Science.gov

Sample records for ans topical meeting

  1. Proceedings of the 2007 ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization - DD and R 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization (DD and R 2007), 'Capturing Decommissioning Lessons Learned', is sponsored by the ANS Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization; Environmental Sciences; and Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Divisions. This meeting provides a forum for an international exchange of technical knowledge and project management experience gained from the ongoing process of decommissioning nuclear facilities. Of particular note is the number of projects that are approaching completion. This document gathers 113 presentations given at this meeting.

  2. Topical antifungal-corticosteroid combination therapy for the treatment of superficial mycoses: conclusions of an expert panel meeting.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Martin; Friedrich, Markus; Papini, Manuela; Pujol, Ramon M; Veraldi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Superficial fungal infections affect 20-25% of people worldwide and can cause considerable morbidity, particularly if an inflammatory component is present. As superficial fungal infections can be diverse, the treatment should be tailored to the individual needs of the patient and several factors should be taken into account when deciding on the most appropriate treatment option. These include the type, location and surface area of the infection, patient age, degree of inflammation and underlying comorbidities. Although several meta-analyses have shown that there are no significant differences between the numerous available topical antifungal agents with regard to mycological cure, agents differ in their specific intrinsic properties, which can affect their clinical use. The addition of a corticosteroid to an antifungal agent at the initiation of treatment can attenuate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection and is thought to increase patient compliance, reduce the risk of bacterial superinfection and enhance the efficacy of the antifungal agent. However, incorrect use of antifungal-corticosteroid therapy may be associated with treatment failure and adverse effects. This review summarises available treatment options for superficial fungal infections and provides general treatment recommendations based on the consensus outcomes of an Expert Panel meeting on the topical treatment of superficial mycoses.

  3. Optical characterization of an unknown single layer: Institut Fresnel contribution to the Optical Interference Coatings 2004 Topical Meeting Measurement Problem.

    PubMed

    Lemarchand, Fabien; Deumié, Carole; Zerrad, Myriam; Abel-Tiberini, Laëtitia; Bertussi, Bertrand; Georges, Gaëlle; Lazaridès, Basile; Cathelinaud, Michel; Lequime, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2006-03-01

    We present the characterizations performed at the Institut Fresnel for the Measurement Problem of the Optical Interference Coatings 2004 Topical Meeting. A single layer coated on a fused-silica substrate of unknown composition and parameters is analyzed in terms of optogeometrical parameters, uniformity, and scattering. We determine the refractive index and the average thickness of the coating, then provide the localized determination of the thickness with a 2 mm spatial resolution. Topography measurements include atomic force microscopy and angle-resolved scattering measurements. These results are completed thanks to a Taylor Hobson noncontact 3D surface profiler.

  4. Meeting Course Objectives by Integrating Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjeseth, Steven A.

    1980-01-01

    Outlines two experiments by which several different mathematical topics can be integrated into the unifying theme of oscillating pendulums, as part of a secondary school Algebra II and Trigonometry class. (CS)

  5. Integrated Photonics Research Topical Meeting (1993)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    ANSI Std Z39-16 29. o102 N~O RTED PHOTONICS, RESEARCH 10 CLFRI Integrated Photonics Research Summares of paWrs presented at the Integrated Photonics...fictitious walls is introduced to avoid reflection and recapturing of the radiated power at the walls. The absorbing frame is realised with complex...waveguide coupling in Fig. 1 serves to illustrate the technic. The short-dashed curve in Fig. 3 is calculated with an absorbing frame (4 layers, 10000

  6. Topical Meeting on Picosecond Electronics and Optoelectronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-10

    National Labs, and K.R. Gleason of TriQuint Semiconductor for their help with the GaAs IC’s, and J. Kafka and T. Baer of Spectra- Physics, inc. for their...where a probe beam monitors band edge absorption, an appropriate technique for voltage-biased structures in which the Franz -Keldysh effect is...performance up to a few gigahertz (Table 1). The principle of operation is based on the Franz -Keldysh effect in which the absorption edge of semiconductors

  7. 1st meeting on topical drug delivery to the nail.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2007-07-01

    The first ever symposium dedicated solely to drug delivery to the nail following topical application was held on the 2nd April 2007, in London, UK, organised by Dr Clive Roper (Charles River Laboratories, Scotland) and Dr Sudaxshina Murdan (School of Pharmacy, University of London, UK), under the auspices of Skin Forum. The 1-day meeting was attended by approximately 35 delegates from industry, academia and hospitals, and provided a much-needed forum for the presentation and discussion of research and problems in this emerging field. Topical drug delivery is especially suitable for onychomycosis (fungal infections of the nail plate and/or nail bed) and nail psoriasis, which affect 2 - 13 and 1 - 3% of the general population, respectively, and make up the bulk of nail disorders. Topical therapy would avoid the adverse events and drug interactions of systemic antifungal agents and the pain of injection when antipsoriatic agents are injected into affected nail folds. However, successful topical therapy is extremely challenging due to the very low permeability of the nail plate. Five speakers spoke about various aspects of topical drug delivery to the nail, including review of the nail plate structure, function, diseases, their existing therapies (systemic and topical), limitations and global sales. The need for effective topical drug delivery to the nail to overcome the problems associated with present treatment, and the fact that there are few topical formulations available for the treatment of nail fungal infections and psoriasis, and the even fewer effective formulations, was highlighted.

  8. Topical meeting on optical interference coatings (OIC'2001): manufacturing problem.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, J A; Browning, Stephen; Jacobson, Michael; Nadal, Maria

    2002-06-01

    Measurements are presented of the experimental filters submitted to the first optical thin-film manufacturing problem posed in conjunction with the Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings, in which the object was to produce multilayers with spectral transmittance and reflectance curves that were as close as possible to the target values that were specified in the 400- to 600-nm spectral region. No limit was set on the overall thickness of the solutions or the number of layers used in their construction. The participants were free to use the coating materials of their choice. Six different groups submitted a total of 11 different filters for evaluation. Three different physical vapor deposition processes were used for the manufacture of the coatings: magnetron sputtering, ion-beam sputtering, and plasma-ion-assisted, electron-beam gun evaporation. The solutions ranged in metric thickness from 758 to 4226 nm and consisted of between 8 and 27 layers. For all but two of the samples submitted, the average rms departure of the measured transmittances and reflectances from the target values in the spectral region of interest was between 0.98% and 1.55%.

  9. PREFACE: The first meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Ted; Godfrey, Steve; Petrov, Alexey A.; Swanson, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The first meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics (`GHP') took place on 24-26 October 2004, at Fermilab. Two factors contributed to the decision to hold this meeting. First, the Topical Group on Hadronic Physics had recently been established, and there was general agreement that a conference devoted to the physics of hadrons was an important group activity. Second, many exciting new experimental results on hadron spectroscopy had been announced recently, and there was intense interest in these new developments. The meeting was very well attended, with over 120 scientists participating; this was triple our original estimate of the likely audience for this meeting. The plenary sessions covered a broad range of topics, as we considered it important to promote communication between the communities pursuing research in different areas of hadron physics. The topics discussed included new results from RHIC on the QGP, the status of experiments on the flavour-exotic pentaquark and other new baryons, the new open-charm Ds and hidden-charm X states, conventional light quark resonances, glueballs and hybrids, and new facilities. Finally, a `town meeting' was held to discuss funding prospects for hadronic physics and related issues, which included a panel discussion with representatives from DOE, NSF and JLab. These plenary sessions were supplemented by 14 parallel sessions, giving a total of approximately 80 presentations. To make the conference more accessible to younger researchers, as well as to simiplify administration, there was no conference fee for this meeting. This was possible as a result of the generous financial support of our hosts at Fermilab, for which we are very appreciative. We are also grateful to Larry Cardman for arranging Jlab assistance in producing and distributing the conference poster, to Gerald Ragghianti for designing the poster and proceedings cover, and to Lali Chatterjee and the Institute of Physics for arranging publication of the

  10. [Transducer hygiene -- an underrated topic?].

    PubMed

    Merz, E

    2005-02-01

    , whereby ample contact time must be allowed for the disinfecting agent. Coarse contamination of the transducer should be removed with disposable tissue. Above all, dried blood spots should be avoided. Intraoperatively used transducers (= critical medical products), which, for instance, come in contact with abdominal organs, are subject to applicable rules and regulation for cleaning and disinfection. Before each use, an adequately long sterile cover must be placed over the transducer and connecting cable. When the examination is completed, the cover is removed and discarded, and the transducer cleaned and disinfected. The applicability of a reusable medical product implies that each manufacturer is obligated to provide care instruction, including formulated instructions for cleaning and disinfection. This entails that each manufacturer of sonographic equipment must make available a detailed summary of the appropriate disinfectants suitable for the respective transducers. Customarily, recommendations for care and cleaning of the transducers can be found in the manual that comes with the sonographic unit. In the absence of such a manual, a written request should be sent to the manufacturer of the sonographic equipment. Sonographic equipment manufacturers and disinfectant producers prefer disinfecting agents for instruments that are based on glutaraldehyde, aldehydes and quaternary agents, mostly for reason of material compatibility rather than their anti-infective effectiveness. Most recommended disinfectants are not tested for antiviral properties, but this is obligatory when applied to transducers that enter a body cavity potentially harboring a virus load - regardless whether the work is done with protective cover . Further information about the topic "medical products" can be found in the guidelines for hospital hygiene and infection prevention published by the Robert Koch Institute (Section: Required Hygienic Standards for Medical Products ), the website of the Robert

  11. Research on Estrogen and Behavior Is a 'Hot Topic' at the 2011 Society for Neuroscience Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Anat Biegon

    2011-11-14

    The Society for Neuroscience has selected recent research on estrogen and its effect on behavior conducted at BNL for its "hot topics" book distributed to reporters attending the society's 2011 meeting in Washington, D.C., November 12-16.

  12. Research on Estrogen and Behavior Is a 'Hot Topic' at the 2011 Society for Neuroscience Meeting

    ScienceCinema

    Anat Biegon

    2016-07-12

    The Society for Neuroscience has selected recent research on estrogen and its effect on behavior conducted at BNL for its "hot topics" book distributed to reporters attending the society's 2011 meeting in Washington, D.C., November 12-16.

  13. Satellite DNA: An Evolving Topic

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Ramos, Manuel A.

    2017-01-01

    Satellite DNA represents one of the most fascinating parts of the repetitive fraction of the eukaryotic genome. Since the discovery of highly repetitive tandem DNA in the 1960s, a lot of literature has extensively covered various topics related to the structure, organization, function, and evolution of such sequences. Today, with the advent of genomic tools, the study of satellite DNA has regained a great interest. Thus, Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), together with high-throughput in silico analysis of the information contained in NGS reads, has revolutionized the analysis of the repetitive fraction of the eukaryotic genomes. The whole of the historical and current approaches to the topic gives us a broad view of the function and evolution of satellite DNA and its role in chromosomal evolution. Currently, we have extensive information on the molecular, chromosomal, biological, and population factors that affect the evolutionary fate of satellite DNA, knowledge that gives rise to a series of hypotheses that get on well with each other about the origin, spreading, and evolution of satellite DNA. In this paper, I review these hypotheses from a methodological, conceptual, and historical perspective and frame them in the context of chromosomal organization and evolution. PMID:28926993

  14. Satellite DNA: An Evolving Topic.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Ramos, Manuel A

    2017-09-18

    Satellite DNA represents one of the most fascinating parts of the repetitive fraction of the eukaryotic genome. Since the discovery of highly repetitive tandem DNA in the 1960s, a lot of literature has extensively covered various topics related to the structure, organization, function, and evolution of such sequences. Today, with the advent of genomic tools, the study of satellite DNA has regained a great interest. Thus, Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), together with high-throughput in silico analysis of the information contained in NGS reads, has revolutionized the analysis of the repetitive fraction of the eukaryotic genomes. The whole of the historical and current approaches to the topic gives us a broad view of the function and evolution of satellite DNA and its role in chromosomal evolution. Currently, we have extensive information on the molecular, chromosomal, biological, and population factors that affect the evolutionary fate of satellite DNA, knowledge that gives rise to a series of hypotheses that get on well with each other about the origin, spreading, and evolution of satellite DNA. In this paper, I review these hypotheses from a methodological, conceptual, and historical perspective and frame them in the context of chromosomal organization and evolution.

  15. US Support Program Topical Meetings 1999 to 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper,S.

    2008-06-10

    In 1999, the International Safeguards Project Office began organizing topical workshops to explore technical issues facing the International Atomic Energy Agency's Department of Safeguards. Representatives from IAEA member states including the United States, national laboratories and companies were invited to the workshops to discuss the technical issues. In some cases professional facilitators were hired to lead the discussions and in some cases business gaming techniques were employed. Since 1999, the following topics have been addressed Data Communication Technologies (1999), Information Security (2000), Design and Testing for High Reliability (2001), Standardization and Integration of Unattended and Remote Monitoring Systems (2002), Roadmapping: Surveillance (2003), IAEA Seals Technology Roadmapping Workshop (2004), Turning Information Into Knowledge (2004), Safeguards Tools of the Future (2005), and Advanced Sensors for Safeguards (2007). This paper will review the scope of the workshops and summarize their results.

  16. SETAC Focused Topic Meeting on endocrine-disrupting chemicals: Overview and outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    A SETAC North America Focused Topic Meeting (FTM), “Endocrine Disruption: Chemical testing, Risk Assessment Approaches and Implications”, was held 4-6 February, 2014 at the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) conference facility in Research Triangle Park, NC. The meeting,...

  17. SETAC Focused Topic Meeting on endocrine-disrupting chemicals: Overview and outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    A SETAC North America Focused Topic Meeting (FTM), “Endocrine Disruption: Chemical testing, Risk Assessment Approaches and Implications”, was held 4-6 February, 2014 at the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) conference facility in Research Triangle Park, NC. The meeting,...

  18. Optical Society of America's 2010 Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings: introduction by the feature editors.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Christopher J; Tilsch, Markus K; Ristau, Detlev

    2011-03-20

    This Applied Optics feature issue is dedicated to the eleventh topical meeting on Optical Interference Coatings held on 6-11 June 2010 in Tucson, Arizona, USA. This topical conference is held in a three year rotation with conferences in Europe and Asia and is a premier opportunity to discuss advances in research and development within the field of optical interference coatings. Papers from this meeting cover a broad range of topics ranging from deposition processes, thin film design, materials, metrology, and a wide array of practical applications.

  19. Proceedings of the 1992 topical meeting on advances in reactor physics. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents proceedings of the 1992 Topical Meeting on Advances in Reactor Physics on March 8--11, 1992 at Charleston, SC. Session topics were as follows: Transport Theory; Fast Reactors; Plant Analyzers; Integral Experiments/Measurements & Analysis; Core Computational Systems; Reactor Physics; Monte Carlo; Safety Aspects of Heavy Water Reactors; and Space-Time Core Kinetics. The individual reports have been cataloged separately. (FI)

  20. Optical Society of America's 2007 Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings: overview.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Norbert; Stolz, Christopher J

    2008-05-01

    The Optical Society of America's Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings convenes every three years to survey and capture advancements in the broad area of optical coatings. This meeting serves as a focal point for global technical interchange in the field of optical interference coatings. It includes papers on research, development, and applications of optical coatings, such as fundamental and theoretical contributions in the field as well as practical techniques and applications.

  1. Building an Ethical Community in the Classroom: Community Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClurg, Lois Gail

    1998-01-01

    Describes "community meetings" in early childhood classrooms, designed to create an intentional community devoted to learning to live with and consider the perspectives of others. Discusses how meetings work, community meeting and the topic of exclusion, students' learning about themselves, awareness as a kind of solution, airing a…

  2. Report of a Meeting on Contemporary Topics in Zebrafish Husbandry and Care.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Nikki; Paull, Gregory; Grierson, Adam; Dunford, Karen; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth M; Sneddon, Lynne U; Wren, Natalie; Higgins, Joe; Hawkins, Penny

    2016-12-01

    A meeting on Contemporary Topics in Zebrafish Husbandry and Care was held in the United Kingdom in 2014, with the aim of providing a discussion forum for researchers, animal technologists, and veterinarians from academia and industry to share good practice and exchange ideas. Presentation topics included protocols for optimal larval rearing, implementing the 3Rs (replacement, reduction, and refinement) in large-scale colony management, and environmental enrichment. The audience also participated in a survey of current practice relating to practical husbandry, cryopreservation, and the provision of enrichment.

  3. Report of a Meeting on Contemporary Topics in Zebrafish Husbandry and Care

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Nikki; Paull, Gregory; Grierson, Adam; Dunford, Karen; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth M.; Sneddon, Lynne U.; Wren, Natalie; Higgins, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A meeting on Contemporary Topics in Zebrafish Husbandry and Care was held in the United Kingdom in 2014, with the aim of providing a discussion forum for researchers, animal technologists, and veterinarians from academia and industry to share good practice and exchange ideas. Presentation topics included protocols for optimal larval rearing, implementing the 3Rs (replacement, reduction, and refinement) in large-scale colony management, and environmental enrichment. The audience also participated in a survey of current practice relating to practical husbandry, cryopreservation, and the provision of enrichment. PMID:27537782

  4. The Optical Society's 2016 topical meeting on optical interference coatings: introduction.

    PubMed

    Ristau, Detlev; Li, Li; Sargent, Robert; Sytchkova, Anna

    2017-02-01

    This feature issue of Applied Optics is dedicated to the 13th Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings, which was held June 19-24, 2016, in Tucson, Arizona, USA. The conference, taking place every three years, is a focal point for global technical interchange in the field of optical interference coatings and provides premier opportunities for people working in the field to present their new advances in research and development. Papers presented at the meeting covered a broad range of topics, including fundamental research on coating design theory, new materials, and deposition and characterization technologies, as well as the vast and growing number of applications in electronic displays, communication, optical instruments, high power and ultra-fast lasers, solar cells, space missions, gravitational wave detection, and many others.

  5. Biotech in medicine--the topic of the Olten Meeting 2010.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the biotechnet--the national network of competence in biotech research--has been helping partners from industry to access excellence in R&D, giving them optimal support at low cost. Its annual 'Olten Meeting' is a dynamic hub for companies and research institutes as it highlights the latest trends in biotech. On November 24, 2010, the topical subject was biotech in medicine.

  6. Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1986-02-12

    These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

  7. PREFACE: Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, David; de Jager, Kees; Roberts, Craig; Sheldon, Paul; Swanson, Eric

    2007-06-01

    The Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics was held on 22-24 October 2006 at the Opryland Resort in Nashville, Tennessee. Keeping with tradition, the meeting was held in conjunction with the Fall meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics. Approximately 90 physicists participated in the meeting, presenting 25 talks in seven plenary sessions and 48 talks in 11 parallel sessions. These sessions covered a wide range of topics related to strongly interacting matter. Among these were charm spectroscopy, gluonic exotics, nucleon resonance physics, RHIC physics, electroweak and spin physics, lattice QCD initiatives, and new facilities. Brad Tippens and Brad Keister provided perspective from the funding agencies. The organisers are extremely grateful to the following institutions for financial and logistical support: the American Physical Society, Jefferson Lab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Vanderbilt University. We thank the following persons for assisting in organising the parallel sessions: Ted Barnes, Jian-Ping Chen, Ed Kinney, Krishna Kumar, Harry Lee, Mike Leitch, Kam Seth, and Dennis Weygand. We also thank Gerald Ragghianti for designing the conference poster, Will Johns for managing the audio-visual equipment and for placing the talks on the web, Sandy Childress for administrative expertise, and Vanderbilt graduate students Eduardo Luiggi and Jesus Escamillad for their assistance. David Ernst, Kees de Jager, Craig Roberts (Chair), Paul Sheldon and Eric Swanson Editors

  8. Topical antimicrobials for burn infections - an update.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Mert; Toklu, Ani; Vecchio, Daniela; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    The relentless rise in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria and fungi, coupled with the high susceptibility of burn wounds to infection, and the difficulty of systemically administered antibiotics to reach damaged tissue, taken together have made the development of novel topical antimicrobials for burn infections a fertile area of innovation for researchers and companies. We previously covered the existing patent literature in this area in 2010, but the notable progress made since then, has highlighted the need for an update to bring the reader up to date on recent developments. New patents in the areas of topically applied antibiotics and agents that can potentiate the action of existing antibiotics may extend their useful lifetime. Developments have also been made in biofilm-disrupting agents. Antimicrobial peptides are nature's way for many life forms to defend themselves against attack by pathogens. Silver has long been known to be a highly active antimicrobial but new inorganic metal derivatives based on bismuth, copper and gallium have emerged. Halogens such as chlorine and iodine can be delivered by novel technologies. A variety of topically applied antimicrobials include chitosan preparations, usnic acid, ceragenins and XF porphyrins. Natural product derived antimicrobials such as tannins and essential oils have also been studied. Novel techniques to deliver reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in situ have been developed. Light-mediated techniques include photodynamic therapy, ultraviolet irradiation, blue light, low-level laser therapy and titania photocatalysis. Passive immunotherapy employs antibodies against pathogens and their virulence factors. Finally an interesting new area uses therapeutic microorganisms such as phages, probiotic bacteria and protozoa to combat infections.

  9. Topical meeting on optical interference coatings (OIC'2001): design contest results.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Alfred; Tilsch, Markus; Tikhonravov, Alexander V; Trubetskov, Michael K; Brauneck, Ulf

    2002-06-01

    A gain-flattening filter (GFF) for minimum manufacturing errors (12 designs submitted) and dense wavelength-division multiplex (DWDM) filters for low group-delay (GD) variation (9 designs submitted) was the subject of a design contest held in conjunction with the Optical Interference Coatings 2001 topical meeting of the Optical Society of America. Results of the contest are given and evaluated. It turned out that the parameter space for GFFs with optimum performance when manufacturing errors are not considered is much different from that when manufacturing errors are considered. DWDM filter solutions with low GD variation are possible.

  10. Compact Blue-Green Lasers: Summaries of papers presented at the topical meeting. Volume 6: Technical digest series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Jarus W.

    1992-02-01

    Summaries of papers presented at the Compact Blue-Green Lasers Topical Meeting held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 20-21, 1992 are presented. Topics covered are blue-green laser applications, IR pumped visible lasers, blue-green diode emitters, materials, frequency conversion in bulk devices, gas lasers, and frequency conversion in guided-wave devices.

  11. Meetings in Academe: It's Time for an "EXTREME MEETING MAKEOVER!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Meetings have a bad reputation with faculty. Rarely does one hear a positive word uttered about an upcoming or past meeting. That reputation has metastasized throughout higher education. The primary reason is because meetings can be major time wasters, accomplishing very little, often deteriorating into just another social event, or they may be…

  12. Meetings in Academe: It's Time for an "EXTREME MEETING MAKEOVER!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Meetings have a bad reputation with faculty. Rarely does one hear a positive word uttered about an upcoming or past meeting. That reputation has metastasized throughout higher education. The primary reason is because meetings can be major time wasters, accomplishing very little, often deteriorating into just another social event, or they may be…

  13. Oxybutynin topical and transdermal formulations: an update.

    PubMed

    Staskin, D R; Salvatore, S

    2010-06-01

    Oxybutynin, an antimuscarinic agent, is well established for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) and is the gold standard for the treatment of severe neurogenic bladder. Although oral oxybutynin is effective in relieving the urinary symptoms of OAB, medication adherence is low at least in part because of substantial anticholinergic adverse effects. The poor anticholinergic tolerability has been attributed to high circulating levels of N-desethyloxybutynin (DEO), a pharmacologically active product of presystemic metabolism of oral oxybutynin in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. Transdermal formulations of oxybutynin avoid first-pass metabolism and thereby produce lower DEO plasma concentrations. Oxybutynin chloride topical gel (OTG) (Gelnique(R), Watson Pharmaceuticals, Corona, CA, USA), a new gel-based transdermal formulation of oxybutynin, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in January 2009. Results of a placebo-controlled U.S. phase III study demonstrated that OTG is efficacious in relieving symptoms of OAB and is associated with a low incidence of anticholinergic adverse events. Patients may find that OTG, with its excellent efficacy, convenient once-daily application and outstanding tolerability profile, is a valuable alternative to oral antimuscarinic agents for the treatment of OAB. Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  14. A heuristic approach to determine an appropriate number of topics in topic modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weizhong; Chen, James J; Perkins, Roger; Liu, Zhichao; Ge, Weigong; Ding, Yijun; Zou, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Topic modelling is an active research field in machine learning. While mainly used to build models from unstructured textual data, it offers an effective means of data mining where samples represent documents, and different biological endpoints or omics data represent words. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) is the most commonly used topic modelling method across a wide number of technical fields. However, model development can be arduous and tedious, and requires burdensome and systematic sensitivity studies in order to find the best set of model parameters. Often, time-consuming subjective evaluations are needed to compare models. Currently, research has yielded no easy way to choose the proper number of topics in a model beyond a major iterative approach. Based on analysis of variation of statistical perplexity during topic modelling, a heuristic approach is proposed in this study to estimate the most appropriate number of topics. Specifically, the rate of perplexity change (RPC) as a function of numbers of topics is proposed as a suitable selector. We test the stability and effectiveness of the proposed method for three markedly different types of grounded-truth datasets: Salmonella next generation sequencing, pharmacological side effects, and textual abstracts on computational biology and bioinformatics (TCBB) from PubMed. The proposed RPC-based method is demonstrated to choose the best number of topics in three numerical experiments of widely different data types, and for databases of very different sizes. The work required was markedly less arduous than if full systematic sensitivity studies had been carried out with number of topics as a parameter. We understand that additional investigation is needed to substantiate the method's theoretical basis, and to establish its generalizability in terms of dataset characteristics.

  15. A heuristic approach to determine an appropriate number of topics in topic modeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Topic modelling is an active research field in machine learning. While mainly used to build models from unstructured textual data, it offers an effective means of data mining where samples represent documents, and different biological endpoints or omics data represent words. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) is the most commonly used topic modelling method across a wide number of technical fields. However, model development can be arduous and tedious, and requires burdensome and systematic sensitivity studies in order to find the best set of model parameters. Often, time-consuming subjective evaluations are needed to compare models. Currently, research has yielded no easy way to choose the proper number of topics in a model beyond a major iterative approach. Methods and results Based on analysis of variation of statistical perplexity during topic modelling, a heuristic approach is proposed in this study to estimate the most appropriate number of topics. Specifically, the rate of perplexity change (RPC) as a function of numbers of topics is proposed as a suitable selector. We test the stability and effectiveness of the proposed method for three markedly different types of grounded-truth datasets: Salmonella next generation sequencing, pharmacological side effects, and textual abstracts on computational biology and bioinformatics (TCBB) from PubMed. Conclusion The proposed RPC-based method is demonstrated to choose the best number of topics in three numerical experiments of widely different data types, and for databases of very different sizes. The work required was markedly less arduous than if full systematic sensitivity studies had been carried out with number of topics as a parameter. We understand that additional investigation is needed to substantiate the method's theoretical basis, and to establish its generalizability in terms of dataset characteristics. PMID:26424364

  16. Students' Rationale for Topic Choice in Writing an Argumentative Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Eleanor

    A research project surveyed 97 students enrolled in Composition 101 at the University of Illinois, Chicago, in an effort to determine what goes on in the mind of a student faced with three choices of argument topics. The hypothesis was that Topic C--profanity--would be chosen most often and that the reasons cited would be "universality,"…

  17. Students' Rationale for Topic Choice in Writing an Argumentative Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Eleanor

    A research project surveyed 97 students enrolled in Composition 101 at the University of Illinois, Chicago, in an effort to determine what goes on in the mind of a student faced with three choices of argument topics. The hypothesis was that Topic C--profanity--would be chosen most often and that the reasons cited would be "universality,"…

  18. Effectiveness of an OTC topical antifungal powder.

    PubMed

    Conwill, J

    1993-04-01

    Independent clinical testing of products provide unbiased data for practicing clinicians to make an informed decision when confronted with the evaluation of new products. This study examines the effectiveness of an OTC antifungal powder on a small patient population (N = 33) with cutaneous monilial infections. Results and recommendations are discussed.

  19. Selected topics in particle accelerators: Proceedings of the CAP meetings. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1995-10-01

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Editing and changes to the authors` contributions in this Report were made only to fulfill the publication requirements. This volume includes notes and transparencies on eight presentations: ``Application of Accelerator-Driven Spallation Targets - Including Tritium Production and Nuclear Waste Transmutation``, ``BNL 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source Study``, ``Designing and Understanding of Magnets with the Help of Conformal Mapping``, ``Laser - Electron Beam Scattering Coherent Compton X-Ray Sources``, ``The LHC Project``, ``Optimization of the Photocathode-Linac Separation for the ATF [Accelerator Test Facility] Injection System``, ``On CEBAF Commissioning: First Results``, and ``The Proposed Booster Application Facility at BNL``. An Appendix lists dates, topics, and speakers from October 1989 to December 1994.

  20. NASA Physical Sciences - Presentation to Annual Two Phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis; Motil, Brian; McQuillen, John

    2014-01-01

    The Two-phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team consists of researchers and members from various space agencies including ESA, JAXA, CSA, and RSA. This presentation included descriptions various fluid experiments either being conducted by or planned by NASA for the International Space Station in the areas of two-phase flow, flow boiling, capillary flow, and crygenic fluid storage.

  1. Fast reactor safety: proceedings of the international topical meeting. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The emphasis of this meeting was on the safety-related aspects of fast reactor design, analysis, licensing, construction, and operation. Relative to past meetings, there was less emphasis on the scientific and technological basis for accident assessment. Because of its broad scope, the meeting attracted 217 attendees from a wide cross section of the design, safety analysis, and safety technology communities. Eight countries and two international organizations were represented. A total of 126 papers were presented, with contributions from the United States, France, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy. Sessions covered in Volume 1 include: impact of safety and licensing considerations on fast reactor design; safety aspects of innovative designs; intra-subassembly behavior; operational safety; design accommodation of seismic and other external events; natural circulation; safety design concepts; safety implications derived from operational plant data; decay heat removal; and assessment of HCDA consequences.

  2. Fast reactor safety: proceedings of the international topical meeting. Volume 2. [R

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The emphasis of this meeting was on the safety-related aspects of fast reactor design, analysis, licensing, construction, and operation. Relative to past meetings, there was less emphasis on the scientific and technological basis for accident assessment. Because of its broad scope, the meeting attracted 217 attendees from a wide cross section of the design, safety analysis, and safety technology communities. Eight countries and two international organizations were represented. A total of 126 papers were presented, with contributions from the United States, France, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy. Sessions covered in Volume 2 include: safety design concepts; operational transient experiments; analysis of seismic and external events; HCDA-related codes, analysis, and experiments; sodium fires; instrumentation and control/PPS design; whole-core accident analysis codes; and impact of safety design considerations on future LMFBR developments.

