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Sample records for ans advanced neutron

  1. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. ); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. )

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

  2. An overview of the planned advanced neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), now in the conceptual design stage, will be a new user facility for neutron research, including neutron beam experiments, materials irradiation testing and materials analysis capabilities, and production facilities for transuranic and lighter isotopes. The neutron source is to be the world's highest flux beam reactor and is based on existing reactor technology to minimize safety issues. The preferred fuel, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, has been tested in operating reactors in the United States, Japan, and Europe. The core is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water, common practice for research reactors. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. An Advanced Neutron Spectrometer for Future Manned Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark; Apple, Jeffrey A.; Cox, Mark D.; Dietz, Kurtis L.; Dobson, Christopher C.; Gibson, Brian F.; Howard, David E.; Jackson, Amanda C.; Kayatin, Mathew J.; Kuznetsov, Evgeny N.; hide

    2014-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Spectrometer (ANS) is being developed to support future manned exploration missions. This new instrument uses a refined gate and capture technique that significantly improves the identification of neutrons in mixed radiation fields found in spacecraft, habitats and on planetary surfaces. The new instrument is a composite scintillator comprised of PVT loaded with litium-6 glass scintillators. We will describe the detection concept and show preliminary results from laboratory tests and exposures at particle accelerators

  4. The advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 8 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2} {center dot}s{sup {minus}1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research.

  5. The Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 9{center dot}10{sup 19} m{sup -2}{center dot}s{sup -1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; King-Jones, K.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1995-01-01

    The President`s budget request for FY 1994 included a construction project for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). However, the budget that emerged from the Congress did not, and so activities during this reporting period were limited to continued research and development and to advanced conceptual design. A significant effort was devoted to a study, requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and led by Brookhaven National Laboratory, of the performance and cost impacts of reducing the uranium fuel enrichment below the baseline design value of 93%. The study also considered alternative core designs that might mitigate those impacts. The ANS Project proposed a modified core design, with three fuel elements instead of two, that would allow operation with only 50% enriched uranium and use existing fuel technology. The performance penalty would be 15--20% loss of thermal neutron flux; the flux would still just meet the minimum design requirement set by the user community. At the time of this writing, DOE has not established an enrichment level for ANS, but two advisory committees have recommended adopting the new core design, provided the minimum flux requirements are still met.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ADVANCED GADOLINIUM NEUTRON ABSORBER ALLOY BY MEANS OF NEUTRON TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg W. Wachs

    2007-09-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the alloy at specific gadolinium dopant levels. The new alloy is to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched DOE SNF. For the transmission experiments, alloy test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using only radiative capture cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium poison and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the alloy test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the gadolinium was dispersed fairly uniformly in the alloy and the ENDF VII radiative capture cross section data were accurate.

  8. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H. ); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. ); Thompson, P.B. . Engineering Division)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  9. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I & C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  10. Design calculations for the ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation procedure, based on discrete ordinates transport methods, that is being used to carry out design calculations for the Advanced Neutron Source cold source is described. Calculated results on the gain in cold neutron flux produced by a liquid deuterium cold source are compared with experimental data and with calculated data previously obtained by P. Ageron et al., at the Institute Max von Laue-Paul Langevin in Grenoble, France. Calculated results are also presented that indicated how the flux of cold neutrons vary with cold source parameters. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. SERA - An Advanced Treatment Planning System for Neutron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    C. A. Wemple; C. L. Albright; D. W. Nigg; D. W. Wessol; F. J. Wheeler; G. J. Harkin; M. B. Rossmeirer; M. T. Cohen; M. W. Frandsen

    1999-06-01

    The technology for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has advanced significantly over the past few years. Because of the more complex nature of the problem, the computational methods that work well for treatment planning in photon radiotherapy are not applicable to BNCT. The necessary methods have, however, been developed and have been successfully employed both for research applications as well as human trials. Computational geometry for BNCT applications can be constructed directly from tomographic medical imagery and computed radiation dose distributions can be readily displayed in formats that are familiar to the radiotherapy community. The SERA system represents a significant advance in several areas for treatment planning. However further improvements in speed and results presentation are still needed for routine clinical applications, particularly when optimizations of dose pattern is required.

  12. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project: Annual report, April 1987--March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J.; McBee, M.R.

    1989-02-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project (formerly called the Center for Neutron Research) will provide the world's best facilities for the study of neutron scattering. The ANS high-power density reactor will be fueled with uranium silicide and cooled, moderated, and reflected by deuterium oxide. Peak neutron fluxes in the reflector are expected to be 5 to 10 x 10/sup 19/ neutrons/center dot/m/sup -2//center dot/s/sup -1/ with a power level between 270 and 300 MW. This report describes the status of technical work funded through the ANS Project during the period April 1987 through March 1988. Earlier work is described in Center for Neutron Research Project Status Report and other Oak Ridge National Laboratory reports. 22 refs., 57 figs., 23 tabs.

  13. The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project: A world-class research reactor facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.B.; Meek, W.E.

    1993-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a new research facility being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility is based on a 330 MW, heavy-water cooled and reflected reactor as the neutron source, with a thermal neutron flux of about 7.5{times}10{sup 19}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}sec{sup {minus}1}. Within the reflector region will be one hot source which will serve 2 hot neutron beam tubes, two cryogenic cold sources serving fourteen cold neutron beam tubes, two very cold beam tubes, and seven thermal neutron beam tubes. In addition there will be ten positions for materials irradiation experiments, five of them instrumented. The paper touches on the project status, safety concerns, cost estimates and scheduling, a description of the site, the reactor, and the arrangements of the facilities.

  14. Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries (ANSL-V): ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E. III; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Moses, D.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Slater, C.O.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1990-09-01

    Pseudo-problem-independent, multigroup cross-section libraries were generated to support Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor design studies. The ANS is a proposed reactor which would be fueled with highly enriched uranium and cooled with heavy water. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries based on ENDF/B-V), are data bases in AMPX master format for subsequent generation of problem-dependent cross-sections for use with codes such as KENO, ANISN, XSDRNPM, VENTURE, DOT, DORT, TORT, and MORSE. Included in ANSL-V are 99-group and 39-group neutron, 39-neutron-group 44-gamma-ray-group secondary gamma-ray production (SGRP), 44-group gamma-ray interaction (GRI), and coupled, 39-neutron group 44-gamma-ray group (CNG) cross-section libraries. The neutron and SGRP libraries were generated primarily from ENDF/B-V data; the GRI library was generated from DLC-99/HUGO data, which is recognized as the ENDF/B-V photon interaction data. Modules from the AMPX and NJOY systems were used to process the multigroup data. Validity of selected data from the fine- and broad-group neutron libraries was satisfactorily tested in performance parameter calculations.

  15. Status of the advanced neutron source. [Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Research reactors in the United States are becoming more and more outdated, at a time when neutron scattering is being recognized as an increasingly important technique in areas vital to the US scientific and technological future. The last US research reactor was constructed over 25 years ago, whereas new facilities have been built or are under construction in Japan, Russia and, especially, Western Europe, which now has a commanding lead in this important field. Concern over this situation in the early 1980's by a number of organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, led to a recommendation that design work start urgently on an advanced US neutron research facility. This recommendation is realized in the Advanced Neutron Source Project. The centerpiece of the Advanced Neutron Source will be a new research reactor of unprecedented flux (>7.5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1}), equipped with a wide variety of state-of-the-art spectrometers and diffractometers on hot, thermal, and cold neutron beams. Very cold and ultracold neutron beams will also be provided for specialized experiments. This paper will discuss the current status of the design and the plans for scattering instrumentation. 5 refs.

  16. ORNL contributions to the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project for October 1986-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J.

    1987-11-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Facility - formerly called the Center for Neutron Research - will provide the world's best facilities for the study of neutron scattering. The ANS high power density reactor will be fueled with uranium silicide and cooled, moderated, and reflected by D/sub 2/O. Peak neutron fluxes in the reflector are expected to be 5 to 10 x 10/sup 19/ neutrons per square meter with a power level between 270 MW and 300 MW. This report describes the status of technical work at ORNL on the ANS Project during the first half of FY 1987. The scope of this report includes Research and Development Tasks; Safety Tasks; Conceptual Design Tasks; and Project Support. The last two areas were only initiated as separate activities during this reporting period. Technical highlights include a better understanding of the relationship among neutron flux, core power, and core volume; preconceptual design work on a cold source for use in a very high gamma and neutron flux environment; identification of the major applicable safety rules and guidelines; and establishment of initial functional objectives for the containment structure.

  17. An examination of the elastic structural response of the Advanced Neutron Source fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

    1994-09-01

    Procedures for evaluating the elastic structural response of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) fuel plates to coolant flow and to temperature variations are presented in this report. Calculations are made that predict the maximum deflection and the maximum stress for a representative plate from the upper and from the lower fuel elements.

  18. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Progress report FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the progress made in 1993 in the following sections: (1) project management; (2) research and development; (3) design and (4) safety. The section on research and development covers the following: (1) reactor core development; (2) fuel development; (3) corrosion loop tests and analysis; (4) thermal-hydraulic loop tests; (5) reactor control and shutdown concepts; (6) critical and subcritical experiments; (7) material data, structure tests, and analysis; (8) cold source development; (9) beam tube, guide, and instrument development; (10) neutron transport and shielding; (11) I and C research and development; and (12) facility concepts.

  19. Wetlands Assessment for site characterization, Advanced Neutron Source (ANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.C.; Socolof, M.L.; Rosensteel, B.; Awl, D.

    1994-10-01

    This Wetlands Assessment has been prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR 1022, Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements, which established the policy and procedure for implementing Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands. The proposed action is to conduct characterization activities in or near wetlands at the ANS site. The proposed action will covered under a Categorical Exclusion, therefore this assessment is being prepared as a separate document [10 CFR 1022.12(c)]. The purpose of this Wetlands Assessment is to fulfill the requirements of 10 CFR 1022.12(a) by describing the project, discussing the effects of the proposed action upon the wetlands, and considering alternatives to the proposed action.

  20. Reactivity studies on the advanced neutron source. [Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Redmond, E.L. II; Fletcher, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) with a peak thermal neutron flux of about 8.5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} is being designed for condensed matter physics, materials science, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. The ANS is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady-state source of neutrons. The design effort is currently in the conceptual phase. A reference reactor design has been selected in order to examine the safety, performance, and costs associated with this one design. The ANS Project has an established, documented safety philosophy, and safety-related design criteria are currently being established. The purpose of this paper is to present analyses of safety aspects of the reference reactor design that are related to core reactivity events. These analyses include control rod worth, shutdown rod worth, heavy water voiding, neutron beam tube flooding, light water ingress, and single fuel element criticality. Understanding these safety aspects will allow us to make design modifications that improve the reactor safety and achieve the safety related design criteria. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry: part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.; Faust, L.

    1983-08-01

    A continuation of the advances in personnel neutron dosimetry research programs and technology transfer reviews work on active dosimeters, electronic devices that determine the dose equivalent to a worker during an exposure to neutron radiation. Active dosemeters are routinely used for gamma radiation dosimetry. Experience with neutron-sensitive pocket rem-meters at several DOE laboratories covers three prototypes. Pocket rem-meters work well for detecting neutrons over a wide energy range. They give instantaneous readout of the accumulated neutron dose-equivalent. 1 figure.

  2. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  3. ANSL-V: ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E. III; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Waddell, M.W.; Webster, C.C.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Multigroup P3 neutron, P0-P3 secondary gamma ray production (SGRP), and P6 gamma ray interaction (GRI) cross section libraries have been generated to support design work on the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross-Section Libraries), are data bases in a format suitable for subsequent generation of problem dependent cross sections. The ANSL-V libraries are available on magnetic tape from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology.

  5. Report of the advanced neutron source (ANS) aluminum cladding corrosion workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.H.; Gibson, G.W.; Griess, J.C.; Pawel, R.E.; Pace, N.E.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1989-02-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Corrosion Workshop on aluminum cladding corrosion in reactor environments is summarized. The Workshop was held to examine the aluminum cladding oxidation studies being conducted in support of the ANS design. This report was written principally to provide a record of the ideas and judgments expressed by the workshop attendees. The ANS operating heat flux is significantly higher than that in existing reactors, and early experiments indicate that there may be an aluminum cladding oxidation problem unique to higher heat fluxes or associated cladding temperatures that, if not solved, may limit the operation of the ANS to unacceptably low power levels. A brief description of the information presented by each speaker is included along with a compilation of the most significant ideas and recommended research areas. The appendixes contain a copy of the workshop agenda and a list of attendees.

  6. Recent activities of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR) and of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). [Advanced Neutron Source Project

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    The International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR) was formed in 1990 to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. The Advanced Neutron Source Project expects to complete conceptual design in mid-1992. In the present design concept, the neutron source is a heavy-water-cooled, moderated, and reflected reactor of about 350 MW(f) power. 7 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Advanced Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark; Dobson, Chris; Norwood, Joseph; Kayatin, Matthew; Apple, Jeff; Gibson, Brian; Dietz, Kurt; Benson, Carl; Smith, Dennis; Howard, David; hide

    2013-01-01

    Energetic neutron measurements remain a challenge for space science investigations and radiation monitoring for human exploration beyond LEO. We are investigating a new composite scintillator design that uses Li6 glass scintillator embedded in a PVT block. A comparison between Li6 and Boron 10 loaded scintillators are being studied to assess the advantages and shortcomings of these two techniques. We present the details of the new Li6 design and results from the comparison of the B10 and Li6 techniques during exposures in a mixed radiation field produced by high energy protons interacting in a target material.

  8. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  9. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  10. Proposed neutron activation analysis facilities in the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A number of analytical chemistry experimental facilities are being proposed for the Advanced Neutron Source. Experimental capabilities will include gamma-ray analysis and neutron depth profiling. This paper describes the various systems proposed and some of their important characteristics.

  11. Report of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) safety workshop, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 25--26, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, J.R.; Dumont, J.N.; Kendrick, C.M.; Row, T.H.; Thompson, P.B.; West, C.D.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Muhlheim, M.D.; McBee, M.R.

    1988-12-01

    On October 25--26, 1988, about 60 people took part in an Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Safety Workshop, organized in cooperation with the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) and held in Knoxville, Tennessee. After a plenary session at which ANS Project staff presented status reports on the ANS design, research and development (R and D), and safety analysis efforts, the workshop broke into three working groups, each covering a different topic: Environmental and Waste Management, Applicable Regulatory Safety Criteria and Goals, and Reactor Concepts. Each group was asked to review the Project's approach to safety-related issues and to provide guidance on future reactor safety needs or directions for the Project. With the help of able chairmen, assisted by reporters and secretarial support, the working groups were extremely successful. Draft reports from each group were prepared before the workshop closed, and the major findings of each group were presented for review and discussion by the entire workshop attendance. This report contains the final version of the group reports, incorporating the results of the overall review by all the workshop participants.

  12. Neutron scattering of advanced magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf, S. M.; Kumar, Amit

    2017-09-01

    An overview of notable contributions of neutron scattering in the advancement of magnetic materials has been presented. A brief description of static neutron scattering techniques, viz., diffraction, depolarization, small angle scattering, and reflectivity, employed in the studies of advanced magnetic materials, is given. Apart from providing the up-to-date literature, this review highlights the importance of neutron scattering techniques in achieving microscopic as well as mesoscopic understanding of static magnetic properties of the following selective classes of advanced magnetic materials: (i) magnetocaloric materials, (ii) permanent magnets, (iii) multiferroic materials, (iv) spintronic materials, and (v) molecular magnetic materials. In the area of magnetocaloric materials, neutron diffraction studies have greatly improved the understanding of magneto-structural coupling by probing (i) atomic site distribution, (ii) evolution of structural phases and lattice parameters across the TC, and (iii) microscopic details of magnetic ordering in several potential magnetocaloric materials. Such an understanding is vital to enhance the magnetocaloric effect. Structural and magnetic investigations, employing neutron diffraction and allied techniques, have helped to improve the quality of permanent magnets by tailoring (understanding) structural phases, magnetic ordering, crystallinity, microstructure (texture), and anisotropy. The neutron diffraction studies of structural distortions/instabilities and magnetic ordering in multiferroic materials have improved the microscopic understanding of magnetoelectric coupling that allows one to control magnetic order by an electric field and electric order by a magnetic field in multiferroic materials. In the field of molecular magnetic materials, neutron diffraction studies have enhanced the understanding of (i) structural and magnetic ordering, (ii) short-range structural and magnetic correlations, (iii) spin density distribution

  13. Operator role definition: An initial step in the human factors engineering design of the advanced neutron source (ANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Knee, H.E.; Spelt, P.F.; Houser, M.M.; Hill, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new basic and applied research facility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy that is proposed for construction. It will provide neutron beams for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The facility will provide a useful neutron beam flux that is at least five times more than is available at the world`s best existing facilities. It will also provide world-class facilities for isotopes production, materials irradiation testing, materials analysis, and the production of positrons. ANS will be unique in the United States in the extent to which human factors engineering (HFE) principles will be included in its design and construction. Initial HFE accomplishments include the development of a functional analysis, an operating philosophy, and a program plan. In fiscal year 1994, HFE activities are focusing on the role of the ANS control room reactor operator (RO). An operator-centered control room model was used in conjunction with information gathered from existing ANS system design descriptions and other literature to define RO responsibilities. From this list, a survey instrument was developed and administered to ANS design engineers, operations management personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), and HFIR ROs to detail the nature of the RO position. Initial results indicated that the RO should function as a high-level system supervisor with considerable monitoring, verification, and communication responsibilities. The relatively high level of control automation has resulted in a reshaping of the RO`s traditional safety and investment protection roles.

  14. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MW{sub th}, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS.

  15. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  16. Analyses of the reflector tank, cold source, and beam tube cooling for ANS reactor. [Advanced Neutron Source (ANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Marland, S. )

    1992-07-01

    This report describes my work as an intern with Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in the summer of 1991. I was assigned to the Reactor Technology Engineering Department, working on the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). My first project was to select and analyze sealing systems for the top of the diverter/reflector tank. This involved investigating various metal seals and calculating the forces necessary to maintain an adequate seal. The force calculations led to an analysis of several bolt patterns and lockring concepts that could be used to maintain a seal on the vessel. Another project involved some pressure vessel stress calculations and the calculation of the center of gravity for the cold source assembly. I also completed some sketches of possible cooling channel patterns for the inner vessel of the cold source. In addition, I worked on some thermal design analyses for the reflector tank and beam tubes, including heat transfer calculations and assisting in Patran and Pthermal analyses. To supplement the ANS work, I worked on other projects. I completed some stress/deflection analyses on several different beams. These analyses were done with the aid of CAASE, a beam-analysis software package. An additional project involved bending analysis on a carbon removal system. This study was done to find the deflection of a complex-shaped beam when loaded with a full waste can.

  17. Nuclear methods of analysis in the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.; Dyer, F.F.

    1994-12-31

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor is presently in the conceptual design phase. The thermal power of this heavy water cooled and moderated reactor will be about 350 megawatts. The core volume of 27 liter is designed to provide the optimum neutron fluence rate for the numerous experimental facilities. The peak thermal neutron fluence rate is expected to be slightly less than 10{sup 20} neutrons/m{sup 2}s. In addition to the more than 40 neutron scattering stations, there will be extensive facilities for isotope production, material irradiation and analytical chemistry including neutron activation analysis (NAA) and a slow positron source. The highlight of this reactor will be the capability that it will provide for conducting research using cold neutrons. Two cryostats containing helium-cooled liquid deuterium will be located in the heavy water reflector tank. Each cryostat will provide low-temperature neutrons to researchers via numerous guides. A hot source with two beam tubes and several thermal beam tubes will also be available. The NAA facilities in the ANS will consist of seven pneumatic tubes, one cold neutron guide for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), and one cold neutron slanted guide for neutron depth profiling (NDP). In addition to these neutron interrogation systems, a gamma-ray irradiation facility for materials testing will be housed in a spent fuel storage pool. This paper will provide detailed information regarding the design and use of these various experimental systems.

  18. Advanced neutron source materials surveillance program

    SciTech Connect

    Heavilin, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be composed of several different materials, one of which is 6061-T6 aluminum. Among other components, the reflector vessel and the core pressure boundary tube (CPBT), are to be made of 6061-T6 aluminum. These components will be subjected to high thermal neutron fluences and will require a surveillance program to monitor the strength and fracture toughness of the 6061-T6 aluminum over their lifetimes. The purpose of this paper is to explain the steps that were taken in the summer of 1994 toward developing the surveillance program. The first goal was to decide upon standard specimens to use in the fracture toughness and tensile testing. Second, facilities had to be chosen for specimens representing the CPBT and the reflector vessel base, weld, and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) metals. Third, a timetable had to be defined to determine when to remove the specimens for testing.

  19. Reactor design of the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M. ); Selby, D.L.; Primm, R.T. III )

    1991-03-01

    The ongoing preconceptual and conceptual reactor design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is explored. The ANS is being designed for materials sciences, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. A reactor design based on previously developed technology can meet the performance requirements set by the user community for a new ANS to serve all fields of neutron science. These requirements include the capability of producing a peak thermal neutron flux over five times higher than that in use at any currently operating steady-state facility. Achievement of these ultrahigh flux levels involves many interesting aspects of reactor design. The reactor characteristics of the current preconceptual reference design are presented. The attainment of this design was reached by following a design strategy that best met the safety and user requirements. The design has evolved over the last 5 yr from two concepts proposed in 1985. The trade-offs and selection of many reactor parameters are described to illustrate how and why the current design was achieved. Further reactor design is planned, leading to an ANS operating by 1999 for use by scientists of many disciplines.

  20. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.; Faust, L.

    1983-07-01

    A program to assess current personnel neutron dosimeter capabilities and to develop improved personnel neutron dosimeters examines the two types of passive dosimeters in use at DOE facilities: NTA film and TLD-albedo dosimeters. Two new neutron dosimeters under development to overcome some of their problems are combination/track-etch dosimeters and pocket rem-meters. The DOE program is investigating new materials and improved manufacturing processes using the CR-39 polymer and that is nearly free of surface defects. 1 figure.

  1. Advances in neutron based bulk explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Strellis, Dan

    2007-08-01

    Neutron based explosive inspection systems can detect a wide variety of national security threats. The inspection is founded on the detection of characteristic gamma rays emitted as the result of neutron interactions with materials. Generally these are gamma rays resulting from thermal neutron capture and inelastic scattering reactions in most materials and fast and thermal neutron fission in fissile (e.g.235U and 239Pu) and fertile (e.g.238U) materials. Cars or trucks laden with explosives, drugs, chemical agents and hazardous materials can be detected. Cargo material classification via its main elements and nuclear materials detection can also be accomplished with such neutron based platforms, when appropriate neutron sources, gamma ray spectroscopy, neutron detectors and suitable decision algorithms are employed. Neutron based techniques can be used in a variety of scenarios and operational modes. They can be used as stand alones for complete scan of objects such as vehicles, or for spot-checks to clear (or validate) alarms indicated by another inspection system such as X-ray radiography. The technologies developed over the last two decades are now being implemented with good results. Further advances have been made over the last few years that increase the sensitivity, applicability and robustness of these systems. The advances range from the synchronous inspection of two sides of vehicles, increasing throughput and sensitivity and reducing imparted dose to the inspected object and its occupants (if any), to taking advantage of the neutron kinetic behavior of cargo to remove systematic errors, reducing background effects and improving fast neutron signals.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source: The users' perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    User experiments will cover fields such as activation analysis of pollutants, irradiation of materials for the fusion program, and neutron scattering studies of materials as diverse as viruses, aerospace composites, and superconductors. Production capabilities must also be provided for the production of isotopes, especially of transuranic elements. The different ways in which these research areas and their required infrastructure influence the design of the Advanced Neutron Source will be the subject of this paper.

  3. 252Cf fission-neutron spectrum using a simplified time-of-flight setup: An advanced teaching laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Febbraro, M.; Torres-Isea, R.; Ojaruega, M.; Baum, L.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of PuBe and AmBe neutron sources from many university teaching laboratories (due to heightened security issues) has often left a void in teaching various aspects of neutron physics. We have recently replaced such sources with sealed 252Cf oil-well logging sources (nominal 10-100 μCi), and developed several experiments using them as neutron sources. This includes a fission-neutron time-of-flight experiment using plastic scintillators, which utilizes the prompt γ rays emitted in 252Cf spontaneous fission as a fast timing start signal. The experiment can be performed with conventional nuclear instrumentation and a 1-D multi-channel pulse-height analyzer, available in most advanced teaching laboratories. Alternatively, a more sophisticated experiment using liquid scintillators and n/γ pulse-shape discrimination can be performed. Several other experiments using these neutron sources are also feasible. The experiments can introduce students to the problem of detecting the dark matter thought to dominate the universe and to the techniques used to detect contraband fissionable nuclear materials.

  4. Preliminary ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) reactor cold source gain factor calculations for liquid deuterium and liquid nitrogen-15

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D.L.

    1988-11-01

    Individual energy group gain factors are computed for liquid nitrogen-15 and liquid deuterium cold source moderators using simple one-dimensional slab and spherical geometry calculational models. The energy spectrum of the neutron source is assumed to be that of a thermalized Maxwellian flux at 20/degree/C. The slab geometry calculations indicate that the optimum thickness for neutron transmission through a slab given an isotropic incident flux is for wavelengths above .6 nm, approximately .20 m for liquid deuterium and between .28 and .32 m for liquid nitrogen-15. The gain factors at .8 nm corresponding to these thicknesses are 15.5 for liquid deuterium and 3.50 for liquid nitrogen-15. The spherical geometry analysis showed that the cold neutron current below 10 MeV of 1.36 n/m/sup 2/-s for the neutron component entering the cavity of a .16 m thick liquid deuterium spherical shell exceeds the neutron leakage current of 1.08 n/cm/sup 2/-s from a .38 m diameter liquid deuterium solid sphere. However, the cold neutron factors for the neutron entering the void region are considerably lower than for the solid sphere case. 15 refs., 24 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Advanced modeling of prompt fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Talou, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies of prompt fission neutrons are presented. The main results of the Los Alamos model often used in nuclear data evaluation work are reviewed briefly, and a preliminary assessment of uncertainties associated with the evaluated prompt fission neutron spectrum for n (0.5 MeV)+{sup 239}Pu is discussed. Advanced modeling of prompt fission neutrons is done by Monte Carlo simulations of the evaporation process of the excited primary fission fragments. The successive emissions of neutrons are followed in the statistical formalism framework, and detailed information, beyond average quantities, can be inferred. This approach is applied to the following reactions: {sup 252}Cf (sf), n{sub th} + {sup 239}Pu, n (0.5 MeV)+{sup 235}U, and {sup 236}Pu (sf). A discussion on the merits and present limitations of this approach concludes this presentation.

  6. ADVANCEMENTS IN NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    inspection shows the next evolution in nondestructive examination that many areas within the Department of Defense (DoD) require. The NR has the...Nondestructive Testing (NDT) Inspection Constraints 1 Product Design Applications 2 Advanced Neutron Generators 6 Evolution of Neutron Radiography 6...construction of the beam ports 14 15 An image comparison of the early evolution of the beam ports 15 16 The completed assembly and the general placement of

  7. OSMOSE an experimental program for improving neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R. T.; Aliberti, G.; Zhong, Z.; Graczyk, D.; Loussi, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Commissariat a l Energie Atomique

    2007-10-18

    This report describes the technical results of tasks and activities conducted in FY07 to support the DOE-CEA collaboration on the OSMOSE program. The activities are divided into five high-level tasks: reactor modeling and pre-experiment analysis, sample fabrication and analysis, reactor experiments, data treatment and analysis, and assessment for relevance to high priority advanced reactor programs (such as GNEP and Gen-IV).

  8. Comparison of single and split core concepts for the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Oh, C.H.; Lake, J.A.; Lussie, W.G.; Wadkins, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source producing ultrahigh neutron flux intensities is being designed for materials sciences, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. Split/sup 1 -4/ and single/sup 5 -7/ reactor concepts have been proposed for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The purpose of this paper is to document the calculated performance of these two reactor designs. Both reactor designs are capable of producing a peak thermal neutron flux of 10/sup 20/ n/(m/sup 2/s).

  9. Research reactor of the future: The advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, B.; West, C.

    1994-12-31

    Agents for cancer detection and treatment, stronger materials, better electronic gadgets, and other consumer and industrial products - these are assured benefits of a research reactor project proposed for Oak Ridge. Just as American companies have again assumed world leadership in producing semiconductor chips as well as cars and trucks, the United States is poised to retake the lead in neutron science by building and operating the $2.9 billion Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor by the start of the next century. In 1985, the neutron community, led by ORNL researchers, proposed a pioneering project, later called the ANS. Scheduled to begin operation in 2003, the ANS is seen not only as a replacement for the aging HFIR and HFBR but also as the best laboratory in the world for conducting neutron-based research.

  10. Cold source vessel development for the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), will be a user-oriented neutron research facility that will produce the most intense flux of neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the productions of cold neutrons is a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410 mm diameter sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design are being performed with multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This paper presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that will be used to verify the final design.

  11. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design.

  12. Advanced geometries for ballistic neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanzer, Christian; Böni, Peter; Filges, Uwe; Hils, Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Sophisticated neutron guide systems take advantage of supermirrors being used to increase the neutron flux. However, the finite reflectivity of supermirrors becomes a major loss mechanism when many reflections occur, e.g. in long neutron guides and for long wavelengths. In order to reduce the number of reflections, ballistic neutron guides have been proposed. Usually linear tapered sections are used to enlarge the cross-section and finally, focus the beam to the sample. The disadvantages of linear tapering are (i) an inhomogeneous phase space at the sample position and (ii) a decreasing flux with increasing distance from the exit of the guide. We investigate the properties of parabolic and elliptic tapering for ballistic neutron guides, using the Monte Carlo program McStas with a new guide component dedicated for such geometries. We show that the maximum flux can indeed be shifted away from the exit of the guide. In addition we explore the possibilities of parabolic and elliptic geometries to create point like sources for dedicated experimental demands.

  13. Contribution to the validation of MCNP neutronics design of the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, G.A.; Ougouag, A.M.; Wemple, C.A.; Ryskamp, J.M. )

    1993-01-01

    In the research and development plan of the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor, one of the steps planned for neutronics design methods validation is to compare computational model results and experimental results for a critical facility exhibiting similarities with the ANS reactor. One such facility is the FOEHN experiment. In this paper, an MCNP model of the FOEHN experiment is developed, and its results are compared with experimental data from the literature. The MCNP models reproduces measured quantities of interest with a high level of agreement.

  14. Neutronic analysis of three-element core configurations for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    Calculations of several important neutronic parameters have been performed for ten different three-element configurations considered for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor. Six of these configurations (labeled ST, SB, MT, MB, LT, and LB) are there result of the permutations of the same three elements. Two configurations (ST- MOD and SB-MOD) have the same element configuration as their base core design (ST and SB) but have slightly different element dimensions, and two configurations (ST-OL1 and ST-OL2) have two overlapping elements to increase the neutron fluxes in the reflector. For each configuration, in addition to the conceptual two-element design, fuel-cycle calculations were performed with calculations required to obtain unperturbed fluxes. The element power densities, peak thermal neutron flux as a function of position throughout the cycle, fast flux, fast-to-thermal flux ratios, irradiation and production region fluxes, and control rod worth curves were determined. The effective multiplication factor for each fuel element criticality. A comparison shows that the ST core configurations have the best overall performance, and the fully overlapping core configuration ST-OL2 has the best performance by a large margin. Therefore, on the basis of the neutronics results, the fully overlapping configuration is recommended for further consideration in using a three-element ANS reactor core. Other considerations such as thermal-hydraulics, safety, and engineering that are not directly related to the core neutronic performance must be weighed before a final design is chosen.

  15. Advances in neutron radiographic techniques and applications: a method for nondestructive testing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Harold

    2004-10-01

    A brief history of neutron radiography is presented to set the stage for a discussion of significant neutron radiographic developments and an assessment of future directions for neutron radiography. Specific advances are seen in the use of modern, high dynamic range imaging methods (image plates and flat panels) and for high contrast techniques such as phase contrast, and phase-sensitive imaging. Competition for neutron radiographic inspection may develop as these techniques offer application prospects for X-ray methods.

  16. The advanced neutron source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 {center_dot} 10{sup 19} {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} s{sup -1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R&D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R&D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R&D program will focus on the four objectives described.

  17. The advanced neutron source safety approach and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.M. )

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a user facility for all areas of neutron research proposed for construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The neutron source is planned to be a 350-MW research reactor. The reactor, currently in conceptual design, will belong to the United States Department of Energy (USDOE). The safety approach and planned elements of the safety program for the ANS are described. The safety approach is to incorporate USDOE requirements (which, by reference, include appropriate requirements from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and other national and state regulatory agencies) into the design, and to utilize probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques during design to achieve extremely low probability of severe core damage. The PRA has already begun and will continue throughout the design and construction of the reactor. Computer analyses will be conducted for a complete spectrum of accidental events, from anticipated events to very infrequent occurrences. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Fowler, M.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    2003-08-26

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4{pi} barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is being implemented.

  19. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

  20. The Advanced Neutron Source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.

    1992-11-30

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of [approximately] 330 MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of > 7 [times] 10[sup 19] M[sup [minus]2] [center dot] S[sup [minus]1]. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science-as well as applied research-leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The R D program will focus on the four objectives: Address feasibility issues; provide analysis support; evaluate options for improvement in performance beyond minimum requirements; and provide prototype demonstrations for unique facilities. The remainder of this report presents (1) the process by which the R D activities are controlled and (2) a discussion of the individual tasks that have been identified for the R D program, including their justification, schedule and costs. The activities discussed in this report will be performed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and through subcontracts with industry, universities, and other national laboratories. It should be noted that in general a success path has been assumed for all tasks.

  1. The Advanced Neutron Source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.

    1992-11-30

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of {approximately} 330 MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of > 7 {times} 10{sup 19} M{sup {minus}2} {center_dot} S{sup {minus}1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science-as well as applied research-leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The R&D program will focus on the four objectives: Address feasibility issues; provide analysis support; evaluate options for improvement in performance beyond minimum requirements; and provide prototype demonstrations for unique facilities. The remainder of this report presents (1) the process by which the R&D activities are controlled and (2) a discussion of the individual tasks that have been identified for the R&D program, including their justification, schedule and costs. The activities discussed in this report will be performed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and through subcontracts with industry, universities, and other national laboratories. It should be noted that in general a success path has been assumed for all tasks.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  3. Design of Cold Neutron Imaging Facility at China Advanced Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songbai; Wu, Meimei; Wang, Hongli; Hao, Lijie; Wei, Guohai; He, Linfeng; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yuntao; Chen, Dongfeng

    The radiography imaging with cold neutrons is being planned at China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR). The 60MW CARR at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) has got full power in March, 2012. It is a tank-in-pool type reactor using a D2O reflector for inverse neutron trap, and the expected optimal undisturbed thermal neutron flux is 8 × 1014 n/cm2rad s. Cold neutron imaging facility will be built at the guide hall. At present, its conceptional and physical designs have been finished. The cold neutron imaging facilities will provide an efficient and versatile tool for basic scientific and industrial non-destructive investigation.

  4. Experience with fast neutron therapy for locally advanced sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, R.; Hussey, D.H.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.; Martin, R.G.; Peters, L.J.; Sinkovics, J.G.

    1980-03-01

    Between October 1972 and April 1978, 34 patients with locally advanced sarcomas were treated with fast neutrons using the Texas A and M variable energy cyclotron. The clinical material included 29 patients with soft tissue sarcomas, 4 with chondrosarcomas, and one with an osteosarcoma. The best results were achieved for patients with soft tissue sarcomas; 69% (20/29) had local control of their tumor. Only one of 4 patients with chondrosarcomas was classified as having local tumor control, and one patient with osteosarcoma had persistent disease. With most fractionation schedules, local tumor control was superior for patients who received doses greater than 6500 rad/sub eq/ (2100 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). The incidence of major complications was notably increased when maximum radiation doses of 7500 rad/sub eq/ or greater were administered (2400 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). In patients who underwent subsequent surgery, healing was satisfactory if the maximum radiation dose was limited to 4500 to 5500 rad/sub eq/(1450 to 1775 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons).

  5. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  6. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, T.W.

    1983-12-21

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  7. Measuring neutron star tidal deformability with Advanced LIGO: black hole - neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Pürrer, Michael; Pfeiffer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    The pioneering observations of gravitational waves (GW) by Advanced LIGO have ushered us into an era of observational GW astrophysics. Compact binaries remain the primary target sources for GW observations, of which black hole - neutron star (BHNS) binaries form an important subset. GWs from coalescing BHNS systems carry signatures of the tidal distortion of the neutron star by its companion black hole during inspiral, as well as of its disruption close to merger. In this talk, I will discuss how well we can measure tidal effects from individual and populations of LIGO observations of disruptive BHNS mergers. I will also talk about how our measurements of non-tidal parameters can get affected by ignoring tidal effects in BHNS parameter estimation.

  8. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; ...

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We, thus, report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. Furthermore, the upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  9. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  10. Enhancing the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  11. Wireless, in-vessel neutron monitor for initial core-loading of advanced breeder reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delorenzo, J. T.; Kennedy, E. J.; Blalock, T. V.; Rochelle, J. M.; Chiles, M. M.; Valentine, K. H.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental wireless, in-vessel neutron monitor was developed to measure the reactivity of an advanced breeder reactor as the core is loaded for the first time to preclude an accidental critically incident. The environment is liquid sodium at a temperature of approx. 220 C, with negligible gamma or neutron radiation. With ultrasonic transmission of neutron data, no fundamental limitation was observed after tests at 230 C for 2000 h. The neutron sensitivity was approx. 1 count/s-nv, and the potential data transmission rate was approx. 10,000 counts/s.

  12. Creep analysis of fuel plates for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Yahr, G.T.

    1994-11-01

    The reactor for the planned Advanced Neutron Source will use closely spaced arrays of fuel plates. The plates are thin and will have a core containing enriched uranium silicide fuel clad in aluminum. The heat load caused by the nuclear reactions within the fuel plates will be removed by flowing high-velocity heavy water through narrow channels between the plates. However, the plates will still be at elevated temperatures while in service, and the potential for excessive plate deformation because of creep must be considered. An analysis to include creep for deformation and stresses because of temperature over a given time span has been performed and is reported herein.

  13. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  14. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry: part 3

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.J.; Faust, L.G.

    1983-09-01

    DOE-sponsored evaluation and upgrading of personnel neutron dosimetry includes a review of new devices involving unique concepts: resonance ionization spectroscopy and organic semiconductor detectors. Resonance ionization spectroscopy uses a laser to detect atoms released by neutron interactions, while organic semiconductors contain large amounts of hydrogen. Although these and other research and evaluation projects reviewed in the first two articles appear promising, there is much more research needed, such as finding a chemically stable organic semiconductor that will be suitable.

  15. Comparison of single and split core concepts for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Oh, C.H.; Lake, J.A.; Lussie, W.G.; Wadkins, R.P.

    1988-09-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source, producing ultrahigh neutron flux intensities is being designed for materials sciences, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. Two reactor concepts have been proposed for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is examining a split core reactor, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is examining a single core reactor. The purpose of this report is to consistently compare the performance, as calculated by INEL, for these two reactor designs. This information can be used to help select the features of the concept that best meets the design requirements. 26 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Advanced Penning-type ion source development and passive beam focusing techniques for an associated particle imaging neutron generator with enhanced spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sy, Amy Vong

    The use of accelerator-based neutron generators for non-destructive imaging and analysis in commercial and security applications is continuously under development, with improvements to available systems and combinations of available techniques revealing new capabilities for real-time elemental and isotopic analysis. The recent application of associated particle imaging (API) techniques for time- and directionally-tagged neutrons to induced fission and transmission imaging methods demonstrates such capabilities in the characterization of fissile material configurations and greatly benefits from improvements to existing neutron generator systems. Increased neutron yields and improved spatial resolution can enhance the capabilities of imaging methods utilizing the API technique. The work presented in this dissertation focused on the development of components for use within an API neutron generator with enhanced system spatial resolution. The major focus areas were the ion source development for plasma generation, and passive ion beam focusing techniques for the small ion beam widths necessary for the enhanced spatial resolution. The ion source development focused on exploring methods for improvement of Penning-type ion sources that are used in conventional API neutron generator systems, while the passive beam focusing techniques explored both ion beam collimation and ion guiding with tapered dielectric capillaries for reduced beam widths at the neutron production target.

  17. Recent advances in laser-driven neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to the limited number and high cost of large-scale neutron facilities, there has been a growing interest in compact accelerator-driven sources. In this context, several potential schemes of laser-driven neutron sources are being intensively studied employing laser-accelerated electron and ion beams. In addition to the potential of delivering neutron beams with high brilliance, directionality and ultra-short burst duration, a laser-driven neutron source would offer further advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness, compactness and radiation confinement by closed-coupled experiments. Some of the recent advances in this field are discussed, showing improvements in the directionality and flux of the laser-driven neutron beams.

  18. Status of neutron diagnostics on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, G. Q.; Hu, L. Q.; Pu, N.; Zhou, R. J.; Xiao, M.; Cao, H. R.; Zhu, Y. B.; Li, K.; Fan, T. S.; Peng, X. Y.; Du, T. F.; Ge, L. J.; Huang, J.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    Neutron diagnostics have become a significant means to study energetic particles in high power auxiliary heating plasmas on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Several kinds of neutron diagnostic systems have been implemented for time-resolved measurements of D-D neutron flux, fluctuation, emission profile, and spectrum. All detectors have been calibrated in laboratory, and in situ calibration using 252Cf neutron source in EAST is in preparation. A new technology of digitized pulse signal processing is adopted in a wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor, compact recoil proton spectrometer, and time of flight spectrometer. Improvements will be made continuously to the system to achieve better adaptation to the EAST's harsh γ-ray and electro-magnetic radiation environment.

  19. The neutron texture diffractometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Tao; Tian, Geng-Fang; Gao, Jian-Bo; Yu, Zhou-Xiang; Li, Yu-Qing; Wu, Li-Qi; Yang, Lin-Feng; Sun, Kai; Wang, Hong-Li; Santisteban, J. r.; Chen, Dong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The first neutron texture diffractometer in China has been built at the China Advanced Research Reactor, due to strong demand for texture measurement with neutrons from the domestic user community. This neutron texture diffractometer has high neutron intensity, moderate resolution and is mainly applied to study texture in commonly used industrial materials and engineering components. In this paper, the design and characteristics of this instrument are described. The results for calibration with neutrons and quantitative texture analysis of zirconium alloy plate are presented. The comparison of texture measurements with the results obtained in HIPPO at LANSCE and Kowari at ANSTO illustrates the reliability of the texture diffractometer. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11105231, 11205248, 51327902) and International Atomic Energy Agency-TC program (CPR0012)

  20. Status of neutron diagnostics on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, G. Q.; Hu, L. Q. Pu, N.; Zhou, R. J.; Xiao, M.; Cao, H. R.; Li, K.; Huang, J.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Zhu, Y. B.; Fan, T. S.; Peng, X. Y.; Du, T. F.; Ge, L. J.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron diagnostics have become a significant means to study energetic particles in high power auxiliary heating plasmas on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Several kinds of neutron diagnostic systems have been implemented for time-resolved measurements of D-D neutron flux, fluctuation, emission profile, and spectrum. All detectors have been calibrated in laboratory, and in situ calibration using {sup 252}Cf neutron source in EAST is in preparation. A new technology of digitized pulse signal processing is adopted in a wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor, compact recoil proton spectrometer, and time of flight spectrometer. Improvements will be made continuously to the system to achieve better adaptation to the EAST’s harsh γ-ray and electro-magnetic radiation environment.

