful eating disorder since the chronic refusal to eat leads to severe, and sometimes, irreversible complications for the whole organism, until death. There is an urgent need to better understand the different aspects of the disease to develop novel approaches complementary to the usual psychological therapies. For this purpose, the use of pertinent animal models becomes a necessity. We present here the various rodent models described in the literature that might be used to dissect central and peripheral mechanisms involved in the adaptation to deficient energy supplies and/or the maintenance of physiological alterations on the long term. Data obtained from the spontaneous or engineered genetic models permit to better apprehend the implication of one signaling system (hormone, neuropeptide, neurotransmitter) in the development of several symptoms observed in anorexia nervosa. As example, mutations in the ghrelin, serotonin, dopamine pathways lead to alterations that mimic the phenotype, but compensatory mechanisms often occur rendering necessary the use of more selective gene strategies. Until now, environmental animal models based on one or several inducing factors like diet restriction, stress, or physical activity mimicked more extensively central and peripheral alterations decribed in anorexia nervosa. They bring significant data on feeding behavior, energy expenditure, and central circuit alterations. Animal models are described and criticized on the basis of the criteria of validity for anorexia nervosa. PMID:26042085

  3. Problematic Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa: Testing Potential Risk Factors against Different Definitions.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Melissa; Lalanne, Christophe; Berthoz, Sylvie; Kern, Laurence; Godart, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    "Hyperactivity" has a wide prevalence range of 31% to 80% in the anorexia nervosa literature that could be partly due to the plethora of definitions provided by researchers in this field. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) To assess the variance across prevalence rates of problematic exercise encountered in patients with anorexia nervosa, in relation to seven different definitions found in the literature. 2) To examine how core eating disorder symptoms and the dimensions of emotional profile are associated with these different definitions and the impact of these definitions on the assessment of patients' quality of life. Exercise was evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, type and compulsion using a semi-structured questionnaire administered to 180 women suffering from severe anorexia nervosa. Seven different definitions of problematic exercise were identified in the literature: three entailing a single dimension of problematic exercise (duration, compulsion or intensity) and four combining these different dimensions. Emotional profile scores, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, eating disorder symptomatology, worries and concerns about body shape, self-esteem and quality of life were assessed using several established questionnaires. The prevalence of problematic exercise varied considerably from, 5% to 54%, depending on the number of criteria used for its definition. The type and level of eating disorder symptomatology was found to be associated with several definitions of problematic exercise. Surprisingly, a better self-reported quality of life was found among problematic exercisers compared to non-problematic exercisers in three of the definitions. The different definitions of problematic exercise explain the broad prevalence ranges and the conflicting associations generally reported in the literature between problematic exercise and eating disorder-related psychological parameters. There is an urgent need for a valid consensus on the definition of

  4. Problematic Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa: Testing Potential Risk Factors against Different Definitions.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Melissa; Lalanne, Christophe; Berthoz, Sylvie; Kern, Laurence; Godart, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    "Hyperactivity" has a wide prevalence range of 31% to 80% in the anorexia nervosa literature that could be partly due to the plethora of definitions provided by researchers in this field. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) To assess the variance across prevalence rates of problematic exercise encountered in patients with anorexia nervosa, in relation to seven different definitions found in the literature. 2) To examine how core eating disorder symptoms and the dimensions of emotional profile are associated with these different definitions and the impact of these definitions on the assessment of patients' quality of life. Exercise was evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, type and compulsion using a semi-structured questionnaire administered to 180 women suffering from severe anorexia nervosa. Seven different definitions of problematic exercise were identified in the literature: three entailing a single dimension of problematic exercise (duration, compulsion or intensity) and four combining these different dimensions. Emotional profile scores, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, eating disorder symptomatology, worries and concerns about body shape, self-esteem and quality of life were assessed using several established questionnaires. The prevalence of problematic exercise varied considerably from, 5% to 54%, depending on the number of criteria used for its definition. The type and level of eating disorder symptomatology was found to be associated with several definitions of problematic exercise. Surprisingly, a better self-reported quality of life was found among problematic exercisers compared to non-problematic exercisers in three of the definitions. The different definitions of problematic exercise explain the broad prevalence ranges and the conflicting associations generally reported in the literature between problematic exercise and eating disorder-related psychological parameters. There is an urgent need for a valid consensus on the definition of

  5. An exploratory study of evoked facial affect in adolescent females with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rhind, Charlotte; Mandy, William; Treasure, Janet; Tchanturia, Kate

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate facial affect in adolescent females with anorexia nervosa (AN). Evoked facial affect was recorded whilst AN and control participants (n=34) viewed emotional films. Significantly less facial affect was found in AN adolescents, despite reporting no differences in subjective emotion experience. These findings correspond with previous studies in adults with AN. Altered facial affect may impair interpersonal functioning and contribute to illness maintenance.

  6. Diagnostic crossover from obesity to atypical anorexia nervosa - a case report.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Heike; Schneider, Nora; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    A 15-year-old, female, formerly obese adolescent was referred to our day care clinic due to self-induced massive weight loss and depressive symptoms. Intense treatment, additional dialectical behavioral therapy and psychopharmacological treatment prevented further weight loss and improved her affective state. Due to remaining anorexic symptoms such as body image distortion, outpatient psychotherapeutic treatment is continued. This case report indicates the importance of further research on diagnostic crossover from obesity to atypical anorexia nervosa. PMID:20054205

  7. Subjective Motives for Requesting In-Patient Treatment in Female with Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, Pauline; Nordon, Clementine; Rouillon, Frederic; Pham-Scottez, Alexandra; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder mainly affecting women. Its treatment is long and accepted with much difficulty, in particular in-patient treatment. Aims To describe the subjective motives of women with anorexia nervosa for requesting in-patient admission, from a qualitative analysis of application letters. Methods Participants were adult women (18 years and older) with anorexia nervosa who were admitted as in-patients in a referral hospital unit in France from January 2008 to December 2010. The application letters, prerequisites to admission, were studied by the interpretative phenomenological method of content analysis. Results 63 letters have been analysed, allowing the identification of six themes related to requests for in-patient care: loss of control of behaviour, and of thoughts, mental exhaustion, isolation, inner struggle and fear of recovery. Conclusions Requests for in-patient admission were motivated by very personal, subjective experiences, unrelated to medical reasons for admission. These results may help improve pre-admission motivational work with individuals, by basing it on their subjective experience. PMID:24204951

  8. Anorexia nervosa and refusal of naso-gastric treatment: a response to Heather Draper.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Simona

    2003-06-01

    Imposing artificial feeding on people with anorexia nervosa may be unethical. This seems to be Heather Draper's suggestion in her article, 'Anorexia Nervosa and Respecting a Refusal of Life-Prolonging Therapy: A Limited Justification.' Although this is an important point, I shall show that the arguments supporting this point are flawed. Draper should have made a brave claim: she should have claimed that people with anorexia nervosa, who competently decide not to be artificially fed, should be respected because everybody is entitled to exercise their autonomy, not only 'in the middle' of their life, but also at the end of it, or when their own life is at stake, because autonomy also extends to the most difficult moments of our life, and, ultimately, 'stretches [...] far out into the distance' at the end of it. I explain why Draper should have made the brave claim, and why she has not made it. I conclude that a defence of people's entitlement to competently refuse artificial feeding cannot rest upon the arguments developed by Draper. Whether or not we should respect competent refusal of artificial feeding depends on the normative strength that we are ready to ascribe to the principle of autonomy, to the moral relevance that we ascribe to the circumstances in which a person's autonomy is exercised, and, perhaps, eventually, on our sense of compassion.

  9. Food refusal and insanity: sitophobia and anorexia nervosa in Victorian asylums.

    PubMed

    van Deth, R; Vandereycken, W

    2000-05-01

    Although anorexia nervosa emerged as a new syndrome in the second half of the 19th century, this clinical picture seemed to be unknown in the psychiatric hospitals or asylums. In asylum medicine, the commonly used concept of sitophobia to designate food refusal in the insane covered a wide variety of mental disturbances and cannot be plainly equated with anorexia nervosa. A major difference is the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions specifically centered around religion and digestion. Most probably, anorectic patients were not treated in asylums, but at home, in the doctor's office, or in general hospitals. This pattern may be partly attributed to the fact that both patients and doctors were focusing on symptoms of self-starvation like emaciation, constipation, and amenorrhea, which were primarily interpreted as referring to somatic diseases. Additionally, wealthy families probably preferred private care in water-cure establishments, sanatoria, and rest homes to the stigmatizing referral of their anorectic daughter to an asylum. Hence, the fact that late 19th-century institutionalized psychiatry was only incidentally confronted with anorexia nervosa may explain its lack of interest in the emerging syndrome.

  10. Chronic anorexia nervosa: enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and liaison psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Malfi, G; Agnello, E; Da Pont, M C; Palmo, A; Zullo, G; Monero, A; Macario, P F; Sterpone, S; Munno, D

    2006-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a complex mental disorder characterized by altered eating behaviour often resulting in life-threatening weight loss (<85% of expected body weight) associated with amenorrhea and a disturbance of body image. Although classified as mental health disorders, they may lead to serious medical consequences and have the highest rate of premature death of any mental health diagnosis. We report our experience with the use of enteral feeding via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in a 39-year-old woman with chronic restricter anorexia nervosa treated in liaison psychiatry and psychotherapy. On admission to psychiatry unit, the patient presented seriously deteriorated general condition and a body mass index (BMI) of 10 (BMI = weight kg/height m(2)). She refused oral feeding, but eventually accepted nasogastric feeding. In preparation for her continuing long-term (>1 month) enteral feeding at home, a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed and a home nutrition support regimen that met her energy-protein intake requirements was prescribed. During the follow-up period, an overall improvement in nutritional status, general condition, mood and cognitive functioning was observed. Patient compliance with refeeding is notoriously problematic; however, enteral feeding interventions may be feasible in the long-term treatment of selected anorexia nervosa patients when closely followed-up by a multidisciplinary medical team.

  11. Brain hypometabolism of glucose in anorexia nervosa: a PET scan study.

    PubMed

    Delvenne, V; Lotstra, F; Goldman, S; Biver, F; De Maertelaer, V; Appelboom-Fondu, J; Schoutens, A; Bidaut, L M; Luxen, A; Mendelwicz, J

    1995-02-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was studied in 20 underweight anorectic girls and in 10 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography with (18-F)-fluorodeoxy-glucose. Both groups were scanned during rest, with eye closed and with low ambient noise. Compared to controls, the underweight anorectic group showed a global hypometabolism (p = .002) and an absolute (p < .001) as well as relative (p < .01) hypometabolism of glucose in cortical regions, with the most significant differences found in the frontal and the parietal cortices. Within the underweight anorectic and the control groups, no correlations were found between absolute or relative rCMRGlu and BMI, anxiety scores, or Hamilton scores of depression. Different factors might explain this reduction of glucose metabolism in anorexia nervosa. It might be the consequence of neurophysiological or morphological aspects of anorexia nervosa and/or the result of some associated symptoms such as anxiety or depressed feelings. Supported by cognitive studies, we can also hypothesize a primary corticocerebral dysfunctioning in anorexia nervosa. PMID:7727624

  12. Family functioning in adolescent anorexia nervosa: a comparison of family members' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Emanuelli, F; Ostuzzi, R; Cuzzolaro, M; Baggio, F; Lask, B; Waller, G

    2004-03-01

    Abnormal patterns of family functioning have often been reported in anorexia nervosa. Moreover, members of families with an adult with eating disorders have different family functioning perspectives. This study investigated whether differences in family members' perspectives, similar to the ones found in families of adults with eating disorders, can be found in families of adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Perceived family functioning, measured with the Family Assessment Device, was compared between 49 control and 34 clinical families, and across family members. Differences were found between the two groups on a number of aspects of family functioning, with the clinical families showing most disturbances. There was a general agreement across family members in their perceptions of family functioning, with one notable exception. Clinical daughters disagreed with both their parents about the family level of communication, whereas control daughters disagreed only with their fathers. Disagreements between clinical adolescents and their mothers about the family communication style appear to be important in anorexia nervosa in this age group, although it is not possible to reach conclusions about the direction of causality. These findings support the use of family-oriented therapies that aim to identify and work with difficulties in communication within the family.

  13. Competence to make treatment decisions in anorexia nervosa: thinking processes and values

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dr. Jacinta O. A.; Hope, Professor Tony; Stewart, Dr. Anne; Fitzpatrick, Professor Raymond

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the ethical and conceptual implications of the findings from an empirical study of decision-making capacity in anorexia nervosa. In the study, ten female patients aged 13 to 21 years with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa, and eight sets of parents, took part in semi-structured interviews. The purpose of the interviews was to identify aspects of thinking that might be relevant to the issue of competence to refuse treatment. All the patient participants were also tested using the MacCAT-T test of competence. This is a formalised, structured interviewer-administered test of competence, which is a widely accepted clinical tool for determining capacity. The young women also completed five brief self-administered questionnaires to assess their levels of psychopathology. The issues identified from the interviews are described under two headings: difficulties with thought processing, and changes in values. The results suggest that competence to refuse treatment may be compromised in people with anorexia nervosa in ways that are not captured by traditional legal approaches or current standardised tests of competence. PMID:18066393

  14. Art therapy, psychodrama, and verbal therapy. An integrative model of group therapy in the treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Diamond-Raab, Lisa; Orrell-Valente, Joan K

    2002-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa typically afflict individuals in adolescence. Given the intractability of these diseases in combination with the natural recalcitrance of adolescence, treatment with this population presents a daunting challenge. Traditional group therapy that focuses on verbal therapy is often not effective with this population, particularly in the acute stages of the diseases. A group therapy approach that integrates art therapy, psychodrama, and verbal therapy offers an innovative alternative to traditional group therapy.

  15. Parent-focused treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa: a study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Family-based treatment is an efficacious outpatient intervention for medically stable adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Previous research suggests family-based treatment may be more effective for some families when parents and adolescents attend separate therapy sessions compared to conjoint sessions. Our service developed a novel separated model of family-based treatment, parent-focused treatment, and is undertaking a randomised controlled trial to compare parent-focused treatment to conjoint family-based treatment. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial will recruit 100 adolescents aged 12–18 years with DSM-IV anorexia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified (anorexia nervosa type). The trial commenced in 2010 and is expected to be completed in 2015. Participants are recruited from the Royal Children’s Hospital Eating Disorders Program, Melbourne, Australia. Following a multidisciplinary intake assessment, eligible families who provide written informed consent are randomly allocated to either parent-focused treatment or conjoint family-based treatment. In parent-focused treatment, the adolescent sees a clinical nurse consultant and the parents see a trained mental health clinician. In conjoint family-based treatment, the whole family attends sessions with the mental health clinician. Both groups receive 18 treatment sessions over 6 months and regular medical monitoring by a paediatrician. The primary outcome is remission at end of treatment and 6 and 12 month follow up, with remission defined as being ≥ 95% expected body weight and having an eating disorder symptom score within one standard deviation of community norms. The secondary outcomes include partial remission and changes in eating pathology, depressive symptoms and self-esteem. Moderating and mediating factors will also be explored. Discussion This will be first randomised controlled trial of a parent-focused model of family-based treatment of adolescent

  16. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Risperidone for the Treatment of Adolescents and Young Adults with Anorexia Nervosa: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagman, Jennifer; Gralla, Jane; Sigel, Eric; Ellert, Swan; Dodge, Mindy; Gardner, Rick; O'Lonergan, Teri; Frank, Guido; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this double-blind, placebo-controlled exploratory pilot study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of risperidone for the treatment of anorexia nervosa. Method: Forty female subjects 12 to 21 years of age (mean, 16 years) with primary anorexia nervosa in an eating disorders program were randomized to receive…

  17. An Open Trial of Acceptance-based Separated Family Treatment (ASFT) for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Timko, C. Alix; Zucker, Nancy L.; Herbert, James D.; Rodriguez, Daniel; Merwin, Rhonda M.

    2016-01-01

    Family based-treatments have the most empirical support in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa; yet, a significant percentage of adolescents and their families do not respond to manualized family based treatment (FBT). The aim of this open trial was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of an innovative family-based approach to the treatment of anorexia: Acceptance-based Separated Family Treatment (ASFT). Treatment was grounded in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), delivered in a separated format, and included an ACT-informed skills program. Adolescents (ages 12–18) with anorexia or sub-threshold anorexia and their families received 20 treatment sessions over 24 weeks. Outcome indices included eating disorder symptomatology reported by the parent and adolescent, percentage of expected body weight achieved, and changes in psychological acceptance/avoidance. Half of the adolescents (48.0%) met criteria for full remission at the end of treatment, 29.8% met criteria for partial remission, and 21.3% did not improve. Overall, adolescents had a significant reduction in eating disorder symptoms and reached expected body weight. Treatment resulted in changes in psychological acceptance in the expected direction for both parents and adolescents. This open trial provides preliminary evidence for the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of ASFT for adolescents with anorexia. Directions for future research are discussed. PMID:25898341

  18. Anorexia nervosa in males. A comparative study of 107 cases reported in the literature (1970 to 1980).

    PubMed

    Vandereycken, W; Van den Broucke, S

    1984-11-01

    The relatively small number of male anorexia nervosa patients is often used as an excuse for the scarce literature on this subject. An exhaustive review of the literature (1970 to 1980), searching for case reports, yielded information about 107 males described as having anorexia nervosa. According to current criteria, the diagnosis was well documented in 37 patients. Data on the clinical picture and the social background were analysed and compared with a sample of 148 female anorectics. It was found that from the clinical point of view anorexia nervosa is strikingly similar in both sexes. A cluster analysis revealed that three subgroups might be distinguished in male cases: a '(pre)pubertal' variant, a 'lower class', and a 'middle class' variant. It is concluded that male patients should be involved in any future research on this syndrome.

  19. [Suspicion of anorexia nervosa as a cause of delayed diagnosis of brain tumor. A case report].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Ewa; Węcławek-Tompol, Jadwiga; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Barg, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are the most common solid tumors diagnosed in children. The most frequent symptoms of brain tumors in this age group are headaches and vomiting, regardless of the location of the lesions. These symptoms are non-specific, and in each case require differential diagnosis, especially if there is no gradual improvement in the patient's condition or progression. The most common signs of anorexia nervosa are chronic vomiting, weakness of the body, pain and in extreme cases cachexia. These symptoms are similar to the clinical image of CNS tumor. Teenager, described in our case report presented the following signs for several weeks prior to the diagnosis of a brain tumor: vomiting (especially after meals), non-specific headache and epigastric pain. No significant progression in the patient's condition oriented the diagnostic process towards anorexia nervosa. Although anorexia in this age group is much more common disease, compared to a brain tumor, it is vital to ruled out/ exclude organic disorders prior to diagnosis of psychogenic disorder. At the same time the waiting for the specialist consultations (ophthalmologist, neurologist) and test results (head CT, head NMR) should not prolong the patients referral to a specialist center. PMID:26615049

  20. Systematic review of evidence for different treatment settings in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Sloane; Hay, Phillipa; Touyz, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes in anorexia nervosa (AN) in different treatment settings: inpatient, partial hospitalization and outpatient. METHODS: Completed and published in the English language, randomized controlled trials comparing treatment in two or more settings or comparing different lengths of inpatient stay, were identified by database searches using terms “anorexia nervosa” and “treatment” dated to July 2014. Trials were assessed for risk of bias and quality according to the Cochrane handbook by two authors (Madden S and Hay P) Data were extracted on trial quality, participant features and setting, main outcomes and attrition. RESULTS: Five studies were identified, two comparing inpatient treatment to outpatient treatment, one study comparing different lengths of inpatient treatment, one comparing inpatient treatment to day patient treatment and one comparing day patient treatment with outpatient treatment. There was no difference in treatment outcomes between the different treatment settings and different lengths of inpatient treatment. Both outpatient treatment and day patient treatment were significantly cheaper than inpatient treatment. Brief inpatient treatment followed by evidence based outpatient care was also cheaper than prolonged inpatient care for weight normalization also followed by evidence based outpatient care. CONCLUSION: There is preliminary support for AN treatment in less restrictive settings but more research is needed to identify the optimum treatment setting for anorexia nervosa. PMID:25815264

  1. Does the impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in anorexia nervosa depend on increased sensitivity to endogenous melatonin?

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Zarzycki, J

    1999-02-01

    The authors hypothesize that the impairment of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in patients suffering from anorexia nervosa depends (at least in part) on the increased sensitivity to endogenous melatonin. The hypothesis is based mainly on the following facts: (1) melatonin is well known to exert an inhibitory effect on gonadotropin secretion; (2) melatonin binding is increased in brains of fasted rats; (3) undernutrition dramatically increases the inhibitory effect of exogenous melatonin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced gonadotropin secretion in female rats; (4) the administration of propranolol in girls suffering from anorexia nervosa diminishes the nocturnal peak of melatonin and, in parallel, restores the gonadotropin response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

  2. TORSADES DE POINTES ASSOCIATED WITH TAKOTSUBO CARDIOMYOPATHY IN AN ANOREXIA NERVOSA PATIENT DURING EMERGENCE FROM GENERAL ANESTHESIA.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroaki; Kinoshita, Michiko; Kondo, Akio; Yamada, Yasuhito; Inoue, Masaya

    2016-06-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a disease in which the patient exhibits transient, reversible left ventricular dysfunction that is triggered by physical or emotional stress. Prolongation of QT interval, a risk factor for arrhythmia and sudden death, has been reported to be prevalent among patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and is also observed in those with severe anorexia nervosa. In this report, we describe the rare case of a 30-year-old female patient with anorexia nervosa who developed Torsades de Pointes associated with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy during emergence from general anesthesia for emergency exploratory laparotomy. PMID:27487642

  3. [About a very extreme malnutrition case in a female patient with long-term non-treated restrictive anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Pelegrina Cortés, Beatriz; Guillén Sacoto, María Augusta; Palma Milla, Samara; Lisbona Catalán, Arturo; Martín Fuentes, María; Gómez-Candela, Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that often causes malnutrition and carries high mortality risk. A multidisciplinary and highly experienced team is needed to succeed in nutrition education and avoid the refeeding syndrome. We report the most severe case of malnutrition secondary to anorexia nervosa treated in our unit, a 33-year-old woman with a BMI of 8.8 kg/m2 and high liver aminotranferases who did not experience any complication during the refeeding process despite the extreme gravity of her situation.

  4. [Anorexia nervosa in light of Karl Jaspers and Erich Fromm's ideas and social constructivism--hypotheses and thoughts].

    PubMed

    Talarczyk, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The point of the article is to analyse and reflect on certain symptoms of anorexia nervosa in light of Karl Jaspers and Erich Fromm's ideas and social constructivism. Contemplating the disorder in view of the philosophical ideas mentioned earlier, the author analyses such aspects of patients as: functioning on the verge of life and death, the paradoxical struggle to escape from freedom in search of independence, as well as various understandings and descriptions of anorexia in consideration of social constructivism. The author shares thoughts and poses hypotheses, trying to view anorexia in light of selected philosophical and psychological ideas, which in their general assumptions were not concerned with defining nor analysing anorexia nervosa. In view of Karl Jaspers' ideas, the author focuses on the so called 'limit-situations', in the ideas of Erich Fromm she takes notice in "Escape from Freedom" to new relations. Finally in the light of social constructivism the author focuses on the cultural context.

  5. Food cravings discriminate between anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Implications for "success" versus "failure" in dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Silvia; Warren, Cortney S; Rodríguez, Sonia; Fernández, M Carmen; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio

    2009-06-01

    Food cravings are subjective, motivational states thought to induce binge eating among eating disorder patients. This study compared food cravings across eating disorders. Women (N=135) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, restrictive (ANR) or binge-purging (ANBP) types, or bulimia nervosa, non-purging (BNNP) or purging (BNP) types completed measures of food cravings. Discriminant analysis yielded two statistically significant functions. The first function differentiated between all the four group pairs except ANBP and BNNP, with levels of various food-craving dimensions successively increasing for ANR, ANBP, BNNP, and BNP participants. The second function differentiated between ANBP and BNNP participants. Overall, the functions improved classification accuracy above chance level (44% fewer errors). The findings suggest that cravings are more strongly associated with loss of control over eating than with dietary restraint tendencies.