  3. Proceedings of the 5. International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation Controls, and Human Machine Interface Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of nuclear power systems. The ICHMI system, together with plant personnel, is the 'central nervous system' for operating plants. It senses basic parameters, monitors performance, integrates information, and makes adjustments to plant operations as necessary. It also responds to failures and off-normal events, thus ensuring goals of efficient power production and safety. The ICHMI system embodies the sensing, communications, monitoring, control, and presentation and command systems between the process (i.e., the reactor, heat transport, and energy conversion systems) and the plant personnel. It enables plant personnel to more effectively monitor the health of the plant and to identify opportunities to improve the performance of equipment and systems as well as to anticipate, understand, and respond to potential problems. Improved controls provide the basis to operate more closely to performance margins, and the improved integration of automatic and human response enables them to work cooperatively to accomplish production and safety goals. The ICHMI system thus directly impacts the performance of the entire plant and thereby the economics, safety, and security of current and future reactor designs. The 5. International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation Control and Human-Machine Interface Technology (NPIC and HMIT 2006) is specifically devoted to advances in these important technologies. In these proceedings, more than 200 papers and panel sessions from all over the world have been assembled to share the most recent information and innovations in ICHMI technology and to discuss the important issues that face the future of the industry. The papers fall into two major groupings: instrumentation and control (I and C) and human-machine interface technology (HMIT). The I and C papers are organized into five tracks. 'Systems

  4. Topical Meeting on Microphysics of Surfaces, Beams and Adsorbates held at Santa Fe, New Mexico on 4 - 6 February 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J. W.

    1985-12-01

    The Topical Meeting on Microphysics of Surfaces, Beams, and Adsorbates was organized within the interdisciplinary area of molecule/surface interactions induced, or studied, by laser and ion beam techniques. Especially emphasized was the molecular physics and electromagnetism of beam activated chemical reactions for applications in fabrication of semiconductor devices, in photocatalysis, and in optical recording. Emphasis was on the laser spectroscopy of molecular collision and reaction processes on surfaces, new sensitive or high resolution spectroscopies for studies of adsorbates, and optical methods applied to surface characterization.

  5. Brimonidine Toxicity Secondary to Topical Use for an Ulcerated Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kamalvir; Bayart, Cheryl; Desai, Ritu; Golden, Alex; Raimer, Patricia; Tamburro, Joan

    2016-07-01

    Combigan (Allergan, Irvine, CA) is an ophthalmic solution that combines 0.2% brimonidine, a selective α-2 adrenergic agonist, with 0.5% timolol, a nonselective β-adrenergic antagonist. It is approved for the reduction of intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. There have been recent reports of successful treatment of superficial infantile hemangiomas (IHs) using Combigan topically. We report the case of a 2-month-old girl who developed life-threatening brimonidine toxicity requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation secondary to central nervous system depression and apnea after topical application to an ulcerated IH.

  6. Some Selected Topics, Part 5 of a Bibliographic Series on Meeting Special Educational Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakoff, Lorraine, Comp.

    This bibliography on meeting the special needs of various groups cites 69 documents acquired and processed by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education from July 1968 to December 1969. Following are the subheadings within the bibliography (number of citations in parentheses): Rural and Migrant People (26); Intergroup Education (11); Gifted…

  7. Proceedings of the topical meeting on advances in human factors research on man/computer interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: expert systems and knowledge engineering-I; verification and validation of software; methods for modeling UMAN/computer performance; MAN/computer interaction problems in producing procedures -1-2; progress and problems with automation-1-2; experience with electronic presentation of procedures-2; intelligent displays and monitors; modeling user/computer interface; and computer-based human decision-making aids.

  8. Topical meeting on tunable solid state lasers. Digest of technical papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included lidar remote sensing, advances in alexandrite technology, photoluminescence, tunable laser materials selection, flash-pumped titanium lasers, color center lasers, Q-switching, alexandrite lasers, transparent glass ceramics, diode-pumped solid-state lasers for NASA space station lidar experiments, sources for optically pumped solid-state lasers, laser tuning, and monochromator wavelength measurement devices.

  9. EDITORIAL: Selected Papers from OMS'07, the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2008-06-01

    OMS'07 was the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society (EOS) on Optical Microsystems (OMS). It was organized by the EOS in the frame of its international topical meeting activity, and after the success of the inaugural meeting was once again held in Italy, 30 September to 3 October 2007, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. The local organizing committee was composed of researchers from `La Sapienza' University in Rome and the National Council of Research (CNR) in Naples, Italy. A selected group of leading scientists in the field formed the international scientific committee. The conference was fully dedicated to the most recent advancements carried out in the field of optical microsystems. More then 150 scientists coming from five continents attended the conference and more than 100 papers were presented, organized into the following sessions: Photonic cystals and metamaterials Optofluidic microsystems and devices Optical microsystems and devices New characterization methods for materials and devices Application of optical systems Optical sources and photodetectors Optical resonators Nonlinear optic devices Micro-optical devices. Four keynote lecturers were invited for the Plenary sessions: Federico Capasso, Harvard University, USA; Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut, USA (Distinguished Lecturer, Emeritus of LEOS--IEEE Society); Demetri Psaltis, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland; Ammon Yariv, California Institute of Technology, USA. Furthermore, 21 invited speakers opened each session of the conference with their talks. In addition a special session was organized to celebrate eighty years of the Isituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata (INOA) of CNR. The special invited speaker for this session was Professor Theodor W Hänsch (Nobel Prize in Physics, 2005), who gave a lecture entitled `What can we do with optical frequency combs?' In this special issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics, a selection of the most interesting

  10. Antimicrobial activity of topical skin pharmaceuticals - an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Alsterholm, Mikael; Karami, Nahid; Faergemann, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of currently available topical skin pharmaceuticals against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus pyogenes. The agar dilution assay was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration for cream formulations and their active substances. Corticosteroid formulations with the antiseptics clioquinol or halquinol were active against all microbes. The hydrogen peroxide formulation was primarily active against staphylococci. Clotrimazole, miconazole and econazole showed an effect against staphylococci in addition to their effect on C. albicans. In contrast, terbinafine had no antibacterial effect. Fusidic acid was active against staphylococci, with slightly weaker activity against S. pyogenes and no activity against C. albicans or E. coli. In summary, some topical skin pharmaceuticals have broad antimicrobial activity in vitro, clioquinol and halquinol being the most diverse. In limited superficial skin infection topical treatment can be an alternative to systemic antibiotics and should be considered. With the global threat of multi-resistant bacteria there is a need for new, topical, non-resistance-promoting, antimicrobial preparations for the treatment of skin infections.

  11. Herpes genitalis - Topical zinc sulfate: An alternative therapeutic and modality.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, B B; Dhawan, Mohit; Singh, Rajwinder

    2013-01-01

    Herpes genitalis is one of the commonest sexually transmitted infections in the world caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2. All herpes viruses show latency. Herpes genitalis caused by HSV-1 and HSV-2 is recurrent in 55 and 90% of case respectively. To comparatively evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of topical zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) in varying concentrations in herpes genitalis. Ninety patients clinically diagnosed as herpes genitalis and confirmed by Tzanck test were taken up for study and divided into 3 groups of 30 patients each which were applied topical ZnSO4 in concentrations of 1%, 2% and 4% respectively for 3 months. Ten patients of herpes genitalis were kept as control in whom only distilled water was applied. Patients were followed up for a total period of 6 months for any recurrences. Ten patients of group 1 (1% ZnSO4) showed recurrence, 6 patients in group 2 (2% ZnSO4) and only one patient in group 3 (4% ZnSO4) showed recurrence. In the control group, 8 out of 10 patients showed recurrence. No serious side effects were seen in all 3 groups. Topical ZnSO4 has been found to be an effective therapeutic modality not only for treatment but also for prolonging remissions in herpes genitalis. Topical 4% ZnSO4 has been found to be most efficacious out of the three concentrations, without any side effects.

  12. Second national topical meeting on tritium technology in fission, fusion and isotopic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.; Barlit, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    This conference presented information on the following topics: the development of a tritium dispersion code; global environmental transport models for tritium; HT/HTO conversion in mammals; tritium production, releases and population doses at nuclear power reactors; design of tritium processing facilities and equipment for aqueous and gaseous streams; tritium removal from circulating helium by hydriding of rare earth metals; the determination of deuterium and tritium in effluent wastewater by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; tritium surface contamination: process calculations for a moderator detritiation plant; recent developments in magnetically coupled vane pumps for tritium service; recovery and storage of tritium by Zr-V-Fe getter; gas handling systems using titanium-sponge and uranium bulk getters; isotope effects and helium retention behavior in vanadium tritide; interaction of hydrogen isotopes with stainless steel 316 L; and the interaction of polyethylene and tritium gas as monitored by Raman spectroscopy.

  13. An Introduction to Topic Modeling as an Unsupervised Machine Learning Way to Organize Text Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    The field of topic modeling has become increasingly important over the past few years. Topic modeling is an unsupervised machine learning way to organize text (or image or DNA, etc.) information such that related pieces of text can be identified. This paper/session will present/discuss the current state of topic modeling, why it is important, and…

  14. Highlights of the ASPE 2004 Winter Topical Meeting on Free-Form Optics: Design, Fabrication, Metrology, Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Dow, Thomas A.; Sohn, alex

    2004-01-01

    We present highlights from the American Society for Precision Engineering's 2004 winter topical meeting entitled Free-Form Optics: Design, Fabrication, Metrology, Assembly. We emphasize those papers that are most relevant to astronomical optics. Optical surfaces that transcend the bounds of rotational symmetry have been implemented in novel optical systems with fantastic results since the release of Polaroid's first instant camera. Despite these successes, free-form optics have found only a few niche applications and have yet to enter the mainstream. The purpose of this meeting is to identify the state of the art of free-form optics design, fabrication, metrology and assembly and to identify the technical and logistical challenges that inhibit their widespread use. Issues that will be addressed include: What are free-form optics? How can optical systems be made better with free-form optics? How can designers use free-form optics? How can free-form optics be fabricated? How can they be measured? How are free-form optical systems assembled? Control of multi-axis systems.

  15. CONFERENCE NOTE: European Optical Society, Topical Meeting Optical Metrology and Nanotechnology, Engelberg, Switzerland, 27 30 March 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-01-01

    This meeting, organized by the Paul Scherrer Institute's Department of Applied Solid State Physics, will be held from 27 30 March 1994 at the Hotel Regina-Titlis, Engelberg, Switzerland. The aim is to bring together scientists from two important fields of current research and increasing industrial relevance. Optical metrology is a traditional discipline of applied optics which reached the nanometre scale a long time ago. Nanotechnology is setting new limits and represents a major challenge to metrology, as well as offering new opportunities to optics. The meeting is intended to help define a common future for optical metrology and nanotechnology. Topics to be covered include: nanometre position control and measuring techniques ultrahigh precision interferometry scanning probe microscopy (AFM, SNOM, etc.) surface modification by scanning probe methods precision surface fabrication and characterization nanolithography micro-optics, diffractive optics components, including systems and applications subwavelength optical structures synthetic optical materials structures and technologies for X-ray optics. For further information please contact: Jens Gobrecht (Secretary), Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI, Switzerland.Tel. (41)56992529; Fax (41) 5698 2635.

  16. Hot topics and landmark studies from the 43rd annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Fabio; Aprile, Giuseppe; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2008-02-01

    The results of several preclinical and clinical studies were reported by oncology professionals at the 43rd American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, the largest international forum in which the latest achievements in cancer research are annually presented. The central theme this year was 'Translating Research into Practice', emphasizing the goal of forging stronger links between basic research and clinical practice. This review offers a critical, summarized selection of several of the foremost studies presented at the meeting. The focus is on the findings from randomized phase III trials that, in the authors' opinion, are most likely to have an immediate effect on clinical practice.

  17. Topical Antimicrobials for Burn Infections – An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sevgi, Mert; Toklu, Ani; Vecchio, Daniela; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The relentless rise in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria and fungi, coupled with the high susceptibility of burn wounds to infection, and the difficulty of systemically administered antibiotics to reach damaged tissue, taken together have made the development of novel topical antimicrobials for burn infections a fertile area of innovation for researchers and companies. We previously covered the existing patent literature in this area in 2010, but the notable progress made since then, has highlighted the need for an update to bring the reader up to date on recent developments. New patents in the areas of topically applied antibiotics and agents that can potentiate the action of existing antibiotics may extend their useful lifetime. Developments have also been made in biofilm-disrupting agents. Antimicrobial peptides are nature’s way for many life forms to defend themselves against attack by pathogens. Silver has long been known to be a highly active antimicrobial but new inorganic metal derivatives based on bismuth, copper and gallium have emerged. Halogens such as chlorine and iodine can be delivered by novel technologies. A variety of topically applied antimicrobials include chitosan preparations, usnic acid, ceragenins and XF porphyrins. Natural product derived antimicrobials such as tannins and essential oils have also been studied. Novel techniques to deliver reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in situ have been developed. Light-mediated techniques include photodynamic therapy, ultraviolet irradiation, blue light, low-level laser therapy and titania photocatalysis. Passive immunotherapy employs antibodies against pathogens and their virulence factors. Finally an interesting new area uses therapeutic microorganisms such as phages, probiotic bacteria and protozoa to combat infections. PMID:24215506

  18. Children Exposed to Drugs: Meeting Their Needs. HOT TOPICS: Usable Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, Dianne

    This guide attempts to apply research findings on children exposed to drugs during the prenatal period to practical educational considerations. Section I is an overview of the prevalence and impact of substance exposure, including chapters on the effects that prenatal substance exposure and living in a drug-abusing environment have on children.…

  19. The Visit of Prof. R. Sunayev and the Topical Meeting "Accretion onto Compact Objects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloin, D.; Mason, E.; O'Brien, K.

    2004-06-01

    Over the period April 4 to April 17, we had the great pleasure of the visit of Prof. Rashid Sunyaev in Chile. This was an opportunity for him to visit some of ESO's facilities (Paranal, Santiago) as well as APEX, and also to pay a visit to the new facilities of our colleagues in La Serena (among others Magellan and Gemini).

  20. Minoxidil topical solution: an unsafe product for children.

    PubMed

    Claudet, Isabelle; Cortey, Caroline; Honorat, Raphaele; Franchitto, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Minoxidil hair formulation is commonly used for the treatment of male or female androgenic alopecia. This over-the-counter product is wrongly considered safe. The ingestion of a few milliliters by a child can lead to significant intoxication. We report a case of significant intoxication after the ingestion of topical minoxidil (Alopexy; Pierre Fabre Laboratoires, SA, Switzerland). A 7-year-old girl, who accidentally ingested a teaspoon of minoxidil hair solution, presented to the pediatric emergency department for emesis. At admission, she had a blood pressure of 86/56 mm Hg and a pulse of 149 beats per minute. Hypotension lasted 40 hours with the lowest value 24 hours after ingestion (79/33 mm Hg). She presented electrocardiogram changes (sinus tachycardia and flattening T-waves) but normal cardiac enzymes. Infusion of 20 mL/kg of normal saline fluid had no hemodynamic effect. Her blood pressure normalized on day 2. Minoxidil topical solution is an unsafe product for children. This formulation should be strictly kept out of reach of children and manufacturers should enhance child-resistance security of packaging. The over-the-counter availability must be questioned.

  1. An update on topical therapies for mild-moderate psoriasis.

    PubMed

    van de Kerkhof, Peter C M

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapies are the mainstream treatment of psoriasis because most patients have mild disease. First-line treatments are vitamin D derivatives and corticosteroids. These treatments are usually given in combination schedules. For topical treatments the selection of the most appropriate vehicle is of major importance, thus improving adherence to the treatment, which frequently is impaired by the complexities of topical therapeutic choices. Evidence for efficacy and safety of topical treatments is readily available for vitamin D treatments and short-term treatment with corticosteroids. However, the scientific evidence for longer-term treatments is limited. Multiple new small molecules are in various stages of development and are reviewed.

  2. Liver fibrosis in primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: An undervalued topic

    PubMed Central

    Licinio, Raffaele; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Ierardi, Enzo; Leo, Alfredo Di

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) and liver fibrosis is an emerging topic with many obscure aspects due to the rarity of the disorder. A recent paper reported that a six-month low-fat diet improved liver fibrosis. We report the case of a 17-year-old girl affected by PIL whose hepatic fibrosis progressively worsened within one year, despite dietetic support. This and the previous case report describe extraordinary events, which do not allow clear-cut clinical aspects to be established. Nevertheless, both cases suggest that in patients with PIL, it is necessary to closely monitor liver morphology with in-depth investigations including not only ultrasonography, but also elastography. PMID:25276285

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Return To Flight Task Group (RTFTG) holds its first public meeting at the Debus Center, KSC Visitor Complex. The group is co-chaired by former Shuttle commander Richard O. Covey and retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, who was an Apollo commander. The RTFTG was at KSC to conduct organizational activities, tour Space Shuttle facilities and receive briefings on Shuttle-related topics. The task group was chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe to perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Return To Flight Task Group (RTFTG) holds its first public meeting at the Debus Center, KSC Visitor Complex. The group is co-chaired by former Shuttle commander Richard O. Covey and retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, who was an Apollo commander. The RTFTG was at KSC to conduct organizational activities, tour Space Shuttle facilities and receive briefings on Shuttle-related topics. The task group was chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe to perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The news media capture the words and images of the Return To Flight Task Group (RTFTG) which held its first public meeting at the Debus Center, KSC Visitor Complex. The group is co-chaired by former Shuttle commander Richard O. Covey and retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, who was an Apollo commander. The RTFTG was at KSC to conduct organizational activities, tour Space Shuttle facilities and receive briefings on Shuttle-related topics. The task group was chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe to perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The news media capture the words and images of the Return To Flight Task Group (RTFTG) which held its first public meeting at the Debus Center, KSC Visitor Complex. The group is co-chaired by former Shuttle commander Richard O. Covey and retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, who was an Apollo commander. The RTFTG was at KSC to conduct organizational activities, tour Space Shuttle facilities and receive briefings on Shuttle-related topics. The task group was chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe to perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  5. Air Quality and Heart Health: An Emerging Topic for Heart ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Air Quality and Heart Health: An Emerging Topic for Heart Month: Ambient air particle pollution increases short- and long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Older-people, those with pre-existing heart disease and lung disease and diabetes are at higher risk. Mechanisms are under investigation and are likely related to oxidative stress, inflammation and effects on autonomic control. Improvements in air pollution levels reduce health impacts and increase life expectancy. Reductions of short-term exposure in those at highest risk are predicted to mitigate adverse health effects. EPA regularly evaluates the standards, health risks and issues improved standards when needed. Public health action is needed along with EPA standards to reduce the public health burden of short- and long-term adverse health effects of air pollution. Health risks remain and need to be addressed through integrated efforts of public health, health care, environmental health, individuals and communities. Presented at Webinar for the National Association of Clean Air Agencies, February 2, 2017, Chapel Hill, NC- This webinar provided an update of environmental health information related to the effects of air pollution and heart and blood vessel disease. Such information is critically important for the Clean Air Agencies to understand as it provides the justification of their actions.

  6. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from OMS'05, the 1st Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2006-07-01

    OMS'05 is the first international conference wholly dedicated to optical microsystems. It was organized by the European Optical Society (EOS) in the frame of its international topical meeting activity and was held in Italy, September 2005, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. A possible definition of an optical microsystem is a complex system, able to perform one or more sensing and actuation functions, where optical devices are integrated in a smart way with electronic, mechanical and sensing components by taking advantage of the progress in micro- and nano-technologies. The increasing interest in this field arises from the expected applications that would significantly improve the quality of life. The list of possibilities offered by the optical microsystem enabling technologies is very long and seems to increase day by day. We are not only thinking about the next generation of optical telecommunication networks and computers, but also about low-cost, compact microsystems for environmental monitoring, in order to improve safety in the avionic and automotive fields, medical diagnostics and proteomic/genomic studies, or just finding general applications in several industrial fields. The goal of the conference was to involve scientists and young researchers from the main public and private laboratories, giving them the opportunity to present new scientific results and compare their know-how in the exciting and emerging field of optical microsystems. We believe that we succeeded in this. More than 200 scientists from all over the world attended the conference. We had more than 100 oral presentations and approximately 20 from the keynote lectures and invited speeches. It was an opportunity to define the most recent progress carried out in the field and to outline the possible road-map leading to the expected results in the industrial and social fields. We strongly believe that research and technology are closely interconnected at present and cannot

  7. Topical corticosteroid addiction and withdrawal - An overview for GPs.

    PubMed

    Sheary, Belinda

    2016-06-01

    Topical corticosteroid (TCS) withdrawal (addiction) is a potential complication of TCS treatment, particularly where there has been an inappropriate long-term use of moderate-to-potent TCS on the face or genital area. TCS addiction and withdrawal is increasingly being discussed in social and mainstream media; however, it has received little attention in medical publications. Australian general practitioners (GPs) may come into contact with patients who have read material or watched videos about this condition. The objective of this article is to provide a succinct, evidence-based overview of TCS addiction and withdrawal for GPs. TCSs are indicated in the management of many patients with eczema. By being aware of TCS addiction and withdrawal, practitioners may be better able to help prevent this adverse effect and offer supportive care to patients in TCS withdrawal. It would also be useful for GPs to be able to discuss TCS addiction and withdrawal with patients who seek to clarify information they glean from non-medical sources.

  8. Topical nicotinamide for seborrheic dermatitis: an open randomized study.

    PubMed

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Cantelli, Mariateresa; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of seborrheic dermatitis (SD) includes various options with different success and safety limitations. To evaluate the efficacy of topical nicotinamide (NCT) in the treatment of SD. A total of 48 patients with mild to moderate SD of the face were enrolled in the study (36 males and 12 females; age 20-50 years). Patients were randomized into two groups A and B, who were treated once a day with topical administration of NCT 4% cream and with the vehicle without NCT (placebo), respectively. Clinical measures were assessed by erythema, scaling, and infiltration, which were evaluated using a four-point scale 0-3 before starting treatment and after 2, 6, and 12 weeks' therapy. In comparison with baseline, a reduction of 75% of the total score was observed in patients treated with NCT, whereas for placebo-treated patients the reduction was of 35% (p < 0.05). Topical NCT 4% can have a potential for the treatment of SD.

  9. OSA Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Photonic Switching, Held in Salt Lake City, Utah on 6 - 8 March, 1992. Volume 8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    Multiple Quantum-Well Modulator Arrays for Neural Network and Photonic Switching Applications ........................ 210 M. A. Z Rejman- Greene , E G. Scott...34. Kobe, Japan, April 12-14, 1990 16. OSCAR Annual Report, Part A2-CS5 2. N.F. Whitehead, OFC󈨞, January 22-26, 17. M. Gustavsson , A. Karlsson and L... Gustavsson and L. Thylen, Top. Meeting Topical Meetings on Photonic Switching, on Photonic Swithcing, Salt Lake City, 1-3 Kobe, Japan, April 12-14, 1990

  10. Motivation: a new look at an age-old topic.

    PubMed

    Sumrow, Allison

    2003-01-01

    Employee motivation is a shared responsibility. An employee has to have some amount of intrinsic desire to perform a task. You can't create that desire. But, you can create an environment that brings out that desire, and allows an employee to shine. Abraham Maslow developed one of the most useful of all motivation theories--the "Hierarchy of Needs"--in the 1940s, and it is still the prevailing theory today. The Needs Hierarchy begins with the basic idea that only an unfulfilled need is a motivator. Or, in plain English, people perform specific actions to meet specific personal needs. Maslow defines five levels of needs that all people experience: 1: Physiological, Food, shelter, and yes, sex. 2: Safety/Security. No personal harm and the current lifestyle is safe. 3: Social. The need for acceptance by others, for belonging, friendship and affection. 4: Self-Esteem/Ego. Recognition, status and prestige. 5: Self-Actualization. Self-fulfillment and the need for achieving one's personal best. What makes this needs theory so interesting and so useful in the workplace is the clarity with which a position in the hierarchy can be determined. The basic premise is that lower-level needs must be satisfied before moving upward to the next level. Consider your own employees and what you know about them. Look at their situations, and evaluate where they may be in the hierarchy. Remember, it's difficult to separate their personal situations from their work personas. Try using Abraham Maslow as a starting point to identify motivations of your staff.

  11. Learning Spaces in Higher Education: An Under-Researched Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The connections between the design and use of space in higher education, and the production of teaching and learning, and of research, are not well understood. This paper reports on a literature review on these topics, and shows that higher education spaces can be considered in various ways: in terms of campus design, in terms of how space can…

  12. Learning Spaces in Higher Education: An Under-Researched Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The connections between the design and use of space in higher education, and the production of teaching and learning, and of research, are not well understood. This paper reports on a literature review on these topics, and shows that higher education spaces can be considered in various ways: in terms of campus design, in terms of how space can…

  13. The Iodine Spectrum: A New Look at an Old Topic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, George; Sauder, Deborah; Shalhoub, George M.; Stout, Roland; Hamby Towns, Marcy; Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes a new approach to the traditional iodine gas absorption spectrum experiment often performed in undergraduate physical chemistry labs. The approach is student centered and designed to emphasize the conceptual richness in this classic experiment. It gives students the opportunity to examine the conceptual and mathematical connections between spectroscopic data and quantum models by organizing the material in conceptual chunks, which they work through sequentially. Students use symbolic mathematics software, Mathcad, to expedite the sophisticated numerical calculations required. The curricular chunks were specifically constructed to make the sophisticated concepts embedded in the project accessible. The focus activities remind the students of information they already know and require them to employ both paper and pencil and computer worksheets to complete calculations. Five Mathcad templates provide a rich mathematical treatment of the topics in this experiment. This paper describes how the documents MorsePotential.mcd, BirgeSponer.mcd, IodineSpectrum.mcd, FranckCondonBackground.mcd, and FranckCondonComputation.mcd are used during the three weeks in which this experiment can be performed by a typical physical chemistry student. Although originally designed to use the WWW to disseminate information and promote interaction among physical chemistry students at geographically dispersed institutions, this segmented focus-question approach to the iodine experiment has also been used by a physical chemistry class at a single campus. In both formats, faculty noticed decreased anxiety of the students towards the experiment and an increase in the quality of laboratory reports that indicated better understanding of the chemical concepts.

  14. A review on fluoride varnishes: an alternative topical fluoride treatment.

    PubMed

    Clark, D C

    1982-06-01

    The in vitro, in vivo and clinical research on topical fluoride varnishes in surveyed. The probable mechanisms of action for fluoride varnishes is discussed and this effect demonstrated from the results of in vitro and in vivo research. Findings from clinical studies are summarized and selected results are used to estimate expected preventive effects from the treatment. The practical advantages and limitations of fluoride varnishes are also reviewed and indications for the future used of these preventive agents are considered.

  15. Longitudinal Analysis of Discussion Topics in an Online Breast Cancer Community using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaodian; Grave, Edouard; Sklar, Elizabeth; Elhadad, Noémie

    2017-03-18

    Identifying topics of discussions in online health communities (OHC) is critical to various information extraction applications, but can be difficult because topics of OHC content are usually heterogeneous and domain-dependent. In this paper, we provide a multi-class schema, an annotated dataset, and supervised classifiers based on convolutional neural network (CNN) and other models for the task of classifying discussion topics. We apply the CNN classifier to the most popular breast cancer online community, and carry out cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses to show topic distributions and topic dynamics throughout members' participation. Our experimental results suggest that CNN outperforms other classifiers in the task of topic classification and identify several patterns and trajectories. For example, although members discuss mainly disease-related topics, their interest may change through time and vary with their disease severities.

  16. Topical anaesthesia for children's lacerations: an acceptable approach?

    PubMed

    Kendall, J M; Charters, A; McCabe, S E

    1996-03-01

    To compare the anaesthetic properties of conventional intradermal 1% plain lignocaine with a topical gel preparation of adrenaline (1:2000) and cocaine (4.7%) for use in treatment of children's lacerations. Children aged 3-16 years with lacerations (not of the digits or mucous membranes) were consecutively assigned to receive either adrenaline and cocaine (AC) or lignocaine. Pain scores, as perceived by patients, parents, and staff, were measured conventionally using Wong Baker faces and visual analogue scales on administration of the local anaesthetic and on suturing the wound in the AC group (n = 56) and the lignocaine group (n = 51). Mean and median pain scores on administration of the anaesthetic in the AC group were significantly lower than in the lignocaine group as perceived by patient (P < 0.001), parent (P < 0.001), and staff (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in mean and median pain scores between the two groups on suturing the wounds, as perceived by patient, parent and staff. There was a significantly higher number of "failed" anaesthetics (pain scores 8-10) in the lignocaine group (P < 0.01). On direct questioning the overall procedure was considered acceptable by 84.5% of parents in the AC group compared with 61% of parents in the lignocaine group (P < 0.01). There were no significant complications in either group. Topical AC should be considered the local anaesthetic of first choice for suturing appropriate children's lacerations.

  17. Classroom Meetings: An Approach to Transpersonal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVoe, Marianne

    1979-01-01

    Glasser's classroom meetings provide a promising structure for teachers' transpersonal skills and for providing a forum for discussion of transpersonal experiences, concerns, and questions. A preplanning worksheet developed by Bosner and Poppen demonstrating how to use the thinking meeting as a medium to teach relaxation skills is presented here.…

  18. Classroom Meetings: An Approach to Transpersonal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVoe, Marianne

    1979-01-01

    Glasser's classroom meetings provide a promising structure for teachers' transpersonal skills and for providing a forum for discussion of transpersonal experiences, concerns, and questions. A preplanning worksheet developed by Bosner and Poppen demonstrating how to use the thinking meeting as a medium to teach relaxation skills is presented here.…

  19. [Environmental history as an anthropologic topic. Contribution to "chemical anthropology"].

    PubMed

    Grupe, G

    1990-06-01

    Human population history is firmly connected with temporal and regional changes of the environment. Whether natural or anthropogene, alteration of environmental features lead to changes of human life-style and to the development of adaptive strategies. The demand of resources for his subsistence has led man to diverse impacts on his environment since ever. Thus, environmental history is a scientific topic for anthropologists. The research potential of trace element studies of excavated human skeletons for the reconstruction of natural and socio-cultural environments as well as for distribution patterns of hazardous substances is outlined for the European Middle Ages. The scientific value of unravelling past man/environment-interrelationships for both the historical and applied sciences and the place of any "chemical anthropology" within this context is discussed.