  1. Status of neutron diagnostics on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhong, G Q; Hu, L Q; Pu, N; Zhou, R J; Xiao, M; Cao, H R; Zhu, Y B; Li, K; Fan, T S; Peng, X Y; Du, T F; Ge, L J; Huang, J; Xu, G S; Wan, B N

    2016-11-01

    Neutron diagnostics have become a significant means to study energetic particles in high power auxiliary heating plasmas on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Several kinds of neutron diagnostic systems have been implemented for time-resolved measurements of D-D neutron flux, fluctuation, emission profile, and spectrum. All detectors have been calibrated in laboratory, and in situ calibration using (252)Cf neutron source in EAST is in preparation. A new technology of digitized pulse signal processing is adopted in a wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor, compact recoil proton spectrometer, and time of flight spectrometer. Improvements will be made continuously to the system to achieve better adaptation to the EAST's harsh γ-ray and electro-magnetic radiation environment.

  2. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Carpenter, John

    2016-07-12

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  3. Advanced plastic scintillators for fast neutron discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Patrick L; Anstey, Mitchell; Doty, F. Patrick; Mengesha, Wondwosen

    2014-09-01

    The present work addresses the need for solid-state, fast neutron discriminating scintillators that possess higher light yields and faster decay kinetics than existing organic scintillators. These respective attributes are of critical importance for improving the gamma-rejection capabilities and increasing the neutron discrimination performance under high-rate conditions. Two key applications that will benefit from these improvements include large-volume passive detection scenarios as well as active interrogation search for special nuclear materials. Molecular design principles were employed throughout this work, resulting in synthetically tailored materials that possess the targeted scintillation properties.

  4. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Optics for Advanced Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, David E.; Khaykovich, Boris

    2016-03-30

    During the report period, we continued the work as outlined in the original proposal. We have analyzed potential optical designs of Wolter mirrors for the neutron-imaging instrument VENUS, which is under construction at SNS. In parallel, we have conducted the initial polarized imaging experiment at Helmholtz Zentrum, Berlin, one of very few of currently available polarized-imaging facilities worldwide.

  6. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >1011 nṡs-1. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  7. Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Tiley, Jaimie; Wang, Yandong; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    The selection of articles in the special topic 'Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials' is based on the materials presented during the TMS 2009 annual meeting in San Francisco, CA, February 15-19, 2009. The development of ultrabrilliant third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, together with advances in X-ray optics, has created intense X-ray microbeams, which provide the best opportunities for in-depth understanding of mechanical behavior in a broad spectrum of materials. Important applications include ultrasensitive elemental detection by X-ray fluorescence/absorption and microdiffraction to identify phase and strain with submicrometer spatial resolution. X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly exciting application compared with alternative probes of crystalline structure, orientation, and strain. X-ray microdiffraction is nondestructive with good strain resolution, competitive or superior spatial resolution in thick samples, and with the ability to probe below the sample surface. Moreover, the high-energy X-ray diffraction technique provides an effective tool for characterizing the mechanical and functional behavior in various environments (temperature, stress, and magnetic field). At the same time, some neutron diffraction instruments constructed mainly for the purpose of engineering applications can be found at nearly all neutron facilities. The first generation-dedicated instruments designed for studying in-situ mechanical behavior have been commissioned and used, and industrial standards for reliable and repeatable measurements have been developed. Furthermore, higher penetration of neutron beams into most engineering materials provides direct measurements on the distribution of various stresses (i.e., types I, II, and III) beneath the surface up to several millimeters, even tens of millimeters for important industrial components. With X-ray and neutron measurements, it is possible to characterize material behavior at different length scales. It

  8. Advances in spherical neutron polarimetry with Cryopad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre-Berna, E.; Bourgeat-Lami, E.; Fouilloux, P.; Geffray, B.; Gibert, Y.; Kakurai, K.; Kernavanois, N.; Longuet, B.; Mantegezza, F.; Nakamura, M.; Pujol, S.; Regnault, L.-P.; Tasset, F.; Takeda, M.; Thomas, M.; Tonon, X.

    2005-02-01

    Within the frame of the ILL millennium programme, the European ENPI network and the ILL-ASRC/JAERI Memorandum of Understanding, a third-generation Cryopad has been developed and built in three copies. The aim of this collaboration is to open new fields of investigation on the D3/ILL diffractometer, the IN22/CEA and TAS-1/JAERI three-axis spectrometers: complex antiferromagnetic structures, precision determination of antiferromagnetic distributions, magnetic-lattice excitations spectra, search for the neutron electric dipole moment, etc. We present the progress performed with the new-generation devices and show how easy and reliable it is today to carry out spherical neutron polarimetry measurements with Cryopad.

  9. Neutron spectrum studies in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.; Putnam, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been and currently is used to provide irradiation fields to study the effects of intense radiation on samples of reactor materials. These samples include fuel, cladding, control and structural materials. The ATR is also used to irradiate target materials for the production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications as well as for scientific research. Routine monitoring of the thermal'' and fast'' neutron levels have been conducted during every operational cycle since its startup in 1970. The routine neutron dosimetry has been primarily accomplished using the {sup 59}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 60}Co reaction for thermal'' neutrons and the {sup 58}Ni(n,p) {sup 58}Co reaction for fast'' neutrons as described in ASTM standard methods E261, E262, and E264. Neutron spectrum studies have now been conducted in the epithermal and fast neutron energy ranges for the various capsule irradiation test facilities and the routine neutron monitoring locations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Advances in Neutron Spectroscopy with Deuterated Organic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febbraro, Michael; Pain, Steve; Becchetti, Frederick

    2015-10-01

    Deuterated organic scintillators have shown promise as neutron detectors for nuclear science as well as applications in nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards. In particular, they can extract neutron spectra without the use of neutron time-of-flight measurement (n-ToF) utilizing spectrum unfolding techniques. This permits the measure of cross sections of bound and unbound states with high efficiency and angular coverage. In the case of measurements with radioactive ion beams where low beam intensities limit long path n-ToF, short path n-ToF can be used to discriminate neutrons of interest from room return and background neutrons. This presentation will provide recent advances with these types of detectors. Digital pulse-shape discrimination using fast waveform digitizers, spectrum unfolding methods for extraction of neutron spectra, and a new safer deuterated-xylene formulation EJ-301D will be discussed. In addition, experimental results from measurements of discrete and continuous neutron spectra which illustrate the advantage of these detectors for certain applications in nuclear physics research and nuclear security will be shown. This work is supported by NSF and DOE.

  11. Implementation and Initial Testing of Advanced Processing and Analysis Algorithms for Correlated Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter Angelo; Cutler, Theresa Elizabeth; Favalli, Andrea; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Henzl, Vladimir; Henzlova, Daniela; Parker, Robert Francis; Croft, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy and capabilities of neutron multiplicity counting, additional quantifiable information is needed in order to address the assumptions that are present in the point model. Extracting and utilizing higher order moments (Quads and Pents) from the neutron pulse train represents the most direct way of extracting additional information from the measurement data to allow for an improved determination of the physical properties of the item of interest. The extraction of higher order moments from a neutron pulse train required the development of advanced dead time correction algorithms which could correct for dead time effects in all of the measurement moments in a self-consistent manner. In addition, advanced analysis algorithms have been developed to address specific assumptions that are made within the current analysis model, namely that all neutrons are created at a single point within the item of interest, and that all neutrons that are produced within an item are created with the same energy distribution. This report will discuss the current status of implementation and initial testing of the advanced dead time correction and analysis algorithms that have been developed in an attempt to utilize higher order moments to improve the capabilities of correlated neutron measurement techniques.

  12. ANS cold source neutronics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the calculational procedures employed in the ongoing neutronics analysis of the ANS cold source and presents in chronological order some of the more important results from the one- and two-dimensional discrete calculations performed to date in support of the ANS cold source design. In particular, cold neutron currents from cryostat shapes which can be adequately modeled with two-dimensional geometries are compared with and without reentrant cavities. Also, results are presented from one-dimensional comparative liquid hydrogen vs liquid deuterium calculations in which the density, placement, and para-ortho mixture of liquid hydrogen is investigated. In addition, the evolution of the ANS conceptual design cold source from an initial short cylindrical cryostat with hemispherical upper and lower heads employing a natural convection liquid deuterium circulation system to the final spherical design employing a pumped system is described. Finally, performance data and heating rates are presented for some possible alternate ANS cryostat and vacuum jacket materials.

  13. Assessment of the roles of the Advanced Neutron Source Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, W.E.; Houser, M.M.; Knee, H.E.; Spelt, P.F.

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is unique in the extent to which human factors engineering (HFE) principles are being applied at the conceptual design stage. initial HFE accomplishments include the development of an ANS HFE program plan, operating philosophy, and functional analysis. In FY 1994, HFE activities focused on the role of the ANS control room reactor operator (RO). An operator-centered control room model was used in conjunction with information gathered from existing ANS system design descriptions and other literature to define a list of RO responsibilities. From this list, a survey instrument was developed and administered to ANS design engineers, operations management personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), and HFIR ROs to detail the nature of the RO position. Initial results indicated that the RO will function as a high-level system supervisor with considerable monitoring, verification, and communication responsibilities. The relatively high level of control automation has resulted in a reshaping of the RO`s traditional safety and investment protection roles.

  14. Advances in associated-particle neutron probe diagnostics for substance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar A.; Dickerman, Charles E.; Frey, Manfred

    1995-09-01

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) shows potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles can yield a separate course tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. Generally, no collimators or radiation shielding are needed. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Most recently, inspection applications have been investigated for radioactive waste characterization, presence of cocaine in propane tanks, and uranium and plutonium smuggling. Based on lessons learned with the present APSTNG system, an advanced APSTNG tube (along with improved high voltage supply and control units) is being designed and fabricated that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  15. Advances in associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe diagnostics for substance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; Frey, M.

    1995-07-01

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) shows potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles can yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. Generally no collimators or radiation shielding are needed. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Most recently, inspection applications have been investigated for radioactive waste characterization, presence of cocaine in propane tanks, and uranium and plutonium smuggling. Based on lessons learned with the present APSTNG system, an advanced APSTNG tube (along with improved high voltage supply and control units) is being designed and fabricated that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  16. Neutron measurements around an 18 MV linac.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Madurga, G; Arráns, R

    1989-07-01

    An estimate of the neutron production of medical electron accelerators is of interest in order to quantify the radiological risk for the staff operating such machines. First, we used a theoretical procedure, based on the Montecarlo method, in order to get some information about the neutron spectrum. Second, by using the neutron activation of indium foils, we have empirically obtained the neutron fluence at different locations in the accelerator room. Finally, some post-irradiation environmental levels of radiation are given.

  17. Performance of an elliptically tapered neutron guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbauer, Sebastian; Stadlbauer, Martin; Böni, Peter; Schanzer, Christan; Stahn, Jochen; Filges, Uwe

    2006-11-01

    Supermirror coated neutron guides are used at all modern neutron sources for transporting neutrons over large distances. In order to reduce the transmission losses due to multiple internal reflection of neutrons, ballistic neutron guides with linear tapering have been proposed and realized. However, these systems suffer from an inhomogeneous illumination of the sample. Moreover, the flux decreases significantly with increasing distance from the exit of the neutron guide. We propose using elliptically tapered guides that provide a more homogeneous phase space at the sample position as well as a focusing at the sample. Moreover, the design of the guide system is simplified because ellipses are simply defined by their long and short axes. In order to prove the concept we have manufactured a doubly focusing guide and investigated its properties with neutrons. The experiments show that the predicted gains using the program package McStas are realized. We discuss several applications of elliptic guides in various fields of neutron physics.

  18. Advanced neutron source reactor probabilistic flow blockage assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, C.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Phase I Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor identified core flow blockage as the most likely internal event leading to fuel damage. The flow blockage event frequency used in the original ANS PRA was based primarily on the flow blockage work done for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) PRA. This report examines potential flow blockage scenarios and calculates an estimate of the likelihood of debris-induced fuel damage. The bulk of the report is based specifically on the conceptual design of ANS with a 93%-enriched, two-element core; insights to the impact of the proposed three-element core are examined in Sect. 5. In addition to providing a probability (uncertainty) distribution for the likelihood of core flow blockage, this ongoing effort will serve to indicate potential areas of concern to be focused on in the preliminary design for elimination or mitigation. It will also serve as a loose-parts management tool.

  19. Advanced research capabilities for neutron science and technology: Neutron polarizers for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S.I.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Delheij, P.J.

    1998-12-01

    The authors describe work on the development of polarized gaseous {sup 3}He cells, which are intended for use as neutron polarizers. Laser diode arrays polarize Rb vapor in a sample cell and the {sup 3}He is polarized via collisions. They describe development and tests of such a system at LANSCE.

  20. Flow excursion time scales in the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    Flow excursion transients give rise to a key thermal limit for the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor because its core involves many parallel flow channels with a common pressure drop. Since one can envision certain accident scenarios in which the thermal limits set by flow excursion correlations might be exceeded for brief intervals, a key objective is to determine how long a flow excursion would take to bring about a system failure that could lead to fuel damage. The anticipated time scale for flow excursions has been examined by subdividing the process into its component phenomena: bubble nucleation and growth, deceleration of the resulting two-phase flow, and finally overcoming thermal inertia to heat up the reactor fuel plates. Models were developed to estimate the time required for each individual stage. Accident scenarios involving sudden reduction in core flow or core exit pressure have been examined, and the models compared with RELAP5 output for the ANS geometry. For a high-performance reactor like the ANS, flow excursion time scales were predicted to be in the millisecond range, so that even very brief transients might lead to fuel damage. These results should prove useful whenever one must determine the time involved in any portion of a flow excursion transient.

  1. Application of pixel-cell detector technology for Advanced Neutron Beam Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Daniel M.

    2011-01-11

    Application of Pixel-Cell Detector Technology for Advanced Neutron Beam Monitors Specifications of currently available neutron beam detectors limit their usefulness at intense neutron beams of large-scale national user facilities used for the advanced study of materials. A large number of neutron-scattering experiments require beam monitors to operate in an intense neutron beam flux of >10E+7 neutrons per second per square centimeter. For instance, a 4 cm x 4 cm intense beam flux of 6.25 x 10E+7 n/s/cm2 at the Spallation Neutron Source will put a flux of 1.00 x 10E+9 n/s at the beam monitor. Currently available beam monitors with a typical efficiency of 1 x 10E-4 will need to be replaced in less than two years of operation due to wire and gas degradation issues. There is also a need at some instruments for beam position information that are beyond the capabilities of currently available He-3 and BF3 neutron beam monitors. ORDELA, Inc.’s research under USDOE SBIR Grant (DE-FG02-07ER84844) studied the feasibility of using pixel-cell technology for developing a new generation of stable, long-life neutron beam monitors. The research effort has led to the development and commercialization of advanced neutron beam detectors that will directly benefit the Spallation Neutron Source and other intense neutron sources such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor. A prototypical Pixel-Cell Neutron Beam Monitor was designed and constructed during this research effort. This prototype beam monitor was exposed to an intense neutron beam at the HFIR SNS HB-2 test beam site. Initial measurements on efficiency, uniformity across the detector, and position resolution yielded excellent results. The development and test results have provided the required data to initiate the fabrication and commercialization of this next generation of neutron-detector systems. ORDELA, Inc. has (1) identified low-cost design and fabrication strategies, (2) developed and built pixel-cell detectors and

  2. Advanced neutron source final preconceptual reference core design

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, G.L.; Gambill, W.R.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Peretz, F.J.; Reutler, H.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Selby, D.L.; West, C.D.; Yoder, G.L.

    1989-08-01

    The preconceptual design phase of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project ended with the selection of a reference reactor core that will be used to begin conceptual design work. The new reference core consists of two involute fuel elements, of different diameters, aligned axially with a small axial gap between them. The use of different element diameters permits a separate flow of coolant to be provided for each one, thus enhancing the heat removal capability and increasing the thermal-hydraulic margins. The improved cooling allows the elements to be relatively long and thin, so self-shielding is reduced and an acceptable core life can be achieved with a relatively small loading of highly enriched uranium silicide fuel clad in aluminium. The new reference design has a fueled volume 67.4 L, each element having a heated length of 474 mm and a radial fuel thickness of 66 mm. The end-of-cycle peak thermal flux in the large heavy-water reflector tank around the core is estimated to be in the range of 0.8 to 1.0 /times/ 10/sup 20/ m/sup /minus/2/ /center dot/ s/sup /minus/1/. 7 refs., 23 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Hardening neutron spectrum for advanced actinide transmutation experiments in the ATR.

    PubMed

    Chang, G S; Ambrosek, R G

    2005-01-01

    The most effective method for transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast test reactor in the United States, initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. Such a test facility, with a spectrum similar but somewhat softer than that of the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), has been constructed in the INEEL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The radial fission power distribution of the actinide fuel pin, which is an important parameter in fission gas release modelling, needs to be accurately predicted and the hardened neutron spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum is compared. The comparison analyses in this study are performed using MCWO, a well-developed tool that couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and build-up code ORIGEN-2. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations and detailed radial fission power profile calculations for a typical fast reactor (LMFBR) neutron spectrum and the hardened neutron spectrum test region in the ATR. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the cadmium basket used in the advanced fuel test assembly in the ATR can effectively depress the linear heat generation rate in the experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum in the test region.

  4. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.P.; Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-11-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials.

  5. AND/R: Advanced neutron diffractometer/reflectometer for investigation of thin films and multilayers for the life sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Dura, Joseph A.; Pierce, Donald J.; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Maliszewskyj, Nicholas C.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Loesche, Mathias; O'Donovan, Kevin V.; Mihailescu, Mihaela; Perez-Salas, Ursula; Worcester, David L.; White, Stephen H.

    2006-07-15

    An elastic neutron scattering instrument, the advanced neutron diffractometer/reflectometer (AND/R), has recently been commissioned at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. The AND/R is the centerpiece of the Cold Neutrons for Biology and Technology partnership, which is dedicated to the structural characterization of thin films and multilayers of biological interest. The instrument is capable of measuring both specular and nonspecular reflectivity, as well as crystalline or semicrystalline diffraction at wave-vector transfers up to approximately 2.20 A{sup -1}. A detailed description of this flexible instrument and its performance characteristics in various operating modes are given.

  6. Thermal-hydraulic studies of the Advanced Neutron Source cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was to be a user-oriented neutron research facility producing the most intense steady-state flux of thermal and cold neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the production of cold neutrons was a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410-mm-diam sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design were performed with heat conduction simulations of the vessel walls and multidimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This report presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that were planned to verify the final design.

  7. Advances in Neutron Radiography: Application to Additive Manufacturing Inconel 718

    DOE PAGES

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Song, Gian; An, Ke; ...

    2016-01-01

    Reactor-based neutron radiography is a non-destructive, non-invasive characterization technique that has been extensively used for engineering materials such as inspection of components, evaluation of porosity, and in-operando observations of engineering parts. Neutron radiography has flourished at reactor facilities for more than four decades and is relatively new to accelerator-based neutron sources. Recent advances in neutron source and detector technologies, such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN, and the microchannel plate (MCP) detector, respectively, enable new contrast mechanisms using the neutron scattering Bragg features for crystalline information such as averagemore » lattice strain, crystalline plane orientation, and identification of phases in a neutron radiograph. Additive manufacturing (AM) processes or 3D printing have recently become very popular and have a significant potential to revolutionize the manufacturing of materials by enabling new designs with complex geometries that are not feasible using conventional manufacturing processes. However, the technique lacks standards for process optimization and control compared to conventional processes. Residual stresses are a common occurrence in materials that are machined, rolled, heat treated, welded, etc., and have a significant impact on a component s mechanical behavior and durability. They may also arise during the 3D printing process, and defects such as internal cracks can propagate over time as the component relaxes after being removed from its build plate (the base plate utilized to print materials on). Moreover, since access to the AM material is possible only after the component has been fully manufactured, it is difficult to characterize the material for defects a priori to minimize expensive re-runs. Currently, validation of the AM process and materials is mainly through expensive trial-and-error experiments at the

  8. Advances in Neutron Radiography: Application to Additive Manufacturing Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Song, Gian; An, Ke; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Kirka, Michael M; Dehoff, Ryan R; Santodonato, Louis J; Gorti, Sarma B; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Xie, Qingge

    2016-01-01

    Reactor-based neutron radiography is a non-destructive, non-invasive characterization technique that has been extensively used for engineering materials such as inspection of components, evaluation of porosity, and in-operando observations of engineering parts. Neutron radiography has flourished at reactor facilities for more than four decades and is relatively new to accelerator-based neutron sources. Recent advances in neutron source and detector technologies, such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN, and the microchannel plate (MCP) detector, respectively, enable new contrast mechanisms using the neutron scattering Bragg features for crystalline information such as average lattice strain, crystalline plane orientation, and identification of phases in a neutron radiograph. Additive manufacturing (AM) processes or 3D printing have recently become very popular and have a significant potential to revolutionize the manufacturing of materials by enabling new designs with complex geometries that are not feasible using conventional manufacturing processes. However, the technique lacks standards for process optimization and control compared to conventional processes. Residual stresses are a common occurrence in materials that are machined, rolled, heat treated, welded, etc., and have a significant impact on a component s mechanical behavior and durability. They may also arise during the 3D printing process, and defects such as internal cracks can propagate over time as the component relaxes after being removed from its build plate (the base plate utilized to print materials on). Moreover, since access to the AM material is possible only after the component has been fully manufactured, it is difficult to characterize the material for defects a priori to minimize expensive re-runs. Currently, validation of the AM process and materials is mainly through expensive trial-and-error experiments at the component

  9. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  10. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  11. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections for the Advanced Neutron Source against the FOEHN critical experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-04-01

    The FOEHN critical experiments were analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. Eleven critical configurations were evaluated using the KENO, DORT, and VENTURE neutronics codes. Eigenvalue and power density profiles were computed and show very good agreement with measured values.

  12. Flow blockage analysis for the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, T.K.; Crabtree, J.A.; Felde, D.K.; Park, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor was designed to provide a research tool with capabilities beyond those of any existing reactors. One portion of its state-of-the-art design required high-speed fluid flow through narrow channels between the fuel plates in the core. Experience with previous reactors has shown that fuel plate damage can occur when debris becomes lodged at the entrance to these channels. Such debris disrupts the fluid flow to the plate surfaces and can prevent adequate cooling of the fuel. Preliminary ANS designs addressed this issue by providing an unheated entrance length for each fuel plate so that any flow disruption would recover, thus providing adequate heat removal from the downstream, heated portions of the fuel plates. As part of the safety analysis, the adequacy of this unheated entrance length was assessed using both analytical models and experimental measurements. The Flow Blockage Test Facility (FBTF) was designed and built to conduct experiments in an environment closely matching the ANS channel geometry. The FBTF permitted careful measurements of both heat transfer and hydraulic parameters. In addition to these experimental efforts, a thin, rectangular channel was modeled using the Fluent computational fluid dynamics computer code. The numerical results were compared with the experimental data to benchmark the hydrodynamics of the model. After this comparison, the model was extended to include those elements of the safety analysis that were difficult to measure experimentally. These elements included the high wall heat flux pattern and variable fluid properties. The results were used to determine the relationship between potential blockage sizes and the unheated entrance length required.

  13. Finite element analysis of advanced neutron source fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, C.R.

    1995-08-01

    The proposed design for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor core consists of closely spaced involute fuel plates. Coolant flows between the plates at high velocities. It is vital that adjacent plates do not come in contact and that the coolant channels between the plates remain open. Several scenarios that could result in problems with the fuel plates are studied. Finite element analyses are performed on fuel plates under pressure from the coolant flowing between the plates at a high velocity, under pressure because of a partial flow blockage in one of the channels, and with different temperature profiles.

  14. Advanced neutron imaging methods with a potential to benefit from pulsed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Penumadu, D.; Manke, I.

    2011-09-01

    During the last decade neutron imaging has seen significant improvements in instrumentation, detection and spatial resolution. Additionally, a variety of new applications and methods have been explored. As a consequence of an outstanding development nowadays various techniques of neutron imaging go far beyond a two- and three-dimensional mapping of the attenuation coefficients for a broad range of samples. Neutron imaging has become sensitive to neutron scattering in the small angle scattering range as well as with respect to Bragg scattering. Corresponding methods potentially provide spatially resolved and volumetric data revealing microstructural inhomogeneities, texture variations, crystalline phase distributions and even strains in bulk samples. Other techniques allow for the detection of refractive index distribution through phase sensitive measurements and the utilization of polarized neutrons enables radiographic and tomographic investigations of magnetic fields and properties as well as electrical currents within massive samples. All these advanced methods utilize or depend on wavelength dependent signals, and are hence suited to profit significantly from pulsed neutron sources as will be discussed.

  15. The Advanced Neutron Source liquid deuterium cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will employ two cold sources to moderate neutrons to low energy (<10 meV). The cold neutrons produced are then passed through beam guides to various experiment stations. Each cold source moderator is a sphere of 410-mm internal diameter. The moderator material is liquid deuterium flowing at a rate of 1 kg/s and maintained at subcooled temperatures at all points of the circuit, to prevent boiling. Nuclear beat deposited within the liquid deuterium and its containment structure totals more than 30 kW. All of this heat is removed by the liquid deuterium, which raises its temperature by 5 K. The liquid prime mover is a cryogenic circulator that is situated in the return leg of the flow loop. This arrangement minimizes the heat added to the liquid between the heat exchanger and the moderator vessel, allowing the moderator to be operated at the minimum practical temperature. This report describes the latest thinking at the time of project termination. It also includes the status of various systems at that time and outlines anticipated directions in which the design would have progressed. In this regard, some detail differences between this report and official design documents reflect ideas that were not approved at the time of closure but are considered noteworthy.

  16. Reactivity studies on the final preconceptual reference design of the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Redmond, E.L. II; Kim, S.S.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1990-04-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) with a peak thermal neutron flux of 8.0 {minus} 9.0 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} is being designed for condensed matter physics, materials science, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. A final preconceptual reference reactor design has been selected in order to examine the safety, performance, and costs associated with this one design. This report presents reactor physics analyses of safety aspects of the reference reactor design that are related to core reactivity changes. These analyses include control rod worth, shutdown rod worth, heavy water voiding, light water ingress, single fuel element criticality, fuel element movement, and neutron beam tube flooding. The positive and negative findings are explored for each of these analyses. Based on these analyses, some design modifications that further improve the reactor safety are identified and recommended. 12 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Loss-of-coolant accident analyses of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L. ); Wendel, M.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Currently in the conceptual design stage, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) will operate at a high heat flux, a high mass flux, an a high degree of coolant subcooling. Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses using RELAP5 have been performed as part of an early evaluation of ANSR safety issues. This paper discusses the RELAP5 ANSR conceptual design system model and preliminary LOCA simulation results. Some previous studies were conducted for the preconceptual design. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Hardening Neutron Spectrum for Advanced Actinides Transmutation Experiments in the ATR

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

    2004-05-01

    The most effective method for transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast rest reactor in the United States, initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. Such a test facility, with a spectrum similar but somewhat softer than that of the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), has been constructed in the INEEL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The radial fission power distribution of the actinide fuel pin, which is an important parameter in fission gas released modelling, needs to be accurately predicted and the hardened neturon spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum is compared. The comparison analyses in this study are peformed using MCWO, a well-developed tool that couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and build-up code ORIGEN-2. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations and detailed radial fission power profile calculations for a typical fast reactor (LMFBR) neutron spectrum and the hardened neturon spectrum test region in the ATR. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the cadmium basket used in the advanced fuel test assembly in the ATR can effectively depress the linear heat generation rate in the experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum in the test region.

  19. Effect of neutron irradiation on fracture resistance of advanced SiC/SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kazumi; Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Snead, Lance L.

    2011-10-01

    In order to identify the neutron irradiation effects on fracture resistance of advanced SiC/SiC composites, unloading-reloading single edge notched bend tests were conducted and an analytical model based on non-linear fracture mechanics was applied. As a result of the analysis, energy release rate contributed by macro-crack initiation of 3.1 kJ/m 2 for both unirradiated and irradiated advanced SiC/SiC composites (Hi-Nicalon Type-S (0°/90° plain woven)/multilayer/chemically vapor infiltration) is estimated. This result indicates no significant degradation in fracture resistance after neutron irradiation to 5.9 × 10 25 n/m 2 at 800 °C.

  20. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  1. ANSL-V: ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor studies. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.Q.; Renier, J.P.; Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The original ANSL-V cross-section libraries (ORNL-6618) were developed over a period of several years for the physics analysis of the ANS reactor, with little thought toward including the materials commonly needed for shielding applications. Materials commonly used for shielding applications include calcium barium, sulfur, phosphorous, and bismuth. These materials, as well as {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, and the naturally occurring isotopes of hafnium, have been added to the ANSL-V libraries. The gamma-ray production and gamma-ray interaction cross sections were completely regenerated for the ANSL-V 99n/44g library which did not exist previously. The MALOCS module was used to collapse the 99n/44g coupled library to the 39n/44g broad- group library. COMET was used to renormalize the two-dimensional (2- D) neutron matrix sums to agree with the one-dimensional (1-D) averaged values. The FRESH module was used to adjust the thermal scattering matrices on the 99n/44g and 39n/44g ANSL-V libraries. PERFUME was used to correct the original XLACS Legendre polynomial fits to produce acceptable distributions. The final ANSL-V 99n/44g and 39n/44g cross-section libraries were both checked by running RADE. The AIM module was used to convert the master cross-section libraries from binary coded decimal to binary format (or vice versa).

  2. Measuring neutron star tidal deformability with Advanced LIGO: A Bayesian analysis of neutron star-black hole binary observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Pürrer, Michael; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2017-02-01

    The pioneering discovery of gravitational waves (GWs) by Advanced LIGO has ushered us into an era of observational GW astrophysics. Compact binaries remain the primary target sources for GW observation, of which neutron star-black hole (NSBH) binaries form an important subset. GWs from NSBH sources carry signatures of (a) the tidal distortion of the neutron star by its companion black hole during inspiral, and (b) its potential tidal disruption near merger. In this paper, we present a Bayesian study of the measurability of neutron star tidal deformability ΛNS∝(R /M )NS5 using observation(s) of inspiral-merger GW signals from disruptive NSBH coalescences, taking into account the crucial effect of black hole spins. First, we find that if nontidal templates are used to estimate source parameters for an NSBH signal, the bias introduced in the estimation of nontidal physical parameters will only be significant for loud signals with signal-to-noise ratios greater than ≃30 . For similarly loud signals, we also find that we can begin to put interesting constraints on ΛNS (factor of 1-2) with individual observations. Next, we study how a population of realistic NSBH detections will improve our measurement of neutron star tidal deformability. For an astrophysically likely population of disruptive NSBH coalescences, we find that 20-35 events are sufficient to constrain ΛNS within ±25 %- 50 % , depending on the neutron star equation of state. For these calculations we assume that LIGO will detect black holes with masses within the astrophysical mass gap. In case the mass gap remains preserved in NSBHs detected by LIGO, we estimate that approximately 25% additional detections will furnish comparable ΛNS measurement accuracy. In both cases, we find that it is the loudest 5-10 events that provide most of the tidal information, and not the combination of tens of low-SNR events, thereby facilitating targeted numerical-GR follow-ups of NSBHs. We find these results

  3. Advancing the agent methodology to include the higher order of neutron anisotropy with accelerated solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satvat, Nader

    With the development of new core designs for generation IV reactors with their complexity and newer fuel designs, the need for consideration of neutron anisotropic scattering is becoming important for enchasing the economy and reliability of these designs. The theory and accurate modeling of neutron anisotropy is one of the most important problems of the transport solution to neutron Boltzmann equation. A number of methods based on careful theoretical developments, were established to numerically determine the effect of anisotropy; some of these methods are: the spherical harmonics method, the so-called function method (FN), the discrete ordinate method, and the Monte Carlo method. The AGENT methodology, based on the method of characteristics, currently the most accurate neutron transport method, represents the state-of-the-art advanced neutronics simulation tool available for 2D, 3D, and full core modeling. The higher order of anisotropic scattering (with no limitation of the number of expansion) is introduced into the AGENT code. An extensive analysis is performed to verify and validate this new model. It is shown that anisotropic scattering is important to be considered for complex geometries due to high angular dependence of neutron flux. The first principle in physics were used to explain the effects of anisotropic scattering (at the level on particle interactions), importance in including the higher moments in flux development for the core designs of high heterogonous structure promoting biased scattering (at the level of heterogeneous reactor assemblies in 2D and 3D). This inclusion of higher order of anisotropic scattering as expected increased the complexity of the mathematical model which in turn increased the computational time. An analysis of the computational time dependence on anisotropic scattering and the method of characteristics resolution parameters are analyzed with accurate predictions of scaling to larger geometries. Finally, an accelerated

  4. Monte Carlo methods, models, and applications to the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, E.L.; Redmond, I.I.; Ryskamp, J.M. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on three-dimensional continuous-energy coupled neutron-gamma Monte Carlo models of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) final preconceptual and conceptual reference core designs developed using the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon transport code (MCNP) Version 3b. These models contain the reactor core with control rods, the heavy water reflector tank with shutdown rods and some beam tubes, and the outer light water pool. Eighty homogenized fuel zones per fuel element are used to represent the radial and axial {sup 235}U fuel distribution. These models are the most sophisticated, physically accurate reactor physics models of the ANS currently available. The use of MCNP methods and applications to the ANS are demonstrated. Beam tube studies, coolant voiding studies, and many criticality studies have already been performed, as have studies with variance reduction techniques. In comparison with deterministic methods, MCNP proves superior in calculating the core multiplication factor and neutron fluxers in the reflector. The MCNP code offers the ANS project the capability of performing complicated reactor physics calculations not currently possible with most deterministic methods.

  5. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

  6. Recent advances in fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, B. D.; Tickner, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Fast neutron radiography techniques are attractive for screening cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine elemental composition. Compared to neutron interrogation techniques that measure secondary radiation (neutron or gamma-rays), neutron radiography systems are much more efficient and rapid and they are much more amenable to imaging. However, for neutron techniques to be successfully applied to cargo screening, they must demonstrate significant advantages over well-established X-ray techniques. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection. These developments include a fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography system that utilizes a 14 MeV neutron generator as well as fast neutron resonance radiography systems that use variable energy quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and pulsed broad energy neutron beams. These systems will be discussed and compared with particular emphasis on user requirements, sources, detector systems, imaging ability and performance.

  7. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation site evaluation report for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmon, B.; Heitzman, A.C. Jr.; Morrissey, J. )

    1990-03-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is the US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to build for initial service late in this century. The primary purpose of the ANS is to provide a useable neutron flux for scattering experiments 5 to 10 times as a high as that generated by any existing research reactor, secondary purposes include production of a variety of transuranic and other isotopes and irradiation of materials. The ANS is proposed to be located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report documents the evaluation of alternative sites on the ORR and the selection of a site for the ANS.

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation site evaluation report for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmon, B.; Heitzman, A.C. Jr.; Morrissey, J.

    1990-03-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is the US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to build for initial service late in this century. The primary purpose of the ANS is to provide a useable neutron flux for scattering experiments 5 to 10 times as a high as that generated by any existing research reactor, secondary purposes include production of a variety of transuranic and other isotopes and irradiation of materials. The ANS is proposed to be located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report documents the evaluation of alternative sites on the ORR and the selection of a site for the ANS.

  10. Monte Carlo methods, models, and applications for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, E.L. II; Ryskamp, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    A three-dimensional, continuous-energy, coupled neutron-gamma Monte Carlo model of the advanced neutron source (ANS) final preconceptual reference core design has been developed using MCNP Version 3b. This model contains the reactor core with control rods, the heavy-water reflector tank with shutdown rods and representative beam tubes, and the outer light-water poor. Eighty homogenized fuel zones per fuel element are used to represent the radical and axial {sup 235}U fuel grading. This model is the most sophisticated, physically accurate reactor physics model of the ANS currently available. The purpose of this summary is to demonstrate the MCNP methods and applications for the ANS.

  11. Advanced passive detectors for neutron dosimetry and spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, L

    2004-01-01

    Different neutron detectors have been developed in the past which exploit electrical and electrochemical processes in plastic foils and thin-film capacitors (namely metal-oxide-silicon devices) to trigger avalanche processes, which greatly facilitate the detection of neutron-induced charged particles. These detectors are: (i) spark-replica counter of neutron-induced fission-fragment holes in plastic films, thin-film breakdown counter of neutron-induced fission fragments, and electrochemically etched detectors of neutron-induced recoils in plastic foils. The major shortcomings of damage-track detectors for the measurement of low neutron fluencies, such as those of cosmic ray neutrons at civil aviation altitudes, are their large and unpredictable background and their small signal-to-noise ratio. These shortcomings have been overcome respectively by using long exposure times and large detector areas and counting coincidence-track events on matched pairs of detectors even for a few-micron-long tracks such as those of neutron recoils. The responses of all these detectors have been analysed both with neutrons with energy up to approximately 200 MeV and protons up to tens of gigaelectron volts. Applications of these detectors for the cosmic ray neutron dosimetry and/or spectrometry will be mentioned.

  12. Fuel qualification plan for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, G.L.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the development and qualification plan for the fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source. The reference fuel is U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, dispersed in aluminum and clad in 6061 aluminum. This report was prepared in May 1994, at which time the reference design was for a two-element core containing highly enriched uranium (93% {sup 235}U) . The reactor was in the process of being redesigned to accommodate lowered uranium enrichment and became a three-element core containing a higher volume fraction of uranium enriched to 50% {sup 235}U. Consequently, this report was not issued at that time and would have been revised to reflect the possibly different requirements of the lower-enrichment, higher-volume fraction fuel. Because the reactor is now being canceled, this unrevised report is being issued for archival purposes. The report describes the fabrication and inspection development plan, the irradiation tests and performance modeling to qualify performance, the transient testing that is part of the safety program, and the interactions and interfaces of the fuel development with other tasks.

  13. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A FAST NEUTRON TEST CONCEPT FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2008-06-01

    Since 1967, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has provided state-of-the-art experimental irradiation testing capability. A unique design is investigated herein for the purpose of providing a fast neutron flux test capability in the ATR. This new test capability could be brought on line in approximately 5 or 6 years, much sooner than a new test reactor could be built, to provide an interim fast-flux test capability in the timeframe before a fast-flux research reactor could be built. The proposed cost for this system is approximately $63M, much less than the cost of a new fast-flux test reactor. A concept has been developed to filter out a large portion of the thermal flux component by using a thermally conductive neutron absorber block. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of this experiment cooling concept.

  14. Hunting for continuous gravitational waves from unknown neutron stars in binary systems in Advanced LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Evan; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Non-axisymmetric, rapidly rotating neutron stars are predicted to emit quasi-monochromatic gravitational waves. Accretion from a companion star may drive asymmetries of the neutron star causing it to emit gravitational waves, perhaps even after accretion has subsided. Searching for unknown sources in binary systems is a significant computational challenge. In this talk, I will describe a search method, called TwoSpect, that has been developed to search for unknown sources in binary systems; show results from the TwoSpect search of initial LIGO/Virgo data; describe recent improvements to TwoSpect and other semi-coherent methods; and provide an outlook on TwoSpect searches in the advanced detector era.

  15. A Review of Significant Advances in Neutron Imaging from Conception to the Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenizer, J. S.

    This review summarizes the history of neutron imaging with a focus on the significant events and technical advancements in neutron imaging methods, from the first radiograph to more recent imaging methods. A timeline is presented to illustrate the key accomplishments that advanced the neutron imaging technique. Only three years after the discovery of the neutron by English physicist James Chadwick in 1932, neutron imaging began with the work of Hartmut Kallmann and Ernst Kuhn in Berlin, Germany, from 1935-1944. Kallmann and Kuhn were awarded a joint US Patent issued in January 1940. Little progress was made until the mid-1950's when Thewlis utilized a neutron beam from the BEPO reactor at Harwell, marking the beginning of the application of neutron imaging to practical applications. As the film method was improved, imaging moved from a qualitative to a quantitative technique, with applications in industry and in nuclear fuels. Standards were developed to aid in the quantification of the neutron images and the facility's capabilities. The introduction of dynamic neutron imaging (initially called real-time neutron radiography and neutron television) in the late 1970's opened the door to new opportunities and new challenges. As the electronic imaging matured, the introduction of the CCD imaging devices and solid-state light intensifiers helped address some of these challenges. Development of improved imaging devices for the medical community has had a major impact on neutron imaging. Additionally, amorphous silicon sensors provided improvements in temporal resolution, while providing a reasonably large imaging area. The development of new neutron imaging sensors and the development of new neutron imaging techniques in the past decade has advanced the technique's ability to provide insight and understanding of problems that other non-destructive techniques could not provide. This rapid increase in capability and application would not have been possible without the

  16. Fuel density, uranium enrichment, and performance studies for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Alston, E.E.; Gehin, J.C.; West, C.D.

    1994-06-01

    Consistent with the words of the budget request for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), DOE commissioned a study of the impact on performance of using medium- or low-enriched uranium (MEU or LEU) in the fuel of the reactor that generates the neutrons. In the course of the study, performance calculations for 19 different combinations of reactor core volume, fuel density and enrichment, power level, and other relevant parameters were carried out. Since then, another 14 cases have been analyzed at Oak Ridge to explore some of the more interesting and important configurations and to gain further insights into the tradeoffs between performance and enrichment. Furthermore, with the aid of the data from these additional cases, we have been able to correlate the most important performance parameters (peak thermal neutron flux in the reflector and core life) with reactor power, fuel density, and fuel enrichment. This enables us to investigate intermediate cases, or alternative cases that might be proposed by people within or outside the project, without the time and expense of doing completely new neutronics calculations for each new example. The main drivers of construction and operating costs are the reactor power level and the number of fuel plates to be fabricated each year; these quantities can be calculated from the correlations. The results show that the baseline two-element core design cannot be adapted to any practical fuel of greatly reduced enrichment without great performance penalties, but that a modification of the design, in which one additional fuel element is incorporated to provide extra volume for lower enrichment fuels, has the capability of using existing, or more advanced, fuel types to lower the uranium enrichment.

  17. Design of the cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, P.; Zhang, Hongxia; Bao, W.; Schneidewind, A.; Link, P.; Grünwald, A. T. D.; Georgii, R.; Hao, L. J.; Liu, Y. T.

    2016-06-01

    The design of the first cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor is presented. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations using neutron ray-tracing program McStas, the parameters of major neutron optics in this instrument are optimized. The neutron flux at sample position is estimated to be 5.6 ×107 n/cm2/s at neutron incident energy Ei=5 meV when the reactor operates normally at the designed 60 MW power. The performances of several neutron supermirror polarizing devices are compared and their critical parameters are optimized for this spectrometer. The polarization analysis will be realized with a flexible switch from the unpolarized experimental mode.

  18. Neutronics assessment for the ARIES advanced reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    El-Guebaly, L.A.

    1994-12-31

    To enhance the attractiveness of fusion reactors as a clean and safe source of energy, several recent tokamak designs have incorporated the environmental and safety constraints in the design from the beginning. As such, limitations have been imposed on the type of materials that can be used in the design and the potential of low neutron yield fuel cycles (like D-{sup 3}He) to fulfill the safety goals was investigated. Over the past 5 years, several designs have emerged highlighting the safety and environmental features of tokamaks. Theses designs are the ARIES (I,II,III and IV) and PULSAR (I and II) series. PULSAR designs are pulsed versions of ARIES-II and IV. All designs employ D-T fuel cycles except ARIES-III which is D-{sup 3}He fueled. Low activation materials such as SiC/SiC composites, vanadium alloys, and modified HT-9 ferritic steel were utilized as the main structural materials. Neutronics related issues were assessed for these designs. These include breeding capability of blankets, radiation damage to structural components, and shielding requirements. The D-T fueled designs need a blanket to breed tritium (T). The breeder of choice is ceramics for ARIES-I and IV and liquid metal for ARIES-II. ARIES-III employs pure shield to protect the magnets with no need for breeding blanket. It appears that the Li{sub 2}O breeder requires beryllium multiplier to achieve tritium self-sufficiency in the ARIES-IV design while the lithium has the ability to breed sufficient T in ARIES-II without multiplier. An overall tritium breeder ratio of 1.12 seems adequate for ARIES-II/IV. The 12% excess breeding is necessary to account for uncertainties in cross section data and to supply the T inventory for startup of new reactors.