  6. Elevated cognitive control over reward processing in recovered female patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Stefan; Geisler, Daniel; Ritschel, Franziska; King, Joseph A.; Seidel, Maria; Boehm, Ilka; Breier, Marion; Clas, Sabine; Weiss, Jessika; Marxen, Michael; Smolka, Michael N.; Roessner, Veit; Kroemer, Nils B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with anorexia nervosa are thought to exert excessive self-control to inhibit primary drives. Methods This study used functional MRI (fMRI) to interrogate interactions between the neural correlates of cognitive control and motivational processes in the brain reward system during the anticipation of monetary reward and reward-related feedback. In order to avoid confounding effects of undernutrition, we studied female participants recovered from anorexia nervosa and closely matched healthy female controls. The fMRI analysis (including node-to-node functional connectivity) followed a region of interest approach based on models of the brain reward system and cognitive control regions implicated in anorexia nervosa: the ventral striatum, medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Results We included 30 recovered patients and 30 controls in our study. There were no behavioural differences and no differences in hemodynamic responses of the ventral striatum and the mOFC in the 2 phases of the task. However, relative to controls, recovered patients showed elevated DLPFC activity during the anticipation phase, failed to deactivate this region during the feedback phase and displayed greater functional coupling between the DLPFC and mOFC. Recovered patients also had stronger associations than controls between anticipation-related DLPFC responses and instrumental responding. Limitations The results we obtained using monetary stimuli might not generalize to other forms of reward. Conclusion Unaltered neural responses in ventral limbic reward networks but increased recruitment of and connectivity with lateral–frontal brain circuitry in recovered patients suggests an elevated degree of self-regulatory processes in response to rewarding stimuli. An imbalance between brain systems subserving bottom–up and top–down processes may be a trait marker of the disorder. PMID:26107161

  7. The effects of clomiphene citrate on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, A; Marshall, J C; Beardwood, C J; Souza, V F; Russell, G F

    1976-08-01

    Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) responses to a course of clomiphene citrate were studied in eleven patients with anorexia nervosa at different stages of the illness. In malnourished patients basal levels of LH were invariably low. With the resumption of a normal weight a small but definite rise in LH levels was observed but this spontaneous response to weight gain was variable in that many patients continued to exhibit abnormally low LH levels. The response to clomiphene in terms of a rise in basal LH levels after administration of the drug, followed by a second peak of LH and subsequent menstrual bleeding, was clearly dependent in part on the patient's nutritional state. In the malnourished state the response to clomiphene was usually either absent or incomplete. After the resumption of a more normal weight, the patients invariably showed an initial rise in LH after the clomiphene, but the second LH peak and subsequent menstruation were frequently not demonstrated. Six patients maintained a normal body weight for at least six months after a course of clomiphene, but only three of them resumed cyclical menstrual bleeding. It was concluded that factors additional to the nutritional state contribute to the prolonged amenorrhoea in anorexia nervosa and that clomiphene appears to have only a limited role in the treatment and management of patients with the disorder. Some aspects of current knowledge of the endocrine mechanisms that regulate normal menstruation and of the mode of action of clomiphene are outlined. The results of the present study are discussed against this background in an attempt to elucidate further the hypothalamic disorder underlying the amenorrhoea in anorexia nervosa.

  8. Effect of management of patients with Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa on symptoms and impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Sernec, Karin; Tomori, Martina; Zalar, Bojan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to provide further and up to date information on the evaluation of the management of Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa at the Eating Disorders Unit (EDU) of the Ljubljana Psychiatric Clinic, based upon detailed assessment of the eating disorders specific and non specific symptoms of impulsive behaviors, highly correlated with these entities. 34 female patients with anorexia (restrictive or purgative type) and 38 female patients with Bulimia nervosa (purgative or non-purgative type) undergoing hospital treatment at the EDU were evaluated upon admission, as well as upon discharge and three and six months after discharge, using the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Upon discharge a marked decrease in the overall symptoms was noted. The differences in symptoms incidences between the two groups were significantly specific for the individual form of eating disorder, especially upon admission, and were more pronounced in anorexia group. In later measurements, performed during the period of three and six months after discharge, a mild trend of increase in the disorder specific symptoms was detected in both groups, but was not statistically significant. In addition to binging on food, striking, quarreling and spending sprees are characteristics of patients with eating disorders, which in particular apply to the Bulimia nervosa group. Apart from the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior was also reduced during study period, while the difference in its occurrence between the two groups gradually became non-significant. The management of patients with eating disorders at the EDU was successful in both groups, confirmed by an intense reduction of the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior and increased stability recorded three and six months after discharge. The study strongly suggests that the effect of treatment regime for eating disorders can be predicted by careful assessment of the relevant symptoms and impulsive behavioral patterns.

  9. MR Imaging in a case of severe anorexia nervosa: the ‘flip-flop’ effect

    PubMed Central

    DiVasta, Amy D.; Mulkern, Robert V.; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    We report an MR imaging phenomenon that can lead to misinterpretation. The unique appearance of the soft tissues and bone marrow in a 19-year-old severely malnourished woman with anorexia nervosa raised concerns about technical failure or systemic pathology. Due to extreme fat depletion, the T1-weighted images appeared to be fat-suppressed and the fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images appeared to be non-fat-suppressed (“flip-flopped”). Failure to recognize the influence of a patient’s overall nutritional status on MR images may cause confusion and misdiagnosis. PMID:25129340

  10. The neuropsychological profile of children, adolescents, and young adults with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Stedal, Kristin; Rose, Mark; Frampton, Ian; Landrø, Nils Inge; Lask, Bryan

    2012-05-01

    The neuropsychological profile of a sample of 155 patients with a clinical diagnosis of anorexia nervosa was assessed using a test battery specifically developed for such patients. The current findings suggest that the patients display a common neuropsychological profile including both strengths and weaknesses when compared with published norms. The patients displayed good verbal fluency skills, but performed poorly on tests of visuospatial memory, associated with relatively weak central coherence. They were within the average range on the assessment of executive functioning except for one measure of set-shifting. This study provides a valuable point of reference for clinicians when considering treatment options.

  11. Abnormal Liver Function Tests in an Anorexia Nervosa Patient and an Atypical Manifestation of Refeeding Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vootla, Vamshidhar R.; Daniel, Myrta

    2015-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is defined as electrolyte and fluid abnormalities that occur in significantly malnourished patients when they are refed orally, enterally, or parenterally. The principal manifestations include hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, vitamin deficiencies, volume overload and edema. This can affect multiple organ systems, such as the cardiovascular, pulmonary, or neurological systems, secondary to the above-mentioned abnormalities. Rarely, patients may develop gastrointestinal symptoms and show abnormal liver function test results. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa who developed refeeding syndrome and simultaneous elevations of liver function test results, which normalized upon the resolution of the refeeding syndrome. PMID:26351414

  12. Abnormal Liver Function Tests in an Anorexia Nervosa Patient and an Atypical Manifestation of Refeeding Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vootla, Vamshidhar R; Daniel, Myrta

    2015-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is defined as electrolyte and fluid abnormalities that occur in significantly malnourished patients when they are refed orally, enterally, or parenterally. The principal manifestations include hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, vitamin deficiencies, volume overload and edema. This can affect multiple organ systems, such as the cardiovascular, pulmonary, or neurological systems, secondary to the above-mentioned abnormalities. Rarely, patients may develop gastrointestinal symptoms and show abnormal liver function test results. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa who developed refeeding syndrome and simultaneous elevations of liver function test results, which normalized upon the resolution of the refeeding syndrome.

  13. Dimensions of emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: A conceptual review of the empirical literature.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Engel, Scott G; Gordon, Kathryn H; Kaye, Walter H; Mitchell, James E

    2015-08-01

    Several existing conceptual models and psychological interventions address or emphasize the role of emotion dysregulation in eating disorders. The current article uses Gratz and Roemer's (2004) multidimensional model of emotion regulation and dysregulation as a clinically relevant framework to review the extant literature on emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Specifically, the dimensions reviewed include: (1) the flexible use of adaptive and situationally appropriate strategies to modulate the duration and/or intensity of emotional responses, (2) the ability to successfully inhibit impulsive behavior and maintain goal-directed behavior in the context of emotional distress, (3) awareness, clarity, and acceptance of emotional states, and (4) the willingness to experience emotional distress in the pursuit of meaningful activities. The current review suggests that both AN and BN are characterized by broad emotion regulation deficits, with difficulties in emotion regulation across the four dimensions found to characterize both AN and BN, although a small number of more specific difficulties may distinguish the two disorders. The review concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of the findings, as well as a summary of limitations of the existing empirical literature and suggestions for future research.

  14. A history of the identification of the characteristic eating disturbances of Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder and Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Heaner, Martica K; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-06-01

    During the last 25 years, the careful examination of the eating behavior of individuals with eating disorders has provided critical insights into the nature of these disorders. Crucially, studies investigating components of different eating behaviors have documented that Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) are characterized by objective disturbances in eating patterns that are significantly different than behaviors exhibited by individuals who do not have these eating disorders. The detailed description of the disturbances in eating behavior has helped to identify diagnostic criteria associated with each disorder, and has led to important hypotheses about the underlying pathophysiology. These advances in understanding have provided, and continue to provide, a foundation for translational research and for the development of novel treatment interventions. This review is based on a presentation given by B. Timothy Walsh, M.D. at the 40th anniversary symposium of the Columbia University Appetite talks outlining the evolution of the discovery of the characteristic eating disturbances seen with each disorder.

  15. Drop-out and treatment outcome of outpatient cognitive-behavioral therapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Schnicker, Katja; Hiller, Wolfgang; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, drop-out-analyses were carried out for a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for 104 females with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), in the service setting of a university outpatient clinic (naturalistic setting). A total of 22.9% of patients with AN terminated therapy prematurely (drop-outs), compared to 40.6% of patients with BN. Group differences between drop-outs and completers show that the group of drop-outs with BN had higher values in the depression score at the start of therapy and was almost two times more likely to have a comorbid disorder (odds ratio 1.69), whereas drop-outs with AN had higher values in the outcome-scale drive for thinness and the odds ratio for being employed or living in a partnership was slightly lower. Completers and drop-outs did not differ significantly within groups in regard to age, body mass index at the start and end of therapy, or the number of comorbid disorders. On the whole, the therapy effect in the group of drop-outs was relatively moderate. For patients with AN, even higher therapy effects were observed among the drop-outs than among the completers. These data suggest that moderate therapy effects and responses can be achieved even among the drop-outs.

  16. Dimensions of Emotion Dysregulation in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: A Conceptual Review of the Empirical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Jason M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Engel, Scott G.; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Kaye, Walter H.; Mitchell, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Several existing conceptual models and psychological interventions address or emphasize the role of emotion dysregulation in eating disorders. The current article uses Gratz and Roemer’s (2004) multidimensional model of emotion regulation and dysregulation as a clinically relevant framework to review the extant literature on emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Specifically, the dimensions reviewed include: (1) the flexible use of adaptive and situationally appropriate strategies to modulate the duration and/or intensity of emotional responses, (2) the ability to successfully inhibit impulsive behavior and maintain goal-directed behavior in the context of emotional distress, (3) awareness, clarity, and acceptance of emotional states, and (4) the willingness to experience emotional distress in the pursuit of meaningful activities. The current review suggests that both AN and BN are characterized by broad emotion regulation deficits, with difficulties in emotion regulation across the four dimensions found to characterize both AN and BN, although a small number of more specific difficulties may distinguish the two disorders. The review concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of the findings, as well as a summary of limitations of the existing empirical literature and suggestions for future research. PMID:26112760

  17. [Eating disorders in childhood and adolescence. Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder].

    PubMed

    Gerlinghoff, M; Backmund, H

    2004-03-01

    The most important eating disorders are anorexia and bulimia, which most frequently occur for the first time during adolescence and continue into adulthood. Medical complications and accompanying psychological disturbances cause a significant mortality rate of up to 6% in anorexia and up to 3% in bulimia. The pathogenesis of eating disorders is still unclear. Current etiological concepts are multidimensional including biological, individual, familial, and sociocultural factors. In spite of a great variety of therapeutic possibilities, the prognosis for eating disorders is quite poor. In the long term, only about 50% of the persons affected overcome their illness. Preventive measures are therefore indispensable.

  18. Greater Insula White Matter Fiber Connectivity in Women Recovered from Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shott, Megan E; Pryor, Tamara L; Yang, Tony T; Frank, Guido K W

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder associated with reduced drive to eat. Altered taste-reward circuit white matter fiber organization in anorexia nervosa after recovery could indicate a biological marker that alters the normal motivation to eat. Women recovered from restricting-type anorexia (Recovered AN, n = 24, age = 30.3 ± 8.1 years) and healthy controls (n = 24, age = 27.4 ± 6.3 years) underwent diffusion weighted imaging of the brain. Probabilistic tractography analyses calculated brain white matter connectivity (streamlines) as an estimate of fiber connections in taste-reward-related white matter tracts, and microstructural integrity (fractional anisotropy, FA) was assessed using tract-based spatial statistics. Recovered AN showed significantly (range P<0.05-0.001, Bonferroni corrected) greater white matter connectivity between bilateral insula regions and ventral striatum, left insula and middle orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and right insula projecting to gyrus rectus and medial OFC. Duration of illness predicted connectivity of tracts projecting from the insula to ventral striatum and OFC. Microstructural integrity was lower in Recovered AN in most insula white matter tracts, as was whole-brain FA in parts of the anterior corona radiata, external capsule, and cerebellum (P<0.05, family-wise error-corrected). This study indicates higher structural white matter connectivity, an estimate of fibers connections, in anorexia after recovery in tracts that connect taste-reward processing regions. Greater connectivity together with less-fiber integrity could indicate altered neural activity between those regions, which could interfere with normal food-reward circuit function. Correlations between connectivity and illness duration suggest that connectivity could be a marker for illness severity. Whether greater connectivity can predict prognosis of the disorder requires further study.

  19. Co-Occurring Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care of You Top Ten Freshman Year Issues Alcohol, Substance Abuse and Depression Winter Break Survival Tips for College Students Implementing ... supporters and consumers in the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring ... In Crisis? Call ...

  20. Dysregulation of brain reward systems in eating disorders: neurochemical information from animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E

    2012-07-01

    Food intake is mediated, in part, through brain pathways for motivation and reinforcement. Dysregulation of these pathways may underlay some of the behaviors exhibited by patients with eating disorders. Research using animal models of eating disorders has greatly contributed to the detailed study of potential brain mechanisms that many underlie the causes or consequences of aberrant eating behaviors. This review focuses on neurochemical evidence of reward-related brain dysfunctions obtained through animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, or anorexia nervosa. The findings suggest that alterations in dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh) and opioid systems in reward-related brain areas occur in response to binge eating of palatable foods. Moreover, animal models of bulimia nervosa suggest that while bingeing on palatable food releases DA, purging attenuates the release of ACh that might otherwise signal satiety. Animal models of anorexia nervosa suggest that restricted access to food enhances the reinforcing effects of DA when the animal does eat. The activity-based anorexia model suggests alterations in mesolimbic DA and serotonin occur as a result of restricted eating coupled with excessive wheel running. These findings with animal models complement data obtained through neuroimaging and pharmacotherapy studies of clinical populations. Information on the neurochemical consequences of the behaviors associated with these eating disorders will be useful in understanding these complex disorders and may inform future therapeutic approaches, as discussed here. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  1. [Contemporary criteria of the diagnosis and current recommendations for nutritional therapy in anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł; Musialik, Katarzyna; Skrypnik, Katarzyna

    2014-05-01

    The basic criterion for the diagnosis of anorexia (AN - anorexia nervosa) by ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, version 10) is the body weight less than 15% of the expected normal body weight. According to DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, version IV) the basic feature of AN is a refusal to maintain body weight equal or greater than the minimal normal weight. The prevalence of anorexia nervosa is 0.3-0.5% or even 1.3-3.7% if include pre-anorexic states (eg. the phenomenon of pro-ana). The main feature of anorexia is a reduction of caloric intake. According to the recommendations of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) for nutritional treatment of patients with AN the main goals in therapy of AN are: restoration of body weight, normalization of eating patterns, achievement a normal feeling of hunger and satiety and correction of the consequences of improper nutrition. APA suggests that achievable weight gain is about 0.9-1.4 kg per week in the case of hospitalized patients and approximately 0.23-0.45 kg per week in the case of outpatients. During the nutritional treatment of AN numerous side effects including anxiety, phobia, occurrence of obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior, suicidal thoughts and intentions may occur. According to National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) the most important goal of AN therapy is weight gain in the range of 0.5-1 kg per week in hospitalized patients and 0.5 kg per week for outpatients. A person suffering from anorexia in the initial period of nutritional treatment spends twice more energy to maintain elevated body temperature, which significantly increases during the night rest. This phenomenon is called nocturnal hyperthermia and has a negative effect on the healing process. "Refeeding syndrome" is an adverse effect of nutritional treatment in anorexia. It is caused by too rapid nutrition in a patient suffering from chronic starvation. It can endanger the patient

  2. Increased anticipatory but decreased consummatory brain responses to food in sisters of anorexia nervosa patients

    PubMed Central

    Horndasch, Stefanie; O’Keefe, Sophie; Lamond, Anneka; Brown, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Background We have previously shown increased anticipatory and consummatory neural responses to rewarding and aversive food stimuli in women recovered from anorexia nervosa (AN). Aims To determine whether these differences are trait markers for AN, we examined the neural response in those with a familial history but no personal history of AN. Method Thirty-six volunteers were recruited: 15 who had a sister with anorexia nervosa (family history) and 21 control participants. Using fMRI we examined the neural response during an anticipatory phase (food cues, rewarding and aversive), an effort phase and a consummatory phase (rewarding and aversive tastes). Results Family history (FH) volunteers showed increased activity in the caudate during the anticipation of both reward and aversive food and in the thalamus and amygdala during anticipation of aversive only. FH had decreased activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the pallidum and the superior frontal gyrus during taste consumption. Conclusions Increased neural anticipatory but decreased consummatory responses to food might be a biomarker for AN. Interventions that could normalise these differences may help to prevent disorder onset. Declaration of interest C.M. has acted as a consultant to P1VITAL, Givaudan, GWPharma, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and Channel 4. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27703784

  3. Family therapy for adolescent anorexia nervosa: the results of a controlled comparison of two family interventions.

    PubMed

    Eisler, I; Dare, C; Hodes, M; Russell, G; Dodge, E; Le Grange, D

    2000-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a randomised treatment trial of two forms of outpatient family intervention for anorexia nervosa. Forty adolescent patients with anorexia nervosa were randomly assigned to "conjoint family therapy" (CFT) or to "separated family therapy" (SFT) using a stratified design controlling for levels of critical comments using the Expressed Emotion index. The design required therapists to undertake both forms of treatment and the distinctiveness of the two therapies was ensured by separate supervisors conducting live supervision of the treatments. Measures were undertaken on admission to the study, at 3 months, at 6 months and at the end of treatment. Considerable improvement in nutritional and psychological state occurred across both treatment groups. On global measure of outcome, the two forms of therapy were associated with equivalent end of treatment results. However, for those patients with high levels of maternal criticism towards the patient, the SFT was shown to be superior to the CFT. When individual status measures were explored, there were further differences between the treatments. Symptomatic change was more marked in the SFT whereas there was considerably more psychological change in the CFT group. There were significant changes in family measures of Expressed Emotion. Critical comments between parents and patient were significantly reduced and that between parents was also diminished. Warmth between parents increased.

  4. [Diet or health--the linkage between vegetarianism and anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Aloufy, Aviva; Latzer, Yael

    2006-07-01

    Vegetarianism in its various forms, is widely encountered in different societies all over the world; thus, combining nutritional, social, behavioral and psychological aspects. The prevalence of vegetarianism in the western world, as well as in Israel, is dealt with in this review. The extent of vegetarianism among young patients with eating disorders is much higher than in any other age group. Anorexia nervosa patients in Israel admit to be vegetarians in 85% (mean), as compared to 65% (mean) in other western countries. The last three decades abound with nutritional messages concerning healthy life styles. Food Pyramids recommend meat avoidance as a remedy and promise for longevity. This reason for abstaining from meat has led to the adoption of vegetarian diets in grownups. All age groups have mastered the "Vegi" trend, and mostly young girls. They express feelings of disgust especially towards red meat. Despite the knowledge gained by the public about the linkage between diet and health, the proportion of patients suffering from eating disorders is rising. There seems to be a direct connection between the "Vegi" fashion of the teenagers and eating disorders which start typically in adolescence. Many surveys point to the abuse of vegetarianism as a mask for weight control. The vegetarian diet, a selective way of eating, might precede different eating disorders and increase the risk of developing anorexia nervosa.

  5. Enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: an alternative to family therapy?

    PubMed

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Calugi, Simona; Doll, Helen A; Fairburn, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    A specific form of family therapy (family-based treatment) is the leading treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. As this treatment has certain limitations, alternative approaches are needed. "Enhanced" cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E) is a potential candidate given its utility as a treatment for adults with eating disorder psychopathology. The aim of the present study was to establish, in a representative cohort of patients with marked anorexia nervosa, the immediate and longer term outcome following CBT-E. Forty-nine adolescent patients were recruited from consecutive referrals to a community-based eating disorder clinic. Each was offered 40 sessions of CBT-E over 40 weeks from a single therapist. Two-thirds completed the full treatment with no additional input. In these patients there was a substantial increase in weight together with a marked decrease in eating disorder psychopathology. Over the 60-week post-treatment follow-up period there was little change despite minimal subsequent treatment. These findings suggest that CBT-E may prove to be a cost-effective alternative to family-based treatment.

  6. Gene receptor polymorphism as a risk factor for BMD deterioration in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Stergioti, E; Deligeoroglou, E; Economou, E; Tsitsika, A; Dimopoulos, K D; Daponte, A; Katsioulis, A; Creatsas, G

    2013-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder that is associated with decreased bone mineral density and greater lifetime risk for fractures. This case-controlled study, analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms of genes encoding vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1), collagen type I and calcitonin receptor (CTR). Relationships between genotype and body mass index, cycling status and lumbar spine bone mineral density (LBMD) were determined in 40 adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa and 10 age-matched controls. The distribution of CTR-AluI genotypes differed between groups, but this polymorphism was not associated with LBMD Z-score. Distribution of ESR1-XbaI genotypes did not differ between groups, but the AA genotype was associated with decreased LBMD Z-score (≤-1) (OR = 24.79, 95% CI, 1.01-606.08). Carriers of the A allele were more likely to have decreased LBMD Z-scores compared with carriers of the G allele (OR = 4.12, 95% CI, 1.23-13.85, p = 0.022). In conclusion, our study shows that anorexic patients with wild-type genotype ESR-XbaI receptor are in greater risk for decreased BMD in relation to those with the mutated gene. Prompt recognition of these patients is crucial because early administration of the proper therapeutic treatment may contribute to the prevention of adverse sequelae on bone metabolism.