  20. Topical anaesthesia for children's lacerations: an acceptable approach?

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, J M; Charters, A; McCabe, S E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the anaesthetic properties of conventional intradermal 1% plain lignocaine with a topical gel preparation of adrenaline (1:2000) and cocaine (4.7%) for use in treatment of children's lacerations. METHODS--Children aged 3-16 years with lacerations (not of the digits or mucous membranes) were consecutively assigned to receive either adrenaline and cocaine (AC) or lignocaine. Pain scores, as perceived by patients, parents, and staff, were measured conventionally using Wong Baker faces and visual analogue scales on administration of the local anaesthetic and on suturing the wound in the AC group (n = 56) and the lignocaine group (n = 51). RESULTS--Mean and median pain scores on administration of the anaesthetic in the AC group were significantly lower than in the lignocaine group as perceived by patient (P < 0.001), parent (P < 0.001), and staff (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in mean and median pain scores between the two groups on suturing the wounds, as perceived by patient, parent and staff. There was a significantly higher number of "failed" anaesthetics (pain scores 8-10) in the lignocaine group (P < 0.01). On direct questioning the overall procedure was considered acceptable by 84.5% of parents in the AC group compared with 61% of parents in the lignocaine group (P < 0.01). There were no significant complications in either group. CONCLUSIONS--Topical AC should be considered the local anaesthetic of first choice for suturing appropriate children's lacerations. PMID:8653235

  1. Propylene glycol: an often unrecognized cause of allergic contact dermatitis in patients using topical corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Al Jasser, M; Mebuke, N; de Gannes, G C

    2011-05-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) is considered to be a ubiquitous formulary ingredient used in many personal care products and pharmaceutical preparations. It is an organic compound commonly found in topical corticosteroids (CS). Cutaneous reactions to PG are mostly irritant, but allergic contact dermatitis to PG is well-documented. Cosensitization to PG and topical CS can occur, making it challenging to choose the appropriate topical CS in a PG-allergic patient. This review is aimed at guiding clinicians in the selection of a suitable topical corticosteroid when presented with patients allergic to PG.

  2. An innovative approach to the topical treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Sparavigna, Adele; Tenconi, Beatrice; De Ponti, Ileana; La Penna, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Acne is characterized by primary lesions on the face, chest, and back, and by a variety of other signs and symptoms. In particular, acne inflammatory lesions result from Propionibacterium acnes colonization and are of particular relevance as they can cause permanent scarring. Acne also causes significant psychological morbidity in affected patients. Products currently available for the treatment of acne include systemic and topical treatments. As these products can cause severe side effects, new, innovative therapies are needed. Farmaka Acne Cream (FAC) is a novel, film-forming cream developed to treat mild and moderate acne. In vitro studies have demonstrated that FAC is as effective as 5% benzoyl peroxide in inhibiting growth of P. acnes. In 32 subjects with mild or moderate acne, FAC reduced all the major signs and symptoms of the disease. These included itching, erythema, and scaling, as well as reductions in the numbers of papules, pustules, and open and closed comedones. Acne severity improved in 38% of subjects, while none worsened. FAC was found to be effective in controlling sebum secretion, and was non-comedogenic. Most subjects (90%) reported tolerability as good or very good, while clinical efficacy and cosmetic acceptability were judged as good. For assessment of contact sensitization and photosensitization, FAC was applied daily to the backs of 29 subjects in two symmetric areas for 10 days. Using a solar stimulator, one minimal erythema dose was delivered to one side of the back from days 11 to 13. The four different subareas of treated/untreated and irradiated/nonirradiated and combinations thereof were compared. No cases of contact sensitization or photosensitization were observed, and FAC is considered safe for use in intense sunlight. In vitro and in vivo studies provide evidence for the safety and clinical benefits of FAC, a promising candidate for the treatment of mild and moderate acne.

  3. An innovative approach to the topical treatment of acne

    PubMed Central

    Sparavigna, Adele; Tenconi, Beatrice; De Ponti, Ileana; La Penna, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Acne is characterized by primary lesions on the face, chest, and back, and by a variety of other signs and symptoms. In particular, acne inflammatory lesions result from Propionibacterium acnes colonization and are of particular relevance as they can cause permanent scarring. Acne also causes significant psychological morbidity in affected patients. Products currently available for the treatment of acne include systemic and topical treatments. As these products can cause severe side effects, new, innovative therapies are needed. Farmaka Acne Cream (FAC) is a novel, film-forming cream developed to treat mild and moderate acne. In vitro studies have demonstrated that FAC is as effective as 5% benzoyl peroxide in inhibiting growth of P. acnes. In 32 subjects with mild or moderate acne, FAC reduced all the major signs and symptoms of the disease. These included itching, erythema, and scaling, as well as reductions in the numbers of papules, pustules, and open and closed comedones. Acne severity improved in 38% of subjects, while none worsened. FAC was found to be effective in controlling sebum secretion, and was non-comedogenic. Most subjects (90%) reported tolerability as good or very good, while clinical efficacy and cosmetic acceptability were judged as good. For assessment of contact sensitization and photosensitization, FAC was applied daily to the backs of 29 subjects in two symmetric areas for 10 days. Using a solar stimulator, one minimal erythema dose was delivered to one side of the back from days 11 to 13. The four different subareas of treated/untreated and irradiated/nonirradiated and combinations thereof were compared. No cases of contact sensitization or photosensitization were observed, and FAC is considered safe for use in intense sunlight. In vitro and in vivo studies provide evidence for the safety and clinical benefits of FAC, a promising candidate for the treatment of mild and moderate acne. PMID:25914552

  4. Cometary environments; Proceedings of Symposium 5, Workshop IV, and Topical Meeting of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I. (Editor); Atreya, S. K. (Editor); Gruen, E. (Editor); Hanner, M. S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Papers on the environment of comets are presented, covering topics such as constraints on the interstellar dust model of comet dust, dust particles and comet nuclei, models of cometary nuclei, subliming gas in the near-nuclear layer of the comet coma, the nucleus and rotation of Comet Halley, the surface albedo of comet nuclei, observational studies on Comet Halley, comet simulations, comet ion composition, and chemical abundances in comets. Additional topics include the O 1D and H2O production rate from comets, collisional coma models, the gas coma of Comet Giacobini-Zinner, IR properties of rough comet grains, studies of Comet Halley by Giotto, the impact of large dust particles on the Vega spacecraft, and carbonaceous materials as components of comet dust. Also, consideration is given to comet plasma boundaries, the comet ionopause, the solar wind-comet interaction, MHD turbulence and particle acceleration in a mass-loaded solar wind, combined first and second order Fermi acceleration at comets, discrete wave packets upstream from the earth and comets, and the visual appearance of comets under varying solar wind conditions.

  5. [Prioritisation of topics for systematic reviews in hand surgery. Results of an expert survey].

    PubMed

    Schädel-Höpfner, M; Diener, M K; Eisenschenk, A; Lögters, T; Windolf, J

    2011-02-01

    Systematic reviews are fundamental decision-making tools for the assessment of the effectiveness of healthcare interventions and for determining future research fields. In the field of hand surgery, so far, there exists only a limited number of systematic reviews. According to the diversity and multitude of hand surgical topics, relevant fields for systematic reviews were identified by means of an expert ranking. A catalogue of 24 topics was extracted from publications of representative hand surgical journals. These topics were categorized and integrated into a questionnaire which was presented to 30 experts in the field of hand surgery. Every single topic had to be rated by marks from 1 (very relevant) to 5 (not relevant). Further topics could have been indicated. Averaging of the marks allowed to define a ranking and a prioritisation of the topics. 29 of 30 questionnaires were returned. The ranking showed scapholunate ligament injury, Kienboeck's disease and scaphoid nonunion to have the highest relevance, followed by 5 other topics dealing with wrist problems. The lowest relevance was attributed to neck fractures of the fifth metacarpal, ulnar collateral ligament injury of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint and postoperative management following replantation. The results of the presented survey allow for a prioritisation of topics for systematic reviews in hand surgery. The ranking of the topics emphasises the particular relevance of injuries and diseases of the wrist. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. The upper atmospheres of the earth and planets; Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Ottawa, Canada, May 16-June 2, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, C. A. (Editor); Offermann, D. (Editor); Labitzke, K. (Editor); Vette, J. I. (Editor); Taylor, H. A. (Editor); Rawer, K.

    1982-01-01

    Various topics concerned with the upper atmosphere of the earth and planets are discussed. The atmospheres of the terrestrial planets are addressed, emphasizing Venus. The energy budget of the mesosphere and thermosphere is considered, discussing current and particles as energy sources, the radiation field, and neutral atmosphere dynamics. The results of Pre-Map Project One are covered, and the International Reference Ionosphere is discussed, including electron density profiles, the lower ionosphere, the plasmasphere, plasma temperature profiles, and ion composition. Finally, the mass spectroscopy of atmospheres is treated.

  7. The Computer as an Aid to Reading Instruction. Hot Topic Guide 27. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Marge, Comp.; Essex, Christopher, Comp.

    One of a series of educational packages designed for implementation either in a workshop atmosphere or through individual study, this Hot Topic guide presents a variety of materials to assist educators in designing and implementing classroom projects and activities centering on the topic of the computer as an aid to reading instruction. The Hot…

  8. Strategies for Finding and Selecting an Ideal Thesis or Dissertation Topic: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Simon A.

    2009-01-01

    Choosing an ideal master's thesis or doctoral dissertation topic is probably one of the most important decisions students will make while in graduate school. Some graduate students may spend a year or even longer looking for potential topics before finally selecting one for their thesis or dissertation. There are a number of successful strategies…

  9. On the Presentation of Pre-Calculus and Calculus Topics: An Alternate View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davydov, Aleksandr; Sturm-Beiss, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    The orders of presentation of pre-calculus and calculus topics, and the notation used, deserve careful study as they affect clarity and ultimately students' level of understanding. We introduce an alternate approach to some of the topics included in this sequence. The suggested alternative is based on years of teaching in colleges within and…

  10. Organizing Learning Materials through Hierarchical Topic Maps: An Illustration through Chinese Herb Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, B.-J.; Shih, J.-L.; Chen, R.-L.

    2007-01-01

    This research aims to use hierarchical topic maps to compile digital learning material and to discuss its design and application possibilities. The system renders tremendous original assets and then embeds a self-organizing map (SOM) in the material database to produce topical learning materials, as in this case, an illustration through Chinese…

  11. Organizing Learning Materials through Hierarchical Topic Maps: An Illustration through Chinese Herb Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, B.-J.; Shih, J.-L.; Chen, R.-L.

    2007-01-01

    This research aims to use hierarchical topic maps to compile digital learning material and to discuss its design and application possibilities. The system renders tremendous original assets and then embeds a self-organizing map (SOM) in the material database to produce topical learning materials, as in this case, an illustration through Chinese…

  12. Outer planets; Proceedings of Symposium 4 and the Topical Meeting of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V. (Editor); Atreya, S. K. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on the magnetospheres, atmospheres, satellites, and rings of the outer planets are presented. Individual topics addressed include: thermal plasma in outer planet magnetospheres, neutral gas-plasma interaction in the Io plasma torus, satellite-plasma interactions, comparison of planetary magnetic fields, energization process of trapped particles in outer planets, remote sensing of planetary plasma, comparison of the deep atmospheres of the giant planets, seasonal thermal structure of giant planet atmospheres, CCD imaging of Neptune at methane-band wavelengths, physical parameters for the Uranus atmosphere, Uranus photochemistry, Uranus electroglow production, vibrationally excited H2 in Saturn's upper atmosphere, Titan, origin of outer planet satellite systems, microphysical modeling of Titan's aerosols, tectonics of icy satellites, geological evolution of Ganymede, photometric techniques for atmosphereless solar system bodies, the new rings, narrow rings, and time variability of the Jovian system.

  13. Outer planets; Proceedings of Symposium 4 and the Topical Meeting of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V. (Editor); Atreya, S. K. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on the magnetospheres, atmospheres, satellites, and rings of the outer planets are presented. Individual topics addressed include: thermal plasma in outer planet magnetospheres, neutral gas-plasma interaction in the Io plasma torus, satellite-plasma interactions, comparison of planetary magnetic fields, energization process of trapped particles in outer planets, remote sensing of planetary plasma, comparison of the deep atmospheres of the giant planets, seasonal thermal structure of giant planet atmospheres, CCD imaging of Neptune at methane-band wavelengths, physical parameters for the Uranus atmosphere, Uranus photochemistry, Uranus electroglow production, vibrationally excited H2 in Saturn's upper atmosphere, Titan, origin of outer planet satellite systems, microphysical modeling of Titan's aerosols, tectonics of icy satellites, geological evolution of Ganymede, photometric techniques for atmosphereless solar system bodies, the new rings, narrow rings, and time variability of the Jovian system.

  14. Life sciences and space research XXI(1); Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Graz, Austria, June 25-July 7, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P. (Editor); Horneck, G. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Space research in biology is presented with emphasis on flight experiment results and radiation risks. Topics discussed include microorganisms and biomolecules in the space-environment experiment ES 029 on Spacelab-1, the preliminary characterization of persisting circadian rhythms during space flight; plant growth, development, and embryogenesis during the Salyut-7 flight, and the influence of space-flight factors on viability and mutability of plants. Consideration is also given to radiation-risk estimation and its application to human beings in space, the radiation situation in space and its modification by the geomagnetic field and shielding, the quantitative interpretation of cellular heavy-ion action, and the effects of heavy-ion radiation on the brain vascular system and embryonic development.

  15. Life sciences and space research XXI(1); Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Graz, Austria, June 25-July 7, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P. (Editor); Horneck, G. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Space research in biology is presented with emphasis on flight experiment results and radiation risks. Topics discussed include microorganisms and biomolecules in the space-environment experiment ES 029 on Spacelab-1, the preliminary characterization of persisting circadian rhythms during space flight; plant growth, development, and embryogenesis during the Salyut-7 flight, and the influence of space-flight factors on viability and mutability of plants. Consideration is also given to radiation-risk estimation and its application to human beings in space, the radiation situation in space and its modification by the geomagnetic field and shielding, the quantitative interpretation of cellular heavy-ion action, and the effects of heavy-ion radiation on the brain vascular system and embryonic development.

  16. Pediatric urology and the internet--does an uncommon topic decrease content quality?

    PubMed

    Routh, Jonathan C; Gong, Edward M; Nelson, Caleb P

    2009-10-01

    The Internet has become a widely used resource for patients and families to obtain medical information but the quality of information available is highly variable. We sought to determine if Web pages addressing common and uncommon pediatric urology topics differ in terms of quality or characteristics. We performed an Internet search using 5 common conditions (vesicoureteral reflux, hypospadias, prenatal hydronephrosis, cryptorchidism, enuresis) and 5 uncommon conditions (exstrophy, prune belly, posterior urethral valves, Wilms tumor, ureterocele). We recorded total hits, presence of sponsored links, page owner and author type, last update, content quality, readability, accreditation and advertising. Content quality was graded on a 5-point scale for accuracy and completeness of natural history, diagnosis and treatment. We evaluated 100 sites on 10 topics. Common topics had more hits (980,000 vs 194,000) and were more likely to have sponsored advertisements (40% vs 0%) than uncommon topics. No difference was seen between topics in time from last update, owner/author type, financial disclosure, accreditation or advertising. Median quality grade was 4.0. Common topics had higher quality grades for disease natural history and diagnosis. Reading grade level was high and was similar between the groups. Web sites devoted to common pediatric urology topics have higher quality information for disease diagnosis and natural history. Otherwise, the quality of pediatric urology information on the Internet is high for common and uncommon topics. A high reading level is required to use these resources.

  17. Spatially Varying Index of Refraction: An Open Ended Undergraduate Topic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an experiment on the bending of light in a medium with a continuously varying index of refraction. Several theoretical approaches for the analysis of this experiment, designed for college physics students, are also presented. (HM)

  18. Spatially Varying Index of Refraction: An Open Ended Undergraduate Topic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an experiment on the bending of light in a medium with a continuously varying index of refraction. Several theoretical approaches for the analysis of this experiment, designed for college physics students, are also presented. (HM)

  19. Active experiments in space; Proceedings of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission D (Meeting D3) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R.

    1992-12-01

    The present volume on active experiments in space discusses dynamic trapping of electrons in the Porcupine ionospheric ion beam experiment, plasma wave observations during electron gun experiments on ISEE-1, spatial coherence and electromagnetic wave generation during electron beam experiments in space, and recent experimental measurements of space platform charging at LEO altitudes. Attention is given to high voltage spheres in an unmagnetized plasma, energetic ion emission for active spacecraft control, the collective gyration of a heavy ion cloud in a magnetized plasma, and remote sensing of artificial luminous clouds by lidars. Topics addressed include modulation of the background flux of energetic particles by artificial injection, wave measurements in active experiments on plasma beam injection, field formation around negatively biased solar arrays in the LEO-plasma, and the registration of ELF waves in rocket-satellite experiments with plasma injection.

  20. IFPA Meeting 2008 Workshops Report

    PubMed Central

    Lash, G.E.; Ansari, T.; Bischof, P.; Burton, G.J.; Chamley, L.; Crocker, I.; Dantzer, V.; Desoye, G.; Drewlo, S.; Fazleabas, A.; Jansson, T.; Keating, S.; Kliman, H.J.; Lang, I.; Mayhew, T.; Meiri, H.; Miller, R.K.; Nelson, D.M.; Pfarrer, C.; Roberts, C.; Samar, M.; Sharma, S.; Shiverick, K.; Strunk, D.; Turner, M.A.; Huppertz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At the IFPA meeting 2008 diverse topics were discussed in 12 themed workshops. Topics covered included: immunology of placentation; galectins and trophoblast invasion; signaling in implantation and invasion; markers to identify trophoblast subpopulations; placental pathology; placental toxicology; stereology; placental transport of fatty acids; placental mesenchymal stem cells; comparative placentation; trophoblast and neoplasia; trophoblast differentiation. This report is a summary of the various topics covered. PMID:19084270

  1. Virus-Bacteria Interactions: An Emerging Topic in Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Almand, Erin A.; Moore, Matthew D.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and viruses often occupy the same niches, however, interest in their potential collaboration in promoting wellness or disease states has only recently gained traction. While the interaction of some bacteria and viruses is well characterized (e.g., influenza virus), researchers are typically more interested in the location of the infection than the manner of cooperation. There are two overarching types of bacterial-virus disease causing interactions: direct interactions that in some way aid the viruses, and indirect interactions aiding bacteria. The virus-promoting direct interactions occur when the virus exploits a bacterial component to facilitate penetration into the host cell. Conversely, indirect interactions result in increased bacterial pathogenesis as a consequence of viral infection. Enteric viruses mainly utilize the direct pathway, while respiratory viruses largely affect bacteria in an indirect fashion. This review focuses on some key examples of how virus-bacteria interactions impact the infection process across the two organ systems, and provides evidence supporting this as an emerging theme in infectious disease. PMID:28335562

  2. Virus-Bacteria Interactions: An Emerging Topic in Human Infection.

    PubMed

    Almand, Erin A; Moore, Matthew D; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2017-03-21

    Bacteria and viruses often occupy the same niches, however, interest in their potential collaboration in promoting wellness or disease states has only recently gained traction. While the interaction of some bacteria and viruses is well characterized (e.g., influenza virus), researchers are typically more interested in the location of the infection than the manner of cooperation. There are two overarching types of bacterial-virus disease causing interactions: direct interactions that in some way aid the viruses, and indirect interactions aiding bacteria. The virus-promoting direct interactions occur when the virus exploits a bacterial component to facilitate penetration into the host cell. Conversely, indirect interactions result in increased bacterial pathogenesis as a consequence of viral infection. Enteric viruses mainly utilize the direct pathway, while respiratory viruses largely affect bacteria in an indirect fashion. This review focuses on some key examples of how virus-bacteria interactions impact the infection process across the two organ systems, and provides evidence supporting this as an emerging theme in infectious disease.

  3. Volcanic Infrasound - A technical topic communicated in an entertaining way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlow, Isaac

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic Infrasound is a 9-minute film about using infrasound waves to detect and measure volcanic eruptions as they unfold. The film was made by an interdisciplinary team of filmmakers and scientists for a general audience. The movie explains the basic facts of using infrasound to detect volcanic activity, and it also shows volcano researchers as they install infrasound sensors in a natural reserve in the middle of the city. This is the first in a series of films that seek to address natural hazards of relevance to Singapore, a country shielded from violent hazards. This presentation reviews the science communication techniques and assumptions used to develop and produce this entertaining scientific documentary short. Trailer: https://vimeo.com/192206460

  4. Topical application of antibiotics in primary teeth: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kayalvizhi, Gurusamy; Subramaniyan, Balaji; Suganya, Gurusamy

    2013-01-01

    Root canal infections are polymicrobial in nature, consisting of both aerobic and anaerobic species. The successful treatment of both primary and secondary endodontic infections involves effective eradication of the causative microorganisms during root canal treatment procedures. Reduction and elimination of microorganisms from the infected root canal provides optimal opportunity for treatment success. Local application of antibiotics has been considered an effective way to deliver antibiotics. A combination of antibiotic drugs have been tried under the concept of lesion sterilization and tissue repair therapy to eliminate the target bacteria, which are possible sources of endodontic lesions. The purpose of this article is to discuss the lesion sterilization and tissue repair therapy technique in primary teeth.

  5. Optical Rotatory Dispersion: New Twists on AN Old Topic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Among the many physicochemical properties used to distinguish chiral molecules, perhaps none has had as profound and sustained an impact in the realm of chemistry as the characteristic interactions that take place with polarized light. Of special note is the dispersive (non-resonant) phenomenon of circular birefringence (CB), the manifestation of which first was reported over two centuries ago and which still is employed routinely - in the more familiar guise of specific optical rotation - to gauge the enantiomeric purity of the products emerging from asymmetric syntheses. Concerted experimental and theoretical efforts designed to probe such electronic optical activity in isolated chiral molecules will be presented, with special emphasis directed towards the marked influence that intramolecular (vibrational and conformational) dynamics and intermolecular (environmental) perturbations can exert upon the intrinsic chiroptical response. Requisite isolated-molecule measurements have been made possible by our continuing development of cavity ring-down polarimetry (CRDP), an ultrasensitive polarimetric scheme that has permitted the first quantitative analyses of optical rotatory dispersion (ORD or wavelength-resolved CB) to be performed in rarefied (gaseous) media. Various technical aspects of CRDP will be discussed to illustrate the unique capabilities and practical limitations afforded by this novel methodology. Comparison of specific rotation values acquired for a broad spectrum of rigid and flexible chiral species under complementary isolated and solvated conditions will highlight the intimate coupling that exists among electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom as well as the pronounced, yet oftentimes counterintuitive, effects incurred by subtle solute-solvent interactions. The disparate nature of optical activity extracted from different surroundings will be demonstrated, with quantum-chemical calculations serving to elucidate the structural, electronic, and

  6. Separation experiences: a new look at an old topic.

    PubMed

    Rutter, M

    1979-07-01

    Research findings on the effects of separation are reviewed. Children of working mothers develop as well as those whose mothers remain at home. The effects of day care for very young children depend very much on the quality of care provided. Admission to hospital is stressful for preschool children through separation from the family, lack of opportunity to form new attachments, a strange environment, and disturbed parent-child relationships on return home; recurrent hospital admissions may have long-term sequelae, especially in children under chronic stress. An institutional upbringing need not impair cognitive development, but multiple rotating caretakers are likely to interfere with social development. Broken homes are associated with psychiatric disorder only in so far as they reflect family discord and disharmony. Bereavement is most likely to lead to prolonged grief reactions in older children and adolescents. Forced separations of mother and infant in the neonatal period may damage parent-child relationships. Many mechanisms are involved in these different experiences, and in only a few is the separation itself the main stress.

  7. Genetics meets pathology - an increasingly important relationship.

    PubMed

    Bonthron, David T; Foulkes, William D

    2017-01-01

    The analytical power of modern methods for DNA analysis has outstripped our capability to interpret and understand the data generated. To make good use of this genomic data in a biomedical setting (whether for research or diagnosis), it is vital that we understand the mechanisms through which mutations affect biochemical pathways and physiological systems. This lies at the centre of what genetics is all about, and it is the reason why genetics and genomics should go hand in hand whenever possible. In this Annual Review Issue of The Journal of Pathology, we have assembled a collection of 16 expert reviews covering a wide range of topics. Through these, we illustrate the power of genetic analysis to improve our understanding of normal physiology and disease pathology, and thereby to think in rational ways about clinical management. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The 4-H Club Meeting: An Essential Youth Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassels, Alicia; Post, Liz; Nestor, Patrick I.

    2015-01-01

    The club meeting has served as a key delivery method for 4-H programming across the United States throughout its history. A survey of WV 4-H community club members reinforces the body of evidence that the 4-H club meeting is an effective vehicle for delivering positive youth learning opportunities within the umbrella of the Essential Elements of…

  9. The 4-H Club Meeting: An Essential Youth Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassels, Alicia; Post, Liz; Nestor, Patrick I.

    2015-01-01

    The club meeting has served as a key delivery method for 4-H programming across the United States throughout its history. A survey of WV 4-H community club members reinforces the body of evidence that the 4-H club meeting is an effective vehicle for delivering positive youth learning opportunities within the umbrella of the Essential Elements of…

  10. Multidisciplinary colposcopy clinicopathology correlation meetings: an activity review.

    PubMed

    Moss, Esther L; Byrom, Jenny; Owen, Geraint; Pearmain, Philippa; Douce, Gill; Todd, Richard; Redman, Charles W E

    2009-07-01

    Multidisciplinary colposcopy clinicopathology correlation meetings are deemed to be an important aspect of colposcopic quality assurance and are often a focus of attention in colposcopy quality assurance peer-review assessments. Despite this, there are few data on such meetings detailing activity or providing benchmarks for audit. A retrospective analysis of clinicopathology correlation meetings held during a 3-year period (2004-2006) at the University Hospital of North Staffordshire was performed. A total of 65 meetings were held on a 2 to 4 weekly basis. All meetings contained a representation from cytology, pathology, and colposcopy. A total of 518 cases were listed and 475 were discussed, representing 6.6% of the total patient attendances at the colposcopy clinic during the study period. The main indications for discussion were as follows: cytology/histology discrepancy (35%), cytology/colposcopy discrepancy (10%), management dilemma (25%), and invasive cancer review (18%). A small proportion of cases listed (8%) were not discussed because of administrative problems. Problems were encountered in the quality of documentation, inconsistencies in the recording of findings, conclusions, and management plans. Multidisciplinary colposcopy pathology meetings provide a valuable data resource for recording and analyzing challenging areas in the clinical management of women with abnormal cervical cytology. However, such meetings are time and labor intensive both in terms of personnel and preparation. National guidelines need to be developed to guide clinicians on the frequency and standards required from such meetings.

  11. Topical tranexamic acid as an adjuvant treatment in melasma: Side-by-side comparison clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jong Yoon; Lee, Jong Hee; Lee, Joo Heung

    2016-08-01

    Tranexamic acid (TNA) is a novel therapeutic agent for hyperpigmented skin disorders. The efficacy and safety of topical TNA in patients with melasma has not been heretofore studied. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical TNA combined with intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment in Asians with melasma. A randomized, split-face (internally controlled) study was conducted in 15 women who received four monthly sessions of IPL to both sides of the face. Topical TNA or vehicle was applied to a randomly assigned side during and after IPL treatment. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks after completing the IPL treatments. Baseline and follow-up melanin index (MI; measured by Mexameter®, Courage and Khazaka, Cologne, Germany) and modified melasma area and severity index (mMASI) scores were determined. Thirteen subjects completed the study without serious adverse events. MI and mMASI decreased significantly from baseline to 12 weeks after the last IPL treatment on the topical TNA side but not on the vehicle side. The efficacy of topical TNA in preventing rebound pigmentation after IPL treatment was also statistically significant. Topical TNA can be considered an effective and safe adjuvant to conventional treatment for melasma.

  12. Ototoxicity associated with topical administration of diclofenac sodium as an otic drop: An experimental animal study.

    PubMed

    Acioglu, Engin; Yigit, Ozgur; Onur, Firat; Atas, Ahmet; Server, Ela Araz; Kara, Eyup

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the ototoxicity of topical diclofenac sodium in comparison to positive and negative controls prior to the investigation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy of the agent in otic administration. Twenty four ears of 12 guinea pigs were included in the study. Wide myringotomy was performed on all tympanic membranes under general anesthesia and auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were evaluated. The subjects were separated into four groups, two groups received diclofenac sodium at low and high doses, positive controls received gentamicin and negative controls received isotonic sodium chloride topically for 14 days and ABRs were reevaluated. No significant difference were observed between the pre and post-treatment click response, 1 kHz and 8 kHz response threshold levels after isotonic sodium chloride administration. All threshold levels were elevated in the positive control group. In the low and high dose diclofenac sodium groups, click response, 1 kHz and 8 kHz response threshold levels were significantly higher compared to the baseline values. Pre and post-treatment mean threshold level changes were not significantly different between the low and high dose diclofenac sodium groups. Pre and post-treatment mean threshold level changes in the gentamicin group were not significantly different from low or high dose diclofenac sodium groups. Diclofenac sodium, considered as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory otic preparation, is shown to be as ototoxic as gentamicin in chronic use which may lead to loss of hearing especially when used topically in chronic otitis cases with tympanic membrane damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Current perspectives on the pediatric hip: selected topics in hip dysplasia, Perthes disease, and chondrolysis: synopsis of the hip subspecialty session at the POSNA Annual Meeting, May 1, 2013, Toronto.

    PubMed

    Millis, Michael B; Zaltz, Ira

    2014-01-01

    The following are proceedings from the Hip Breakout Session held at the 2013 annual meeting of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America in Toronto, Canada. The organizer's goal of the meeting was to gather experts with years of clinical experience to discuss topics based upon both experience and current clinical evidence. The topics that were selected represented the most commonly encountered pathology where there are wide variations of clinical practice. The invited speakers were asked to summarize both their clinical experience and the current scientific evidence and to summarize areas that require further scientific investigation.

  14. Silver nanoparticles in therapeutics: development of an antimicrobial gel formulation for topical use.

    PubMed

    Jain, Jaya; Arora, Sumit; Rajwade, Jyutika M; Omray, Pratibha; Khandelwal, Sanjeev; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2009-01-01

    the antimicrobial agent) varied with the type of organism (e.g., 10.5 h for P. aeruginosa, 1.3 h for Staphylococcus sp. and 1.6 h for Candida albicans) indicating that dose regimen of the SNP formulation should ensure sustained release of the drug. To meet this requirement, a gel formulation containing SNP (S-gel) was prepared. The antibacterial spectrum of S-gel was found to be comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine, albeit at a 30-fold less silver concentration. As part of toxicity studies, localization of SNP in Hep G2 cell line, cell viability, biochemical effects and apoptotic/necrotic potential were assessed. It was found that SNP get localized in the mitochondria and have an IC(50) value of 251 microg/mL. Even though they elicit an oxidative stress, cellular antioxidant systems (reduced glutathione content, superoxide dismutase, catalase) get triggered and prevent oxidative damage. Further, SNP induce apoptosis at concentrations up to 250 microg/mL, which could favor scarless wound healing. Acute dermal toxicity studies on SNP gel formulation (S-gel) in Sprague-Dawley rats showed complete safety for topical application. These results clearly indicate that silver nanoparticles could provide a safer alternative to conventional antimicrobial agents in the form of a topical antimicrobial formulation.