  19. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  20. Advanced Microstructured Semiconductor Neutron Detectors: Design, Fabrication, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, Steven Lawrence

    The microstructured semiconductor neutron detector (MSND) was investigated and previous designs were improved and optimized. In the present work, fabrication techniques have been refined and improved to produce three-dimensional microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors with reduced leakage current, reduced capacitance, highly anisotropic deep etched trenches, and increased signal-to-noise ratios. As a result of these improvements, new MSND detection systems function with better gamma-ray discrimination and are easier to fabricate than previous designs. In addition to the microstructured diode fabrication improvement, a superior batch processing backfill-method for 6LiF neutron reactive material, resulting in a nearly-solid backfill, was developed. This method incorporates a LiF nano-sizing process and a centrifugal batch process for backfilling the nanoparticle LiF material. To better transition the MSND detector to commercialization, the fabrication process was studied and enhanced to better facilitate low cost and batch process MSND production. The research and development of the MSND technology described in this work includes fabrication of variant microstructured diode designs, which have been simulated through MSND physics models to predict performance and neutron detection efficiency, and testing the operational performance of these designs in regards to neutron detection efficiency, gamma-ray rejection, and silicon fabrication methodology. The highest thermal-neutron detection efficiency reported to date for a solid-state semiconductor detector is presented in this work. MSNDs show excellent neutron to gamma-ray (n/γ) rejection ratios, which are on the order of 106, without significant loss in thermal-neutron detection efficiency. Individually, the MSND is intrinsically highly sensitive to thermal neutrons, but not extrinsically sensitive because of their small size. To improve upon this, individual MSNDs were tiled together into a 6x6-element array

  1. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Walker, Steven A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2010-01-01

    Long term human presence in space requires the inclusion of radiation constraints in mission planning and the design of shielding materials, structures, and vehicles. In this paper, the numerical error associated with energy discretization in HZETRN is addressed. An inadequate numerical integration scheme in the transport algorithm is shown to produce large errors in the low energy portion of the neutron and light ion fluence spectra. It is further shown that the errors result from the narrow energy domain of the neutron elastic cross section spectral distributions, and that an extremely fine energy grid is required to resolve the problem under the current formulation. Two numerical methods are developed to provide adequate resolution in the energy domain and more accurately resolve the neutron elastic interactions. Convergence testing is completed by running the code for various environments and shielding materials with various energy grids to ensure stability of the newly implemented method.

  2. Advanced LIGO Constraints on Neutron Star Mergers and r-process Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Benoit; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Fryer, Chris L.; Ritter, Christian; Paul, Adam; Wehmeyer, Benjamin; O’Shea, Brian W.

    2017-02-01

    The role of compact binary mergers as the main production site of r-process elements is investigated by combining stellar abundances of Eu observed in the Milky Way, galactic chemical evolution (GCE) simulations, and binary population synthesis models, and gravitational wave measurements from Advanced LIGO. We compiled and reviewed seven recent GCE studies to extract the frequency of neutron star–neutron star (NS–NS) mergers that is needed in order to reproduce the observed [Eu/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relationship. We used our simple chemical evolution code to explore the impact of different analytical delay-time distribution functions for NS–NS mergers. We then combined our metallicity-dependent population synthesis models with our chemical evolution code to bring their predictions, for both NS–NS mergers and black hole–neutron star mergers, into a GCE context. Finally, we convolved our results with the cosmic star formation history to provide a direct comparison with current and upcoming Advanced LIGO measurements. When assuming that NS–NS mergers are the exclusive r-process sites, and that the ejected r-process mass per merger event is 0.01 M {}ȯ , the number of NS–NS mergers needed in GCE studies is about 10 times larger than what is predicted by standard population synthesis models. These two distinct fields can only be consistent with each other when assuming optimistic rates, massive NS–NS merger ejecta, and low Fe yields for massive stars. For now, population synthesis models and GCE simulations are in agreement with the current upper limit (O1) established by Advanced LIGO during their first run of observations. Upcoming measurements will provide an important constraint on the actual local NS–NS merger rate, will provide valuable insights on the plausibility of the GCE requirement, and will help to define whether or not compact binary mergers can be the dominant source of r-process elements in the universe.

  3. Advanced Scintillator Detectors for Neutron Imaging in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2016-10-01

    The neutron imaging team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing two-dimensional neutron imaging of the inertial confinement fusion process at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for over five years. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool in which position-sensitive detectors register neutrons emitted in the fusion reactions, producing a picture of the burning fuel. Recent images have revealed possible multi-dimensional asymmetries, calling for additional views to facilitate three-dimensional imaging. These will be along shorter lines of sight to stay within the existing facility at NIF. In order to field imaging capabilities equivalent to the existing system several technological challenges have to be met: high spatial resolution, high light output, and fast scintillator response to capture lower-energy neutrons, which have scattered from non-burning regions of fuel. Deuterated scintillators are a promising candidate to achieve the timing and resolution required; a systematic study of deuterated and non-deuterated polystyrene and liquid samples is currently ongoing. A test stand has been implemented to measure the response function, and preliminary data on resolution and light output have been obtained at the LANL Weapons Neutrons Research facility.

  4. Chandra Observations of Neutron Stars: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Karovska, M.; Pavlov, G. G.; Zavlin, V. E.; Clarke, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    We present a brief review of Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of neutron stars. The outstanding spatial and spectral resolution of this great observatory have allowed for observations of unprecedented clarity and accuracy. Many of these observations have provided new insights into neutron star physics. We present an admittedly biased and overly brief overview of these observations, highlighting some new discoveries made possible by the Observatory's unique capabilities. We also include our analysis of recent multiwavelength observations of the putative pulsar and its pulsar-wind nebula in the IC 443 SNR.

  5. Coded aperture Fast Neutron Analysis: Latest design advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, Roberto; Lanza, Richard C.

    2001-07-01

    Past studies have showed that materials of concern like explosives or narcotics can be identified in bulk from their atomic composition. Fast Neutron Analysis (FNA) is a nuclear method capable of providing this information even when considerable penetration is needed. Unfortunately, the cross sections of the nuclear phenomena and the solid angles involved are typically small, so that it is difficult to obtain high signal-to-noise ratios in short inspection times. CAFNAaims at combining the compound specificity of FNA with the potentially high SNR of Coded Apertures, an imaging method successfully used in far-field 2D applications. The transition to a near-field, 3D and high-energy problem prevents a straightforward application of Coded Apertures and demands a thorough optimization of the system. In this paper, the considerations involved in the design of a practical CAFNA system for contraband inspection, its conclusions, and an estimate of the performance of such a system are presented as the evolution of the ideas presented in previous expositions of the CAFNA concept.

  6. A new method for measuring the neutron lifetime using an in situ neutron detector

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, Christopher L.; Adamek, Evan Robert; Broussard, Leah Jacklyn; ...

    2017-05-30

    Here, we describe a new method for measuring surviving neutrons in neutron lifetime measurements using bottled ultracold neutrons (UCN), which provides better characterization of systematic uncertainties and enables higher precision than previous measurement techniques. We also used an active detector that can be lowered into the trap to measure the neutron distribution as a function of height and measure the influence of marginally trapped UCN on the neutron lifetime measurement. Additionally, measurements have demonstrated phase-space evolution and its effect on the lifetime measurement.

  7. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles.

  8. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O'Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  9. Neutron radiography as a non-destructive method for diagnosing neutron converters for advanced thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraro, A.; Albani, G.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Croci, G.; Angella, G.; Birch, J.; Cazzaniga, C.; Caniello, R.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Schimdt, S.; Robinson, L.; Rebai, M.; Salvato, G.; Tresoldi, D.; Vasi, C.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the well-known problem of 3He shortage, a series of different thermal neutron detectors alternative to helium tubes are being developed, with the goal to find valid candidates for detection systems for the future spallation neutron sources such as the European Spallation Source (ESS). A possible 3He-free detector candidate is a charged particle detector equipped with a three dimensional neutron converter cathode (3D-C). The 3D-C currently under development is composed by a series of alumina (Al2O3) lamellas coated by 1 μ m of 10B enriched boron carbide (B4C). In order to obtain a good characterization in terms of detector efficiency and uniformity it is crucial to know the thickness, the uniformity and the atomic composition of the B4C neutron converter coating. In this work a non-destructive technique for the characterization of the lamellas that will compose the 3D-C was performed using neutron radiography. The results of these measurements show that the lamellas that will be used have coating uniformity suitable for detector applications. This technique (compared with SEM, EDX, ERDA, XPS) has the advantage of being global (i.e. non point-like) and non-destructive, thus it is suitable as a check method for mass production of the 3D-C elements.

  10. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Brown, J.; Adroja, D. T.; Manuel, P.; Kouzmenko, G.; Bewley, R. I.; Wotherspoon, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  11. Detailed flux calculations for the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    A detailed MCNP model of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor has been developed. All reactor components inside the reflector tank were included, and all components were highly segmented. Neutron and photon multigroup flux spectra have been calculated for each segment in the model, and thermal-to-fast neutron flux ratios were determined for each component segment. Axial profiles of the spectra are provided for all components of the reactor. Individual segment statistical uncertainties were limited wherever possible, and the group fluxes for all important reflector components have a standard deviation below 10%.

  12. Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D.; Eberle, C.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world`s best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world`s best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using {sup 64}Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet.

  13. WENDI: an improved neutron rem meter.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; Hsu, H H; Beverding, A; Kleck, J H; Casson, W H; Vasilik, D G; Devine, R T

    2000-08-01

    Neutron rem meters are routinely used for real-time field measurements of neutron dose equivalent where neutron spectra are unknown or poorly characterized. These meters are designed so that their response per unit fluence approximates an appropriate fluence-to-dose conversion function. Typically, a polyethylene moderator assembly surrounds a thermal neutron detector, such as a BF3 counter tube. Internal absorbers may also be used to further fine-tune the detector response to the shape of the desired fluence conversion function. Historical designs suffer from a number of limitations. Accuracy for some designs is poor at intermediate energies (50 keV-250 keV) critical for nuclear power plant dosimetry. The well-known Andersson-Braun design suffers from angular dependence because of its lack of spherical symmetry. Furthermore, all models using a pure polyethylene moderator have no useful high-energy response, which makes them inaccurate around high-energy accelerator facilities. This paper describes two new neutron rem meter designs with improved accuracy over the energy range from thermal to 5 GeV. The Wide Energy Neutron Detection Instrument (WENDI) makes use of both neutron generation and absorption to contour the detector response function. Tungsten or tungsten carbide (WC) powder is added to a polyethylene moderator with the expressed purpose of generating spallation neutrons in tungsten nuclei and thus enhance the high-energy response of the meter beyond 8 MeV. Tungsten's absorption resonance structure below several keV was also found to be useful in contouring the meter's response function. The WENDI rem meters were designed and optimized using the Los Alamos Monte Carlo codes MCNP, MCNPX, and LAHET. A first generation prototype (WENDI-I) was built in 1995 and its testing was completed in 1996. This design placed a BF3 counter in the center of a spherical moderator assembly, whose outer shell consisted of 30% by weight WC in a matrix of polyethylene. A borated

  14. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawabata, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS

  15. Analysis of core-concrete interaction event with flooding for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.

    1993-11-01

    This paper discusses salient aspects of the methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from an accident involving a molten core-concrete interaction event (with and without flooding) in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for this postulated severe accident. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during this severe accident. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms, which are then used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for the support of the Conceptual Safety Analysis Report for ANS. The results are also to be used to examine the effectiveness of subpile room flooding during this type of severe accident.

  16. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Engelhaupt, D. E.; Burgess, J.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2007-01-01

    The focusing capabilities of neutron imaging optic based on the Wolter-1 geometry have been successfully demonstrated with a beam of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence.. A test mirror was fabricated using an electroformed nickel replication process at Marshall Space Flight Center. The neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror is found to be at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20 A. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  17. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  18. Securing Special Nuclear Material: Recent Advances in Neutron Detection and Their Role in Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; Bernstein, A.; Vanier, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Neutron detection is an integral part of the global effort to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear material (SNM). Applications relying on neutron-detection technology range from traditional nuclear non-proliferation objectives, such as safeguarding nuclear material and verifying stockpile reductions, to the interdiction of SNM—a goal that has recently risen in priority to a level on par with traditional applications. Large multi-national programs targeting detection and safeguards have deployed radiation-detection assets across the globe. Alongside these deployments of commercially available technology, significant research and development efforts have been directed towards the creation of next-generation assets. While much of this development has focused on gamma-ray spectrometers, neutron-detection technology remains an important component of the global strategy because of the capability of neutrons to penetrate materials that readily absorb gamma rays and the unique multiplicity signatures offered by neutrons. One particularly acute technology-development challenge results from dwindling supplies of 3He, partially triggered by widespread deployment of high-efficiency systems for portal monitoring. Other emerging missions, such as the desire to detect SNM at greater standoff distances, have also stimulated neutron-detection technology development. In light of these needs for novel neutron-detection technologies, this manuscript reviews the signatures of neutrons emitted by SNM, the principles of neutron detection, and various strategies under investigation for detection in the context of nonproliferation.

  19. Modeling and analysis of hydrogen detonation events in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor containment

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Kim, S.H.; Valenti, S.N.; Simpson, D.B.; Sawruk, W.

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling, analyses, and evaluations for hydrogen detonation in selected regions of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) containment during hypothetical severe accident conditions. Shock wave generation and transport modeling and analyses were conducted for two stratified configurations in the dome region of the high bay. Principal tools utilized for these purposes were the CTH and CET89 computer codes. Dynamic pressure loading functions were generated for key locations and used for evaluating structural response behavior for which a finite-element model was developed using the ANSYS code. For the range of conditions analyzed in the two critical dome regions, it was revealed that the ANS containment would be able to withstand detonation loads without failure.

  20. A high intensity slow positron facility for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Eberle, C.C.

    1994-07-01

    A slow positron spectroscopy facility, based on {sup 64}Cu activation, has been designed for incorporation in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The ANS is a reactor-based research center planned for construction at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Multiple sources of slow positron beams will be available. One-half mm diameter, copper-coated aluminum microspheres will be activated and transported to a positron spectroscopy building, where they will be dispersed over the surfaces of horizontal pans, 0.1 m{sup 2} in area, located in source chambers. Fast positions from the pans will be intercepted by cylinders coated inside with inert gas moderators. Yields will approach 10{sup 12} positrons per second before brightness enhancement. Beams will be transported to multiple experiment stations, which will include a 50 meter diameter, 20-detector angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) spectrometer, and other equipment for materials analysis and fundamental science.

  1. Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

    1993-05-01

    The planned reactor for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will use closely spaced arrays of involute-shaped fuel plates that will be cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities, adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported. The tests were conducted using full-scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute-shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as functions of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted.

  2. Recent advances in the US fission yield and delayed neutron evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    England, T.R.; Rider, B.F.; Brady, M.C.

    1992-08-01

    Over the past fifteen years, US reactor analysts have been presented with three major evaluated nuclear data bases: Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B) versions -IV, -V, and most recently, -VI. Advances in the quantity and quality of fission yield data have been almost exponential from evaluation to evaluation. The most recent release of ENDF/B-VI represents an entirely new approach to the evaluation of delayed neutron data. Due to the effort and expense of processing and testing the basic data evaluations for specific applications, data libraries contained in the m mn reactor physics codes are not usually dated with the release of a new evaluation. This is particularly true for the decay data files utilizing fission yield and delayed neutron data. The introduction of ANSI/ANS standards for data of this type would provide a mechanism for assuring the reliability and quality of data of this type. Working groups for each of these proposed standards are comprised of both US and international experts in areas of reactor physics utilizing these data, as well as the data evaluators themselves. This summary briefly discusses the status of the two data evaluations and the progress toward developing standards in each area.

  3. Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study -- Volume 1: Main report. Final report, Revision 12/94

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J.

    1994-12-31

    A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology. Volume 2 of this report contains 26 appendices containing results, meeting minutes, and fuel panel presentations.

  4. Advanced LIGO constraints on neutron star mergers and r-process sites

    DOE PAGES

    Côté, Benoit; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Fryer, Chris L.; ...

    2017-02-20

    The role of compact binary mergers as the main production site of r-process elements is investigated by combining stellar abundances of Eu observed in the Milky Way, galactic chemical evolution (GCE) simulations, and binary population synthesis models, and gravitational wave measurements from Advanced LIGO. We compiled and reviewed seven recent GCE studies to extract the frequency of neutron star–neutron star (NS–NS) mergers that is needed in order to reproduce the observed [Eu/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relationship. We used our simple chemical evolution code to explore the impact of different analytical delay-time distribution functions for NS–NS mergers. We then combined our metallicity-dependent population synthesis models with our chemical evolution code to bring their predictions, for both NS–NS mergers and black hole–neutron star mergers, into a GCE context. Finally, we convolved our results with the cosmic star formation history to provide a direct comparison with current and upcoming Advanced LIGO measurements. When assuming that NS–NS mergers are the exclusive r-process sites, and that the ejected r-process mass per merger event is 0.01 Mmore » $${}_{\\odot }$$, the number of NS–NS mergers needed in GCE studies is about 10 times larger than what is predicted by standard population synthesis models. Here, these two distinct fields can only be consistent with each other when assuming optimistic rates, massive NS–NS merger ejecta, and low Fe yields for massive stars. For now, population synthesis models and GCE simulations are in agreement with the current upper limit (O1) established by Advanced LIGO during their first run of observations. Upcoming measurements will provide an important constraint on the actual local NS–NS merger rate, will provide valuable insights on the plausibility of the GCE requirement, and will help to define whether or not compact binary mergers can be the dominant source of r-process elements in the universe.« less

  5. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL NEUTRONICS METHODS AND VALIDATION PROTOCOLS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Joseph W. Nielsen; Benjamin M. Chase; Ronnie K. Murray; Kevin A. Steuhm

    2012-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is in the process of modernizing the various reactor physics modeling and simulation tools used to support operation and safety assurance of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009 was successfully completed during 2011. This demonstration supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR fuel cycle management process beginning in 2012. On the experimental side of the project, new hardware was fabricated, measurement protocols were finalized, and the first four of six planned physics code validation experiments based on neutron activation spectrometry were conducted at the ATRC facility. Data analysis for the first three experiments, focused on characterization of the neutron spectrum in one of the ATR flux traps, has been completed. The six experiments will ultimately form the basis for a flexible, easily-repeatable ATR physics code validation protocol that is consistent with applicable ASTM standards.

  6. Review and Assessment of Neutron Cross Section and Nubar Covariances for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov,V.M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2007, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) produced a set of preliminary neutron covariance data for the international project 'Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems'. The project was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Paris, under the Subgroup 26 of the International Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). These preliminary covariances are described in two recent BNL reports. The NNDC used a simplified version of the method developed by BNL and LANL that combines the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances, the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE and the Bayesian code KALMAN with the experimental data used as guidance. There are numerous issues involved in these estimates of covariances and it was decided to perform an independent review and assessment of these results so that better covariances can be produced for the revised version in future. Reviewed and assessed are uncertainties for fission, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross sections as well as prompt nubars for 15 minor actinides ({sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am and {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) and 4 major actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu). We examined available evaluations, performed comparison with experimental data, taken into account uncertainties in model parameterization and made use state-of-the-art nuclear reaction theory to produce the uncertainty assessment.

  7. Updated pipe break analysis for Advanced Neutron Source Reactor conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will supply the highest continuous neutron flux levels of any reactor in the world. It uses plate-type fuel with high-mass-flux and highly subcooled heavy water as the primary coolant. The Conceptual Safety Analysis for the ANSR was completed in June 1992. The thermal-hydraulic pipe-break safety analysis (performed with a specialized version of RELAP5/MOD3) focused primarily on double-ended guillotine breaks of the primary piping and some core-damage mitigation options for such an event. Smaller, instantaneous pipe breaks in the cold- and hot-leg piping were also analyzed to a limited extent. Since the initial analysis for the conceptual design was completed, several important changes to the RELAP5 input model have been made reflecting improvements in the fuel grading and changes in the elevation of the primary coolant pumps. Also, a new philosophy for pipe-break safety analysis (similar to that adopted for the New Production Reactor) accentuates instantaneous, limited flow area pipe-break accidents in addition to finite-opening-time, double-ended guillotine breaks of the major coolant piping. This paper discloses the results of the most recent instantaneous pipe-break calculations.

  8. Study on recriticality of fuel debris during hypothetical severe accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Shin, S.T.

    1995-09-01

    A study has been performed to measure the potential of recriticality during hypothetical severe accident in Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). For the lumped debris configuration in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), as found in the previous study, recriticality potential may be very low. However, if fuel debris is dispersed and mixed with heavy water in RCS, recriticality potential has been predicted to be substantial depending on thermal-hydraulic conditions surrounding fuel debris mixture. The recriticality potential in RCS is substantially reduced for the three element core design with 50% enrichment. Also, as observed in the previous study, strong dependencies of k{sub eff} on key thermal hydraulic parameters are shown. Light water contamination is shown to provide a positive reactivity, and void formation due to boiling of mixed water provides enough negative reactivity and to bring the system down to subcritical. For criticality potential in the subpile room, the lumped debris configuration does not pose a concern. Dispersed configuration in light water pool of the subpile room is also unlikely to result in criticality. However, if the debris is dispersed in the pool that is mixed with heavy water, the results indicate that a substantial potential exists for the debris to reach the criticality. However, if prompt recriticality disperses the debris completely in the subpile room pool, subsequent recriticality may be prevented since neutron leakage effects become large enough.

  9. Reactor physics methods for the preconceptual core design of the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Difilippo, F.C.; Primm, R.T. III

    1987-01-01

    Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been jointly working to develop and evaluate preconceptual reactor core configurations for the advanced neutron source. This paper reviews the reactor physics methods used to compute reactor parameters and demonstrates that the laboratories achieve good agreement on these parameters.

  10. Evaluation of an iron-filtered epithermal neutron beam for neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, S V; McGinley, P H; Greenwood, R C; Kliauga, P; Fairchild, R G

    1991-01-01

    An epithermal neutron filter using iron, aluminum, and sulfur was evaluated to determine if the therapeutic performance could be improved with respect to aluminum-sulfur-based filters. An empirically optimized filter was developed that delivered a 93% pure beam of 24-keV epithermal neutrons. It was expected that a thick filter using iron with a density thickness greater than 200 g/cm2 would eliminate the excess gamma contamination found in Al-S filters. This research showed that prompt gamma production from neutron interactions in iron was the dominant dose component. Dosimetric parameters of the beam were determined from the measurement of absorbed dose in air, thermal neutron flux in a head phantom, neutron and gamma spectroscopy, and microdosimetry.

  11. Development of Advanced Multi-Modality Radiation Treatment Planning Software for Neutron Radiotherapy and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D; Wessol, D; Wemple, C; Harkin, G; Hartmann-Siantar, C

    2002-08-20

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has long been active in development of advanced Monte-Carlo based computational dosimetry and treatment planning methods and software for advanced radiotherapy, with a particular focus on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Fast-Neutron Therapy. The most recent INEEL software system of this type is known as SERA, Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications. As a logical next step in the development of modern radiotherapy planning tools to support the most advanced research, INEEL and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the developers of the PEREGRTNE computational engine for radiotherapy treatment planning applications, have recently launched a new project to collaborate in the development of a ''next-generation'' multi-modality treatment planning software system that will be useful for all modern forms of radiotherapy.

  12. Development of An Epi-thermal Neutron Field for Fundamental Researches for BNCT with A DT Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Yuta; Imoto, Shoichi; Kusaka, Sachie; Sato, Fuminobu; Tanoshita, Masahiro; Murata, Isao

    2017-09-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is known to be a new promising cancer therapy suppressing influence against normal cells. In Japan, Accelerator Based Neutron Sources (ABNS) are being developed for BNCT. For the spread of ABNS based BNCT, we should characterize the neutron field beforehand. For this purpose, we have been developing a low-energy neutron spectrometer based on 3He position sensitive proportional counter. In this study, a new intense epi-thermal neutron field was developed with a DT neutron source for verification of validity of the spectrometer. After the development, the neutron field characteristics were experimentally evaluated by using activation foils. As a result, we confirmed that an epi-thermal neutron field was successfully developed suppressing fast neutrons substantially. Thereafter, the neutron spectrometer was verified experimentally. In the verification, although a measured detection depth distribution agreed well with the calculated distribution by MCNP, the unfolded spectrum was significantly different from the calculated neutron spectrum due to contribution of the side neutron incidence. Therefore, we designed a new neutron collimator consisting of a polyethylene pre-collimator and boron carbide neutron absorber and confirmed numerically that it could suppress the side incident neutrons and shape the neutron flux to be like a pencil beam.

  13. A concept of advanced broad-band solid-state supermirror polarizers for cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, A. K.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Bigault, T.; Courtois, P.; Jullien, D.; Soldner, T.

    2016-12-01

    An ideal solid-state supermirror (SM) neutron polarizer assumes total reflection of neutrons from the SM coating for one spin-component and total absorption for the other, thus providing a perfectly polarized neutron beam at the exit. However, in practice, the substrate's neutron-nuclei optical potential does not match perfectly that for spin-down neutrons in the SM. For a positive step in the optical potential (as in a Fe / Si Nx SM on Si substrate), this mismatch results in spin-independent total reflection for neutrons with small momentum transfer Q , limiting the useful neutron bandwidth in the low- Q region. To overcome this limitation, we propose to replace Si single-crystal substrates by media with higher optical potential than that for spin-down neutrons in the SM ferromagnetic layers. We found single-crystal sapphire and single-crystal quartz as good candidates for solid-state Fe / Si Nx SM polarizers. To verify this idea, we coated a thick plate of single-crystal sapphire with a m = 2.5 Fe / Si Nx SM. At the T3 instrument at the ILL, we measured the spin-up and spin-down reflectivity curves with λ = 7.5 Å neutrons incident from the substrate to the interface between the substrate and the SM coating. Results of this experimental test are in excellent agreement with our expectations: the bandwidth of high polarizing power extends significantly into the low- Q region. This finding, together with the possibility to apply a strong magnetizing field, opens a new road to produce high-efficiency solid-state SM polarizers with an extended neutron wavelength bandwidth and near-to-perfect polarizing power.

  14. Neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.; Iddings, F.

    1998-08-01

    Neutron radiography is becoming a well established nondestructive testing (NDT) method. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recognized the method through its recommended practice SNT-TCIA which outlines training, knowledge, and experience necessary to obtain levels of competency in the method. Certification of nondestructive testing personnel is also covered in a military standard. Technical publications in the field of NDT and nuclear technology carry articles on neutron radiography and technical meetings include papers or even entire sessions on neutron radiography. There is an on-going series of international conferences on neutron radiography. Many books are available to provide introductory and advanced material on neutron radiographic techniques and applications. Neutron radiography as a service for hire is available, similar to that offered for other NDT services. The method is being adopted to solve NDT problems in specialty areas. The objective of this report is to provide a brief survey of the current state of the art in the use of neutron radiography. The survey will include information on the technique including principles of the method, sources of neutrons, detection methodology, standards and image quality indicators, and representative applications. An extensive reference list provides additional information for those who wish to investigate further and a Glossary is included which provides definitions for terms used in Neutron Radiography.

  15. Neutron diffractometer for bio-crystallography (BIX) with an imaging plate neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1994-12-31

    We have constructed a dedicated diffractometer for neutron crystallography in biology (BIX) on the JRR-3M reactor at JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). The diffraction intensity from a protein crystal is weaker than that from most inorganic materials. In order to overcome the intensity problem, an elastically bent silicon monochromator and a large area detector system were specially designed. A preliminary result of diffraction experiment using BIX has been reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility experiment was carried out on BIX. Results are reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility test was carried out using BIX.

  16. Electromagnetic Signatures of Neutron Star Mergers in the Advanced LIGO Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-10-01

    The mergers of binaries containing neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes are among the most promising sources for direct detection in gravitational waves by the interferometers Advanced LIGO and Virgo over the next few years. The concurrent detection of electromagnetic emission from these events would greatly enhance the scientific return of these discoveries. We review the state of the art in modeling the electromagnetic signal of neutron star binary mergers across different phases of the merger and multiple wavelengths. We focus on those observables that provide the most sensitive diagnostics of the merger physics and the contribution to the synthesis of rapid neutron capture (r-process) elements in the Galaxy. We also outline expected future developments on the observational and theoretical sides of this rapidly evolving field.

  17. Relative performance properties of the ORNL Advanced Neutron Source Reactor with reduced enrichment fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.; Deen, J.R.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Pond, R.B.; Travelli, A.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    Three cores for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor, differing in size, enrichment, and uranium density in the fuel meat, have been analyzed. Performance properties of the reduced enrichment cores are compared with those of the HEU reference configuration. Core lifetime estimates suggest that none of these configurations will operate for the design goal of 17 days at 330 MW. With modes increases in fuel density and/or enrichment, however, the operating lifetimes of the HEU and MEU designs can be extended to the desired length. Achieving this lifetime with LEU fuel in any of the three studies cores, however, will require the successful development of denser fuels and/or structural materials with thermal neutron absorption cross sections substantially less than that of Al-6061. Relative to the HEU reference case, the peak thermal neutron flux in cores with reduced enrichment will be diminished by about 25--30%.

  18. An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William S; Peerani, Paolo

    2012-08-13

    Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential

  19. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, Gandolfi; Steiner, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  20. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, S.; Steiner, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron- rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  1. Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials V: CENTENNIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, George

    2012-05-01

    In 2012 the diffraction community will celebrate 100 years since the prediction of X-ray diffraction by M. Laue, and following his suggestion the first beautiful diffraction experiment by W. Friedrich and P. Knipping. The significance of techniques based on the analysis of the diffraction of X-rays, neutrons, electrons and Mossbauer photons discovered later, has continued to increase in the past 100 years. The aim of this symposium is to provide a forum for discussion of using state-of-the-art neutron and X-ray scattering techniques for probing advanced materials. These techniques have been widely used to characterize materials structures across all length scales, from atomic to nano, meso, and macroscopic scales. With the development of sample environments, in-situ experiments, e.g., at temperatures and applied mechanical load, are becoming routine. The development of ultra-brilliant third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, together with advances in X-ray optics, has created intense X-ray microbeams, which provide the best opportunities for in-depth understanding of mechanical behavior in a broad spectrum of materials. Important applications include ultra-sensitive elemental detection by X-ray fluorescence/absorption and microdiffraction to identify phase and strain with submicrometer spatial resolution. X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly exciting application compared with alternative probes of crystalline structure, orientation and strain. X-ray microdiffraction is non-destructive with good strain resolution, competitive or superior spatial resolution in thick samples, and with the ability to probe below the sample surface. Advances in neutron sources and instrumentation also bring new opportunities in neutron scattering research. In addition to characterizing the structures, neutrons are also a great tool for elucidating the dynamics of materials. Because neutrons are highly penetrating, neutrons have been used to map stress in engineering systems

  2. Cadmium Depletion Impacts on Hardening Neutron6 Spectrum for Advanced Fuel Testing in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang

    2011-05-01

    For transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products effectively is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast spectrum test reactor in the United States of America (USA), initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. A test region is achieved with a Cadmium (Cd) filter which can harden the neutron spectrum to a spectrum similar (although still somewhat softer) to that of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). A fuel test loop with a Cd-filter has been installed within the East Flux Trap (EFT) of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A detailed comparison analyses between the cadmium (Cd) filter hardened neutron spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum have been performed using MCWO. MCWO is a set of scripting tools that are used to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2.2. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the Cd-filter can effectively flatten the Rim-Effect and reduce the linear heat rate (LHGR) to meet the advanced fuel testing project requirements at the beginning of irradiation (BOI). However, the filtering characteristics of Cd as a strong absorber quickly depletes over time, and the Cd-filter must be replaced for every two typical operating cycles within the EFT of the ATR. The designed Cd-filter can effectively depress the LHGR in experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum enough to adequately flatten the Rim Effect in the test region.

  3. Dose measurements of bremsstrahlung-produced neutrons from thick targets at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P. K.

    1998-09-16

    Bremsstrahlung is produced in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring when the positron beam interacts with the storage-ring components or with the residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum. This bremsstrahlung has an energy range of zero to 7.0 GeV, which is the maximum energy of the positron beam. Bremsstrahlung photons of sufficient high energy can interact with beamline components such as beam stops and collimators, generating neutrons of varying energies. This paper presents the results of simultaneous measurements, conducted at the Advanced Photon Source, of bremsstrahlung and the corresponding photoneutron production from thick targets of iron, copper, tungsten and lead, which allow one to correlate photoneutron dose rates from these metals as a function of bremsstrahlung power. The average photoneutron dose equivalent rates, normalized to the bremsstrahlung power, are measured as 2.7 {+-} 0.5 rem/h/W for iron, 3.2 {+-} 0.5 rem/h/W for copper, 3.9 {+-} 0.5 rem/h/W for tungsten, and 4.6 {+-} 0.8 rem/h/W for lead targets. These are measured at 80 cm lateral from the center of the targets, perpendicular to the photon beam direction.

  4. Recent advances in polarized 3 He based neutron spin filter development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wangchun; Gentile, Thomas; Erwin, Ross; Watson, Shannon; Krycka, Kathryn; Ye, Qiang; NCNR NIST Team; University of Maryland Team

    2015-04-01

    Polarized 3 He neutron spin filters (NSFs) are based on the strong spin-dependence of the neutron absorption cross section by 3 He. NSFs can polarize large area, widely divergent, and broadband neutron beams effectively and allow for combining a neutron polarizer and a spin flipper into a single polarizing device. The last capability utilizes 3 He spin inversion based on the adiabatic fast passage (AFP) nuclear magnetic resonance technique. Polarized 3 He NSFs are significantly expanding the polarized neutron measurement capabilities at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). Here we present an overview of 3 He NSF applications to small-angle neutron scattering, thermal triple axis spectrometry, and wide-angle polarization analysis. We discuss a recent upgrade of our spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) systems that utilize chirped volume holographic gratings for spectral narrowing. The new capability allows us to polarize rubidium/potassium hybrid SEOP cells over a liter in volume within a day, with 3 He polarizations up to 88%, Finally we discuss how we can achieve nearly lossless 3 He polarization inversion with AFP.

  5. Upper Limits on the Rates of Binary Neutron Star and Neutron Star-Black Hole Mergers from Advanced LIGO’s First Observing Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio., M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary-neutron star systems and neutron star-black hole systems during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In particular, we searched for gravitational-wave signals from binary-neutron star systems with component masses \\in [1,3] {M}⊙ and component dimensionless spins <0.05. We also searched for neutron star-black hole systems with the same neutron star parameters, black hole mass \\in [2,99] {M}⊙ , and no restriction on the black hole spin magnitude. We assess the sensitivity of the two LIGO detectors to these systems and find that they could have detected the merger of binary-neutron star systems with component mass distributions of 1.35 ± 0.13 M ⊙ at a volume-weighted average distance of ˜70 Mpc, and for neutron star-black hole systems with neutron star masses of 1.4 M ⊙ and black hole masses of at least 5 M ⊙, a volume-weighted average distance of at least ˜110 Mpc. From this we constrain with 90% confidence the merger rate to be less than 12,600 Gpc-3 yr-1 for binary-neutron star systems and less than 3600 Gpc-3 yr-1 for neutron star-black hole systems. We discuss the astrophysical implications of these results, which we find to be in conflict with only the most optimistic predictions. However, we find that if no detection of neutron star-binary mergers is made in the next two Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observing runs we would place significant constraints on the merger rates. Finally, assuming a rate of {10}-7+20 Gpc-3 yr-1, short gamma-ray bursts beamed toward the Earth, and assuming that all short gamma-ray bursts have binary-neutron star (neutron star-black hole) progenitors, we can use our 90% confidence rate upper limits to constrain the beaming angle of the gamma-ray burst to be greater than 2\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {3}-1.1+1.7 (4\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {3}-1.9+3.1).

  6. An Exploration of Neutron Detection in Semiconducting Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Nina

    The 3He supply problem in the U.S. has necessitated the search for alternatives for neutron detection. The neutron detection efficiency is a function of density, atomic composition, neutron absorption cross section, and thickness of the neutron capture material. The isotope 10B is one of only a handful of isotopes with a high neutron absorption cross section---3840 barns for thermal neutrons. So a boron carbide semiconductor represents a viable alternative to 3He. This dissertation provides an evaluation of the performance of semiconducting boron carbide neutron detectors grown by plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in order to determine the advantages and drawbacks of these devices for neutron detection. Improved handling of the PECVD system has resulted in an extremely stable plasma, enabling deposition of thick films of semiconducting boron carbide. A variety of material and semiconducting characterization tools have been used to investigate the structure and electronic properties of boron carbide thin films, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, infrared/Raman spectroscopy, current-voltage measurements and capacitance-voltage measurements. Elemental concentrations in the boron carbide films have been obtained from Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis. Solid state neutron detection devices have been fabricated in the form of heterostructured p-n diodes, p-type boron carbide/n-type Si. Operating conditions, including applied bias voltage, and time constants, have been optimized for maximum detection efficiency and correlated to the semiconducting properties investigated in separate electronic measurements. Accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency and the response of the detector to a wide range of neutron wavelengths have been performed at a well calibrated, tightly collimated, "white" cold neutron beam source using time-of-flight neutron detection technique

  7. Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-11-29

    This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the code’s versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research project’s primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

  8. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-02-04

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5x1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2x103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125{mu}m in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  9. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-02-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5×1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2×103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125μm in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  10. Fluence and dose measurements for an accelerator neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Byun, S. H.; McNeill, F. E.; Mothersill, C. E.; Seymour, C. B.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2007-10-01

    The 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at McMaster University accelerator laboratory is extended to a neutron irradiation facility for low-dose bystander effects research. A long counter and an Anderson-Braun type neutron monitor have been used as monitors for the determination of the total fluence. Activation foils were used to determine the thermal neutron fluence rate (around 106 neutrons s-1). Meanwhile, the interactions of neutrons with the monitors have been simulated using a Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code. Bystander effects, i.e. damage occurring in cells that were not traversed by radiation but were in the same radiation environment, have been well observed following both alpha and gamma irradiation of many cell lines. Since neutron radiation involves mixed field (including gamma and neutron radiations), we need to differentiate the doses for the bystander effects from the two radiations. A tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) filled with propane based tissue equivalent gas simulating a 2 μm diameter tissue sphere has been investigated to estimate the neutron and gamma absorbed doses. A photon dose contamination of the neutron beam is less than 3%. The axial dose distribution follows the inverse square law and lateral and vertical dose distributions are relatively uniform over the irradiation area required by the biological study.

  11. Thermal neutron imaging in an active interrogation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L., and Norman, D.R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of xcitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutronemitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  12. From the similarities between neutrons and radon to advanced radon-detection and improved cold fusion neutron-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasino, L.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    Neutrons and radon are both ubiquitous in the earth's crust. The neutrons of terrestrial origin are strongly related to radon since they originate mainly from the interactions between the alpha particles from the decays of radioactive-gas (namely Radon and Thoron) and the light nuclei. Since the early studies in the field of neutrons, the radon gas was used to produce neutrons by (α, n) reactions in beryllium. Another important similarity between radon and neutrons is that they can be detected only through the radiations produced respectively by decays or by nuclear reactions. These charged particles from the two distinct nuclear processes are often the same (namely alpha-particles). A typical neutron detector is based on a radiator facing a alpha-particle detector, such as in the case of a neutron film badge. Based on the similarity between neutrons and radon, a film badge for radon has been recently proposed. The radon film badge, in addition to be similar, may be even identical to the neutron film badge. For these reasons, neutron measurements can be easily affected by the presence of unpredictable large radon concentration. In several cold fusion experiments, the CR-39 plastic films (typically used in radon and neutron film-badges), have been the detectors of choice for measuring neutrons. In this paper, attempts will be made to prove that most of these neutron-measurements might have been affected by the presence of large radon concentrations.

  13. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments: A 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Neutron Capture Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Reifarth, R.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Alpizar, A.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Folden, C.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Greife, U.; Schwantes, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.

    2005-05-24

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element 4{pi} BaF2 array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as one milligram. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. The design and initial performance results of DANCE is discussed.

  14. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K{sub Q} due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail.

  15. Design of a magnetic shielding system for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Cui, Z Q; Chen, Z J; Xie, X F; Peng, X Y; Hu, Z M; Du, T F; Ge, L J; Zhang, X; Yuan, X; Xia, Z W; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Fan, T S; Chen, J X; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H

    2014-11-01

    The novel neutron spectrometer TOFED (Time of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics), comprising 90 individual photomultiplier tubes coupled with 85 plastic scintillation detectors through light guides, has been constructed and installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A dedicated magnetic shielding system has been constructed for TOFED, and is designed to guarantee the normal operation of photomultiplier tubes in the stray magnetic field leaking from the tokamak device. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations carried out employing the finite element method are combined to optimize the design of the magnetic shielding system. The system allows detectors to work properly in an external magnetic field of 200 G.

  16. Studies of D-Li neutron source: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-06-01

    The construction of a neutron source facility able to reproduce the radiation environment predicted for a fusion reactor can be considered a very important milestone for the fusion program. Such a neutron source should allow materials testing over a wide range of neutron flux and neutron fluence. To date, none of the existing facilities reproduce the neutron flux with the energy spectrum of a fusion reactor. As a result, the major part of the required material database is obtained by extrapolations which may not be as reliable as needed to predict the real performance of those materials under fusion reactor conditions. As an example, the effect of the gas production, transmutation, atomic displacement, and other nuclear responses on the ductility and swelling and perhaps other properties as well, must be analyzed in samples which have undergone reactor conditions environment. This study is focused on the neutronics analysis of a D-Li neutron source. Neutron induced nuclear responses and neutron transport are calculated with the aim at defining the expected performance of a D-Li neutron source. The first section describes the differences in the magnitude of the neutron flux when material is present or not inside the test cell The second section deals with nuclear responses such as DPA, helium production, and nuclear heating. In the third section, calculations of the available volume above a threshold DPA value are presented. Section four presents results for the gamma-ray flux distribution. A brief discussion about tritium generation in the lithium jet is given in section live, and the conclusions are summarized in section six.

  17. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections and calculational methods for the advanced neutron source against the FOEHN critical experiments measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Gallmeier, F.X.; Gehin, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    The FOEHN critical experiment was analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections and Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutronics computer codes in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. The ANSL-V 99-group master cross section library was used for all the calculations. Three different critical configurations were evaluated using the multigroup KENO Monte Carlo transport code, the multigroup DORT discrete ordinates transport code, and the multigroup diffusion theory code VENTURE. The simple configuration consists of only the fuel and control elements with the heavy water reflector. The intermediate configuration includes boron endplates at the upper and lower edges of the fuel element. The complex configuration includes both the boron endplates and components in the reflector. Cross sections were processed using modules from the AMPX system. Both 99-group and 20-group cross sections were created and used in two-dimensional models of the FOEHN experiment. KENO calculations were performed using both 99-group and 20-group cross sections. The DORT and VENTURE calculations were performed using 20-group cross sections. Because the simple and intermediate configurations are azimuthally symmetric, these configurations can be explicitly modeled in R-Z geometry. Since the reflector components cannot be modeled explicitly using the current versions of these codes, three reflector component homogenization schemes were developed and evaluated for the complex configuration. Power density distributions were calculated with KENO using 99-group cross sections and with DORT and VENTURE using 20-group cross sections. The average differences between the measured values and the values calculated with the different computer codes range from 2.45 to 5.74%. The maximum differences between the measured and calculated thermal flux values for the simple and intermediate configurations are {approx} 13%, while the average differences are < 8%.