  7. Predictors of outcomes in outpatients with anorexia nervosa - Results from the ANTOP study.

    PubMed

    Wild, Beate; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Zipfel, Stephan; Resmark, Gaby; Giel, Katrin; Teufel, Martin; Schellberg, Dieter; Löwe, Bernd; de Zwaan, Martina; Zeeck, Almut; Herpertz, Stephan; Burgmer, Markus; von Wietersheim, Jörn; Tagay, Sefik; Dinkel, Andreas; Herzog, Wolfgang

    2016-10-30

    This study aimed to determine predictors of BMI and recovery for outpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Patients were participants of the ANTOP (Anorexia Nervosa Treatment of Out-Patients) trial and randomized to focal psychodynamic therapy (FPT), enhanced cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-E), or optimized treatment as usual (TAU-O). N=169 patients participated in the one-year follow-up (T4). Outcomes were the BMI and global outcome (recovery/partial syndrome/full syndrome) at T4. We examined the following baseline variables as possible predictors: age, BMI, duration of illness, subtype of AN, various axis I diagnoses, quality of life, self-esteem, and psychological characteristics relevant to AN. Linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of the BMI and global outcome. The strongest positive predictor for BMI and recovery at T4 was a higher baseline BMI of the patients. Negative predictors for BMI and recovery were a duration of illness >6 years and a lifetime depression diagnosis at baseline. Additionally, higher bodily pain was significantly associated with a lower BMI and self-esteem was a positive predictor for recovery at T4. A higher baseline BMI and shorter illness duration led to a better outcome. Further research is necessary to investigate whether or not AN patients with lifetime depression, higher bodily pain, and lower self-esteem may benefit from specific treatment approaches. PMID:27467700

  8. Testing the disgust conditioning theory of food-avoidance in adolescents with recent onset anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Grotzinger, Andrew; Reddan, Marianne; Greif, Rebecca; Levy, Ifat; Goodman, Wayne; Schiller, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa is characterized by chronic food avoidance that is resistant to change. Disgust conditioning offers one potential unexplored mechanism for explaining this behavioral disturbance because of its specific role in facilitating food avoidance in adaptive situations. A food based reversal learning paradigm was used to study response flexibility in 14 adolescent females with restricting subtype anorexia nervosa (AN-R) and 15 healthy control (HC) participants. Expectancy ratings were coded as a behavioral measure of flexibility and electromyography recordings from the levator labii (disgust), zygomaticus major (pleasure), and corrugator (general negative affect) provided psychophysiological measures of emotion. Response inflexibility was higher for participants with AN-R, as evidenced by lower extinction and updated expectancy ratings during reversal. EMG responses to food stimuli were predictive of both extinction and new learning. Among AN-R patients, disgust specific responses to food were associated with impaired extinction, as were elevated pleasure responses to the cued absence of food. Disgust conditioning appears to influence food learning in acutely ill patients with AN-R and may be maintained by counter-regulatory acquisition of a pleasure response to food avoidance and an aversive response to food presence. Developing strategies to target disgust may improve existing interventions for patients with AN. PMID:26131915

  9. Open Trial of Family-Based Treatment for Full and Partial Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescence: Evidence of Successful Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeb, Katharine L.; Walsh, B. Timothy; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel; Jones, Jennifer; Marcus, Sue; Weaver, James; Dobrow, Ilyse

    2007-01-01

    Objective: There is a paucity of evidence-based interventions for anorexia nervosa (AN). An innovative family-based treatment (FBT), developed at the Maudsley Hospital and recently put in manual form, has shown great promise for adolescents with AN. Unlike traditional treatment approaches, which promote sustained autonomy around food, FBT…

  10. Use of the MMPI-I in Identifying Personality Characteristics of Anorexia Nervosa, Restrictor Subtype: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regardie, Cynthia Ramos

    In recent decades, the incidence of eating disorders has sharply increased. This paper reviews literature published between 1969 through 1992 which addresses personality characteristics of individuals with anorexia nervosa, restrictor subtype, utilizing the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-I). The current literature and research…

  11. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  12. Anorexia Nervosa: A Synthesis of Poetic and Narrative Therapies in the Outpatient Treatment of Young Adult Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Joy M.; Pehrsson, Dale-Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Current trends for treatment of women with anorexia nervosa often focus on weight gain as the primary therapeutic goal without concurrently addressing psychological concerns. As a result of this singular focus, many women drop out of treatment before recovering. This article offers an alternate treatment model. A synthesized narrative and poetry…

  13. Using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient to Measure Autistic Traits in Anorexia Nervosa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Heather; Eisler, Ivan; Mandy, William; Leppanen, Jenni; Treasure, Janet; Tchanturia, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the link between Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has led to estimates of the prevalence of autistic traits in AN. This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the use of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) or abbreviated version (AQ-10) to examine whether patients with AN have elevated levels of autistic…

  14. Eating attitudes of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and obesity without eating disorder female patients: differences and similarities.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, M S; Koritar, P; Pisciolaro, F; Mancini, M; Cordás, T A; Scagliusi, F B

    2014-05-28

    The objective was to compare eating attitudes, conceptualized as beliefs, thoughts, feelings, behaviors and relationship with food, of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) patients and a group of obese (OBS) without eating disorders (ED). Female patients from an Eating Disorder (ED) Unit with AN (n=42), BN (n=52) and BED (n=53) and from an obesity service (n=37) in Brazil answered the Disordered Eating Attitude Scale (DEAS) which evaluate eating attitudes with 5 subscales: relationship with food, concerns about food and weight gain, restrictive and compensatory practices, feelings toward eating, and idea of normal eating. OBS patients were recruited among those without ED symptoms according to the Binge Eating Scale and the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns. ANOVA was used to compare body mass index and age between groups. Bonferroni test was used to analyze multiple comparisons among groups. AN and BN patients presented more dysfunctional eating attitudes and OBS patients less dysfunctional (p<0.001). For DEAS total score, AN and BN patients were similar and all other were different (p<0.001). Similarities suggested between BN and BED were true just for the "Relationship with food" and "Idea of normal eating." BED patients were worst than OBS for "Relationship with food" and as dysfunctional as AN patients - besides their behavior could be considered the opposite. Differences and similarities support a therapeutic individualized approach for ED and obese patients, call attention for the theoretical differences between obesity and ED, and suggest more research focused on eating attitudes.

  15. The Role of Leptin, Melanocortin, and Neurotrophin System Genes on Body Weight in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Kaplan, Allan S.; Tiwari, Arun K.; Levitan, Robert D.; Piran, Sara; Bergen, Andrew W.; Kaye, Walter H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Wang, Kai; Berrettini, Wade H.; Brandt, Harry A.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Crawford, Steve; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M.; Halmi, Katherine A.; Johnson, Craig L.; Keel, Pamela K.; Klump, Kelly L.; Magistretti, Pierre; Mitchell, James E.; Strober, Michael; Thornton, Laura M.; Treasure, Janet; Woodside, D. Blake; Knight, Joanne; Kennedy, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although low weight is a key factor contributing to the high mortality in anorexia nervosa (AN), it is unclear how AN patients sustain low weight compared with bulimia nervosa (BN) patients with similar psychopathology. Studies of genes involved in appetite and weight regulation in eating disorders have yielded variable findings in part due to small sample size and clinical heterogeneity. This study: (1) assessed the role of leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin genetic variants in conferring risk for AN and BN and (2) explored the involvement of these genes in body mass index (BMI) variations within AN and BN. Method Our sample consisted of 745 individuals with AN without a history of BN, 245 with BN without a history of AN, and 321 controls. We genotyped 20 markers with known or putative function among genes selected from leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin systems. Results There were no significant differences in allele frequencies among individuals with AN, BN, and controls. AGRP rs13338499 polymorphism was associated with lowest illness-related BMI in those with AN (p=0.0013), and NTRK2 rs1042571 was associated with highest BMI in those with BN (p=0.0018). Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first study to address the issue of clinical heterogeneity in eating disorder genetics and to explore the role of known or putatively functional markers in genes regulating appetite and weight in individuals with AN and BN. If replicated, our results may serve as an important first step toward gaining a better understanding of weight regulation in eating disorders. PMID:24831852

  16. The change in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture: a possible marker to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao-Tao; Hong, Qing-Xiong; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for patients who suffer from intractable anorexia nervosa. However, the nature of DBS may not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option for anorexia nervosa because of the unpredictable outcome before DBS. Just like DBS in the brain, electroacupuncture at acupoints is also efficient in treating refractory anorexia nervosa. Some neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) had revealed that both DBS and electroacupuncture at acupoints with electrical stimulation are related to the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture might be useful to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa. PMID:26770596

  17. Resting-state synchrony between anterior cingulate cortex and precuneus relates to body shape concern in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seojung; Ran Kim, Kyung; Ku, Jeonghun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Namkoong, Kee; Jung, Young-Chul

    2014-01-30

    Cortical areas supporting cognitive control and salience demonstrate different neural responses to visual food cues in patients with eating disorders. This top-down cognitive control, which interacts with bottom-up appetitive responses, is tightly integrated not only in task conditions but also in the resting-state. The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) is a key node of a large-scale network that is involved in self-referential processing and cognitive control. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity of the dACC and hypothesized that altered connectivity would be demonstrated in cortical midline structures involved in self-referential processing and cognitive control. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity was analyzed in women with anorexia nervosa (N=18), women with bulimia nervosa (N=20) and age matched healthy controls (N=20). Between group comparisons revealed that the anorexia nervosa group exhibited stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and retrosplenial cortex, whereas the bulimia nervosa group showed stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Both groups demonstrated stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and precuneus, which correlated with higher scores of the Body Shape Questionnaire. The dACC-precuneus resting-state synchrony might be associated with the disorder-specific rumination on eating, weight and body shape in patients with eating disorders. PMID:24300085

  18. Resting-state synchrony between anterior cingulate cortex and precuneus relates to body shape concern in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seojung; Ran Kim, Kyung; Ku, Jeonghun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Namkoong, Kee; Jung, Young-Chul

    2014-01-30

    Cortical areas supporting cognitive control and salience demonstrate different neural responses to visual food cues in patients with eating disorders. This top-down cognitive control, which interacts with bottom-up appetitive responses, is tightly integrated not only in task conditions but also in the resting-state. The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) is a key node of a large-scale network that is involved in self-referential processing and cognitive control. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity of the dACC and hypothesized that altered connectivity would be demonstrated in cortical midline structures involved in self-referential processing and cognitive control. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity was analyzed in women with anorexia nervosa (N=18), women with bulimia nervosa (N=20) and age matched healthy controls (N=20). Between group comparisons revealed that the anorexia nervosa group exhibited stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and retrosplenial cortex, whereas the bulimia nervosa group showed stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Both groups demonstrated stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and precuneus, which correlated with higher scores of the Body Shape Questionnaire. The dACC-precuneus resting-state synchrony might be associated with the disorder-specific rumination on eating, weight and body shape in patients with eating disorders.

  19. Historical evolution of the concept of anorexia nervosa and relationships with orthorexia nervosa, autism, and obsessive-compulsive spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Liliana; Abelli, Marianna; Carpita, Barbara; Pini, Stefano; Castellini, Giovanni; Carmassi, Claudia; Ricca, Valdo

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders have been defined as "characterized by persistence disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that results in the altered consumption or absorption of food and that significantly impairs health or psychosocial functioning". The psychopathology of eating disorders changed across time under the influence of environmental factors, determining the emergence of new phenotypes. Some of these conditions are still under investigation and are not clearly identified as independent diagnostic entities. In this review, the historic evolution of the eating disorder concept up to the recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, has been evaluated. We also examined literature supporting the inclusion of new emergent eating behaviors within the eating disorder spectrum, and their relationship with anorexia, autism, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. In particular, we focused on what is known about the symptoms, epidemiology, assessment, and diagnostic boundaries of a new problematic eating pattern called orthorexia nervosa that could be accepted as a new psychological syndrome, as emphasized by an increasing number of scientific articles in the last few years. PMID:27462158

  20. Historical evolution of the concept of anorexia nervosa and relationships with orthorexia nervosa, autism, and obsessive–compulsive spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Osso, Liliana; Abelli, Marianna; Carpita, Barbara; Pini, Stefano; Castellini, Giovanni; Carmassi, Claudia; Ricca, Valdo

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders have been defined as “characterized by persistence disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that results in the altered consumption or absorption of food and that significantly impairs health or psychosocial functioning”. The psychopathology of eating disorders changed across time under the influence of environmental factors, determining the emergence of new phenotypes. Some of these conditions are still under investigation and are not clearly identified as independent diagnostic entities. In this review, the historic evolution of the eating disorder concept up to the recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, has been evaluated. We also examined literature supporting the inclusion of new emergent eating behaviors within the eating disorder spectrum, and their relationship with anorexia, autism, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In particular, we focused on what is known about the symptoms, epidemiology, assessment, and diagnostic boundaries of a new problematic eating pattern called orthorexia nervosa that could be accepted as a new psychological syndrome, as emphasized by an increasing number of scientific articles in the last few years. PMID:27462158

  1. Historical evolution of the concept of anorexia nervosa and relationships with orthorexia nervosa, autism, and obsessive-compulsive spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Liliana; Abelli, Marianna; Carpita, Barbara; Pini, Stefano; Castellini, Giovanni; Carmassi, Claudia; Ricca, Valdo

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders have been defined as "characterized by persistence disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that results in the altered consumption or absorption of food and that significantly impairs health or psychosocial functioning". The psychopathology of eating disorders changed across time under the influence of environmental factors, determining the emergence of new phenotypes. Some of these conditions are still under investigation and are not clearly identified as independent diagnostic entities. In this review, the historic evolution of the eating disorder concept up to the recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, has been evaluated. We also examined literature supporting the inclusion of new emergent eating behaviors within the eating disorder spectrum, and their relationship with anorexia, autism, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. In particular, we focused on what is known about the symptoms, epidemiology, assessment, and diagnostic boundaries of a new problematic eating pattern called orthorexia nervosa that could be accepted as a new psychological syndrome, as emphasized by an increasing number of scientific articles in the last few years.

  2. All Better? How Former Anorexia Nervosa Patients Define Recovery and Engaged in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Darcy, Alison M.; Katz, Shaina; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Forsberg, Sarah; Utzinger, Linsey; Lock, James

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) engage in treatment and define recovery. A mixed methods design was used to triangulate the experience of 20 women with a history of AN. Interview data were analysed thematically to explore frequency of emergent themes and current eating disorder psychopathology was assessed using standardized self-report measures. Participants’ mean age was 29.35 (SD = 12.11). Participants’ scores were indicative of persistent psychopathology. Those with more involvement in treatment choice had better motivation to change and normalized eating. Participants’ definition of recovery mapped on well to current research conceptualizations, though a substantial proportion of the group expressed some ambivalence around the concept. Results are interpreted in the context of self-determination theory of motivation and suggest that patients should be involved collaboratively in the formulation of shared goals and concepts of recovery in treatment settings. PMID:20589765

  3. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome in a patient with anorexia nervosa: A case report.

    PubMed

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Benini, Luigi; Sgarbi, Daniela; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    This case report describes the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of a 26-year-old patient with anorexia nervosa (AN) diagnosed with Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS). To our knowledge, this is the first case report to document SRUS in AN, whose pathogenesis in this case seems to have been determined by the patient's malnourished and underweight state. Furthermore, SRUS symptoms appear to have interacted with the eating disorder psychopathology, increasing the need to exert control over eating. Cognitive behavioral strategies and procedures were accordingly used to address the eating disorder psychopathology and to promote complete weight restoration, which brought about a significant reduction in the size of the ulcer and the complete resolution of SRUS symptoms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:731-735).

  4. Using neuropsychological feedback therapeutically in treatment for anorexia nervosa: two illustrative case reports.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Carolina; Roberts, Marion E; Tchanturia, Kate; Treasure, Janet

    2008-11-01

    Information processing in anorexia nervosa (AN) has been characterised as having a tendency to get trapped in detail, and having difficulties with set-shifting. These characteristics can be addressed in treatment through personalised interventions targeting thinking styles and their role in the development and maintenance of an eating disorder (ED). This paper outlines a three-session assessment and feedback module designed to identify and address these information processing biases. Two case reports are presented to illustrate the structure, content and outcome of the intervention. Both patients described the intervention as helpful in providing a structure and rationale for the steps required in recovery. The short nature and promising results of this intervention make it an attractive addition to current treatment programmes.

  5. Neurobiologically informed treatment for adults with anorexia nervosa: a novel approach to a chronic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Knatz, Stephanie; Wierenga, Christina E.; Murray, Stuart B.; Hill, Laura; Kaye, Walter H.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and debilitating disorder with significant medical and psychological sequelae. To date, there are no effective treatments for adults, resulting in high rates of chronicity, morbidity, and mortality. Recent advances in brain imaging research have led to an improved understanding of etiology and specific neurobiological mechanisms underlying symptoms. Despite this, there are no treatments focused on targeting symptoms using this empirically supported mechanistic understanding of the illness. Updated treatment approaches focused on targeting neurobiological mechanisms underlying core AN symptomatology are necessary to improve treatment out-comes for this population. Neurobiologically Enhanced With Family Eating Disorder Trait Response Treatment (NEW FED TR) is a neurobiologically informed treatment targeting key temperament constructs associated with the illness through the delivery of psychoeducation and skills training to patients and nominated carers. PMID:26246796

  6. [Typology of disordered eating behaviour (anorexia nervosa with bulimia and vomitomanic disturbances) in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Balakireva, E E; Kozlova, I A; Iakupova, L P; Savost'ianova, O L

    2004-01-01

    Eighty children (66 girls and 14 boys), aged 6-16 years, with syndrome of anorexia nervosa (AN) have been studied. Two nosologic groups: pathological age crisis of childhood and adolescence (F50.0-F50.2 in ICD-10)--30 patients and slow-progressive schizophrenia (schizotypical disorder, F21.3-F21.4)--50 patients are determined. The latter group was divided according to syndrome types: syndrome of AN (28 patients); AN syndrome with predominant bulimia (11 patients); AN syndrome with dominating bulimia and vomitomanic disturbances (11 patients). Syndrome structure was determined by the stages of the course, syntropy character with other psychopathological disorders and process of their reduction. Psychotic disorders in patients of the third type were most pronounced. In each group, statistically significant EEG features, comparing to control age-matched group, were revealed. The severer were psychopathological symptoms, the less was an amount of organized and the more--desynchronized "flat" EEG.

  7. Maladaptive schemas in adolescent females with anorexia nervosa and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Stephanie R; Reece, John; Reid, Sophie; Atkins, Linsey; Patton, George

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has highlighted the presence of Young's Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMSs) in individuals with an eating disorder (ED). This study assessed the EMSs reported by adolescent females with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) compared with a community group. Thirty-six adolescent females diagnosed with AN or subthreshold AN and 111 female secondary school students completed a questionnaire that included the Young Schema Questionnaire, the Behavior Assessment System for Children Self-report of Personality, and the Eating Disorder Screen for Primary Care. Two independent AN subtypes and two community subtypes were derived from responses to the questionnaire, and significant differences between the four comparison groups were found. High Pathology AN participants reported the highest level of psychological maladjustment. Social Isolation and Emotional Inhibition appeared to be most characteristic of adolescent AN in this sample. The results suggest that EMSs may require attention in the treatment of AN in adolescent females, and that different AN subtypes may require individualized treatment approaches. PMID:25464069

  8. Pharmacologic treatment of anorexia nervosa: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Attia, Evelyn; Schroeder, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious mental disorder, characterized by severely low weight and cognitive distortions about body shape and weight. AN is generally associated with a range of psychological symptoms, including depression, anxiety, obsessions, and rituals. The current study summarized findings from randomized controlled trials (RCT) using pharmacologic treatments in patients with AN. We conducted a review of literature using Medline. Several classes of pharmacologic agents have been studied in small samples of patients with acute AN without finding clear benefit to eating, weight, body shape concerns, or associated psychopathology. Studies have been limited by small sample sizes, as well as by research design with most studies adding medication to comprehensive hospital-based treatment programs. Future directions for pharmacologic treatment research in AN should include outpatient trials, rigorous study of atypical antipsychotic medication, and assessment of medication effect for relapse prevention in weight-restored patients.

  9. Mycobacterium chimaera causes tuberculosis-like infection in a male patient with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Alhanna, Joseph; Purucker, Michael; Steppert, Claus; Grigull-Daborn, Andrea; Schiffel, Gabriele; Gruber, Heribert; Borgmann, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    Here we present a 27-year-old male patient--with a known prolonged history of anorexia nervosa (AN)--suffering from tuberculosis like infection. At the time he was admitted to clinical treatment, he had developed fever up to 40°C and survived on a body mass index of 11.8. In this case, Mycobacterium chimaera, generally recognized for low pathogenicity, was identified as the causative agent. Remission from lung infection was achieved after antibiotic treatment according to laboratory susceptibility testing while earlier antituberculosis therapies had failed. Because of a large cavity in the upper left lung, surgical excision was necessary to prevent recurrence of lung infection. Moreover, stabilization of the patient general health problem needs to be supported by a lasting psychotherapy.

  10. Hunger, food intake and weight: the impact of clomipramine on a refeeding anorexia nervosa population.

    PubMed

    Lacey, J H; Crisp, A H

    1980-01-01

    This double-blind controlled study examines the impact of clomipramine when taken by an anorexia nervosa population, refeeding in hospital, over and above that generated by the established treatment programme. Of the 16 patients studied, all reached their target weights including three who asked to leave the study. Clomipramine was significantly associated with increased hunger, appetite and energy intake. It tended, though, to be associated with a reduced rate of weight gain, possibly because activity was increased. Patients receiving clomipramine were more stable in their eating habits and maintained body weight better than those on placebo after leaving the trial. These findings indicate the sensitivity of the hypothalamus to changes in body weight. Clomipramine, which is known to act at a hypothalamic level, seems to influence hunger, appetite and dietary intake according to the body weight of the patient. The threshold weights which have been shown to trigger hypothalamic sexual responses, may also influence hunger, appetite, motility and voluntary energy intake.

  11. Cognitive Function in Adolescent Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Unipolar Affective Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sarrar, Lea; Holzhausen, Martin; Warschburger, Petra; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Schneider, Nora

    2016-05-01

    Studies have shown impairments in cognitive function among adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and affective disorders (AD). The association between cognitive dysfunctions, AN and AD as well as the specificity for these psychiatric diagnoses remains unclear. Therefore, we examined cognitive flexibility and processing speed in 47 female adolescent patients with AN, 21 female adolescent patients with unipolar affective disorders and 48 female healthy adolescents. All participants completed a neuropsychological test battery. There were no significant group differences regarding cognitive function, except for psychomotor processing speed with poorer performance in patients with AN. A further analysis revealed that all groups performed with the normal range, although patients with AN were over represented in the poorest performing quartile. We found no severe cognitive impairments in either patient group. Nevertheless, belonging to the AN group contributed significantly to poor performances in neuropsychological tasks. Therefore, we conclude that the risk for cognitive impairments is slightly higher for patients with AN.

  12. Amphetamine induced dopamine release increases anxiety in individuals recovered from anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bailer, Ursula F.; Narendran, Rajesh; Frankle, W. Gordon; Himes, Michael L; Duvvuri, Vikas; Mathis, Chester A; Kaye, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Genetic, pharmacologic, and physiological data suggest that individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) have altered striatal dopamine (DA) function. Method We used an amphetamine challenge and positron emission tomography [11C]raclopride paradigm to explore DA striatal transmission in 10 recovered (REC) AN compared to 9 control women (CW). Results REC AN and CW were similar for baseline, post-amphetamine [11C]raclopride binding potential (BPND) and change (Δ) in BPND for all regions. In CW, ventral striatum Δ BPND was associated with euphoria (r = − .76; p = .03), which was not found for REC AN. Instead, REC AN showed a significant relationship between anxiety and Δ BPND in the pre-commissural dorsal caudate (r = −.62, p = .05). Discussion REC AN have a positive association between endogenous DA release and anxiety in the dorsal caudate. This finding could explain why food-related DA release produces anxiety in AN, whereas feeding is pleasurable in healthy participants. PMID:21541980

  13. Leptin-mediated neuroendocrine alterations in anorexia nervosa: somatic and behavioral implications.

    PubMed

    Müller, Timo D; Föcker, Manuel; Holtkamp, Kristian; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Hypoleptinemia is a key endocrinological feature of anorexia nervosa (AN). Several symptoms in acute AN are related to the low circulating leptin levels including amenorrhea and semi-starvation-induced hyperactivity. The drop in leptin levels results from the loss of fat mass; once leptin levels fall below specific thresholds the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and -thyroid axes are down-regulated; in contrast, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is up-regulated. Hypoleptinemia is the major signal underlying both somatic and behavioral adaptations to starvation. Because the mechanisms involved in this adaptation are similar in rodents and humans, rodent models can be used to investigate the relevant central pathways which underly the respective starvation-induced symptoms. During therapeutically induced weight gain, leptin levels can intermittently increase above normal concentrations. This hyperleptinemia could predispose to renewed weight loss.