  15. Organization of the Topical Meeting on Optical Computing Held in Toulon, France on 29 August-2 September 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-02

    reported in /1-3/ as an optical code generator in digital optical computers . The inverters of this type can be operated with a pulse repe- tition rate of up...thresholding and thin amplitude computer generated holograms perform the weighted interconnections. Two 6-bit vectors and their complements were stored...the resultant vector #’+ where: _1 (4) The holograms are Lee type computer generated holograms which were calculated and plotted with a laser printer

  16. Topical analgesics for acute and chronic pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    PubMed

    Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Kalso, Eija A; Bell, Rae F; Aldington, Dominic; Phillips, Tudor; Gaskell, Helen; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-05-12

    Topical analgesic drugs are used for a variety of painful conditions. Some are acute, typically strains or sprains, tendinopathy, or muscle aches. Others are chronic, typically osteoarthritis of hand or knee, or neuropathic pain. To provide an overview of the analgesic efficacy and associated adverse events of topical analgesics (primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), salicylate rubefacients, capsaicin, and lidocaine) applied to intact skin for the treatment of acute and chronic pain in adults. We identified systematic reviews in acute and chronic pain published to February 2017 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (the Cochrane Library). The primary outcome was at least 50% pain relief (participant-reported) at an appropriate duration. We extracted the number needed to treat for one additional beneficial outcome (NNT) for efficacy outcomes for each topical analgesic or formulation, and the number needed to treat for one additional harmful outcome (NNH) for adverse events. We also extracted information on withdrawals due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, systemic and local adverse events, and serious adverse events. We required information from at least 200 participants, in at least two studies. We judged that there was potential for publication bias if the addition of four studies of typical size (400 participants) with zero effect increased NNT compared with placebo to 10 (minimal clinical utility). We extracted GRADE assessment in the original papers, and made our own GRADE assessment. Thirteen Cochrane Reviews (206 studies with around 30,700 participants) assessed the efficacy and harms from a range of topical analgesics applied to intact skin in a number of acute and chronic painful conditions. Reviews were overseen by several Review Groups, and concentrated on evidence comparing topical analgesic with topical placebo; comparisons of topical and oral analgesics were rare.For at least 50% pain relief, we considered evidence was

  17. Topical cyclosporin as an alternative treatment for vision threatening blepharokeratoconjunctivitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Abdul-Salim; Taharin, Rohana; Embong, Zunaina

    2012-01-01

    Here, a case of vision threatening blepharokeratoconjunctivitis that responded well to topical cyclosporin is reported. A 9-year-old Malay girl with a history of bilateral blepharokeratoconjunctivitis was regularly treated with lid scrubbing using diluted baby shampoo, fusidic acid gel, and topical steroids as well as an intermittent course of oral doxycycline for the past year. She developed acute onset bilateral eye redness associated with poor vision in her right eye. Both eyes showed marked diffuse hyperemic conjunctiva with corneal vascularization. The presence of corneal vascularization obscured the visual axis in the right eye. The condition did not improve with regular intensive lid hygiene using diluted baby shampoo, fusidic acid gel, and topical steroids. She was started on topical cyclosporin A 0.5% every 6 hours. There was a dramatic regression of corneal vascularization after 3 days on topical cyclosporin, with marked improvement in visual acuity. This is a single case in which cyclosporin improved the status of the ocular surface. A large cohort study is required to justify its effectiveness in treating blepharokeratoconjunctivitis and to test its potential as an alternative immunosuppressive agent in comparison to conventional corticosteroids.

  18. Topical Steroid Damaged/Dependent Face (TSDF): An Entity of Cutaneous Pharmacodependence

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Koushik; Coondoo, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Topical Steroid Damaged/Dependent face (TSDF) is a phenomenon which has been described very recently (2008). It is characterized by a plethora of symptoms caused by an usually unsupervised misuse/abuse/overuse of topical corticosteroid of any potency on the face over an unspecified and/or prolonged period of time. This misuse and damage have a serious effect on the quality of life of the patients in general and the skin of the face in particular. Management is difficult and necessitates psychological counseling as well as physical soothing of the sensitive skin. PMID:27293246

  19. Dermatokinetics as an Important Tool to Assess the Bioavailability of Drugs by Topical Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Thotakura, Nagarani; Kumar, Pramod; Wadhwa, Sheetu; Raza, Kaisar; Katare, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Now-a-days, numerous nanocarrier-based drug products for topical applications are present in the market and number of similar products are being researched. To estimate the amount of drug delivery to skin, the scientists have now established techniques for separation of skin layers for the determination of drug concentrations. This forms the basis of pharmacokinetics of drug(s) in skin, i.e., dermatokinetics. However, dermatokinetic modeling of topical products is still a colossal challenge. Assessment of bioavailability helps in determination of safety and efficacy of topical formulations. This article is an attempt to explore the usefulness and methodologies of dermatokinetics for nanocarriermediated topical delivery. It also showcases challenges in methodologies used for determination of dermatokinetic parameters along with advantages. All the articles (research and review) used for writing the manuscript were collected from various search engines like Science Direct, Google Scholar, PubMed and Eureka Select using keywords like dermatokinetics, novel drug delivery systems, bioequivalence, bioavailability and topical delivery. As the methods used for determination of pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous formulations are not useful for dermatokinetic assessment, various methods like tape stripping, microdialysis and vasoconstrictor assays are being used for dermatokinetic assessment. These methods are not only useful to determine the drug concentrations in skin layers, but can also be used to correlate the toxic effects of xenobiotics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Spotlight Topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A Spotlight Topic consists of a set of two or more review articles focused on a specific subject in surface science. The topics are recommended by the Board of Editors. A topic may be chosen because it is particularly new or fast-breaking, thus deserving introduction to the general readership. Or, it may be because a topic is especially controversial or confusing, requiring clarification by experts. Each review will give a critical assessment rather than an encyclopedic report. While our editors always will insist on fairness and accuracy, any review which forwards an opinion is bound to be somewhat subjective. Therefore, it is the editors' wish that the set of reviews written by different authors on the same subject matter will provide a broad and balanced viewpoint. It is often the case that an author who is an expert in a technique or method may be especially enthusiastic or critical about this technique or method. A companion review in the set may provide a different viewpoint. We are hopeful that the reader, after studying these reviews and checking some of the key references, will obtain an informed opinion of the subject. We think the set of reviews in a spotlight area will considerably shorten the ``learning time'' that a nonexpert would otherwise need to become knowledgeable about a subject. In this issue, we feature a spotlight topic on oxide surfaces. The set contains an overview article by Jacques Jupille, and four articles written by G. Pacchioni, F. Cosandey and T. E. Madey, B. G. Daniels, R. Lindsay and G. Thornton, and C. Noguera respectively. Of these, the article by Pacchioni has already appeared in SRL 7, 277 (2000). The other three articles appear in this issue. A reader who wishes to suggest a spotlight topic or recommend authors to write such reviews should contact the Editor-in-Chief. We would like to hear from you.

  1. Motivation during an Excessively Challenging Reading Task: The Buffering Role of Relative Topic Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, Sara M.; Frijters, Jan C.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the influence of an excessively challenging reading task on middle school students' motivation, attributions for failure, and persistence. In particular, the authors considered the possibility that relative topic interest might function as a buffer against the negative outcomes of excessive challenge. Students ranging from 10…

  2. Teaching Medication Compliance to Psychiatric Residents: Placing an Orphan Topic into a Training Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiden, Peter J.; Rao, Nyapati

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Medication compliance is an orphan topic. Training in the understanding and management of noncompliance does not neatly fall within the domain of psychopharmacology, nor does it clearly fit into other core curricula areas, such as clinical interviewing or psychotherapy training. The objective of this article is to increase awareness…

  3. Air Quality and Heart Health: An Emerging Topic for Heart Month

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air Quality and Heart Health: An Emerging Topic for Heart Month: Ambient air particle pollution increases short- and long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Older-people, those with pre-existing heart disease and lung disease and diabetes are at higher risk. Mechanism...

  4. Teaching Medication Compliance to Psychiatric Residents: Placing an Orphan Topic into a Training Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiden, Peter J.; Rao, Nyapati

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Medication compliance is an orphan topic. Training in the understanding and management of noncompliance does not neatly fall within the domain of psychopharmacology, nor does it clearly fit into other core curricula areas, such as clinical interviewing or psychotherapy training. The objective of this article is to increase awareness…

  5. Peer and Cross-Age Tutoring and Related Topics: An Annotated Bibliography. Theoretical Paper No. 53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, Roberta

    This annotated bibliography is an effort to provide educators and researchers with a comprehensive listing of current resources, information, and research concerning peer and cross age academic tutoring by students, together with a selection of references on related topics of cross age interactions, tutoring in general, and the use of…

  6. Critical Literacy and Transgender Topics in an Upper Elementary Classroom: A Portrait of Possibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann-Wilmarth, Jill M.; Lannen, Rosemary; Ryan, Caitlin L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the intersection of critical literacy pedagogy, queer pedagogy, and transgender topics by turning our attention to the learning that supported the writing of an acrostic poem about Title IX and transgender students. We examine how this writing, in turn, created additional content and context that spurred others' learning.…

  7. Neuroscience meets salivary bioscience: An integrative perspective.

    PubMed

    Segal, Sabrina K

    2016-04-01

    Advances in salivary bioscience enable unique opportunities to explore individual differences in biological mechanisms related to learning and memory, psychiatric disorders, and more recently neurodegenerative diseases, neurotrauma/stroke, pain, and sleep. Sampling oral fluid is not only minimally invasive, but specimens can be collected easily and quickly in clinical and field settings. Salivary analytes allow neuroscientists to index endocrine, autonomic, immune, metabolic, and inflammatory processes within close proximity of discrete behavioral, biological, and social events, which is particularly important to advancing our understanding of human neuroscience. This review provides an update on the advances in salivary bioscience for specialty fields within neuroscience, presents novel salivary analytes of interest to neuroscience and the status of their development, and outlines a procedural framework to facilitate integration of these concepts and methods into neuroscience. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Use of compounded topical analgesics--results of an Internet survey.

    PubMed

    Ness, Timothy J; Jones, Leslye; Smith, Howard

    2002-01-01

    Topically applied single or multiagent analgesics compounded by specialty pharmacies are utilized by an unknown number of pain clinicians to unknown effect. To assess the use and perceived efficacy of these agents, an e-mail survey of members of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine was performed. Response rate was low, but identified use of compounded topical agents throughout the United States. Of the 120 clinicians responding, 27% (n = 32) reported that they prescribed compounded topical analgesics containing 1 to 5 agents (mean + SEM; 2.6 +/- 0.2) in their practice 3.5 +/- 0.6 times per month. Use of 36 different agents of varying concentrations was reported. These clinicians perceived that 43% +/- 4% of treated patients responded favorably to the topical agents with an average of 47% +/- 3% pain relief and few side effects. Despite favorable reports of benefit, most clinicians perceived use of such compounded agents in their regions to generally be "little or none."

  9. Ciclopirox Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... use this medication near heat or an open flame, such as a cigarette.To use ciclopirox topical solution, follow these steps: Be sure that you have trimmed your nails properly before your first treatment. Use the applicator brush attached to the bottle ...

  10. Reflective topical autobiography: an under utilised interpretive research method in nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, M J

    1999-01-01

    Reflective topical autobiography (an autobiographical method) belongs to the genre of testimonial research and is located within the postpositivist interpretive research paradigm. Despite the (reflective) topical autobiographical method enjoying a 'rebirth' in recent years and being utilised by a range of researchers in the human and literary disciplines, it remains largely unknown and under utilised in nursing research domains. In this article it is proposed that reflective topical autobiography is an important research method in its own right, and one which promises to make a substantive contribution to the overall project of advancing nursing inquiry and knowledge. This is particularly so where nursing research shares in the affirming projects of interpretive research generally and the relatively new sociology of the emotions in particular apropos: (i) increasing understanding of subjectivity and making subjective experiences more visible and intelligible, (ii) the search for meaning and increasing understanding of the commonality of existential human experience, and (iii) decentring the detached observer and his/her privileging the objectivist illusion in the hierarchy of research discourses, paving the way for the admission of multiple realities and interpretations of lived experience. In this article, a coherent reflective topical autobiographical research method is advanced for use in nursing education and research contexts.

  11. Selecting their Own Research Topic: An Effective Means of Engaging Undergraduates in Geoscience Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, V.; Haacker-Santos, R.

    2012-12-01

    Research experiences have been shown to successfully help draw undergraduates into STEM fields. In the SOARS and RESESS summer internship programs, which focus on the atmospheric and Earth sciences respectively, we attempt to match each intern with a project that is of specific interest to them, and to place the student with a science mentor with that expertise. Initially interns are solicited before the summer on their preferred topics of interest by having applicants or reapplicants choose fields of study from a list of topics. Follow-up conversations help to better define their area of interest. We then match those with the projects that have been proposed by prospective mentors, or seek scientists in the community who do research in that subdiscipline. Mentors also evaluate the intern's course background to determine if they have the foundation necessary for that work. Interns report that the opportunity to work on a topic that they perceive as interesting is vital to their engagement in the research. One intern wrote, "One of the most important components of internships like this is definitely letting the students somewhat chose their project. I think that a really good way to turn students OFF from research is by having them spend a summer researching something they are not even close to interested in." Another commented, "I really appreciated being matched with a project in my interest area. I think that's really important, even if it just teaches you that you might want to work in a different field than you initially thought." Being immersed in such a research group or lab provides interns with a rich opportunity to learn relevant content and skills, and to start developing a professional support network. Interns continue to engage with experts in their field of interest when they present at at scientifically relevant meeting sessions during the following academic year. Many of our interns go on to study the same subdiscipline of atmospheric or Earth

  12. Longitudinal Gender Disparity in Female Urology Resident Primary Authorship at an American Urological Association Sectional Meeting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tony R; Kocher, Neil J; Klausner, Adam P; Raman, Jay D

    2017-08-22

    To further evaluate the academic representation of female urology residents in the United States, we reviewed abstracts from the Mid-Atlantic American Urological Association (MA-AUA) sectional meetings to determine if the recent increase in the number of female urology residents mirrored an increase in this group's abstract authorship. Full text abstracts from the MA-AUA meetings were analyzed from 2008-2014 excluding one joint section meeting. First-author gender was determined by querying publicly available institutional websites, social media platforms, and the U.S. News & World Report. First-author gender was indeterminable in 10 abstracts based on search criteria and these were excluded. Individual abstracts were broadly categorized based on keywords into one of several topics. Chi-squared statistical tests examined the relationship between first-authorship gender, publication year, and abstract category. The number of female urology residents in the MAAUA increased over the study period. A total of 484 abstracts were analyzed. Three hundred ninety-three abstracts (81%) included a male first-author, whereas 81 abstracts (17%) included a female first-author. Female first authorship ranged between 13% and 25% annually. Comparison of male-to-female first authorship was statistically significant at all years evaluated (P<0.001). There was a statistically significant difference between male and female first authorship in all topic categories (P<0.01) except Education/Other (P=0.56). Despite continued gains and increasing female representation within urology, these data highlight significantly fewer female first-authors at the regional Mid-Atlantic section meetings. Larger studies are necessary to identify contributing factors and further areas for improvement toward decreasing gender imbalances within the academic community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of topical phenytoin on nasal wound healing after mechanical trauma: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Şimşek, Gökçe; Ciftci, Osman; Karadag, Neşe; Karatas, Erkan; Kizilay, Ahmet

    2014-12-01

    Impaired postoperative wound healing is the second most common morbidity after synechia formation in endoscopic sinus surgery. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the potential effects of topical phenytoin on wound healing after nasal mucosal trauma in rats. An experimental study at the Inonu University Faculty of Medicine. Twenty-four rats were randomized into three groups: 1) phenytoin group (n = 8), 2) control group (n = 8), and 3) vehicle group (n = 8). After damaging the right nasal cavity, in the phenytoin group, 1% topical phenytoin cream was applied for 7 days. The rats in the control group did not receive any treatment. The vehicle group was treated with daily topical cold cream for 1 week. The rats were sacrificed at the end, and the nasal cavities were excised. Tissue edema and inflammatory cell infiltration were compared among the groups. Additionally, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) immunoexpression levels were evaluated. Furthermore, in biochemical analysis, the tissue levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and (EGF) of the groups were investigated. In the phenytoin group, tissue edema and inflammatory cell infiltration were significantly decreased, and PCNA and CD31 immunoexpression levels were more prominent (P < .001) and the tissue EGF levels were significantly higher (P < .01). Topical phenytoin treatment may alter the nasal wound healing after mechanical trauma. The potential beneficial effects of topical phenytoin on nasal mucosa should be investigated by further experimental and human trials. NA. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. 21 CFR 14.22 - Meetings of an advisory committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Meetings of an advisory committee. 14.22 Section 14.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL..., e.g., the Board of Tea Experts and the Science Advisory Board of the National Center...

  15. 21 CFR 14.22 - Meetings of an advisory committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Meetings of an advisory committee. 14.22 Section 14.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL..., e.g., the Science Advisory Board of the National Center for Toxicological Research will...

  16. Web image retrieval using an effective topic and content-based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Cheng; Prabhakara, Rashmi

    2005-03-01

    There has been an exponential growth in the amount of image data that is available on the World Wide Web since the early development of Internet. With such a large amount of information and image available and its usefulness, an effective image retrieval system is thus greatly needed. In this paper, we present an effective approach with both image matching and indexing techniques that improvise on existing integrated image retrieval methods. This technique follows a two-phase approach, integrating query by topic and query by example specification methods. In the first phase, The topic-based image retrieval is performed by using an improved text information retrieval (IR) technique that makes use of the structured format of HTML documents. This technique consists of a focused crawler that not only provides for the user to enter the keyword for the topic-based search but also, the scope in which the user wants to find the images. In the second phase, we use query by example specification to perform a low-level content-based image match in order to retrieve smaller and relatively closer results of the example image. From this, information related to the image feature is automatically extracted from the query image. The main objective of our approach is to develop a functional image search and indexing technique and to demonstrate that better retrieval results can be achieved.

  17. Academic Meeting Scheduling Using an Antiferromagnetic Potts Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Kazue

    2017-07-01

    Scheduling parallel sessions of an academic meeting is a complicated task. If each presentation is assigned to an appropriate session, an antiferromagnetic Potts model can be used for semi-automatic timetabling. The timetabling method proposed here is based on graph coloring and includes additional constraints to be considered in a practical situation. We examine the feasibility of semi-automatic timetabling in some practical examples.

  18. The transfer of drugs and therapeutics into human breast milk: an update on selected topics.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Hari Cheryl

    2013-09-01

    Many mothers are inappropriately advised to discontinue breastfeeding or avoid taking essential medications because of fears of adverse effects on their infants. This cautious approach may be unnecessary in many cases, because only a small proportion of medications are contraindicated in breastfeeding mothers or associated with adverse effects on their infants. Information to inform physicians about the extent of excretion for a particular drug into human milk is needed but may not be available. Previous statements on this topic from the American Academy of Pediatrics provided physicians with data concerning the known excretion of specific medications into breast milk. More current and comprehensive information is now available on the Internet, as well as an application for mobile devices, at LactMed (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov). Therefore, with the exception of radioactive compounds requiring temporary cessation of breastfeeding, the reader will be referred to LactMed to obtain the most current data on an individual medication. This report discusses several topics of interest surrounding lactation, such as the use of psychotropic therapies, drugs to treat substance abuse, narcotics, galactagogues, and herbal products, as well as immunization of breastfeeding women. A discussion regarding the global implications of maternal medications and lactation in the developing world is beyond the scope of this report. The World Health Organization offers several programs and resources that address the importance of breastfeeding (see http://www.who.int/topics/breastfeeding/en/).

  19. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 2, Human factors research; Advanced I and C hardware and software; Severe accident research; Probabilistic risk assessment topics; Individual plant examination: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 2, present topics in human factors research, advanced instrumentation and control hardware and software, severe accident research, probabilistic risk assessment, and individual plant examination. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  20. Non-hormonal topical treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy: an up-to-date overview.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A; Ewies, A A A

    2013-06-01

    Vulvovaginal atrophy-related symptoms exert a negative impact on the quality of life of up to 50% of postmenopausal women. Many of them decline to use topical vaginal estrogen, which is the standard effective therapy, due to the adverse publicity over recent years, and seek for alternatives. Further, there are no safety studies to support the use of topical vaginal estrogen in breast cancer survivors, and it is considered as contraindicated by many health-care professionals. Vaginal moisturizers and lubricants as well as regular sexual activity may be helpful to such women. Vaginal moisturizers may have an equivalent efficacy to topical vaginal estrogen and should be offered to women wishing to avoid the use of hormonal therapy. Lubricants are usually used during sexual intercourse to provide temporary relief from vaginal dryness and dyspareunia; however, they have no long-term therapeutic effects. We provide in this systematic review up-to-date information, for women and health-care professionals, about the use, safety and efficacy of the available vaginal moisturizers and lubricants.

  1. Topical pimecrolimus 1% cream for resistant seborrheic dermatitis of the face: an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Muge Guler; Tekin, Nilgun Solak; Ilter, Nilsel; Ankarali, Handan

    2010-01-01

    Treatment options for seborrheic dermatitis are numerous, including both topical and systemic agents (e.g. topical corticosteroids, oral antifungals, and psoralen plus UVA). However, long-term use of topical corticosteroids may lead to adverse effects. Pimecrolimus 1% cream is an effective and well tolerated treatment for seborrheic dermatitis. To explore the efficacy of pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis lesions resistant to conventional treatments. Sixteen patients with resistant seborrheic dermatitis of the face applied pimecrolimus 1% cream twice daily for 2 weeks. The lesions were assessed clinically and the severity of the signs were assessed using a 4-point score. Additionally, the scores of all affected regions (paranasal, forehead, and eyebrows) were evaluated separately to assess whether different results would be obtained in different regions of the face. Also, patients completed self-assessments on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at each visit. Statistically significant reductions in the scores of all parameters were observed at day 7 and day 14 of the study. There were no significant differences between the responses on the three regions of the face. No adverse effects were reported except for temporary pruritus immediately after the application of pimecrolimus 1% cream in one patient. Although the interpretation of efficacy was limited by the open-label, non-controlled study design and the small number of patients, this trial suggests that pimecrolimus 1% cream may be a successful treatment choice for patients with resistant seborrheic dermatitis of the face.

  2. Examining Accumulated Emotional Traits in Suicide Blogs With an Emotion Topic Model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fuji; Kang, Xin; Quan, Changqin

    2016-09-01

    Suicide has been a major cause of death throughout the world. Recent studies have proved a reliable connection between the emotional traits and suicide. However, detection and prevention of suicide are mostly carried out in the clinical centers, which limit the effective treatments to a restricted group of people. To assist detecting suicide risks among the public, we propose a novel method by exploring the accumulated emotional information from people's daily writings (i.e., Blogs), and examining these emotional traits that are predictive of suicidal behaviors. A complex emotion topic model is employed to detect the underlying emotions and emotion-related topics in the Blog streams, based on eight basic emotion categories and five levels of emotion intensities. Since suicide is caused through an accumulative process, we propose three accumulative emotional traits, i.e., accumulation, covariance, and transition of the consecutive Blog emotions, and employ a generalized linear regression algorithm to examine the relationship between emotional traits and suicide risk. Our experiment results suggest that the emotion transition trait turns to be more discriminative of the suicide risk, and that the combination of three traits in linear regression would generate even more discriminative predictions. A classification of the suicide and nonsuicide Blog articles in our additional experiment verifies this result. Finally, we conduct a case study of the most commonly mentioned emotion-related topics in the suicidal Blogs, to further understand the association between emotions and thoughts for these authors.

  3. 78 FR 64025 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Matter Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Matter Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency Meeting FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: October 21, 2013 (78 FR 62364). TIME AND DATE: 10:00 a...

  4. SciFinder Scholar 2006: an empirical analysis of research topic query processing.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A Ben

    2006-01-01

    Topical search queries in SciFinder Scholar are processed through an extensive set of natural language processing algorithms that greatly enhance the relevance and comprehensiveness of the search results. Little detailed documentation on these algorithms has been published. However, a careful examination of the highlighted hit terms coupled with a comparison of results from small variations in query language reveal much additional, useful information about these algorithms. An understanding of how these algorithms work can lead to better search results and explain many unexpected results, including differing hit counts for singular versus plural query words and phrases.

  5. Tumid lupus erythematosus: an intriguing dermatopathological connotation treated successfully with topical tacrolimus and hydroxyxhloroquine combination.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prashant; Sharma, Sonal; Yadav, Pravesh; Namdeo, Chaitanya; Mahajan, Garima

    2014-03-01

    Tumid lupus erythematosus (LE) is a rare variant of lupus erythematosus, which often follows a favorable course. A case of a young woman is illustrated, who presented with an asymptomatic erythematous, solitary plaque over her face. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence examination established a diagnosis of tumid lupus erythematosus. She responded slowly and near-completely to hydroxychloroquine sulfate; however, a flare up occurred a month later. Addition of topical tacrolimus 0.1% resulted in complete regression without leaving any residual changes. No recurrence was seen subsequently.

  6. o-HETM: An Online Hierarchical Entity Topic Model for News Streams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-22

    the time factor into the well-known nCRP (nested Chinese RestaurantProcess) and construct anon-parametric hierarchical topicmodel based on it. The topic...Dependent nCRP As described in HLDA [8], the nCRP places priors over trees and does not limit the branching factors or the depths of the trees. It supposes...that there are an infinite number of infinite-tableChinese restaurants.A customer enters the root restaurant with infinite tables where each refers to

  7. ‘The concept of information in physics’: an interdisciplinary topical lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T.

    2015-01-01

    I present a didactical project, introducing the concept of information with all its interdisciplinary ramifications to students of physics and the neighbouring sciences. Proposed by Boltzmann as entropy, information has evolved into a common paradigm in science, economy, and culture, superseding energy in this role. As an integrating factor of the natural sciences at least, it lends itself as guiding principle for innovative teaching that transcends the frontiers of the traditional disciplines and emphasizes general viewpoints. Based on this idea, the postgraduate topical lecture presented here is intended to provide a firm conceptual basis, technically precise but versatile enough to be applied to specific topics from a broad range of fields. Basic notions of physics like causality, chance, irreversibility, symmetry, disorder, chaos, complexity can be reinterpreted on a common footing in terms of information and information flow. Dissipation and deterministic chaos, exemplifying information currents between macroscopic and microscopic scales, receive special attention. An important part is dedicated to quantum mechanics as an approach to physics that takes the finiteness of information systematically into account. Emblematic features like entanglement and non-locality appear as natural consequences. The course has been planned and tested for an audience comprising, besides physicists, students of other natural sciences as well as mathematics, informatics, engineering, sociology, and philosophy. I sketch history and objectives of this project, provide a resume of the course, report on experiences gained teaching it in various formats, and indicate possible future developments.

  8. Topical distribution of acyclovir in normal equine skin and equine sarcoids: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Haspeslagh, M; Taevernier, L; Maes, A A; Vlaminck, L E M; De Spiegeleer, B; Croubels, S M; Martens, A M

    2016-06-01

    Topical acyclovir application is an owner-friendly treatment for occult equine sarcoids, without the caustic side-effects other topical treatments have. Variable clinical success rates have been described, but it is not known to what rate and extent acyclovir penetrates in and through equine skin from a topical formulation. In the current study, an in vitro Franz diffusion model was used to determine the permeation parameters for a generic 5% acyclovir cetomacrogol cream for both healthy and sarcoid equine skin. The distribution of acyclovir between different layers of both skin types was also evaluated. While acyclovir penetrated through both skin types, significantly less acyclovir permeated to the deep dermis of sarcoid skin (197.62ng/mm(3)) compared to normal skin (459.41ng/mm(3)). Within sarcoid skin samples, significantly higher acyclovir concentrations were found in the epidermis (983.59ng/mm(3)) compared to the superficial dermis (450.02ng/mm(3)) and the deep dermis. At each sample point, significantly more acyclovir permeated to the receptor fluid through normal skin compared to sarcoid skin, which is reflected in the significantly higher permeation parameters of normal skin. Normal skin was found to be more permissive for acyclovir, but even in sarcoid skin, enough acyclovir reached the deep dermis to treat a Herpes simplex virus infection. In the case of equine sarcoids, the treatment is aimed at the Bovine papillomavirus and no information is available on the susceptibility of the DNA polymerase of this virus for acyclovir. Therefore, further research is needed to determine the efficacy of acyclovir to treat equine sarcoids.

  9. 'Hot Topics' in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Three current topics in astrophysics are described here on the occasion of the joint meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Astronomical Society (Jan. 7-11, 2001, San Diego, Calif.). Many equally exciting topics--ranging from the dozens of newly discovered planets of sunlike stars to evidence suggesting that the expansion of the universe is accelerating--could have been chosen. The topics discussed are: (1) the habitability of Mars, (2) black holes, galaxy bulges, and the X-ray background, and (3) the greatest explosions since the Big Bang.

  10. 'Hot Topics' in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Three current topics in astrophysics are described here on the occasion of the joint meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Astronomical Society (Jan. 7-11, 2001, San Diego, Calif.). Many equally exciting topics--ranging from the dozens of newly discovered planets of sunlike stars to evidence suggesting that the expansion of the universe is accelerating--could have been chosen. The topics discussed are: (1) the habitability of Mars, (2) black holes, galaxy bulges, and the X-ray background, and (3) the greatest explosions since the Big Bang.

  11. Remote sensing of the earth's surface; Proceedings of the Symposium 2, Topical Meeting, and Workshop I of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V. (Editor); Walter, L. S. (Editor); Maetzler, C. (Editor); Rott, H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the spaceborne study of the earth's surface, crust, and lithosphere, recent results from SPOT and Landsat TM investigations, and microwave observations of snowpack and soil properties. Attention is given to airborne and satellite-borne gravimetry, stereoviewing from space, TM studies of volcanism and tectonism in central Mexico, remote sensing of volcanoes, the uses of SPOT in forest management, the tectonics of the central Andes, and the application of VLBI to crustal movement studies. Also discussed are Landsat TM band ratios for soil investigations, snow dielectric measurements, the microwave radiometry of snow, microwave signatures of bare soil, the estimation of Alpine snow properties from Landsat TM data, and an experimental study of vegetable canopy microwave emissions.