  18. Applying an analytical method to study neutron behavior for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, S. A. Mousavi

    2016-12-01

    In this investigation, a new dosimetry process is studied by applying an analytical method. This novel process is associated with a human liver tissue. The human liver tissue has compositions including water, glycogen and etc. In this study, organic compound materials of liver are decomposed into their constituent elements based upon mass percentage and density of every element. The absorbed doses are computed by analytical method in all constituent elements of liver tissue. This analytical method is introduced applying mathematical equations based on neutron behavior and neutron collision rules. The results show that the absorbed doses are converged for neutron energy below 15MeV. This method can be applied to study the interaction of neutrons in other tissues and estimating the absorbed dose for a wide range of neutron energy.

  19. Design of an integrating type neutron dose monitor.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    2011-07-01

    It is intended that deuterium-deuterium reaction experiments will be performed for the next phase of the large helical device (LHD) at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Japan. To protect workers against radiation, the characteristics of the radiation field at the LHD workplace should be evaluated. The neutron fluence at the workplace was calculated by means of the radiation transportation code. Since the neutron energy distribution at the workplace has a wide energy range, from thermal to fast neutrons, a neutron dose monitor had to be especially designed. The author designed an integrating type neutron dose monitor for this purpose. Since this monitor has good responses for dose evaluation in every energy range, it should be able to evaluate the dose at the LHD workplace accurately.

  20. Tuning advanced gravitational-wave detectors to optimally measure neutron-star merger waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Leo

    2010-02-01

    Next-generation gravitational wave detectors have the potential to bring us astrophysical information in yet unexplored regimes. One of the possibilities is learning about neutron stars' equations of state from the gravitational wave burst of a binary coalescence. Since these events are ``bursty'', one does not have the luxury of time-averaging to improve S/N; one can only hope to do better by ``tuning'' a detector network to have the noise performance which will be most informative about the physics. We present a Bayesian method for optimizing a detector network given a prior distribution of physical parameters which affect the gravitational wave signal. Each detection adds information about the parameter distribution, updating the posterior and the optimal detector configuration. We demonstrate the algorithm with toy signal and detector response models and predict whether tuning Advanced LIGO (via the signal recycling cavity) will be fruitful in accelerating our understanding of neutron stars through their mergers. )

  1. Delayed neutron detection with an integrated differential die-away and delayed neutron instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Pauline; Tobin, Stephen J; Lee, Taehoon; Hu, Jianwei S; Hendricks, John; Croft, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded a multilab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass and detect the diversion of pins from spent nuclear fuel. The first two years of this NGSI effort was focused on quantifying the capability of a range of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques with Monte Carlo (MCNPX) modeling and the second current phase involves measuring Spent Fuel. One of the techniques of interest in this paper involves measuring delayed neutrons. A delayed neutron instrument using 36 fission chambers and a 14 MeV neutron generator so called DT generator (Deuterium + Tritium) surrounding the fuel was previously studied as part of the NGSI effort. This paper will quantify the capability of a standalone delayed neutron instrument using 4 {sup 3}He gas filled tubes and a DT generator with significant spectrum tailoring, located far from the fuel. So that future research can assess how well a delayed neutron instrument will function as part of an integrated NDA system. A new design is going to be used to respond to the need of the techniques. This design has been modeled for a water media and is currently being optimized for borated water and air media as part of ongoing research. This new design was selected in order to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U, to use a more realistic neutron generator design in the model, to reduce cost and facilitate the integration of a delayed neutron (DN) with a differential die-away (DDA) instrument. Since this paper will focus on delayed neutron detection, the goal is to quantify the signal from {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu, which are the isotopes present in Spent Fuel that respond significantly to a neutron interrogation. This report will quantify the capability of this new delayed neutron design to measure the combined mass of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu for 16 of the 64 assemblies of the NGSI Spent Fuel library in one

  2. Secondary Neutron Production from Space Radiation Interactions: Advances in Model and Experimental Data Base Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Braley, G. Scott; Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    For humans engaged in long-duration missions in deep space or near-Earth orbit, the risk from exposure to galactic and solar cosmic rays is an important factor in the design of spacecraft, spacesuits, and planetary bases. As cosmic rays are transported through shielding materials and human tissue components, a secondary radiation field is produced. Neutrons are an important component of that secondary field, especially in thickly-shielded environments. Calculations predict that 50% of the dose-equivalent in a lunar or Martian base comes from neutrons, and a recent workshop held at the Johnson Space Center concluded that as much as 30% of the dose in the International Space Station may come from secondary neutrons. Accelerator facilities provide a means for measuring the effectiveness of various materials in their ability to limit neutron production, using beams and energies that are present in cosmic radiation. The nearly limitless range of beams, energies, and target materials that are present in space, however, means that accelerator-based experiments will not provide a complete database of cross sections and thick-target yields that are necessary to plan and design long-duration missions. As such, accurate nuclear models of neutron production are needed, as well as data sets that can be used to compare with, and verify, the predictions from such models. Improvements in a model of secondary neutron production from heavy-ion interactions are presented here, along with the results from recent accelerator-based measurements of neutron-production cross sections. An analytical knockout-ablation model capable of predicting neutron production from high-energy hadron-hadron interactions (both nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions) has been previously developed. In the knockout stage, the collision between two nuclei result in the emission of one or more nucleons from the projectile and/or target. The resulting projectile and target remnants, referred to as

  3. Secondary Neutron Production from Space Radiation Interactions: Advances in Model and Experimental Data Base Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Braley, G. Scott; Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    For humans engaged in long-duration missions in deep space or near-Earth orbit, the risk from exposure to galactic and solar cosmic rays is an important factor in the design of spacecraft, spacesuits, and planetary bases. As cosmic rays are transported through shielding materials and human tissue components, a secondary radiation field is produced. Neutrons are an important component of that secondary field, especially in thickly-shielded environments. Calculations predict that 50% of the dose-equivalent in a lunar or Martian base comes from neutrons, and a recent workshop held at the Johnson Space Center concluded that as much as 30% of the dose in the International Space Station may come from secondary neutrons. Accelerator facilities provide a means for measuring the effectiveness of various materials in their ability to limit neutron production, using beams and energies that are present in cosmic radiation. The nearly limitless range of beams, energies, and target materials that are present in space, however, means that accelerator-based experiments will not provide a complete database of cross sections and thick-target yields that are necessary to plan and design long-duration missions. As such, accurate nuclear models of neutron production are needed, as well as data sets that can be used to compare with, and verify, the predictions from such models. Improvements in a model of secondary neutron production from heavy-ion interactions are presented here, along with the results from recent accelerator-based measurements of neutron-production cross sections. An analytical knockout-ablation model capable of predicting neutron production from high-energy hadron-hadron interactions (both nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions) has been previously developed. In the knockout stage, the collision between two nuclei result in the emission of one or more nucleons from the projectile and/or target. The resulting projectile and target remnants, referred to as

  4. Advanced Neutron Detection Methods: new Tools for Countering Nuclear Terrorism (412th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, Peter

    2006-02-15

    Acts of terrorism have become almost daily occurrences in the international news. Yet one of the most feared types of terrorism — nuclear terrorism — has not yet happened. One important way of preventing nuclear terrorism is to safeguard nuclear materials, and many people worldwide work continuously to achieve that goal. A second, vital defense is being developed: greatly improved methods of detecting material that a nuclear terrorist would need so that timely discovery of the material could become more probable. Special nuclear materials can emit neutrons, either spontaneously or when excited by a source of high-energy gamma rays, such as an electron accelerator. Traditional neutron detectors can sense these neutrons, but not the direction from which the neutrons come, or their energy. The odds against finding smuggled nuclear materials using conventional detectors are great. However, innovative designs of detectors are producing images that show the locations and even the shapes of man-made neutron sources, which stand out against the uniform background produced by cosmic rays. With the new detectors, finding needles in haystacks — or smuggled nuclear materials in a huge container among thousands of others in a busy port — suddenly becomes possible.

  5. An instability in neutron stars at birth.

    PubMed

    Burrows, A; Fryxell, B A

    1992-10-16

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supemova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this "convective" instability is pivotal to the supemova mechanism, pulsar magnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  6. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  7. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  8. Preliminary probabilistic design accident evaluation of the cold source facilities of the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.M.; Ramsey, C.T.

    1995-08-01

    Consistent with established Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project policy for the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in design, a task has been established to use PRA techniques to help guide the design and safety analysis of the ANS cold sources. The work discussed in this report is the first formal output of the cold source PRA task. The major output at this stage is a list of design basis accidents, categorized into approximate frequency categories. This output is expected to focus attention on continued design work to define and optimize the design such that design basis accidents are better defined and have acceptable outcomes. Categorizing the design basis events (DBEs) into frequency categories should prove helpful because it will allow appropriate acceptance criteria to be applied. Because the design of the cold source is still proceeding, it is beyond the scope of this task to produce detailed event probability calculations or even, in some cases, detailed event sequence definitions. That work would take place as a logically planned follow-on task, to be completed as the design matures. Figure 1.1 illustrates the steps that would typically be followed in selecting design basis accidents with the help of PRA. Only those steps located above the dashed line on Fig. 1.1 are included in the scope of the present task. (Only an informal top-level failure modes and effects analysis was done.) With ANS project closeout expected in the near future, the scope of this task has been abbreviated somewhat beyond the state of available design information on the ANS cold sources, or what could be achieved in a reasonable time. This change was necessary to ensure completion before the closeout and because the in-depth analytical support necessary to define fully some of the accidents has already been curtailed.

  9. Pulsed Neutron Measurments With A DT Neutron Generator for an Annular HEU Uranium Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, John T; Archer, Daniel E; Wright, Michael C; Mullens, James Allen

    2007-09-01

    Measurements were performed with a single annular, stainless-steel-canned casting of uranium (93.17 wt% 235U) metal ( ~18 kg) to provide data to verify calculational methods for criticality safety. The measurements used a small portable DT generator with an embedded alpha detector to time and directionally tag the neutrons from the generator. The center of the time and directional tagged neutron beam was perpendicular to the axis of the casting. The radiation detectors were 1x1x6 in plastic scintillators encased in 0.635-cm-thick lead shields that were sensitive to neutrons above 1 MeV in energy. The detector lead shields were adjacent to the casting and the target spot of the generator was about 3.8 cm from the casting at the vertical center. The time distribution of the fission induced radiation was measured with respect to the source event by a fast (1GHz) processor. The measurements described in this paper also include time correlation measurements with a time tagged spontaneously fissioning 252Cf neutron source, both on the axis and on the surface of the casting. Measurements with both types of sources are compared. Measurements with the DT generator closely coupled with the HEU provide no more additional information than those with the Cf source closely coupled with the HEU and are complicated by the time and directionally tagged neutrons from the generator scattering between the walls and floor of the measurements room and the casting while still above detection thresholds.

  10. Follow-up fuel plate stability experiments and analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

    1993-11-01

    The reactor for the planned Advanced Neutron Source uses closely spaced plates cooled by heavy water flowing through narrow channels. Two sets of tests were performed on the upper and lower fuel plates for the structural response of the fuel plates to the required high coolant flow velocities. This report contains the data from the second round of tests. Results and conclusions from all of the tests are also included in this report. The tests were done using light water on full-scale epoxy models, and through model theory, the results were related to the prototype plates, which are aluminum-clad aluminum/uranium silicide involute-shaped plates.

  11. An Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, John H.

    The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Program is a project designed to devise experiments to coordinate the use of instruments in the laboratory programs of physical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and inorganic chemistry at the advanced undergraduate level. It is intended that such experiments would incorporate an introduction to the instrument…

  12. An application of the neutron television fluoroscopic system to neutron computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Kanda, Keiji

    1984-10-01

    Recently the real-time neutron radiography system of the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) has been developed and practically applied to penetrating the side plates of the MTR type reactor fuels and investigation of moving objects. In this paper an application of the KUR neutron TV system to neutron computed tomography (NCT) is described. By using the NTV system, projection data can be acquired in a single measurement and simultaneously the projection image can be observed on a CRT monitor. The Fourier-convolution technique is used to produce the reconstructed image and its image has a good enough quality for revealing water in a small hole of 1.5 mm in diameter.

  13. Neutronics methods, models, and applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the advanced neutron source reactor three-element core design

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, C.A.; Schnitzler, B.G.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    A summary of the methods and models used to perform neutronics analyses on the Advanced Neutron Source reactor three-element core design is presented. The applications of the neutral particle Monte Carlo code MCNP are detailed, as well as the expansion of the static role of MCNP to analysis of fuel cycle depletion calculations. Results to date of these applications are presented also. A summary of the calculations not yet performed is also given to provide a {open_quotes}to-do{close_quotes} list if the project is resurrected.

  14. SNM Detection with an Optimized Water Cherenkov Neutron Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Dazeley, S.; Sweany, M.; Bernstein, A.

    2012-07-23

    Special Nuclear Material (SNM) can either spontaneously fission or be induced to do so: either case results in neutron emission. For this reason, neutron detection performs a crucial role in the functionality of Radiation Portal Monitoring (RPM) devices. Since neutrons are highly penetrating and difficult to shield, they could potentially be detected escaping even a well-shielded cargo container. If the shielding were sophisticated, detecting escaping neutrons would require a highly efficient detector with close to full solid angle coverage. In 2008, we reported the successful detection of neutrons with a 250 liter (l) gadolinium doped water Cherenkov prototype—a technology thatmore » could potentially be employed cost effectively with full solid angle coverage. More recently we have built and tested both 1-kl and 3.5-kl versions, demonstrating that very large, cost effective, non-flammable and environmentally benign neutron detectors can be operated efficiently without being overwhelmed by background. In our paper, we present a new design for a modular system of water-based neutron detectors that could be deployed as a real RPM. The modules contain a number of optimizations that have not previously been combined within a single system. We present simulations of the new system, based on the performance of our previous detectors. These simulations indicate that an optimized system such as is presented here could achieve SNM sensitivity competitive with a large 3He-based system. Moreover, the realization of large, cost effective neutron detectors could, for the first time, enable the detection of multiple neutrons per fission from within a large object such as a cargo container. Such a signal would provide a robust indication of the presence of fissioning material, reducing the frequency of false alarms while increasing sensitivity.« less

  15. Validation of liquid lithium target stability for an intense neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, H.; Kanemura, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hirakawa, Y.; Wakai, E.; Knaster, J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports on validation results for the stability of a liquid lithium (Li) target intended for use as an intense fusion neutron source such as for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), an advanced fusion neutron source (A-FNS), and a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO)-oriented neutron source (DONES). The variation in the thickness of a Li target must be suppressed to within  ±1 mm inside a deuteron beam footprint to both maintain the integrity of the Li target and guarantee the desired level of neutron flux. We achieved a stable Li target with an average thickness variation of just 0.17 mm inside the beam footprint under standard IFMIF operating conditions (target speed: 15 m s-1 vacuum pressure: 10-3 Pa; and Li temperature: 250 °C). Moreover, the mean and maximum wave amplitudes at the beam center under such conditions were found to be 0.26 mm and 1.46 mm, respectively; these are small enough to satisfy operational requirements. Finally, it was determined that the stability of the Li target remained unchanged despite using it for an extended period of 1561 h. This finding is regarded as a significant step toward the realization of the IFMIF and the potential use of relevant neutron sources such as A-FNS and DONES.

  16. Advances in explosives analysis—part II: photon and neutron methods

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Greenfield, Margo T.; McGrane, Shawn D.; ...

    2015-10-07

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245–246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. Our review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers,more » electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. In Part II, we review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.« less

  17. Advances in explosives analysis—part II: photon and neutron methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Greenfield, Margo T.; McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2015-10-07

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245–246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. Our review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. In Part II, we review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.

  18. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Daum, M.; Kirch, K.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Meier, M.; Ries, D.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments (32 L) e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  19. RELAP5 analyses of two hypothetical flow reversal events for the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents RELAP5 results of two hypothetical, low flow transients analyzed as part of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor safety program. The reactor design features four independent coolant loops (three active and one in standby), each containing a main curculation pump (with battery powered pony motor), heat exchanger, an accumulator, and a check valve. The first transient assumes one of these pumps fails, and additionally, that the check valve in that loop remains stuck in the open position. This accident is considered extremely unlikely. Flow reverses in this loop, reducing the core flow because much of the coolant is diverted from the intact loops back through the failed loop. The second transient examines a 102-mm-diam instantaneous pipe break near the core inlet (the worst break location). A break is assumed to occur 90 s after a total loss-of-offsite power. Core flow reversal occurs because accumulator injection overpowers the diminishing pump flow. Safety margins are evaluated against four thermal limits: T{sub wall}=T{sub sat}, incipient boiling, onset of significant void, and critical heat flux. For the first transient, the results show that these limits are not exceeded (at a 95% non-exceedance probability level) if the pony motor battery lasts 30 minutes (the present design value). For the second transient, the results show that the closest approach of the fuel surface temperature to the local saturation temperature during core flow reversal is about 39{degrees}C. Therefore the fuel remains cool during this transient. Although this work is done specifically for the ANSR geometry and operating conditions, the general conclusions may be applicable to other highly subcooled reactor systems.

  20. A Neutron Burst Associated with an Extensive Air Shower?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Mauro; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Gusev, Anatoly; De Abreu, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    A portable and compact system based on a He-3 tube (LND, USA; model 25311) with an area of approximately 250 cm² and is used to record neutron count rates at ground level in the energy range of 0.025 eV to 10 MeV, in São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil (23° 12' 45" S, 45° 52' 00" W; altitude, 660m). The detector, power supply, digitizer and other hardware are housed in an air-conditioned room. The detector power supply and digitizer are not connected to the main electricity network; a high-capacity 12-V battery is used to power the detector and digitizer. Neutron counts are accumulated at 1-minute intervals continuously. The data are stored in a PC for further analysis. In February 8, 2015, at 12 h 22 min (local time) during a period of fair weather with minimal cloud cover (< 1 okta) the neutron detector recorded a sharp (count rate = 27 neutrons/min) and brief (< 1 min) increase in the count rate. In the days before and after this event, the neutron count rate has oscillated between 0 and 3 neutrons/min. Since the occurrence of this event is not related with spurious signals, malfunctioning equipment, oscillations in the mains voltage, etc. we are led to believe that the sharp increase was caused by a physical source such as a an extensive air shower that occurred over the detector.

  1. An Ultracold Neutron Source using Superfluid Helium at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumiya, Ryohei; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Canada-Japan UCN Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    An Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) are an extremely slow neutrons with a kinetic energy in the order of 100 neV. As a consequence, UCNs are totally reflected at surface of certain materials and can be confined in a material bottle. Using this unique property, UCNs are used for various experiments such as neutron electric dipole moment searches, neutron lifetime measurements, gravity experiments, and other. A UCN source has been developed at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), in Osaka Japan. The UCN source is composed of a combination of a spallation neutron source and a superfluid helium UCN converter. Spallation neutrons are thermalized first by warm and cold D2O moderators. After that they give their kinetic energy to a phonon (single- phonon excitation) or phonons (multi-phonon excitation) in superfluid helium to result in UCNs. The UCN source achieved 26 UCN/cm3 at 1 μA proton current at RCNP. Now, the source is adapted to a new, dedicated proton beam line at TRIUMF for use at higher proton beam currents up to 40 μA. The developments at RCNP and future prospects at TRIUMF will be discussed.

  2. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; ...

    2014-05-10

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here in this paper, we present a full characterization of pulse height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for bothmore » detectors. A Continuous spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of 27Al with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light output relation on the ability to detect low energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Furthermore the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of held applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals.« less

  3. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; Flaska, Marek; Becchetti, F. D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-05-10

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here in this paper, we present a full characterization of pulse height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A Continuous spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of 27Al with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light output relation on the ability to detect low energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Furthermore the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of held applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals.

  4. PREFACE: Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    updates on recent progress and global trends in the field. We planned to cover quite a wide area of surface and buried interface science with x-rays and neutrons. Following a great deal of discussion during the editing process, we have decided to change direction. As we intend to publish similar special issues on a frequent basis, we will not insist on editing this issue as systematic and complete collections of research. Many authors decided to write an ordinary research paper rather than an article including systematic accounts. Due to this change in policy, some authors declined to contribute, and the number of papers is now just 12. However, readers will find that the special issue gives an interesting collection of new original research in surface and buried interface studies with x-rays and neutrons. The 12 papers cover the following research topics: (1) polymer analysis by diffuse scattering; (2) discussion of the electrochemical solid--liquid interface by synchrotron x-ray diffraction; (3) analysis of capped nanodots by grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS); (4) discussion of the strain distribution in silicon by high-resolution x-ray diffraction; (5) study of mesoporous structures by a combination of x-ray reflectivity and GISAXS; (6) discussion of energy-dispersive x-ray reflectometry and its applications; (7) neutron reflectivity studies on hydrogen terminated silicon interface; (8) the fabrication and performance of a special mirror for water windows; (9) depth selective analysis by total-reflection x-ray diffraction; (10) nanoparticle thin films prepared by a gas deposition technique; (11) discussion of crystal truncation rod (CTR) scattering of semiconductor nanostructures; (12) magnetic structure analysis of thin films by polarized neutron reflectivity. While not discussed in the present special issue, x-ray and neutron techniques have made great progress. The most important steps forward have been in 2D/3D real-space imaging, and realtime

  5. An Am/Be neutron source and its use in integral tests of differential neutron reaction cross-section data.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M S; Zaman, M R; Hossain, S M; Spahn, I; Sudár, S; Qaim, S M

    2010-09-01

    An Am/Be neutron source, installed recently at the Rajshahi University, is described. Neutron flux mapping was done using the nuclear reactions (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au, (113)In(n,gamma)(114m)In, (115)In(n,n'gamma)(115m)In and (58)Ni(n,p)(58)Co. An approximate validation of the neutron spectral shape was done using five neutron threshold detectors and the iterative unfolding code SULSA. Integral cross sections of the reactions (54)Fe(n,p)(54)Mn, (59)Co(n,p)(59)Fe and (92)Mo(n,p)(92m)Nb were measured with fast neutrons (E(n)>1.5MeV) and compared with data calculated using the neutron spectral distribution and the excitation function of each reaction given in data libraries: an agreement within +/-6% was found.

  6. ICANS-XIV. The fourteenth meeting of the international collaboration on advanced neutron sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J. M., ed.; Tobin, C. A., ed.

    1999-02-10

    The meeting began with a reception on Sunday evening. Monday's plenary sessions included status reports on the four operating spallation neutron sources, IPNS, ISIS, KENS, and the Lujan Center; on the INR source under construction at Troitsk; on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor at Dubna; and on proposals for five new installations. We also heard reports on spin-off activities: the ASTE tests (liquid mercury target tests at the AGS accelerator at Brookhaven), the ACoM activities (developments aimed to provide cold moderators suitable for high-power pulsed sources), and the International Workshop on Cold Moderators for Pulsed Neutron Sources, held in September 1997 at Argonne. Jose Alonso and Bob Macek delivered enlightening invited talks overviewing linear accelerators and rings for spallation neutron sources. The rest of the meeting was devoted to targets and moderators and to instrumentation in a normal rotation of ICANS topics. There were altogether 84 oral reports and 23 poster presentations. On Tuesday and on Wednesday morning, we divided into separate series of sessions on Instrumentation and on Targets and Moderators. In the first, we had reports and discussions on instrumentation and techniques, on computer software, on instrument suites, and on new instruments and equipment. In the second series were sessions on liquid target systems, on solid target systems, on neutron production and target physics, on moderator physics and performance, and on target and moderator neutronics. The Tuesday evening meetings went on until 10:00, making for a 14-hour working day. That everyone willingly endured the long hours is a credit to the dedication of the attendees. On Wednesday afternoon, we boarded buses for the 1-hour trip to Argonne, where attendees toured IPNS and the Advanced Photon Source. Returning to Starved Rock, we enjoyed boat rides on the Illinois River and then a barbecue banquet dinner at the Lodge. All day Thursday and Friday morning, the attendees, in small

  7. Neutron interrogation to identify chemical elements with an ion-tube neutron source (INS)

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.; Dougan, A.D.; Rowland, M.R.; Wang, T.F.

    1994-04-07

    A non-destructive analysis technique using a portable, electric ion-tube neutron source (INS) and gamma ray detector has been used to identify the key constituent elements in a number of sealed munitions, and from the elemental makeup, infer the types of agent within each. The high energy (14 MeV) and pulsed character of the neutron flux from an INS provide a method of measuring, quantitatively, the oxygen, carbon, and fluorine content of materials in closed containers, as well as the other constituents that can be measured with low-energy neutron probes. The broad range of elements that can be quantitatively measured with INS-based instruments provides a capability of verifying common munition fills; it provides the greatest specificity of any portable neutron-based technique for determining the full matrix of chemical elements in completely unrestricted sample scenarios. The specific capability of quantifying the carbon and oxygen content of materials should lead to a fast screening technique which, can discriminate very quickly between high-explosive and chemical agent-filled containers.

  8. Basic parameter estimation of binary neutron star systems by the advanced LIGO/Vigro network

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carl L.; Farr, Benjamin; Raymond, Vivien; Farr, Will M.; Littenberg, Tyson B.; Fazi, Diego; Kalogera, Vicky

    2014-04-01

    Within the next five years, it is expected that the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network will have reached a sensitivity sufficient to enable the routine detection of gravitational waves. Beyond the initial detection, the scientific promise of these instruments relies on the effectiveness of our physical parameter estimation capabilities. A major part of this effort has been toward the detection and characterization of gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence, e.g., the coalescence of binary neutron stars. While several previous studies have investigated the accuracy of parameter estimation with advanced detectors, the majority have relied on approximation techniques such as the Fisher Matrix which are insensitive to the non-Gaussian nature of the gravitational wave posterior distribution function. Here we report average statistical uncertainties that will be achievable for strong detection candidates (S/N = 20) over a comprehensive sample of source parameters. We use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo based parameter estimation software developed by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration with the goal of updating the previously quoted Fisher Matrix bounds. We find the recovery of the individual masses to be fractionally within 9% (15%) at the 68% (95%) credible intervals for equal-mass systems, and within 1.9% (3.7%) for unequal-mass systems. We also find that the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network will constrain the locations of binary neutron star mergers to a median uncertainty of 5.1 deg{sup 2} (13.5 deg{sup 2}) on the sky. This region is improved to 2.3 deg{sup 2} (6 deg{sup 2}) with the addition of the proposed LIGO India detector to the network. We also report the average uncertainties on the luminosity distances and orbital inclinations of strong detections that can be achieved by different network configurations.

  9. An evaluated neutronic data file for bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, P.T.; Lawson, R.D.; Meadows, J.W.; Smith, A.B.; Smith, D.L.; Sugimoto, M. ); Howerton, R.J. )

    1989-11-01

    A comprehensive evaluated neutronic data file for bismuth, extending from 10{sup {minus}5} eV to 20.0 MeV, is described. The experimental database, the application of the theoretical models, and the evaluation rationale are outlined. Attention is given to uncertainty specification, and comparisons are made with the prior ENDF/B-V evaluation. The corresponding numerical file, in ENDF/B-VI format, has been transmitted to the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. 106 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Neutron and X-ray Studies of Advanced Materials VII Symposium at the 143rd TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, George

    2015-02-05

    The Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials VII Symposium, held at the 2014, 143rd Annual Meeting of The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS), brought together experts, young investigators, and students from this sub-discipline of materials science in order for them to share their latest discoveries and develop collaborations. This annual symposium, which is organized by The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, is an important event for this community of scientists. This year, over 100 high-level technical talks were delivered over the course of the four day event. In addition, the large number of students and young investigators in attendance ensured the maximum benefit to the next generation’s work force in this area of study. The science surrounding the utilization of neutrons and x-rays to study advanced materials is becoming increasingly important in increasing the understanding of how the exceptional materials properties of such materials arise. In particular, x-rays and neutrons can be used to visualize material structures at an extremely high resolution and in some cases, three dimensions—allowing unprecedented insights into the mechanisms governing certain materials properties such as strength and toughness. Moreover, some of these techniques allow materials to be visualized without damaging the material, approaches known as non-destructive evaluation or “NDE”. This allows materials to be studied in 3 dimensions while undergoing change in real time which represents an important (and long sought-after) advancement in materials science. The types of interactions afforded by this event are beneficial to society at large primarily because they provide opportunities for the leaders within this field to learn from one another and thus improve the quality and productivity of their investigations. Additionally, the presence of young investigators and students with technical interests in this field provides promise that the United

  11. Preparation and benchmarking of ANSL-V cross sections for advanced neutron source reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Arwood, J.W.; Ford, W.E. III; Greene, N.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Waddell, M.W.; Webster, C.C.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Validity of selected data from the fine-group neutron library was satisfactorily tested in performance parameter calculations for the BAPL-1, TRX-1, and ZEEP-1 thermal lattice benchmarks. BAPL-2 is an H/sub 2/O moderated, uranium oxide lattice; TRX-1 is an H/sub 2/O moderated, 1.31 weight percent enriched uranium metal lattice; ZEEP-1 is a D/sub 2/O-moderated, natural uranium lattice. 26 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Comparison of the 3-D Deterministic Neutron Transport Code Attila® To Measure Data, MCNP And MCNPX For The Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. Scott Lucas; D. S. Lucas

    2005-09-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to apply the three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to criticality, flux and depletion calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the development of Attila models for ATR, capabilities of Attila, the generation and use of different cross-section libraries, and comparisons to ATR data, MCNP, MCNPX and future applications.

  13. Dose homogeneity in boron neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, M W; Dewit, L G; Mijnheer, B J; Raaijmakers, C P; Watkins, P R

    1995-06-01

    Simulation models based on the neutron and photon Monte Carlo code MCNP were used to study the therapeutic possibilities of the HB11 epithermal neutron beam at the High Flux Reactor in Petten. Irradiations were simulated in two types of phantoms filled with water or tissue-equivalent material for benchmark treatment planning calculations. In a cuboid phantom the influence of different field sizes on the thermal-neutron-induced dose distribution was investigated. Various shapes of collimators were studied to test their efficacy in optimizing the thermal-neutron distribution over a planning target volume and healthy tissues. Using circular collimators of 8, 12 and 15 cm diameter it was shown that with the 15-cm field a relatively larger volume within 85% of the maximum neutron-induced dose was obtained than with the 8- or 12-cm-diameter field. However, even for this large field the maximum diameter of this volume was 7.5 cm. In an ellipsoid head phantom the neutron-induced dose was calculated assuming the skull to contain 10 ppm 10B, the brain 5 ppm 10B and the tumor 30 ppm 10B. It was found that with a single 15-cm-diameter circular beam a very inhomogenous dose distribution in a typical target volume was obtained. Applying two equally weighted opposing 15-cm-diameter fields, however, a dose homogeneity within +/- 10% in this planning target volume was obtained. The dose in the surrounding healthy brain tissue is 30% at maximum of the dose in the center of the target volume. Contrary to the situation for the 8-cm field, combining four fields of 15 cm diameter gave no large improvement of the dose homogeneity over the target volume or a lower maximum dose in the healthy brain. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated for the planning target volume as well as for the healthy brain to compare different irradiation techniques, yielding a graphical confirmation of the above conclusions. Therapy with BNCT on brain tumors must be performed either with an 8-cm four

  14. Advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic test loop facility description

    SciTech Connect

    Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G.; Hardy, J.H.; King, J.F.; McFee, M.T.; Montgomery, B.H.; Pawel, R.E.; Power, B.H.; Shourbaji, A.A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Wood, R.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-02-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is a facility for experiments constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ANSR is both cooled and moderated by heavy water and uses uranium silicide fuel. The core is composed of two coaxial fuel-element annuli, each of different diameter. There are 684 parallel aluminum-clad fuel plates (252 in the inner-lower core and 432 in the outer-upper core) arranged in an involute geometry that effectively creates an array of thin rectangular flow channels. Both the fuel plates and the coolant channels are 1.27 mm thick, with a span of 87 mm (lower core), 70 mm (upper core), and 507-mm heated length. The coolant flows vertically upwards at a mass flux of 27 Mg/m{sup 2}s (inlet velocity of 25 m/s) with an inlet temperature of 45{degrees}C and inlet pressure of 3.2 MPa. The average and peak heat fluxes are approximately 6 and 12 MW/m{sup 2}, respectively. The availability of experimental data for both flow excursion (FE) and true critical heat flux (CHF) at the conditions applicable to the ANSR is very limited. The THTL was designed and built to simulate a full-length coolant subchannel of the core, allowing experimental determination of thermal limits under the expected ANSR thermal-hydraulic conditions. For these experimental studies, the involute-shaped fuel plates of the ANSR core with the narrow 1.27-mm flow gap are represented by a narrow rectangular channel. Tests in the THTL will provide both single- and two-phase thermal-hydraulic information. The specific phenomena that are to be examined are (1) single-phase heat-transfer coefficients and friction factors, (2) the point of incipient boiling, (3) nucleate boiling heat-transfer coefficients, (4) two-phase pressure-drop characteristics in the nucleate boiling regime, (5) flow instability limits, and (6) CHF limits.

  15. Detailed heat load calculations for the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, C.A.

    1993-12-01

    A very detailed MCNP model of the Advanced Neutron Source reactor has been developed at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. All reactor components inside the reflector vessel were included, and al components were highly segmented. Specific heat loads (watts per gram) have been calculated for each segment in the model, and system-integrated total powers are compared with the design value for the total reactor fission power. The calculated results agree very well with the design values. Axial profiles of the heat loads are provided for all components of the reactor. Individual segment statistical uncertainties were limited wherever possible, and the heat loads for all important reflector components have a standard deviation below 5%.

  16. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-01

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  17. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  18. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  19. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Lei; Miller, Don

    2015-01-23

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  20. Parameter Estimation for Binary Neutron-star Coalescences with Realistic Noise during the Advanced LIGO Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Christopher P. L.; Mandel, Ilya; Middleton, Hannah; Singer, Leo P.; Urban, Alex L.; Vecchio, Alberto; Vitale, Salvatore; Cannon, Kipp; Farr, Ben; Farr, Will M.; Graff, Philip B.; Hanna, Chad; Haster, Carl-Johan; Mohapatra, Satya; Pankow, Chris; Price, Larry R.; Sidery, Trevor; Veitch, John

    2015-05-01

    Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors begin operation imminently. Their intended goal is not only to make the first direct detection of GWs, but also to make inferences about the source systems. Binary neutron-star mergers are among the most promising sources. We investigate the performance of the parameter-estimation (PE) pipeline that will be used during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) in 2015: we concentrate on the ability to reconstruct the source location on the sky, but also consider the ability to measure masses and the distance. Accurate, rapid sky localization is necessary to alert electromagnetic (EM) observatories so that they can perform follow-up searches for counterpart transient events. We consider PE accuracy in the presence of non-stationary, non-Gaussian noise. We find that the character of the noise makes negligible difference to the PE performance at a given signal-to-noise ratio. The source luminosity distance can only be poorly constrained, since the median 90% (50%) credible interval scaled with respect to the true distance is 0.85 (0.38). However, the chirp mass is well measured. Our chirp-mass estimates are subject to systematic error because we used gravitational-waveform templates without component spin to carry out inference on signals with moderate spins, but the total error is typically less than {{10}-3} {{M}⊙ }. The median 90% (50%) credible region for sky localization is ˜ 600 {{deg }2} (˜ 150 {{deg }2}), with 3% (30%) of detected events localized within 100 {{deg }2}. Early aLIGO, with only two detectors, will have a sky-localization accuracy for binary neutron stars of hundreds of square degrees; this makes EM follow-up challenging, but not impossible.

  1. Advances in Neutron Spectroscopy and High Magnetic Field Instrumentation for studies of Correlated Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Granroth, Garrett E

    2011-01-01

    Neutron Spectroscopy has provided critical information on the magnetism in correlated electron systems. Specifically quantum magnets, superconductors, and multi-ferroics are areas of productive research. A discussion of recent measurements on the SEQUOIA spectrometer will provide examples of how novel instrumentation concepts are used on the latest generation of spectrometers to extend our knowledge in such systems. The now ubiquitous function of sample rotation allows for full mapping of volumes of $Q$ and $\\omega$ space. An instrument focused on low angles could extend these maps to cover more of the first Brillioun zone. Innovative chopper cascades allow two unique modes of operation. Multiplexed measurements allow the simultaneous measurement of high and low energy features in an excitation spectrum. Alternatively by limiting the neutron bandwidth incident on the Fermi Chopper, background from subsequent time frames is removed, enabling the observation of weak, large energy transfer features. Finally the implementation of event-based detection for neutron experiments is time correlated experiments. Diffraction studies of the high field spin states in MnWO$_4$ using magnetic fields up to 30 T, provided by a pulsed magnet, illustrate this method. Expanding the high field studies to spectroscopy will require a novel instrument, focused around a world class DC magnet, like Zeemans proposed for the SNS.

  2. An accurate metric for the spacetime around rotating neutron stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, George

    2017-01-01

    The problem of having an accurate description of the spacetime around rotating neutron stars is of great astrophysical interest. For astrophysical applications, one needs to have a metric that captures all the properties of the spacetime around a rotating neutron star. Furthermore, an accurate appropriately parameterised metric, i.e., a metric that is given in terms of parameters that are directly related to the physical structure of the neutron star, could be used to solve the inverse problem, which is to infer the properties of the structure of a neutron star from astrophysical observations. In this work we present such an approximate stationary and axisymmetric metric for the exterior of rotating neutron stars, which is constructed using the Ernst formalism and is parameterised by the relativistic multipole moments of the central object. This metric is given in terms of an expansion on the Weyl-Papapetrou coordinates with the multipole moments as free parameters and is shown to be extremely accurate in capturing the physical properties of a neutron star spacetime as they are calculated numerically in general relativity. Because the metric is given in terms of an expansion, the expressions are much simpler and easier to implement, in contrast to previous approaches. For the parameterisation of the metric in general relativity, the recently discovered universal 3-hair relations are used to produce a 3-parameter metric. Finally, a straightforward extension of this metric is given for scalar-tensor theories with a massless scalar field, which also admit a formulation in terms of an Ernst potential.

  3. An accurate metric for the spacetime around rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, George

    2017-04-01

    The problem of having an accurate description of the spacetime around rotating neutron stars is of great astrophysical interest. For astrophysical applications, one needs to have a metric that captures all the properties of the spacetime around a rotating neutron star. Furthermore, an accurate appropriately parametrized metric, i.e. a metric that is given in terms of parameters that are directly related to the physical structure of the neutron star, could be used to solve the inverse problem, which is to infer the properties of the structure of a neutron star from astrophysical observations. In this work, we present such an approximate stationary and axisymmetric metric for the exterior of rotating neutron stars, which is constructed using the Ernst formalism and is parametrized by the relativistic multipole moments of the central object. This metric is given in terms of an expansion on the Weyl-Papapetrou coordinates with the multipole moments as free parameters and is shown to be extremely accurate in capturing the physical properties of a neutron star spacetime as they are calculated numerically in general relativity. Because the metric is given in terms of an expansion, the expressions are much simpler and easier to implement, in contrast to previous approaches. For the parametrization of the metric in general relativity, the recently discovered universal 3-hair relations are used to produce a three-parameter metric. Finally, a straightforward extension of this metric is given for scalar-tensor theories with a massless scalar field, which also admit a formulation in terms of an Ernst potential.

  4. Development of an IEC neutron source for NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, R.A,; Hartwell, J.K.; Nadler, J.H.

    1995-12-01

    This paper concerns the development of a neutron so based on the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) of a low density fusion plasma in a gridded, spherically-focusing device. With the motivation of using such sources for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications, the focus of the development is on : Small size devices, sealed operation with D{sub 2} or D{sub 2}/T{sub 2} mixtures, Power-utilization and neutron-output optimization, and integration into an assay system. In this paper, we describe an experimental system that has been established for the development and testing of IEC neutron sources, and we present preliminary results of tests conducted for 25-cm and 15-cm diameter IEC devices.

  5. An ultra-cold neutron source at the MLNSC

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.; Brun, T.; Hill, R.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.J.; Crow, L.; Serebrov, A.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have carried out the research and development of an Ultra-Cold Neutron (UCN) source at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC). A first generation source was constructed to test the feasibility of a rotor source. The source performed well with an UCN production rate reasonably consistent with that expected. This source can now provide the basis for further development work directed at using UCN in fundamental physics research as well as possible applications in materials science.

  6. An advanced electric vehicle powertrain

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, B.; Leslie, J.

    1982-08-01

    Limited range, marginal performance and high cost are the major factors impeding potential market acceptance of electric vehicles. Advancing the technology of electric vehicle powertrain motors, controllers and transmissions, will help reduce these objectionable electric vehicle characteristics. Ford Motor Company has been awarded a research and development program supported by the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program and managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center to develop an advanced electric vehicle powertrain which will be more energy efficient and cost effective than any known to be under development today. This paper discusses the NASA research contract, DEN 3-238, Advanced Electric Vehicle Powertrain Program, including technical characteristics of the powertrain concept being developed. The powertrain includes an ac induction motor, automatic transmission, final drive and differential integrated into a single unit mounted on the wheel axis, an electric subsystem, (the ac motor, dc-ac inverter and inverter/motor controller), and a microcomputer-based vehicle control system. The electric subsystem, which includes an advanced power transistor, is being developed by General Electric, a major subcontractor for the program.

  7. Neutron Beam Radiation Therapy: An Overview of Treatment and Oral Complications When Treating Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Sikes, Justin; Namaranian, Parshan; Laramore, George; Dillon, Jasjit K

    2016-04-01

    There is limited information in the literature regarding the oral complications of neutron radiotherapy, with an associated lack of guidelines for their management. The purpose of this study was to review the indications, dosing, prognosis, and oral complications of neutron radiotherapy for salivary gland malignancies. This is a retrospective case series of patients with salivary gland malignancies treated with neutron radiotherapy by the Radiation Oncology Department at the University of Washington from 1997 to 2006. Variables included patient demographics, tumor staging and characteristics, operative treatment, final diagnosis, operative and pathologic findings (ie, perineural invasion, lymph node involvement, and skull base invasion), dosing, complications, and locoregional control and survival rates. Data were extracted from patients' charts and by telephone for follow-up and quality-of-life information. The sample was composed of 140 patients (49% men, 51% women) with a mean age of 53 years (standard deviation, 15 yr). Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the submandibular gland was the most common tumor type and location. Post-treatment trismus occurred in 56%. Acute mucositis and xerostomia occurred in approximately 88 and 89% of patients, respectively. Osteoradionecrosis was reported in 5.7% of patients. The 6-year survival rate was 58% and the 6-year locoregional control was 72%. The current standard neutron dose for head and neck tumors is 1.15 neutron Gray (nGy) 4 times per week for 4 weeks (total, 18.4 nGy), which is an equivalent amount of radiation as the standard 60 to 70 Gy given for 6 to 7 weeks with conventional photon radiation. The 6-year overall survival of 58% found in this study compares favorably to the survival rate reported in the literature for traditional photon radiation treatment of advanced salivary gland tumors. The dental profession should be educated regarding neutron radiotherapy and its indications, dosing methods, and oral complications

  8. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Rush, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  9. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    The refractive index for most materials is slightly less than unity, which opens an opportunity to develop the grazing incidence neutron imaging optics. The ideal material for the optics would be natural nickel and its isotopes. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has active development program on the nickel replicated optics for use in x-ray astronomy. Brief status report on the program is presented. The results of the neutron focusing optic test carried by the MSFC team at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are also presented. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  10. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Velikaya, V. V. Startseva, Zh. A.; Musabaeva, L. I. Lisin, V. A.