  14. Severe gastric dilatation due to superior mesenteric artery syndrome in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mascolo, Margherita; Dee, Elizabeth; Townsend, Ronald; Brinton, John T; Mehler, Philip S

    2015-07-01

    Forty-seven year old female, with a history of anorexia nervosa, was admitted to a medical stabilization unit (ACUTE) complaining of abdominal pain exacerbated by oral intake, associated with nausea, and relieved by emesis. Admission body mass index was 10.6. Labs were notable for hepatitis and hypoglycemia. On her progressive oral refeeding plan, she suddenly developed severe abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed gastric dilatation and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome. SMA syndrome is a rare complication of severe malnutrition resulting from compression of the duodenum between the aorta and the SMA. It is diagnosed by an upper gastrointestinal series or an abdominal CT. Gastric dilatation, in turn, is a rare complication of SMA syndrome to be included in the differential diagnoses of abdominal pain in severely malnourished patients as it is potentially life-threatening. The patient was switched to an oral liquid diet, began weight restoring, and had resolution of symptoms.

  15. Management of ischiopubic stress fracture in patients with anorexia nervosa and excessive compulsive exercising.

    PubMed

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Bazzani, Paola; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2014-10-09

    This case report describes a 28-year-old non-athlete female patient with anorexia nervosa who was diagnosed with an ischiopubic ramus stress fracture and treated successfully as an inpatient with a cognitive behaviour-based therapy. The patient's clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described, and a brief review of the relevant literature is included. The importance of this case report stems from the rarity of descriptions of this kind of injury in such patients, despite their inherent risk, and the originality of the treatment applied. This, in addition to the usual approach to medical management, exploited specific cognitive and behavioural procedures and strategies to address the patient's excessive compulsive exercising, promoting rest and movement avoidance in order to allow the fracture to heal, while simultaneously addressing the underlying psychopathology.

  16. Nothing Tastes as Good as Skinny Feels: The Neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Walter H; Wierenga, Christina E; Bailer, Ursula F; Simmons, Alan N; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) engage in relentless, restrictive eating and often become severely emaciated. Because there are no proven treatments, AN has high rates of relapse, chronicity, and death. Those with AN tend to have childhood temperament and personality traits, such as anxiety, obsessions, and perfectionism, which may reflect neurobiological risk factors for developing AN. Restricted eating may be a means of reducing negative mood caused by skewed interactions between serotonin aversive or inhibitory and dopamine reward systems. Brain imaging studies suggest altered eating is a consequence of dysregulated reward, and/or awareness of homeostatic needs, perhaps related to enhanced executive ability to inhibit incentive motivational drives. Understanding the neurobiology of this disorder is likely to be important for developing more effective treatments. PMID:23333342

  17. Osteomalacia, severe thoracic deformities and respiratory failure in a young woman with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Hotta, Mari; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The recent trends in avoiding sunbathing and eating fewer fish products have resulted in a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the general Japanese population. We herein report the case of a young woman with enduring anorexia nervosa (AN) who suffered from osteomalacia, thoracic deformities and respiratory failure. Her vitamin D deficiency had been overlooked for years. Although the serum 25-hyroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level is a marker of vitamin D stores, it is not routinely examined because the cost is not covered by the national health insurance program. However, measuring the serum 25(OH)D levels in AN patients with hypocalcemia is recommended to prevent osteomalacia and osteoporosis.

  18. BodyWise: evaluating a pilot body image group for patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Victoria A; Brown, Amy; Bamford, Bryony; Saeidi, Saeideh; Morgan, John F; Lacey, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Body image disturbance can be enduring and distressing to individuals with eating disorders and effective treatments remain limited. This pilot study evaluated a group-based treatment-BodyWise-developed for use in full and partial hospitalization with patients with anorexia nervosa at low weight. A partial crossover waitlist design was used. BodyWise (N = 50) versus treatment as usual (N = 40) were compared on standardized measures of body image disturbance. Results demonstrated significant improvement in the group compared to treatment as usual for the primary outcome measure (Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire Shape Concern subscale) and other manifestations of body image disturbance including body checking and body image quality of life. BodyWise appeared acceptable to participants, and was easy to deliver within the pragmatics of a busy eating disorder service. There is potential for its wider dissemination as a precursor to more active body image interventions.

  19. High level increase in liver enzymes and severe thrombocytopenia in a male case of anorexia nervosa*

    PubMed Central

    Karahmadi, Mojgan; Layegh, Elmira; Layegh, Samira; Keypour, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a difficult-to-treat psychosomatic disease. Very few cases of acute liver failure associated with AN have been described. We describe one patient who was affected by AN and presented high level increase of serum liver enzymes, along with sever thrombocytopenia. Then, we discuss the possible etiopathogenic factors. METHODS: A 14-year-old boy with AN was admitted in the pediatric psychiatric emergency department of Alzahra Hospital with impaired electrolyte levels, bradycardia, hypotension, liver dysfunction, and thrombocytopenia. RESULTS: A ten-time increase in liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia were observed on admission. After two months of treatment, the levels were within the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: Improvement of initial clinical symptoms and recovery of liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia after the treatment suggested that liver dysfunction and thrombocytopenia may be observed in AN patients and should be taken care of by physicians. PMID:22973335

  20. Can Attention to the Intestinal Microbiota Improve Understanding and Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jacquelyn; Kleiman, Susan C.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Bulik-Sullivan, Emily C.; Carroll, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by severe dietary restriction or other weight loss behaviors and exhibits the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. Therapeutic renourishment in AN is founded primarily on clinical opinion and guidelines, with a weak evidence base. Genetic factors do not fully account for the etiology of AN, and non-genetic factors that contribute to the onset and persistence of this disease warrant investigation. Compelling evidence that the intestinal microbiota regulates adiposity and metabolism, and more recently, anxiety behavior, provides a strong rationale for exploring the role of this complex microbial community in the onset, maintenance of, and recovery from AN. This review explores the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and AN and a potential role for this enteric microbial community as a therapy for this severe illness. PMID:27003627

  1. Effects of treating gender dysphoria and anorexia nervosa in a transgender adolescent: Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Strandjord, Sarah E; Ng, Henry; Rome, Ellen S

    2015-11-01

    Patients with gender dysphoria and patients with eating disorders often experience discontent with their bodies. Several reports have recognized the co-occurrence of these two conditions, typically in adults who identify as transgender females and desire a more feminine physique. This case report, in contrast, describes a 16-year-old patient with a female sex assigned at birth who first presented with features consistent with anorexia nervosa and later revealed underlying gender dysphoria with a drive for a less feminine body shape. We discuss both the path to recognizing gender dysphoria in this patient as well as the impact of treatment on his eating disorder and overall well-being. This case is one of only a few reports describing a female-to-male transgender patient with an eating disorder and is the first to explore the effects of hormone and surgical intervention in an adolescent patient.

  2. Maladaptive schemas in adolescent females with anorexia nervosa and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Stephanie R; Reece, John; Reid, Sophie; Atkins, Linsey; Patton, George

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has highlighted the presence of Young's Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMSs) in individuals with an eating disorder (ED). This study assessed the EMSs reported by adolescent females with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) compared with a community group. Thirty-six adolescent females diagnosed with AN or subthreshold AN and 111 female secondary school students completed a questionnaire that included the Young Schema Questionnaire, the Behavior Assessment System for Children Self-report of Personality, and the Eating Disorder Screen for Primary Care. Two independent AN subtypes and two community subtypes were derived from responses to the questionnaire, and significant differences between the four comparison groups were found. High Pathology AN participants reported the highest level of psychological maladjustment. Social Isolation and Emotional Inhibition appeared to be most characteristic of adolescent AN in this sample. The results suggest that EMSs may require attention in the treatment of AN in adolescent females, and that different AN subtypes may require individualized treatment approaches.

  3. Improving psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa: Introduction to the special section on innovative treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The available forms of psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa (AN) are helpful to many patients; however, a substantial proportion of adults with AN continues to show persistent symptoms and medical risks following treatment. Clinical investigators are therefore developing innovative adjunctive treatments for adults, to augment treatment effects. The 3 cases in this special section each demonstrate a creative, potent adjunctive treatment approach: Exposure and Response Prevention, Cognitive Remediation Therapy, and Unified Couples Therapy. In addition to demonstrating the treatment and response, the authors also discuss the important opportunities and struggles associated with the experience of providing each treatment for AN. Because adults with AN are often very attached to symptoms, and afraid of change, it is crucial to develop a basis for the therapeutic alliance and motivation to change. In these detailed, vivid, evidence-based case examples, the authors demonstrate highly distinct, innovative approaches to these issues. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Quality of friendships and motivation to change in adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Malmendier-Muehlschlegel, Anja; Rosewall, Juliet K; Smith, Jared G; Hugo, Pippa; Lask, Bryan

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the relationship between quality of friendships, motivation to change and peer support among young people receiving inpatient treatment for Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Thirty participants were recruited from three inpatient wards. Questionnaires assessed motivational stage, friendship functions and characteristics of friendships specific to AN. Three friendship functions - Help, Intimacy and Self-Validation - were significantly and positively correlated with greater motivational stage. Describing friends on the ward as supportive of adherence to the treatment program was positively associated with greater motivational stage and higher quality friendships. The association between motivation, friendship quality and peer support in treatment identifies close and supportive friendships among young people with AN as a potential target to improve outcomes.

  5. The Genetics of Anorexia Nervosa Collaborative Study: Methods and Sample Description

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Walter H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Plotnicov, Katherine; Thornton, Laura; Devlin, Bernie; Fichter, Manfred M.; Treasure, Janet; Kaplan, Allan; Woodside, D. Blake; Johnson, Craig L.; Halmi, Katherine; Brandt, Harry A.; Crawford, Steve; Mitchell, James E.; Strober, Michael; Berrettini, Wade; Jones, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Objective Supported by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), this 12-site international collaboration seeks to identify genetic variants that affect risk for anorexia nervosa (AN). Method Four hundred families will be ascertained with two or more individuals affected with AN. The assessment battery produces a rich set of phenotypes comprising eating disorder diagnoses and psychological and personality features known to be associated with vulnerability to eating disorders. Results We report attributes of the first 200 families, comprising 200 probands and 232 affected relatives. Conclusion These results provide context for the genotyping of the first 200 families by the Center for Inherited Disease Research. We will analyze our first 200 families for linkage, complete recruitment of roughly 400 families, and then perform final linkage analyses on the complete cohort. DNA, genotypes, and phenotypes will form a national eating disorder repository maintained by NIMH and available to qualified investigators. PMID:18236451

  6. Emotion Recognition in Blended Facial Expressions in Women with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Dapelo, Marcela Marin; Surguladze, Simon; Morris, Robin; Tchanturia, Kate

    2016-01-01

    People with anorexia nervosa (AN) have difficulties in the social domain, and problems in the ability to recognise emotions in people's faces may contribute to these difficulties. This study aimed to investigate emotion recognition in women with AN and healthy controls (HC), using pictures of faces portraying blended emotions at different levels of ambiguity, which resemble real-life expressions more closely than prototypical expressions used in past studies. Seventy-seven participants (35 AN; 42 HC) completed the emotion recognition task. Results indicated that participants with AN were less accurate than HC recognising expressions of disgust, when shown less ambiguously. There were no differences in the recognition of other emotions. Participants with AN also showed response bias towards anger. These findings suggest a generally preserved ability to recognise emotions in women with AN, with the exception of disgust recognition. They also support previous findings of bias towards anger in AN patients.

  7. Expressed Emotion, Family Functioning, and Treatment Outcome for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rienecke, Renee D; Accurso, Erin C; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the relation between parental expressed emotion (EE) and treatment outcome among adolescents participating in a treatment study for adolescent anorexia nervosa, as well as its impact on family functioning. One hundred and twenty-one families were assigned to family-based treatment or adolescent-focused therapy. Paternal criticism predicted lesser improvement in eating disorder psychopathology at end of treatment. There was also a significant interaction between maternal hostility and treatment, indicating that adolescents whose mothers displayed hostility had greater increases in percent of expected body weight in adolescent-focused therapy than family-based treatment. In addition, maternal hostility predicted less improvement in general family functioning and family communication at the end of treatment. Findings suggest that maternal and paternal EE may differentially impact treatment outcome and should be directly attended to in clinical settings. Future research is needed to further explore ways in which parental EE can be effectively modified in treatment.

  8. A description of multiple family workshops for carers of people with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Treasure, Janet; Whitaker, Wendy; Todd, Gill; Whitney, Jenna

    2012-01-01

    Carers of people with eating disorders are uncertain about how best to help and express the need for information. Fifty per cent of carers (usually parents) exhibit clinically significant anxiety and/or depression. This may result from a difficulty coping with the manifestations of anorexia nervosa (AN) in the sufferer. In turn, eating disorder symptoms can be maintained by family reactions to the illness. Thus, carer's own symptoms, plus their uncertainty about how to help, impinge upon the AN sufferer, exacerbating their symptoms and behaviours. In this paper, we describe an intervention which uses cognitive behavioural therapy principles to alleviate carer's depression and anxiety and motivational interviewing to target behaviours that maintain eating disorder symptoms, for example high expressed emotion and poor communication. This is given in the form of an educational workshop for two families.

  9. Expressed Emotion, Family Functioning, and Treatment Outcome for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Rienecke, Renee D.; Accurso, Erin C.; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the relation between parental expressed emotion (EE) and treatment outcome among adolescents participating in a treatment study for adolescent anorexia nervosa, as well as its impact on family functioning. One hundred and twenty-one families were assigned to family-based treatment or adolescent-focused therapy. Paternal criticism predicted lesser improvement in eating disorder psychopathology at end of treatment. There was also a significant interaction between maternal hostility and treatment, indicating that adolescents whose mothers displayed hostility had greater increases in percent of expected body weight in adolescent-focused therapy than family-based treatment. In addition, maternal hostility predicted less improvement in general family functioning and family communication at the end of treatment. Findings suggest that maternal and paternal EE may differentially impact treatment outcome and should be directly attended to in clinical settings. Future research is needed to further explore ways in which parental EE can be effectively modified in treatment. PMID:26201083

  10. A quantitative study of body-related attitudes in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ben-Tovim, D I; Walker, M K

    1992-11-01

    The Ben-Tovim Walker Body Attitudes Questionnaire (BAQ) is a psychometrically sound self-report instrument for assessing women's attitudes towards their own bodies. The BAQ responses of a large sample of patients with eating disorders (ED) diagnosed in accordance with DSM-III-R criteria were compared with those from a normative population and from diverse groups of psychiatrically and physically ill patients. The ED group was distinct, and showed extreme responses in the area of weight and shape concerns. But a better discrimination between the ED and other populations was achieved using subscales that related to 'body disparagement' (an intense loathing of the body) and 'attractiveness', rather than to weight and shape concerns. ED patients may have a more pervasive disturbance in body-related attitudes than is currently widely accepted. Patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa showed very similar attitudes despite the symptomatic differences between the groups. PMID:1488491

  11. Serum lipids and apolipoprotein B values, blood pressure and pulse rate in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Marcos, A; Varela, P

    1991-01-01

    Some risk factors associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) were evaluated in patients with different types of anorexia nervosa (AN). Anthropometric parameters, serum cholesterol, triglycerides and apoprotein (apo) B values, blood pressure and pulse rate were tested in 29 young female patients and 16 controls. Cholesterol, triglycerides and apo B were higher at the acute period of the illness (AN1), whereas at the chronic period the values of these parameters tended to normalize. Triglycerides were higher in patients who binge ate (bulimarexia). Systolic blood pressure decreased in all types of AN, while diastolic blood pressure decreased only in AN1; pulse rate was not altered. According to cholesterol and apo B values, AN patients may be at risk of CHD if they remain at low body weight. PMID:1855497

  12. [Anorexia nervosa: bioelectrical impedance analysis in body composition measurement during hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Van Leer, M; Leistedt, S J; Linkowski, P; Simon, Y

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring parameters for anorexia nervosa include clinical, biological and psychological factors. Many research groups are currently trying to identify parameters more likely to predict the severity or the evolution of the illness. Body composition has been proposed as one of those parameters. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate that measures of body composition are more accurate and efficient than the use of body composition index (BMI). We also aim to show that body composition could be used as a prognostic factor in the long-term evolution of patients with anorexia nervosa. It's a retrospective study investigating body composition and BMI in 44 patients treated in a specialized unit for eating disorder. Measures of body composition and BMI were gathered at the time of admission and again 3 months after refeeding onset. Data was correlated to the EDI-2 questionnaire scores. BMI and %FM where found to be increased (P < 0.05) between admission and after 3 months refeeding. The double objective of reaching a BMI value > or = 20 kg/m2 and a %FM value > or = 2% was achieved by 22% of patients. No significant correlation was found between EDI-2 scores and measures of BMI and %FM either on admission or after the 3 months refeeding period. In conclusion, results of our study don't allow concluding for a prognostic superiority of %FM. Nonetheless, BMI currently used as a reference for the monitoring of eating disorders patients seems to lack sensitivity where measures of body composition seem more informative regarding nutritional status. Furthermore, fat mass plays an important role in other clinical manifestations. In addition, measures of body composition should allow more individualised therapeutic support.

  13. Trends in anorexia nervosa research: an analysis of the top 100 most cited works.

    PubMed

    Lipsman, Nir; Woodside, D Blake; Lozano, Andres M

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of highly cited papers provides unique insights into the status of research in a given field. We sought to identify the top 100 most highly cited papers in the field of anorexia nervosa (AN). A free, publically accessible software was used to conduct an online search of publications with accompanying citation data. Search terms were selected to focus on papers dealing predominantly with AN, and the results manually screened to exclude out-of-scope publications. Papers in bulimia nervosa, eating disorder not otherwise specified and binge-eating disorder, were not included. The top 100 most highly cited papers in the AN field were identified. Of these, 34 garnered greater than 400 citations, classifying them as 'citation classics'. These works were divided into five categories, those dealing with epidemiological trends, medical/psychiatric comorbidities, treatment, mechanisms of disease and measurement/classification. Publications examining the epidemiology and underlying mechanisms of AN account for the majority of the top 100 papers. Scales and measurement tools have had the greatest impact, garnering the greatest number of average citations per paper. Although reasonably diverse, the top 100 papers highlight areas still lagging behind, including the neuroscience of AN as well as research into novel treatment strategies. PMID:24338826

  14. Differential Neural Responses to Food Images in Women with Bulimia versus Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Samantha J.; O′Daly, Owen G.; Uher, Rudolf; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Williams, Steven C. R.; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous fMRI studies show that women with eating disorders (ED) have differential neural activation to viewing food images. However, despite clinical differences in their responses to food, differential neural activation to thinking about eating food, between women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) is not known. Methods We compare 50 women (8 with BN, 18 with AN and 24 age-matched healthy controls [HC]) while they view food images during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Results In response to food (vs non-food) images, women with BN showed greater neural activation in the visual cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right insular cortex and precentral gyrus, women with AN showed greater activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and right precuneus. HC women activated the cerebellum, right insular cortex, right medial temporal lobe and left caudate. Direct comparisons revealed that compared to HC, the BN group showed relative deactivation in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus/insula, and visual cortex, and compared to AN had relative deactivation in the parietal lobe and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, but greater activation in the caudate, superior temporal gyrus, right insula and supplementary motor area. Conclusions Women with AN and BN activate top-down cognitive control in response to food images, yet women with BN have increased activation in reward and somatosensory regions, which might impinge on cognitive control over food consumption and binge eating. PMID:21799807

  15. Selective Visual Attention during Mirror Exposure in Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Bender, Caroline; Caffier, Detlef; Klenner, Katharina; Braks, Karsten; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cognitive theories suggest that body dissatisfaction results from the activation of maladaptive appearance schemata, which guide mental processes such as selective attention to shape and weight-related information. In line with this, the present study hypothesized that patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by increased visual attention for the most dissatisfying/ugly body part compared to their most satisfying/beautiful body part, while a more balanced viewing pattern was expected for controls without eating disorders (CG). Method Eye movements were recorded in a group of patients with AN (n = 16), BN (n = 16) and a CG (n = 16) in an ecologically valid setting, i.e., during a 3-min mirror exposure. Results Evidence was found that patients with AN and BN display longer and more frequent gazes towards the most dissatisfying relative to the most satisfying and towards their most ugly compared to their most beautiful body parts, whereas the CG showed a more balanced gaze pattern. Discussion The results converge with theoretical models that emphasize the role of information processing in the maintenance of body dissatisfaction. Given the etiological importance of body dissatisfaction in the development of eating disorders, future studies should focus on the modification of the reported patterns. PMID:26714279

  16. Serotonin alterations in anorexia and bulimia nervosa: new insights from imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Walter H; Frank, Guido K; Bailer, Ursula F; Henry, Shannan E; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Price, Julie C; Mathis, Chester A; Wagner, Angela

    2005-05-19

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders with relatively homogenous presentations such as age of onset and gender distribution. In addition, they share symptoms, such as extremes of food consumption, body image distortion, anxiety and obsessions, and ego-syntonic neglect, raises the possibility that these symptoms reflect disturbed brain function that contributes to the pathophysiology of this illness. Recent brain imaging studies have identified altered activity in frontal, cingulate, temporal, and parietal cortical regions in AN and BN. Importantly, such disturbances are present when subjects are ill and persist after recovery, suggesting that these may be traits that are independent of the state of the illness. Emerging data point to a dysregulation of serotonin pathways in cortical and limbic structures that may be related to anxiety, behavioral inhibition, and body image distortions. In specific, recent studies using PET with serotonin specific radioligands implicate alterations of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors and the 5-HT transporter. Alterations of these circuits may affect mood and impulse control as well as the motivating and hedonic aspects of feeding behavior. Such imaging studies may offer insights into new pharmacology and psychotherapy approaches.

  17. Altered sensitization patterns to sweet food stimuli in patients recovered from anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Angela; Simmons, Alan N; Oberndorfer, Tyson A; Frank, Guido K W; McCurdy-McKinnon, Danyale; Fudge, Julie L; Yang, Tony T; Paulus, Martin P; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-12-30

    Recent studies show that higher-order appetitive neural circuitry may contribute to restricted eating in anorexia nervosa (AN) and overeating in bulimia nervosa (BN). The purpose of this study was to determine whether sensitization effects might underlie pathologic eating behavior when a taste stimulus is administered repeatedly. Recovered AN (RAN, n=14) and BN (RBN, n=15) subjects were studied in order to avoid the confounding effects of altered nutritional state. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measured higher-order brain response to repeated tastes of sucrose (caloric) and sucralose (non-caloric). To test sensitization, the neuronal response to the first and second administration was compared. RAN patients demonstrated a decreased sensitization to sucrose in contrast to RBN patients who displayed the opposite pattern, increased sensitization to sucrose. However, the latter was not as pronounced as in healthy control women (n=13). While both eating disorder subgroups showed increased sensitization to sucralose, the healthy controls revealed decreased sensitization. These findings could reflect on a neuronal level the high caloric intake of RBN during binges and the low energy intake for RAN. RAN seem to distinguish between high energy and low energy sweet stimuli while RBN do not.

  18. Thought-shape fusion in anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a comparative experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulou, Myrsini; Varsou, Eleftheria; Stalikas, Anastassios

    2013-09-01

    'Thought-shape fusion' (TSF) is a cognitive distortion specific in patients with eating disorders and occurs when the thought about eating a forbidden food increases a person's estimate of her weight/shape, elicits a perception of moral wrongdoing and makes her feel fat. This study aimed to experimentally induce, study and compare TSF between patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). 31 patients diagnosed with a current eating disorder, of which 20 met DSM-IV-TR criteria for BN and 11 for AN, participated in a mixed-model experimental design with the aim of eliciting TSF and investigating the effects of corrective behaviors (checking and mental neutralizing). Verbal analogue scales constituted the main outcome measures. TSF was experimentally induced and expressed in a similar way in both clinical groups, apart from 'feeling fat' which was higher in BN patients. TSF induction triggered heightened levels of anxiety, guilt and urges to engage in corrective behaviors in both groups. Body dissatisfaction only increased in the BN patients. Mental neutralizing and to a lesser extent checking reduced most effects of the experimental procedure, but this effect was larger for BN patients. The nature of TSF seems to have similarities between BN and AN patients; however, the precise connection between TSF and different types of eating disorders remains to be explored in future clinical trials.