  12. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p < 0.05). Histological analysis indicated a reduction in mast cell tryptase and chymase positive cell numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p < 0.05). Determination of transdermal uptake indicated that GTCs were detected in the biopsies. This model could be adapted to study a range of different topical formulations in both normal and diseased skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment.

  13. Topical Rosiglitazone Is an Effective Anti-Scarring Agent in the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Huxlin, Krystel R.; Hindman, Holly B.; Jeon, Kye-Im; Bühren, Jens; MacRae, Scott; DeMagistris, Margaret; Ciufo, David; Sime, Patricia J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal scarring remains a major cause of blindness world-wide, with limited treatment options, all of which have side-effects. Here, we tested the hypothesis that topical application of Rosiglitazone, a Thiazolidinedione and ligand of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), can effectively block scar formation in a cat model of corneal damage. Adult cats underwent bilateral epithelial debridement followed by excimer laser ablation of the central corneal stroma to a depth of ∼160 µm as a means of experimentally inducing a reproducible wound. Eyes were then left untreated, or received 50 µl of either 10 µM Rosiglitazone in DMSO/Celluvisc, DMSO/Celluvisc vehicle or Celluvisc vehicle twice daily for 2 weeks. Cellular aspects of corneal wound healing were evaluated with in vivo confocal imaging and post-mortem immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Impacts of the wound and treatments on optical quality were assessed using wavefront sensing and optical coherence tomography at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-operatively. In parallel, cat corneal fibroblasts were cultured to assess the effects of Rosiglitazone on TGFβ-induced αSMA expression. Topical application of Rosiglitazone to cat eyes after injury decreased αSMA expression and haze, as well as the induction of lower-order and residual, higher-order wavefront aberrations compared to vehicle-treated eyes. Rosiglitazone also inhibited TGFβ-induced αSMA expression in cultured corneal fibroblasts. In conclusion, Rosiglitazone effectively controlled corneal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro, while restoring corneal thickness and optics. Its topical application may represent an effective, new avenue for the prevention of corneal scarring with distinct advantages for pathologically thin corneas. PMID:23940641

  14. OSA Proceedings on Advanced Solid-State Lasers. Vol. 10 - Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Hilton Head, SC, Mar. 18-20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, G.; Chase, L. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advanced solid-state lasers discusses Cr(3+), Cr(4+), short-pulse, titanium, F-center, mid-IR, and diode-pumped lasers, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to the stabilization and a spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements, crystal growth and spectroscopy of Cr:LiBaAlF6, a Q-switched tunable forsterite laser, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of chromium-doped forsterite. Topics addressed include efficient frequency doubling of a self-starting additive-pulse mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, recent advances in Ti:Al2O3 unstable-resonator lasers, all-solid-state operation of a CW Ti:Al2O3 laser, and upconversion studies of flashlamp-pumped Cr,T,Ho:YAG. Also discussed are the top output parameters of an Ho-laser, spectroscopy and the 3-micron laser potential of Er crystals, the pulsed operation of microchip lasers, and blue optical parametric generation in LiB3O5.

  15. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  16. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Hamed, Maha I; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-11-10

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin's ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections.

  17. An open, randomized, comparative study of oral finasteride and 5% topical minoxidil in male androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Arca, Ercan; Açikgöz, Gürol; Taştan, Halis Bülent; Köse, Osman; Kurumlu, Zafer

    2004-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is undoubtedly the most common form of hair loss in males. It is a condition which may cause cosmetic and psychosocial problems in androgen-dependent cases. In this open, randomized and comparative study we evaluated the efficacy of oral finasteride and 5% topical minoxidil treatment for 12 months in 65 male patients with mild to severe AGA. We randomly assigned 40 (61.53%) patients to receive 1 mg/day oral finasteride for 12 months, and 25 (38.47%) patients applied 5% topical minoxidil solution twice daily for 12 months. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups considering age, age of onset of hair loss, family history and type of hair loss (p > 0.05). In the clinical evaluation at the endpoint of treatment, the clinical cure rates (i.e. increased intensity of hair) were 80% (32/40) for the oral finasteride group and 52% (13/25) for the 5% topical minoxidil group. Encountered side effects were all mild, and there was no need to stop the treatment. In the group given oral finasteride, side effects were noted in 7 patients: 6 patients suffered from loss of libido, and 1 patient had an increase in other body hairs; irritation of the scalp was seen in 1 patient in the group administered 5% minoxidil. These adverse events disappeared as soon as the treatment was stopped. The laboratory data on both drug groups did not show any statistically or clinically significant intragroup changes from baseline values to the endpoint (p > 0.05), except the level of serum total testosterone which was increased, and free testosterone and serum prostate-specific antigen in the finasteride group which were statistically decreased from baseline values to the endpoint (p < 0.05). In this comparative study of systemic finasteride and topical minoxidil, it was concluded that both drugs were effective and safe in the treatment of mild to severe AGA, although oral finasteride treatment was more effective (p < 0.05). Adverse events were not

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Return To Flight Task Group (RTFTG) holds the first public meeting at the Debus Center, KSC Visitor Complex. Members and staff at the table, from left, are retired Navy Rear Adm. Walter H. Cantrell, David Raspet, retired Air Force Col. Gary S. Geyer, Dr. Kathryn Clark, Dr. Decatur B. Rogers, Dr. Dan L. Crippen, Dr. Walter Broadnax and astronaut Carlos Noriega. The RTFTG was at KSC to conduct organizational activities, tour Space Shuttle facilities and receive briefings on Shuttle-related topics. The task group was chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe to perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. The group is co-chaired by former Shuttle commander Richard O. Covey and retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, who was an Apollo commander.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Return To Flight Task Group (RTFTG) holds the first public meeting at the Debus Center, KSC Visitor Complex. Members and staff at the table, from left, are retired Navy Rear Adm. Walter H. Cantrell, David Raspet, retired Air Force Col. Gary S. Geyer, Dr. Kathryn Clark, Dr. Decatur B. Rogers, Dr. Dan L. Crippen, Dr. Walter Broadnax and astronaut Carlos Noriega. The RTFTG was at KSC to conduct organizational activities, tour Space Shuttle facilities and receive briefings on Shuttle-related topics. The task group was chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe to perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. The group is co-chaired by former Shuttle commander Richard O. Covey and retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, who was an Apollo commander.

  19. Sentential and discourse topic effects on lexical ambiguity processing: an eye movement examination.

    PubMed

    Binder, Katherine S

    2003-07-01

    Models of lexical ambiguity resolution posit a role for context, but this construct has remained relatively undefined in the literature. The present study isolated two different forms of contextual constraint and examined how these sources of information might differentiate between a selective access and a reordered access model of ambiguity processing. Eye movements were monitored as participants read passages that contained either a balanced or a biased ambiguous word. The sentence containing the ambiguous word was held constant and instantiated either the subordinate meaning (Experiment 1) or the dominant meaning (Experiment 2) through the use of local context. These sentences were embedded in passages in which the topic was consistent, inconsistent, or neutral with respect to the meaning biased by the critical sentence. Experiment 1 provided evidence suggesting that the subordinate meaning of an ambiguous word was not selectively accessed even when sentence and discourse topic information biased that meaning. The data from Experiment 2 provided evidence that even the dominant meaning was not selectively accessed. These contextual sources of information were evaluated in terms of the roles they play in models of lexical ambiguity resolution.

  20. Facial Angiofibromas of Tuberous Sclerosis Treated with Topical Sirolimus in an Indian Patient

    PubMed Central

    Vasani, Resham J

    2015-01-01

    Facial angiofibromas are the most visible and unsightly of all the cutaneous manifestations of tuberous sclerosis (TSC). A 17-year-old female, a known case of TSC, presented for the treatment of cosmetically disfiguring facial angiofibromas. She was started on twice daily application of 0.1% sirolimus ointment prepared from crushed tablets of sirolimus compounded in white soft paraffin. After 3 months of use, there was visible decrease in the erythema and the size of the angiofibromas. In an attempt to accelerate the response, the concentration was further increased to 1% sirolimus which was used for a month, resulting in a decrease not only in the size and redness but also in the number of the angiofibromas. The patient did not experience any cutaneous or systemic complications related to therapy. Sirolimus belongs to a novel class of anticancer drugs known as mTOR (mammalian target of Rapamycin) inhibitors. Sirolimus has been used as a targeted therapy for the renal and neurological manifestations of TSC. Topical preparation of sirolimus is not commercially available till date and hence preparations from crushed tablets or oral solution of sirolimus have been used with beneficial effects in treatment of angiofibromas especially in younger patients with flatter lesions. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to enable us to confirm the efficacy, long-term safety, the optimal dosage and possibility of reappearance once the drug is withdrawn. This is possibly the first case report of the use of topical sirolimus in India. PMID:25814705

  1. Using Solar System Topics to Teach the Scientific Method in an Age of Science Denial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presto, M. C.

    2013-04-01

    A number of excellent opportunities to remind students of the scientific method and how the process of science works come about during coverage of common topics in a Solar System “unit” in an introductory college astronomy course. With the tremendous amount of misinformation about science that students are exposed to through the Internet and other forms of media, this is now more important than ever. If non-science majors can leave introductory astronomy, often the only science course they will take, with a decent appreciation of, or at least an exposure to, how science works, they will then be better able to judge the validity of what they hear about science in the media throughout their lives.

  2. Evaluation of topical antifungal products in an in vitro onychomycosis model.

    PubMed

    Sleven, Reindert; Lanckacker, Ellen; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Many topical commercial products are currently available for the treatment of onychomycosis. However, limited data are available concerning their antifungal activity. Using an in vitro onychomycosis model, the daily application of seven nail formulations was compared to the antifungal reference drug amorolfine (Loceryl(®) ) and evaluated for inhibitory activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes using an agar diffusion test. Of all commercial nail formulations, only Excilor(®) and Nailner(®) demonstrated inhibitory activity, which was much lower compared to the daily application of Loceryl(®) . However, Excilor(®) showed similar efficacy compared to the conventional weekly application of Loceryl(®) . These results suggest a role for organic acids in the antifungal effect of Excilor(®) (acetic acid, ethyl lactate) and Nailner(®) (lactic acid, citric acid, ethyl lactate) as all tested formulations without organic acids were inactive.

  3. 142nd AAAS Meeting: Information Overdose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeper, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the major topics of an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting on the future of science, including university research, nuclear energy, and scientific journals. (MLH)

  4. 142nd AAAS Meeting: Information Overdose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeper, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the major topics of an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting on the future of science, including university research, nuclear energy, and scientific journals. (MLH)

  5. Dogmas and controversies in compression therapy: report of an International Compression Club (ICC) meeting, Brussels, May 2011.

    PubMed

    Flour, Mieke; Clark, Michael; Partsch, Hugo; Mosti, Giovanni; Uhl, Jean-Francois; Chauveau, Michel; Cros, Francois; Gelade, Pierre; Bender, Dean; Andriessen, Anneke; Schuren, Jan; Cornu-Thenard, André; Arkans, Ed; Milic, Dragan; Benigni, Jean-Patrick; Damstra, Robert; Szolnoky, Gyozo; Schingale, Franz

    2013-10-01

    The International Compression Club (ICC) is a partnership between academics, clinicians and industry focused upon understanding the role of compression in the management of different clinical conditions. The ICC meet regularly and from these meetings have produced a series of eight consensus publications upon topics ranging from evidence-based compression to compression trials for arm lymphoedema. All of the current consensus documents can be accessed on the ICC website (http://www.icc-compressionclub.com/index.php). In May 2011, the ICC met in Brussels during the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) annual conference. With almost 50 members in attendance, the day-long ICC meeting challenged a series of dogmas and myths that exist when considering compression therapies. In preparation for a discussion on beliefs surrounding compression, a forum was established on the ICC website where presenters were able to display a summary of their thoughts upon each dogma to be discussed during the meeting. Members of the ICC could then provide comments on each topic thereby widening the discussion to the entire membership of the ICC rather than simply those who were attending the EWMA conference. This article presents an extended report of the issues that were discussed, with each dogma covered in a separate section. The ICC discussed 12 'dogmas' with areas 1 through 7 dedicated to materials and application techniques used to apply compression with the remaining topics (8 through 12) related to the indications for using compression. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  6. Treatment of melasma with topical agents, peels and lasers: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Shelly; Pandya, Amit G

    2013-10-01

    Melasma is an acquired disorder of hyperpigmentation occurring on the face and predominantly affecting women of childbearing age. It is a chronic, often relapsing condition with a negative impact on quality of life. Current treatments for melasma are unsatisfactory. The aim of this article was to conduct an evidence-based review of interventions available for the treatment of melasma. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed and the keywords 'melasma' or 'chloasma' in the title. The search was further refined by using a filter for 'controlled clinical trials' and 'randomized controlled trial'. The included studies were used to develop recommendations for treatment. The electronic search yielded a total of 80 citations. Forty studies were included in this review, which had a total of 2,912 participants. Three different therapeutic modalities were investigated-topical agents, chemical peels, and laser and light therapies. Topical depigmenting agents were found to be the most effective in treating moderate-to-severe melasma, with combination therapies, such as triple-combination therapy (hydroquinone, tretinoin, and fluocinolone acetonide), yielding the best results. Chemical peels as well as laser and light therapies were found to have moderate benefit but more studies are needed to determine their efficacy and long-term safety. Adverse events associated with treatment were mild and short-lasting and included skin irritation, dryness, burning, and erythema. The data could not be statistically pooled because of the heterogeneity of treatments and lack of consistency across study designs. Topical combination therapies were found to be more effective than monotherapy. Triple combination therapy was found to be the most effective, but approximately 40 % of patients develop erythema and peeling. Chemical peels and laser and light therapies produced mixed results, with increased risk of irritation and subsequent hyperpigmentation, particularly in darker

  7. [Problem-solving counselling for caregivers of stroke survivors - an analysis of the addressed topics].

    PubMed

    Beische, Denis; Hautzinger, Martin; Becker, Clemens; Pfeiffer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Problem-solving therapies for family caregivers have been described for different dyads and care recipients with various chronic conditions. Only little attention is directed to the specific topics worked on with informal caregivers. This study focuses on the intensive intervention period of 3 months of an individualized mainly telephone-based problem-solving training for informal carers of stroke survivors (TIPS-Study). We present data of 47 strained caregivers who cared for their spouses and partners (n=42) or (grand-)parents (n=5). Results show that effective changes in burden can be achieved with only few contacts concentrating on problems that can be controlled by problem-focused coping mechanisms. Problems that require emotion-focused coping were processed rarely. Future perspectives of the approach are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Formulation of an effective mosquito-repellent topical product from lemongrass oil.

    PubMed

    Oyedele, A O; Gbolade, A A; Sosan, M B; Adewoyin, F B; Soyelu, O L; Orafidiya, O O

    2002-04-01

    Ointment and cream formulations of lemongrass oil in different classes of base and the oil in liquid paraffin solution have been evaluated for mosquito repellency in a topical application. Mosquito repellency was tested by determining the bite-deterrence of product samples applied on an experimental bird's skin against a 2-day starved culture of Aedes aegypti L. mosquitoes. The 1%v/v solution and 15%v/w cream and ointment preparations of the oil exhibited > or =50% repellency lasting 2-3 h, which may be attributed to citral, a major oil constituent. This activity was comparable to that of a commercial mosquito repellent. Base properties of the lemongrass oil formulations influenced their effectiveness. The oil demonstrated efficacy from the different bases in the order of hydrophilic base > emulsion base > oleaginous base.

  9. The US FDA 'black box' warning for topical calcineurin inhibitors: an ongoing controversy.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Henkel, Verena

    2008-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by recurrent intense pruritus and a distinctive distribution of skin lesions. The topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus were approved in the USA, as an ointment and a cream, respectively, for the treatment of atopic dermatitis in 2000 and 2001, respectively. In 2005, the Pediatric Advisory Committee of the US FDA implemented a 'black box' warning for tacrolimus ointment and pimecrolimus cream due to the lack of long-term safety data and the potential risk of the development of malignancies. This article focuses on the safety aspects of these agents by discussing the findings from preclinical and clinical studies and postmarketing reports with regard to malignancies occurring after the use of tacrolimus ointment and pimecrolimus cream.

  10. 76 FR 4113 - Independent Scientific Peer Review Panel Meeting on an In Vitro

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), announces a public meeting of an independent scientific peer review... HUMAN SERVICES Independent Scientific Peer Review Panel Meeting on an In Vitro Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activation Test Method for Endocrine Disruptor Chemical Screening; National Toxicology Program...

  11. An Investigation of Children's Interested and Not Interested Science Topics in Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Fu-Pei; Lee, Sung-Tao

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the science topics that children felt interested and not interested in textbooks for compiling science texts to improve their learning. Four hundred and eighty-eight fifth and sixth graders were invited to finish ISTQ (interested science topics questionnaire) which was composed of three subscales: (1)…

  12. Topical Estrogen Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing in Aged Humans Associated with an Altered Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, Gillian S.; Greenwell-Wild, Teresa; Horan, Michael A.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of intrinsic aging on the cutaneous wound healing process are profound, and the resulting acute and chronic wound morbidity imposes a substantial burden on health services. We have investigated the effects of topical estrogen on cutaneous wound healing in healthy elderly men and women, and related these effects to the inflammatory response and local elastase levels, an enzyme known to be up-regulated in impaired wound healing states. Eighteen health status-defined females (mean age, 74.4 years) and eighteen males (mean age, 70.7 years) were randomized in a double-blind study to either active estrogen patch or identical placebo patch attached for 24 hours to the upper inner arm, through which two 4-mm punch biopsies were made. The wounds were excised at either day 7 or day 80 post-wounding. Compared to placebo, estrogen treatment increased the extent of wound healing in both males and females with a decrease in wound size at day 7, increased collagen levels at both days 7 and 80, and increased day 7 fibronectin levels. In addition, estrogen enhanced the strength of day 80 wounds. Estrogen treatment was associated with a decrease in wound elastase levels secondary to reduced neutrophil numbers, and decreased fibronectin degradation. In vitro studies using isolated human neutrophils indicate that one mechanism underlying the altered inflammatory response involves both a direct inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by estrogen and an altered expression of neutrophil adhesion molecules. These data demonstrate that delays in wound healing in the elderly can be significantly diminished by topical estrogen in both male and female subjects. PMID:10514397

  13. Compact Blue-Green Lasers: Summaries of Papers Presented at the Topical Meeting Held in Sante Fe, New Mexico on 20-21 February 1992. Volume 6. Technical Digest Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-21

    AD-A255 001 COMPACT BLUE -GREEN LASERS L- | This document has enldD. I =.. AUG 12 1992 Sponsored by fl :’ Air Force Office of Scientific Research A...20-21,1992 ERIES VOLUME 6 SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO 92 8 7 10F4 BRA20-22466 IVOUESNTEINEWIMEXIC Compact Blue -Green Lasers Summaries ofpapers presented at...the Compact Blue -Green Lasers Topical Meeting February 20-21, 1992 Santa Fe, New Mexico 1992 Technical Digest Series IC QUALITY INSPECTED 8 Volume 6

  14. Oral low dose and topical tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention: modern approaches for an old drug.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, Matteo; Serrano, Davide; Dunn, Barbara K; Heckman-Stoddard, Brandy M; Lee, Oukseub; Khan, Seema; Decensi, Andrea

    2012-10-29

    Tamoxifen is a drug that has been in worldwide use for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer for over 30 years; it has been used in both the metastatic and adjuvant settings. Tamoxifen's approval for breast cancer risk reduction dates back to 1998, after results from the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial, co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, showed a 49% reduction in the incidence of invasive, ER-positive breast cancer in high-risk women. Despite these positive findings, however, the public's attitude toward breast cancer chemoprevention remains ambivalent, and the toxicities associated with tamoxifen, particularly endometrial cancer and thromboembolic events, have hampered the drug's uptake by high-risk women who should benefit from its preventive effects. Among the strategies to overcome such obstacles to preventive tamoxifen, two novel and potentially safer modes of delivery of this agent are discussed in this paper. Low-dose tamoxifen, expected to confer fewer adverse events, is being investigated in both clinical biomarker-based trials and observational studies. A series of systemic biomarkers (including lipid and insulin-like growth factor levels) and tissue biomarkers (including Ki-67) are known to be favorably affected by conventional tamoxifen dosing and have been shown to be modulated in a direction consistent with a putative anti-cancer effect. These findings suggest possible beneficial clinical preventive effects by low-dose tamoxifen regimens and they are supported by observational studies. An alternative approach is topical administration of active tamoxifen metabolites directly onto the breast, the site where the cancer is to be prevented. Avoidance of systemic administration is expected to reduce the distribution of drug to tissues susceptible to tamoxifen-induced toxicity. Clinical trials of topical tamoxifen with biological endpoints are still ongoing

  15. Topical Products for Human Hair Regeneration: A Comparative Study on an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Orasan, Meda Sandra; Coneac, Andrei; Muresan, Adriana; Mihu, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background Hair loss and hair growth is the subject of tremendous amount of research. Objective This study investigated the efficacy of three chemical treatments used in humans for hair loss, using a rat model of hair regrowth. The products tested were 2% minoxidil, Hairgrow (Dar-Al-Dawa Pharma), Aminexil, Dercos (Vichy Laboratoires), and Kerium, Anti-chute (La Roche-Posay). Methods Thirty-two adult female Wistar-Bratislava rats were assigned to 4 groups. Two rectangular areas (2×4 cm) were shaved on either sides of the mid dorsal line (left side - control; right side - test area). Group I was treated topically with 2% minoxidil, group II with Aminexil, and group III with Kerium. Each rat received 0.3 ml of substance applied topically to the shaved dorsal skin every day for 28 days. Rats in group IV served as sham controls receiving no treatment. Hair regrowth was evaluated by trichoscopy (with a dermatoscope), grown hair weight (from a surface area of 1 cm2), and histopathological examination for skin thickness, follicle count, and percentage of anagen induction (morphometric assessment). Results Treatment with 2% minoxidil significantly induced hair regrowth as assessed by trichoscopy, hair weight examination, and morphometric evaluation. Hair weight examination and morphometric assessment demonstrated the lowest hair growth effect with Aminexil among the tested products. Treatment with Kerium was found to significantly induce hair regrowth (p<0.05 as compared to the control group). Conclusion Our study demonstrates that hair regrowth efficacy of products recommended for human use is not similar when tested on an animal model. PMID:26848220

  16. Smaller solar system bodies and orbits; Proceedings of Symposium 3, Workshops II, III, and XXVI, and Topical Meetings of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runcorn, S. K. (Editor); Carr, M. H. (Editor); Moehlmann, D. (Editor); Stiller, H. (Editor); Matson, D. L. (Editor); Ambrosius, B. A. C. (Editor); Kessler, D. J. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics discussed in this volume include the reappraisal of the moon and Mars/Phobos/Deimos; the origin and evolution of planetary and satellite systems; asteroids, comets, and dust (a post-IRAS perspective); satellite dynamics; future planetary missions; and orbital debris. Papers are presented on a comparison of the chemistry of moon and Mars, the use of a mobile surface radar to study the atmosphere and ionosphere, and laser-ionization studies with the technical models of the LIMA-D/Phobos. Attention is given to planetogonic scenarios and the evolution of relatively mass-rich preplanetary disks, the kinetic behavior of planetesimals revolving around the sun, the planetary evolution of Mars, and pre- and post-IRAS asteroid taxonomies. Consideration is also given to ocean tides and tectonic plate motions in high-precision orbit determination, the satellite altimeter calibration techniques, a theory of the motion of an artificial satellite in the earth atmosphere, ESA plans for planetary exploration, and the detection of earth orbiting objects by IRAS.

  17. Cancer and fertility preservation: international recommendations from an expert meeting.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Matteo; Del Mastro, Lucia; Pescio, Maria C; Andersen, Claus Y; Azim, Hatem A; Peccatori, Fedro A; Costa, Mauro; Revelli, Alberto; Salvagno, Francesca; Gennari, Alessandra; Ubaldi, Filippo M; La Sala, Giovanni B; De Stefano, Cristofaro; Wallace, W Hamish; Partridge, Ann H; Anserini, Paola

    2016-01-04

    In the last years, thanks to the improvement in the prognosis of cancer patients, a growing attention has been given to the fertility issues. International guidelines on fertility preservation in cancer patients recommend that physicians discuss, as early as possible, with all patients of reproductive age their risk of infertility from the disease and/or treatment and their interest in having children after cancer, and help with informed fertility preservation decisions. As recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society for Medical Oncology, sperm cryopreservation and embryo/oocyte cryopreservation are standard strategies for fertility preservations in male and female patients, respectively; other strategies (e.g. pharmacological protection of the gonads and gonadal tissue cryopreservation) are considered experimental techniques. However, since then, new data have become available, and several issues in this field are still controversial and should be addressed by both patients and their treating physicians.In April 2015, physicians with expertise in the field of fertility preservation in cancer patients from several European countries were invited in Genova (Italy) to participate in a workshop on the topic of "cancer and fertility preservation". A total of ten controversial issues were discussed at the conference. Experts were asked to present an up-to-date review of the literature published on these topics and the presentation of own unpublished data was encouraged. On the basis of the data presented, as well as the expertise of the invited speakers, a total of ten recommendations were discussed and prepared with the aim to help physicians in counseling their young patients interested in fertility preservation.Although there is a great interest in this field, due to the lack of large prospective cohort studies and randomized trials on these topics, the level of evidence is not higher than 3 for most of the recommendations

  18. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. (a) To close all or part of a meeting of an NRC...

  19. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. (a) To close all or part of a meeting of an NRC...

  20. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. (a) To close all or part of a meeting of an NRC...

  1. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. (a) To close all or part of a meeting of an NRC...

  2. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. (a) To close all or part of a meeting of an NRC...

  3. Efinaconazole Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... may catch fire. Stay away from heat and flames while you are applying this medication.Do not get a pedicure or apply nail polish or other cosmetic nail products to your toenails during your treatment with efinaconazole topical solution.To apply the topical ...

  4. Functional assessment and treatment of perseverative speech about restricted topics in an adolescent with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Wayne W; Rodriguez, Nicole M; Owen, Todd M

    2013-01-01

    A functional analysis showed that a 14-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome displayed perseverative speech (or "restricted interests") reinforced by attention. To promote appropriate speech in a turn-taking format, we implemented differential reinforcement (DR) of nonperseverative speech and DR of on-topic speech within a multiple schedule with stimuli that signaled the contingencies in effect and who was to select the topic. Both treatments reduced perseverative speech, but only DR of on-topic speech increased appropriate turn taking during conversation. Treatment effects were maintained when implemented by family members and novel therapists. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  5. Design of an Inflammation-Sensitive Polyelectrolyte-Based Topical Drug Delivery System for Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bijukumar, Divya; Choonara, Yahya E; Murugan, Karmani; Choonara, Bibi Fatima; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-10-01

    The most successful treatment strategy for arthritis is intra-articular injections that are costly and have reduced patient compliance. The purpose of the current study was to develop an inflammation-sensitive system for topical drug administration. Multi-macromolecular alginate-hyaluronic acid-chitosan (A-H-C) polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles, loaded with indomethacin were developed employing pre-gel and post-gel techniques in the presence of dodecyl-L-pyroglutamate (DLP). In addition to in vitro studies, in silico simulations were performed to affirm and associate the molecular interactions inherent to the formulation of core all-natural multi-component biopolymeric architectures composed of an anionic (alginate), a cationic (chitosan), and an amphi-ionic polyelectrolytic (hyaluronic acid) macromolecule. The results demonstrated that DLP significantly influenced the size of the synthesized nanoparticles. Drug-content analysis revealed higher encapsulation efficiency (77.3%) in the presence of DLP, irrespective of the techniques used. Moreover, in vitro drug release studies showed that indomethacin release from the nanosystem was significantly improved (98%) in Fenton's reagent. Drug permeation across a cellulose membrane using a Franz diffusion cell system showed an initial surge flux (0.125 mg/cm(-2)/h), followed by sustained release of indomethacin for the post-gel nanoparticles revealing its effective skin permeation efficiency. In conclusion, the study presents novel nanoparticles which could effectively encapsulate and deliver hydrophobic drugs to the target site, particularly for arthritis.

  6. Remote sensing of atmosphere and oceans; Proceedings of Symposium 1 and of the Topical Meeting of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raschke, E. (Editor); Ghazi, A. (Editor); Gower, J. F. R. (Editor); Mccormick, P. (Editor); Gruber, A. (Editor); Hasler, A. F. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Papers are presented on the contribution of space remote sensing observations to the World Climate Research Program and the Global Change Program, covering topics such as space observations for global environmental monitoring, experiments related to land surface fluxes, studies of atmospheric composition, structure, motions, and precipitation, and remote sensing for oceanography, observational studies of the atmosphere, clouds, and the earth radiation budget. Also, papers are given on results from space observations for meteorology, oceanography, and mesoscale atmospheric and ocean processes. The topics include vertical atmospheric soundings, surface water temperature determination, sea level variability, data on the prehurricane atmosphere, linear and circular mesoscale convective systems, Karman vortex clouds, and temporal patterns of phytoplankton abundance.

  7. 13 CFR 125.15 - What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... meet to submit an offer on a contract? 125.15 Section 125.15 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL... requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract? (a) Representation of SDVO SBC status. An... an offer on an SDVO contract for supplies if it meets the requirements of the non-manufacturer...

  8. 13 CFR 125.15 - What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... meet to submit an offer on a contract? 125.15 Section 125.15 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL... requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract? (a) Representation of SDVO SBC status. An... an offer on an SDVO contract for supplies if it meets the requirements of the non-manufacturer...

  9. 13 CFR 125.15 - What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... meet to submit an offer on a contract? 125.15 Section 125.15 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL... requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract? (a) Representation of SDVO SBC status. An... an offer on an SDVO contract for supplies if it meets the requirements of the non-manufacturer...