    2016-08-02

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  11. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  12. Recent Research with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (dance) at the LOS Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The DANCE detector at Los Alamos is a 160 element, nearly 4π BaF2 detector array designed to make measurements of neutron capture on rare or radioactive nuclides. It has also been used to make measurements of gamma-ray multiplicity following capture and gamma-ray output from fission. Several examples of measurements are briefly discussed.

  13. Measurements of the thermal neutron flux for an accelerator-based photoneutron source.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Ali; Pazirandeh, Ali

    2016-12-01

    To have access to an appropriate neutron source is one of the most demanding requirements for neutron studies. This is important specially in laboratory and clinical applications, which need more compact and accessible sources. The most known neutron sources are fission reactors and natural isotopes, but there is an increasing interest for using accelerator based neutron sources because of their advantages. In this paper, we shall present a photo-neutron source prototype which is designed and fabricated to be used for different neutron researches including in-laboratory neutron activation analysis and neutron imaging, and also preliminary studies in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Series of experimental tests were conducted to examine the intensity and quality of the neutron field produced by this source. Monte-Carlo simulations were also utilized to provide more detailed evaluation of the neutron spectrum, and determine the accuracy of the experiments. The experiments demonstrated a thermal neutron flux in the order of 10(7) (n/cm(2).s), while simulations affirmed this flux and showed a neutron spectrum with a sharp peak at thermal energy region. According to the results, about 60 % of produced neutrons are in the range of thermal to epithermal neutrons.

  14. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  15. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  16. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Jr., Thomas Dean

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 • s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy•cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy•cm2/nepi , respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  17. A debris disk around an isolated young neutron star.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Kaplan, David L

    2006-04-06

    Pulsars are rotating, magnetized neutron stars that are born in supernova explosions following the collapse of the cores of massive stars. If some of the explosion ejecta fails to escape, it may fall back onto the neutron star or it may possess sufficient angular momentum to form a disk. Such 'fallback' is both a general prediction of current supernova models and, if the material pushes the neutron star over its stability limit, a possible mode of black hole formation. Fallback disks could dramatically affect the early evolution of pulsars, yet there are few observational constraints on whether significant fallback occurs or even the actual existence of such disks. Here we report the discovery of mid-infrared emission from a cool disk around an isolated young X-ray pulsar. The disk does not power the pulsar's X-ray emission but is passively illuminated by these X-rays. The estimated mass of the disk is of the order of 10 Earth masses, and its lifetime (> or = 10(6) years) significantly exceeds the spin-down age of the pulsar, supporting a supernova fallback origin. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks seen around ordinary young stars, suggesting the possibility of planet formation around young neutron stars.

  18. Investigating the effect of precession on searches for neutron-star-black-hole binaries with Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, Ian W.; Nitz, Alexander H.; Brown, Duncan A.; Lundgren, Andrew P.; Ochsner, Evan; Keppel, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The first direct detection of neutron-star- black-hole binaries will likely be made with gravitational-wave observatories. Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will be able to observe neutron-star- black-hole mergers at a maximum distance of 900 Mpc. To achieve this sensitivity, gravitational-wave searches will rely on using a bank of filter waveforms that accurately model the expected gravitational-wave signal. The emitted signal will depend on the masses of the black hole and the neutron star and also the angular momentum of both components. The angular momentum of the black hole is expected to be comparable to the orbital angular momentum when the system is emitting gravitational waves in Advanced LIGO's and Advanced Virgo's sensitive band. This angular momentum will affect the dynamics of the inspiralling system and alter the phase evolution of the emitted gravitational-wave signal. In addition, if the black hole's angular momentum is not aligned with the orbital angular momentum, it will cause the orbital plane of the system to precess. In this work we demonstrate that if the effect of the black hole's angular momentum is neglected in the waveform models used in gravitational-wave searches, the detection rate of (10+1.4)M⊙ neutron-star- black-hole systems with isotropic spin distributions would be reduced by 33%-37% in comparison to a hypothetical perfect search at a fixed signal-to-noise ratio threshold. The error in this measurement is due to uncertainty in the post-Newtonian approximations that are used to model the gravitational-wave signal of neutron-star- black-hole inspiralling binaries. We describe a new method for creating a bank of filter waveforms where the black hole has nonzero angular momentum that is aligned with the orbital angular momentum. With this bank we find that the detection rate of (10+1.4)M⊙ neutron-star- black-hole systems would be reduced by 26%-33%. Systems that will not be detected are ones where the precession of the orbital

  19. Preparation of a one-curie 171Tm target for the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.

    2008-05-15

    Roughly one curie of 171Tm (t1/2=1.92a) has been produced and purified for the purpose of making a nuclear target for the first measurements of its neutron capture cross section. Target preparation consisted of three key steps: (1) material production; (2) separation and purification; and (3) electrodeposition onto a suitable backing material. Approximately 1.5 mg of the target material (at the time of separation) was produced by irradiating roughly 250 mg of its stable enriched 170Er lanthanide neighbor with neutrons at the ILL reactor in France. This production method resulted in a “difficult-to-separate” 1:167 mixture of near-neighboring lanthanides, Tm and Er. Separation and purification was accomplished using high-performance liquid chromatorgraphy (HPLC), with a proprietary cation exchange column (Dionex, CS-3) and alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (a-HIB) eluent. This technique yielded a final product of ~95% purity with respect to Tm. A portion (20 ug) of the Tm was electrodeposited on thin Be foil and delivered to the Los Alamos Neutron Science CEnter (LANSCE) for preliminary analysis of its neutron capture cross section using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This paper discusses the major hurdles associated with the separation and purification step including, scale-up issues related to the use of HPLC for material separation and purification of the target material from a-HIB and 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) colorant.

  20. Reactor physics methods, models, and applications used to support the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Renier, J.P.; Wemple, C.A.; Jahshan, S.N.; Ryskammp, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the neutronics analysis performed during 1991 and 1992 in support of characterization of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The methods used in the analysis, parametric studies, and key results supporting the design and safety evaluations of the conceptual design are presented. The analysis approach used during the conceptual design phase followed the same approach used in early ANS evaluations: (1) a strong reliance on Monte Carlo theory for beginning-of-cycle reactor performance calculations and (2) a reliance on few-group diffusion theory for reactor fuel cycle analysis and for evaluation of reactor performance at specific time steps over the fuel cycle. The Monte Carlo analysis was carried out using the MCNP continuous-energy code, and the few- group diffusion theory calculations were performed using the VENTURE and PDQ code systems. The MCNP code was used primarily for its capability to model the reflector components in realistic geometries as well as the inherent circumvention of cross-section processing requirements and use of energy-collapsed cross sections. The MCNP code was used for evaluations of reflector component reactivity effects and of heat loads in these components. The code was also used as a benchmark comparison against the diffusion-theory estimates of key reactor parameters such as region fluxes, control rod worths, reactivity coefficients, and material worths. The VENTURE and PDQ codes were used to provide independent evaluations of burnup effects, power distributions, and small perturbation worths. The performance and safety calculations performed over the subject time period are summarized, and key results are provided. The key results include flux and power distributions over the fuel cycle, silicon production rates, fuel burnup rates, component reactivities, control rod worths, component heat loads, shutdown reactivity margins, reactivity coefficients, and isotope production rates.

  1. Impact of an improved neutrino energy estimate on outflows in neutron star merger simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Roberts, Luke; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Scheel, Mark A.

    2016-12-01

    Binary neutron star mergers are promising sources of gravitational waves for ground-based detectors such as Advanced LIGO. Neutron-rich material ejected by these mergers may also be the main source of r-process elements in the Universe, while radioactive decays in the ejecta can power bright electromagnetic postmerger signals. Neutrino-matter interactions play a critical role in the evolution of the composition of the ejected material, which significantly impacts the outcome of nucleosynthesis and the properties of the associated electromagnetic signal. In this work, we present a simulation of a binary neutron star merger using an improved method for estimating the average neutrino energies in our energy-integrated neutrino transport scheme. These energy estimates are obtained by evolving the neutrino number density in addition to the neutrino energy and flux densities. We show that significant changes are observed in the composition of the polar ejecta when comparing our new results with earlier simulations in which the neutrino spectrum was assumed to be the same everywhere in optically thin regions. In particular, we find that material ejected in the polar regions is less neutron rich than previously estimated. Our new estimates of the composition of the polar ejecta make it more likely that the color and time scale of the electromagnetic signal depend on the orientation of the binary with respect to an observer's line of sight. These results also indicate that important observable properties of neutron star mergers are sensitive to the neutrino energy spectrum, and may need to be studied through simulations including a more accurate, energy-dependent neutrino transport scheme.

  2. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  3. Modeling heat generation and flow in the Advanced Neutron Source Corrosion Test Loop specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, R.E.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A finite difference computer code HEATING5 was used to model heat generation and flow in a typical experiment envisioned for the Advanced Neutron Source Corrosion Test Loop. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of the test specimen were allowed to vary with local temperature, and the corrosion layer thickness was assigned along the length of the specimen in the manner predicted by the Griess Correlation. The computer solved the two-dimensional transport problem for a given total power dissipated in the specimen and stipulated coolant temperatures and water-side heat-transfer coefficients. The computed specimen temperatures were compared with those calculated on the basis of approximate analytical equations involving the total power dissipation and the assignment of the physical properties based on temperatures at single axial points on the specimen. The comparisons indicate that when temperature variations are large along the axis of the specimen, the variation in local heat flux should not be overlooked when using approximate equations or models. The approximate equations are most accurate near the center of the specimen where the heat flux remains closest to the average value, and in that region the calculated quantities agree closely with the results of the computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Natural circulation analysis for the advanced neutron source reactor refueling process 11

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, R.F.; Dasardhi, S.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Yoder, G.L.

    1995-09-01

    During the refueling process of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR), the spent fuel elements must be moved from the primary coolant loop (containing D{sub 2}O), through a heavy water pool, and finally into a light water spent fuel storage area. The present refueling scheme utilizes remote refueling equipment to move the spent fuel elements through a D{sub 2}O filled stack and tunnel into a temporary storage canal. A transfer lock is used to move the spent fuel elements from the D{sub 2}O-filled interim storage canal to a light water pool. Each spent fuel element must be cooled during this process, using either natural circulation or forced convection. This paper presents a summary of the numerical techniques used to analyze natural circulation cooling of the ANSR fuel elements as well as selected results of the calculations. Details of the analysis indicate that coolant velocities below 10 cm/s exist in the coolant channels under single phase natural circulation conditions. Also, boiling does not occur within the channels if power levels are below a few hundred kW when the core transitions to natural circulation conditions.

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy outcomes for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Minoru; Kato, Ituro; Aihara, Teruhito; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Niimi, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Haginomori, Shin-Ichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively review outcomes of applying boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. Patients who were treated with BNCT for either local recurrent or newly diagnosed unresectable head or neck cancers between December 2001 and September 2007 were included. Clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrieved from hospital records. Either a combination of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine (BPA) or BPA alone were used as boron compounds. In all the treatment cases, the dose constraint was set to deliver a dose <10-12 Gy-eq to the skin or oral mucosa. There was a patient cohort of 62, with a median follow-up of 18.7 months (range, 0.7-40.8). A total of 87 BNCT procedures were performed. The overall response rate was 58% within 6 months after BNCT. The median survival time was 10.1 months from the time of BNCT. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 43.1% and 24.2%, respectively. The major acute Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were hyperamylasemia (38.6%), fatigue (6.5%), mucositis/stomatitis (9.7%) and pain (9.7%), all of which were manageable. Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced carotid artery hemorrhage, two of whom had coexistent infection of the carotid artery. This study confirmed the feasibility of our dose-estimation method and that controlled trials are warranted.

  6. Digital neutron-gamma discrimination with scintillators: An innovative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamili, S.; Bayat, E.; Ghal-Eh, N.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a digital neutron-gamma discrimination (DNGD) method with an NE213 scintillator has been proposed in which the anode pulse is divided into two different pulses, one representing the amplitude and the other characterizes the DNGD. Then the two pulses are summed up after travelling through delay and mixer circuits to form an input pulse for sampling in analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The discrimination tests have been performed with an 8-bit digital storage oscilloscope (DSO) as ADC and 241Am-Be neutron source, whereas the Fourier method has been used to derive the discrimination characteristic. The results confirm the fast performance and efficiency of proposed method.

  7. Principle and Uncertainty Quantification of an Experiment Designed to Infer Actinide Neutron Capture Cross-Sections

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatorre; G. Imel; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Paul

    2010-01-01

    An integral reactor physics experiment devoted to infer higher actinide (Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) neutron cross sections will take place in the US. This report presents the principle of the planned experiment as well as a first exercise aiming at quantifying the uncertainties related to the inferred quantities. It has been funded in part by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act and has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation. The principle is to irradiate different pure actinide samples in a test reactor like INL’s Advanced Test Reactor, and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation allows the energy integrated neutron cross-sections to be inferred since the relation between the two are the well-known neutron-induced transmutation equations. This approach has been used in the past and the principal novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined with the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) facility located at ANL. While AMS facilities traditionally have been limited to the assay of low-to-medium atomic mass materials, i.e., A < 100, there has been recent progress in extending AMS to heavier isotopes – even to A > 200. The detection limit of AMS being orders of magnitude lower than that of standard mass spectroscopy techniques, more transmutation products could be measured and, potentially, more cross-sections could be inferred from the irradiation of a single sample. Furthermore, measurements will be carried out at the INL using more standard methods in order to have another set of totally uncorrelated information.

  8. Steam-explosion safety considerations for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.

    1990-02-01

    This report provides a perspective on steam-explosion safety and design issues for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A historical background along with a description of experiments and analytical work performed to date has been provided. Preliminary analyses (for the ANS) have been conducted to evaluate steam-explosion pressure- pulse loadings, the effects of reactor coolant system (RCS) overpressurization, and slug energetics. The method used for pressure-pulse magnitude evaluation was benchmarked with previous calculations, an aluminum-water steam-explosion experiment, and test reactor steam explosion data with good agreement. Predicted pressure-pulse magnitudes evaluated were found to be several orders of magnitude lower than corresponding values evaluated by correlating available energies with shock-wave pressures from equivalent chemical detonations. The preliminary best estimate, as well as conservative estimates for RCS volume-pressurization failure and slug energetics for RCS volume-pressurization failure and slug energetics, indicated that (1) steam explosions in the ANS have significant damage potential, and (2) steam-explosion issues must be considered during the design phase of the ANS Project. Recommendations are made for efficiently addressing this important safety and design issue. 38 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. The quest for an electric dipole moment of the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.

    2016-07-07

    To date no electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) has been observed. Why it is so vanishing small, escaping detection in the last 50 years, is not easy to explain. In general it is considered as the most sensitive probe for the violation of the combined symmetry of charge and parity (CP). A discovery could shed light on the poorly understood matter/anti-matter asymmetry of the universe. The neutron might one day help to distinguish different sources of CP-violation in combination with measurements of the electron and diamagnetic EDMs. This proceedings article presents an overview of the most important concepts in searches for an nEDM and presents a brief overview of the world wide efforts.

  10. An epithermal neutron beam from the MURR and from an accelerator source compared to the beam at the BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.

    1992-12-31

    An ideal neutron beam for BNCT is a beam of epithermal neutrons, forward directed, and free of gamma rays and thermal and fast neutrons. Three neutron beams were evaluated, and compared: (1) the operating Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal beam, (2) the designed Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) epithermal beam, and (3) the accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam designed by Wu. These neutron beams were compared with respect to the neutron spectra, neutron and gamma fluxes and doses, and beam directionality. The epithermal neutron beams were inter-compared for different beam parameters in air at the irradiation point. The BMRR beam has the highest neutron plus gamma doses per epithermal neutron among these neutron beams but is satisfactory for patient trials by BNCT at the present time. The RBE dose delivered to the normal brain reaches the tolerance dose limit before the skin RBE dose reaches its limit, so the skin dose can be controlled under the limit. Generally speaking, a treatment can be completed in 54 minutes using the BMRR beam for irradiation at a full-power operation of the reactor. The MURR beam has better beam parameters, including lower neutron and gamma doses per epithermal neutron, higher in intensity, and also directed. The irradiation time could be 5 minutes to complete a treatment. The accelerator-based neutron beam which has shown promising beam parameters similar to the BMRR beam could be a choice in hospitals. However, a complete system at the required power has not yet been demonstrated.

  11. An epithermal neutron beam from the MURR and from an accelerator source compared to the beam at the BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    An ideal neutron beam for BNCT is a beam of epithermal neutrons, forward directed, and free of gamma rays and thermal and fast neutrons. Three neutron beams were evaluated, and compared: (1) the operating Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal beam, (2) the designed Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) epithermal beam, and (3) the accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam designed by Wu. These neutron beams were compared with respect to the neutron spectra, neutron and gamma fluxes and doses, and beam directionality. The epithermal neutron beams were inter-compared for different beam parameters in air at the irradiation point. The BMRR beam has the highest neutron plus gamma doses per epithermal neutron among these neutron beams but is satisfactory for patient trials by BNCT at the present time. The RBE dose delivered to the normal brain reaches the tolerance dose limit before the skin RBE dose reaches its limit, so the skin dose can be controlled under the limit. Generally speaking, a treatment can be completed in 54 minutes using the BMRR beam for irradiation at a full-power operation of the reactor. The MURR beam has better beam parameters, including lower neutron and gamma doses per epithermal neutron, higher in intensity, and also directed. The irradiation time could be 5 minutes to complete a treatment. The accelerator-based neutron beam which has shown promising beam parameters similar to the BMRR beam could be a choice in hospitals. However, a complete system at the required power has not yet been demonstrated.

  12. Broad energy range neutron spectroscopy using a liquid scintillator and a proportional counter: Application to a neutron spectrum similar to that from an improvised nuclear device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J.

    2015-09-01

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  13. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device

    PubMed Central

    Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima. PMID:26273118

  14. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J

    2015-09-11

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)(3)He and D(d,n)(3)He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the (9)Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  15. An overview of the TPX neutronics and shielding aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1994-07-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) device, which is under conceptual design in the US, presents several neutronics and shielding issues that are challenging from the design analysis viewpoint. This paper presents an overview of the various issues and a summary of the various design analyses that have been performed thus far to quantify the issues and to guide the design toward near-optimal engineering solutions to the problems. Some planned activities are also discussed.

  16. An overview of the TPX neutronics and shielding aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1994-11-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) device, which is under conceptual design in the US, presents several neutronics and shielding issues that impact the machine design significantly. This paper presents an overview of the various issues and a summary of the various design analyses that have been performed thus far to quantify the issues and to guide the design toward near-optimal engineering solutions to the problems.

  17. Choice of a process design for simultaneous detritiation and upgrading of heavy water for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.I.; Spagnolo, D.A.; DeVore, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Tritium removal and heavy water upgrading are essential components of the heavy water-moderated reactor that is the heart of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The technologies for these two processes, which are closely related, are reviewed in the context of the ANS requirements. The evolution of the design of the Heavy Water Upgrading and Detritiation Facility (HWUDF) for ANS is outlined, and the final conceptual design is presented. The conceptual design of HWUDF has two main component systems: (a) a front-end combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) system and (b) a back-end cryogenic distillation (CD) system. The CECE process consists of a countercurrent exchange column for hydrogen-water exchange over a wetproofed catalyst and electrolysis to convert water into hydrogen. It accepts all the tritiated heavy water streams of the reactor and performs an almost total separation into a protium (light hydrogen) stream containing tritium and deuterium at only natural abundance and a deuterium stream containing all the tritium and almost no protium. The tritium-containing deuterium stream is then processed by a CD unit, which removes over 90% of the tritium and concentrates it to >99% tritium for indefinite storage as a metal tritide. Deuterium gas with a small residue of tritium is recombined with oxygen from the electrolytic cells and returned as heavy water to the reactor.

  18. Proceedings of the 1986 workshop on advanced time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Smith, K.

    1986-09-01

    This report contains abstracts of talks and summaries of discussions from a small workshop held to discuss the future of time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction and its implementation at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations for the development of polarized neutron instrumentation: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsigmond, Geza; Manoshin, Sergey; Lieutenant, Klaus; Seeger, Philip A.; Christiansen, Peter; Willendrup, Peter; Lefmann, Kim

    2007-07-01

    Handling of polarization became very important in simulations of neutron scattering. One of the very comprehensive and open-source neutron simulation package, VITESS, has been intensely involved in polarized neutron simulations. Several examples will be shown here. Another similar package NISP also contains polarization tools. McStas has implemented an initial set of routines handling polarization, as our examples will also show.

  20. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  1. Secondary neutron dose measurement for proton eye treatment using an eye snout with a borated neutron absorber

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We measured and assessed ways to reduce the secondary neutron dose from a system for proton eye treatment. Methods Proton beams of 60.30 MeV were delivered through an eye-treatment snout in passive scattering mode. Allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) etch detectors were used to measure the neutron dose in the external field at 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm depths in a water phantom. Secondary neutron doses were measured and compared between those with and without a high-hydrogen–boron-containing block. In addition, the neutron energy and vertices distribution were obtained by using a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. Results The ratio of the maximum neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose (H(10)/D) at 2.00 cm from the beam field edge was 8.79 ± 1.28 mSv/Gy. The ratio of the neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose with and without a high hydrogen-boron containing block was 0.63 ± 0.06 to 1.15 ± 0.13 mSv/Gy at 2.00 cm from the edge of the field at depths of 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm. Conclusions We found that the out-of-field secondary neutron dose in proton eye treatment with an eye snout is relatively small, and it can be further reduced by installing a borated neutron absorbing material. PMID:23866307

  2. Neutron cross-sections for advanced nuclear systems: the n_TOF project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbagallo, M.; Mastromarco, M.; Colonna, N.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2014-12-01

    The study of neutron-induced reactions is of high relevance in a wide variety of fields, ranging from stellar nucleosynthesis and fundamental nuclear physics to applications of nuclear technology. In nuclear energy, high accuracy neutron data are needed for the development of Generation IV fast reactors and accelerator driven systems, these last aimed specifically at nuclear waste incineration, as well as for research on innovative fuel cycles. In this context, a high luminosity Neutron Time Of Flight facility, n_TOF, is operating at CERN since more than a decade, with the aim of providing new, high accuracy and high resolution neutron cross-sections. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, a rich experimental program relevant to nuclear technology has been carried out so far. The program will be further expanded in the near future, thanks in particular to a new high-flux experimental area, now under construction.

  3. Study on severe accident fuel dispersion behavior in the advanced neutron source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.

    1995-09-01

    Core flow blockage events have been determined to represent a leading contributor to core damage initiation risk in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. During such an accident, insufficient cooling of the fuel in a few adjacent blocked coolant channels out of several hundred channels, could also result in core heatup and melting under full coolant flow condition in other coolant channels. Coolant inertia forces acting on the melt surface would likely break up the melt into small particles. Under thermal-hydraulic conditions of ANS coolant channel, micro-fine melt particles are expected. Hat transfer between melt particle and coolant, which affects the particle breakup characteristics, was studied. The study indicates that the thermal effect on melt fragmentation seems to be negligible because the time corresponding to the breakup due to hydrodynamic forces is much shorter than the time for the melt surface to solidify. The study included modeling and analyses to predict transient behavior and transport of debris particles throughout the coolant system. The transient model accounts for the surface forces acting on the particle that results from the pressure variation on the surface, inertia, virtual mass, viscous force due to the relative motion of the particle in the coolant, gravitation, and resistance due to inhomogenous coolant velocity radially across piping due to possible turbulent coolant motions. The results indicate that debris particles would reside longest in heat exchangers because of lower coolant velocity there. Also they are entrained and move together in a cloud.

  4. Neutron star matter in an effective model

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, T. K.; Raina, P. K.; Panda, P. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2006-11-15

    We study an equation of state (EOS) for dense matter in the core of a compact star with hyperons and calculate the star's structure in an effective model using a mean-field approach. With varying incompressibility and effective nucleon mass, we analyze the resulting EOS with hyperons in {beta} equilibrium and their underlying effect on the gross properties of the compact star sequences. The results obtained in our analysis are compared with predictions of other theoretical models and observations. The maximum mass of a compact star lies in the range 1.21-1.96M{sub {center_dot}} for the different EOS obtained in the model.

  5. Neutron-proton correlations in an exactly solvable model

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Pittel, S.; Stoitsov, M.; Vogel, P.; Dukelsky, J.

    1997-04-01

    We examine isovector and isoscalar neutron-proton correlations in an exactly solvable model based on the algebra SO(8). We look particularly closely at Gamow-Teller strength and double {beta} decay, both to isolate the effects of the two kinds of pairing and to test two approximation schemes: the renormalized neutron-proton quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) and generalized BCS theory. When isoscalar pairing correlations become strong enough a phase transition occurs and the dependence of the Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} strength on isospin changes in a dramatic and unfamiliar way, actually increasing as neutrons are added to an N=Z core. Renormalization eliminates the well-known instabilities that plague the QRPA as the phase transition is approached, but only by unnaturally suppressing the isoscalar correlations. Generalized BCS theory, on the other hand, reproduces the Gamow-Teller strength more accurately in the isoscalar phase than in the usual isovector phase, even though its predictions for energies are equally good everywhere. It also mixes T=0 and T=1 pairing, but only on the isoscalar side of the phase transition. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.

    2000-01-01

    A low-energy neutron transport algorithm for use in space radiation protection is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multigroup analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. This analysis is accomplished by solving a realistic but simplified neutron transport test problem. The test problem is analyzed by using numerical and analytical procedures to obtain an accurate solution within specified error bounds. Results from the test problem are then used for determining mean values associated with rescattering terms that are associated with a multigroup solution of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through the evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for a water and an aluminum-water shield-target configuration is then compared with LAHET and MCNPX Monte Carlo code calculations for the same shield-target configuration. The algorithm developed showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a two-directional solution of the evaporation source showed even further improvement of the fluence near the front of the water target where diffusion from the front surface is important.

  7. The AN neutron transport by nodal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarino, A.; Tomatis, D.

    2013-07-01

    The two group diffusion model combined to a nodal approach in space is the preferred scheme for the industrial simulation of nuclear water reactors. The main selling point is the speed of computation, allowing a large number of parametric studies. Anyway, the drawbacks of the underlying diffusion equation may arise with highly heterogeneous interfaces, often encountered in modern UO{sub 2} and MO{sub x} fuel loading patterns, and boron less controlled systems. This paper aims at showing how the simplified AN transport model, equivalent to the well known SPN, can be implemented in standard diffusion codes with minor modifications. Some numerical results are illustrated. (authors)

  8. A new shipping container for an intense neutron emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, J.E.; Alexander, C.W.; Pace, J.V. III; Simmons, C.M.

    1994-06-01

    Californium-252 is an intense neutron emitter (2.34 {times} 10{sup 12} n/s{center_dot}g) used in medicine, research, and industry. The western world`s sole source of this rare radioisotope is the Californium Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). A project has been initiated at the REDC to design a new Type B Californium Shipping Container. This effort is essential for future transportation of californium to meet the needs of users all over the world. The shipping container must meet all requirements for transport by motor freight, air, vessel, and rail, both domestic and foreign. There are unique problems in the design, fabrication, and licensing of a new Type B shipping container that will accommodate up to 60 milligrams of californium-252. One of the first challenges in the design phase of the project is the selection of a material to shield the high neutron flux. The more stringent safety precautions of today`s world impel us to consider more exotic materials for such a purpose. The candidate materials must be examined not just for their neutron shielding properties, but also in conjunction with other properties such as thermal and structural requirements to withstand the hypothetical accident conditions. The design and building of such a container is a formidable task requiring much planning. The licensing process, with the complex, interactive federal codes, is a special challenge and may be the biggest on the project in terms of time and money.

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy applied to advanced breast cancers: Engineering simulation and feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Goncalves-Carralves, Manuel Leonardo

    This dissertation describes a novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) application for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 positive (HER2+) breast cancers. The original contribution of the dissertation is the development of the engineering simulation and the feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol for this novel combination of BNCT and HER2+ breast cancer treatment. This new concept of BNCT, representing a radiation binary targeted treatment, consists of the combination of two approaches never used in a synergism before. This combination may offer realistic hope for relapsed and/or metastasized breast cancers. This treatment assumes that the boronated anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are administrated to the patient and accumulate preferentially in the tumor. Then the tumor is destroyed when is exposed to neutron irradiation. Since the use of anti-HER2 MABs yields good and promising results, the proposed concept is expected to amplify the known effect and be considered as a possible additional treatment approach to the most severe breast cancers for patients with metastasized cancer for which the current protocol is not successful and for patients refusing to have the standard treatment protocol. This dissertation makes an original contribution with an integral numerical approach and proves feasible the combination of the aforementioned therapy and disease. With these goals, the dissertation describes the theoretical analysis of the proposed concept providing an integral engineering simulation study of the treatment protocol. An extensive analysis of the potential limitations, capabilities and optimization factors are well studied using simplified models, models based on real CT patients' images, cellular models, and Monte Carlo (MCNP5/X) transport codes. One of the outcomes of the integral dosimetry assessment originally developed for the proposed treatment of advanced breast cancers is the implementation of BNCT

  10. Determination of the thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of an LBO chamber.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimazaki, Takuto; Nakajima, Erika; Kotani, Kei; Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-08-01

    An LBO (Li2B4O7) walled ionization chamber was designed to monitor the epithermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy clinical irradiation. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of the device were evaluated using accelerator neutrons from the (9)Be(d, n) reaction at a deuteron energy of 4 MeV (4 MeV d-Be neutrons). The response of the chamber in terms of the electric charge induced in the LBO chamber was compared with the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences measured using the gold-foil activation method. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities obtained were expressed in units of pC cm(2), i.e., from the chamber response divided by neutron fluence (cm(-2)). The measured LBO chamber sensitivities were 2.23 × 10(-7) ± 0.34 × 10(-7) (pC cm(2)) for thermal neutrons and 2.00 × 10(-5) ± 0.12 × 10(-5) (pC cm(2)) for epithermal neutrons. This shows that the LBO chamber is sufficiently sensitive to epithermal neutrons to be useful for epithermal neutron monitoring in BNCT irradiation.

  11. Passive and Active Fast-Neutron Imaging in Support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Blackston, Matthew A; Hausladen, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Results from safeguards-related passive and active coded-aperture fast-neutron imaging measurements of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) material configurations performed at Idaho National Laboratory s Zero Power Physics Reactor facility are presented. The imaging measurements indicate that it is feasible to use fast neutron imaging in a variety of safeguards-related tasks, such as monitoring storage, evaluating holdup deposits in situ, or identifying individual leached hulls still containing fuel. The present work also presents the first demonstration of imaging of differential die away fast neutrons.

  12. The performance of an amorphous silicon flat panel for neutron imaging at the PSI NEUTRA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estermann, Mirko; Frei, Gabriel; Lehmann, Eberhard; Vontobel, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Commonly applied imaging methods in neutron radiography use a CCD camera in conjunction with a scintillator or imaging plates. CCDs and imaging plates have desirable properties concerning resolution, linearity, dynamic range and signal-to-noise ratio ( S/ N) but both techniques have the disadvantage of a slow read out and for the CCD camera, an additional disadvantage is the loss of light through the optical system. Amorphous silicon detectors, originally developed for medical and industrial X-ray imaging, generally do not have the above-mentioned disadvantages. These detectors have a much faster readout and, in comparison to the generally used crystalline silicon, can be put directly in the X-ray or neutron beam without being damaged. This type of detector also does not require any optical interface, minimizing possible light loss. The detector is operated at room temperature, which has some influence on the noise. Using the whole dynamic range with a low gain, results in a S/ N of up to 30, for normal applications, however, a S/ N of about 15-20 is typical. The main drawback of this imaging device is the dynamic range of only 12 bits and the relatively complicated operating system in which different operation modes can be chosen. In 2003, successful experiments were performed with this new device, but it is still in its fledgling stages and improvements from the manufacturer as well as the experience from the NEUTRA team will help to advance this technique for neutron imaging in a most efficient way.

  13. Monte Carlo calculation of skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS (Advanced Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Moin-Vasiri, M.

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS: Sources of radiation; ALS modeling for skyshine calculations; MORSE Monte-Carlo; Implementation of MORSE; Results of skyshine calculations from storage ring; and Comparison of MORSE shielding calculations.

  14. Field Testing of an In-Situ Neutron Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Feldman, W. C.; Wiens, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to demonstrate the utility of using in-situ neutron spectroscopy to measure water content on planetary surfaces, we have developed a field site for carrying out neutron spectroscopy measurements. Specifically, our objectives in developing the field site are: 1) Demonstrate in-situ neutron measurements in a realistic field test scenario; 2) Demonstrate our ability to accurately model neutron measurements for various conditions and identify measurement factors that need to be controlled and/or accounted for such as detailed stratigraphy; 3) Provide a field test location for future in-situ neutron measurements using a variety of instrument and soil configurations.

  15. Advancement Planning: An Objectives View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druck, Kalman B.

    1986-01-01

    Planning must revolve around objectives related to students, faculty, money, and political support. When it is understood that all of the institution's advancement activity should help produce these four things, planning is easy. (MLW)

  16. Detailed heat load calculations at the beginning, middle, and end of cycle for the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, C. A.; Schnitzler, B. G.

    1995-04-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a world-class research reactor and experimental center for neutron research, presently being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The reactor consists of a 330-MW(f) highly enriched uranium core, which is cooled, moderated, and reflected with heavy water. When completed, it will be the preeminent ultrahigh neutron flux reactor in the world, with facilities for research programs in biology, materials science, chemistry, fundamental and nuclear physics, and analytical chemistry. Irradiation facilities are provided for a variety of isotope production capabilities, as well as materials irradiation. The ANS reactor design, at the time of this report, has completed the conceptual design phase and entered the advanced conceptual design phase. This report is part of an effort to fully document the analysis methods and results for the conceptual design. It details the methods used to perform heat load calculations on the ANS reactor design, describes the model used, and gives the resulting heat loads in all components of the reactor, in both a differential (by segment) and integral (by component) fashion. These heat load data are provided at three times within the ANS fuel cycle - at beginning (0 days), middle (8.5 days), and end (17 days) of cycle. The remainder of the report is dedicated to this description. In Chapter 2, some necessary background on the reactor design is provided. Chapters 3 and 4 give details of the depletion methods used and revisions to previous MCNP models. Chapter 5 analyzes the results of these calculations, and Chapter 6 provides a summary and conclusions.

  17. Reduction of the secondary neutron dose in passively scattered proton radiotherapy, using an optimized pre-collimator/collimator

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, David J; Elliston, Carl D; Hall, Eric J; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy represents a potential major advance in cancer therapy. Most current proton beams are spread out to cover the tumor using passive scattering and collimation, resulting in an extra whole-body high-energy neutron dose, primarily from proton interactions with the final collimator. There is considerable uncertainty as to the carcinogenic potential of low doses of high-energy neutrons, and thus we investigate whether this neutron dose can be significantly reduced without major modifications to passively scattered proton beam lines. Our goal is to optimize the design features of a patient-specific collimator or pre-collimator/collimator assembly. There are a number of often contradictory design features, in terms of geometry and material, involved in an optimal design. For example, plastic or hybrid plastic/metal collimators have a number of advantages. We quantify these design issues, and investigate the practical balances that can be achieved to significantly reduce the neutron dose without major alterations to the beamline design or function. Given that the majority of proton therapy treatments, at least for the next few years, will use passive scattering techniques, reducing the associated neutron-related risks by simple modifications of the collimator assembly design is a desirable goal. PMID:19779218

  18. Systematic neutron guide misalignment for an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a long pulse spallation neutron source that is currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. A considerable fraction of the 22 planned instruments extend as far as 75-150 m from the source. In such long beam lines, misalignment between neutron guide segments can decrease the neutron transmission significantly. In addition to a random misalignment from installation tolerances, the ground on which ESS is built can be expected to sink with time, and thus shift the neutron guide segments further away from the ideal alignment axis in a systematic way. These systematic errors are correlated to the ground structure, position of buildings and shielding installation. Since the largest deformation is expected close to the target, even short instruments might be noticeably affected. In this study, the effect of this systematic misalignment on short and long ESS beam lines is analyzed, and a possible mitigation by overillumination of subsequent guide sections investigated.

  19. Neutron Transport Characteristics of a Nuclear Reactor Based Dynamic Neutron Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Khaial, Anas M.; Harvel, Glenn D.; Chang, Jen-Shih

    2006-07-01

    An advanced dynamic neutron imaging system has been constructed in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) for nondestructive testing and multi-phase flow studies in energy and environmental applications. A high quality neutron beam is required with a thermal neutron flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}-s and a collimation ratio of 120 at image plane to promote high-speed neutron imaging up to 2000 frames per second. Neutron source strength and neutron transport have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance was evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and simple analytical neutron transport calculations were performed based upon these measured neutron fluxes to predict facility components in accordance with high-speed dynamic neutron imaging and operation safety requirements. Monte-Carlo simulations (using MCNP-4B code) with multiple neutron energy groups have also been used to validate neutron beam parameters and to ensure shielding capabilities of facility shutter and cave walls. Neutron flux distributions at the image plane and the neutron beam characteristics were experimentally measured by irradiating a two-dimensional array of Copper foils and using a real-time neutron radiography system. The neutron image characteristics -- such as neutron flux, image size, beam quality -- measured experimentally and predicted numerically for beam tube, beam shutter and radiography cave are compared and discussed in detail in this paper. The experimental results show that thermal neutron flux at image plane is nearly uniform over an imaging area of 20.0-cm diameter and its magnitude ranges from 8.0 x 10{sup 6} - 1.0 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}-sec while the neutron-to-gamma ratio is 6.0 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}-{mu}Sv. (authors)

  20. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  1. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  2. Advanced sample environments for in situ neutron diffraction studies of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, Helmut Matthias

    Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts, such as the supercritical-water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR), are actively researched internationally. Operating conditions above the critical point of water (374°C, 22.1 MPa) and fuel core temperature that potentially exceed 1850°C put a high demand on the surrounding materials. For their safe application, it is essential to characterize and understand the material properties on an atomic scale such as crystal structure and grain orientation (texture) changes as a function of temperature and stress. This permits the refinement of models predicting the macroscopic behavior of the material. Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool in characterizing such crystallographic properties due to their deep penetration depth into condensed matter. This leads to the ability to study bulk material properties, as opposed to surface effects, and allows for complex sample environments to study e.g. the individual contributions of thermo-mechanical processing steps during manufacturing, operating or accident scenarios. I present three sample environments for in situ neutron diffraction studies that provide such crystallographic information and have been successfully commissioned and integrated into the user program of the High Pressure -- Preferred Orientation (HIPPO) diffractometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) user facility. I adapted a sample changer for reliable and fast automated texture measurements of multiple specimens. I built a creep furnace combining a 2700 N load frame with a resistive vanadium furnace, capable of temperatures up to 1000°C, and manipulated by a pair of synchronized rotation stages. This combination allows following deformation and temperature dependent texture and strain evolutions in situ. Utilizing the presented sample changer and creep furnace we studied pressure tubes made of Zr-2.5wt%Nb currently employed in CANDURTM nuclear reactors and proposed for future SCWRs, acting as the primary

  3. Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.G.; Durkee, J.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in the design and demonstrations of a small, long-lived nuclear heat and electric power source for potential applications at remote sites where alternate fossil energy systems would not be cost effective. This paper describes the neutronic design analysis that was performed to arrive at two conceptual designs, one using thermoelectric conversion, the other using an organic Rankine cycle. To meet the design objectives and constraints a number of scoping and optimization studies were carried out. The results of calculations of control worths, temperature coefficients of reactivity and fuel depletion effects are reported.

  4. Advanced ATC: An aircraft perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, Leonard; Williams, David H.; Howell, William E.; Spitzer, Cary R.

    1986-01-01

    The principal operational improvements desired by commercial aircraft operators in the United States are efficient aircraft operations and delay reductions at the major terminals. Efforts underway within the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program at the Langley Research Center to provide a technology basis for reducing delay while improving aircraft efficiency are discussed. The principal thrust is the development of time-based traffic control concepts which could be used within the framework of the upgraded National Airspace System and which would allow conventionally equipped aircraft to operate in a manner compatible with advanced aircraft.

  5. Advanced ATC: An aircraft perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, Leonard; Williams, David H.; Howell, William E.; Spitzer, Cary R.

    1986-01-01

    The principal operational improvements desired by commercial aircraft operators in the United States are efficient aircraft operations and delay reductions at the major terminals. Efforts underway within the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program at the Langley Research Center to provide a technology basis for reducing delay while improving aircraft efficiency are discussed. The principal thrust is the development of time-based traffic control concepts which could be used within the framework of the upgraded National Airspace System and which would allow conventionally equipped aircraft to operate in a manner compatible with advanced aircraft.

  6. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  7. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M. Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-15

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 10{sup 7} n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  8. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, R. M.; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 107 n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  9. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C.; Marino, Stephen A.; Geard, Charles R.; Brenner, David J.; Garty, Guy

    2015-01-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  10. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields.

  11. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  12. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  13. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  14. Description of TASHA: Thermal Analysis of Steady-State-Heat Transfer for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G.; Chen, N.C.; Nelson, W.R.; Yoder, G.L.

    1996-10-01

    This document describes the code used to perform Thermal Analysis of Steady-State-Heat-Transfer for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor (TASHA). More specifically, the code is designed for thermal analysis of the fuel elements. The new code reflects changes to the High Flux Isotope Reactor steady-state thermal-hydraulics code. These changes were aimed at both improving the code`s predictive ability and allowing statistical thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis to be performed. A significant portion of the changes were aimed at improving the correlation package in the code. This involved incorporating more recent correlations for both single-phase flow and two-phase flow thermal limits, including the addition of correlations to predict the phenomenon of flow excursion. Since the code was to be used in the design of the ANS, changes were made to allow the code to predict limiting powers for a variety of thermal limits, including critical heat flux, flow excursion, incipient boiling, oxide spallation, maximum centerline temperature, and surface temperature equal to the saturation temperature. Statistical uncertainty analysis also required several changes to the code itself as well as changes to the code input format. This report describes these changes in enough detail to allow the reader to interpret code results and also to understand where the changes were made in the code programming. This report is not intended to be a stand alone report for running the code, however, and should be used in concert with the two previous reports published on the original code. Sample input and output files are also included to help accomplish these goals. In addition, a section is included that describes requirements for a new, more modem code that the project planned to develop.

  15. Smashing the Guitar: An Evolving Neutron Star Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Guitar Nebula is a spectacular example of an Hα bow shock nebula produced by the interaction of a neutron star with its environment. The radio pulsar B2224+65 is traveling at ~800-1600 km s-1 (for a distance of 1-2 kpc), placing it on the high-velocity tail of the pulsar velocity distribution. Here we report time evolution in the shape of the Guitar Nebula, the first such observations for a bow shock nebula, as seen in Hα imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope. The morphology of the nebula provides no evidence for anisotropy in the pulsar wind nor for fluctuations in the pulsar wind luminosity. The nebula shows morphological changes over two epochs spaced by 7 years that imply the existence of significant gradients and inhomogeneities in the ambient interstellar medium. These observations offer astrophysically unique, in situ probes of length scales between 5×10-4 and 0.012 pc. Model fitting suggests that the nebula axis-and thus the three-dimensional velocity vector-lies within 20° of the plane of the sky and also jointly constrains the distance to the neutron star and the ambient density.