  19. Typical Versus Atypical Anorexia Nervosa Among Adolescents: Clinical Characteristics and Implications for ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Silén, Yasmina; Raevuori, Anu; Jüriloo, Elisabeth; Tainio, Veli-Matti; Marttunen, Mauri; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2015-09-01

    There is scant research on the clinical utility of differentiating International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 diagnoses F50.0 anorexia nervosa (typical AN) and F50.1 atypical anorexia. We reviewed systematically records of 47 adolescents who fulfilled criteria for ICD-10 F50.0 (n = 34) or F50.1 (n = 13), assessing the impact of diagnostic subtype, comorbidity, background factors and treatment choices on recovery. Atypical AN patients were significantly older (p = 0.03), heavier (minimum body mass index 16.7 vs 15.1 kg/m(2) , p = 0.003) and less prone to comorbidities (38% vs 71%, p = 0.04) and had shorter, less intensive and less costly treatments than typical AN patients. The diagnosis of typical versus atypical AN was the sole significant predictor of treatment success: recovery from atypical AN was 4.3 times (95% confidence interval [1.1, 17.5]) as likely as recovery from typical AN. Overall, our findings indicate that a broader definition of AN may dilute the prognostic value of the diagnosis, and therefore, ICD-11 should retain its distinction between typical and atypical AN.

  20. Who am I? How do I look? Neural differences in self-identity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Carrie J; Krawczyk, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) patients exhibit a disparity in their actual physical identity and their cognitive understanding of their physical identity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tasks have contributed to understanding the neural circuitry involved in processing identity in healthy individuals. We hypothesized that women recovering from AN would show altered neural responses while thinking about their identity compared with healthy control women. We compared brain activation using fMRI in 18 women recovering from anorexia (RAN) and 18 healthy control women (CON) using two identity-appraisal tasks. These neuroimaging tasks were focused on separable components of identity: one consisted of adjectives related to social activities and the other consisted of physical descriptive phrases about one's appearance. Both tasks consisted of reading and responding to statements with three different perspectives: Self, Friend and Reflected. In the comparisons of the RAN and CON subjects, we observed differences in fMRI activation relating to self-knowledge ('I am', 'I look') and perspective-taking ('I believe', 'Friend believes') in the precuneus, two areas of the dorsal anterior cingulate, and the left middle frontal gyrus. These data suggest that further exploration of neural components related to identity may improve our understanding of the pathology of AN.

  1. Anorexia nervosa as a motivated behavior: Relevance of anxiety, stress, fear and learning.

    PubMed

    Guarda, Angela S; Schreyer, Colleen C; Boersma, Gretha J; Tamashiro, Kellie L; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-12-01

    The high comorbidity between anorexia nervosa (AN) and anxiety disorders is well recognized. AN is a motivated behavioral disorder in which habit formation is likely to contribute to the persistence of abnormal eating and exercise behaviors. Secondary alterations in brain circuitry underlying the reward value of food and exercise, along with disturbances in neuroendocrine hunger and satiety signaling arising from starvation and excessive exercise, are likely contributors to the maintenance of anorectic behaviors in genetically vulnerable individuals. The potential role of fear conditioning in facilitating onset of AN, or of impaired fear extinction in contributing to the high relapse rates observed following weight restoration, is of interest. Evidence from animal models of anxiety and human laboratory studies indicate that low estrogen impairs fear extinction. Low estradiol levels in AN may therefore play a role in perpetuating fear of food and fat in recently weight restored patients. Translational models including the activity based anorexia (ABA) rodent model of AN, and neuroimaging studies of fear extinction and conditioning, could help clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms and neurocircuitry involved in food avoidance behaviors in AN. Moreover, the adaptation of novel treatment interventions with efficacy in anxiety disorders may contribute to the development of new treatments for this impairing disorder.

  2. Verbal Versus Figural Fluency Tests in Currently Ill and Weight Restored Anorexia Nervosa Patients.

    PubMed

    Heled, Eyal; Hoofien, Dan; Bachar, Eytan; Ebstein, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    Fluency tests allow domain-specific assessment of verbal and non-verbal executive functions (EF) comparison and also enable utilizing of both quantitative and qualitative scoring methods. Thirty-five currently ill anorexia nervosa patients (PANs), 33 weight-restored patients (WRAN) and 47 healthy controls (HCs) were administered the word fluency test and the five-point test. Results show that WRANs tended to perseverate more than HCs in the verbal-fluency test. In addition, PANs produced significantly less correct figures and perseverated more than HCs and WRANs; HCs used more strategy methods than PANs and WRANs. Additionally, a positive correlation was found in the HC group between the total number of words in the verbal phonemic test and the number of designs produced and the number of correct designs. No such correlations were found in both anorexia groups. In conclusion, there is a differentiation between verbal and non-verbal EF in PANs and WRANs, showing a deficiency in the non-verbal domain. These findings may contribute to our understanding of the cognitive nature of the disorder.

  3. Reduced capacity in automatic processing of facial expression in restrictive anorexia nervosa and obesity.

    PubMed

    Cserjési, Renáta; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Lénárd, László; Luminet, Olivier

    2011-07-30

    There is growing evidence that disordered eating is associated with facial expression recognition and emotion processing problems. In this study, we investigated the question of whether anorexia and obesity occur on a continuum of attention bias towards negative facial expressions in comparison with healthy individuals of normal weight. Thirty-three patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN-R), 30 patients with obesity (OB) and 63 healthy age and social-economic status matched controls were recruited. Our results indicated that AN-R patients were more attentive to angry faces and had difficulties in being attentive to positive expressions, whilst OB patients had problems in looking for or being attentive to negative expressions independently of self-reported depression and anxiety. Our findings did not support the idea that AN-R and OB occur on a continuum. We found that AN-R was associated with a reduced capacity in positive facial expression processing, whereas OB was associated with a reduced capacity in negative facial expressions processing. The social relevance of our findings and a possible explanation based upon neuroscience are discussed.

  4. Anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder: A comparison of body image concerns and explicit and implicit attractiveness beliefs.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A S; Thomas, J J; Greenberg, J L; Elliott, C M; Matheny, N L; Wilhelm, S

    2015-06-01

    Although body image is central to the etiological models of anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder, studies comparing body image and beliefs about attractiveness between the disorders are rare. Sixty-nine individuals (anorexia nervosa: n=24, body dysmorphic disorder: n=23, healthy controls: n=22) completed self-report measures (body image and general psychopathology), diagnostic interviews, and Go/No-Go Association tasks measuring implicit associations. Compared to controls, both clinical groups exhibited greater negative body image, a more negative attitude toward their physical selves, and more dysfunctional coping strategies (ps<.001). Also, both clinical groups shared greater explicit beliefs about the importance of attractiveness (ps<.001). In addition to supporting previous research with regard to comparable body image disturbance, this study also showed that beliefs regarding the importance of appearance (e.g., "one must be attractive to be successful") might be a fruitful target for therapy across both disorders. PMID:25920044

  5. Metabolic and Nutritional Needs to Normalize Body Mass Index by Doubling the Admission Body Weight in Severe Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Maria Gabriella; Lessa, Chiara; Cattaneo, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa exhibits one of the highest death rates among psychiatric patients and a relevant fraction of it is derived from undernutrition. Nutritional and medical treatment of extreme undernutrition present two very complex and conflicting tasks: (1) to avoid “refeeding syndrome” caused by a too fast correction of malnutrition; and (2) to avoid “underfeeding” caused by a too cautious refeeding. To obtain optimal treatment results, the caloric intake should be planned starting with indirect calorimetry measurements and electrolyte abnormalities accurately controlled and treated. This article reports the case of an anorexia nervosa young female affected by extreme undernutrition (BMI 9.6 kg/m2) who doubled her admission body weight (from 22.5 kg to 44 kg) in a reasonable time with the use of enteral tube feeding for gradual correction of undernutrition. Refeeding syndrome was avoided through a specialized and flexible program according to clinical, laboratory, and physiological findings. PMID:23645991

  6. Come play with me: an argument to link autism spectrum disorders and anorexia nervosa through early childhood pretend play.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Genevieve; Stagnitti, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This article builds on the argument of a link between behaviours observed in persons with autism spectrum disorders and persons with anorexia nervosa. In describing these behaviours, a link is made between deficits in social cognition, lack of flexible and creative thinking, theory of mind, and deficits in early pretend play ability. Early pretend play ability is a strong avenue to the development and strengthening of social cognition, problem solving, language, logical sequential thought, and understanding social situations. Currently, there is no literature on the pretend play ability of persons who develop anorexia nervosa. This article argues for research into this area which may potentially contribute to developments in new intervention strategies for these persons.

  7. Anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder: A comparison of body image concerns and explicit and implicit attractiveness beliefs.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A S; Thomas, J J; Greenberg, J L; Elliott, C M; Matheny, N L; Wilhelm, S

    2015-06-01

    Although body image is central to the etiological models of anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder, studies comparing body image and beliefs about attractiveness between the disorders are rare. Sixty-nine individuals (anorexia nervosa: n=24, body dysmorphic disorder: n=23, healthy controls: n=22) completed self-report measures (body image and general psychopathology), diagnostic interviews, and Go/No-Go Association tasks measuring implicit associations. Compared to controls, both clinical groups exhibited greater negative body image, a more negative attitude toward their physical selves, and more dysfunctional coping strategies (ps<.001). Also, both clinical groups shared greater explicit beliefs about the importance of attractiveness (ps<.001). In addition to supporting previous research with regard to comparable body image disturbance, this study also showed that beliefs regarding the importance of appearance (e.g., "one must be attractive to be successful") might be a fruitful target for therapy across both disorders.

  8. Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boright, Lucinda

    The purpose of this literature review is to develop a conceptual framework for counseling anorexic female clients. Literature is reviewed in the areas of the clinical picture for identifying anorexics; assessment tools for developing a therapeutic plan; cognitions and behavior change over time; and combining individual psychotherapy with family…

  9. Anorexia Nervosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard to adapt to a new culture (a theory called "culture clash"). The stress of trying to ... U.S. federal government and is in the public domain. This public information is not copyrighted and may ...

  10. An exploration of the perceptions and experiences of living with chronic anorexia nervosa while an inpatient on an Eating Disorders Unit: an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) study.

    PubMed

    Fox, John R E; Diab, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Chronic anorexia nervosa (cAN) is a challenging presentation for the clinician. Motivation to recover is low, and outcomes are often poor. Within this study. six participants, currently in treatment, were interviewed. These interview transcripts were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The results highlighted five superordinate themes resulted from the analysis and these referred to the following points: (1) 'making sense of AN', (2) 'experience of treatment/treatment', (3) 'interpersonal relationships', (4) 'battling with anorexia' and (5) 'staff pessimism in the treatment of cAN'. These results highlighted how the self is entwined with anorexia nervosa and thus making it incredibly difficult to perceive a life without cAN.

  11. d-Cycloserine Facilitation of Exposure Therapy Improves Weight Regain in Patients With Anorexia Nervosa: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Cheri A.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Fewell, Laura; Kass, Andrea E.; Riley, Elizabeth N.; Stark, Lynn; McCallum, Kimberly; Lenze, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Exposure therapy in anorexia nervosa has preliminarily been shown to be effective for increasing food intake. d-Cycloserine is a glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor agonist that has been shown to facilitate the benefits of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders by enhancing the emotional learning in the exposures; therefore, we examined d-cycloserine–facilitation of exposure therapy to increase body mass index (BMI) in patients with anorexia nervosa. Method Participants (N = 36) with anorexia nervosa (diagnosed via DSM-IV) were recruited from a partial hospitalization eating disorder clinic between February 2013 and November 2013. Participants were randomly assigned to receive exposure therapy plus d-cycloserine (n = 20) or placebo (n = 16). Participants completed psychoeducation and 4 sessions of exposure therapy, with medication (d-cycloserine vs placebo) given prior to the first 3 exposure sessions. They also completed a 1-month follow-up. Results As hypothesized, participants in the d-cycloserine group showed a significantly greater increase in BMI than those in the placebo group (Wilk Λ = 0.86, F3,32 = 2.20, P = .043, ηp2 = 0.12). d-Cycloserine participants gained 3 pounds relative to 0.5 pounds in the placebo group. Both groups experienced significantly decreased anxiety over the course of therapy (Wilk Λ = 0.80, F3,32 = 3.32, P = .023, ηp2 = 0.20). Conclusions This study preliminarily demonstrates that d-cycloserine facilitates exposure therapy for anorexia nervosa, leading to increased weight gain. A potential mechanism is that participants who receive d-cycloserine may generalize learning from within-session exposures to food intake during other similar meals, resulting in sustained increases in BMI. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and test the putative mechanism that generalized learning from exposure therapy can increase BMI and stabilize a healthy weight. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT

  12. [Clinical nutritional outcome in patients recovering in a psychiatric setting from severe protein-energy malnutrition of anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    De Caprio, Carmela; Zarrella, Luigi; Senatore, Ignazio; Silvestri, Eufemia; Contaldo, Franco; Pasanisi, Fabrizio

    2005-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition due to anorexia nervosa, either restrictive or bulimic, requires an integrated medical psychiatric intervention to be treated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this integrated treatment in severely malnourished anorectic patients requiring to be hospitalized in Psychiatry Unit. Fifteen patients (14 females, 1 male, mean age 19.6 +/- 4.7 years, body mass index 14.0 +/- 1.9 kg/m2) 13 of whom affected by restrictive anorexia nervosa and 2 by bulimic anorexia nervosa, have been hospitalized in the Psychiatry Unit of the Federico II University Hospital, Naples from September 2000 to July 2003, always without requiring compulsory sanitary treatment. Hospitalization was due to failure of the outpatient treatment in all of them, complicated by uncontrolled weight loss in 7, hydroelectrolytic unbalance in 2, edema in 1 patient. All were hypotensive and 4 had marked bradycardia. Forced nutrition was never necessary. Enteral nutrition by nasogastric tube was prescribed in 4 patients, oral nutrition supplements with diet in 4 and only diet in the remaining 7. All patients received vitamin and mineral supplements, if necessary parenterally. A mild body weight increase and satisfactory normalization of biochemical parameters was obtained in all patients during hospitalization. Thereafter they were enrolled in an outpatient integrated medical/psychiatric protocol, including group therapy. Only in 1 case, a few months later, a second hospitalization was necessary. In conclusion, integrated medical psychiatric treatment represents an effective intervention also in severely malnourished anorectic patient requiring hospitalization.

  13. Meal Plan in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: A Way of Feeding the Disorder and Starving the Patient

    PubMed Central

    Padrão, Maria João; Barbosa, Maria Raquel; Coimbra, Joaquim Luís

    2013-01-01

    For the mainstream Psychology/Psychiatry, anorexia nervosa is considered an eating disorder characterized by the low body weight and by the restrictive eating pattern. The traditional psychiatric treatment consists in the establishment of a meal plan that must be scrupulously followed and, most frequently, in pharmacological treatment. We propose an alternative conceptualization of anorexia nervosa that envisages this disorder as pertaining to the control domain. In this sense, we formulate psychiatric intervention as a “pact with anorexia”, once it follows the very same logic, prohibitions and self-impositions of the disorder. Specifically, we envisage the meal plan as a way of maintaining anorexia, instead of suppressing it. As we could observe in our four year research project, in which we’ve followed several anorectic female patients, those who were more committed to their psychiatric treatment were precisely those who had more difficulty in recovering from anorexia – i.e., from renouncing the control from which the disorder lives. Finally, we suggest some fundamental underpinnings to an effective therapeutic approach, based in our conceptualization and understanding of the disorder. PMID:23283043

  14. Micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities in buccal mucosa cells in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Pacheco-Gutiérrez, Angélica Guadalupe; Vázquez-Valls, Eduardo; Ramos-Ibarra, María Luisa; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca Miriam

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of micronucleated cell (MNC) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in the buccal mucosa cells of females with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN), compared with healthy women. Individuals with AN and BN have inadequate feeding and compensatory behaviour to avoid weight gain. These behaviours can cause extreme body stress, thereby inducing DNA damage. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed the frequency of MNC and NA in the buccal mucosa cells of female participants with AN or BN. All of these patients had been admitted to a private clinic for the treatment of eating disorders after diagnosis with AN (n = 10) or BN (n = 7) according to the DSM-IV. Age-matched healthy female participants (n = 17) composed the control group. Oral mucosa samples were collected, fixed, stained by aceto-orcein/fast green and microscopically examined. Normal cells, MNC and NAs were counted within a 2000 cell sample. The results were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Differences were observed in the frequency of MNC in healthy females (1.2±0.9) versus that of patients with AN (3.4±1.5) (P < 0.0001) and BN (4.1±2.2) (P < 0.001). No differences were found among these groups in terms of NA. AN and BN are related to the loss of genetic material through chromosomal fractures and/or damage to the mitotic spindle (i.e. possibly a result of a deficiency in DNA precursors). Self-imposed compensatory behaviours in AN and BN, such as severe food restriction, potential malnutrition, vomiting, use of diuretics and laxatives and acute exhaustive exercise, are possible inducers of MNC and genotoxic damage. Of these compensatory behaviours, only vomiting has not been linked to genotoxic damage. This is the first report in women with BN, which should be studied in the future.

  15. Brain volumetric abnormalities in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Caroppo, Paola; D'Agata, Federico; Spalatro, Angela; Lavagnino, Luca; Caglio, Marcella; Righi, Dorico; Bergui, Mauro; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Rigardetto, Roberto; Mortara, Paolo; Fassino, Secondo

    2013-09-30

    Recent studies focussing on neuroimaging features of eating disorders have observed that anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by significant grey matter (GM) atrophy in many brain regions, especially in the cerebellum and anterior cingulate cortex. To date, no studies have found GM atrophy in bulimia nervosa (BN) or have directly compared patients with AN and BN. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to characterize brain abnormalities in AN and BN patients, comparing them with each other and with a control group, and correlating brain volume with clinical features. We recruited 17 AN, 13 BN and 14 healthy controls. All subjects underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1-weighted 3D image. VBM analysis was carried out with the FSL-VBM 4.1 tool. We found no global atrophy, but regional GM reduction in AN with respect to controls and BN in the cerebellum, fusiform area, supplementary motor area, and occipital cortex, and in the caudate in BN compared to AN and controls. Both groups of patients had a volumetric increase bilaterally in somatosensory regions with respect to controls, in areas that are typically involved in the sensory-motor integration of body stimuli and in mental representation of the body image. Our VBM study documented, for the first time in BN patients, the presence of volumetric alterations and replicated previous findings in AN patients. We evidenced morphological differences between AN and BN, demonstrating in the latter atrophy of the caudate nucleus, a region involved in reward mechanisms and processes of self-regulation, perhaps involved in the genesis of the binge-eating behaviors of this disorder.

  16. Prevalence, incidence, and natural course of anorexia and bulimia nervosa among adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Nagl, Michaela; Jacobi, Corinna; Paul, Martin; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Höfler, Michael; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to assess the prevalence, incidence, age-of-onset and diagnostic stability of threshold and subthreshold anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in the community. Data come from a prospective-longitudinal community study of 3021 subjects aged 14-24 at baseline, who were followed up at three assessment waves over 10 years. Eating disorder (ED) symptomatology was assessed with the DSM-IV/M-CIDI at each wave. Diagnostic stability was defined as the proportion of individuals still affected with at least symptomatic eating disorders (EDs) at follow-ups. Baseline lifetime prevalence for any threshold ED were 2.9 % among females and 0.1 % among males. For any subthreshold ED lifetime prevalence were 2.2 % for females and 0.7 % for males. Symptomatic expressions of EDs (including core symptoms of the respective disorder) were most common with a lifetime prevalence of 11.5 % among females and 1.8 % among males. Symptomatic AN showed the earliest onset with a considerable proportion of cases emerging in childhood. 47 % of initial threshold AN cases and 42 % of initial threshold BN cases showed at least symptomatic expressions of any ED at any follow-up assessment. Stability for subthreshold EDs and symptomatic expressions was 14-36 %. While threshold EDs are rare, ED symptomatology is common particularly in female adolescents and young women. Especially threshold EDs are associated with a substantial risk for stability. A considerable degree of symptom fluctuation is characteristic especially for subthreshold EDs.

  17. Neurotransmitter and imaging studies in anorexia nervosa: new targets for treatment.

    PubMed

    Barbarich, Nicole C; Kaye, Walter H; Jimerson, David

    2003-02-01

    Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa are disorders of unknown etiology that invariably begin during adolescence and near in time to puberty in young women. These disorders are associated with aberrant eating behaviors, body image distortions, impulse and mood disturbances, as well as characteristic temperament and personality traits. It is well known that malnutrition produces changes in neuroendocrine function. More recently, disturbances in neuronal systems have been found to play a role in the modulation of feeding, mood, and impulse control. These neuronal systems include neuropeptides (CRH, opioids, neuropeptide-Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY), vasopressin and oxytocin, CCK, and leptin) and monoamines (serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine). Disturbances of most of these neuronal systems have been found when people are ill with an eating disorder, but it was not certain whether they were a cause or consequence of symptoms. In order to address these questions, a growing number of studies have investigated whether neuromodulatory disturbances persist after recovery. Studies from several centers tend to show altered serotonin activity persists after prolonged normalization of weight, nutrition, and menstrual function, as do anxiety, obsessionality, and perfectionism. While there are fewer data, there may be persistent alterations of dopamine or some neuropeptides in some subjects in a recovered state. The inaccessibility of the central nervous system has made it difficult to understand brain and behavior. In the past decade, new tools, such as brain imaging, have offered the possibility of better characterization of complex neuronal function and behavior. Such studies have tended to consistently find that alterations of brain regions, such as the temporal lobe, occur in people who are ill with anorexia nervosa and appear to persist after some degree of weight gain and recovery. New imaging technology, that marries Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging with selective

  18. Alexithymia, a compounding factor for eating and social avoidance symptoms in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Courty, Annaig; Godart, Nathalie; Lalanne, Christophe; Berthoz, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Socio-affective difficulties, in particular difficulties in representing, communicating and feeling emotions, may play a critical role in anorexia nervosa (AN). The aim of this longitudinal study was to explore the links between alexithymia and two types of difficulties in AN: eating symptoms and social avoidance. Sixty adolescent girls with AN were recruited following hospitalisation in a specialised department. They completed self-administered questionnaires of alexithymia (TAS-20), of central symptoms of the eating disorders (EDI), and of anxious and depressive affects (SCL-90). Anxiety and social avoidance were assessed in the course of a standardised interview (LSAS). These measures were performed at inclusion, and at 6-, 12- and 18-months' follow-up. The relationship between TAS-20 and EDI or LSAS total scale scores across the four time points was assessed using mixed-effects models, including anxiety, depression, BMI, anorexia subtype, and age as co-factors. Partial least square regression was used to refine this multivariate analysis at subscale level, at inclusion and 18 months. Robust associations between TAS-20 and EDI scores were found, independently from anxious and depressive scores, nutritional state and AN subtype. These effects appeared more particularly linked to the implication of the dimensions difficulties identifying and describing feelings, interpersonal mistrust, feelings of inadequacy and interoceptive awareness deficit. There was also a durable association between alexithymia and social anxiety and avoidance, after adjusting for the confounding effects of depression, and anxiety, and the state of starvation. Difficulties in describing feelings appeared particularly involved here. Thus alexithymia does appear as a factor in the persistence of disorders in AN, and difficulties identifying and describing feelings could compound the social difficulties and major the relational isolation of these patients. PMID:25443977

  19. Total body potassium fat free weight and maximal aerobic power in children with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Davies, C T; von Döbeln, W; Fohlin, L; Freyschuss, U; Thorén, C

    1978-03-01

    Body composition and aerobic work performance have been studied in 5 boys and 10 girls suffering from anorexia nervosa. The average ages of the two groups of children were 15.4 (boys) and 15.2 (girls) years respectively. Measurements of body composition included height, weight (W), body potassium (40K), skinfold thickness (SFT) at triceps and subscapularis, blood volume (BV) and femoral condylar and radioulnar breadths. From these measurements estimates of fat free weight (FFW), skeletal weight (S) and lean body mass (LBM) were made. Work performance was assessed by measurement of the maximal aerobic power (VO2 max). The patients had lost on average 26% of their former body weight. The boys had on average greater than 7% of their body weight as fat compared with greater than 9% in the girls. However, the loss of weight was not solely due to loss of body fat, but could also be ascribed to a decrease in soft fatfree tissue. LBM or FFW could be estimated as well from SFT as from 40k. vo2 max averaged 1.43 1/min (35.1 ml/kg/min) in the anorexic boys and 1.24 l/min (33.2 ml/kg/min) in the girls and was associated with FFW and LBM. However, VO2 max was lower in relation to LBM than in healthy children of the same age. Thus it was suggested that the emaciation in anorexia is directly attributable to loss of both fat and muscle and accounts in part for the reduction of aerobic power observed. However, an important factor may be the debilitating effect of starvation on the patient, particularly in its advanced and later stages, which reduces his/her level of habitual physical activity.