  10. A study of an ethics education topic for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzidis, Evdokia; Schmitz, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to explore nursing students' perceptions of the relative value of various aspects of the ethical component of the undergraduate topic, 'Ethics and Law applied to Nursing' (topic NURS2104). To enable time for reflection on ethics in nursing, sampling occurred 1 year after successful completion of the above-mentioned topic and after successful completion of all but the final clinical experience components of the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) degree. A significant proportion of respondents perceived ethics education as relevant to professional practices. It is also noteworthy that the ethical decision-making strategies that had been incorporated into the topic (NURS2104) became transformed by the clinical experience of each particular student. While results of this study are not conclusive, they nevertheless provide important information for future nursing students on the evolutionary development of ethics education. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An Innovative Website in the United States for Meeting the Emotional and Supportive Care Needs of Young Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fasciano, Karen M; Souza, Phoebe M; Braun, Ilana; Trevino, Kelly

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the development of an institution-specific website designed to meet the supportive and emotional needs of young adults (18-39 years old) with cancer in the United States. The website contains information about topics of particular interest to young adults, coping skills education, and resources; and has social networking capacity. In a survey of website users, participants reported increased "connectedness" and variable impact on feelings of sadness, fear, and worry. Recommendations are made for fostering peer interactions, encouraging staff to educate website users around self-monitoring for distress, and incorporating relevant content on the website.

  12. Evaluating an Organizational Protocol to Implement Effective Leadership Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Erika

    2009-01-01

    The problem on which this study focused was the need to organize and implement effective leadership meetings that led to improved professional collaboration. The purpose was to evaluate the use of a protocol in organizing and implementing such meetings. The research questions were framed around the four levels of the Kirkpatrick (1996) evaluation…

  13. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch early cancer lesions: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Liu, Kuang-Ting; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Liu, Chung-Ji; Chen, Chih-Ping

    2011-03-01

    Oral cancer has becomes the most prominent cancer disease in recent years in Taiwan. The reason is the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people results in oral cancer becomes the fastest growth incident cancer amongst other major cancer diseases. In previous studies showed that photosan, haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), has demonstrated effective PDT results on human head and neck disease studies. To avoid the systemic phototoxic effect of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when photosan reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan gel. We found that photosan reached its peak level in cancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical photosan-mediated PDT (fluence rate: 600 mW/cm2; light exposure dose 200 J/cm2) using the portable Lumacare 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that topical photosan-mediated PDT was an applicable treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions.

  14. Effect of Topical Morphine on Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in an Animal Model: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Akbarzadeh, Afsoon; Heiran, Hamid Reza; Karimi, Ali Asghar; Akbarzadeh, Armin; Ghobadifar, Mohamed Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background Pentavalent antimonials remain the choice of treatment for leishmaniasis, despite their toxicity, high cost, and difficult administration. As an alternative, morphine may induce the healing process of cutaneous leishmaniasis by its immunoregulatory characteristics. Objectives To study the effect of morphine on the wound-healing process of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in a mouse model. Materials and Methods This was an experimental study in which 40 BALB/c mice (female, 6 - 8 weeks) were divided into four groups (each n = 10) who received either placebo alone (group 1), morphine ointment after parasite inoculation (group 2), morphine ointment after wound occurrence (group 3), or placebo after wound occurrence (group 4). Wound size was measured weekly for eight weeks. Results On the first day of treatment, the lesions measured ~1.5 mm in diameter. After eight weeks of treatment, the wound size was significantly smaller in the mice who received morphine ointment (4.81 ± 3.22 mm) compared to those who received placebo after parasite inoculation (8.95 ± 5.71 mm; P = 0.0001) or placebo after wound occurrence (P = 0.028). Conclusions The above data suggest that topical application of morphine accelerates the healing process of CL wounds. We are cautiously optimistic that the results of this study can be used clinically for potentiating CL wound-healing. PMID:27437123

  15. Disposition of nanoparticles and an associated lipophilic permeant following topical application to the skin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Price, Gareth J; Guy, Richard H

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine the disposition of polymer nanoparticles and an associated, lipophilic, model "active" component on and within the skin following topical application. Polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles containing covalently bound fluorescein methacrylate and dispersed Nile Red were prepared by emulsion polymerization. The two fluorophores differentiate the fate of the polymeric vehicle on and within the skin from that of the active. Nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and NMR spectroscopy. In vitro skin permeation experiments were performed using dermatomed porcine skin. Post-treatment with nanoparticle formulations, the skin surface was either cleaned carefully with buffer or simply dried with tissue, and then immediately visualized by confocal microscopy. Average nanoparticle diameters were below 100 nm. Confocal images showed that nanoparticles were located in skin "furrows" and around hair follicles. Surface cleaning removed the former but not all of the latter. At the skin surface, Nile Red remained partly associated with nanoparticles, but was also released to some extent and penetrated into deeper layers of the stratum corneum (SC). In summary, polymeric nanoparticles did not penetrate beyond the superficial SC, showed some affinity for hair follicles, and released an associated "active" into the skin.

  16. Fluorouracil Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by years of too much exposure to sunlight). Fluorouracil cream and topical solution are also used ... plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and UV light (such as tanning booths) and ...

  17. Oxybutynin Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Oxybutynin topical gel is used to treat overactive bladder (a condition in which the bladder muscles contract uncontrollably and cause frequent ... bladder even when it is not full). Oxybutynin gel is in a class of medications called antimuscarinics. ...

  18. Topics in Biomedical Optics: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Boas, David A.; George, John S.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2003-06-01

    The field of biomedical optics is experiencing tremendous growth. Biomedical technologies contribute in the creation of devices used in healthcare of various specialties (ophthalmology, cardiology, anesthesiology, and immunology, etc.). Recent research in biomedical optics is discussed. Overviews of meetings held at the 2002 Optical Society of America Biomedical Topical Meetings are presented.

  19. Topical beta-blockers are not associated with an increased risk of treatment for depression.

    PubMed

    Kaiserman, Igor; Kaiserman, Nadia; Elhayany, Asher; Vinker, Shlomo

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the effect of topical beta-blockers on the prevalence of depression among glaucoma patients. Retrospective observational population-based cohort study. We reviewed the electronic medical records of all the members in a district of the largest health maintenance organization in Israel (Central District of Clalit Health Services) who were older than 20 years (317,469 members). We documented all antiglaucoma prescriptions (n = 274,023) and all antidepressant prescriptions (n = 16,948) filled by glaucoma patients in the district between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2003. We included only those patients who filled at least 6 consecutive antiglaucoma prescriptions at least once every 2 months (n = 6597; 5846 [88.6%] were treated with topical beta-blockers). Depressed patients were defined as patients that filled at least four prescriptions for antidepressants during the study period (n= 810, 12.3% of all glaucoma patients). Relationship of topical beta-blocker use and prevalence of depression among glaucoma patients. No significant demographic differences were noted between glaucoma patients treated and not treated with topical beta-blockers. Of those treated and not treated with beta-blockers, 12.2% (12.7% after age-adjustment) and 12.7%, respectively, were also receiving drug therapy for depression (P = 0.7, chi-square test). With stratification by age, treatment with topical beta-blockers did not influence the prevalence of depression in any age group. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant effect of age, place of birth, and gender on the prevalence of depression, but the prevalence of use of topical beta-blockers had no significant effect. Use of topical beta-blockers by glaucoma patients does not appear to increase the risk of depression in this population.

  20. Don't Plan Another Meeting--Without Calling An Airline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Delaine R.

    1977-01-01

    An increasing number of training managers and other meeting planners are taking advantage of the free meeting planning help--plus discounts on car rentals, meeting speakers, AV productions, and more--that the major airlines have begun to provide. The article presents a look at these services along with material from several airlines. (MF)

  1. Don't Plan Another Meeting--Without Calling An Airline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Delaine R.

    1977-01-01

    An increasing number of training managers and other meeting planners are taking advantage of the free meeting planning help--plus discounts on car rentals, meeting speakers, AV productions, and more--that the major airlines have begun to provide. The article presents a look at these services along with material from several airlines. (MF)

  2. Comparison of skin permeability for three diclofenac topical formulations: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Folzer, E; Gonzalez, D; Singh, R; Derendorf, H

    2014-01-01

    Diclofenac is a hydrophilic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) widely used in humans and animals. There are limited published studies evaluating diclofenac's skin permeation following topical administration. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the in vitro permeation of three different diclofenac-containing formulations (patch, gel, solution) over 24 hours. These formulations were applied (n = 6 per formulation) to pig skin sandwiched between the two chambers in a static Franz diffusion cell and aliquots from the receptor medium were sampled at pre-defined time points. An HPLC method with UV detection was developed and validated with the aim of characterizing the transepidermal penetration in the in vitro system. Using this assay to determine the permeation parameters, results at 24 hours showed that the Flector patch released the highest drug amount (54.6%), whereas a lower drug amount was delivered with the Voltaren Emulgel (38.2%) and the solution (34.4%). The commercial gel showed the highest flux (39.9 +/- 0.9 microg/cm2/h) and the shortest lag-time (1.97 +/- 0.02 h). Based on these in vitro results using pig skin, the transdermal patch resulted in a long-lasting controlled release of diclofenac, while the gel had the shortest lag-time.

  3. Development of an HPLC method for the analysis of Apomine in a topical cream formulation.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Philip J; Angersbach, B Steven; Stratton, Steven P; Myrdal, Paul B

    2006-03-03

    A stability indicating, reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the quantification of Apomine, tetraisopropyl 2-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethyl-1, 1-bisphosphonate, in a topical cream formulation. Analysis of Apomine in the cream formulation was performed through a dilution of the cream base with tetrahydrofuran. This allowed the current method to bypass extraction and/or centrifugation for direct injection and analysis. Separation was achieved using an Alltima C18 5 microm, 150 mm x 2.1 mm column and employed a gradient procedure, beginning with acetonitrile-water (65:35, v/v), at 0.6 mL/min for 9 min, followed by a rinse with isopropyl alcohol for 9 min. The complete gradient method has been optimized to separate Apomine from the nonpolar cream components, wash and equilibrate the column in a 30-min assay. This report demonstrates that this method is effective for quantification of Apomine in a cream formulation.

  4. Topical Meeting on Lasers in Material Diagnostics Held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on 11-12 February 1987. Technical Digest Series. Volume 7

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-31

    meeting treated all aspects of laer design, development and characterization. Lasers in Material Diagnostics: Laser and optical techniques are...FJSRL US AIR FORCE ACADEMY COLORADO S6, CO 80840 USA S DAHLHAUSER KARL j. VS AIR FORCE AFILIARBF KIRTLANO AFB, 6M 87117 USA S OALTON DONALD A. UNITED TECH...DREYFUS RUSSELL N. IBM T J WATSON RESEARCH CTR PO BOX 218 YKTONN HTS , NY 10598 USA L DUFFY PHILIP B. LLIL P0 BO 808, L-86 LIVERMORE, CA 94550 USA a

  5. Role of natural gas in meeting an electric sector emissions ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With advances in natural gas extraction technologies, there is an increase in availability of domestic natural gas, and natural gas is gaining a larger share of use as a fuel in electricity production. At the power plant, natural gas is a cleaner burning fuel than coal, but uncertainties exist in the amount of methane leakage occurring upstream in the extraction and production of natural gas. At high leakage levels, these methane emissions could outweigh the benefits of switching from coal to natural gas. This analysis uses the MARKAL linear optimization model to compare the carbon emissions profiles and system-wide global warming potential of the U.S. energy system over a series of model runs in which the power sector is asked to meet a specific CO2 reduction target and the availability of natural gas changes. Scenarios are run with a range of upstream methane emission leakage rates from natural gas production. While the total CO2 emissions are reduced in most scenarios, total greenhouse gas emissions show an increase or no change when both natural gas availability and methane emissions from natural gas production are high. Article presents summary of results from an analyses of natural gas resource availability and power sector emissions reduction strategies under different estimates of methane leakage rates during natural gas extraction and production. This was study was undertaken as part of the Energy Modeling Forum Study #31:

  6. 2011 Annual Meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2012-03-01

    The keynote address of 2011 Annual Meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society examined the known and the still to be known on drug-induced nephrotoxicity. The nominee of the Distinguished Service Award Lecture gave an account of his career achievements particularly on the domain of chronically instrumented animals for assessing cardiovascular safety. The value of Safety Pharmacology resides in the benefits delivered to Pharma organizations, regulators, payers and patients. Meticulous due diligence concerning compliance of Safety Pharmacology studies to best practices is an effective means to ensure that equally stringent safety criteria are applied to both in-licensed and in-house compounds. Innovative technologies of great potential for Safety Pharmacology presented at the meeting are organs on chips (lung, heart, intestine) displaying mechanical and biochemical features of native organs, electrical field potential (MEA) or impedance (xCELLigence Cardio) measurements in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for unveiling cardiac electrophysiological and mechanical liabilities, functional human airway epithelium (MucilAir™) preparations with unique 1-year shelf-life for acute and chronic in vitro evaluation of drug efficacy and toxicity. Custom-designed in silico and in vitro assay platforms defining the receptorome space occupied by chemical entities facilitate, throughout the drug discovery phase, the selection of candidates with optimized safety profile on organ function. These approaches can now be complemented by advanced computational analysis allowing the identification of compounds with receptorome, or clinically adverse effect profiles, similar to those of the drug candidate under scrutiny for extending the safety assessment to potential liability targets not captured by classical approaches. Nonclinical data supporting safety can be quite reassuring for drugs with a discovered signal of risk. However, for marketing authorization

  7. Topic analysis: an objective measure of the consultation and its application to computer assisted consultations.

    PubMed

    Pringle, M; Robins, S; Brown, G

    1985-06-15

    A simple method has been developed to classify the verbal interaction during medical consultations in terms of the relative proportions of medical and social content and the initiator of conversational topics discussed. The method has been applied to video tape recordings of three doctors' consultations with and without a computer present to classify and compare the items discussed. Actual computer use has been shown to have a medical effect on the consultations (p less than 0.05) and to increase the proportion of topics initiated by the doctor (p less than 0.001). Although this was largely accounted for by the massive increase in doctor initiated medical items resulting directly from computer use, there was evidence that, for two of the doctors, these topics were replacing some of the normal social and patient initiated medical exchanges.

  8. Six key topics informal carers of patients with breathlessness in advanced disease want to learn about and why: MRC phase I study to inform an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Morag; Penfold, Clarissa; Benson, John; Lovick, Roberta; Mahadeva, Ravi; Howson, Sophie; Burkin, Julie; Booth, Sara; Gilligan, David; Todd, Christopher; Ewing, Gail

    2017-01-01

    Breathlessness is a common symptom of advanced disease placing a huge burden on patients, health systems and informal carers (families and friends providing daily help and support). It causes distress and isolation. Carers provide complex personal, practical and emotional support yet often feel ill-prepared to care. They lack knowledge and confidence in their caring role. The need to educate carers and families about breathlessness is established, yet we lack robustly developed carer-targeted educational interventions to meet their needs. We conducted a qualitative interview study with twenty five purposively-sampled patient-carer dyads living with breathlessness in advanced disease (half living with advanced cancer and half with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to identify carers' educational needs (including what they wanted to learn about) and explore differences by diagnostic group in order to inform an educational intervention for carers of patients with breathlessness in advanced disease. There was a strong desire among carers for an educational intervention on breathlessness. Six key topics emerged as salient for them: 1) understanding breathlessness, 2) managing anxiety, panic and breathlessness, 3) managing infections, 4) keeping active, 5) living positively and 6) knowing what to expect in the future. A cross-cutting theme was relationship management: there were tensions within dyads resulting from mismatched expectations related to most topics. Carers felt that knowledge-gains would not only help them to support the patient better, but also help them to manage their own frustrations, anxieties, and quality of life. Different drivers for education need were identified by diagnostic group, possibly related to differences in caring role duration and resulting impacts. Meeting the educational needs of carers requires robustly developed and evaluated interventions. This study provides the evidence-base for the content of an

  9. Emotional Intelligence Meets Traditional Standards for an Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, John D.; Caruso, David R.; Salovey, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Results of 2 studies involving 503 adults and 229 adolescents show that emotional intelligence, as measured by the Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale, a new ability test of emotional intelligence, meets 3 classical criteria of a standard intelligence. (SLD)

  10. Staff Meetings: An Opportunity for Accelerated Training of Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattison, Sherry A.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerated learning techniques for training incorporated into staff meetings were designed to address different learning styles and modalities. The use of experiential games and multisensory whole-brain approaches was engaging and motivating. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  11. Staff Meetings: An Opportunity for Accelerated Training of Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattison, Sherry A.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerated learning techniques for training incorporated into staff meetings were designed to address different learning styles and modalities. The use of experiential games and multisensory whole-brain approaches was engaging and motivating. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  12. Successful treatment of ligneous conjunctivitis with topical fresh frozen plasma in an infant.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Zuhal Özen; Özdemir, Özdemir; Acar, Damla; Gül, Ece; Akbay, Serap

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old female infant presented to our clinic with bilateral eyelid swelling, yellowish-white membranes under both lids, and mucoid ocular discharge. Her aunt had similar ocular problems that were undiagnosed. The conjunctival membranes were excised and histopathological investigation of these membranes showed ligneous conjunctivitis. Further, laboratory examination revealed plasminogen deficiency. A good response was observed to topical fresh frozen plasma (FFP) treatment without systemic therapy, and the membranes did not recur during the treatment. Topical FFP treatment may facilitate rapid rehabilitation and prevent recurrence in patients with ligneous conjunctivitis.

  13. Mining FDA drug labels using an unsupervised learning technique - topic modeling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug labels contain a broad array of information, ranging from adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to drug efficacy, risk-benefit consideration, and more. However, the labeling language used to describe these information is free text often containing ambiguous semantic descriptions, which poses a great challenge in retrieving useful information from the labeling text in a consistent and accurate fashion for comparative analysis across drugs. Consequently, this task has largely relied on the manual reading of the full text by experts, which is time consuming and labor intensive. Method In this study, a novel text mining method with unsupervised learning in nature, called topic modeling, was applied to the drug labeling with a goal of discovering “topics” that group drugs with similar safety concerns and/or therapeutic uses together. A total of 794 FDA-approved drug labels were used in this study. First, the three labeling sections (i.e., Boxed Warning, Warnings and Precautions, Adverse Reactions) of each drug label were processed by the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) to convert the free text of each label to the standard ADR terms. Next, the topic modeling approach with latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) was applied to generate 100 topics, each associated with a set of drugs grouped together based on the probability analysis. Lastly, the efficacy of the topic modeling was evaluated based on known information about the therapeutic uses and safety data of drugs. Results The results demonstrate that drugs grouped by topics are associated with the same safety concerns and/or therapeutic uses with statistical significance (P<0.05). The identified topics have distinct context that can be directly linked to specific adverse events (e.g., liver injury or kidney injury) or therapeutic application (e.g., antiinfectives for systemic use). We were also able to identify potential adverse events that

  14. An Update of the Brazilian Regulatory Bioequivalence Recommendations for Approval of Generic Topical Dermatological Drug Products.

    PubMed

    Soares, Kelen Carine Costa; Santos, Gustavo Mendes Lima; Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Gratieri, Tais

    2015-11-01

    This note aims to clarify the Brazilian regulatory bioequivalence recommendations for approval of generic topical dermatological drug products, since the legal framework of the "Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency" (ANVISA) is only available in Portuguese. According to Resolutions RE n. 1170 (December 19th 2006) and RDC n. 37 (August 3rd 2011) in Brazil, only in vitro studies are required for registration of generic topical dermatological drug products. Current Regulatory Agenda of ANVISA, which contains possible future resolutions to be revised over 2015-2016, includes a discussion on biowaiver requirements and on possible in vitro and in vivo comparability tests for these products.

  15. An essential primer for understanding the role of topical hemostats, surgical sealants, and adhesives for maintaining hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Gabay, Michael; Boucher, Bradley A

    2013-09-01

    A wide variety of topical hemostats are approved as adjunctive therapies in the maintenance of hemostasis during surgical procedures in which conventional methods are insufficient or not practical. A multidisciplinary approach to the selection and application of these agents requires input from all members of the surgical team including surgeons, perioperative nurses, blood bank specialists, and pharmacists. However, pharmacist knowledge regarding topical hemostats may be limited based on lack of formal education within college of pharmacy curricula as well as their use being predominantly in the operating room setting. Furthermore, some of these agents might be procured through central supply rather than the hospital pharmacy. Topical hemostats include agents that act as a mechanical barrier to bleeding and provide a physical matrix for clotting, biologically active agents that catalyze coagulation, combination therapies, and synthetic sealants and adhesives. Although many of the topical hemostats were approved for use before the requirement for clinical trials, this review provides an overview of the available clinical evidence regarding the appropriate uses and safety considerations associated with these agents. Proper use of these agents is vital to achieving the best clinical outcomes. Specifically, knowledge of the contraindications and potential adverse events associated with topical hemostats can help prevent unwanted outcomes. Therefore, an understanding of the benefits and potential risks associated with these agents will allow hospital pharmacists to assist in the development and implementation of institutional policies regarding the safe and effective use of hemostatic agents commonly used in the surgical suite.

  16. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Li, Yun-Yao; Debnath, Asim K

    2004-01-01

    Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1) infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2) binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s) to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored. PMID:15485580

  17. Meeting NPDES permit limits for an effluent-dependent stream

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, W.L.

    1998-09-01

    When the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina received a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit containing very low copper and toxicity limits for an effluent-dependent stream, an innovative and cost-effective method to meet them was sought. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control mandated that compliance with the new limits be achieved within three years of the effective date of the permit. SRS personnel studied various regulatory options for complying with the new limits including Water Effect Ratio, use of a Metals Translator, blending with additional effluents, and outfall relocation. Regulatory options were determined to not be feasible because the receiving stream is effluent dependent. Treatment options were studied after it was determined that none of the regulatory pathways were viable. Corrosion inhibitors were evaluated on a full-scale basis with only limited benefits. Ion exchange was promising, but not cost effective for a high flow effluent with a very low concentration of copper. A treatment wetlands, not normally given consideration for the removal of metals, proved to be the most cost effective method studied and is currently under construction.

  18. Exploring the role and function of trial steering committees: results of an expert panel meeting.

    PubMed

    Harman, Nicola L; Conroy, Elizabeth J; Lewis, Steff C; Murray, Gordon; Norrie, John; Sydes, Matt R; Lane, J Athene; Altman, Douglas G; Baigent, Colin; Bliss, Judith M; Campbell, Marion K; Elbourne, Diana; Evans, Stephen; Sandercock, Peter; Gamble, Carrol

    2015-12-30

    The independent oversight of clinical trials, which is recommended by the Medical Research Council (MRC) Guidelines for Good Clinical Practice, is typically provided by an independent advisory Data Monitoring Committee (DMC) and an independent executive committee, to whom the DMC makes recommendations. The detailed roles and function of this executive committee, known as the Trial Steering Committee (TSC), have not previously been studied or reviewed since those originally proposed by the MRC in 1998. An expert panel (n = 7) was convened comprising statisticians, clinicians and trial methodologists with prior TSC experience. Twelve questions about the role and responsibilities of the TSC were discussed by the panel at two full-day meetings. Each meeting was transcribed in full and the discussions were summarised. The expert panel reached agreement on the role of the TSC, to which it was accountable, the membership, the definition of independence, and the experience and training needed. The management of ethical issues, difficult/complex situations and issues the TSC should not ask the DMC to make recommendations on were more difficult to discuss without specific examples, but support existed for further work to help share issues and to provide appropriate training for TSC members. Additional topics discussed, which had not been identified by previous work relating to the DMCs but were pertinent to the role of the TSC, included the following: review of data sharing requests, indemnity, lifespan of the TSC, general TSC administration, and the roles of both the Funder and the Sponsor. This paper presents recommendations that will contribute to the revision and update of the MRC TSC terms of reference. Uncertainty remains in some areas due to the absence of real-life examples; future guidance on these issues would benefit from a repository of case studies. Notably, the role of a patient and public involvement (PPI) contributor was not discussed, and further work is

  19. An NLP Framework for Non-Topical Text Analysis in Urdu--A Resource Poor Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukund, Smruthi

    2012-01-01

    Language plays a very important role in understanding the culture and mindset of people. Given the abundance of electronic multilingual data, it is interesting to see what insight can be gained by automatic analysis of text. This in turn calls for text analysis which is focused on non-topical information such as emotions being expressed that is in…

  20. The Systems Analysis and Design Course: An Educators' Assessment of the Importance and Coverage of Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidry, Brandi N.; Stevens, David P.; Totaro, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines instructors' perceptions regarding the skills and topics that are most important in the teaching of a Systems Analysis and Design ("SAD") course and the class time devoted to each. A large number of Information Systems ("IS") educators at AACSB accredited schools across the United States were surveyed.…

  1. Earthquake! An Example of How to Develop Reading Skills Using a Topic of Current Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montori, Laura; Lally, Julia

    A topic of student interest, earthquakes, is used as a vehicle for teaching reading and research skills in a California junior high school. Students develop geography skills by labeling fault lines on maps of the Pacific Basin, California, and San Francisco; develop their vocabulary by preparing a list of words about earthquakes; and practice word…

  2. The Systems Analysis and Design Course: An Educators' Assessment of the Importance and Coverage of Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidry, Brandi N.; Stevens, David P.; Totaro, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines instructors' perceptions regarding the skills and topics that are most important in the teaching of a Systems Analysis and Design ("SAD") course and the class time devoted to each. A large number of Information Systems ("IS") educators at AACSB accredited schools across the United States were surveyed.…

  3. DNA, Drugs, and Detectives: An Interdisciplinary Special Topics Course for Undergraduate Students in Forensic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coticone, Sulekha Rao; Van Houten, Lora Bailey

    2015-01-01

    A special topics course combining two relevant and contemporary themes (forensic DNA analysis and illicit drug detection) was developed to stimulate student enthusiasm and enhance understanding of forensic science. Building on the interest of popular television shows such as "CSI" and "Breaking Bad," this course connects…

  4. Earthquake! An Example of How to Develop Reading Skills Using a Topic of Current Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montori, Laura; Lally, Julia

    A topic of student interest, earthquakes, is used as a vehicle for teaching reading and research skills in a California junior high school. Students develop geography skills by labeling fault lines on maps of the Pacific Basin, California, and San Francisco; develop their vocabulary by preparing a list of words about earthquakes; and practice word…

  5. Topic Outlines in Microbiology: An Instructor's Guide for Junior and Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.

    This resource guide presents subject matter organized in outline form for four topical areas: introductory microbiology; medical microbiology; microbial genetics; and microbial physiology. The first two units comprise the two most frequently taught microbiology courses in community and junior colleges. The outlines for microbial genetics and…

  6. An Analysis of Two Textbooks on the Topic of Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Daniel Kim Chwee; Seng, Chan Kim

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of two commonly used high school (Grades 11 and 12) chemistry textbooks in Singapore to determine if the content presented in the topic of intermolecular forces is consistent with the concepts and propositional knowledge identified by the authors as essential for the learning and understanding of the topic…

  7. DNA, Drugs, and Detectives: An Interdisciplinary Special Topics Course for Undergraduate Students in Forensic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coticone, Sulekha Rao; Van Houten, Lora Bailey

    2015-01-01

    A special topics course combining two relevant and contemporary themes (forensic DNA analysis and illicit drug detection) was developed to stimulate student enthusiasm and enhance understanding of forensic science. Building on the interest of popular television shows such as "CSI" and "Breaking Bad," this course connects…

  8. An NLP Framework for Non-Topical Text Analysis in Urdu--A Resource Poor Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukund, Smruthi

    2012-01-01

    Language plays a very important role in understanding the culture and mindset of people. Given the abundance of electronic multilingual data, it is interesting to see what insight can be gained by automatic analysis of text. This in turn calls for text analysis which is focused on non-topical information such as emotions being expressed that is in…

  9. An Analysis of Two Textbooks on the Topic of Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Daniel Kim Chwee; Seng, Chan Kim

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of two commonly used high school (Grades 11 and 12) chemistry textbooks in Singapore to determine if the content presented in the topic of intermolecular forces is consistent with the concepts and propositional knowledge identified by the authors as essential for the learning and understanding of the topic…

  10. Reduction in Force. An Analysis of the Policies and their Implementation. Topical Paper No. 48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, John

    Reduction in force (RIF) policies in community colleges are analyzed. The analysis focuses on the following topics: Regulations on Academic Freedom and Tenure (Gillis, 1971); RIF and Merit; Number of Colleges Involved in RIF; Strategies for Obviating RIF; Need for Carefully Prepared Policies and Procedures; RIF Policies; Faculty Participation;…

  11. Topical tazarotene cream (0.1%) in the treatment of facial acne: an open clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, A S M; Paul, H K; Rahman, M A; Islam, M T; Choudhury, A M

    2010-08-01

    Tazarotene is a new 3rd generation topical acetylenic retinoid. It normalizes keratinocyte differentiation, reduces keratinocyte proliferation and decreases expression of inflammatory markers. Tazarotene was approved by U.S.F.D.A. in 1997 for acne vulgaris. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical tazarotene 0.1% cream in the treatment of facial acne. 67 patients with facial acne in the age range of 13-30 years were enrolled in the study. Purposive sampling was done. Patients were treated with topical Tazarotene cream (0.1%) and were instructed to apply the medication as a thin film over the affected area in the evening once daily for 12 weeks. Follow-up was done at 2nd, 4th week, 8th week and at 12th week. Of the 67 patients, 53% got remission, 9% had good response, 34% had poor response and there was no response in 4% of the patients by 12 weeks of treatment. Among the patients, 9 (13.43%) developed mild side effects. Topical tazarotene cream (0.1%) is a effective and safe treatment option for acne vulgaris affecting face. It is mostly effective in grade-1 and grade-2 acne.

  12. Is topical vitamin C an effective post-Fraxel laser regimen for asians?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Ryul; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Chi, Su-Hyuk; Kim, Deok-Woo; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang

    2012-10-01

    The Fraxel laser has been a useful method for skin resurfacing. According to recent reports, vitamin C has beneficial effects for the skin. However, there is a paucity of data about the effect of vitamin C associated with the Fraxel laser. This study aimed to assess the effect of topical vitamin C as a post-Fraxel regimen. The study involved 44 Koreans, who wished to improve their facial skin aesthetics. All the patients were treated by Fraxel laser twice, with a 4-week interval between treatments. Beginning on day 1, the treatment group used a topical vitamin C agent as a post-Fraxel regimen for 12 weeks. The control group was told not to apply any topical agents. At every visit (0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the first Fraxel), colorimetric status, stratum corneum hydration, skin surface lipids, skin pH, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were measured. The parameters showing significant differences were TEWL and pH. Stratum corneum hydration, skin surface lipids, and colorimetric status showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Topical vitamin C application reduces the injury of the skin's surface barrier after Fraxel laser and promotes restoration of skin pH. However, there is a limit with increasing skin lightness or decreasing skin redness. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article.