  16. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  17. Advanced in-situ measurement of soil carbon content using inelastic neutron scattering

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measurement and mapping of natural and anthropogenic variations in soil carbon stores is a critical component of any soil resource evaluation process. Emerging modalities for soil carbon analysis in the field is the registration of gamma rays from soil under neutron irradiation. The inelastic neutro...

  18. Validation and verification of RELAP5 for Advanced Neutron Source accident analysis: Part I, comparisons to ANSDM and PRSDYN codes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Ibn-Khayat, M.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Wendel, M.W.

    1993-12-01

    As part of verification and validation, the Advanced Neutron Source reactor RELAP5 system model was benchmarked by the Advanced Neutron Source dynamic model (ANSDM) and PRSDYN models. RELAP5 is a one-dimensional, two-phase transient code, developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for reactor safety analysis. Both the ANSDM and PRSDYN models use a simplified single-phase equation set to predict transient thermal-hydraulic performance. Brief descriptions of each of the codes, models, and model limitations were included. Even though comparisons were limited to single-phase conditions, a broad spectrum of accidents was benchmarked: a small loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA), a large LOCA, a station blackout, and a reactivity insertion accident. The overall conclusion is that the three models yield similar results if the input parameters are the same. However, ANSDM does not capture pressure wave propagation through the coolant system. This difference is significant in very rapid pipe break events. Recommendations are provided for further model improvements.

  19. Study of the neutron field in the vicinity of an unshielded PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Méndez, R; Iñiguez, M P; Martí-Climent, J M; Peñuelas, I; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Barquero, R

    2005-11-07

    The neutron field in the proximity of an unshielded PET cyclotron was investigated during 18F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. Thermoluminescent detector (TLD) models TLD600 and TLD700 as well as Bonner moderating spheres were irradiated at different positions inside the vault room where the cyclotron is located to determine the thermal neutron flux, neutron spectrum and dose equivalent. Furthermore, from a combination of measurements and Monte Carlo simulations the neutron source intensity at the target was estimated. The resulting intensity is in good agreement with the IAEA recommendations. Neutron doses derived from the measured spectra were found to vary between 7 and 320 mSv per 1 microA h of proton-integrated current. Finally, gamma doses were determined from TLD700 readings and amounted to around 10% of the neutron doses.

  20. The Signal Chain - how the Removal of an Image Intensifier at the AERE Reactor in Bangladesh Improves Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, Burkhard; Saha, Sudipta

    Most neutron imaging systems use a neutron sensitive scintillation screen and camera. Due to the highly exothermic nature of the detection reaction, many thousand photons are produced for one detected neutron. If an additional image intensifier is used, the signal generated by very few neutrons may saturate the camera without delivering sufficient neutron statistics to examine a neutron radiography sample. This article takes a look at the signal chain for neutron radiography and tries to give some help for estimating required statistics and exposure times.

  1. Lightweight concrete with enhanced neutron shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2016-09-13

    A lightweight concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate in an amount of 20% by total volume. The concrete is enriched with hydrogen and is therefore highly effective at thermalizing neutrons. The concrete can be used independently or as a component of an advanced neutron radiation shielding system.

  2. An intercomparison of neutron dosimeters and detectors for in-containment dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Auman, L.E.; Miller, W.H.; Graham, C.C.; Stretch, C.D.; Welty, T.J.; West, L. Jr. )

    1992-02-01

    To improve the methodology for assessing neutron dose at Union Electric's Callaway Nuclear Power Plant, an intercomparison of neutron detectors and dosimeters was performed. Seven different neutron detectors and dosimeters were tested in four different neutron fields utilizing facilities at the Missouri University Research Reactor and at the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. In general, all results agree within a factor of 2 in predicting the neutron dose equivalent. It was concluded that measurements of dose in containment should utilize the Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), the Bonner-sphere system, and the proton recoil spectrometer to accurately assess the neutron dose. These data can then be used to provide correction factors for more traditionally used dosimeters in containment, such as thermoluminescent dosimeters and survey meters.

  3. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  4. Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

    2009-04-30

    We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

  5. An ultracold neutron source at the NC State University PULSTAR reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkina, E.; Wehring, B. W.; Hawari, A. I.; Young, A. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Golub, R.; Xu, Y.; Palmquist, G.

    2007-08-01

    Research and development is being completed for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source to be installed at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University (NCSU). The objective is to establish a university-based UCN facility with sufficient UCN intensity to allow world-class fundamental and applied research with UCN. To maximize the UCN yield, a solid ortho-D 2 converter will be implemented coupled to two moderators, D 2O at room temperature, to thermalize reactor neutrons, and solid CH 4, to moderate the thermal neutrons to cold-neutron energies. The source assembly will be located in a tank of D 2O in the space previously occupied by the thermal column of the PULSTAR reactor. Neutrons leaving a bare face of the reactor core enter the D 2O tank through a 45×45 cm cross-sectional area void between the reactor core and the D 2O tank. Liquid He will cool the disk-shaped UCN converter to below 5 K. Independently, He gas will cool the cup-shaped CH 4 cold-neutron moderator to an optimum temperature between 20 and 40 K. The UCN will be transported from the converter to experiments by a guide with an inside diameter of 16 cm. Research areas being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source include time-reversal violation in neutron beta decay, neutron lifetime determination, support measurements for a neutron electric-dipole-moment search, and nanoscience applications.

  6. Gadolinium as an element for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Liu, H.B.; Laster, B.H.; Gordon, C.R.; Greenberg, D.D.; Warkentien, L.S.

    1992-12-31

    At BNL, preparations are being made to test in vitro compounds containing Gd and compare their response to the response of GD-DTPA to determine if one or several compounds can be located that enter the cells and enhance the Auger effect. Two similar rotators with positions for cell vials that have been constructed for these tests. The first rotator is made of only paraffin which simulates healthy tissue and provides control curves. The second rotator has 135 ppM of Gd-157 in the paraffin to simulate a Gd loaded tumor. Cells are irradiated in vials in the paraffin rotator and in the Gd-paraffin rotator at the epithermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This produces an irradiation similar to what a patient would receive In an actual treatment. A combination of irradiations are made with both rotators; with no Gd compound or IdUrd In the cell media, with only Gd compound in the cell media and with both Gd compound and IdUrd in the cell media. The first set shows the effects of gamma rays from the H(n,gamma) reaction and the prompt gamma rays from capture of neutrons by Gd. The second set shows if there is any effect of Gd being in the cell media or inside the cells, i.e., an Auger effect. The third set shows the effect of enhancement by the IdUrd produced by the gamma rays from neutrons captured by either H or Gd. The fourth set combines all of the reactions and enhancements. Preliminary calculations and physical measurements of the doses that the cells will receive In these rotators have been made.

  7. Gadolinium as an element for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Liu, H.B.; Laster, B.H.; Gordon, C.R.; Greenberg, D.D.; Warkentien, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    At BNL, preparations are being made to test in vitro compounds containing Gd and compare their response to the response of GD-DTPA to determine if one or several compounds can be located that enter the cells and enhance the Auger effect. Two similar rotators with positions for cell vials that have been constructed for these tests. The first rotator is made of only paraffin which simulates healthy tissue and provides control curves. The second rotator has 135 ppM of Gd-157 in the paraffin to simulate a Gd loaded tumor. Cells are irradiated in vials in the paraffin rotator and in the Gd-paraffin rotator at the epithermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This produces an irradiation similar to what a patient would receive In an actual treatment. A combination of irradiations are made with both rotators; with no Gd compound or IdUrd In the cell media, with only Gd compound in the cell media and with both Gd compound and IdUrd in the cell media. The first set shows the effects of gamma rays from the H(n,gamma) reaction and the prompt gamma rays from capture of neutrons by Gd. The second set shows if there is any effect of Gd being in the cell media or inside the cells, i.e., an Auger effect. The third set shows the effect of enhancement by the IdUrd produced by the gamma rays from neutrons captured by either H or Gd. The fourth set combines all of the reactions and enhancements. Preliminary calculations and physical measurements of the doses that the cells will receive In these rotators have been made.

  8. Review of pipe-break probability assessment methods and data for applicability to the advanced neutron source project for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.R.

    1989-04-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) (Difilippo, 1986; Gamble, 1986; West, 1986; Selby, 1987) will be the world's best facility for low energy neutron research. This performance requires the highest flux density of all non-pulsed reactors with concomitant low thermal inertial and fast response to upset conditions. One of the primary concerns is that a flow cessation of the order of a second may result in fuel damage. Such a flow stoppage could be the result of break in the primary piping. This report is a review of methods for assessing pipe break probabilities based on historical operating experience in power reactors, scaling methods, fracture mechanics and fracture growth models. The goal of this work is to develop parametric guidance for the ANS design to make the event highly unlikely. It is also to review and select methods that may be used in an interactive IBM-PC model providing fast and reasonably accurate models to aid the ANS designers in achieving the safety requirements. 80 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Neutronics analysis for an accelerator-based nuclear waste transmuter

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, W.C.; Beard, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    The neutronic analysis for a target/blanket design that is capable of supporting the high level waste stream from 2.5 LWR`s is described. The target consists of a set of solid tungsten and lead plates, cooled by heavy water and surrounded by a lead annulus. The annular blanket, which surrounds the target, consists of a set of AcO{sub 2} slurry bearing tubes, each 3 meters long, surrounded by heavy water moderator. Heat removal from the slurry tubes is by passing the rapidly moving slurry through an external heat exchanger. There are separate regions for long-lived fission product burning. Using the Monte Carlo codes LAHET and MCNP we have optimized the design for a minimum beam current of 62.5 mA of 1.6 GeV protons.

  10. Inspection of an artificial heart by the neutron radiography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Geraldo, L. P.; Andrade, M. L. G.; Menezes, M. O.,; Pereira, M. A. S.; Maizato, M. J. S.

    1999-11-01

    The neutron radiography technique was employed to inspect an artificial heart prototype which is being developed to provide blood circulation for patients expecting heart transplant surgery. The radiographs have been obtained by the direct method with a gadolinium converter screen along with the double coated Kodak-AA emulsion film. The artificial heart consists of a flexible plastic membrane located inside a welded metallic cavity, which is employed for blood pumping purposes. The main objective of the present inspection was to identify possible damages in this plastic membrane, produced during the welding process of the metallic cavity. The obtained radiographs were digitized as well as analysed in a PC and the improved images clearly identify several damages in the plastic membrane, suggesting changes in the welding process.

  11. Recent advancements of wide-angle polarization analysis with 3He neutron spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. C.; Gentile, T. R.; Ye, Q.; Kirchhoff, A.; Watson, S. M.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Qiu, Y.; Broholm, C.

    2016-09-01

    Wide-angle polarization analysis with polarized 3He based neutron spin filters (NSFs) has recently been employed on the Multi-Axis Crystal Spectrometer (MACS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). Over the past several years, the apparatus has undergone many upgrades to address the fundamental requirements for wide angle polarization analysis using spin exchange optical pumping based 3He NSFs. In this paper, we report substantial improvements in the on-beam-line performance of the apparatus and progress toward routine user capability. We discuss new standard samples used for 3He NSF characterization and the flipping ratio measurement on MACS. We further discuss the management of stray magnetic fields produced by operation of superconducting magnets on the MACS instrument, which can significantly reduce the 3He polarization relaxation time. Finally, we present the results of recent development of horseshoe-shaped wide angle cells.

  12. Plan for the future of neutron research on condensed matter: an Argonne National Laboratory report prepared in response to the Report of the Review Panel on Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-27

    The Review Panel on Neutron Scattering has recommended an expanded budget to allow systematic development of the field. An alternative plan for the future of neutron research on condensed matter is presented here, in case it is not possible to fund the expanded budget. This plan leads, in a rational and logical way, to a world-class neutron source that will ensure the vitality of the field and exploit the many benefits that state-of-the-art neutron facilities can bring to programs in the materials and biological sciences. 2 tables. (RWR)

  13. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  14. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  15. An improved prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility using a focused diffracted neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Kent J.; Harling, Otto K.

    1998-09-01

    The performance of the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility at the MIT Research Reactor has been improved by a series of modifications. These modifications have increased the flux by a factor of three at the sample position to 1.7 × 10 7 n/cm 2 s, and have increased the sensitivity, on average, by a factor of 2.5. The background for many samples of interest is dominated by unavoidable neutron interactions that occur in or near the sample. Other background components comprise only 20% of the total background count rate. The implementation of fast electronics has helped to keep dead time reasonable, in spite of the increased count rates. The PGNAA facility at the MIT Research Reactor continues to serve as a major analytical tool for quantifying 10B in biological samples for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. The sensitivity for boron-10 in water is 18 750 cps/mg. The sensitivity for pure elements suitable for PGNAA analysis is reported. Possible further improvements are discussed.

  16. A compact self-flowing lithium system for use in an industrial neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor Kumar; Szott, Matthew; Jurczyk, Brian; Ahn, Chisung; Ruzic, David

    2016-10-01

    A compact trench module to flow liquid lithium in closed loops for handling high heat and particle flux have been fabricated and tested at UIUC. The module was designed to demonstrate the proof of concept in utilizing liquid metals for two principal objectives: i) as self-healing low Z plasma facing components, which is expected to solve the issues facing the current high Z components and ii) using flowing lithium as an MeV-level neutron source. A continuously flowing lithium loop ensures a fresh lithium interface and also accommodate a higher concentration of D, enabling advanced D-Li reactions without using any radioactive tritium. Such a system is expected to have a base yield of 10e7 n/s. For both the applications, the key success factor of the module is attaining the necessary high flow velocity of the lithium especially over the impact area, which will be the disruptive plasma events in fusion reactors and the incident ion beam for the neutron beam source. This was achieved by the efficient shaping of the trenches to exploit the nozzle effect in liquid flow. The compactness of the module, which can also be scaled as desired, was fulfilled by the use of high Tc permanent magnets and air cooled channels attained the necessary temperature gradient for driving the lithium. The design considerations and parameters, experimental arrangements involving lithium filling and attaining flow, data and results obtained will be elaborated. DOE SBIR project DE-SC0013861.

  17. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Hannah E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 107 neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF3 composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  18. Studies on the properties of an epithermal-neutron hydrogen analyzer.

    PubMed

    Papp, A; Csikai, J

    2010-09-01

    Systematic investigations have proved the advantages of the Epithermal Neutron Analyzer (ETNA) for bulk hydrogen analysis as compared to the thermal neutron techniques. Results can contribute, for example, to the design and construction of instruments needed for the detection and identification of plastic anti-personnel landmines, explosives hidden in airline baggage and cargo containers via hydrogen contents as an indicator of their presence.

  19. An overview of advanced nonvolatile memory technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dressendorfer, P.V.

    1991-01-01

    This report is an overview of advanced nonvolatile memory technologies. The memory technologies discussed are: floating gate nonvolatile memory technologies; SNOS nonvolatile technology; ferroelectric technology; and thin film magnetic memories.

  20. Simulation and calibration of an active neutron dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Bergmeier, F; Volnhals, M; Wielunski, M; Rühm, W

    2014-10-01

    Here the latest development stages of the HMGU active neutron dosemeter are presented. This work includes the comparison of the dosemeter's response function, calculated with Geant4, and the measurements in monoenergetic neutron fields at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig, Germany. These results were used to match the response function and the count-to-dose conversion factors of the dosemeter to the Hp(10) personal dose equivalent.

  1. Low-level measuring techniques for neutrons: High accuracy neutron source strength determination and fluence rate measurement at an underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbal, Andreas; Reginatto, Marcel; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Degering, Detlev; Zuber, Kai

    2013-08-08

    We report on measuring techniques for neutrons that have been developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute. PTB has characterized radioactive sources used in the BOREXINO and XENON100 experiments. For the BOREXINO experiment, a {sup 228}Th gamma radiation source was required which would not emit more than 10 neutrons per second. The determination of the neutron emission rate of this specially designed {sup 228}Th source was challenging due to the low neutron emission rate and because the ratio of neutron to gamma radiation was expected to be extremely low, of the order of 10{sup −6}. For the XENON100 detector, PTB carried out a high accuracy measurement of the neutron emission rate of an AmBe source. PTB has also done measurements in underground laboratories. A two month measurement campaign with a set of {sup 3}He-filled proportional counters was carried out in PTB's former UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine. The aim of the campaign was to determine the intrinsic background of detectors, which is needed for the analysis of data taken in lowintensity neutron fields. At a later time, PTB did a preliminary measurement of the neutron fluence rate at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller operated by VKTA. By taking into account data from UDO, Felsenkeller, and detector calibrations made at the PTB facility, it was possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate at the Felsenkeller underground laboratory.

  2. Evaluation of the need for emergency heat exchangers for long term emergency cooling of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khayat, M.I.; Anderson, J.L.; Battle, R.E.; March-Leuba, J.

    1994-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to evaluate the heat transferred to the light water pools from the primary piping system for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor (ANSR) conceptual design. It has been determined that the ANSR primary piping system will remove sufficient heat from the primary coolant system to the pools for certain design basis event accidents without the emergency heat exchangers if the design parameters, such as pool volumes and pipe sizes (length and surface area), are selected appropriately. Based on this analysis, the emergency heat exchangers might be removed, and their function can be performed by the primary piping passing through the light water pools described in the conceptual design report. This study also shows that connecting the pipe chase pool and the heat exchanger pools improve performance for ANSR emergency heat removal.

  3. Advanced neutron source reactor conceptual safety analysis report, three-element-core design: Chapter 15, accident analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.; Harrington, R.M.

    1996-02-01

    In order to utilize reduced enrichment fuel, the three-element-core design for the Advanced Neutron Source has been proposed. The proposed core configuration consists of inner, middle, and outer elements, with the middle element offset axially beneath the inner and outer elements, which are axially aligned. The three-element-core RELAP5 model assumes that the reactor hardware is changed only within the core region, so that the loop piping, heat exchangers, and pumps remain as assumed for the two-element-core configuration. To assess the impact of changes in the core region configuration and the thermal-hydraulic steady-state conditions, the safety analysis has been updated. This report gives the safety margins for the loss-of-off-site power and pressure-boundary fault accidents based on the RELAP5 results. AU margins are greater for the three-element-core simulations than those calculated for the two-element core.

  4. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at ORNL. Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between dmaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur beause of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A parametric study was done for several uncertain variables. The study included investigating effects of plate contact area, convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity on fuel swelling, and initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects of damage propagation. Results provide useful insights into how variouss uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  5. Monitoring water storage changes using absolute gravity measurements, neutron probes and piezometer data in West Africa: advances in specific yield and recharge estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, B.; Séguis, L.; Descloîtres, M.; Hinderer, J.; Wubda, M.; Luck, B.; Le Moigne, N.

    2012-04-01

    Advances in water storage monitoring are crucial to characterize the spatial variability of hydrological processes. Classical water storage investigation methods often involve point measurements (piezometers, neutron probes, humidity sensors…), which may be irrelevant in heterogeneous mediums. Over the past few years, there has been an increasing interest in the use of gravimeters for hydrological studies. Water mass redistribution leads to variations in the Earth's gravity field which can be measured by gravimetry. In the framework of the GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project, 3 years of repeated absolute gravity measurements using FG5#206 from Micro-g Solutions Inc. have been undertaken at Nalohou, a Sudanian site in northern Benin. Hydrological monitoring is carried out within the long-term observing system AMMA-Catch (an observatory of RBV, the French critical zone exploration network). Seasonal gravity variations in link with the hydrological cycle can reach 11 µgal at this site, equivalent to a 26cm thick infinite layer of water. The vadose zone and a shallow unconfined aquifer in weathered metamorphic rocks are responsible for most of the water storage variations. For the first time in the climatic context of the West African monsoon, gravity data are compared to the time evolution of the water storages deduced from neutron probes and water-table variations. The approach is two-fold: first, total storage variations are estimated from neutron probe-derived moisture through the whole vertical profile (surface to groundwater) monitored at the gravimetric site and uniformly extended according to the topography. Results show a very good fit with gravity data, enlightening the fact that absolute gravimeters are sensitive to total water storage variations from the soil surface to the aquifer. The second approach introduces a spatial variability: it was undertaken to check a structural model for specific yield of the aquifer, based on magnetic

  6. Evaluation of Damage Tolerance of Advanced SiC/SiC Composites after Neutron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kazumi; Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon carbide composites (SiC/SiC) are attractive candidate materials for structural and functional components in fusion energy systems. The effect of neutron irradiation on damage tolerance of the nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites (plain woven Hi-Nicalon™ Type-S reinforced CVI matrix composites multilayer interphase and unidirectional Tyranno™-SA3 reinforced NITE matrix with carbon mono-layer interphase) was evaluated by means of miniaturized single-edged notched beam test. No significant changes in crack extension behavior and in the load-loadpoint displacement characteristics such as the peak load and hysteresis loop width were observed after irradiation to 5.9 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 800°C and to 5.8 × 1025 n/m2 at 1300°C. By applying a global energy balance analysis based on non-linear fracture mechanics, the energy release rate for these composite materials was found to be unchanged by irradiation with a value of 3±2 kJ/m2. This has led to the conclusion that, for these fairly aggressive irradiation conditions, the effect of neutron irradiation on the fracture resistance of these composites appears insignificant.

  7. An ontological view of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Hicks, Frank D; Whall, Ann L; Algase, Donna L

    2005-01-01

    Identifying, developing, and incorporating nursing's unique ontological and epistemological perspective into advanced practice nursing practice places priority on delivering care based on research-derived knowledge. Without a clear distinction of our metatheoretical space, we risk blindly adopting the practice values of other disciplines, which may not necessarily reflect those of nursing. A lack of focus may lead current advanced practice nursing curricula and emerging doctorate of nursing practice programs to mirror the logical positivist paradigm and perspective of medicine. This article presents an ontological perspective for advanced practice nursing education, practice, and research.

  8. P13.09ADVANCES IN CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY (BNCT) IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Detta, A.; Cruickshank, G.C.; Green, S.; Lockyer, N.P.; Ngoga, D.; Ghani, Z.; Phoenix, B.

    2014-01-01

    BNCT is a biologically targeted form of enhanced cellular radiotherapy where preferential accumulation of boron in the cancerous as opposed to adjacent normal cells is able to interact with incident neutrons to cause irreversible alpha particle DNA damage. The key to the implementation of this potentially powerful and selective therapy is the delivery of at least 30ppm 10B within the tumour tissue while minimising superfluous 10B in healthy tissue. It is thus an elegant technique for treating infiltrating tumours such as diffuse gliomas. In order to assess its clinical potential we carried out a pharmacokinetic study in glioblastoma patients where we sought to determine the optimal route of delivering a new formulation of the boronated drug (p-boronophenylalanine, BPA), its pharmacokinetic behaviour, toxicity profile, and cellular uptake. Using a number of analytical techniques, including inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), boron was measured at various times in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, extracellular fluid (ECF), and tumour-related solid tissue spanning 0.5 h pre- and up to 48 h post-BPA infusion in newly-diagnosed patients (n = 10). Blood was sampled through a central catheter whilst the ECF was sampled by parenchymal microdialysis catheters, placed remotely from the tumour site. Urine was collected over the same time period. Tumour and brain-around tumour (BAT) tissue was sampled stereotactically at 2.5 h and 3.5 h post-infusion. IHC expression levels of the BPA transporter molecule, L-amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1), were recorded as % LAT-1 positive cells, and cellular boron levels were estimated as spatially resolved pixels in normalised-to-C+ isotopic SIMS images of the biopsies. There were no toxicity-related issues with this new formulation of BPA given at 375 mg/kg as a 2 h intravenous or intracarotid infusion with or without pre-infusion mannitol-induced BBB

  9. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  10. Thermal and Cold Neutron Computed Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center Using an Amorphous Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Farnum, E.H.; McDonald, T.E.; Summa, D.A.; Sheats, M.J.; Stupin, D.M.; Sievers, W.L.

    1998-07-19

    The use of the EG and G-Heimann RTM 128 or dpiX FS20 amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array for thermal neutron radiography/computed tomography has proven to be a quick and efficient means of producing high quality digital radiographic images. The resolution, although not as good as film, is about 750 pm with the RTM and 127 pm with the dpiX array with a dynamic range in excess of 2,800. In many respects using an amorphous silicon detector is an improvement over other techniques such as imaging with a CCD camera, using a storage phosphor plate or film radiography. Unlike a CCD camera, which is highly susceptible to radiation damage, a-Si detectors can be placed in the beam directly behind the object under examination and do not require any special optics or turning mirrors. The amorphous silicon detector also allows enough data to be acquired to construct a digital image in just a few seconds (minimum gate time 40 ms) whereas film or storage plate exposures can take many minutes and then need to be digitized with a scanner. The flat panel can therefore acquire a complete 3D computed tomography data set in just a few tens of minutes. While a-Si detectors have been proposed for use in imaging neutron beams, this is the first reported implementation of such a detector for neutron imaging.

  11. Advanced midwifery practice: An evolutionary concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Goemaes, Régine; Beeckman, Dimitri; Goossens, Joline; Shawe, Jill; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann

    2016-11-01

    the concept of 'advanced midwifery practice' is explored to a limited extent in the international literature. However, a clear conception of advanced midwifery practice is vital to advance the discipline and to achieve both internal and external legitimacy. This concept analysis aims to clarify advanced midwifery practice and identify its components. a review of the literature was executed using Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis to analyze the attributes, references, related terms, antecedents and consequences of advanced midwifery practice. an international consensus definition of advanced midwifery practice is currently lacking. Four major attributes of advanced midwife practitioners (AMPs) are identified: autonomy in practice, leadership, expertise, and research skills. A consensus was found on the need of preparation at master's level for AMPs. Such midwives have a broad and internationally varied scope of practice, fulfilling different roles such as clinicians, clinical and professional leaders, educators, consultants, managers, change agents, researchers, and auditors. Evidence illustrating the important part AMPs play on a clinical and strategic level is mounting. the findings of this concept analysis support a wide variety in the emergence, titles, roles, and scope of practice of AMPs. Research on clinical and strategic outcomes of care provided by AMPs supports further implementation of these roles. As the indistinctness of AMPs' titles and roles is one of the barriers for implementation, a clear conceptualization of advanced midwifery practice seems essential for successful implementation. an international debate and consensus on the defining elements of advanced midwifery practice could enhance the further development of midwifery as a profession and is a prerequisite for its successful implementation. Due to rising numbers of AMPs, extension of practice and elevated quality requirements in healthcare, more outcomes research exclusively

  12. MCViNE - An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiao Y. Y.; Smith, Hillary L.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Winn, Barry; Aczel, Adam A.; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2016-02-01

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiple scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. With simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.

  13. MCViNE- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Smith, Hillary L.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Winn, Barry L.; Aczel, Adam A.; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2015-11-28

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiple scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. As a result, with simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.

  14. MCViNE- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Smith, Hillary L.; Granroth, Garrett E.; ...

    2015-11-28

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiplemore » scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. As a result, with simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.« less

  15. Scattered neutron dose equivalent from an active scanning proton beam delivery system.

    PubMed

    Hecksel, Draik; Sandison, George A; Farr, Jonathan B; Edwards, Andrew C

    2007-12-01

    A study of neutron production from a novel active scanning proton beam delivery system at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI) has been performed. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using a neutron rem (roentgen equivalent in man) detector which has an upper energy limit of 10 MeV. Measurement were taken at 0, 45, and 90 degrees from the proton beam central axis and for various proton beam energies (127-208 MeV) and scanned field sizes (25-144 cm2). The maximum neutron dose observed was 0.43 mSv / (proton treatment Gy) at 90 degrees from the beam axis for a beam energy of 208.4 MeV and a scanned field size of 144 cm2. It is still possible to further mitigate this secondary neutron dose during treatment by optimizing parameters within the treatment nozzle and using shielding.

  16. Plasma Heating: An Advanced Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Mercury and Apollo spacecraft shields were designed to protect astronauts from high friction temperatures (well over 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit) when re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. It was necessary to test and verify the heat shield materials on Earth before space flight. After exhaustive research and testing, NASA decided to use plasma heating as a heat source. This technique involves passing a strong electric current through a rarefied gas to create a plasma (ionized gas) that produces an intensely hot flame. Although NASA did not invent the concept, its work expanded the market for commercial plasma heating systems. One company, Plasma Technology Corporation (PTC), was founded by a member of the team that developed the Re-entry Heating Simulator at Ames Research Center (ARC). Dr. Camacho, President of PTC, believes the technology has significant environmental applications. These include toxic waste disposal, hydrocarbon, decomposition, medical waste disposal, asbestos waste destruction, and chemical and radioactive waste disposal.

  17. EPR: an Advanced Evolutionary Design

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Juergen; Bouteille, Francois; Hudson, Greg

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the main features of the EPR, an evolutionary design product that builds on French N4 plants (Chooz and Civaux) and Konvoi, the most recent reactor series built in Germany. This Franco-German project was driven by a common French and German desire to cooperate in several areas. In January 2001, Framatome SA and Siemens AG merged their nuclear activities to form Framatome ANP with three regional entities in France, Germany and the USA. The recent decision of Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) to select the EPR for construction in Olkiluoto of the fifth Nuclear Power Plant in Finland gave a new impetus to the project. Framatome ANP is committed to put the FOAK EPR in commercial operation on May 1, 2009. This challenging time schedule will set a new reference for 'Generation III +' LWR's. (authors)

  18. Estimation of neutron dose equivalent at the mezzanine of the Advanced Light Source and the laboratory boundary using the ORNL program MORSE.

    PubMed

    Sun, R K

    1990-12-01

    To investigate the radiation effect of neutrons near the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) with respect to the neutron dose equivalents in nearby occupied areas and at the site boundary, the neutron transport code MORSE, from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was used. These dose equivalents result from both skyshine neutrons transported by air scattering and direct neutrons penetrating the shielding. The ALS neutron sources are a 50-MeV linear accelerator and its transfer line, a 1.5-GeV booster, a beam extraction line, and a 1.9-GeV storage ring. The most conservative total occupational-dose-equivalent rate in the center of the ALS mezzanine, 39 m from the ALS center, was found to be 1.14 X 10(-3) Sv y-1 per 2000-h "occupational" year, and the total environmental-dose-equivalent rate at the ALS boundary, 125 m from the ALS center, was found to be 3.02 X 10(-4) Sv y-1 per 8760-h calendar year. More realistic dose-equivalent rates, using the nominal (expected) storage-ring current, were calculated to be 1.0 X 10(-4) Sv y-1 and 2.65 X 10(-5) Sv y-1 occupational year and calendar year, respectively, which are much lower than the DOE reporting levels.

  19. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  20. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  1. QUOTA - An Advanced Mosaic Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, George; Howell, S.; Harbeck, D.; Sawyer, D.

    2009-01-01

    QUOTA is an 8Kx8K (16'x16') optical imager that uses four 4Kx4K orthogonal transfer CCDs arrays (OTAs). Each OTA has 64 nearly independent CCDs having 480x494 12µm pixels. By reading out several of the CCDs rapidly (20 Hz), the centroids of the stars in those CCDs can be used to measure image motion due to atmospheric effects, telescope shake, and guide errors. Motions are fed back to the remaining 250 CCDs that continue to integrate normally, allowing a shift of the collecting charge packets so that they always fall under the moving star images, thereby effecting low order AO tip/tilt correction in the silicon to improve image quality. As a bonus, the stars that are read rapidly can be studied for high speed variability. Although QUOTA was intended as a pioneering prototype for WIYN's 32Kx32K One Degree Imager (ODI), providing a means to test the technical developments needed for ODI (e.g., detectors, controllers, optics, software), it is a useful mosaic camera on its own. With WIYN's r-band median seeing of 0.7", we have already seen that orthogonal transfer guiding improves the images by about 0.15", to about 0.55". The gains are most effective over the isokinetic patch, 2' from a guide star. QUOTA's design allows for up to 32 guide stars across the field of view to provide for excellent correction when the target field is rich in bright stars (V<14). In its current configuration, QUOTA will have been to the telescope twice prior to the AAS Meeting. We will report on the performance of this imager: the degree of image quality improvement with readout speed and wavelength, the field over which the correction is effective, and the accuracy of the high speed photometry. QUOTA was funded in part by NSF/ATI grant AST-0352979.

  2. Neutron polycapillary optics: back to future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, Alexander

    2005-08-01

    At the sunrise of the Kumakhov optics, the latter was enormously attractive for neutron scientists eager to take advantage from focused neutron beams. However, in spite of this initial enthusiasm, rear neutron applications of polycapillary optics are mostly limited either to feasibility studies or to non-scattering techniques. The reason for such a drawback is a serious degradation in the momentum resolution of neutron scattering methods caused by increased divergence of focused beams. However, limited brightness of present day neutron sources (both existing and coming) requires rethinking the current situation. Neutron lenses are successfully tested for low Q-resolution applications providing an enormous increase of neutron flux at small samples. Moreover, some recent developments in the field of neutron instrumentation allow us to overcome the resolution problem by decoupling the angular resolution and the incident beam divergence thus opening the opportunity for the use of focusing neutron optics in some high Q-resolution application. Further advances in technology required to improve the performance of neutron polycapillary optics, also in combination with modem methods of polarization of neutron beams, are discussed.

  3. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  4. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  5. Phosphorus activation neutron dosimetry and its application to an 18-MV radiotherapy accelerator.

    PubMed

    Bading, J R; Zeitz, L; Laughlin, J S

    1982-01-01

    Neutron fluxes and dose rates in and near the 18-MV x-ray beam of a Therac-20 accelerator were determined with measured activities from the nuclear reactions 31P(n, rho)31Si (fast neutrons) and 31P(n, gamma)32P (thermal neutrons), published cross sections, and neutron energy spectra from Monte Carlo calculations. Measurements were made in the patient plane in air and at a 10-cm depth in a tissue-similar phantom, and in a plane containing the x-ray target. Orthophosphoric acid solution was identified as a suitable and convenient phosphorus dosimeter material. In the 31P activation method, fluxes and dose rates are determined as the product of measured saturation activity per 31P atom and a conversion factor, which depends on the shape of the assumed neutron spectrum. For fast neutrons, which deliver most of the dose, the accuracy error in the saturation activity determinations was shown to be approximately less than 25%. An inconsistency resulting from neglect of the accelerator's adjustable collimator in the Monte Carlo calculations was demonstrated between the measured saturation activities and the theoretical neutron spectra. The maximum neutron dose equivalent rate observed was 5.9 mSv/Gy of x-ray absorbed dose at the accelerator calibration point. Surface dose equivalent rates of the present study are less than those of fluxmeter and remmeter studies at sites outside Therac-20 treatment fields by as much as factors of 2.4 and 2.8, respectively. The phantom study showed that at 18 MV internally produced neutrons have a negligible effect on the neutron field within the patient.

  6. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  7. Developing an Advanced Lab course from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, Rudi

    2012-10-01

    A few years ago the Alpha group in APS organized faculty with interests in advanced lab courses in physics. At the University of Wyoming, we re-launched an advanced lab course after doing more than 15 years without one. Our majors had to take an electronic course in the Electrical Engineering department to get familiar with any kind of electronic equipment. Now we are in the fourth teaching session of the advanced Modern Physics lab and we will expand the course into a two-term course beginning spring 2013. Forty-five majors have gone through our labs, We developed an oral exam tradition, which is now beginning to lend our department upper level outcome assessment credibility for campus wide assessment.

  8. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    PubMed Central

    Eley, John; Newhauser, Wayne; Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca; Schneider, Christopher; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects. PMID:25768061

  9. Neutron Star Physics in the Square Kilometre Array Era: An Indian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Sushan; Bagchi, Manjari; Bandyopadhyay, Debades; Banik, Sarmistha; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Gangadhara, R. T.; Gopakumar, A.; Gupta, Yashwant; Joshi, B. C.; Maan, Yogesh; Maitra, Chandreyee; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Pai, Archana; Paul, Biswajit; Ray, Alak K.; Sutaria, Firoza K.

    2016-12-01

    It is an exceptionally opportune time for astrophysics when a number of next-generation mega-instruments are poised to observe the Universe across the entire electromagnetic spectrum with unprecedented data quality. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is undoubtedly one of the major components of this scenario. In particular, the SKA is expected to discover tens of thousands of new neutron stars giving a major fillip to a wide range of scientific investigations. India has a sizeable community of scientists working on different aspects of neutron star physics with immediate access to both the uGMRT (an SKA pathfinder) and the recently launched X-ray observatory Astrosat. The current interests of the community largely centre around studies of (a) the generation of neutron stars and the SNe connection, (b) the neutron star population and evolutionary pathways, (c) the evolution of neutron stars in binaries and the magnetic fields, (d) the neutron star equation of state, (e) the radio pulsar emission mechanism, and (f) the radio pulsars as probes of gravitational physics. Most of these studies are the main goals of the SKA first phase, which is likely to be operational in the next four years. This article summarizes the science goals of the Indian neutron star community in the SKA era, with significant focus on coordinated efforts among the SKA and other existing/upcoming instruments.

  10. Combination of boron and gadolinium compounds for neutron capture therapy. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, A; Zhang, T; Nakai, K; Endo, K; Kumada, H; Yamamoto, T; Yoshida, F; Sakurai, Y; Yamamoto, K; Nose, T

    2005-03-01

    In neutron capture therapy, the therapeutic effect of the boron compound is based on alpha particles produced by the B(n, alpha) reaction while with the gadolinium compound the main radiation effect is from gamma rays derived from the Gd(n, gamma) reaction. The uptake and distribution within the tumor may be different among these compounds. Thus, the combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds may be beneficial for enhancing the radiation dose to the tumor. Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were used. For the neutron targeting compounds, 10B (BSH) at 0, 5, 10, and 15 ppm, and 157Gd (Gd-BOPTA) at 0, 800, 1600, 2400, 3200, and 4800 ppm, were combined. The neutron irradiation was performed with thermal neutrons for 30 min. (neutron flux: 0.84 x 10(8) n/cm2/s in free air). The combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds showed an additive effect when the gadolinium concentration was lower than 1600 ppm. This additive effect decreased as a function of gadolinium concentration at 2400 ppm and resulted in no additive effect at more than 3200 ppm of gadolinium. In conclusion, the combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds can enhance the therapeutic effect with an optimum concentration ratio. When the gadolinium concentration is too high, it may weaken the boron neutron capture reaction due to the high cross-section of gadolinium compound against neutrons.

  11. Feasibility of an epithermal neutron source for BNCT based on RFQ accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlizzi, R.; Colonna, N.; Bisceglie, E.; Colangelo, P.; Marrone, S.; Rainò, A.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V.

    2004-01-01

    The use of boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of deep-seated tumours, such as glioblastoma multiforme, requires neutron beams of suitable energy and intensity. The analysis of the therapeutic gain shows that a high tumour control probability with sublethal dose at healthy tissues can be achieved, in most cases, by using neutron beams of a few keV energy, with a flux of about 10 9 neutrons/cm 2 s. Therapeutic neutron beams with high-spectral purity in this energy range could be produced by accelerator-based neutron sources through a suitable neutron-producing reaction. We investigate the feasibility of a solution based on a small radio frequency quadrupole for a proton beam current of 30 mA and an energy of 2 MeV. An appropriate choice of the function parameters of the RFQ (modulation, efficiency of acceleration, phase shift, etc., …) allows one to design relatively compact accelerators, which could eventually lead to setup hospital-based BNCT facilities.

  12. Implementation of an analytical model for leakage neutron equivalent dose in a proton radiotherapy planning system.

    PubMed

    Eley, John; Newhauser, Wayne; Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca; Schneider, Christopher; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  13. Correcting the Response of an Albedo Neutron Dosimeter for Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    detectors; thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), neutron, energy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Dr. Gordon K. Riel a... Thermoluminescent Dosemeters (TLD).......................................................................................... 1 Detectors for Energy...SSBN ballistic missile submarine TLD thermoluminescent dosemeter USNA United States Naval Academy NSWCCD-63-TR–2006/36 1 Introduction The

  14. Production and applications of neutrons using particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chichester, David L.

    2009-11-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development and of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields of study. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and how neutrons interact in matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed too. Today the diversity of applications for industrial accelerator-based neutron sources is high and so to is the actual number of instruments in daily use is high, and they serve important roles in the fields where they're used. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the early development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of some current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends in the industrial uses of neutron producing particle accelerators.

  15. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  16. Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars and the Need for an Intermediate Neutron Capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancliffe, Richard J.; Hampel, Melanie; Lugaro, Maria; Meyer, Bradley S.

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the Galactic Halo display enrichments in heavy elements associated with either the s (slow) or the r (rapid) neutron-capture process (e.g., barium and europium respectively), and in some cases they display evidence of both. The abundance patterns of these CEMP-s/r stars, which show both Ba and Eu enrichment, are particularly puzzling since the s and the r processes require neutron densities that are more than ten orders of magnitude apart, and hence are thought to occur in very different stellar sites. We investigate whether the abundance patterns of CEMP-s/r stars can arise from the nucleosynthesis of the intermediate neutron-capture process (the i process), which is characterised by neutron densities between those of the s and the r processes. Using nuclear network calculations, we study neutron capture nucleosynthesis at different constant neutron densities n ranging from 107 to 1015 cm-3. Neutron densities on the highest side of this range result in abundance patterns that show an increased production of heavy s- and r-process elements but similar levels of the light s-process elements. With our i-process model, we are able to reproduce the abundance patterns of 20 CEMP-s/r stars that could not be explained by s-process nucleosynthesis.

  17. Future of Semiconductor Based Thermal Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R J; Cheung, C L; Reinhardt, C E; Wang, T F

    2006-02-22

    Thermal neutron detectors have seen only incremental improvements over the last decades. In this paper we overview the current technology of choice for thermal neutron detection--{sup 3}He tubes, which suffer from, moderate to poor fieldability, and low absolute efficiency. The need for improved neutron detection is evident due to this technology gap and the fact that neutrons are a highly specific indicator of fissile material. Recognizing this need, we propose to exploit recent advances in microfabrication technology for building the next generation of semiconductor thermal neutron detectors for national security requirements, for applications requiring excellent fieldability of small devices. We have developed an innovative pathway taking advantage of advanced processing and fabrication technology to produce the proposed device. The crucial advantage of our Pillar Detector is that it can simultaneously meet the requirements of high efficiency and fieldability in the optimized configuration, the detector efficiency could be higher than 70%.

  18. Analytical design of an advanced radial turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Large, G.D.; Finger, D.G.; Linder, C.G.

    1981-02-01

    The analytical design of an advanced radial turbine, which is part of an optimum ceramic radial inflow, single-stage turbine system for an advanced automotive gas turbine engine is reported. The turbine study program is based on an advanced gas turbine cycle, 100.67-kW (135-shp) engine for use in a 1588-kg (3500-lb) automobile, with a specific fuel consumption of 0.227 kg/kW-hr (0.373 lb/hp-hr). Utilization of high turbine cycle temperatures of 1370/sup 0/C and ceramic materials are prime features of this study. The program objective was to investigate the effects of tip speed, non-radial rotor blading, inducer-to-exducer work split, and deswirl vanes on the system efficiency and mechanical reliability of a single-stage, ceramic, radial turbine designed to meet the performance requirements of an advanced automotive gas turbine cycle. Analysis results indicate that, based on projected 1983 aerodynamic performance and ceramic material properties, radial blade rotor configurations with a tip speed of 701 m/sec (2300 fps) are feasible and satisfy the goals of 87.0% system efficiency and 0.9999 cumulative probability of success mechanically. As compared with the blade stress complications of nonradial rotor configurations, from aerodynamic, mechanical, and off-design considerations, the radial-blade rotor appears to offer the lowest overall risk and is the optimum configuration considered in this study.