  20. Assessing the Heritability of Anorexia Nervosa Symptoms Using a Marginal Maximal Likelihood Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Suzanne E.; Mitchell, Karen S.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Neale, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessment of eating disorders at the symptom level can facilitate the refinement of phenotypes. We examined genetic and environmental contributions to liability to anorexia nervosa (AN) symptoms in a population-based twin sample using a genetic common pathway model. Method Participants were from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel and included all female monozygotic (n = 448 complete pairs and 4 singletons) and dizygotic (n = 263 complete pairs and 4 singletons) twins who completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview assessing DSM-IV axis I and ICD-10 criteria. Responses to items assessing AN symptoms were included in a model fitted using marginal maximum likelihood. Results Heritability of the overall AN diagnosis was moderate (a2 = .22, 95% CI: 0.0; .50), whereas heritabilities of the specific items varied. Heritability estimates for weight loss items were moderate (a2 estimates ranged from .31 to .34) and items assessing weight concern when at a low weight were smaller (ranging from .18 to .29). Additive genetic factors contributed little to the variance of amenorrhea, which was most strongly influenced by unshared environment (a2 =.16; e2 = .71). Conclusions AN symptoms are differentially heritable. Specific criteria such as those related to body weight and weight loss history represent more biologically driven potential endophenotypes or liability indices. Results regarding weight concern differ somewhat from those of previous studies, which highlights the importance of assessing genetic and environmental influences on variance of traits within specific subgroups of interest. PMID:18485259

  1. Maintenance of parasympathetic inhibition following emotional induction in patients with restrictive type anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Delphine; Nandrino, Jean-Louis; De Jonckheere, Julien; Swierczek, Marie; Dodin, Vincent; Logier, Régis

    2015-02-28

    This study aimed to explore changes in heart rate variability (HRV), a proxy for parasympathetic activity characterizing emotion regulation processes before, during and after negative emotional induction in patients suffering from restrictive type anorexia nervosa (AN-RT). We compared two methods of HRV analysis, the Fast Fourier Transform high frequency (FFT-HF) and a specific HRV high frequency analysis technique, namely, the wavelet transform HRV (WT-HRV). A sample of 16 inpatients with AN-RT was compared to 24 control participants. Heart rate (HR) was continuously recorded for 5 min before the beginning of the video until 5 min after the video. The participants answered questionnaires concerning their eating behaviors, mood disorders and difficulties in emotion regulation. During the entire procedure, the FFT-HF in patients was lower than that in controls. Using the WT-HRV, the patients did not differ from the controls at baseline, and only the controls showed a decrease during emotional induction. After the video, the WT-HRV in patients began to decrease during the first 2 min of emotional recovery although the WT-HRV in controls was already increased. These results highlighted the disturbances in the physiological dynamics of emotion regulation processes in patients with AN-RT. PMID:25500345

  2. Sclerostin levels and bone turnover markers in adolescents with anorexia nervosa and healthy adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Faje, Alexander T; Fazeli, Pouneh K; Katzman, Debra K; Miller, Karen K; Breggia, Anne; Rosen, Clifford J; Mendes, Nara; Klibanski, Anne; Misra, Madhusmita

    2012-09-01

    Sclerostin, product of the SOST gene, is an important determinant of bone formation and resorption. Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) have low bone density and decreased levels of bone turnover markers. However, sclerostin has not been examined in AN as a potential mediator of impaired bone metabolism. Our study objectives were to (i) assess associations of sclerostin with surrogate bone turnover markers in girls with AN and controls and (ii) examine effects of transdermal estradiol on sclerostin in AN. 69 girls (44 with AN and 25 normal-weight controls) 13-18 years old were studied at baseline. 22 AN girls were randomized to transdermal estradiol (plus cyclic medroxyprogesterone) or placebo in a double-blind study for 12 months. Sclerostin correlated positively with P1NP and CTX in controls (r=0.67 and 0.53, p=0.0002 and 0.005, respectively) but not in AN despite comparable levels at baseline. Changes in sclerostin over twelve months did not differ in girls randomized to estradiol or placebo. The relationship between sclerostin and bone turnover markers is disrupted in adolescent girls with AN. Despite an increase in BMD with estradiol administration in AN, estrogen does not impact sclerostin levels in this group.

  3. Assessment of anorexia nervosa: an overview of universal issues and contextual challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aim Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a complex and clinically challenging syndrome. Intended for specialist audiences, this narrative review aims to summarise the available literature related to assessment in the adult patient context, synthesising both research evidence and clinical consensus guidelines. Method We provide a review of the available literature on specialist assessment of AN focusing on common trajectories into assessment, obstacles accessing assessment, common presenting issues and barriers to the assessment process, the necessary scope of assessment, and tools and techniques. It describes the further step of synthesising assessment information in ways that can inform resultant care plans. Results In addition to assessment of core behaviours and diagnostic skills, considerations for the expert assessor include the functions of primary care, systemic and personal barriers, knowledge of current assessment tools and research pertaining to comorbid pathology in AN, assessing severity of illness, role of family at assessment, as well as medical, nutritional and compulsory elements of assessment. Conclusion Comprehensive assessment of AN in the current healthcare context still remains largely the remit of the specialist ED clinician. Assessment should remain an on-going process, paying particular attention to available empirical evidence, thereby reducing the gap between research and practice. PMID:24999408

  4. An experimental exploration of social problem solving and its associated processes in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sternheim, Lot; Startup, Helen; Pretorius, Natalie; Johnson-Sabine, Eric; Schmidt, Ulrike; Channon, Shelley

    2012-12-30

    People with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) have well-documented socio-emotional and neurocognitive impairments. As yet, little is known about their ability to solve problems in social situations, although a link with cognitive avoidance has been suggested. This study explored social problem-solving (SPS), using an experimental task. Secondly, the role of cognitive avoidance in SPS was investigated. Individuals with AN (n=31) and healthy controls (HC; n=39) completed the Social Problem Resolution Task which consists of problem scenarios involving awkward everyday social situations. Participants were asked to generate both the optimal solution and their personal solution. Solutions were rated in terms of how socially sensitive and practically effective they were. AN patients produced relatively poorer personal solutions compared to optimal solutions than HC participants and had higher scores on a measure of cognitive avoidance than the HC group. In AN patients, cognitive avoidance was partially associated with poor SPS. These findings suggest that whilst people with AN have no difficulty in generating socially sensitive and effective solutions to problems, but may have difficulty applying this knowledge to themselves. PMID:22809854

  5. Examining affect and perfectionism in relation to eating disorder symptoms among women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Mason, Tyler B; Utzinger, Linsey M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-07-30

    This study examined personality and affective variables in relation to eating disorder symptoms in anorexia nervosa (AN). Women (N=118) with DSM-IV AN completed baseline questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) and interviews (Eating Disorder Examination, Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale), followed by two weeks of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) involving multiple daily reports of affective states and eating disorder behaviors. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted using eating disorder symptoms as dependent variables (i.e., EMA binge eating, EMA self-induced vomiting, eating disorder rituals, eating disorder preoccupations, dietary restraint). Predictor variables were maladaptive perfectionism (baseline), depressive symptoms (baseline), and affect lability (EMA). Results revealed that affect lability was independently associated with binge eating, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with self-induced vomiting. Depressive symptoms were independently associated with eating disorder rituals, whereas both depressive symptoms and maladaptive perfectionism were independently associated with eating disorder preoccupations. Finally, maladaptive perfectionism and affect lability were both independently associated with dietary restraint. This pattern of findings suggests the importance of affective and personality constructs in relation to eating disorder symptoms in AN and may highlight the importance of targeting these variables in the context of treatment.

  6. The impact of internalizing symptoms on autistic traits in adolescents with restrictive anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Calderoni, Sara; Fantozzi, Pamela; Balboni, Giulia; Pagni, Veronica; Franzoni, Emilio; Apicella, Fabio; Narzisi, Antonio; Maestro, Sandra; Muratori, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Background Although previous studies indicated a positive association between restrictive anorexia-nervosa (AN-R) and autistic traits, the potential interference of psychiatric internalizing comorbidity on this association is not yet fully investigated. Materials and methods The aim of this study was to explore autistic traits and internalizing psychopathology in adolescents (age range: 11.7–17.2 years) with AN-R. Twenty-five patients referred to two tertiary-care hospitals were compared to a large control group (N=170) with no differences in age and sex. AN-R patients and controls filled out instruments assessing autistic traits (autism spectrum quotient [AQ]), psychopathology (youth self-report [YSR] 11–18), and eating patterns (eating attitude test [EAT]). In order to disentangle the possible mediating role of internalizing symptoms on autistic traits, two separate control groups (called True and False healthy control, both composed of 25 eating-problem-free participants) were derived from the whole control group on the basis of the presence or absence of internalizing problems in the YSR. Results AN-R patients scored significantly higher on AQ compared to the whole control group and to controls without internalizing problems (True HC), but these differences disappeared when only controls with internalizing problems (False HC) were considered. Conclusion Autistic traits in AN-R individuals may have been overestimated and may partly be due to comorbid internalizing symptoms in investigated patients. PMID:25609969

  7. Hunger, food intake and weight: the impact of clomipramine on a refeeding anorexia nervosa population.

    PubMed

    Lacey, J H; Crisp, A H

    1980-01-01

    This double-blind controlled study examines the impact of clomipramine when taken by an anorexia nervosa population, refeeding in hospital, over and above that generated by the established treatment programme. Of the 16 patients studied, all reached their target weights including three who asked to leave the study. Clomipramine was significantly associated with increased hunger, appetite and energy intake. It tended, though, to be associated with a reduced rate of weight gain, possibly because activity was increased. Patients receiving clomipramine were more stable in their eating habits and maintained body weight better than those on placebo after leaving the trial. These findings indicate the sensitivity of the hypothalamus to changes in body weight. Clomipramine, which is known to act at a hypothalamic level, seems to influence hunger, appetite and dietary intake according to the body weight of the patient. The threshold weights which have been shown to trigger hypothalamic sexual responses, may also influence hunger, appetite, motility and voluntary energy intake. PMID:6994086

  8. Emotional intelligence in anorexia nervosa: is anxiety a missing piece of the puzzle?

    PubMed

    Hambrook, David; Brown, Gary; Tchanturia, Kate

    2012-11-30

    Problematic emotional processing has been implicated in the genesis and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN). This study built on existing research and explored performance-based emotional intelligence (EI) in people with AN. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) was administered to 32 women diagnosed with AN and 32 female healthy controls (HC). Compared to HC women, the AN group demonstrated significantly lower total EI scores and poorer ability to understand how emotions can progress and change over time. Despite scores within the broadly average range compared to published EI norms, there was a general pattern of poorer performance in the AN sample. Self-reported anxiety symptoms were the strongest predictor of EI, over and above a diagnosis of AN. This study adds to the literature documenting the socioemotional phenotype of AN, suggesting this group of individuals may find it relatively difficult to carry out accurate reasoning about emotions, and to use emotions and emotional knowledge to enhance thought. Anxiety was highlighted as a putative variable partially explaining why people with AN demonstrated lower EI compared to controls. Implications for further research are discussed, including the need to explore the specificity of EI difficulties in AN using larger samples and additional control groups.

  9. Is Anorexia Nervosa a Disorder of the Self? A Psychological Approach.

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Northoff, Georg; Abbate Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo; Tasca, Giorgio A

    2016-01-01

    The debate concerning the pathogenesis and the maintaining factors of eating disorders, anorexia nervosa in particular, is ongoing especially since therapeutic interventions do not result in satisfactory and enduring rates of remission. This paper presents a model for the pathogenesis of eating disorders, based on the hypothesis of a deficiency in the development of the self. We present the theory in light of new evidence concerning the role of attachment insecurity in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. In particular, we define the self in eating disorders in a comprehensive way by taking into account recent evidence from experimental psychology and neurobiology. The paper considers the development of the self in terms of its synchronic (i.e., experienced in the moment) and diachronic (i.e., experienced as continuous over time) aspects. Both synchronic and diachronic aspects of the self are relevant to the expression of eating disorder symptoms. Further, the maturation of the self is interwoven with the development of attachment functioning from infancy to adolescence. This interplay between these developmental processes of the self and of attachment could be crucial in understanding the pathogenesis of eating disorders. The final part of the paper suggests a neurobiological link between the theory of the self in the eating disorders and the spatiotemporal functioning of the brain. Disturbances in spatiotemporal functioning may represent the neurobiological pathway by which deficiencies in the self is related to attachment functions in individuals with eating disorders. PMID:27378967

  10. Delivery of family therapy in the treatment of anorexia nervosa using telehealth.

    PubMed

    Goldfield, Gary S; Boachie, Ahmed

    2003-01-01

    Family therapy plays an important role in the comprehensive treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, most comprehensive hospital-based treatment facilities for eating disorders are situated in large urban centers, thus not accessible to individuals living in underserviced rural communities. Telehealth is now being used to provide psychiatric services to individuals who do not have access to urban-based treatment centers. We report the therapeutic outcome and patient satisfaction of using telehealth to provide family therapy as an adjunctive treatment for AN to an adolescent female admitted to a large urban-based hospital treatment program. Family therapy was delivered via telehealth in a therapeutic environment within a hospital setting, and was received in a telehealth facility in the rural community. Family therapy was effectively delivered and contributed to patient recovery, as measured by objective criteria (weight gain, improved medical condition) and subjective clinical observations. In addition, all family members reported high satisfaction with telehealth without any concern regarding confidentiality. The advantages of telehealth are discussed in the context of legal and ethical issues relating to the use of this technology to deliver psychiatric care.

  11. Thermal Imaging of Body Surface Temperature Distribution in Women with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chudecka, Monika; Lubkowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The drastic reduction in body weight observed in anorexia nervosa (AN) leads to various endocrine changes and consequently to disturbance in thermoregulation mechanisms and body temperature. Thermography allows for a noninvasive diagnosis of the distribution of skin surface temperatures, which is especially important for difficult patients such as women with AN, who are often very sensitive and difficult to treat. The main aim of this study was to measure the mean temperatures (Tmean ) of selected body areas in young women diagnosed with AN and identify those areas where the temperature differences were particularly significant between healthy women and them. Additionally, we determined the relationships between body mass index, body composition (especially subcutaneous and VFM) and the value of mean surface temperature (Tmean ) in AN woman. In the subjects with AN, Tmean of the abdomen, lower back and thighs were significantly higher than in the reference group, while Tmean of the hands were significantly lower. Among other things, analysis showed a significant negative correlation between Tmean of the abdomen, lower back and thighs, and the mass of subcutaneous and visceral fat. The lower Tmean of the hand was directly proportional to the reduced anthropomorphic parameters. The direct evaluation of body surface temperature distribution could provide clinical implications for the treatment of anorexic patients, including the potential use of thermotherapy in stimulating the circulatory system, especially in hypothermia, bradycardia and hypotension.

  12. Attitudinal and perceptual factors in body image distortion: an exploratory study in patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Body image disturbance is a core feature of anorexia nervosa (AN). Attitudinal and cognitive biases as well as fundamental perceptual differences have been hypothesized to play a role in this disturbance. Method This study investigated body image dissatisfaction and distortion, haptic perception and perfectionism in 30 patients with AN and 31 age-matched healthy controls. Participants completed perceptual tasks and self-report measures. Results As predicted, participants with AN scored significantly higher on body dissatisfaction, perfectionism measures and had greater body distortion (as assessed by a body size estimation task). Cognitive–affective factors and perfectionism were highly correlated with body image distortion in AN. No significant differences were found between groups on the generic perception task. Conclusions Findings did not confirm the hypothesis of fundamental perceptual inefficiencies in body image disturbance in individuals with AN. Despite renewed interest in fundamental perceptual factors implicated in body image disturbance, these findings suggest that it continues to be important to focus treatment on cognitive affective biases versus fundamental perceptual inefficiencies. PMID:24999398

  13. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Caitlin B; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN. PMID:26808920

  14. The two dimensions of the body representation in women suffering from Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Spitoni, Grazia Fernanda; Serino, Andrea; Cotugno, Armando; Mancini, Francesco; Antonucci, Gabriella; Pizzamiglio, Luigi

    2015-12-15

    A core symptom of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe alteration of body representations. Evidence from somatoperception studies point to a generic disturbances of somatosensory components of body representations. Here we have investigated whether AN patients (N=18) and controls differed in the perception of tactile stimuli differently oriented along the body axes. We tested the hypothesis that patients perceive and represent their body selectively larger in only one dimension. To this aim we used elementary tactile measures for tactile acuity (Von Frey's test and two-point discrimination thresholds - 2PD) and tactile discrimination measures. The rationale is based on the assumption that AN patients have a wider body representation, and that tactile body representation tasks (Tactile Distance task) oriented across the bodies (horizontally) are influenced by distorted body representations compared with tactile stimuli oriented along the bodies (vertically) which should not be influenced by body representations. Results showed that patients judged horizontal tactile stimuli significantly wider than the same stimuli oriented vertically.These results suggest that human brain perceives things differently based on body representations and that the beliefs concerning body size influence the specific somatosensory process of tactile experience.

  15. Anorexia nervosa in female adolescents: endocrine and bone mineral density disturbances.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M T; Argente, J

    2002-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a chronic childhood psychiatric illness that involves a reduction in caloric intake, loss of weight and amenorrhea, either primary or secondary. The diagnostic criteria for AN have been established by the American Psychiatric Association. The prevalence of this disease amongst adolescents and young adults is between 0.5 and 1% and the incidence of new cases per year is approximately 5-10/100,000 between 15 and 19 years of age.A number of endocrine and metabolic disturbances have been described in patients with AN including amenorrhea-oligomenorrhea, delayed puberty, hypothyroidism, hypercortisolism, IGF-I deficiency, electrolyte abnormalities, hypoglycemia and hypophosphatemia, among others. In addition to prolonged amenorrhea, osteopenia and osteoporosis are the most frequent complications leading to clinically relevant fractures and increased fracture risk throughout life. Patients exhibit an alteration in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which is responsible for the menstrual disorders. The increase in gonadotropin secretion that can be observed after ponderal recuperation suggests that malnutrition could be the most important mechanism involved in the decrease in gonadotropin secretion. The loss of fat tissue as a consequence of nutrient restriction has been associated with hypoleptinemia and abnormal secretion of peptides implicated in food control (neuropeptide Y, melanocortins and corticotropin-releasing factor, among others).A review of the endocrine abnormalities, disturbances in neurotransmitters, as well as a detailed analysis of bone markers and bone mineral density in patients with AN is described.

  16. Neural differences in self-perception during illness and after weight-recovery in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Evans, Siobahn; Lohrenz, Terry; Montague, P. Read; Krawczyk, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness characterized by problems with self-perception. Whole-brain neural activations in healthy women, women with AN and women in long-term weight recovery following AN were compared using two functional magnetic resonance imaging tasks probing different aspects of self-perception. The Social Identity-V2 task involved consideration about oneself and others using socially descriptive adjectives. Both the ill and weight-recovered women with AN engaged medial prefrontal cortex less than healthy women for self-relevant cognitions, a potential biological trait difference. Weight-recovered women also activated the inferior frontal gyri and dorsal anterior cingulate more for direct self-evaluations than for reflected self-evaluations, unlike both other groups, suggesting that recovery may include compensatory neural changes related to social perspectives. The Faces task compared viewing oneself to a stranger. Participants with AN showed elevated activity in the bilateral fusiform gyri for self-images, unlike the weight-recovered and healthy women, suggesting cognitive distortions about physical appearance are a state rather than trait problem in this disease. Because both ill and recovered women showed neural differences related to social self-perception, but only recovered women differed when considering social perspectives, these neurocognitive targets may be particularly important for treatment. PMID:27354739

  17. Hyperactivity in anorexia nervosa: warming up not just burning-off calories.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Olaia; Adan, Roger A H; Gutierrez, Emilio; Danner, Unna N; Hoek, Hans W; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Kas, Martien J H

    2012-01-01

    Excessive physical activity is a common feature in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) that interferes with the recovery process. Animal models have demonstrated that ambient temperature modulates physical activity in semi-starved animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of ambient temperature on physical activity in AN patients in the acute phase of the illness. Thirty-seven patients with AN wore an accelerometer to measure physical activity within the first week of contacting a specialized eating disorder center. Standardized measures of anxiety, depression and eating disorder psychopathology were assessed. Corresponding daily values for ambient temperature were obtained from local meteorological stations. Ambient temperature was negatively correlated with physical activity (p = -.405) and was the only variable that accounted for a significant portion of the variance in physical activity (p = .034). Consistent with recent research with an analogous animal model of the disorder, our findings suggest that ambient temperature is a critical factor contributing to the expression of excessive physical activity levels in AN. Keeping patients warm may prove to be a beneficial treatment option for this symptom. PMID:22848634

  18. Aspects of social cognition in anorexia nervosa: affective and cognitive theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Russell, Tamara Anne; Schmidt, Ulrike; Doherty, Liz; Young, Vicky; Tchanturia, Kate

    2009-08-15

    Although social functioning is clearly impaired in anorexia nervosa (AN), there has been limited empirical assessment of this domain in this illness. This study assesses social cognition in AN by examining performance on two 'theory of mind' (ToM) tasks; Baron-Cohen's "Reading the mind in the Eyes" task (RME) and Happé's cartoon task. These tasks probe affective and cognitive ToM, respectively. Forty-four female participants were recruited (AN N=22; healthy controls N=22) and completed both tasks, with concurrent clinical and intellectual functioning assessment. Compared with healthy controls, AN performed significantly worse on both the RME and the Cartoon task (both conditions). The mental state condition did not facilitate performance in the AN group, as it did in the healthy controls. The findings broadly replicate limited previous work [Tchanturia, K., Happé, F., Godley, J., Bara-Carill, N., Treasure, J., Schmidt, U., 2004. Theory of mind in AN. European Eating Disorders Review 12, 361-366] but in addition demonstrate abnormalities on a task requiring affective ToM interpretation. More detailed information about the components of ToM and the ToM difficulties demonstrated in AN sufferers may inform our understanding of the disorder as well as future social-cognitive based treatments.