  13. "Touch It Lightly": Israeli Students' Construction of Pedagogical Paradigms about an Emotionally Laden Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, David L.; Cohen, Hindy

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood educators are increasingly being called upon to deal with emotionally charged topics, which include natural and manmade disasters, war, terror, death, and other traumatic events. At our teachers college, we prepare students to deal with a challenging issue, memory of the Holocaust, through a series of activities and workshops…

  14. "Touch It Lightly": Israeli Students' Construction of Pedagogical Paradigms about an Emotionally Laden Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, David L.; Cohen, Hindy

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood educators are increasingly being called upon to deal with emotionally charged topics, which include natural and manmade disasters, war, terror, death, and other traumatic events. At our teachers college, we prepare students to deal with a challenging issue, memory of the Holocaust, through a series of activities and workshops…

  15. Sustainable Energy: An Energy Education Topic that Belongs in the Social Studies Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marker, Gerald W.

    This paper examines the impending crisis of depletion of natural resources and explores the development of alternative resources for use. The topic of energy education needs to be included in the social studies curriculum. The program must focus around the following three principles: (1) the coming transition from fossil fuels to some other energy…

  16. An algorithm for the preclinical development of anti-HIV topical microbicides.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, Robert W; Buckheit, Karen W

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the world, and especially in countries comprising the developing world, women are now bearing the brunt of the HIV pandemic, with over 50% living with HIV infection primarily contracted through sexual transmission in monogamous relationships. Thus, effective chemical or physical means of preventing HIV transmission are urgently needed and in the absence of an approved and effective vaccine, microbicides have become the strategy of choice to provide women with the ability to prevent HIV transmission from their infected partners. Topical microbicides include agents specifically developed and formulated for use in either the vaginal or rectal environment to prevent the sexual transmission of infectious organisms, including pathogenic viruses, bacteria and fungi. Although a microbicide product will have many of the same properties as other anti-infective therapeutic agents and would be similarly developed through a defined preclinical program leading to human clinical trials, microbicide development bears its own challenges related to appropriate and informative preclinical investigation, formulation and delivery, and the complex biological environment in which the product must act, as well as the requirement to develop a product that is acceptable to the user. Following years of microbicide development and a series of unsuccessful human clinical trials, a preclinical microbicide development algorithm has been continuously evolving as greater understanding of the required properties of a successful microbicide are defined through laboratory and clinical experience. Herein, we discuss currently accepted practices required for the development of a successful microbicide product which will prevent cell-free and cell-associated virus transmission in the vaginal and rectal vaults.

  17. Teaching medication compliance to psychiatric residents: placing an orphan topic into a training curriculum.

    PubMed

    Weiden, Peter J; Rao, Nyapati

    2005-01-01

    Medication compliance is an orphan topic. Training in the understanding and management of noncompliance does not neatly fall within the domain of psychopharmacology, nor does it clearly fit into other core curricula areas, such as clinical interviewing or psychotherapy training. The objective of this article is to increase awareness about this vagueness among academic psychiatrists and to offer a suggested curriculum to facilitate implementation. The authors present a curriculum covering major aspects of the theory and practice of compliance. The proposed curriculum is divided into five core components that can be used together or separately. These components are: 1) definition of compliance and noncompliance; 2) understanding how compliance depends on efficacy; 3) assessment of compliance and noncompliance; 4) the importance of the therapeutic alliance; and 5) pharmacological and psychosocial strategies to improve compliance. These five sections can be modified into specific lectures that are added to ongoing psychopharmacology, psychiatric interviewing, or psychotherapy courses. A careful review of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) core curriculum found no mention of medication compliance/adherence as a specific training goal, and our residency program, like many others, did not have a specific course that focused on this issue. To address this omission, the authors designed and taught a five-session course for PGY-III and PGY-IV psychiatry residents that specifically addressed assessment and management of noncompliance. It was piloted in the 2003-2004 academic year. The course was very well received and formed the basis of this material presented in this review and discussion. The principles of understanding, assessing, and managing medication compliance should be a part of the core curriculum for every psychiatric residency training program.

  18. Transient spreading and swelling behavior of a gel deploying an anti-HIV topical microbicide.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F; Szeri, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    Drug delivery of topical microbicidal molecules against HIV offers promise as a modality to prevent sexual transmission of the virus. Success of any microbicide product depends, in an interactive way, upon its drug (the microbicide active pharmaceutical ingredient, API) and its delivery system (e.g. a gel, film or intravaginal ring). There is a widespread agreement that more effective drug delivery vehicles, as well as better APIs, must be developed to improve the efficacy of microbicide products. Non-Newtonian gels are primary microbicide vehicles, but those to date have been created with limited understanding of how their properties govern their spreading and retention in the vagina, which, in turn, govern successful drug delivery. Here, we apply fundamental fluid mechanical and physicochemical transport theory to help better understand how successful microbicide API delivery depends upon properties of a gel and the vaginal environment. We address several critical components of this complex process, including: elastohydrodynamic flow of the bolus of a non-Newtonian fluid; and mass transfer due to inhomogeneous dilution of the gel by vaginal fluid contacting it along a moving boundary (the locally deforming vaginal epithelial surface). Local dilution of gel alters local rheological properties. We evaluated this experimentally, delin-eating the way that constitutive parameters of a shear-thinning gel are modified by dilution. We supplement the Reynolds lubrication equation with a mass conservation equation to model diluting fluid movement across the moving vaginal epithelial surface and into the gel bolus. This is a physicochemically complex phenomenon that is not well understood. We implement a boundary flux model based upon the elevated hydrodynamic pressures in the cells. Results show that this model produces fluxes that lie within the range of mean values that have been reported. Further experimental characterization of the vaginal wall is required for a more

  19. Investigation of an angiogenesis-promoting topical treatment for diabetic wounds using multimodal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Joanne; Bower, Andrew J.; Arp, Zane A.; Olson, Eric; Holland, Claire; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Impaired skin wound healing is a significant co-morbid condition of diabetes that is caused by poor microcirculation among other factors. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcription factors that mediate the effects of decreased levels of oxygen in biological environments. Inducing mild hypoxia in the tissue could promote angiogenesis, a critical step in the wound healing process in diabetic wounds. To investigate the relationship between hypoxia and diabetic wound healing, a topical treatment consisting of a HIF-activating prolyl-hydroxylase inhibitor was administered to the wounded skin of diabetic (db/db) mice. Studies were conducted in accordance with the GSK Policy on the Care, Welfare and Treatment of Laboratory Animals and were reviewed at GSK or by the ethical review process at the institution where the work was performed. The wounded area was tracked in vivo for 28 days utilizing a custom-built multimodal microscopy system. An increase in vascular density around the wounds of treated animals was observed using phase-variance optical coherence tomography (PV-OCT), in comparison to normal controls. In addition, second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) were utilized to examine the collagen regeneration and cellular metabolic activity, respectively, in the wounded skin. The utilization of these light based methods can follow metabolic and morphologic changes in the wound healing process in ways not possible with current evaluation processes. Insights demonstrated in these studies could lead to new endpoints for evaluation of the efficacy of drugs and lead to more direct ways of detecting patient response to treatment.

  20. The human heart and the circulatory system as an interesting interdisciplinary topic in lessons of physics and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volná, M.; Látal, F.; Kubínek, R.; Richterek, L.

    2014-01-01

    Many topics which are closely related can be found in the national curriculum of the Czech Republic for physics and biology. One of them is the heart and the circulatory system in the human body. This topic was examined cross curriculum, a teaching module was created and the topic was chosen for our research. The task was to determine if the students of bachelor study are aware of connections between physics and biology within this topic and whether we can help them effectively to describe the corresponding physics phenomena in the human body connected, for example, with a heart attack or with the measurement of blood pressure. In this paper, the heart and the circulatory system are presented as suitable topics for an interdisciplinary teaching module which includes both theoretical and experimental parts. The module was evaluated by a group of first-year undergraduate students of physics at the Faculty of Science, Palacký University. The acquired knowledge was compared with another control group through a test. The highest efficiency of the module was evaluated on the basis of questions that covered the calculation problems.

  1. Factors affecting prescription of ultra-high potency topical corticosteroids in skin disease: an analysis of US national practice data.

    PubMed

    Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Camacho, Fabian T; Pearce, Daniel J; Kulkarni, Amit S; Spencer, Lori; Fleischer, Alan B; Feldman, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    Of the topical preparations available, the ultra-high potency corticosteroids have an important role in treating psoriasis. However, the use of these agents in many other conditions and patient populations may not be appropriate. This study examines the prescribing patterns of Class I topical corticosteroids in patients with skin disease by analyzing data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (1990-2000). Of the nearly 718 million visits for skin disease, Class I topical corticosteroids were prescribed in nearly 3% of all skin disease-related visits, with prescription rates being highest in psoriasis (22%). The study found greater prescription rates of Class I topical steroids by dermatologists compared to non-dermatologists [Odds Ratio (OR) = 4.39 (95% CI: 2.15, 8.99)]. However, there were also a large number of questionable prescriptions for other conditions, which could be construed as misuse of these medications. Despite limitations and the potential dubious use seen here, Class I topical corticosteroid use is relatively commonplace. Education efforts and novel preparations of Class I agents will help to ensure the best possible care for patients suffering from significant skin diseases like psoriasis.

  2. In Absentia: An Exploratory Study of How Patients Are Considered in Multidisciplinary Cancer Team Meetings.

    PubMed

    Hahlweg, Pola; Hoffmann, Jana; Härter, Martin; Frosch, Dominick L; Elwyn, Glyn; Scholl, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team meetings and shared decision-making are potential means of delivering patient-centred care. Not much is known about how those two paradigms fit together in cancer care. This study aimed to investigate how decisions are made in multidisciplinary team meetings and whether patient perspectives are incorporated in these decisions. A qualitative study was conducted using non-participant observation at multidisciplinary team meetings (also called tumor boards) at the University Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. Two researchers recorded structured field notes from a total of N = 15 multidisciplinary team meetings. Data were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics. Physicians mainly exchanged medical information and based their decision-making on this information. Individual patient characteristics or their treatment preferences were rarely considered or discussed. In the few cases where patient preferences were raised as a topic, this information did not seem to be taken into account in decision-making processes about treatment recommendations. The processes in multidisciplinary team meetings we observed did not exhibit shared decision-making. Patient perspectives were absent. If multidisciplinary team meetings wish to become more patient-centred they will have to modify their processes and find a way to include patient preferences into the decision-making process.

  3. Clindamycin Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, eczema (sensitive skin that often becomes itchy or irritated) or allergies.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using topical clindamycin, ...

  4. Spinosad Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Spinosad suspension is used to treat head lice (small insects that attach themselves to the skin) in adults and ... Topical spinosad comes as a suspension (liquid) to apply to the scalp and hair. It is usually applied to the scalp and hair in one or sometimes ...

  5. Life sciences and space research XXIV(1) - Gravitational biology; Proceedings of Symposia 10 and 13 of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission F (Meetings F1 and F2) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S. (Editor); Cogoli, A. (Editor); Planel, H. (Editor); Ubbels, G. A. (Editor); Sievers, A. (Editor); Oser, H. (Editor); Horneck, G. (Editor); Wagner, H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Topics presented include an introduction to theories and models of biological response to gravity, gravity effects on biological systems, the function of calcium in plant graviperception, developmental biology on unmanned spacecraft, and the effect of microgravity on the development of plant protoplasts flown on Biocosmos 9. Also presented are the mechanism by which an asymmetric distribution of plant growth hormone is attained, the perception of gravity by plants, an animal research facility for Space Station Freedom, the long-term effects of microgravity and possible countermeasures, and an experimental system for determining the influence of microgravity on B lymphocyte activation and cell fusion.

  6. Life sciences and space research XXIV(1) - Gravitational biology; Proceedings of Symposia 10 and 13 of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission F (Meetings F1 and F2) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S. (Editor); Cogoli, A. (Editor); Planel, H. (Editor); Ubbels, G. A. (Editor); Sievers, A. (Editor); Oser, H. (Editor); Horneck, G. (Editor); Wagner, H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Topics presented include an introduction to theories and models of biological response to gravity, gravity effects on biological systems, the function of calcium in plant graviperception, developmental biology on unmanned spacecraft, and the effect of microgravity on the development of plant protoplasts flown on Biocosmos 9. Also presented are the mechanism by which an asymmetric distribution of plant growth hormone is attained, the perception of gravity by plants, an animal research facility for Space Station Freedom, the long-term effects of microgravity and possible countermeasures, and an experimental system for determining the influence of microgravity on B lymphocyte activation and cell fusion.

  7. Weather Avoidance Using Route Optimization as a Decision Aid: An AWIN Topical Study. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The aviation community is faced with reducing the fatal aircraft accident rate by 80 percent within 10 years. This must be achieved even with ever increasing, traffic and a changing National Airspace System. This is not just an altruistic goal, but a real necessity, if our growing level of commerce is to continue. Honeywell Technology Center's topical study, "Weather Avoidance Using Route Optimization as a Decision Aid", addresses these pressing needs. The goal of this program is to use route optimization and user interface technologies to develop a prototype decision aid for dispatchers and pilots. This decision aid will suggest possible diversions through single or multiple weather hazards and present weather information with a human-centered design. At the conclusion of the program, we will have a laptop prototype decision aid that will be used to demonstrate concepts to industry for integration into commercialized products for dispatchers and/or pilots. With weather a factor in 30% of aircraft accidents, our program will prevent accidents by strategically avoiding weather hazards in flight. By supplying more relevant weather information in a human-centered format along with the tools to generate flight plans around weather, aircraft exposure to weather hazards can be reduced. Our program directly addresses the NASA's five year investment areas of Strategic Weather Information and Weather Operations (simulation/hazard characterization and crew/dispatch/ATChazard monitoring, display, and decision support) (NASA Aeronautics Safety Investment Strategy: Weather Investment Recommendations, April 15, 1997). This program is comprised of two phases, Phase I concluded December 31, 1998. This first phase defined weather data requirements, lateral routing algorithms, an conceptual displays for a user-centered design. Phase II runs from January 1999 through September 1999. The second phase integrates vertical routing into the lateral optimizer and combines the user

  8. Incorporating Topics That Aren't Distance-Friendly into an Online Program: One Development Team's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Valentin; Doner, Sue; Pivnick, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The Native Species and Natural Processes certificate at the University of Victoria is an advanced-level online program of four courses to introduce students to state-of-the-art topics in the field of ecological restoration. The program posed some unique challenges for course developers. The development team needed to find ways to create online…

  9. The Effect of Socioscientific Topics on Discourse within an Online Game Designed to Engage Middle School Students in Scientific Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig-Hare, Jana; Ault, Marilyn; Rowland, Amber

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the types of argumentation discourse displayed by students when they engaged in chat as part of an online multiplayer game about both socioscientific and scientific topics. Specifically, this study analyzed discourse episodes created by middle school students as they discussed scientific and…

  10. Incorporating Topics That Aren't Distance-Friendly into an Online Program: One Development Team's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Valentin; Doner, Sue; Pivnick, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The Native Species and Natural Processes certificate at the University of Victoria is an advanced-level online program of four courses to introduce students to state-of-the-art topics in the field of ecological restoration. The program posed some unique challenges for course developers. The development team needed to find ways to create online…

  11. LEOS Summer Topical Meetings (1991) on Spaceborne Photonics: Aerospace Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics and Optical Millimeter-Wave Interactions: Measurements, Generation, Transmission and Control Held in Newport Beach, California on July 22-26, 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-29

    AlinAsGalnAs graded superlattice," Appi. Phys. Lett., 54, pp. 16-17, 1988. 4. W . J. Kozlovsky, C. D. Nabors , and R. L. Byer, ’Efficient second harmonic...A D-A 269 037 MENTATION PAGE ,Mo.70 muhIhIII m N1 I urn mmi et iii NIe d H jHeracUe i hour per respon•e.. including he ti , w .or e•weoing e rstru...Library of Congress #: 90-85245 ISBN: 0-87942-618-7 Softbound 0-87942-619-5 Microfiche IIm mm F 0 R E W 0 R D Welcome to the first summer topical meeting

  12. Antimicrobial efficacy of oral topical agents on microorganisms associated with radiated head and neck cancer patients: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; Tarrand, Jeffery J; Roberts, Dianna B; Rolston, Kenneth V; Chambers, Mark S

    2011-04-01

    A variety of oral topical agents have been used for prevention and management of radiotherapy-induced adverse effects. The antimicrobial nature of some of the commonly used agents is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial efficacies of various oral topical agents on common microorganisms associated with radiated head and neck cancer patients. Seven commonly used topical oral agents-0.12% chlorhexidine with alcohol, 0.12% chlorhexidine without alcohol, baking soda-salt rinse, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel, 0.63% stannous fluoride rinse, calcium phosphate mouthrinse, and acemannan hydrogel (aloe vera) rinse-were evaluated in vitro for their antimicrobial efficacies against four common microorganisms. A combination of baking soda-salt rinse and 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was evaluated as the eighth agent. The microorganisms used were Staphylococcus aureus, group B Streptococcus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans. An ELISA reader was used to measure the turbidity of microbial culture wells and optical density (OD) values for each of the 960 wells recorded. Mean OD values were rank ordered based on their turbidity. One-way ANOVA with Tukey HSD post hoc analysis was used to study differences in OD values (P < .05). Mean OD values classified for topical agents from lowest to highest were chlorhexidine with alcohol, chlorhexidine without alcohol, baking soda- salt, calcium phosphate rinse, and the combination of baking soda-salt and stannous fluoride gel. Mean OD values classified for microorganisms from lowest to highest were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, group B Streptococcus, and Candida albicans. A significant difference among the antimicrobial efficacies of topical agents was evident for each of four microorganisms (P < .05). There was also a significant difference among the antimicrobial efficacies of the same topical agent on the four microorganisms tested (P < .05).

  13. Topical ambroxol for the treatment of neuropathic pain. An initial clinical observation.

    PubMed

    Kern, K-U; Weiser, T

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, and the available options are often inadequate. The expectorant ambroxol also acts as a strong local anaesthetic and blocks sodium channels about 40 times more potently than lidocaine. It preferentially inhibits the channel subtype Nav 1.8, which is expressed especially in nociceptive C-fibres. In view of the low toxicity of ambroxol, it seemed reasonable to try using it for the treatment of neuropathic pain that failed to respond to other standard options. The medical records of seven patients with severe neuropathic pain and pain reduction following topical ambroxol treatment are reported retrospectively. As standard therapies had not proved sufficient, a topical ambroxol 20% cream was repeatedly applied by the patients in the area of neuropathic pain. The reasons for neuropathic pain were postherpetic neuralgia (2 ×), mononeuropathy multiplex, phantom pain, deafferentation pain, postoperative neuralgia and foot neuropathy of unknown origin. The individual mean pain intensity reported was between 4 and 6/10 (NRS), maximum pain at 6-10/10 (NRS). The pain reduction achieved individually following ambroxol cream was 2-8 points (NRS) within 5-30 min and lasted for 3-8 h. Pain attacks were reduced in all five patients presenting with this problem. Four patients with no improvement after lidocaine 5% and one patient with no response to capsaicin 8% nevertheless experienced a pain reduction with topical ambroxol. No patient reported any side effects or skin changes during a treatment that has since been continued for up to 4 years. Ambroxol acts as a strong local anaesthetic and preferentially inhibits the nociceptively relevant sodium channel subtype Nav 1.8. For the first time, we report below on a relevant pain relief following topical ambroxol 20% cream in patients with neuropathic pain. In view of the positive side effect profile, the clinical benefit in patients with pain should be investigated further.

  14. Global health ethics: an introduction to prominent theories and relevant topics.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Greg; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Laaser, Ulrich; Meershoek, Agnes; Popa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Global health ethics is a relatively new term that is used to conceptualize the process of applying moral value to health issues that are typically characterized by a global level effect or require action coordinated at a global level. It is important to acknowledge that this account of global health ethics takes a predominantly geographic approach and may infer that the subject relates primarily to macro-level health phenomena. However, global health ethics could alternatively be thought of as another branch of health ethics. It may then relate to specific topics in themselves, which might also include micro-level health phenomena. In its broadest sense, global health ethics is a normative project that is best characterized by the challenge of developing common values and universal norms for responding to global health threats. Consequently, many subjects fall within its scope. Whilst several accounts of global health ethics have been conceptualized in the literature, a concise demarcation of the paradigm is still needed. Through means of a literature review, this paper presents a two-part introduction to global health ethics. First, the framework of 'borrowed' ethics that currently form the core of global health ethics is discussed in relation to two essential ethical considerations: 1) what is the moral significance of health and 2) what is the moral significance of boundaries? Second, a selection of exemplar ethical topics is presented to illustrate the range of topics within global health ethics.

  15. Global health ethics: an introduction to prominent theories and relevant topics

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Greg; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Laaser, Ulrich; Meershoek, Agnes; Popa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Global health ethics is a relatively new term that is used to conceptualize the process of applying moral value to health issues that are typically characterized by a global level effect or require action coordinated at a global level. It is important to acknowledge that this account of global health ethics takes a predominantly geographic approach and may infer that the subject relates primarily to macro-level health phenomena. However, global health ethics could alternatively be thought of as another branch of health ethics. It may then relate to specific topics in themselves, which might also include micro-level health phenomena. In its broadest sense, global health ethics is a normative project that is best characterized by the challenge of developing common values and universal norms for responding to global health threats. Consequently, many subjects fall within its scope. Whilst several accounts of global health ethics have been conceptualized in the literature, a concise demarcation of the paradigm is still needed. Through means of a literature review, this paper presents a two-part introduction to global health ethics. First, the framework of ‘borrowed’ ethics that currently form the core of global health ethics is discussed in relation to two essential ethical considerations: 1) what is the moral significance of health and 2) what is the moral significance of boundaries? Second, a selection of exemplar ethical topics is presented to illustrate the range of topics within global health ethics. PMID:24560262

  16. Global health ethics: an introduction to prominent theories and relevant topics.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Greg; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Laaser, Ulrich; Meershoek, Agnes; Popa, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Global health ethics is a relatively new term that is used to conceptualize the process of applying moral value to health issues that are typically characterized by a global level effect or require action coordinated at a global level. It is important to acknowledge that this account of global health ethics takes a predominantly geographic approach and may infer that the subject relates primarily to macro-level health phenomena. However, global health ethics could alternatively be thought of as another branch of health ethics. It may then relate to specific topics in themselves, which might also include micro-level health phenomena. In its broadest sense, global health ethics is a normative project that is best characterized by the challenge of developing common values and universal norms for responding to global health threats. Consequently, many subjects fall within its scope. Whilst several accounts of global health ethics have been conceptualized in the literature, a concise demarcation of the paradigm is still needed. Through means of a literature review, this paper presents a two-part introduction to global health ethics. First, the framework of 'borrowed' ethics that currently form the core of global health ethics is discussed in relation to two essential ethical considerations: 1) what is the moral significance of health and 2) what is the moral significance of boundaries? Second, a selection of exemplar ethical topics is presented to illustrate the range of topics within global health ethics.

  17. An Investigation of Topics and Trends of Tracheal Replacement Studies Using Co-Occurrence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Fariba; Feizabadi, Mansoureh; Farzanegan, Roya; Vaziri, Esmaeil; Samani, Saeed; Lajevardi, Seyedamirmohammad; Moradi, Lida; Shadmehr, Mohammad Behgam

    2016-11-22

    This study evaluated tracheal regeneration studies using scientometric and co-occurrence analysis to identify the most important topics and assess their trends over time. To provide the adequate search options, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science (WOS) were used to cover various categories such as keywords, countries, organizations, and authors. Search results were obtained by employing Bibexcel. Co-occurrence analysis was applied to evaluate the publications. Finally, scientific maps, author's network, and country contributions were depicted using VOSviewer and NetDraw. Furthermore, the first 25 countries and 130 of the most productive authors were determined. Regarding the trend analysis, 10 co-occurrence terms out of highly frequent words were examined at 5-year intervals. Our findings indicated that the field of trachea regeneration has tested different approaches over the time. In total, 65 countries have contributed to scientific progress both in experimental and clinical fields. Special keywords such as tissue engineering and different types of stem cells have been increasingly used since 1995. Studies have addressed topics such as angiogenesis, decellularization methods, extracellular matrix, and mechanical properties since 2011. These findings will offer evidence-based information about the current status and trends of tracheal replacement research topics over time, as well as countries' contributions.

  18. Upper atmosphere models and research; Proceedings of Workshops X and XI and the Topical Meeting of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rycroft, M. J. (Editor); Keating, G. M. (Editor); Rees, D. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics are presented on the updating of CIRA, the trace constituents of the middle and upper atmosphere, and the localized response of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere at high latitude. Papers are presented on mean temperature fields in the lower thermosphere, a comparison of the thermosphere total density model TD 88 with CIRA 86, improved reference models for the middle-atmosphere ozone, a reference model for CH4 and N2O and trends, reference models for thermospheric NO, and a simulation of odd nitrogen distribution in the thermosphere. Other papers are on the response of the ionosphere-thermosphere system to magnetospheric forcing, microinstabilities driven by nonthermal plasma in the high-latitude F-region, the characteristics of the high-latitude trough, the lower thermospheric coupling study of the CEDAR and WITS programs, and numerical simulations of the seasonal response of the thermosphere to propagating tides.

  19. Life sciences and space research XXIII(3): Natural and artificial ecosystems; Proceedings of the Topical Meetings of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D. (Editor); Tibbitts, T. W. (Editor); Thompson, B. G. (Editor); Volk, T. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of higher plant growth under controlled environmental conditions, waste oxidation, carbon cycling, and biofermentor design and operation. Attention is given to CO2 and O2 effects on the development and fructification of wheat in closed systems, transpiration during life cycle in controlled wheat growth, sources and processing of CELSS wastes, waste-recycling in bioregenerative life support, and the effect of iodine disinfection products on higher plants. Also discussed are carbon cycling by cellulose-fermenting nitrogen-fixing bacteria, a bioreactor design with sunlight supply and operations systems for use in the space environment, gas bubble coalescence in reduced gravity conditions, and model system studies of a phase-separated membrane bioreactor.

  20. Life sciences and space research XXIII(3): Natural and artificial ecosystems; Proceedings of the Topical Meetings of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D. (Editor); Tibbitts, T. W. (Editor); Thompson, B. G. (Editor); Volk, T. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of higher plant growth under controlled environmental conditions, waste oxidation, carbon cycling, and biofermentor design and operation. Attention is given to CO2 and O2 effects on the development and fructification of wheat in closed systems, transpiration during life cycle in controlled wheat growth, sources and processing of CELSS wastes, waste-recycling in bioregenerative life support, and the effect of iodine disinfection products on higher plants. Also discussed are carbon cycling by cellulose-fermenting nitrogen-fixing bacteria, a bioreactor design with sunlight supply and operations systems for use in the space environment, gas bubble coalescence in reduced gravity conditions, and model system studies of a phase-separated membrane bioreactor.

  1. Development and in vitro assessment of alginate bilayer films containing the olive compound hydroxytyrosol as an alternative for topical chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shiow-Fern; Tan, Say-Lee

    2015-11-30

    Topical chemotherapy is the application of cancer drugs directly onto the skin, which has become a standard treatment for basal cell carcinoma. Due to the promising results in the treatment of skin cancer, topical chemotherapy has recently been applied to breast cancer patients because some breast cancer tissues are only superficial. Hydroxytyrosol, a phenolic compound from olives that is present in high amounts in Hidrox(®) olive extract, has been shown to have a protective effect on normal cells and selective antitumor activities on cancerous cells. The aims of the present study were to develop an alginate bilayer film containing Hidrox(®) and to investigate its potential use as a topical chemotherapeutic agent. Alginate films were characterized for swelling and for physical, thermal, rheological, and mechanical properties. Drug content uniformity and in vitro drug release tests were also investigated. The alginate bilayer films containing Hidrox(®), HB2, showed controlled release of hydroxytyrosol at a flux of 0.094±0.009 mg/cm(2)/h. The results of the cytotoxic assay showed that the HB2 films were dose-dependent and could significantly reduce the growth of breast cancer cells (MCF-7) at 150 μg/mL for a cell viability of 29.34±4.64%. In conclusion, an alginate bilayer film containing Hidrox(®) can be a potential alternative for topical chemotherapeutic agent for skin and breast cancer treatment.

  2. An Analysis of Duplicate Presentations at the 2014 Through 2016 AOSSM and AANA Annual Meetings.

    PubMed

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Carver, Trevor J; McCarty, Eric C

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have shown a high incidence of duplicate presentations at research conferences within different medical disciplines. To determine the rate and analyze characteristics of duplicate presentations at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) and Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) Annual Meetings. Cross-sectional study. Meeting programs for the 2014 to 2016 AOSSM and AANA Annual Meetings were searched. All podium presentation abstracts from each AOSSM meeting were cross-referenced with podium presentation abstracts from AANA meetings from all 3 years of the study period to locate all duplicate presentations. Duplicate presentations were then analyzed for changes in abstract title, author order, and addition or removal of authors. A total of 192 and 213 abstracts were accepted for podium presentations at the AOSSM and AANA Annual Meetings, respectively, during the study period. This included 65 presentations at the 2014 AOSSM Annual Meeting, 72 in 2015, and 55 in 2016. Overall, 28 AOSSM presentations (15%) were also presented at an AANA Annual Meeting, including 9 (14%) from the 2014 AOSSM meeting, 15 (21%) from the 2015 meeting, and 4 (7%) from the 2016 meeting. Of the 28 duplicate presentations, authors often altered their abstracts in several ways, including changing the abstract title (14; 50%), changing the author order (17; 61%), and adding or removing authors (10; 36%). Duplication rates were not significantly different between the years (P = .10). A moderate proportion of abstracts presented at the AOSSM and AANA Annual Meetings are duplicates. Meeting committees may want to consider stricter guidelines to ensure only original work is presented at these meetings.

  3. Topical anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects.

  4. Topical anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  5. An open-label tolerability and efficacy study of an aluminum sesquichlorohydrate topical foam in axillary and palmar primary hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, Daniele; Ruggero, Arianna; Francesconi, Lidia; Lacarrubba, Francesco; Nardone, Beatrice; Micali, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Primary hyperidrosis (PH) is a disorder characterized by excessive eccrine sweat gland production that primarily involves the axillae as well as palms and soles. Common first-line topical treatment for PH consists of aluminum salts (AS) that act by physically blocking eccrine sweat gland ducts. However, primary irritant contact dermatitis is a common side effect of AS treatment. Recently, a new low-residue, thermophobic foam formulation containing 20% aluminum sesquichlorohydrate has been developed (Nidrox, Mipharm S.p.A.). To evaluate the local tolerability and efficacy of 20% aluminum sesquichlorohydrate foam in the treatment of axillary and palmar PH. Twenty subjects affected by PH were enrolled in a multicenter, open-label study. Local tolerability was evaluated by physicians assessing itching, burning, and skin irritation using a four-point score (from 0: no symptoms to 3: severe symptoms). Skin irritation was quantified with a visual score. Efficacy was assessed by means of Minor test score using a four-point score (range 0-3). The foam was applied to clean dry skin, every night during the first 2 weeks and three times a week during the following 2 weeks. Clinical evaluations were performed at baseline, at day 14 and at day 28. Patients were monitored throughout the study for adverse events. All 20 subjects completed the study. The foam induced a significant reduction of the Minor score in comparison with baseline values (p = 0.0002) both at day 14 and at day 28. At the end of the 4-week treatment period, the foam reduced eccrine sweating by 61% (Minor score: 3.3 vs. 8.5). No skin irritation was observed during the trial except for one subject who experienced a mild and transient itching sensation. No other side effects were reported during the study. This new foam appears to be an effective and well-tolerated topical treatment in reducing sweating in patients with axillary and palmar PH.