  19. An investigation of aerogels, foams, and foils for multi-wire proportional counter neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kyle Alan

    The 3He gas shortage for neutron detection has caused an increase in research efforts to develop viable alternative technologies. 3He neutron detectors cover areas ranging from 10-1000 cm2 in cylindrical form factors and are ideal for many nuclear applications due to their high intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency (> 80%) and gamma-ray discrimination (GRR ≤ 1 x 10-6) capabilities. Neutron monitoring systems for nuclear security applications include Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM’s), backpack, briefcase, and hand-held sensors. A viable replacement technology is presented here and compares three neutron detectors, each with different neutron absorber materials, to current 3He standards. These materials include Li and/or B silica aerogels, LiF impregnated foams, and metallic Li foils. Additionally, other neutron absorbing materials were investigated in this work and include LiF coated Mylar, B foils, BN coated carbon foam, and BN coated plastic honeycomb. From theoretical calculations, the Li foil material showed the greatest promise as a viable 3He alternative, thus a majority of the research efforts were focused on this material. The new neutron detector was a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) constructed using alternating banks of anode wires and 95% enriched 6Li foils sheets spaced 1.63 cm apart. In total, six anode banks and five layers of foil were used, thus an anode wire bank was positioned on each side of a suspended foils. Reaction products from the 6Li(n,α)3H reaction were able to escape both side of a foil sheet simultaneously and be measured in the surrounding gas volume concurrently. This new concept of measuring both reaction products from a single neutron absorption in a solid-form absorber material increased the intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency and gamma-ray discrimination compared to coated gas-filled detectors. Three different sizes of Li foil MWPC neutron detectors were constructed ranging from 25-1250 cm2 and

  20. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  1. An Advance Organizer for Teaching Bacterial Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Heloiza R.; Marques, Marilis V.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic versatility of bacteria is a source of learning difficulty for students in classical microbiology courses. To facilitate the learning process, the authors developed an advance organizer. It consists of a set of six diagrams of metabolic pathways describing the basic living requirements of several types of bacteria: energy, carbon…

  2. The Advancement Value Chain: An Exploratory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Edward F., III

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of the value chain concept in 1985, several varying, yet virtually similar, value chains have been developed for the business enterprise. Shifting to higher education, can a value chain be found that links together the various activities of advancement so that an institution's leaders can actually look at the philanthropic…

  3. Assessing an Advanced Level Introductory Sociology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesler, Venessa A.; Fermin, Baranda J.; Schneider, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, the governing council of the American Sociological Association (ASA) appointed Professor Caroline Persell of New York University to launch a task force with the goal of creating an advanced high school sociology curriculum that would also be a model for introductory sociology courses in colleges and universities. The principle goal of the…

  4. An Advance Organizer for Teaching Bacterial Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Heloiza R.; Marques, Marilis V.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic versatility of bacteria is a source of learning difficulty for students in classical microbiology courses. To facilitate the learning process, the authors developed an advance organizer. It consists of a set of six diagrams of metabolic pathways describing the basic living requirements of several types of bacteria: energy, carbon…

  5. Benchmarking of activation reaction distribution in an intermediate energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Morev, Mikhail N; Hirota, Masahiro; Abe, Takuya; Koike, Yuya; Iwai, Satoshi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction rate depth profiles inside concrete shield irradiated by intermediate energy neutron were calculated using a Monte-Carlo code and compared with an experiment. An irradiation field of intermediate neutron produced in the forward direction from a thick (stopping length) target bombarded by 400 MeV nucleon(-1) carbon ions was arranged at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. Ordinary concrete shield of 90 cm thickness was installed 50 cm downstream the iron target. Activation detectors of aluminum, gold and gold covered with cadmium were inserted at various depths. Irradiated samples were extracted after exposure and gamma-ray spectrometry was performed for each sample. Comparison of experimental and calculated shows good agreement for both low- and high-energy neutron-induced reaction except for (27)Al(n,X)(24)Na reaction at the surface.

  6. New fabrication method for an ellipsoidal neutron focusing mirror with a metal substrate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiang; Takeda, Shin; Morita, Shin-ya; Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kato, Jun-ichi; Yamagata, Yutaka; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2014-10-06

    We propose an ellipsoidal neutron focusing mirror using a metal substrate made with electroless nickel-phosphorus (NiP) plated material for the first time. Electroless NiP has great advantages for realizing an ellipsoidal neutron mirror because of its amorphous structure, good machinability and relatively large critical angle of total reflection for neutrons. We manufactured the mirror by combining ultrahigh precision cutting and fine polishing to generate high form accuracy and low surface roughness. The form accuracy of the mirror was estimated to be 5.3 μm P-V and 0.8 μm P-V for the minor-axis and major-axis direction respectively, while the surface roughness was reduced to 0.2 nm rms. The effect of form error on focusing spot size was evaluated by using a laser beam and the focusing performance of the mirror was verified by neutron experiments.

  7. Characterization of an explosively bonded aluminum proton beam window for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Janney, Jim G; Parish, Chad M

    2014-01-01

    An effort is underway at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to change the design of the 1st Generation high-nickel alloy proton beam window (PBW) to one that utilizes aluminum for the window material. One of the key challenges to implementation of an aluminum PBW at the SNS was selection of an appropriate joining method to bond an aluminum window to the stainless steel bulk shielding of the PBW assembly. An explosively formed bond was selected as the most promising joining method for the aluminum PBW design. A testing campaign was conducted to evaluate the strength and efficacy of explosively formed bonds that were produced using two different interlayer materials: niobium and titanium. The characterization methods reported here include tensile testing, thermal-shock leak testing, optical microscopy, and advanced scanning electron microscopy. All tensile specimens examined failed in the aluminum interlayer and measured tensile strengths were all slightly greater than the native properties of the aluminum interlayer, while elongation values were all slightly lower. A leak developed in the test vessel with a niobium interlayer joint after repeated thermal-shock cycles, and was attributed to an extensive crack network that formed in a layer of niobium-rich intermetallics located on the bond interfaces of the niobium interlayer; the test vessel with a titanium interlayer did not develop a leak under the conditions tested. Due to the experience gained from these characterizations, the explosively formed bond with a titanium interlayer was selected for the aluminum PBW design at the SNS.

  8. Analysis of the in-vessel control rod guide tube and subpile room shielding design for the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Bucholz, J.A.; Engle, W.W. Jr.; Williams, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    An extensive sheilding analysis of the control rod guide tube (CRGT) and the subpile room was performed for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. A two-dimensional model for the CRGT and subpile room was developed. Coupled 39 neutron group and 44 gamma group calculations with the multigroup DORT discrete originates transport code were done using cross sections from the ANSL-V library including photoneutron production. Different shield designs were investigated with a shield thickness of 10 to 15 mm. None of the shields affected the neutron dose rate and gamma dose rate at the top of the subpile room, which were 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 5} mrem/h and 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 3} mrem/h, respectively. An L-shaped cylindrical boral shield positioned around the core pressure boundary tube at the bottom of the reflector vessel with the horizontal part extended over the whole bottom of the reflector vessel reduced the maximal displacements per atom (DPA) level and helium production level in the primary coolant supply adapter and its flange after 40 years of reactor operation from 1 and 500 appm to 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} and 2 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} appm compared with the unshielded arrangement. Shields of boral and hafnium with the horizontal part of the shield restricted to a radius of 485 mm gave a maximal DPA of 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -2} and a helium production of up to 20 appm. Heat loads of up to 70 W{center_dot}cm{sup -3} were calculated at the most exposed parts of the shield both for boral and hafnium shields. A depletion/activation analysis of the hafnium shield showed that at the most exposed part of the shield, the naturally occurring isotope {sup 177}Hf is 34% depleted at the end of two years of reactor operation. This high burnup is somewhat balanced by a subsequent buildup of {sup 178}Hf, {sup 179}Hf, and {sup 180}Hf. In all other parts of the shield, the burnup is much smaller.

  9. DOD's advanced thermionics program an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, T.R.

    1998-07-01

    The Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) manages a congressionally mandated program in advanced thermionics research. Guided by congressional language to advance the state-of-the-art in the US and support the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program, DSWA efforts concentrate on four areas: an electrically testable design of a high-performance, in-core thermionic fuel element (TFE), the ISUS program, a microminiature thermionic converter and several modeling efforts. The DSWA domestic program is augmented by several small contracts with Russian institutes, awarded under the former TOPAZ International Program that the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization transferred to DSWA. The design effort at General Atomics will result in an electrically testable, multi-cell TFE for in-core conversion, involving system design and advanced collector and emitter technologies. For the ISUS program, DSWA funded a portion of the engine ground demonstration, including development of the power management system and the planar diodes. Current efforts supporting ISUS include continued diode testing and developing an advanced planar diode. The MTC program seeks to design a mass producable, close-spaced thermionic converter using integrated circuit technologies. Modeling and analysis at DSWA involves development of the Reactor System Mass with Thermionics estimation model (RSMASS-T), developing a new thermionic theory, and reviewing applications for the MTC technology. The Russian deliverables include several reports and associated hardware that describe many of its state-of-the-art thermionic technologies and processes.

  10. Solutions of Boltzmann`s Equation for Mono-energetic Neutrons in an Infinite Homogeneous Medium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-11-30

    Boltzman's equation is solved for the case of monoenergetic neutrons created by a plane or point source in an infinite medium which has spherically symmetric scattering. The customary solution of the diffusion equation appears to be multiplied by a constant factor which is smaller than 1. In addition to this term the total neutron density contains another term which is important in the neighborhood of the source. It varies as 1/r{sup 2} in the neighborhood of a point source. (auth)

  11. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed.

  12. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using this method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors.

  13. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D{sub 2}O-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Elementary quantum mechanics of the neutron with an electric dipole moment

    PubMed Central

    Baym, Gordon; Beck, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    The neutron, in addition to possibly having a permanent electric dipole moment as a consequence of violation of time-reversal invariance, develops an induced electric dipole moment in the presence of an external electric field. We present here a unified nonrelativistic description of these two phenomena, in which the dipole moment operator, D→, is not constrained to lie along the spin operator. Although the expectation value of D→ in the neutron is less than 10−13 of the neutron radius, rn, the expectation value of D→ 2 is of order rn2. We determine the spin motion in external electric and magnetic fields, as used in past and future searches for a permanent dipole moment, and show that the neutron electric polarizability, although entering the neutron energy in an external electric field, does not affect the spin motion. In a simple nonrelativistic model we show that the expectation value of the permanent dipole is, to lowest order, proportional to the product of the time-reversal-violating coupling strength and the electric polarizability of the neutron. PMID:27325765

  15. Design of an electron-accelerator-driven compact neutron source for non-destructive assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, A.; Ikeda, S.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2017-09-01

    The threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism remains one of the greatest challenges to international security, and the threat is constantly evolving. In order to prevent nuclear terrorism, it is important to avoid unlawful import of nuclear materials, such as uranium and plutonium. Development of technologies for non-destructive measurement, detection and recognition of nuclear materials is essential for control at national borders. At Tokyo Institute of Technology, a compact neutron source system driven by an electron-accelerator has been designed for non-destructive assay (NDA). This system is composed of a combination of an S-band (2.856 GHz) RF-gun, a tungsten target to produce photons by bremsstrahlung, a beryllium target, which is suitable for use in generating neutrons because of the low threshold energy of photonuclear reactions, and a moderator to thermalize the fast neutrons. The advantage of this system can accelerate a short pulse beam with a pulse width less than 1 μs which is difficult to produce by neutron generators. The amounts of photons and neutron produced by electron beams were simulated using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS 2.82. When the RF-gun is operated with an average electron beam current of 0.1 mA, it is expected that the neutron intensities are 1.19 × 109 n/s and 9.94 × 109 n/s for incident electron beam energies of 5 MeV and 10 MeV, respectively.

  16. Elementary quantum mechanics of the neutron with an electric dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Baym, Gordon; Beck, D H

    2016-07-05

    The neutron, in addition to possibly having a permanent electric dipole moment as a consequence of violation of time-reversal invariance, develops an induced electric dipole moment in the presence of an external electric field. We present here a unified nonrelativistic description of these two phenomena, in which the dipole moment operator, [Formula: see text], is not constrained to lie along the spin operator. Although the expectation value of [Formula: see text] in the neutron is less than [Formula: see text] of the neutron radius, [Formula: see text], the expectation value of [Formula: see text] is of order [Formula: see text] We determine the spin motion in external electric and magnetic fields, as used in past and future searches for a permanent dipole moment, and show that the neutron electric polarizability, although entering the neutron energy in an external electric field, does not affect the spin motion. In a simple nonrelativistic model we show that the expectation value of the permanent dipole is, to lowest order, proportional to the product of the time-reversal-violating coupling strength and the electric polarizability of the neutron.

  17. Method of using deuterium-cluster foils for an intense pulsed neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Yang, Xiaoling

    2013-09-03

    A method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: providing a converter foil comprising deuterium clusters; focusing a laser on the foil with power and energy sufficient to cause deuteron ions to separate from the foil; and striking a surface of a target with the deuteron ions from the converter foil with energy sufficient to cause neutron production by a reaction selected from the group consisting of D-D fusion, D-T fusion, D-metal nuclear spallation, and p-metal. A further method is provided for assembling a plurality of target assemblies for a target injector to be used in the previously mentioned manner. A further method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: splitting a laser beam into a first beam and a second beam; striking a first surface of a target with the first beam, and an opposite second surface of the target with the second beam with energy sufficient to cause neutron production.

  18. Development of a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber for fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Unesaki, H; Misawa, T; Pyeon, C H; Shiroya, S; Matsumoto, T; Harano, H

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics of a reactor and a neutron generator, a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber with ThO(2) has been developed to measure fast neutrons. However, experimental facilities where (232)Th can be used are limited by regulations, and S/N ratio is low because the background counts of this detector are increase by alpha decay of (232)Th. The purpose of this study is to develop a new optical fiber detector for measuring fast neutrons that does not use nuclear material such as (232)Th. From the measured and calculated results, the new optical fiber detector which uses ZnS(Ag) as a converter material together with a scintillator have the highest detection efficiency among several developed detectors. It is applied for the measurement of reaction rates generated from fast neutrons; furthermore, the absolute detection efficiency of this detector was obtained experimentally.

  19. A station blackout simulation for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor using the integrated primary and secondary system model

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper deals with thermal-hydraulic analysis of ANSR`s cooling systems during nominal and transient conditions, with the major effort focusing upon the construction and testing of computer models of the reactor`s primary, secondary and reflector vessel cooling systems. The code RELAP5 was used to simulate transients, such as loss of coolant accidents and loss of off-site power, as well as to model the behavior of the reactor in steady state. Three stages are involved in constructing and using a RELAP5 model: (1) construction and encoding of the desired model, (2) testing and adjustment of the model until a satisfactory steady state is achieved, and (3) running actual transients using the steady-state results obtained earlier as initial conditions. By use of the ANSR design specifications, a model of the reactor`s primary and secondary cooling systems has been constructed to run a transient simulating a loss of off-site power. This incident assumes a pump coastdown in both the primary and secondary loops. The results determine whether the reactor can survive the transition from forced convection to natural circulation.

  20. Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) phenomena identification and ranking (PIR) for large break loss of coolant accidents (LBLOCA)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, A. E.; Cheng, L. Y.; Dimenna, R. A.; Griffith, P.; Wilson, G. E.

    1994-06-01

    A team of experts in reactor analysis conducted a phenomena identification and ranking (PIR) exercise for a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) in the Advanced Neutron source Reactor (ANSR). The LBLOCA transient is broken into two separate parts for the PIR exercise. The first part considers the initial depressurization of the system that follows the opening of the break. The second part of the transient includes long-term decay heat removal after the reactor is shut down and the system is depressurized. A PIR is developed for each part of the LBLOCA. The ranking results are reviewed to establish if models in the RELAP5-MOD3 thermalhydraulic code are adequate for use in ANSR LBLOCA simulations. Deficiencies in the RELAP5-MOD3 code are identified and existing data or models are recommended to improve the code for this application. Experiments were also suggested to establish models for situations judged to be beyond current knowledge. The applicability of the ANSR PIR results is reviewed for the entire set of transients important to the ANSR safety analysis.

  1. An epithermal neutron source for BNCT based on an ESQ-accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Kwan, J.; Phillips, T.L.; Reginato, L.L.; Wells, R.P.

    1997-07-01

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Neutrons will be produced via the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction at proton energies of about 2.5 MeV with subsequent moderation and filtering for shaping epithermal neutron beams for BNCT. Moderator, filter, and shielding assemblies have been modeled using MCNP. Head-phantom dose distributions have been calculated using the treatment planning software BNCT{_}RTPE. The simulation studies have shown that a proton beam current of {approximately} 20 mA is required to deliver high quality brain treatments in about 40 minutes. The results also indicate that significantly higher doses can be delivered to deep-seated tumors in comparison to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor beam. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is ideally suited to provide the high beam currents desired. A novel power supply utilizing the air-coupled transformer concept is under development. It will enable the ESQ-accelerator to deliver proton beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A lithium target has been designed which consists of a thin layer of lithium on an aluminum backing. Closely spaced, narrow coolant passages cut into the aluminum allow the removal of a 50kW heat-load by convective water cooling. The system under development is suitable for hospital installation and has the potential for providing neutron beams superior to reactor sources.

  2. Developing an in-situ Detector of Neutron-Induced Fission for Actinide Sputtering Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellers, Deion

    2016-09-01

    The physical mechanism describing the transfer of large amounts of energy due to fission in a material is not well understood and represents one of the modern challenges facing nuclear scientists, with applications including nuclear energy and national defense. Fission fragments cause damage to the material from sputtering of matter as they pass through or near the material's surface. We have developed a new technique at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for characterizing the ejecta by using ultracold neutrons (neutrons with kinetic energy less than 300 neV) to induce fission at finely controlled depths in an actinide. This program will ultimately provide a detailed description of the properties of the sputtered particles as a function of the depth of the fission in the material. A key component of this project is accurately quantifying the number of neutron induced fissions in the sample. This poster depicts the development of an in-situ detector of neutron-induced fission for the AShES (Actinide Sputtering from ultracold neutron Exposure at the Surface) experiment.

  3. Design of thermal neutron beam based on an electron linear accelerator for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, Mona; Sedaghatizadeh, Mahmood

    2016-12-01

    An electron linear accelerator (Linac) can be used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by producing thermal neutron flux. In this study, we used a Varian 2300 C/D Linac and MCNPX.2.6.0 code to simulate an electron-photoneutron source for use in BNCT. In order to decelerate the produced fast neutrons from the photoneutron source, which optimize the thermal neutron flux, a beam-shaping assembly (BSA) was simulated. After simulations, a thermal neutron flux with sharp peak at the beam exit was obtained in the order of 3.09×10(8)n/cm(2) s and 6.19×10(8)n/cm(2) s for uranium and enriched uranium (10%) as electron-photoneutron sources respectively. Also, in-phantom dose analysis indicates that the simulated thermal neutron beam can be used for treatment of shallow skin melanoma in time of about 85.4 and 43.6min for uranium and enriched uranium (10%) respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The Response of an Albedo Neutron Dosimeter to Moderated AmBe and 252(Cf) Neutron Sources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    20814 G. K. RIEL, K. Woo, J. C . Y. WANG, AND N . E. SCOFIELD Naval Surjace Weapons Center, White Oak Silver Spring, MD 20910 July 23, 1985 NAVAL RESEARCH...LA80RATORY Approved for public release-, distribution unlimited. -z Z-VP 9 S C .- ,1CASS- c CAflON OF TH!S PAGE- REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE * ~ ! R...GROUP -~Persunnel radiation monitoring, Neutron dosimetry, .2 ___________________________Radiation dosimetry / Albedo neutron dosimetry N ~~Neutrons

  5. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    DOEpatents

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  6. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  7. Neutron science opportunities at pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Using the IPNS Upgrade plan developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a worked example of the design of a pulsed spallation neutron source, this paper explores some of the scientific applications of an advanced facility for materials science studies and the instrumentation for those purposes.

  8. Design of an advanced flight planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Goka, T.

    1985-01-01

    The demand for both fuel conservation and four-dimensional traffic management require that the preflight planning process be designed to account for advances in airborne flight management and weather forecasting. The steps and issues in designing such an advanced flight planning system are presented. Focus is placed on the different optimization options for generating the three-dimensional reference path. For the cruise phase, one can use predefined jet routes, direct routes based on a network of evenly spaced grid points, or a network where the grid points are existing navaid locations. Each choice has its own problem in determining an optimum solution. Finding the reference path is further complicated by choice of cruise altitude levels, use of a time-varying weather field, and requiring a fixed time-of-arrival (four-dimensional problem).

  9. Rapid prototyping of an advanced motion controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. S.

    This paper illustrates how, using existing research material, an advanced motion control system was developed both rapidly and economically. The paper emphasizes the approach used to put the system together, rather than the results of the evaluation (which is still under way). The system consists of a field-oriented controlled (FOC) induction motor, along with a pulse-population modulated current motor drive. Specific areas addressed in this paper include: a thorough overview of the technologies involved in the project (with emphasis on FOC theory); use of advanced simulation tools and models to aid in system design and debug; use of existing systems wherever possible to help speed up development; and developing the system in an environment suited to true development work.

  10. An overview of DANCE: a 4II BaF[2] detector for neutron capture measurements at LANSCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element, 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as 1 mg. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. Up to now, except for a few long-lived nuclides there are essentially no differential capture measurements on radioactive nuclei. The DANCE array is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE, which is a continuous-spectrum neutron source with useable energies from below thermal to about 100 keV. Data acquisition is done with 320 fast waveform digitizers. The design and initial performance results, including background minimization, will be discussed.

  11. An Advanced Telereflexive Tactical Response Robot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Autonomous Robots 1 1 ,3947 ,2001 @ 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands. An Advanced Telereflexive Tactical Response... Robot H.R. EVERETT, G.A. GILBREATH AND D.A. CICCIMARO SPAWAR Systems Center*, San Diego, Code D371, 53406 Woodward Road, San Diego, CA 92152-7383...centered mapping” strategy. Keywords: robotic sensors, tactical response robot robotics , teleoperated, telereflexive, non-lethal response, world modeling

  12. MANTA. An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    Neutron cross-sections characterize the way neutrons interact with matter. They are essential to most nuclear engineering projects and, even though theoretical progress has been made as far as the predictability of neutron cross-section models, measurements are still indispensable to meet tight design requirements for reduced uncertainties. Within the field of fission reactor technology, one can identify the following specializations that rely on the availability of accurate neutron cross-sections: (1) fission reactor design, (2) nuclear fuel cycles, (3) nuclear safety, (4) nuclear safeguards, (5) reactor monitoring and neutron fluence determination and (6) waste disposal and transmutation. In particular, the assessment of advanced fuel cycles requires an extensive knowledge of transuranics cross sections. Plutonium isotopes, but also americium, curium and up to californium isotope data are required with a small uncertainty in order to optimize significant features of the fuel cycle that have an impact on feasibility studies (e.g. neutron doses at fuel fabrication, decay heat in a repository, etc.). Different techniques are available to determine neutron cross sections experimentally, with the common denominator that a source of neutrons is necessary. It can either come from an accelerator that produces neutrons as a result of interactions between charged particles and a target, or it can come from a nuclear reactor. When the measurements are performed with an accelerator, they are referred to as differential since the analysis of the data provides the cross-sections for different discrete energies, i.e. σ(Ei), and for the diffusion cross sections for different discrete angles. Another approach is to irradiate a very pure sample in a test reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after

  13. Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project`s maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes.

  14. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma: An experimental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, B.S.; Larsson, B.; Roberto, A. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that some thioamides, e.g., thiouracil, are incorporated as false precursors into melanin during its synthesis. If boronated analogs of the thioamides share this property, the melanin of melanotic melanomas offers a possibility for specific tumoural uptake and retention of boron as a basis for neutron capture therapy. We report on the synthesis of boronated 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (B-TZT), boronated 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil (B-CTU), and boronated 5-diethylaminomethyl-2-thiouracil (B-DEAMTU) and the localization of these substances in melanotic melanomas transplanted to mice. The distribution in the mice was studied by boron neutron capture radiography. B-TZT and B-CTU showed the highest tumour:normal tissue concentration ratios, with tumour:liver ratios of about 4 and tumour:muscle ratios of about 14; B-DEAMTU showed corresponding ratios of 1.4 and 5, respectively. The absolute concentration of boron in the tumours, however, was more than three times higher in the mice injected with B-TZT, compared with B-CTU. The results suggest that B-TZT may be the most promising compound of the three tested with regard to possible therapy of melanotic melanomas.

  16. Proton Neutron Gamma-X Detection (PNGXD): An introduction to contrast agent detection during proton therapy via prompt gamma neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, James L.

    2017-09-01

    Proton therapy is an alternative external beam cancer treatment modality to the conventional linear accelerator-based X-ray radiotherapy. An inherent by-product of proton-nuclear interactions is the production of secondary neutrons. These neutrons have long been thought of as a secondary contaminant, nuisance, and source of secondary cancer risk. In this paper, a method is proposed to use these neutrons to identify and localize the presence of the tumor through neutron capture reactions with the gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent. This could provide better confidence in tumor targeting by acting as an additional quality assurance tool of tumor position during treatment. This effectively results in a neutron induced nuclear medicine scan. Gadolinium (Gd), is an ideal candidate for this novel nuclear contrast imaging procedure due to its unique nuclear properties and its widespread use as a contrast agent in MRI. Gd has one of the largest thermal neutron capture cross sections of all the stable nuclides, and the gadolinium-based contrast agents localize in leaky tissues and tumors. Initial characteristics of this novel concept were explored using the Monte Carlo code MCNP6. The number of neutron capture reactions per Gy of proton dose was found to be approximately 50,000 neutron captures/Gy, for a 8 cm3 tumor containing 300 ppm Gd at 8 cm depth with a simple simulation designed to represent the active delivery method. Using the passive method it is estimated that this number can be up to an order of magnitude higher. The thermal neutron distribution was found to not be localized within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) for this geometrical configuration and therefore would not allow for the identification of a geometric miss of the tumor by the proton SOBP. However, this potential method combined with nuclear medicine imaging and fused with online CBCT and prior MRI or CT imaging could help to identify tumor position during treatment. More computational and

  17. Benchmarking shielding simulations for an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGES

    Cherkashyna, Nataliia; Di Julio, Douglas D.; Panzner, Tobias; ...

    2015-08-09

    The shielding at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron facility plays a critical role in the performance of the neutron scattering instruments, the overall safety, and the total cost of the facility. Accurate simulation of shielding components is thus key for the design of upcoming facilities, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently in construction in Lund, Sweden. In this paper, we present a comparative study between the measured and the simulated neutron background at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland. The measurements were carried out at several positions along the SINQ monolithmore » wall with the neutron dosimeter WENDI-2, which has a well-characterized response up to 5 GeV. The simulations were performed using the Monte-Carlo radiation transport code Geant4, and include a complete transport from the proton beam to the measurement locations in a single calculation. An agreement between measurements and simulations is about a factor of 2 for the points where the measured radiation dose is above the background level, which is a satisfactory result for such simulations spanning many energy regimes, different physics processes and transport through several meters of shielding materials. The neutrons contributing to the radiation field emanating from the monolith were confirmed to originate from neutrons with energies above 1 MeV in the target region. The current work validates Geant4 as being well suited for deep-shielding calculations at accelerator-based spallation sources. We also extrapolate what the simulated flux levels might imply for short (several tens of meters) instruments at ESS.« less

  18. Propulsion technology for an advanced subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, M. A.; Antl, R. J.; Povolny, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Engine design studies for future subsonic commercial transport aircraft were conducted in parallel with airframe studies. These studies surveyed a broad distribution of design variables, including aircraft configuration, payload, range, and speed, with particular emphasis on reducing noise and exhaust emissions without severe economic and performance penalties. The results indicated that an engine for an advanced transport would be similar to the currently emerging turbofan engines. Application of current technology in the areas of noise suppression and combustors imposed severe performance and economic penalties.

  19. Postirradiation evaluations of capsules HANS-1 and HANS-2 irradiated in the HFIR target region in support of fuel development for the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Copeland, G.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, irradiation, and evaluation of two capsule tests containing U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel particles in contact with aluminum. The tests were in support of fuel qualification for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, a high-powered research reactor that was planned for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At the time of these tests, the fuel consisted of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, containing highly enriched uranium dispersed in aluminum at a volume fraction of {approximately}0.15. The extremely high thermal flux in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor provided up to 90% burnup in one 23-d cycle. Temperatures up to 450{degrees}C were maintained by gamma heating. Passive SiC temperature monitors were employed. The very small specimen size allowed only microstructural examination of the fuel particles but also allowed many specimens to be tested at a range of temperatures. The determination of fission gas bubble morphology by microstructural examination has been beneficial in developing a fuel performance model that allows prediction of fuel performance under these extreme conditions. The results indicate that performance of the reference fuel would be satisfactory under the ANS conditions. In addition to U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, particles of U{sub 3}Si, UAl{sub 2}, UAl{sub x}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were tested.

  20. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  1. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design of a 6-MV X-ray treatment room was inadequate to protect personnel from an accelerator neutron source operating at 30 mA, we decided to analyze and determine the shielding requirements of a treatment room for an ANIF. We determined the amount of shielding that would be sufficient to protect facility personnel from excessive radiation exposure caused by operation of the accelerator at 30 mA.

  2. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, A.; Mitchell, G.; Vieira, D.; Bredeweg, T.; Ullmann, J.; Jandel, M.; Couture, A.; Keksis, A.; Rundberg, R.; Wilhelmy, J.; O'Donnell, J.; Baramsai, B.; Haight, R.; Wouters, J.; Krticka, M.; Parker, W.; Becker, J.; Agvaanlusan, U.

    2009-10-01

    DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility. The absolute cross sections of the ^89Y(n,γ) reaction was measured for the first time ever in the neutron energy range of 10 eV -- 10 keV and improvements were made in the 10 -- 300 keV range. The error bars were significantly reduced and number of cross section points was increased since the past ^89Y(n,γ) experiments. The ^157Gd(n,γ) cross section was determined at En = 20 eV -- 300 keV by normalizing the experimental DANCE data to a well known resonance taken from the ENDF/B-VII library. Computer simulations of the ^157Gd(n,γ) cascades and DANCE pulse height function were made using DICEBOX and GEANT4 codes and simulated Esum and Eγ spectra are compared to the experimental DANCE data. Values of spin and photon strength function (PSF) of the ^157Gd(n,γ) resonances are provided in the range of En = 2 -- 300 eV using spin dependence upon a γ-ray multiplicity.

  3. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  4. Neutron supermirrors: an accurate theory for layer thickness computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael

    2001-11-01

    We present a new theory for the computation of Super-Mirror stacks, using accurate formulas derived from the classical optics field. Approximations are introduced into the computation, but at a later stage than existing theories, providing a more rigorous treatment of the problem. The final result is a continuous thickness stack, whose properties can be determined at the outset of the design. We find that the well-known fourth power dependence of number of layers versus maximum angle is (of course) asymptotically correct. We find a formula giving directly the relation between desired reflectance, maximum angle, and number of layers (for a given pair of materials). Note: The author of this article, a classical opticist, has limited knowledge of the Neutron world, and begs forgiveness for any shortcomings, erroneous assumptions and/or misinterpretation of previous authors' work on the subject.

  5. Neutron lifetime measurements and effective spectral cleaning with an ultracold neutron trap using a vertical Halbach octupole permanent magnet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. K. H.; Geltenbort, P.; Ivanov, S.; Rosenau, F.; Zimmer, O.

    2016-10-01

    Ultracold neutron (UCN) storage measurements were made in a trap constructed from a 1.3-T Halbach octupole permanent (HOPE) magnet array aligned vertically, using the TES port of the PF2 source at the Institut Laue-Langevin. A mechanical UCN valve at the bottom of the trap was used for filling and emptying. This valve was covered with Fomblin grease to induce nonspecular reflections and was used in combination with a movable polyethylene UCN remover inserted from the top for cleaning of above-threshold UCNs. Loss from UCN depolarization was suppressed with a minimum 2-mT bias field. Without using the UCN remover, a total storage time constant of (712 ±19 )s was observed; with the remover inserted for 80 s and used at either 80 cm or 65 cm from the bottom of the trap, time constants of (824 ±32 )s and (835 ±36 )s were observed. Combining the latter two values, a neutron lifetime of τn=(887 ±39 ) s is extracted after primarily correcting for losses at the UCN valve. The time constants of the UCN population during cleaning were observed and compared to calculations based on kinetic theory as well as Monte Carlo studies. These calculations are used to predict above-threshold populations of ˜5 % ,˜0.5 % , and ˜10-12% remaining after cleaning in the no-remover, 80-cm remover, and 65-cm remover measurements. Thus, by using a nonspecular reflector covering the entire bottom of the trap and a remover at the top of the trap, we have established an effective cleaning procedure for removing a major systematic effect in high-precision τn experiments with magnetically stored UCNs.

  6. An automated analysis workflow for optimization of force-field parameters using neutron scattering data

    DOE PAGES

    Lynch, Vickie E.; Borreguero, Jose M.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; ...

    2017-03-27

    Large-scale simulations and data analysis are often required to explain neutron scattering experiments to establish a connection between the fundamental physics at the nanoscale and data probed by neutrons. In order to perform simulations at experimental conditions it is critical to use correct force-field (FF) parameters which are unfortunately not available for most complex experimental systems. In this work, we have developed a workflow optimization technique to provide optimized FF parameters by comparing molecular dynamics (MD) to neutron scattering data. Here, we describe the workflow in detail by using an example system consisting of tRNA and hydrophilic nanodiamonds in amore » deuterated water (D2O) environment. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) data show a faster motion of the tRNA in the presence of nanodiamond than without the ND. In order to compare the QENS and MD results quantitatively, a proper choice of FF parameters is necessary. We use an efficient workflow to optimize the FF parameters between the hydrophilic nanodiamond and water by comparing to the QENS data. Our results show that we can obtain accurate FF parameters by using this technique. The workflow can be generalized to other types of neutron data for FF optimization, such as vibrational spectroscopy and spin echo.« less

  7. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Burlon, A A; Kreiner, A J; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon, and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  8. An automated analysis workflow for optimization of force-field parameters using neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Vickie E.; Borreguero, Jose M.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Proffen, Thomas E.; Goswami, Monojoy

    2017-07-01

    Large-scale simulations and data analysis are often required to explain neutron scattering experiments to establish a connection between the fundamental physics at the nanoscale and data probed by neutrons. However, to perform simulations at experimental conditions it is critical to use correct force-field (FF) parameters which are unfortunately not available for most complex experimental systems. In this work, we have developed a workflow optimization technique to provide optimized FF parameters by comparing molecular dynamics (MD) to neutron scattering data. We describe the workflow in detail by using an example system consisting of tRNA and hydrophilic nanodiamonds in a deuterated water (D2O) environment. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) data show a faster motion of the tRNA in the presence of nanodiamond than without the ND. To compare the QENS and MD results quantitatively, a proper choice of FF parameters is necessary. We use an efficient workflow to optimize the FF parameters between the hydrophilic nanodiamond and water by comparing to the QENS data. Our results show that we can obtain accurate FF parameters by using this technique. The workflow can be generalized to other types of neutron data for FF optimization, such as vibrational spectroscopy and spin echo.

  9. Neutron-halo nuclei in cold synthesis and cluster decay of heavy nuclei: {ital Z}=104 nucleus as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.K.; Singh, S.; Muenzenberg, G.; Scheid, W. ||

    1995-05-01

    Nuclei at the neutron-drip line are studied. The light neutron-halo nuclei are found to play an important role for both cold fusion reactions and exotic cluster decay studies of heavy nuclei at the neutron-drip line. For cold fusion reactions, beams of neutron-halo nuclei are shown to occur as natural extensions of the conventional lighter beams but with the corresponding target nuclei as the heavy neutron-rich radioactive nuclei. Thus, in synthesizing the various isotopes of a neutron-rich cool compound nucleus, both the target and projectile nuclei have to be richer in neutrons, with their proton numbers remaining the same. On the other hand, neutron-halo (cluster) decays are favored for a relatively less neutron-rich parent nucleus. Possible consequences of this work for the shell structure effects in neutron-rich heavy nuclei are also pointed out. This follows from the fact that the so far observed phenomena of both cold fusion and cluster radioactivity are associated with closed or nearly closed shell nuclei. Calculations are made for {sup 274,288}104, using the quantum mechanical fragmentation theory for cold fusion reaction studies and a performed cluster model for cluster decay studies.

  10. Private practice--an advanced practice option.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anne; Jarman, Heather

    2002-10-01

    Currently there is considerable debate on the role and function of nurses in Australia and internationally. This debate stems from developments within the nursing profession itself from political and economic issues in health platforms, due to restructuring of the health care system, consumer expectations of health care and nurses' expectations of a career. This paper provides the opportunity to reflect on the development of the role of the private practice (independent nurse) and where that role is situated in the nursing profession. This forms the basis for discussion of the development of specialty practice at an advanced level in Australia and to demonstrate its relationship with the nurse practitioner movement in Australia.

  11. Technology advancement of an oxygen generation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. K.; Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An oxygen generation subsystem based on water electrolysis was developed and tested to further advance the concept and technology of the spacecraft air revitalization system. Emphasis was placed on demonstrating the subsystem integration concept and hardware maturity at a subsystem level. The integration concept of the air revitalization system was found to be feasible. Hardware and technology of the oxygen generation subsystem was demonstrated to be close to the preprototype level. Continued development of the oxygen generation technology is recommended to further reduce the total weight penalties of the oxygen generation subsystem through optimization.

  12. Advances in neural networks research: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Robert; Bressler, Steven; Perlovsky, Leonid; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    The present Special Issue "Advances in Neural Networks Research: IJCNN2009" provides a state-of-art overview of the field of neural networks. It includes 39 papers from selected areas of the 2009 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN2009). IJCNN2009 took place on June 14-19, 2009 in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and it represents an exemplary collaboration between the International Neural Networks Society and the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society. Topics in this issue include neuroscience and cognitive science, computational intelligence and machine learning, hybrid techniques, nonlinear dynamics and chaos, various soft computing technologies, intelligent signal processing and pattern recognition, bioinformatics and biomedicine, and engineering applications.

  13. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  14. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the advanced neutron source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effect of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  17. A toroidal vortex field as an origin of the narrow mass spectrum of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The evolution and collapse of a gaseous, self-gravitating sphere in the presence of an internal massive toroidal vortex analogous to the vortex created by the toroidal magnetic field of the Sun is considered. When thermal pressure is taken into account, for sufficiently high masses, the instability is preserved even for a polytropic index γ < 4/3. In the case of a degenerate gas, the evolution of the electrons and neutrons differs appreciably. In the ultrarelativistic limit, an interval of stablemasses arises in a neutron gas, between a minimum mass that depends on the circulation velocity in the vortex and the critical mass for the formation of a black hole. This suggests toroidal vortex fields as a possible physical origin for the observed narrow spectrum of neutron-star masses.

  18. Overview of Spallation Neutron Source Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, G. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Muhrer, G.; Mezei, F.; Ferguson, P. D.

    In December 1971 , the world's most advanced steady-state research reactor, the High Flux Reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, reached full power operation. The reactor has recently undergone an extensive renovation, is equipped with hot and cold sources, and has a complement of word class instruments. As such, the ILL reactor is the worldwide center for neutron research at a reactor installation. With present technology, the constraints of heat removal and fuel cost place a limit on the available flux of a steadystate research reactor at levels not much higher than that of the ILL reactor. There has been extensive progress worldwide to realize new high-flux neutron facilities using the technology of spallation. When coupled with the spallation process in appropriate target materials, highpower accelerators can be used to produce large numbers of neutrons, thus providing an alternate method to the use of nuclear reactors for this purpose. Spallation technology has recently become increasingly focussed on pulsed spallation neutron sources. Pulsed spallation neutron sources avoid the limitations of high time-average heat removal by producing neutrons for only a small fraction of the time. Also, the amount of energy deposited per useful neutron produced from spallation is less than that from fission. During the pulse, the available neutron flux from a pulsed spallation source can be much more intense than that obtainable in a steady-state reactor. Furthermore, pulsed neutron sources have certain unique features, which open up qualitatively new areas of science, which are not accessible to steady-state reactors. We discuss here the spallation process and spallation neutron sources. We compare the qualitative differences between fission and spallation and provide absolute neutron intensities for cold neutron production from a liquid H2, moderator at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) short-pulse pulsed spallation

  19. METHOD OF INITIATING AND SUSTAINING AN ENERGETIC PLASMA FOR NEUTRON PRODUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Mackin, R.J. Jr.; Simon, A.

    1961-08-22

    A method for producing an energetic plasma for neutron production and for faeling this plasma once it is formed is described. The plasma is initially fonmed as set forth in U. S. Patent No. 2,969,308. After the plasma is formed, cold neutral particles with an energy of at least 1 Kev are injected in a radial directinn and transverse to the axis of the device. These cold particles are substituted for the molecular ion injection and are used for fueling the plasma device on a continuous regulated basis in order to maintain a reaction temperature of about 60 Kev for producing neutrons. (AE C)

  20. High conduction neutron absorber to simulate fast reactor environment in an existing test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Larry R. Greenwood; James R. Parry

    2014-06-22

    A new metal matrix composite material has been developed to serve as a thermal neutron absorber for testing fast reactor fuels and materials in an existing pressurized water reactor. The performance of this material was evaluated by placing neutron fluence monitors within shrouded and unshrouded holders and irradiating for up to four cycles. The monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and X-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. Adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins—thermal, epithermal, and fast—to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. A comparison of shrouded and unshrouded fluence monitors shows a thermal fluence decrease of ~11 % for the shielded monitors. Radioisotope activity and mass for each of the major activation products is given to provide insight into the evolution of thermal absorption cross-section during irradiation. The thermal neutron absorption capability of the composite material appears to diminish at total neutron fluence levels of ~8 × 1025 n/m2. Calculated values for dpa in excess of 2.0 were obtained for two common structural materials (iron and nickel) of interest for future fast flux experiments.

  1. Neutrons as Party Animals: An Analogy for Understanding Heavy-Element Fissility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2012-12-01

    I teach a general education class on the history of nuclear physics and the Manhattan Project. About halfway through the course we come to the discovery of fission and Niels Bohr's insight that it is the rare isotope of uranium, U-235, which fissions under slow-neutron bombardment as opposed to the much more common U-238 isotope. As an "explanation" of the differing responses of the two isotopes to bombarding neutrons, I use the known (measured) masses of the various isotopes involved to compute the energies released upon neutron capture and then compare them to the fission barriers of the "compound" nuclei so formed (U-236 and U-239). The energy released in the (neutron + U-235) reaction exceeds the fission barrier by about one million electron-volts (1 MeV), while that for the (neutron + U-238) case falls about 1.6 MeV short. (The fission barriers are respectively about 5.7 and 6.5 MeV.)

  2. Implementation of an enhanced, permanently installed neutron activation diagnostic hardware for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovec, Donald R.; Edwards, Ellen R.; Carrera, Jorge A.; Yeamans, Charles B.

    2015-08-01

    Neutron activation diagnostics are commonly employed as baseline neutron yield and relative spatial flux measurement instruments. Much insight into implosion performance has been gained by deployment of up to 19 identical activation diagnostic samples distributed around the target chamber at unique angular locations. Their relative simplicity and traceability provide neutron facilities with a diagnostic platform that is easy to implement and verify. However, the current National Ignition Facility (NIF) implementation relies on removable activation samples, creating a 1-2 week data turn-around time and considerable labor costs. The system described here utilizes a commercially-available lanthanum bromide (cerium-doped) scintillator with an integrated MCA emulator as the counting system and a machined zirconium-702 cap as the activation medium. The device is installed within the target bay and monitored remotely. Additionally, this system allows the placement of any activation medium tailored to the specific measurement needs. We discuss the design and function of a stand-alone and permanently installed neutron activation detector unit to measure the yield and average energy of a nominal 14 MeV neutron source with a pulse length less than one nanosecond.