  19. Larger hippocampus size in women with anorexia nervosa who exercise excessively than healthy women.

    PubMed

    Beadle, Janelle N; Paradiso, Sergio; Brumm, Michael; Voss, Michelle; Halmi, Katherine; McCormick, Laurie M

    2015-05-30

    Exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal volume in healthy older adults. Observations from animal models of diabetes and hypertension suggest that the combination of exercise and caloric restriction may exert greater neuroprotection in the hippocampus than either behavior alone. Yet, in humans, the effects of exercise and caloric restriction on the hippocampus are not known. We measured the volume of the hippocampus prior to clinical treatment in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) who were restricting calories and engaging in excessive exercise, women with AN who did not exercise excessively, and healthy women who did not engage in either behavior. Women with AN were also examined longitudinally (once weight was restored and 6 months later). In the present report, we found that women with AN engaged in caloric restriction and excessive exercising prior to clinical treatment had larger hippocampal volumes than healthy comparison women. After weight restoration, women with AN who had engaged in food restriction and excessive exercise prior to treatment had hippocampal volumes similar to that of women with AN who only engaged in caloric restriction. These results advance the field by showing for the first time that hippocampal volume may be increased by exercise alone or exercise interacting with food restriction in AN. PMID:25624068

  20. Affiliative Behaviour and Conflictual Communication during Brief Family Therapy of Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Doba, Karyn; Pezard, Laurent; Berna, Guillaume; Vignau, Jean; Nandrino, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) present positive responses to family therapy, the key features of therapeutic changes still require identification. This study explores the role of conflictual communication and affiliative nonverbal behaviour in therapeutic change in brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) for AN patients. Methods Ten female AN patients and their parents were included in the sample and took part in a 6-month follow-up of BSFT. The durations of conflictual communication and of affiliative nonverbal behaviour estimated by eye contact were compared between the first and the last sessions of family-based treatment using nonparametric statistical tests. Results An increase of the Body Mass Index associated with an increase in the conflictual communication expressed during BSFT sessions were observed. Moreover, affiliative nonverbal behaviour expressed by the father and the patient decrease, after a BSFT follow-up, in conflictual situations only. By contrast, no significant difference was observed in affiliative nonverbal behaviour expressed by the mother. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that the impact of the BSFT differs between members of a family: the AN patient and the father have established a new form of emotional functioning with a decrease in emotional involvement. The study of the combination between verbal and nonverbal communication can represent an important step in the understanding of the mechanisms of therapeutic change. PMID:23936421

  1. Does compulsive behavior in Anorexia Nervosa resemble an addiction? A qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Godier, Lauren R; Park, Rebecca J

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic relentless self-starvation behavior seen in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has been described as evidence of compulsivity, with increasing suggestion of parallels with addictive behavior. This study used a thematic qualitative analysis to investigate the parallels between compulsive behavior in AN and Substance Use Disorders (SUD). Forty individuals currently suffering from AN completed an online questionnaire reflecting on their experience of compulsive behavior in AN. Eight main themes emerged from thematic qualitative analysis; compulsivity as central to AN, impaired control, escalating compulsions, emotional triggers, negative reactions, detrimental continuation of behavior, functional impairment, and role in recovery. These results suggested that individuals with AN view the compulsive nature of their behavior as central to the maintenance of their disorder, and as a significant barrier to recovery. The themes that emerged also showed parallels with the DSM-V criteria for SUDs, mapping onto the four groups of criteria (impaired control, social impairment, risky use of substance, pharmacological criteria). These results emphasize the need for further research to explore the possible parallels in behavioral and neural underpinnings of compulsivity in AN and SUDs, which may inform novel treatment avenues for AN.

  2. Self perception and facial emotion perception of others in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry A.; Castle, David J.; Hughes, Matthew E.; Gurvich, Caroline; Nibbs, Richard G.; Rossell, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whether individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) are able to accurately perceive emotions from faces of others is unclear. Furthermore, whether individuals with AN process images of their own face differently to healthy individuals has thus far not been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate facial affect processing and the processing of one’s own face through measures of emotion identification, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and eyetracking. Methods: Twenty-four females with AN and 25 matched healthy control participants were presented with an implicit emotion processing task during fMRI and eyetracking, followed by an explicit emotion identification task. Results: The AN group were found to ‘hyperscan’ stimuli and avoided visually attending to salient features of their own face images. Results of the fMRI revealed increased activity to own face stimuli in AN in the right inferior and middle temporal gyri, and right lingual gyrus. AN participants were not found to display emotion identification deficits to the standard emotional face stimuli. Discussion: The findings are discussed in terms of increased anxiety to disorder-relevant stimuli in AN. Potential clinical implications are discussed in relation to the use of eyetracking techniques to improve the perception of self in AN. PMID:26321993

  3. Alterations in white matter microstructure in women recovered from anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Torres, Laura; Wagner, Angela; Kaye, Walter H.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Objective A recent study of ill individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) reported microstructural alterations in white matter integrity including lower fractional anisotropy and higher mean diffusivity. The present study was designed to determine whether such alterations exist in longterm recovered AN individuals and to examine potential associations with underlying AN traits. Method Twelve adult women recovered from restricting-type AN and 10 control women were studied using diffusion tensor imaging. Results Overall, there was no significant fractional anisotropy alteration in recovered AN, in contrast to a prior study reporting lower fractional anisotropy in ill AN. Further, recovered AN showed lower mean diffusivity in frontal, parietal and cingulum white matter relative to control women, contrary to elevated mean diffusivity previously reported in ill AN. Lower longitudinal diffusivity in recovered AN was associated with higher harm avoidance. However, more severe illness history was associated with worse white matter integrity after recovery in the same direction as reported in prior work. Discussion Our findings suggest that fractional anisotropy in recovered AN is not different from controls, however, a novel pattern of lower mean diffusivity was evidenced in recovered AN, and this alteration was associated with harm avoidance. Notably, severity of illness history may have long-term consequences, emphasizing the importance of aggressive treatment. PMID:23818167

  4. Is psychotherapy mandatory during the acute refeeding period in the treatment of anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Danziger, Y; Carel, C A; Tyano, S; Mimouni, M

    1989-07-01

    Forty-five adolescent and preadolescent patients (42 females, three males) with anorexia nervosa (AN) were treated in a pediatric day care unit of a large urban hospital by a multidisciplinary team. In our treatment model, the pediatrician has the responsibility for the initial evaluation and physical rehabilitation while the pediatric psychiatrist does the initial evaluation of the patient and family and is available for intervention in an emergency. Parents are actively involved in the treatment program. Family psychotherapy is recommended for each patient and his or her family. Among 45 patients, 24 did not enter psychotherapy during the first 2 months of the refeeding period, while the remaining 21 patients started psychotherapy (family and/or individual) during this period. Weight gain was higher in the group without formal psychotherapy during the initial period of refeeding (7.3 +/- 3.1 kg versus 5 +/- 2.5 kg; p less than 0.01). It is suggested that the initiation of structured psychotherapy is not mandatory and does not contribute to treatment effectiveness in the acute phase when emaciation and negativism may hinder the psychotherapeutic process. We believe a multidisciplinary team, together with the parents, is the treatment of choice during the acute phase of AN.

  5. Hunger does not motivate reward in women remitted from anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Wierenga, Christina E.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Melrose, A. James; Irvine, Zoe; Torres, Laura; Bailer, Ursula F.; Simmons, Alan; Fudge, Julie L.; McClure, Samuel M.; Ely, Alice; Kaye, Walter H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hunger enhances sensitivity to reward, yet individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) are not motivated to eat when starved. This study examined whether diminished response to reward could underlie food restriction in AN by investigating brain response to rewards during hunger and satiated states. Methods Using a delay discounting monetary decision task known to discriminate brain regions contributing to processing of immediate rewards and cognitive control important for decision making regarding future rewards, we compared 23 adults remitted from AN (to reduce the confounding effects of starvation [RAN]) to 17 healthy women (CW). Monetary rewards were used because the rewarding value of food may be confounded by anxiety in AN. Results Interactions of group (RAN, CW) × visit (hunger, satiety) revealed that, for CW, hunger significantly increased activation in reward salience circuitry (ventral striatum, dorsal caudate, anterior cingulate cortex) during processing of immediate reward, whereas satiety increased activation in cognitive control circuitry (ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, insula) during decision-making. In contrast, brain response in reward and cognitive neurocircuitry did not differ during hunger and satiety in RAN. A main effect of group revealed elevated response in the middle frontal gyrus for RAN. Conclusions RAN failed to increase activation of reward valuation circuitry when hungry and showed elevated response in cognitive control circuitry independent of metabolic state. Decreased sensitivity to hunger’s motivational drive may explain AN individuals’ ability to restrict food when emaciated. Moreover, difficulties in valuating emotional salience may contribute to inabilities to appreciate the risks inherent in this deadly disorder. PMID:25481622

  6. Enhanced Early Neuronal Processing of Food Pictures in Anorexia Nervosa: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Scaife, Jessica C.; Park, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) have shown increased activation in reward and cognitive control regions in response to food, and a behavioral attentional bias (AB) towards food stimuli is reported. This study aimed to further investigate the neural processing of food using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Participants were 13 females with restricting-type AN, 14 females recovered from restricting-type AN, and 15 female healthy controls. MEG data was acquired whilst participants viewed high- and low-calorie food pictures. Attention was assessed with a reaction time task and eye tracking. Time-series analysis suggested increased neural activity in response to both calorie conditions in the AN groups, consistent with an early AB. Increased activity was observed at 150 ms in the current AN group. Neuronal activity at this latency was at normal level in the recovered group; however, this group exhibited enhanced activity at 320 ms after stimulus. Consistent with previous studies, analysis in source space and behavioral data suggested enhanced attention and cognitive control processes in response to food stimuli in AN. This may enable avoidance of salient food stimuli and maintenance of dietary restraint in AN. A later latency of increased activity in the recovered group may reflect a reversal of this avoidance, with source space and behavioral data indicating increased visual and cognitive processing of food stimuli. PMID:27525258

  7. A Virtual Reality Full Body Illusion Improves Body Image Disturbance in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Keizer, Anouk; van Elburg, Annemarie; Helms, Rossa; Dijkerman, H. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) have a persistent distorted experience of the size of their body. Previously we found that the Rubber Hand Illusion improves hand size estimation in this group. Here we investigated whether a Full Body Illusion (FBI) affects body size estimation of body parts more emotionally salient than the hand. In the FBI, analogue to the RHI, participants experience ownership over an entire virtual body in VR after synchronous visuo-tactile stimulation of the actual and virtual body. Methods and Results We asked participants to estimate their body size (shoulders, abdomen, hips) before the FBI was induced, directly after induction and at ~2 hour 45 minutes follow-up. The results showed that AN patients (N = 30) decrease the overestimation of their shoulders, abdomen and hips directly after the FBI was induced. This effect was strongest for estimates of circumference, and also observed in the asynchronous control condition of the illusion. Moreover, at follow-up, the improvements in body size estimation could still be observed in the AN group. Notably, the HC group (N = 29) also showed changes in body size estimation after the FBI, but the effect showed a different pattern than that of the AN group. Conclusion The results lead us to conclude that the disturbed experience of body size in AN is flexible and can be changed, even for highly emotional body parts. As such this study offers novel starting points from which new interventions for body image disturbance in AN can be developed. PMID:27711234

  8. White matter alterations in anorexia nervosa: A systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Martin Monzon, Beatriz; Hay, Phillipa; Foroughi, Nasim; Touyz, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify findings concerning white matter (WM) fibre microstructural alterations in anorexia nervosa (AN). METHODS: A systematic electronic search was undertaken in several databases up to April 2015. The search strategy aimed to locate all studies published in English or Spanish that included participants with AN and which investigated WM using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Trials were assessed for quality assessment according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses checklist and a published quality index guideline. RESULTS: A total of 6 studies met the inclusion criteria, four of people in the acute state of the illness, one included both recovered and unwell participants, and one included people who had recovered. Participants were female with ages ranging from 14 to 29 years. All studies but one measured a range of psychopathological features. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were the main DTI correlates reported. Alterations were reported in a range of WM structures of the limbic system, most often of the fornix and cingulum as well as the fronto-occipital fibre tracts, i.e., regions associated with anxiety, body image and cognitive function. Subtle abnormalities also appeared to persist after recovery. CONCLUSION: This diversity likely reflects the symptom complexity of AN. However, there were few studies, they applied different methodologies, and all were cross-sectional. PMID:27014606

  9. Increased frontal electroencephalogram theta amplitude in patients with anorexia nervosa compared to healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Hestad, Knut A; Weider, Siri; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø; Sand, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Objective To conduct a blind study of quantitative electroencephalogram-band amplitudes in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and healthy controls. Methods Twenty-one patients with AN and 24 controls were examined with eyes-closed 16-channel electroencephalogram. Main variables were absolute alpha, theta, and delta amplitudes in frontal, temporal, and posterior regions. Results There were no significant differences between the AN patients and controls regarding absolute regional band amplitudes in μV. Borderline significance was found for anterior theta (P=0.051). Significantly increased left and right frontal electrode theta amplitude was found in AN patients (F3, P=0.014; F4, P=0.038) compared to controls. Significant differences were also observed for secondary variables: lower values for relative parietooccipital delta and frontocentral alpha activity among AN patients than among controls. Conclusion We observed slight excess frontal theta and lower relative alpha and delta amplitudes among AN patients than among controls. This pattern is possibly related to a slight frontal lobe dysfunction in AN, or it may reflect increased attention/vigilance or another state-related change in patients with AN compared to healthy controls. PMID:27703359

  10. Is Anorexia Nervosa a Disorder of the Self? A Psychological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Amianto, Federico; Northoff, Georg; Abbate Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo; Tasca, Giorgio A.

    2016-01-01

    The debate concerning the pathogenesis and the maintaining factors of eating disorders, anorexia nervosa in particular, is ongoing especially since therapeutic interventions do not result in satisfactory and enduring rates of remission. This paper presents a model for the pathogenesis of eating disorders, based on the hypothesis of a deficiency in the development of the self. We present the theory in light of new evidence concerning the role of attachment insecurity in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. In particular, we define the self in eating disorders in a comprehensive way by taking into account recent evidence from experimental psychology and neurobiology. The paper considers the development of the self in terms of its synchronic (i.e., experienced in the moment) and diachronic (i.e., experienced as continuous over time) aspects. Both synchronic and diachronic aspects of the self are relevant to the expression of eating disorder symptoms. Further, the maturation of the self is interwoven with the development of attachment functioning from infancy to adolescence. This interplay between these developmental processes of the self and of attachment could be crucial in understanding the pathogenesis of eating disorders. The final part of the paper suggests a neurobiological link between the theory of the self in the eating disorders and the spatiotemporal functioning of the brain. Disturbances in spatiotemporal functioning may represent the neurobiological pathway by which deficiencies in the self is related to attachment functions in individuals with eating disorders. PMID:27378967

  11. Negative Mood Increases Selective Attention to Negatively Valenced Body Parts in Female Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Svaldi, Jennifer; Bender, Caroline; Caffier, Detlef; Ivanova, Viliana; Mies, Nina; Fleischhaker, Christian; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous research has yielded evidence of increased attentional processing of negatively valenced body parts in women with anorexia nervosa (AN), especially for those with high depressive symptomatology. The present study extended previous research by implementing an experimental mood manipulation. Method In a within-subjects design, female adolescents with AN (n = 12) and an age matched female control group (CG; n = 12) were given a negative and a positive mood induction at a one-week interval. After each mood induction, participants underwent a 3-min mirror exposure, while their eye movements were recorded. Results After the positive mood induction, both AN and CG participants displayed longer and more frequent gazes towards their self-defined most ugly relative to their self-defined most beautiful body part. However, after the negative mood induction, only females with AN were characterized by increased attention to their most ugly compared to their most beautiful body part, while CG participants’ attention distribution was balanced. Furthermore, in the negative (but not in the positive) mood induction condition gaze frequency and duration towards the most ugly body part was significantly stronger in the AN group relative to the CG. Discussion The results emphasize the role of negative mood in the maintenance of pathological information processing of the self-body. This increased body-related negativity-bias during negative mood may lead to the persistence and aggravation of AN patients’ body image disturbance. PMID:27123587

  12. In vivo evidence of global and focal brain alterations in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boghi, Andrea; Sterpone, Sara; Sales, Stefano; D'Agata, Federico; Bradac, Gianni Boris; Zullo, Giuseppina; Munno, Donato

    2011-06-30

    Brain alterations are known to be associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) and tend to be distributed across brain structures, with only a few reports describing focal damage. Magnetic resonance images of 21 anorexic patients with different disease duration and 27 control subjects were acquired and compared using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Patients had a significant reduction of total white matter (WM) volume and focal gray matter (GM) atrophy in cerebellum, hypothalamus, caudate nucleus and frontal, parietal and temporal areas. The cerebellum was more affected in patients with longer disease duration, whereas the hypothalamic alterations were more pronounced in patients with shorter food restriction. A correlation with body mass index (BMI) and GM was found in the hypothalamus. Our data demonstrate a diffuse reduction of WM together with focal areas of GM atrophy in AN. The finding of a hypothalamic focal atrophy points to hormonal dysfunction and opens the possibility for a central dysregulation of homeostasis. The involvement of temporoparietal areas could account for body image distortion. Finally, the cerebellar GM atrophy confirms previous findings and seems to be a late consequence of AN that could play a role in the chronic phase of the disease.

  13. Examining affect and perfectionism in relation to eating disorder symptoms among women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Mason, Tyler B; Utzinger, Linsey M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-07-30

    This study examined personality and affective variables in relation to eating disorder symptoms in anorexia nervosa (AN). Women (N=118) with DSM-IV AN completed baseline questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) and interviews (Eating Disorder Examination, Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale), followed by two weeks of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) involving multiple daily reports of affective states and eating disorder behaviors. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted using eating disorder symptoms as dependent variables (i.e., EMA binge eating, EMA self-induced vomiting, eating disorder rituals, eating disorder preoccupations, dietary restraint). Predictor variables were maladaptive perfectionism (baseline), depressive symptoms (baseline), and affect lability (EMA). Results revealed that affect lability was independently associated with binge eating, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with self-induced vomiting. Depressive symptoms were independently associated with eating disorder rituals, whereas both depressive symptoms and maladaptive perfectionism were independently associated with eating disorder preoccupations. Finally, maladaptive perfectionism and affect lability were both independently associated with dietary restraint. This pattern of findings suggests the importance of affective and personality constructs in relation to eating disorder symptoms in AN and may highlight the importance of targeting these variables in the context of treatment. PMID:27208513

  14. Multi-dimensional self-esteem and magnitude of change in the treatment of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Collin, Paula; Karatzias, Thanos; Power, Kevin; Howard, Ruth; Grierson, David; Yellowlees, Alex

    2016-03-30

    Self-esteem improvement is one of the main targets of inpatient eating disorder programmes. The present study sought to examine multi-dimensional self-esteem and magnitude of change in eating psychopathology among adults participating in a specialist inpatient treatment programme for anorexia nervosa. A standardised assessment battery, including multi-dimensional measures of eating psychopathology and self-esteem, was completed pre- and post-treatment for 60 participants (all white Scottish female, mean age=25.63 years). Statistical analyses indicated that self-esteem improved with eating psychopathology and weight over the course of treatment, but that improvements were domain-specific and small in size. Global self-esteem was not predictive of treatment outcome. Dimensions of self-esteem at baseline (Lovability and Moral Self-approval), however, were predictive of magnitude of change in dimensions of eating psychopathology (Shape and Weight Concern). Magnitude of change in Self-Control and Lovability dimensions were predictive of magnitude of change in eating psychopathology (Global, Dietary Restraint, and Shape Concern). The results of this study demonstrate that the relationship between self-esteem and eating disorder is far from straightforward, and suggest that future research and interventions should focus less exclusively on self-esteem as a uni-dimensional psychological construct.

  15. Enhanced Early Neuronal Processing of Food Pictures in Anorexia Nervosa: A Magnetoencephalography Study.

    PubMed

    Godier, Lauren R; Scaife, Jessica C; Braeutigam, Sven; Park, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) have shown increased activation in reward and cognitive control regions in response to food, and a behavioral attentional bias (AB) towards food stimuli is reported. This study aimed to further investigate the neural processing of food using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Participants were 13 females with restricting-type AN, 14 females recovered from restricting-type AN, and 15 female healthy controls. MEG data was acquired whilst participants viewed high- and low-calorie food pictures. Attention was assessed with a reaction time task and eye tracking. Time-series analysis suggested increased neural activity in response to both calorie conditions in the AN groups, consistent with an early AB. Increased activity was observed at 150 ms in the current AN group. Neuronal activity at this latency was at normal level in the recovered group; however, this group exhibited enhanced activity at 320 ms after stimulus. Consistent with previous studies, analysis in source space and behavioral data suggested enhanced attention and cognitive control processes in response to food stimuli in AN. This may enable avoidance of salient food stimuli and maintenance of dietary restraint in AN. A later latency of increased activity in the recovered group may reflect a reversal of this avoidance, with source space and behavioral data indicating increased visual and cognitive processing of food stimuli.

  16. Impaired configural body processing in anorexia nervosa: evidence from the body inversion effect.

    PubMed

    Urgesi, Cosimo; Fornasari, Livia; Canalaz, Francesca; Perini, Laura; Cremaschi, Silvana; Faleschini, Laura; Thyrion, Erica Zappoli; Zuliani, Martina; Balestrieri, Matteo; Fabbro, Franco; Brambilla, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) suffer from severe disturbances of body perception. It is unclear, however, whether such disturbances are linked to specific alterations in the processing of body configurations with respect to the local processing of body part details. Here, we compared a consecutive sample of 12 AN patients with a group of 12 age-, gender- and education-matched controls using an inversion effect paradigm requiring the visual discrimination of upright and inverted pictures of whole bodies, faces and objects. The AN patients presented selective deficits in the discrimination of upright body stimuli, which requires configural processing. Conversely, patients and controls showed comparable abilities in the discrimination of inverted bodies, which involves only detail-based processing, and in the discrimination of both upright and inverted faces and objects. Importantly, the body inversion effect negatively correlated with the persistence scores at the Temperament and Character Inventory, which evaluates increased tendency to convert a signal of punishment into a signal of reinforcement. These results suggest that the deficits of configural processing in AN patients may be associated with their obsessive worries about body appearance and to the excessive attention to details that characterizes their general perceptual style.

  17. Antioxidant activity and nutritional status in anorexia nervosa: effects of weight recovery.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-López, María-Jesús; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada; Bolaños-Ríos, Patricia; De la Cerda, Francisco; Martín, Franz; Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2015-03-30

    Few studies are focused on the antioxidant status and its changes in anorexia nervosa (AN). Based on the hypothesis that renutrition improves that status, the aim was to determine the plasma antioxidant status and the antioxidant enzymes activity at the beginning of a personalized nutritional program (T0) and after recovering normal body mass index (BMI) (T1). The relationship between changes in BMI and biochemical parameters was determined. Nutritional intake, body composition, anthropometric, hematological and biochemical parameters were studied in 25 women with AN (19.20 ± 6.07 years). Plasma antioxidant capacity and antioxidant enzymes activity were measured. Mean time to recover normal weight was 4.1 ± 2.44 months. Energy, macronutrients and micronutrients intake improved. Catalase activity was significantly modified after dietary intake improvement and weight recovery (T0 = 25.04 ± 1.97 vs. T1 = 35.54 ± 2.60 μmol/min/mL; p < 0.01). Total antioxidant capacity increased significantly after gaining weight (T0 = 1033.03 ± 34.38 vs. T1 = 1504.61 ± 99.73 μmol/L; p < 0.01). Superoxide dismutase activity decreased (p < 0.05) and glutathione peroxidase did not change. Our results support an association between nutrition improvement and weight gain in patients with AN, followed by an enhancement of antioxidant capacity and catalase antioxidant system.