  3. Bis(pinacolato)diboron as an additive for the detection of thermal neutrons in plastic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahl, Adam; Yemam, Henok A.; Stuntz, John; Remedes, Tyler; Sellinger, Alan; Greife, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    A readily available and inexpensive boron compound was tested as an additive for the detection of thermal neutrons in plastic scintillators. Bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2Pin2) was determined to be a compatible boron source (8.51 wt% boron, 1.70 wt% 10B) in poly(vinyltoluene) based matrices. Plastic scintillator blends of 1-20 wt% 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO), 0.1 wt% 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl) benzene (POPOP) and 1-15 wt% B2Pin2 were prepared that provided optical clarity, good mechanical properties, and the capability of thermal neutron detection. Independent of B2Pin2 concentration, strong 10B neutron capture signals around 90 keVee were observed at essentially constant light output. Increasing PPO concentration allowed for the use of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in both fast and thermal neutron detection. High PPO concentrations appear to cause additional alpha quenching that affected the 10B neutron capture signal. Aging effects after storage in air for several months were observed, which led to degradation of performance and in some samples of mechanical stability.

  4. Design studies related to an in vivo neutron activation analysis facility for measuring total body nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Stamatelatos, I E; Chettle, D R; Green, S; Scott, M C

    1992-08-01

    Design studies relating to an in vivo prompt capture neutron activation analysis facility measuring total body nitrogen are presented. The basis of the design is a beryllium-graphite neutron collimator and reflector configuration for (alpha, n) type radionuclide neutron sources (238PuBe or 241AmBe), so as to reflect leaking, or out-scattered, neutrons towards the subject. This improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to dose and the spatial distribution of thermal flux achieved with these sources, whilst retaining their advantage of long half-lives as compared to 252Cf based systems. The common problem of high count-rate at the detector, and therefore high nitrogen region of interest background due to pile-up, is decreased by using a set of smaller (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(Tl) detectors instead of large ones. The facility described presents a relative error of nitrogen measurement of 3.6% and a nitrogen to background ratio of 2.3 for 0.45 mSv skin dose (assuming ten 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm NaI(Tl) detectors).

  5. An Evaluation of Monte Carlo Simulations of Neutron Multiplicity Measurements of Plutonium Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John; Miller, Eric; Solomon, Clell J. Jr.; Dennis, Ben; Meldrum, Amy; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara

    2012-06-21

    In January 2009, Sandia National Laboratories conducted neutron multiplicity measurements of a polyethylene-reflected plutonium metal sphere. Over the past 3 years, those experiments have been collaboratively analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations conducted by University of Michigan (UM), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and North Carolina State University (NCSU). Monte Carlo simulations of the experiments consistently overpredict the mean and variance of the measured neutron multiplicity distribution. This paper presents a sensitivity study conducted to evaluate the potential sources of the observed errors. MCNPX-PoliMi simulations of plutonium neutron multiplicity measurements exhibited systematic over-prediction of the neutron multiplicity distribution. The over-prediction tended to increase with increasing multiplication. MCNPX-PoliMi had previously been validated against only very low multiplication benchmarks. We conducted sensitivity studies to try to identify the cause(s) of the simulation errors; we eliminated the potential causes we identified, except for Pu-239 {bar {nu}}. A very small change (-1.1%) in the Pu-239 {bar {nu}} dramatically improved the accuracy of the MCNPX-PoliMi simulation for all 6 measurements. This observation is consistent with the trend observed in the bias exhibited by the MCNPX-PoliMi simulations: a very small error in {bar {nu}} is 'magnified' by increasing multiplication. We applied a scalar adjustment to Pu-239 {bar {nu}} (independent of neutron energy); an adjustment that depends on energy is probably more appropriate.

  6. Tritium Removal System for Airtight Room in High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor (HANARO) - 12110

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Sung Paal; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Hyung-Kyoo; Jung, Hoan Sung; Lee, Cheo Kyung; Yoo, Sun Kyun

    2012-07-01

    An Airtight room was installed to prevent the diffusion of tritium from the instrument room to other areas in HANARO. It was isolated by a robust structure and the inside was closed tightly. A Tritium removal system located outside the instrument room was connected to the airtight room to lower the tritium concentration when the workers enter the room for maintenance of the instruments. The tritium concentration and the dew point in the airtight room were continuously measured during the operation of the tritium removal system. The data were analyzed by using a model. There was a difference between the measured tritium concentration and the one obtained by the model. It is believed that the difference is due to the change of the generation rate of tritium which would increase as the dew point becomes lower. Based on this assumption, the previous equation was revised to better express the performance of the tritium removal system. It was re-estimated that the change of tritium concentration in an airtight room could be predicted well by using a model and equation proposed in the previous study. It was confirmed that there was a definite difference between the measured tritium concentration and the one obtained by equation from the model. It is believed that the difference is due to the change of the generation rate of tritium which would increase as the dew point becomes lower. Based on this assumption, the generation rate of tritium was controlled to have higher value and the change of tritium concentration in airtight room could be more correctly predicted. By using the revised equation, the tritium removal system would be operated more effectively. (authors)

  7. Neutron crystallography: opportunities, challenges, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Langan, Paul; Niimura, Nobuo; Podjarny, Alberto

    2008-10-01

    Neutron crystallography has had an important, but relatively small role in structural biology over the years. In this review of recently determined neutron structures, a theme emerges of a field currently expanding beyond its traditional boundaries, to address larger and more complex problems, with smaller samples and shorter data collection times, and employing more sophisticated structure determination and refinement methods. The origin of this transformation can be found in a number of advances including first, the development of neutron image-plates and quasi-Laue methods at nuclear reactor neutron sources and the development of time-of-flight Laue methods and electronic detectors at spallation neutron sources; second, new facilities and methods for sample perdeuteration and crystallization; third, new approaches and computational tools for structure determination.

  8. Science Opportunities at ORNL Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Ian

    2010-02-03

    The Neutron Sciences Directorate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates two of the most advanced neutron scattering research facilities in the world: the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Our vision is to provide unprecedented capabilities for understanding structure and properties across the spectrum of biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering, and to stay at the leading edge of neutron science by developing new instruments, tools, and services. This talk will provide an update on the operations of the two research facilities and highlight the significant research that is emerging. For example, scientists from ORNL are at the forefront of research on a new class of iron-based superconductors based on experiments performed at the Triple-Axis Spectrometer at HFIR and ARCS at SNS. The complementary nature of neutron and x-ray techniques will be discussed to spark discussion among attendees.

  9. Deuterium z-pinch as a powerful source of multi-MeV ions and neutrons for advanced applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Shishlov, A. V.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kubes, P.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Rezac, K.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Dudkin, G. N.; Fursov, F. I.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Krasa, J.; Kravarik, J.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Orcikova, H.; Padalko, V. N.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Sila, O.; Turek, K.; Varlachev, V. A.; Velyhan, A.; Wagner, R.

    2016-03-01

    A novel configuration of a deuterium z-pinch has been used to generate a nanosecond pulse of fast ions and neutrons. At a 3 MA current, the peak neutron yield of (3.6 ± 0.5) × 1012 was emitted within 20 ns implying the production rate of 1020 neutrons/s. High neutron yields resulted from the magnetization of MeV deuterons inside plasmas. Whereas deuterons were trapped in the radial direction, a lot of fast ions escaped the z-pinch along the z-axis. A large number of >25 MeV ions were emitted into a 250 mrad cone. The cut-off energy of broad energy spectra of hydrogen ions approached 40 MeV. The total number of >1 MeV and >25 MeV deuterons were 1016 and 1013, respectively. Utilizing these ions offers a real possibility of various applications, including the increase of neutron yields or the production of short-lived isotopes in samples placed in ion paths. On the basis of our experiments with various samples, we concluded that a single shot would have been sufficient to obtain GBq positron activity of 13N isotopes via the 12C(d,n)13N reaction. Furthermore, the first z-pinch generated neutron radiograph produced by ≈20 ns pulses is presented in this paper.

  10. Development of an advanced electromagnetic gun barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, T. W.; D'Aoust, J.; Sevier, L.; Johnson, R.; Wesley, J.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced EM gun (AEMG) barrel was developed for the USAF Wright Laboratory to repetitively accelerate large-mass projectiles. The AEMG barrel employed 5-m rails, had a 50 mm square bore, and was designed to operate at a peak current of 1.5 MA (bore pressure 25 ksi). Key technical achievements included (1) an efficient barrel containment structure that weighs approximately 25 percent of a similarly rated clamped barrel, (2) an insulator material that retains surface resistivity after repeated firings, and (3) a high-velocity water cooling system designed to remove a peak heat flux of 5 MJ/sq m per shot. The AEMG barrel's thermal management system employed a 500 psi blowdown system that generated high velocity coolant flow rates in five axial coolant channels within each rail. Innovative fabrication processes were used to develop the barrel. A 2-m prototype of the AEMG barrel was tested in the General Atomics 4 MJ EM launcher test facility.

  11. An aerial radiological survey of the neutron products company and surrounding area

    SciTech Connect

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1994-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from November 1-10, 1993, over the Neutron Products Company and neighboring areas. The company, located in Dickerson, Maryland, has two major operations involving the radioisotope cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co)-the manufacture of commercial {sup 60}Co sources and the sterilization of medical products by exposure to radiation. The sterilization facility consists of two {sup 60}Co sources with activities of approximately 500,000 and 1,500,000 Ci, respectively. The purpose of the aerial survey was to detect and document any anomalous gamma-emitting radionuclides in the environment which may have resulted from operations of the Neutron Products Company. The survey covered two areas: the first was a 6.5- by 6.5-kilometer area centered over the Neutron Products facility; the second area was a 2- by 2.5-kilometer region surrounding a waste pumping station on Muddy Branch in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This site is approximately fifteen kilometers southeast of the Neutron Products facility and was included because sanitary and other liquid waste materials from the plant site are being disposed of at the pumping station. Contour maps showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level, overlaid on an aerial photo of the area, were constructed from the data measured during the flights. The exposure rates measured within the survey regions were generally uniform and typical of rates resulting from natural background radiation. Only one area showed an enhanced exposure rate not attributable to natural background. This area, located directly over the Neutron Products facility, was analyzed and identified as {sup 60}Co, the radioisotope used in the irradiation and source production operations conducted at the Neutron Products Company. The measurements over the Muddy Branch area in Gaithersburg were typical of natural background radiation and showed no evidence of {sup 60}Co or any other man-made radionuclide.

  12. Simulation of the response functions of an extended range neutron multisphere spectrometer using FLUKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pan-Feng; Ding, Ya-Dong; Wang, Qing-Bin; Ma, Zhong-Jian; Guo, Si-Ming; Li, Guan-Jia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the distribution of radiation field in the CSNS spectrometer hall at Dongguan, China, was simulated by the FLUKA program. The results show that the radiation field of the high energy proton accelerator is dominated by neutron radiation, with a broad range of neutron energies, spanning about eleven orders of magnitude. Simulation and calculation of the response functions of four Bonner spheres with a simplified model is done with FLUKA and MCNPX codes respectively, proving the feasibility of the FLUKA program for this application and the correctness of the calculation method. Using the actual model, we simulate and calculate the energy response functions of Bonner sphere detectors with polyethylene layers of different diameters, including detectors with lead layers, using the FLUKA code. Based on the simulation results, we select eleven detectors as the basic structure for an Extended Range Neutron Multisphere Spectrometer (ERNMS).

  13. Using polycrystalline bismuth filter in an ultracold neutron source with superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Runov, V. V.; Ivanov, S. A.; Onegin, M. S.; Fomin, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Placing polycrystalline bismuth filter in front of an ultracold neutron (UCN) source with superfluid helium at 1 K is shown to be effective. The use of this filter ensures a 30-fold decrease (down to 0.5 W) in the level of heat load in the UCN source, while reducing by 30% the flux of neutrons with 9-Å wavelength (which are converted into UCNs). The phenomenon of small-angle scattering on polycrystalline bismuth has been studied and shown to be insignificant. Cooling of the filter to liquid nitrogen temperature increases the transmission of 9-Å neutrons by only 8%; hence, creation of this cooling system is inexpedient. A project of a technological complex designed for the UCN source at the PIK reactor is presented, which ensures the removal of 1-W heat load from the UCN source with superfluid helium at a 1-K temperature level.

  14. NOPTREX, An Experiment to Search for T Violation in Polarized Neutron Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curole, Jonathan; Snow, William

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive experimental searches for new sources of time reversal violation can uncover new phenomena beyond the Standard Model of particle physics and may be important for our understanding of the baryon asymmetry of the universe. We describe the concept behind an experimental search for a P-odd and T-odd term in the polarized neutron-polarized nucleus forward scattering amplitude. This takes advantage of the approximate 105-106 amplification of P-odd amplitudes in certain epithermal p-wave n-A resonances in nuclei such as 139La. A measurement of such a P-odd/T-odd forward amplitude constitutes a null test for T violation. Recent developments of MW-class spallation neutron sources, neutron polarization technology using 3He, and a motion-reversal-based measurement strategy enable a scientifically interesting sensitivity.

  15. Optimization of the steady neutron source technique for absorption cross section measurement by using an 124Sb-Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Gardner, Robin P.

    2004-01-01

    An improved experimental approach has been developed to determine thermal neutron absorption cross sections. It uses an 124Sb-Be neutron source which has an average neutron energy of only about 12 keV. It can be moderated in either a water tank or a paraffin filled box and can be used for aqueous or powder samples. This new design is first optimized by MCNP simulation and then benchmarked and calibrated with experiments to verify the simulations and realize the predicted improved measurement sensitivity and reproducibility. The 124Sb-Be source device is from 1.35 to 1.71 times more sensitive than the previous method based on the use of a 252Cf source.

  16. Requirements for an Advanced Ocean Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; McClain, Charles R.; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Bailey, Sean W.; Barnes, Robert A.; Brown, Steven; Eplee, Robert E.; Franz, Bryan; Holmes, Alan; Monosmith, W. Bryan; Patt, Frederick S.; Stumpf, Richard P.; Turpie, Kevin R.; Werdell, P. Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This document suggests requirements for an advanced ocean radiometer, such as e.g. the ACE (Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystem) ocean radiometer. The ACE ocean biology mission objectives have been defined in the ACE Ocean Biology white paper. The general requirements presented therein were chosen as the basis for the requirements provided in this document, which have been transformed into specific, testable requirements. The overall accuracy goal for the advanced ocean radiometer is that the total radiometric uncertainties are 0.5% or smaller for all bands. Specific mission requirements of SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS were often used as a model for the requirements presented here, which are in most cases more demanding than the heritage requirements. Experience with on-orbit performance and calibration (from SeaWiFS and MODIS) and prelaunch testing (from SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS) were important considerations when formulating the requirements. This document describes requirements in terms of the science data products, with a focus on qualities that can be verified by prelaunch radiometric characterization. It is expected that a more comprehensive requirements document will be developed during mission formulation

  17. Measurement and calculation of the emission anisotropy of an X1 252Cf neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, N P; Freedman, R; Tagziria, H; Thomas, D J

    2007-01-01

    The authors have measured the emission anisotropy from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source in an X1 encapsulation. The measurements were made in a large low-scatter laboratory using a long counter, and data were taken at angles varying in 10 degrees steps from 0 degrees to 180 degrees relative to the cylindrical axis of the source. Corrections were made for room scatter, loss of neutrons due to air scatter and detector dead time. Calculations corresponding to these measurements were subsequently carried out using the two Monte Carlo codes MCNP and MCBEND, and the results are compared with the measurements and with each other.

  18. Intermolecular associations in an equimolar formamide-water solution based on neutron scattering and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoulahi, Hafedh; Ghalla, Houcine; Nasr, Salah; Darpentigny, Jacques; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-10-07

    In the present work, we have investigated the intermolecular associations of formamide with water in an equimolar formamide-water solution (FA-Water) by means of neutron scattering in combination with density functional theory calculations. The neutron scattering data were analyzed to deduce the structure factor SM(q) and the intermolecular pair correlation function gL(r). By considering different hydrogen bonded FA-Water associations, it has been shown that some of them describe well the local order in the solution. Natural bond orbital and atoms in molecules analyses have been performed to give more insight into the properties of hydrogen bonds involved in the more probable models.

  19. The 10B based Jalousie neutron detector - An alternative for 3He filled position sensitive counter tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henske, M.; Klein, M.; Köhli, M.; Lennert, P.; Modzel, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, U.

    2012-09-01

    Over the last decades 3He filled proportional counter tubes were the working horse employed to serve as neutron counters especially in cases where large area coverage was required. Today the lack of 3He demands the development of an alternative technology. Here we present a prototype neutron detector that is based on a concept with solid 10B as neutron converter and aims for large area neutron detection applications. We report on first experimental results obtained with this prototype to demonstrate the feasibility and operational readiness of our concept.

  20. Emulation of an Advanced G-Seat on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    ASPT ) which culminated in the emulation of an advanced approach to G-seat simulation. The development of the software, the design of the advanced seat...components, the implementation of the advanced design on the ASPT , and the results of the study are presented. (Author)

  1. Neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice; Menelle, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples) and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  2. Synthesis of New Neutron Rich Heavy Nuclei:. AN Experimentalist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveland, W.

    2014-09-01

    I attempt to experimentally evaluate the prospects of synthesizing new neutronrich superheavy nuclei. I consider three possible synthetic paths to neutronrich superheavy nuclei: (a) the use of neutron-rich radioactive beams. (b) the use of damped collisions and (c) the use of multi-nucleon transfer reactions. I consider the prospects of synthesizing new n-rich isotopes of Rf-Bh using light n-rich radioactive beams and targeted beams from ReA3, FRIB and SPIRAL2. For the damped collision path, I present the results of a study of a surrogate reaction, 160Gd + 186W. These data indicate the formation of Au (trans-target) fragments and the depletion of yields of target-like fragments by fission and fragment emission. The data are compared to predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner. For the multi-nucleon transfer reactions, the results of a study of the 136Xe + 208Pb reaction are discussed. I consider the possibility of multi-nucleon transfer reactions with radioactive beams.

  3. Thin film CdTe based neutron detectors with high thermal neutron efficiency and gamma rejection for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L.; Murphy, J. W.; Kim, J.; Rozhdestvenskyy, S.; Mejia, I.; Park, H.; Allee, D. R.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B.

    2016-12-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors offer an alternative to 3He based detectors, but suffer from limited neutron efficiencies that make their use in security applications impractical. Solid-state neutron detectors based on single crystal silicon also have relatively high gamma-ray efficiencies that lead to false positives. Thin film polycrystalline CdTe based detectors require less complex processing with significantly lower gamma-ray efficiencies. Advanced geometries can also be implemented to achieve high thermal neutron efficiencies competitive with silicon based technology. This study evaluates these strategies by simulation and experimentation and demonstrates an approach to achieve >10% intrinsic efficiency with <10-6 gamma-ray efficiency.

  4. Study of the magnetic structure of multilayers and of an ultracold neutron storage anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, Dmitry

    This thesis describes the results of polarized neutron reflectometry experiments with spin-valve samples performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD). The study was motivated by the strong technological interest in spin-valve structures exhibiting the effect of giant magnetoresistance. This phenomenon has been widely utilized in a new generation of magnetoresistive memory, reading heads for magnetic disk drives, and field sensors. The study showed that the interfacial roughness strongly depends on the conditions of sample preparation. We have also observed a non-collinear coupling of magnetization between the ferromagnetic layers of the spin-valve samples. The signs of the coupling constants were determined from the neutron reflectometry data using a minimum energy model for the relative orientations of magnetization. The results are consistent with the theoretical values obtained from the RKKY model of oscillatory exchange coupling. We also present the results of specific ultracold neutron (UCN) storage experiments performed at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). We investigated certain anomalous features of UCN storage. The UCN were filled into a container whose walls were coated by a good neutron reflector (Fomblin grease). Then the neutrons were quickly removed by an absorber, until their residual density in the trap was measured to be negligible. Nevertheless, when the absorber was withdrawn, a measurable number of neutrons emerged from the trap. We have also found that application of a magnetic field gradient at the trap bottom as well as replacement of some Fomblin grease by liquid Fornblin oil gave rise to alterations of UCN count rate. These surprising phenomena are not well understood so far and require further experimental study.

  5. Metabolic Dysregulation after Neutron Exposures Expected from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Wang, Yi-Wen; Young, Erik F; Harken, Andrew D; Xu, Yanping; Smilenov, Lubomir; Garty, Guy Y; Brenner, David J; Fornace, Albert J

    2017-07-01

    The increased threat of terrorism across the globe has raised fears that certain groups will acquire and use radioactive materials to inflict maximum damage. In the event that an improvised nuclear device (IND) is detonated, a potentially large population of victims will require assessment for radiation exposure. While photons will contribute to a major portion of the dose, neutrons may be responsible for the severity of the biologic effects and cellular responses. We investigated differences in response between these two radiation types by using metabolomics and lipidomics to identify biomarkers in urine and blood of wild-type C57BL/6 male mice. Identification of metabolites was based on a 1 Gy dose of radiation. Compared to X rays, a neutron spectrum similar to that encountered in Hiroshima at 1-1.5 km from the epicenter induced a severe metabolic dysregulation, with perturbations in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation being the predominant ones. Urinary metabolites were able to discriminate between neutron and X rays on day 1 as well as day 7 postirradiation, while serum markers showed such discrimination only on day 1. Free fatty acids from omega-6 and omega-3 pathways were also decreased with 1 Gy of neutrons, implicating cell membrane dysfunction and impaired phospholipid metabolism, which should otherwise lead to release of those molecules in circulation. While a precise relative biological effectiveness value could not be calculated from this study, the results are consistent with other published studies showing higher levels of damage from neutrons, demonstrated here by increased metabolic dysregulation. Metabolomics can therefore aid in identifying global perturbations in blood and urine, and effectively distinguishing between neutron and photon exposures.

  6. An advanced terrain modeler for an autonomous planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    A roving vehicle capable of autonomously exploring the surface of an alien world is under development and an advanced terrain modeler to characterize the possible paths of the rover as hazardous or safe is presented. This advanced terrain modeler has several improvements over the Troiani modeler that include: a crosspath analysis, better determination of hazards on slopes, and methods for dealing with missing returns at the extremities of the sensor field. The results from a package of programs to simulate the roving vehicle are then examined and compared to results from the Troiani modeler.

  7. Using an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Nuclear Fusion Device as a Pulsed Neutron Source: Optimizing the Pulse Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomo, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Pulsed neutron sources may prove to be valuable for detecting illicit nuclear materials in items being smuggled across borders or checkpoints. Work already accomplished by Sorebo et al. [1] at the U. of Wisconsin demonstrated the basic detection concept by successfully detecting delayed ^235U fission neutrons using neutron pulses generated by an IEC fusion device. Numerical studies imply the detection of the much more copious prompt induced-fission neutrons would be preferable; the experimental detection of prompt neutrons represents a challenge: the prompt, fission-produced neutron and interrogating neutron pulses may overlap. After IEC device operation and past work by Sorebo et al. are reviewed, efforts to produce a properly shaped interrogating neutron pulse are described. Efforts drawing, in part, on techniques used in hard-switched power inverters are highlighted.[4pt] [1] J.H. Sorebo, G.L. Kulcinski, R.F. Radel, and J.F. Santarius, ``Special Nuclear Materials Detection Using IEC Fusion Pulsed Neutron Source,'' Fusion Science and Technology 56, 540 (2009).

  8. An advanced domestic satellite communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An updated traffic projection for U.S. domestic satellite communications service covering a period of 15 years; mid-1980 to mid-1995 was prepared. This model takes into account expected technology advances and reductions in transmission costs, legislative and regulatory changes permitting increased competition, and rising energy costs which will encourage more extensive substitution of telecommunications for travel. The historical development and current status of satellite systems are discussed as well as the characteristics of follow-on systems. Orbital arc utilization, spacecraft configuration for single shuttle launch, Earth station configuration, and system costs are examined. Areas which require technology development include multiple beam frequency reuse antennas, on-board switching, intersatellite links, and ka-band operation. Packing and deployment schemes for enclosing the satellite within the shuttle orbiter bay must also be devised.

  9. An advanced maintenance free aircraft battery system

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, J.; Green, J.; Kulin, T.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes an advanced aircraft battery system designed to provide 20 years of maintenance free operation with the flexibility for use on all US Air Force aircraft. System, battery, and charger/analyzer requirements are identified. The final design approach and test results are also presented. There are two general approaches to reduce the maintenance cost of batteries. One approach is to develop a disposable battery system, such that after some time interval the battery is simply replaced. The other approach, the subject of this paper, is to develop a battery that does not require any scheduled maintenance for the design life of the aircraft. This approach is currently used in spacecraft applications where battery maintenance is not practical.

  10. Classification Studies in an Advanced Air Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routray, Sunita; Bhima Rao, R.

    2016-10-01

    In the present paper, experiments are carried out using VSK separator which is an advanced air classifier to recover heavy minerals from beach sand. In classification experiments the cage wheel speed and the feed rate are set and the material is fed to the air cyclone and split into fine and coarse particles which are collected in separate bags. The size distribution of each fraction was measured by sieve analysis. A model is developed to predict the performance of the air classifier. The objective of the present model is to predict the grade efficiency curve for a given set of operating parameters such as cage wheel speed and feed rate. The overall experimental data with all variables studied in this investigation is fitted to several models. It is found that the present model is fitting good to the logistic model.

  11. An advanced arc track resistant airframe wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tensolite, a custom cable manufacturer specializing in high temperature materials as the dielectric medium, develops an advance arc track resistant airframe wire called Tufflite 2000. Tufflite 2000 has the following advantages over the other traditional wires: lighter weight and smaller in diameter; excellent wet and dry arc track resistance; superior dynamic cut-through performance even at elevated temperatures; flight proven performance on Boeing 737 and 757 airplanes; and true 260 C performance by utilizing Nickel plated copper conductors. This paper reports the different tests performed on Tufflite 2000: accelerated aging, arc resistance (wet and dry), dynamic cut through, humidity resistance, wire-to-wire abrasion, flammability, smoke, weight, notch sensitivity, flexibility, and markability. It particularly focuses on the BSI (British Standards Institute) dry arc resistance test and BSI wet arc tracking.

  12. An advanced manned launch system concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, H. W.; Piland, W. M.

    1992-08-01

    A two-stage fully reusable rocked powered concept is defined and analyzed in detail for the Advanced Manned Launch System missions. The concept elements include a Mach 3 staging unmanned glideback booster and a 149-ft long winged orbiter with an external payload canister with a 15-ft diameter and 30-ft long payload bay. The booster and orbiter main propulsion system is a lightweight derivative of the current Space Shuttle Main Engine. The primary mission is the Space Station Freedom logistics mission, 40,000-lb payload with two crew members and eight passengers. The structural design and material selection, the thermal protection system, the integral cryogenic tanks and insulation, the propulsion system, and the modular payload canister system are described. The ground and flight operations approach analysis, the manufacturing and certification plan, and the technology development requirements are also discussed.

  13. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in Academia

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, Lynne M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To create an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) that would encourage students to consider a career in academia. Design A 6-week, 6-credit elective APPE was created that offered students the opportunity to observe and participate in activities consistent with a full-time faculty appointment. Assessment A 9-question survey instrument was administered to 27 students who completed the APPE between 2000 and 2004 to determine the impact of the APPE on the student's career choice. Sixteen (59%) of the 27 students returned the completed survey instrument. Ten of the 16 respondents noted that the APPE had influenced their pursuit of a position with a teaching component. Conclusion Offering APPEs in academia may encourage students to incorporate teaching and scholarship into their career plans. PMID:17149426

  14. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  15. Fast neutron radiation induced Glu-B1 deficient lines of an elite bread wheat variety

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Five isogenic wheat lines deficient in high-molecular weight subunit (HMW-GS) proteins encoded by the B-genome were identified from a fast-neutron radiation-mutagenized population of Summit, an elite variety of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The mutant lines differ from the wild-type progenit...

  16. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1983-09-13

    Disclosed is an apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon. 4 figs.

  17. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  18. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  19. Advanced optics in an interdisciplinary graduate program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nic Chormaic, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, established in November 2011, provides a 5- year interdisciplinary PhD program, through English, within Japan. International and Japanese students entering the program undertake coursework and laboratory rotations across a range of topics, including neuroscience, molecular science, physics, chemistry, marine science and mathematics, regardless of previous educational background. To facilitate interdisciplinarity, the university has no departments, ensuring seamless interactions between researchers from all sectors. As part of the PhD program a course in Advanced Optics has been developed to provide PhD students with the practical and theoretical skills to enable them to use optics tools in any research environment. The theoretical aspect of the course introduces students to procedures for complex beam generation (e.g. Laguerre-Gaussian), optical trapping, beam analysis and photon optics, and is supported through a practical program covering introductory interference/diffraction experiments through to more applied fiber optics. It is hoped that, through early exposure to optics handling and measurement techniques, students will be able to develop and utilize optics tools regardless of research field. In addition to the formal course in Advanced Optics, a selection of students also undertakes 13 week laboratory rotations in the Light-Matter Interactions research laboratory, where they work side-by-side with physicists in developing optics tools for laser cooling, photonics or bio-applications. While currently in the first year, conclusive results about the success of such an interdisciplinary PhD training are speculative. However, initial observations indicate a rich cross-fertilization of ideas stemming from the diverse backgrounds of all participants.

  20. Deuterium z-pinch as a powerful source of multi-MeV ions and neutrons for advanced applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A. V.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Fursov, F. I.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Krasa, J.; and others

    2016-03-15

    A novel configuration of a deuterium z-pinch has been used to generate a nanosecond pulse of fast ions and neutrons. At a 3 MA current, the peak neutron yield of (3.6 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 12} was emitted within 20 ns implying the production rate of 10{sup 20} neutrons/s. High neutron yields resulted from the magnetization of MeV deuterons inside plasmas. Whereas deuterons were trapped in the radial direction, a lot of fast ions escaped the z-pinch along the z-axis. A large number of >25 MeV ions were emitted into a 250 mrad cone. The cut-off energy of broad energy spectra of hydrogen ions approached 40 MeV. The total number of >1 MeV and >25 MeV deuterons were 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 13}, respectively. Utilizing these ions offers a real possibility of various applications, including the increase of neutron yields or the production of short-lived isotopes in samples placed in ion paths. On the basis of our experiments with various samples, we concluded that a single shot would have been sufficient to obtain GBq positron activity of {sup 13}N isotopes via the {sup 12}C(d,n){sup 13}N reaction. Furthermore, the first z-pinch generated neutron radiograph produced by ≈20 ns pulses is presented in this paper.

  1. Prototype Demonstration of Gamma- Blind Tensioned Metastable Fluid Neutron/Multiplicity/Alpha Detector – Real Time Methods for Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2016-12-20

    The content of this report summarizes a multi-year effort to develop prototype detection equipment using the Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector (TMFD) technology developed by Taleyarkhan [1]. The context of this development effort was to create new methods for evaluating and developing advanced methods for safeguarding nuclear materials along with instrumentation in various stages of the fuel cycle, especially in material balance areas (MBAs) and during reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. One of the challenges related to the implementation of any type of MBA and/or reprocessing technology (e.g., PUREX or UREX) is the real-time quantification and control of the transuranic (TRU) isotopes as they move through the process. Monitoring of higher actinides from their neutron emission (including multiplicity) and alpha signatures during transit in MBAs and in aqueous separations is a critical research area. By providing on-line real-time materials accountability, diversion of the materials becomes much more difficult. The Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector (TMFD) is a transformational technology that is uniquely capable of both alpha and neutron spectroscopy while being “blind” to the intense gamma field that typically accompanies used fuel – simultaneously with the ability to provide multiplicity information as well [1-3]. The TMFD technology was proven (lab-scale) as part of a 2008 NERI-C program [1-7]. The bulk of this report describes the advancements and demonstrations made in TMFD technology. One final point to present before turning to the TMFD demonstrations is the context for discussing real-time monitoring of SNM. It is useful to review the spectrum of isotopes generated within nuclear fuel during reactor operations. Used nuclear fuel (UNF) from a light water reactor (LWR) contains fission products as well as TRU elements formed through neutron absorption/decay chains. The majority of the fission products are gamma and beta emitters and they represent the

  2. ANEM: A rotating composite target to produce an atmospheric-like neutron beam at the LNL SPES facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta Urdaneta, Gabriela Carolina; Bisello, Dario; Esposito, Juan; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco; Prete, Gianfranco; Silvestrin, Luca; Wyss, Jeffery

    2016-09-01

    A fast neutron (E> MeV) irradiation facility is under development at the 70 MeV SPES proton cyclotron at LNL (Legnaro, Italy) to investigate neutron-induced Single Event Effects (SEE) in microelectronic devices and systems. After an overview on neutron-induced SEE in electronics, we report on the progress in the design of ANEM (Atmospheric Neutron EMulator), a water-cooled rotating target made of Be and W to produce neutrons with an energy spectrum similar to that of neutrons produced by cosmic rays at sea-level. In ANEM, the protons from the cyclotron alternatively impinge on two circular sectors of Be and W of different areas; the effective neutron spectrum is a weighted combination of the spectra from the two sectors. In this contribution, we present the results of thermal-mechanical Finite Element Analysis (ANSYS) calculations of the performance of the ANEM prototype. The calculations at this stage indicate that ANEM can deliver fast neutrons with an atmospheric-like energy spectrum and with an integral flux Φn(1-70 MeV) ˜107 n cm-2s-1 that is 3×109 more intense than the natural one at sea-level: a very competitive flux for SEE testing.

  3. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  4. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  5. An Assessment of the Potential Use of BNNTs for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tiago H.; Miranda, Marcelo C.; Rocha, Zildete; Leal, Alexandre S.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Sousa, Edesia M. B.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, nanostructured compounds have been standing out for their optical, mechanical, and chemical features and for the possibilities of manipulation and regulation of complex biological processes. One of these compounds is boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which are a nanostructured material analog to carbon nanotubes, but formed of nitrogen and boron atoms. BNNTs present high thermal stability along with high chemical inertia. Among biological applications, its biocompatibility, cellular uptake, and functionalization potential can be highlighted, in addition to its eased utilization due to its nanometric size and tumor cell internalization. When it comes to new forms of therapy, we can draw attention to boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), an experimental radiotherapy characterized by a boron-10 isotope carrier inside the target and a thermal neutron beam focused on it. The activation of the boron-10 atom by a neutron generates a lithium atom, a gamma ray, and an alpha particle, which can be used to destroy tumor tissues. The aim of this work was to use BNNTs as a boron-10 carrier for BNCT and to demonstrate its potential. The nanomaterial was characterized through XRD, FTIR, and SEM. The WST-8 assay was performed to confirm the cell viability of BNNTs. The cells treated with BNNTs were irradiated with the neutron beam of a Triga reactor, and the apoptosis caused by the activation of the BNNTs was measured with a calcein AM/propidium iodide test. The results demonstrate that this nanomaterial is a promising candidate for cancer therapy through BNCT. PMID:28417903

  6. Generation of the neutron response function of an NE213 scintillator for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Nocente, M.; Sundén, E. Andersson; JET Contributors

    2017-09-01

    In this work we present a method to evaluate the neutron response function of an NE213 liquid scintillator. This method is particularly useful when the proton light yield function of the detector has not been measured, since it is based on a proton light yield function taken from literature, MCNPX simulations, measurements of gamma-rays from a calibration source and measurements of neutrons from fusion experiments with ohmic plasmas. The inclusion of the latter improves the description of the proton light yield function in the energy range of interest (around 2.46 MeV). We apply this method to an NE213 detector installed at JET, inside the radiation shielding of the magnetic proton recoil (MPRu) spectrometer, and present the results from the calibration along with some examples of application of the response function to perform neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) of fusion plasmas. We also investigate how the choice of the proton light yield function affects the NES analysis, finding that the result does not change significantly. This points to the fact that the method for the evaluation of the neutron response function is robust and gives reliable results.

  7. Calibration of an EJ309 liquid scintillator using an AmBe neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Luyu; Lu, Yi; Jiang, Haoyu; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui

    2017-08-01

    As the light output function of the EJ309 liquid scintillator is nonlinear with respect to the energy of the recoil proton and it is difficult to be predicted, it need to be measured. In the present work, an EJ309 liquid scintillator, 5.1 cm in diameter and 5.1 cm in length, is calibrated with an AmBe neutron source using the time-of-flight method. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed to improve the accuracy of the measured light output function. The obtained light output function is presented and it is compared with existing measurements. The energy resolution of the EJ309 Liquid scintillator is also illustrated.

  8. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star.

    PubMed

    Bachetti, M; Harrison, F A; Walton, D J; Grefenstette, B W; Chakrabarty, D; Fürst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T; Miller, J M; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J; Webb, N A; Zhang, W W

    2014-10-09

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10(39) to 10(41) ergs per second. Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have focused on black hole rather than neutron star systems. The most challenging sources to explain are those at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear region of the galaxy M82 that reveal pulsations with an average period of 1.37 seconds and a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to an X-ray luminosity in the 3-30 kiloelectronvolt range of 4.9 × 10(39) ergs per second. The pulsating source is spatially coincident with a variable source that can reach an X-ray luminosity in the 0.3-10 kiloelectronvolt range of 1.8 × 10(40) ergs per second. This association implies a luminosity of about 100 times the Eddington limit for a 1.4-solar-mass object, or more than ten times brighter than any known accreting pulsar. This implies that neutron stars may not be rare in the ultraluminous X-ray population, and it challenges physical models for the accretion of matter onto magnetized compact objects.

  9. Neutron Capture Reactions on lu Isotopes at Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, O.; Meot, V.; Daugas, J.-M.; Morel, P.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wouters, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    The DANCE1 (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) array at LANSCE spallation neutron source in Los Alamos has been used to obtain the neutron radiative capture cross sections for 175Lu and 176Lu with neutron energies from thermal up to 100 keV. Both isotopes are of current interest for the nucleosynthesis s-process.2,3 Three targets were used to perform these measurements. One was natural Lu foil of 31 mg/cm2 and the other two were isotope-enriched targets of 175Lu and 176Lu. Firstly, the cross sections were obtained by normalizing yield to a well-known cross section at the thermal neutron energy. Now, we want to obtain absolute cross sections of radiative capture through a precise neutron flux determination, an accurate target mass measurement and an efficiency determination of the DANCE array.

  10. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  11. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1981-05-14

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  12. A system of materials composition and geometry arrangement for fast neutron beam thermalization: An MCNP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlář, Radim; Alexa, Petr; Pištora, Jaromír

    2013-03-01

    Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generators emit fast neutrons (14.2 MeV) that have to be thermalized for neutron activation analysis experiments. To maximize thermal neutron flux and minimize epithermal and fast neutron fluxes across the output surface of the neutron generator facility, Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) for different moderator types and widths and collimator and reflector designs have been performed. A thin lead layer close to the neutron generator as neutron multiplier followed by polyethylene moderator and surrounded by a massive lead and nickel collimator and reflector was obtained as the optimum setup.

  13. Palladium deuteride formation in the cathode of an electrochemical cell: An in situ neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Redey, L.; Felcher, G.P.; Hitterman, R.L.; Kleb, R.

    1991-12-31

    In this report, neutron diffraction of palladium cathodes is utilized to reveal palladium deuteride formation within the crystal structure of the metal. The experiment described in this report demonstrates the efficacy of neutron powder diffraction as a tool for structural studies of metal deuterides/hydrides and the feasibility of in situ diffraction measurements from a working electrochemical cell. (JL)

  14. Palladium deuteride formation in the cathode of an electrochemical cell: An in situ neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Redey, L.; Felcher, G.P.; Hitterman, R.L.; Kleb, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this report, neutron diffraction of palladium cathodes is utilized to reveal palladium deuteride formation within the crystal structure of the metal. The experiment described in this report demonstrates the efficacy of neutron powder diffraction as a tool for structural studies of metal deuterides/hydrides and the feasibility of in situ diffraction measurements from a working electrochemical cell. (JL)

  15. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane.

    PubMed

    Goldhagen, P; Reginatto, M; Kniss, T; Wilson, J W; Singleterry, R C; Jones, I W; Van Steveninck, W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was eight times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56-201 g cm-2 atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  16. An Advanced Buffet Load Alleviation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnham, Jay K.; Pitt, Dale M.; White, Edward V.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an advanced buffet load alleviation (BLA) system that utilizes distributed piezoelectric actuators in conjunction with an active rudder to reduce the structural dynamic response of the F/A-18 aircraft vertical tails to buffet loads. The BLA system was defined analytically with a detailed finite-element-model of the tail structure and piezoelectric actuators. Oscillatory aerodynamics were included along with a buffet forcing function to complete the aeroservoelastic model of the tail with rudder control surface. Two single-input-single-output (SISO) controllers were designed, one for the active rudder and one for the active piezoelectric actuators. The results from the analytical open and closed loop simulations were used to predict the system performance. The objective of this BLA system is to extend the life of vertical tail structures and decrease their life-cycle costs. This system can be applied to other aircraft designs to address suppression of structural vibrations on military and commercial aircraft.

  17. An Improved Elastic and Nonelastic Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron transport algorithm including both elastic and nonelastic particle interaction processes for use in space radiation protection for arbitrary shield material is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multiple energy grouping and analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through a bidirectional neutron evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for an aluminum water shield-target configuration is then compared with MCNPX and LAHET Monte Carlo calculations for the same shield-target configuration. With the Monte Carlo calculation as a benchmark, the algorithm developed in this paper showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a high-energy bidirectional neutron source based on a formula by Ranft showed even further improvement of the fluence results over previous results near the front of the water target where diffusion out the front surface is important. Effects of improved interaction cross sections are modest compared with the addition of the high-energy bidirectional source terms.

  18. An investigation into the sensitivity of various albedo neutron dosimeters aimed at correcting the readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A. G.; Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.

    2012-03-01

    The results of an experimental determination of the sensitivity of three types of individual neutron albedo dosimeters in neutron reference fields on the basis of radionuclide sources and at the top concrete shielding of the U-70 accelerator are presented. The results show that the ratios between the responses of the albedo dosimeters designed earlier at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (the albedo dosimeter (AD) and the multicomponent dosimeter (MD)) and the currently used DVGN-01 dosimeter are constant within 25% in a wide range of neutron energy. This fact makes it possible to use the results of measuring the AD and MD responses obtained earlier in neutron fields of nuclear-physical installations at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) for the correction of DVGN-01 dosimeter measurement results to apply it to personal radiation monitoring (PRM) at these installations. The correction factors for DVGN-01 measurement results are found and recommended to be used in PRM for most JINR installations.

  19. Neutron spectrometry--an essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Carpenter, A; Cerjan, C J; Clancy, T J; Doeppner, T; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hatchett, S P; Jones, O S; Kyrala, G; Le Pape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; McKernan, M A; Moran, M J; Moses, E; Munro, D H; McNaney, J; Park, H S; Ralph, J; Remington, B; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S M; Smalyuk, V; Spears, B; Springer, P T; Yeamans, C B; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J P; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Kline, J; Morgan, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J

    2012-10-01

    DT neutron yield (Y(n)), ion temperature (T(i)), and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the complementarity required for reliable measurements of Y(n), T(i), and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density (ρR) is determined through the relationship ρR(tot) (g∕cm(2)) = (20.4 ± 0.6) × dsr(10-12 MeV). The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation, and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration of the as-built spectrometers, which are now performing to the required accuracy. Recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFx), which is a function of dsr (or fuel ρR) and Y(n), has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  20. Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

    2012-05-02

    DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.