  18. Bone mineralization disorders as a complication of anorexia nervosa - etiology, prevalence, course and treatment.

    PubMed

    Jagielska, Gabriela Wiesława; Przedlacki, Jerzy; Bartoszewicz, Zbigniew; Racicka, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) most often has its onset in adolescence, which is a crucial period to achieve peak bone mass. The hormonal abnormalities (hypoestrogenism, hypercortisolism, decreased secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor) and malnutrition are associated with profound bone mineralization disorders. Densitomertic bone mineral density (BMD) values for osteopenia and osteoporosis were found respectively in 35-98% and 13-50% of women with AN. Prospective studies indicate a further decline in BMD at the beginning of treatment and a crucial importance of weight gain and return of spontaneous menses for its growth. Due to frequent chronic and relapsing course of AN densitometric assessment of BMD is recommended in all patients with AN and amenorrhea lasting around twelve months. In order to establish standards for the treatment of osteoporosis in AN, studies on pharmacological treatment are conducted. There are promising results indicating the improvement in BMD after treatment with physiologic oestrogen replacement treatment and sequential administration of medroxyprogesterone in teenage girls and bisphosphonates in adult women. Supplementation of vitamin D and adequate consumption of calcium from diet are recommended. Further studies on the effectiveness of long-term treatment of osteoporosis with regard to the possibility of increase in BMD and reducing the risk of osteoporotic fractures are needed. PMID:27556110

  19. Enhanced Early Neuronal Processing of Food Pictures in Anorexia Nervosa: A Magnetoencephalography Study.

    PubMed

    Godier, Lauren R; Scaife, Jessica C; Braeutigam, Sven; Park, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) have shown increased activation in reward and cognitive control regions in response to food, and a behavioral attentional bias (AB) towards food stimuli is reported. This study aimed to further investigate the neural processing of food using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Participants were 13 females with restricting-type AN, 14 females recovered from restricting-type AN, and 15 female healthy controls. MEG data was acquired whilst participants viewed high- and low-calorie food pictures. Attention was assessed with a reaction time task and eye tracking. Time-series analysis suggested increased neural activity in response to both calorie conditions in the AN groups, consistent with an early AB. Increased activity was observed at 150 ms in the current AN group. Neuronal activity at this latency was at normal level in the recovered group; however, this group exhibited enhanced activity at 320 ms after stimulus. Consistent with previous studies, analysis in source space and behavioral data suggested enhanced attention and cognitive control processes in response to food stimuli in AN. This may enable avoidance of salient food stimuli and maintenance of dietary restraint in AN. A later latency of increased activity in the recovered group may reflect a reversal of this avoidance, with source space and behavioral data indicating increased visual and cognitive processing of food stimuli. PMID:27525258

  20. [Body dysmorphic disorder: clinical aspects, nosological dimensions and controversies with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Behar, Rosa; Arancibia, Marcelo; Heitzer, Cristóbal; Meza, Nicolás

    2016-05-01

    There is strong evidence about the co-existence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and eating disorders (ED), particularly with anorexia nervosa (AN). An exhaustive review of the specialised literature regarding these disorders was carried out. The results show that their co-occurrence implies a more complex diagnosis and treatment, a more severe clinical symptomatology and a worse prognosis and outcome. Both disorders display common similarities, differences and comorbidities, which allow authors to classify them in different nosological spectra (somatomorphic, anxious, obsessive-compulsive, affective and psychotic). Their crossover involves higher levels of body dissatisfaction and body image distortion, depression, suicidal tendency, personality disorders, substance use/abuse, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, alexithymia and childhood abuse or neglect background. Treatment including cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and selective reuptake serotonin inhibitors are effective for both, BDD and ED; nevertheless, plastic surgery could exacerbate BDD. Clinical traits of BDD must be systematically detected in patients suffering from ED and vice versa. PMID:27552014

  1. The ethics of neuromodulation for anorexia nervosa: a focus on rTMS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective Recently there has been emerging clinical and research interest in the application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN). To our knowledge, few studies have discussed ethical aspects associated with the increased use of neuromodulation in AN, some of which are quite specific to AN, despite the rapid development and dissemination of these new technologies. Method We provide a brief overview of three published rTMS studies for AN and discuss ethical issues involved in the use of neuromodulation for AN. Results In contrast to neurosurgery or DBS, rTMS is a less invasive technique, with less associated risk, and thus has greater potential to become a more widespread augmentation or add-on therapy for AN. New therapeutic procedures are promising, yet they raise ethical questions regarding informed consent and patient selection. Illness-specific issues surrounding authenticity and autonomy are important to consider, ensuring an ethical approach to treatment for patients with AN. Discussion We argue that ethical investigations for neuromodulation techniques are timely and important, and discussions should go beyond the immediate goals of patient safety, consent, and risk and benefit, to consider broader ethical concepts such as authenticity and autonomy. PMID:24690315

  2. Rumination but not distraction increases eating-related symptoms in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Eva; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Caffier, Detlef; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Recent models of eating disorders emphasize the importance of ruminative thinking in the occurrence of unhealthy eating behavior. Hence, the aim of the current study was to examine the influence of induced rumination and distraction on the desire to engage in eating-related symptoms in anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). After a sadness induction, either a ruminative or distractive emotion regulation style was encouraged in women with AN (n = 38), BN (n = 37), and non-eating disordered controls (CG; n = 36). At baseline and after the emotion regulation induction feelings of sadness, desire to abstain from eating (DTA) and desire to binge (DTB) were assessed. Main results reveal that rumination led to a significant increase of DTA in the AN group and of DTB in patients with BN. In the CG, DTA significantly decreased after distraction. Although there were significant increases in subjective sadness in the rumination condition, no changes were found in the distraction condition. The results suggest that rumination in response to sadness has a detrimental effect on eating-related symptoms in eating disorders.

  3. Bidirectional associations between binge eating and restriction in anorexia nervosa. An ecological momentary assessment study.

    PubMed

    De Young, Kyle P; Lavender, Jason M; Crosby, Ross D; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Le Grange, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the association between restrictive eating behaviors and binge eating in anorexia nervosa (AN) using data collected in the natural environment. Women (N = 118) with DSM-IV full or subthreshold AN reported eating disorder behaviors, including binge eating episodes, going ≥ 8 waking hours without eating, and skipping meals, during 2 weeks of ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Time-lagged generalized estimating equations tested the following hypotheses: 1) dietary restriction would predict binge eating while controlling for binge eating the previous day; 2) binge eating would predict restriction the subsequent day while controlling for restriction the previous day. After controlling for relevant covariates, the hypotheses were not supported; however, there appeared to be a cumulative effect of repeatedly going 8 consecutive hours without eating (i.e. fasting) on the risk of binge eating among individuals who recently engaged in binge eating. In addition, skipping meals was associated with a lower risk of same day binge eating. The relationship between binge eating and dietary restriction appears to be complex and may vary by type of restrictive eating behavior. Future research should aim to further clarify the nature of the interaction of binge eating and restrictive eating among individuals with AN in order to effectively eliminate these behaviors in treatment.

  4. A Pilot Study of an Acceptance-Based Separated Family Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Merwin, Rhonda M.; Zucker, Nancy L.; Timko, C. Alix

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN) has improved significantly with the increased emphasis on family-based intervention. Yet despite advances, a substantial number of adolescents do not respond optimally to existing treatment models and thus there is a need for treatment alternatives that address barriers to recovery. We developed and piloted an acceptance-based separated family treatment (ASFT) with 6 adolescents with AN or subthreshold AN (eating disorder not otherwise specified, with the primary symptoms of restriction and severe weight loss). Treatment acceptability was adequate. Overall, parents rated the treatment as credible and expected improvement in their child's condition. Five of the 6 adolescents treated with ASFT restored weight to their ideal body mass index as indicated by age, height, and sex and determined by individual growth charts. Many demonstrated improved psychological health and adaptive functioning. There was evidence of broad effects, with parents reporting decreased anxiety and caregiver burden. ASFT holds promise as a treatment option for AN. The efficacy of this therapeutic approach should be tested in larger trials and compared to current family-based interventions to determine unique effects. PMID:27307691

  5. The reinforcing effect of exercise in anorexia nervosa: Clinical correlates and relationship to outcome.

    PubMed

    Gianini, Loren M; Klein, Diane A; Call, Christine; Mayer, Laurel; Foltin, Richard W; Walsh, B Timothy; Wang, Yuanjia; Wu, Peng; Attia, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the relative reinforcing effect of exercise compared to a non-monetary alternative reinforcer (leisure activity), and to money, before and after weight restoration in an inpatient population with anorexia nervosa (AN). Sixty-two inpatients with AN completed a progressive ratio (PR) task to earn exercise, leisure activities, or cash at low weight and after weight restoration. Measures of pathology and motivation to exercise were completed and post-treatment discharge weights were collected. Patients worked harder for exercise at low weight than after weight restoration (df = 46, t = 5.50, p < .001). PR task performance was weakly associated with a measure of commitment to exercise (low weight: r = 0.31, weight restored: r = 0.36, p < .05), but not with other clinical measures or follow-up weights. Contrary to prior suggestions, measurement of the reinforcing value of exercise among individuals with AN via a PR task does not appear valuable in assessing clinical severity or outcome. Other, simpler, self-report measures of commitment to exercise may have greater value in assessing these outcomes. PMID:27348805

  6. Motivational processing of food cues in anorexia nervosa: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Novosel, Anna; Lackner, Nina; Unterrainer, Human-Friedrich; Dunitz-Scheer, Marguerite; Scheer, Peter Jaron Zwi; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra Johanna; Neuper, Christa

    2014-06-01

    Current literature suggests an increased attentional bias toward food stimuli in eating-disordered individuals compared to healthy controls. In line with these research efforts, the present study aims to investigate the processing of food stimuli (enriched by emotional stimuli) between patients diagnosed for anorexia nervosa (AN) and healthy controls by means of electroencephalography. Twenty-two female adolescents (eleven AN patients vs. eleven healthy controls) were investigated. Positive event-related potentials "P300" and "late positive potential" (LPP) reflecting attentional processing (caused by motivationally relevant stimuli) were investigated during passive viewing of the food cue picture stream. This method was used for the first time in a sample of individuals with AN. As a main result, AN patients exhibited a higher amount of attentional bias in P300 and LPP, while watching food stimuli. Moreover, AN patients rated food stimuli as less pleasant. For a conclusion, there is substantial evidence pointing to an abnormal attentional brain reactivity to food pictures in AN. Therefore, food stimuli seem to be more motivationally relevant for AN patients than for healthy controls. By broadening existing knowledge, these findings might bear some implications for the treatment for AN. However, further research is recommended in order to confirm the results coming from rather limited data.

  7. Effects of pioglitazone on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in a patient with anorexia nervosa: A case report

    PubMed Central

    OHNO, TOMOHIKO; NISHIGAKI, YOICHI; YAMADA, TETSUYA; WAKAHARA, YUKO; SAKAI, HIROYASU; YOSHIMURA, KOTARO; SHIMIZU, MASAHITO; USUI, TOSHIO; SAITO, MASAYA; YASUDA, ICHIRO; TSURUMI, HISASHI; TOMITA, EIICHI; MORIWAKI, HISATAKA

    2014-01-01

    Diseases associated with metabolic syndromes are of major concern in developed countries. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is one of the manifestations of metabolic syndrome in the liver. Previous studies have shown that NASH is also caused by malnutrition. In the present study, a case of malnutrition-associated NASH in a 66-year-old female with anorexia nervosa is reported. The patient had a body mass index (BMI) of only 11.1 kg/m2 and serum alanine aminotransferase levels of 1,495 IU/l. Steatohepatitis with fibrosis was confirmed by percutaneous liver needle biopsy. Total parenteral nutrition was conducted at first, followed by the administration of Stronger Neo-Minophagen C (a glycyrrhizin-containing preparation), ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisolone. The abnormal elevation of aminotransferase levels of the patient was prolonged and total bilirubin levels increased. Pioglitazone (15 mg/day), which has been identified to be effective for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, was then administered. This resulted in marked reductions in aminotransferase and bilirubin levels within three months. Histological improvement of the liver was also confirmed by percutaneous liver needle biopsy after one year. The observations in the present case suggest that pioglitazone may be useful for the treatment of malnutrition-associated NASH. PMID:24669237

  8. Nutritional rehabilitation in anorexia nervosa: review of the literature and implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of weight and nutritional status are key elements in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN). This review aims to describe issues related to the caloric requirements needed to gain and maintain weight for short and long-term recovery for AN inpatients and outpatients. We reviewed the literature in PubMed pertaining to nutritional restoration in AN between 1960–2012. Based on this search, several themes emerged: 1. AN eating behavior; 2. Weight restoration in AN; 3. Role of exercise and metabolism in resistance to weight gain; 3. Medical consequences of weight restoration; 4. Rate of weight gain; 5. Weight maintenance; and 6. Nutrient intake. A fair amount is known about overall caloric requirements for weight restoration and maintenance for AN. For example, starting at 30–40 kilocalories per kilogram per day (kcal/kg/day) with increases up to 70–100 kcal/kg/day can achieve a weight gain of 1–1.5 kg/week for inpatients. However, little is known about the effects of nutritional deficits on weight gain, or how to meet nutrient requirements for restoration of nutritional status. This review seeks to draw attention to the need for the development of a foundation of basic nutritional knowledge about AN so that future treatment can be evidenced-based. PMID:24200367

  9. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Caitlin B; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN.

  10. Aetiology of anorexia nervosa: from a "psychosomatic family model" to a neuropsychiatric disorder?

    PubMed

    Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Seitz, Jochen; Konrad, Kerstin

    2011-11-01

    Eating disorders and, in particular, anorexia nervosa (AN) have morbidity and mortality rates that are among the highest of any mental disorders and are associated with significant functional impairment. More than 25 years ago, several researchers hypothesised that the prerequisite for the development of AN was a family process characterised by an overprotective and conflict-avoiding parent-child interaction. Family studies, however, suggest that AN is a complex genetic disorder that is likely expressed primarily by temperament and specific traits during childhood, including inhibition, perfectionism and harm avoidance. Recent studies have described an impaired flexibility and deficits in social cognition that are independent of body weight and the current state of the eating disorder, providing further evidence for a genetic component of AN. The physiological and psychological alterations and the increasing societal demands that occur during puberty may trigger onset. The starvation process itself is associated with severe alterations of central and peripheral metabolism, especially neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter changes, which are thought to affect the adolescent brain during the vulnerable period of neural restructuring. Long-standing malnutrition during adolescence and young adulthood associated with hormonal and neuropeptide dysfunctions may produce "biological scars" that maintain and accelerate the disorder and likely result in chronic mental disorders in adulthood as well as poor social functioning. PMID:21866370

  11. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Caitlin B.; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C.; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN. PMID:26808920

  12. Perception and evaluation of women's bodies in adolescents and adults with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Horndasch, Stefanie; Heinrich, Hartmut; Kratz, Oliver; Mai, Sandra; Graap, Holmer; Moll, Gunther H

    2015-12-01

    Body image disturbance in anorexia nervosa (AN) has been widely studied with regard to the patient's own body, but little is known about perception of or attitude towards other women's bodies in AN. The aim of the present study was to investigate how 20 girls aged 12-18 years and 19 adult women suffering from AN compared to 37 healthy adolescent girls and women estimate weight and attractiveness of women's bodies belonging to different BMI categories (BMI 13.8-61.3 kg/m²). Weight and attractiveness ratings of the participant's own body and information on physical comparisons were obtained, and effects on others' weight and attractiveness ratings investigated. Differential evaluation processes were found: AN patients estimated other women's weight higher than control participants. Patients showed a bias towards assessing extremely underweight women as more attractive and normal weight and overweight women as less attractive than healthy girls and women. These effects were more pronounced in adult than in adolescent AN patients. The tendency to engage in physical comparison with others significantly correlated with weight as well as attractiveness ratings in patients. A logistic regression model encompassing own attractiveness ratings, attractiveness bias towards strongly underweight others' bodies and the interaction of this bias with age as predictors differentiated best between AN patients and controls. Our results indicate that females suffering from AN and healthy girls and women perceive other women's bodies differently. Assessment of others' weight and attractiveness may contribute to the maintenance of dysfunctional physical comparison processes. PMID:25998010

  13. Does compulsive behavior in Anorexia Nervosa resemble an addiction? A qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    Godier, Lauren R.; Park, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic relentless self-starvation behavior seen in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has been described as evidence of compulsivity, with increasing suggestion of parallels with addictive behavior. This study used a thematic qualitative analysis to investigate the parallels between compulsive behavior in AN and Substance Use Disorders (SUD). Forty individuals currently suffering from AN completed an online questionnaire reflecting on their experience of compulsive behavior in AN. Eight main themes emerged from thematic qualitative analysis; compulsivity as central to AN, impaired control, escalating compulsions, emotional triggers, negative reactions, detrimental continuation of behavior, functional impairment, and role in recovery. These results suggested that individuals with AN view the compulsive nature of their behavior as central to the maintenance of their disorder, and as a significant barrier to recovery. The themes that emerged also showed parallels with the DSM-V criteria for SUDs, mapping onto the four groups of criteria (impaired control, social impairment, risky use of substance, pharmacological criteria). These results emphasize the need for further research to explore the possible parallels in behavioral and neural underpinnings of compulsivity in AN and SUDs, which may inform novel treatment avenues for AN. PMID:26539148

  14. Diminished facial emotion expression and associated clinical characteristics in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lang, Katie; Larsson, Emma E C; Mavromara, Liza; Simic, Mima; Treasure, Janet; Tchanturia, Kate

    2016-02-28

    This study aimed to investigate emotion expression in a large group of children, adolescents and adults with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), and investigate the associated clinical correlates. One hundred and forty-one participants (AN=66, HC= 75) were recruited and positive and negative film clips were used to elicit emotion expressions. The Facial Activation Coding system (FACES) was used to code emotion expression. Subjective ratings of emotion were collected. Individuals with AN displayed less positive emotions during the positive film clip compared to healthy controls (HC). There was no significant difference between the groups on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). The AN group displayed emotional incongruence (reporting a different emotion to what would be expected given the stimuli, with limited facial affect to signal the emotion experienced), whereby they reported feeling significantly higher rates of negative emotion during the positive clip. There were no differences in emotion expression between the groups during the negative film clip. Despite this individuals with AN reported feeling significantly higher levels of negative emotions during the negative clip. Diminished positive emotion expression was associated with more severe clinical symptoms, which could suggest that these individuals represent a group with serious social difficulties, which may require specific attention in treatment.

  15. Abnormal Social Reward Responses in Anorexia Nervosa: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Via, Esther; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Sánchez, Isabel; Forcano, Laura; Harrison, Ben J.; Davey, Christopher G.; Pujol, Jesús; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Menchón, José M.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Cardoner, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) display impaired social interactions, implicated in the development and prognosis of the disorder. Importantly, social behavior is modulated by reward-based processes, and dysfunctional at-brain-level reward responses have been involved in AN neurobiological models. However, no prior evidence exists of whether these neural alterations would be equally present in social contexts. In this study, we conducted a cross-sectional social-judgment functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of 20 restrictive-subtype AN patients and 20 matched healthy controls. Brain activity during acceptance and rejection was investigated and correlated with severity measures (Eating Disorder Inventory -EDI-2) and with personality traits of interest known to modulate social behavior (The Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire). Patients showed hypoactivation of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) during social acceptance and hyperactivation of visual areas during social rejection. Ventral striatum activation during rejection was positively correlated in patients with clinical severity scores. During acceptance, activation of the frontal opercula-anterior insula and dorsomedial/dorsolateral prefrontal cortices was differentially associated with reward sensitivity between groups. These results suggest an abnormal motivational drive for social stimuli, and involve overlapping social cognition and reward systems leading to a disruption of adaptive responses in the processing of social reward. The specific association of reward-related regions with clinical and psychometric measures suggests the putative involvement of reward structures in the maintenance of pathological behaviors in AN. PMID:26197051

  16. Emotion regulation in broadly defined anorexia nervosa: association with negative affective memory bias.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Amy; Wade, Tracey D

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical models in anorexia nervosa (AN) implicate difficulties with emotion regulation as a maintaining factor. To date little is known about how different factors might maintain these difficulties. Forty eight women were recruited, 24 receiving treatment for AN (called broadly defined AN) and 24 healthy controls. Self-report measures of difficulties with emotion regulation and current depression were used in addition to computerized tasks which provided measures of social attentional bias and anger-threat bias, as well negative affective memory and recognition bias. Compared to controls, women with AN had significantly higher levels of difficulties with emotion regulation, depression, and negative affective memory bias, as well as lower bias for anger-threat. Simultaneous examination of the two variables that met pre-conditions for mediation of the relationship between group membership and difficulties with emotion regulation (anger-threat bias and negative affective memory) indicated negative affective memory bias to be a mediator, accounting for around one-third of the total effect a diagnosis of AN has on difficulties with emotion regulation. The association of these variables with AN may indicate shared risk factors with depression, and the variety of therapeutic approaches found to be effective with depression may be useful to further incorporate into treatments for AN.

  17. Antioxidant Activity and Nutritional Status in Anorexia Nervosa: Effects of Weight Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Oliveras-López, María-Jesús; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada; Bolaños-Ríos, Patricia; De la Cerda, Francisco; Martín, Franz; Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Few studies are focused on the antioxidant status and its changes in anorexia nervosa (AN). Based on the hypothesis that renutrition improves that status, the aim was to determine the plasma antioxidant status and the antioxidant enzymes activity at the beginning of a personalized nutritional program (T0) and after recovering normal body mass index (BMI) (T1). The relationship between changes in BMI and biochemical parameters was determined. Nutritional intake, body composition, anthropometric, hematological and biochemical parameters were studied in 25 women with AN (19.20 ± 6.07 years). Plasma antioxidant capacity and antioxidant enzymes activity were measured. Mean time to recover normal weight was 4.1 ± 2.44 months. Energy, macronutrients and micronutrients intake improved. Catalase activity was significantly modified after dietary intake improvement and weight recovery (T0 = 25.04 ± 1.97 vs. T1 = 35.54 ± 2.60μmol/min/mL; p < 0.01). Total antioxidant capacity increased significantly after gaining weight (T0 = 1033.03 ± 34.38 vs. T1 = 1504.61 ± 99.73 μmol/L; p < 0.01). Superoxide dismutase activity decreased (p < 0.05) and glutathione peroxidase did not change. Our results support an association between nutrition improvement and weight gain in patients with AN, followed by an enhancement of antioxidant capacity and catalase antioxidant system. PMID:25830944

  18. Electrophysiological Neuroimaging using sLORETA Comparing 12 Anorexia Nervosa Patients to 12 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta; Kapica, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is characterized by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Volume 4 (DSM IV), as one’s refusal to maintain a body weight that is above the calculated limit, which is determined by an algorithm involving one’s height and weight. As more emphasis in society is placed on one’s body image and appearance there has been an increase in the prevalence of this disease. Previously, the sole diagnostic imaging modality was fMRI. Studies determined that there was reduced blood flood in the Parahippocampal Gyrus, and Left Fusiform Gyrus, of those afflicted with AN. Electroencephalography (EEG) was utilized as an alternative imaging modality that was more cost effect. It was determined that the activated regions localized on the fMRI study coincided with those highlighted on the EEG report and previous fMRI studies. The goal of this study was to determine a more cost effective way to earlier detect a diagnosis of AN. The desired outcome would be for patients afflicted with AN to be diagnosed and treated at an earlier stage, increasing their overall long-term survival. PMID:26609424

  19. The role of psychiatric and medical traditions in the discovery and description of anorexia nervosa in France, Germany, and Italy, 1873-1918.

    PubMed

    Habermas, T

    1991-06-01

    Should the national idiosyncrasies in the medical history of anorexia nervosa be attributed to differences in its prevalence or to differences in medical thinking? French, German, and Italian literature prior to World War I demonstrates that three approaches within traditions of psychiatric or medical thinking suffice to explain the national differences in reports of anorexia nervosa: minute clinical description, attentiveness to psychological facts, and attentiveness to nutrition. Furthermore, additional contributing factors are considered: general interest in neuroses, the institutional context, and the political context. As a result, historical epidemiological inferences are not warranted on the basis of the number of publications alone.

  20. "If I see somebody…I'll immediately scope them out": anorexia nervosa clients' perceptions of their therapists' body.

    PubMed

    Rance, Nicola M; Clarke, Victoria; Moller, Naomi P

    2014-01-01

    Although people with eating disorders are known to observe and assess body related stimuli, research has yet to explore these behaviors in the therapy room. Consequently, practitioners do not know if their bodies are having an impact on their clients or the therapy process. This lack of knowledge is problematic given the poor recovery rates and high levels of drop-out in eating disorders treatment. Using semi-structured interviews this study investigated the beliefs and experiences of 11 women diagnosed with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa with a history of restricting, who had received counseling from a female therapist. Results derived from thematic analysis suggest that the patients not only observed, speculated, and made assumptions about their therapists' bodies but also that their assumptions and speculations had the potential to influence both their beliefs about the therapist's ability to help them, and their willingness to engage in therapy. PMID:24555509