  6. Topical Application of Aloe vera Accelerated Wound Healing, Modeling, and Remodeling: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Mohammadalipour, Adel; Moshiri, Ali; Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of large wounds is technically demanding and several attempts have been taken to improve wound healing. Aloe vera has been shown to have some beneficial roles on wound healing but its mechanism on various stages of the healing process is not clear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of topical application of A. vera on cutaneous wound healing in rats. A rectangular 2 × 2-cm cutaneous wound was created in the dorsum back of rats. The animals were randomly divided into 3 groups of control (n = 20), low-dose (n = 20), and high-dose (n = 20) A. vera. The control and treated animals were treated daily with topical application of saline, low-dose (25 mg/mL), and high-dose (50 mg/mL) A. vera gel, up to 10 days, respectively. The wound surface, wound contraction, and epithelialization were monitored. In each group, the animals were euthanized at 10 (n = 5), 20 (n = 5), and 30 (n = 10) days post injury (DPI). At 10, 20, and 30 DPI, the skin samples were used for histopathological and biochemical investigations; and at 30 DPI, the skin samples were also subjected for biomechanical studies. Aloe vera modulated the inflammation, increased wound contraction and epithelialization, decreased scar tissue size, and increased alignment and organization of the regenerated scar tissue. A dose-dependent increase in the tissue level of dry matter, collagen, and glycosaminoglycans' content was seen in the treated lesions, compared to the controls. The treated lesions also demonstrated greater maximum load, ultimate strength, and modulus of elasticity compared to the control ones (P < 0.05). Topical application of A. vera improved the biochemical, morphological, and biomechanical characteristics of the healing cutaneous wounds in rats. This treatment option may be valuable in clinical practice.

  7. JAK3 as an Emerging Target for Topical Treatment of Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alves de Medeiros, Ana Karina; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Desmet, Eline; Van Gele, Mireille; De Schepper, Sofie; Lambert, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The recent interest and elucidation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway created new targets for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases (ISDs). JAK inhibitors in oral and topical formulations have shown beneficial results in psoriasis and alopecia areata. Patients suffering from other ISDs might also benefit from JAK inhibition. Given the development of specific JAK inhibitors, the expression patterns of JAKs in different ISDs needs to be clarified. We aimed to analyze the expression of JAK/STAT family members in a set of prevalent ISDs: psoriasis, lichen planus (LP), cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), atopic dermatitis (AD), pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and alopecia areata (AA) versus healthy controls for (p)JAK1, (p)JAK2, (p)JAK3, (p)TYK2, pSTAT1, pSTAT2 and pSTAT3. The epidermis carried in all ISDs, except for CLE, a strong JAK3 signature. The dermal infiltrate showed a more diverse expression pattern. JAK1, JAK2 and JAK3 were significantly overexpressed in PG and AD suggesting the need for pan-JAK inhibitors. In contrast, psoriasis and LP showed only JAK1 and JAK3 upregulation, while AA and CLE were characterized by a single dermal JAK signal (pJAK3 and pJAK1, respectively). This indicates that the latter diseases may benefit from more targeted JAK inhibitors. Our in vitro keratinocyte psoriasis model displayed reversal of the psoriatic JAK profile following tofacitinib treatment. This direct interaction with keratinocytes may decrease the need for deep skin penetration of topical JAK inhibitors in order to exert its effects on dermal immune cells. In conclusion, these results point to the important contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway in several ISDs. Considering the epidermal JAK3 expression levels, great interest should go to the investigation of topical JAK3 inhibitors as therapeutic option of ISDs. PMID:27711196

  8. JAK3 as an Emerging Target for Topical Treatment of Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Alves de Medeiros, Ana Karina; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Desmet, Eline; Van Gele, Mireille; De Schepper, Sofie; Lambert, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The recent interest and elucidation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway created new targets for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases (ISDs). JAK inhibitors in oral and topical formulations have shown beneficial results in psoriasis and alopecia areata. Patients suffering from other ISDs might also benefit from JAK inhibition. Given the development of specific JAK inhibitors, the expression patterns of JAKs in different ISDs needs to be clarified. We aimed to analyze the expression of JAK/STAT family members in a set of prevalent ISDs: psoriasis, lichen planus (LP), cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), atopic dermatitis (AD), pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and alopecia areata (AA) versus healthy controls for (p)JAK1, (p)JAK2, (p)JAK3, (p)TYK2, pSTAT1, pSTAT2 and pSTAT3. The epidermis carried in all ISDs, except for CLE, a strong JAK3 signature. The dermal infiltrate showed a more diverse expression pattern. JAK1, JAK2 and JAK3 were significantly overexpressed in PG and AD suggesting the need for pan-JAK inhibitors. In contrast, psoriasis and LP showed only JAK1 and JAK3 upregulation, while AA and CLE were characterized by a single dermal JAK signal (pJAK3 and pJAK1, respectively). This indicates that the latter diseases may benefit from more targeted JAK inhibitors. Our in vitro keratinocyte psoriasis model displayed reversal of the psoriatic JAK profile following tofacitinib treatment. This direct interaction with keratinocytes may decrease the need for deep skin penetration of topical JAK inhibitors in order to exert its effects on dermal immune cells. In conclusion, these results point to the important contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway in several ISDs. Considering the epidermal JAK3 expression levels, great interest should go to the investigation of topical JAK3 inhibitors as therapeutic option of ISDs.

  9. Topical retinol and the stratum corneum response to an environmental threat.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Henry, F; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1997-01-01

    The functional consequences of using topical retinol on skin have not been thoroughly studied so far. The aim of this open study was to compare two preparations containing either retinol or vitamin E, using biometric evaluations. Three methods, namely the sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) corneosurfametry bioassay, the ultraviolet (UV) squamometry test and optical profilometry of the UV-induced wrinkling process, were used to assess some properties of the stratum corneum. The retinol preparation achieved better scores than the vitamin-E cream in all three tests and appears to improve the resistance of the stratum corneum against some chemical (SLS) and physical (UV) threats. It also limits UV-induced shallow wrinkling.

  10. An Air Force Guide for Effective Meeting Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    ALCs). In recent yers , both centers have experienced increased maintenance time and decreased on-time production rates, with Due Date Performance (DDP...transition to High Velocity Maintenance (HVM), which is intended to improve aircraft availability to meet mission requirements. This study utilizes...The depots which are responsible for their sustainment are currently struggling to manage the increased workloads due to aging aircraft and high

  11. Impact on quality activities of measurement systems meeting an L:1 rule

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, M. S.; Burkhardt, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    This study considers the impact of a measurement system that meets an L:1 rule on various quality activities. These activities include inspection, acceptance sampling, and control charting. A measurement system that meets a 10:1 rule performs much better than one that meets a 4:1 rule. R code is provided so that the practitioner is able to evaluate these activities to his or her particular situation.

  12. Impact on quality activities of measurement systems meeting an L:1 rule

    DOE PAGES

    Hamada, M. S.; Burkhardt, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    This study considers the impact of a measurement system that meets an L:1 rule on various quality activities. These activities include inspection, acceptance sampling, and control charting. A measurement system that meets a 10:1 rule performs much better than one that meets a 4:1 rule. R code is provided so that the practitioner is able to evaluate these activities to his or her particular situation.

  13. Comparison of topical zinc oxide and silver sulfadiazine in burn wounds: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Kemal; Karahan, Omer; Okuş, Ahmet; Unlü, Yaşar; Eryılmaz, Mehmet Ali; Ay, Serden; Sevinç, Barış

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to compare the effects of topical zinc oxide and topical silver sulfadiazine in the treatment of partial-thickness burn wounds. The study was conducted with 20 New Zealand rabbits, and burn wounds were created by a brass probe. The animals were randomly divided into two groups. The burns were treated with zinc oxide (Group O) or silver sulfadiazine (Group S) with daily application. The wound healing process was followed both clinically and histopathologically. We determined the days at which 50% and 80% re-epithelization was observed. The mean time for 50% and 80% re-epithelization was 21.4 and 25.4 days in Group O and 25.8 and 30.2 days in Group S, respectively (p<0.001). The mean score for wound colonization was lower in Group O. The difference was statistically significant at weeks 2, 3, 4, and 6 (p<0.001). In the histopathological examination, the thicknesses of the epidermis, dermis and scar tissue were 0.12 mm, 3.80 mm and 244 mm in Group O, and 0.16 mm, 4.76 mm and 3.16 mm in Group S, respectively (p<0.001). In this experimental burn study, zinc oxide was more effective than silver sulfadiazine in terms of epithelization, dermis maturation and scar formation.

  14. Topical tacrolimus and pimecrolimus in the treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus: an evidence-based evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tzellos, Thrasivoulos George; Kouvelas, Dimitrios

    2008-04-01

    Lesions of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) are refractory to a wide range of topical or systemic therapies. The pathogenesis of CLE is multifactorial and polygenic, and many of its details remain unclear. However, immunologic evidence suggests the possible therapeutic use of tacrolimus and pimecrolimus. CLE is one of the most common dermatological autoimmune disorders worldwide, which includes systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with malar rash, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) and discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE). Our aim was to determine the efficacy of topical pimecrolimus and tacrolimus in the treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus. The literature was systematically reviewed. Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Database were searched for systemic reviews, randomised controlled trials and nonrandomised clinical trials using the search terms "pimecrolimus", "Elidel", "SDZ ASM 981", "tacrolimus", "Protopic", "FK506" and "cutaneous lupus erythematosus". Studies were assessed independently by two authors. Five studies were eligible for inclusion in this review. Only one of them was a randomised controlled trial (RCT). There was no significant difference between tacrolimus and clobetasol; however, evidence indicates the highest tolerability of tacrolimus compared with corticosteroids. This review indicates the efficacy of tacrolimus and pimecrolimus in, at least initial, cutaneous lesions of SLE. However, in SCLE and DLE lesions, the efficacy appears to be lower, perhaps due to the chronicity of those lesions. The lack of RCTs is characteristic. Future studies should focus on efficacy, short- and long-term effects and cost-effectiveness. However, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus show efficacy, and such effort is worthwhile.

  15. The value of multidisciplinary team meetings within an early pregnancy assessment unit.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, Rasiah; Farag, Mena; Hayes, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    This is the first study to ascertain the value of multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings within an early pregnancy assessment unit (EPAU). Our national telephone survey identified that in the United Kingdom, overall 37% of EPAU utilise regular MDT meetings. Secondary and tertiary hospitals are just as likely to hold regular MDT meetings. The participants in our interview study expressed the principal benefits of regular MDT meetings as communication, education and effective stress management. The perceived additional benefits included improved care quality, better patient experience and enhanced team cohesion. During the meetings, at least, one representative from every tier of staffing was present. The caseload of the MDT meeting comprised ectopic pregnancies and pregnancies of unknown location. We propose a number of research studies, which would build on this study. Such efforts will help enhance the effectiveness of the MDT-based EPAU service.

  16. Liposomal butamben gel formulations: toxicity assays and topical anesthesia in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Cintia Maria Saia; Guilherme, Viviane Aparecida; Alkschbirs, Melissa Inger; de Brito Junior, Rui Barbosa; Tofoli, Giovana Radomille; Franz-Montan, Michelle; de Araujo, Daniele Ribeiro; de Paula, Eneida

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity and the in vivo analgesic effect and local toxicity of the local anesthetic butamben (BTB) encapsulated in conventional or elastic liposomes incorporated in gel formulations. The results showed that both gel formulations of liposomal BTB reduced the cytotoxicity (p < 0.001; one-way ANOVA/Tukey's test) and increased the topical analgesic effect (p < 0.05; one-way ANOVA/Tukey's test) of butamben, compared to plain BTB gel. The gel formulations presented good rheological properties, and stability assays detected no differences in physicochemical stability up to 30 d after preparation. Moreover, histological assessment revealed no morphological changes in rat skin after application of any of the gel formulations tested.

  17. Topical treatments for hydrofluoric acid dermal burns. Further assessment of efficacy using an experimental piq model.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B J; MacKinnon, M A; Knowlden, N F; Billmaier, D J; Derelanko, M J; Rusch, G M; Naas, D J; Dahlgren, R R

    1996-05-01

    Several topical treatments for hydrofluoric acid dermal burns (Zephiran, calcium acetate and magnesium hydroxide antacid soaks, and calcium gluconate gel) were assessed for efficacy in a pig model. Gross appearance and histopathology of treated and untreated burn sites were evaluated. For superficial burns, Zephiran was most effective; calcium acetate, magnesium hydroxide antacid, and calcium gluconate gel were less effective. For deep burns, gross observations showed that calcium acetate and Zephiran were most efficacious, whereas histopathology indicated comparable efficacy of Zephiran, calcium acetate, and calcium gluconate gel for all skin layers. Magnesium hydroxide antacid demonstrated efficacy only for the subdermis. The clinically beneficial effects of both Zephiran and calcium gluconate gel were affirmed. Although results suggest that calcium acetate and magnesium-containing antacids may be beneficial for human hydrofluoric acid dermal burns, these are not established clinical treatments.

  18. Topical Meeting on Laser and Optical Remote Sensing: Instrumentation and Techniques Technical Digest Held in North Falmoth, Massachusetts on September 28-October 1, 1987. Volume 18.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    power and volume are achievable by utilizing emerging technologies in light-weighted mirrors and tunable solid state lasers, pumped by semiconductor...Cretien form of a Cassegrain telescope. The secondary mirror is fused quartz with an aluminum reflecting surface and the primary mirror features a...which receive and separate the backscattered laser signals. The optical assembly is mounted on an optical bench and suspended under the primary mirror

  19. The effectiveness of sublingual and topical compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women: an observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Andres D; Daniels, Kelly R

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrated improved menopausal symptom relief following treatment with compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy; however, clinical effectiveness studies evaluating different routes of bioidentical hormone replacement therapy administration are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of sublingual and topical compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy for the treatment of vasomotor, mood, and other quality-of-life symptoms in post-menopausal women. This was a prospective, observational cohort study of women > or = 18 years of age who received a compounded sublingual or topical bioidentical hormone replacement therapy preparation between January 1, 2003 and October 1, 2010 in a community pharmacy. Data collection included patient demographics, comorbidities, hormone regimens, and therapeutic outcomes. Patients rated their vasomotor, mood, and quality-of-life symptoms as absent, mild, moderate, or severe at baseline, at one to three months follow-up, and three to six months follow-up. Baseline characteristics were compared using the chi-square test for categorical variables and the Wilcoxon rank sum test for continuous variables. Symptom intensity between baseline and follow-up periods were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. A total of 200 patients met study criteria; 160 received topical bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, and 40 received sublingual bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. Most sublingually-treated patients (70%) received an estrogen combination and 100% received progesterone. Nearly half (43%) of the topically treated patients received an estrogen combination (43%) and 99% received progesterone. The percentage of sublingually treated patients reporting "moderate" or "severe" symptoms was significantly reduced at one to three months follow-up for the following target symptoms: hot flashes (31%, P = 0.04), night sweats (38%, P < 0.01), irritability (36%, P = 0

  20. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded with Retinoic Acid and Lauric Acid as an Alternative for Topical Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; De Araújo, Lidiane Advíncula; Trindade, Mariana de Jesus Vaz; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Oréfice, Rodrigo Lambert; Farias, Luis de Macêdo; De Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Goulart, Gisele Assis Castro; Alves, Ricardo José; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is the first choice for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and all-trans retinoic acid is one of the most used drugs. The combination of retinoids and antimicrobials is an innovative approach for acne therapy. Recently, lauric acid, a saturated fatty acid, has shown strong antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes. However, topical application of retinoic acid is followed by high incidence of side-effects, including erythema and irritation. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent an alternative to overcome these side-effects. This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with retinoic acid and lauric acid and evaluate their antibacterial activity. The influence of lipophilic stearylamine on the characteristics of solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated. Solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was evaluated against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. High encapsulation efficiency was obtained at initial time (94 ± 7% and 100 ± 4% for retinoic acid and lauric acid, respectively) and it was demonstrated that lauric acid-loaded-solid lipid nanoparticles provided the incorporation of retinoic acid. However, the presence of stearylamine is necessary to ensure stability of encapsulation. Moreover, retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus, representing an interesting alternative for the topical therapy of acne vulgaris.

  1. Meeting National Science Standards in an Integrative Curriculum: Classroom Examples from a Rural Middle Level Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Bruno G.

    1997-01-01

    Rural schools perceive small size, geographic isolation, and sparse resources as limiting factors in meeting new science standards. A study of an integrated curriculum in a rural middle-level program found that this model, based on Beane's integrative curriculum planning strategies, had no trouble meeting the national life-science curriculum…

  2. Class Meetings as a Tool for Classroom Management and Character Development: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohmann, Rose R.

    Classroom management literature emphasizes non-punitive methods of managing a classroom of students, suggesting that democratic class meetings are an important or central element to developing student character. Class meetings are presented as a method of teaching children problem solving skills, conflict resolution, and a means for encouraging…

  3. 40 CFR 60.2595 - What if I do not meet an increment of progress?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... increment of progress? If you fail to meet an increment of progress, you must submit a notification to the Administrator postmarked within 10 business days after the date for that increment of progress in table 1 of this subpart. You must inform the Administrator that you did not meet the increment, and you...

  4. 40 CFR 60.2835 - What if I do not meet an increment of progress?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... increment of progress? If you fail to meet an increment of progress, you must submit a notification to the Administrator postmarked within 10 business days after the date for that increment of progress in table 1 of this subpart. You must inform the Administrator that you did not meet the increment, and you...

  5. 40 CFR 62.14555 - What if I do not meet an increment of progress?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... violation of the standards under this subpart. If you fail to meet an increment of progress, you must submit a notification to the Administrator postmarked within 10 business days after the due date for that increment of progress. You must inform the Administrator that you did not meet the increment, and you...

  6. Proceedings (1st) of the Topical Meeting on the Microphysics of Surfaces, Beams, and Adsorbates Held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 4-6 February 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-18

    Adsorbates 1372 Preface 1373 Summary Abstract: Ion-enhanced processes in T. M. Mayer, M. S. Ameen, etching of silicon E. L. Barish, T. Mizutani, D. J...Characterization of photochemical processing M. Hirose, S. Yokoyama, Y. Yamakage 1450 Photo-metal organic vapor phase epitaxy: A low S. J. C. Irvine, J. Giess, J...Haigh epitaxy and routes to an ultraviolet-assisted process (conftne.* 1460 Surface photochemical phenomena in laser G. S. Higashi, L. J. Rothberg

  7. Summaries of Papers presented at the Picosecond Electronics and Optoelectronics Topical Meeting Held in Incline Village, Nevada on January 14-16, 1987. Conference Edition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-10

    Gleason of TniQuint Semiconductor for their help with the GaAs IC’s, and J. Kafka and T. Baer of Spectra- Physics, inc. for their guidance in the...beam monitors band edge ’. absorption, an appropriate technique for voltage-biased structurcs in which the Franz -Kcldvsh. elfect is modulated as moving...recently demonstrated performance up to a few gigahertz (Table 1). The principle of operation is based on the Franz -Keldysh effect in which the absorption

  8. Soft X-Ray Projection Lithography. Organization of the Photonics Science Topical Meetings Held in Monterey, California on May 10-12, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-10

    00 pm MA3 Two aspheric mirror system design development MB2 Condenser optics for SXPL, Steve Vernon. Vernon Ap- for SXPL, T. E Jewell. Optical Design...Consultant A generalized plied Physics, Gary Sommargren. Lynn Seppala. David Gaines, procedure for an optical design of a two aspheric mirror system...necessary to develop high-rollectance, tionat Laboratories: J. E, B3jorkhotm. R. R. Freeman, M. 0. Himet, normaltýincidence x-ray mirrors tar projection

  9. Successful human scar regeneration by topical iodine: a case report: an interim (3.5 year) summary.

    PubMed

    Derry, David M

    2009-05-01

    Control of regeneration and wound healing are scientific and clinical objectives. In 1997, topical Lugol's iodine solution applied daily for 3 days to a 50 year old facial scar lead to hyperemic scar tissue. As a working hypothesis, the author proposed topical iodine could initiate, control and complete human scar regeneration. In 2005, after collecting three more surgical scars, topical iodine applications began. Within 3 days all four scars started regenerating. Stopping topical iodine halted the process. Within a week an appropriate adult scar formed. Digital cameras recorded events. Regeneration is complex and slow. Its appearance depends on whether scar is covered with plastic or open. Iodine's chemical properties are discussed along with their reaction with epithelial cells. As there are no visible signs detectable changes from oral iodine on regeneration, details of iodine staining are more thoroughly described. Not all, but most important results are presented. Topical iodine induces hair growth in and around scars. Hair is regeneration's workhorse, moving purposefully in all directions under arrector pili muscle power delivering regenate material accurately to scar tissues and coordinating centers. In addition, hair repeatedly self amputates possibly strengthening regenerating tissues. Two types of regenate material show under plastic wrap: white and globular. The white regenate appears and behaves somewhat like snow, but can be yellow, green or brown depending iodine content. The globular form of regenate material maybe derived from white regenate material with hair's help. Globular regenate material is larger, nondescript, variable in size and color (depends on iodine content) and seemed usually associated with hair. There are two centrally placed coordinating centers 5 mm apart on major scars. Wrist centers have a palpable, but not visible ridge, between them whereas abdominal centers do not. Wrist centers lasted through all regeneration of the wrist

  10. [Use of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in an urban health center. Comparison with the current evidence].

    PubMed

    Yagüe-Sebastián, M M; Coscollar-Escartín, I; Muñoz-Albadalejo, P; López-Canales, M C; Villaverde-Royo, M V; Gutiérrez-Moreno, F

    2013-09-01

    To describe the prescribing of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in an urban health center (Zaragoza, Spain). A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on subjects who belonged to an urban center and were studied during the year 2010. The sample size with a confidence level of 95%, was calculated, a total of 843 prescriptions were analyzed. The sample was single random, and 150 cases were selected. The prevalence and confidence intervals were calculated. The statistical package STATA 9.1 was used for the calculations. The most used drug was diclofenac, in 27.33% (95% CI: 20.65-34.88). NSAIDs were most used in females. In 18% of the cases the area of application was the knee, followed by the 15% in the lower back area (95% CI: 10,22-21,78). There were no adverse reactions. Frequent use is made of topical NSAIDs in a basic health area. Current recommendations support the use in the knee and in the hand, but not in the back, where its use is common. The use of topical NSAIDs decreases side effects and drug interactions, therefore their use is recommended in patients on multiple drug therapy and in the elderly. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Recruitment of underage test persons: motivators and barriers in an anthropological EU-survey on a sensitive topic.

    PubMed

    Nohrdent, Dörte; Cattaneo, Cristina; Gabriel, Peter; Ohlrogge, Sabine; Poppa, Pasquale; Schmitt, Roland; Tutkuviene, Janina; Rizgeliene, Renata; Ratnayake, Melanie; Obertová, Zuzana; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    Recruiting test persons is crucial in many scientific fields. The recognition of motivators or barriers to survey participation may support the design and recruitment strategy of future studies. The recruitment of under age test persons is very complex and sensitive. This paperpresents and analyses the experiences in recruitment of female juveniles (10-18 years old) in Germany, Italy and Lithuania within the context of an EU funded project concerning the extremely sensitive topic of "child pornography". The purpose of the project was to develop a method for age estimation of juveniles on photographs and videos. The faces of the test persons were photographed and anthropologically measured after an informed consent was signed by their parents and themselves. The analysis of the recruitment strategies and response rates revealed that culturally influenced factors played a significant role in the individual decision for or against a participation in the study. In all countries, the sensitive topic of child pornography had a great influence on the decision process. Many German parents agreed especially in light of this topic while in Italy and Lithuania the word "child pornography" triggered a very negative response. In Germany, the anthropological investigation of the faces provoked negative associations with the anthropometric surveys in the Third Reich. Social and political climate were further relevant factors for decision-making especially in Lithuania. The "top-down" principle of recruitment proved to be very effective for this kind of study. The authorities of headmasters, scientists and institutions positively influenced the decisions of the parents.

  12. The Alpha consensus meeting on cryopreservation key performance indicators and benchmarks: proceedings of an expert meeting.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    This proceedings report presents the outcomes from an international workshop designed to establish consensus on: definitions for key performance indicators (KPIs) for oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, using either slow freezing or vitrification; minimum performance level values for each KPI, representing basic competency; and aspirational benchmark values for each KPI, representing best practice goals. This report includes general presentations about current practice and factors for consideration in the development of KPIs. A total of 14 KPIs were recommended and benchmarks for each are presented. No recommendations were made regarding specific cryopreservation techniques or devices, or whether vitrification is 'better' than slow freezing, or vice versa, for any particular stage or application, as this was considered to be outside the scope of this workshop. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. OSA Proceedings of the Topical Meeting on Nonlinear Guided-Wave Phenomena Held in Cambridge, England (United Kingdom) on 2-4 September 1991. Volume 15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    Michel Piche. U. Laval, Canada. The dynamical optical fiber communications due to stimulated Brillouin instabilities at the output of an all-fiber...38. 107 [T] .J. Leavitt t ’ilversit v of Arizonia. 1990. 278 / TuE5-1 Instabilities of a dispersive nonlinear all-fiber ring cavity Rdal Vallde Michel ...Pich6 Centre d’optique photonique et laser (COPL) Universitd Laval (Pav. Vachon ) G1 K 7P4 Canada TEL.: (418) 656-2454 FAX.: (418) 656-2623 Nonlinear

  14. Summaries of Papers Presented at the Picosecond Electronics and Optoelectronics Topical Meeting Held in Salt Lake City, Utah on March 8-10, 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-31

    can be improved 8 dB to -30 dBm by using a semiconductor optical preamplifier. A receiver sensitivity of -37 dBm can be achieved with an erbium- doped ...1: Differential phase contrast confocal microscope. PBS: Polarizing Beam Splitter. A/2: Half-wave plate. YIG: Yttrium -Iron-Garnet Faraday rotator. A...transmission lines defined on lanthanum gallate (LaGaO3 ) as a substrate. On lLaGaO3 , YBCO grows highly oriented like on SrTiO 3 . However, unlike SrTiO3

  15. Organization of the Topical Meeting on Tunable Solid State Lasers Held in North Falmouth, Massachusetts on 1-3 May 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-30

    Moncorg6 and H. Manaa. Laboratoire de physico-chimie des materiaux luminescents U.A 442 CNRS, Universit6 de Lyon I. 59622 Villeurbanne, France. Many...cylinder that was also drilled to accommodate a 10.0K 0 at 25.0°C precision interchangeable thermistor. The resistance of the thermistor was determined...with an accuracy of ±t1- from the voltage generated by a 100lia current. At 37°C a ±1-Q thermistor resistance uncertainty corresponded to a temperature

  16. 25 CFR 292.3 - How does a tribe seek an opinion on whether its newly acquired lands meet, or will meet, one of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribe seek an opinion on whether its newly... tribe seek an opinion on whether its newly acquired lands meet, or will meet, one of the exceptions in... either the National Indian Gaming Commission or the Office of Indian Gaming. (b) If the tribe seeks...

  17. Symbiosis: Rich, Exciting, Neglected Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Jane Thomas

    1974-01-01

    Argues that the topic of symbiosis has been greatly neglected and underemphasized in general-biology textbooks. Discusses many types and examples of symbiosis, and provides an extensive bibliography of the literature related to this topic. (JR)

  18. Leading Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; Heynderickx, James

    Chapter 13 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter offers suggestions to help educators improve their performance in meetings, both as group leaders and as participants. Well-run meetings can rejuvenate an organization, leading to improved teamwork, communication, and morale. A poor meeting, on the other hand, can have a…

  19. An analysis of four ways of assessing student beliefs about sts topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikenhead, Glen S.

    The study investigated the degree of ambiguity harbored by four different response modes used to monitor student beliefs about science-technology-society topics: Likert-type, written paragraph, semistrue tured interview, and empirically developed multiple choice. The study also explored the sources of those beliefs. Grade-12 students in a Canadian urban setting responded, in each of the four modes, to statements from Views on Science-Technology-Society. It was discovered that TV had far more influence on what students believed about science and its social, technological context than did numerous science courses. The challenge to science educators is to use the media effectively in combating naive views about science. Regarding ambiguity in student assessment, the Likert-type responses were the most inaccurate, offering only a guess at student beliefs. Such guesswork calls into question the use of Likert-type standardized tests that claim to assess student views about science. Student paragraph responses contained significant ambiguities in about 50% of the cases. The empirically developed multiple choices, however, reduced the ambiguity to the 20% level. Predictably, the semistructured interview was the least ambiguous of all four response modes, but it required the most time to administer. These findings encourage researchers to develop instruments grounded in the empirical data of student viewpoints, rather than relying solely on instruments structured by the philosophical stances of science educators.

  20. Maximal Usage Trial: An Overview of the Design of Systemic Bioavailability Trial for Topical Dermatological Products

    PubMed Central

    Bashaw, Edward Dennis; Tran, Doanh C.; Shukla, Chinmay G.; Liu, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Dermatologic diseases can present in varying forms and severity, ranging from the individual lesion and up to almost total skin involvement. Pharmacokinetic assessment of topical drug products has previously been plagued by bioanalytical assay limitations and the lack of a standardized study design. Since the mid-1990's the US Food and Drug Administration has developed and implemented a pharmacokinetic maximal usage trial (MUsT) design to help address these issues. The MUsT design takes into account the following elements: the enrollment of patients rather than normal volunteers, the frequency of dosing, duration of dosing, use of highest proposed strength, total involved surface area to be treated at one time, amount applied per square centimeter, application method and site preparation, product formulation, and use of a sensitive bioanalytical method that has been properly validated. This paper provides a perspective of pre-MUsT study designs and a discussion of the individual elements that make up a MUsT. PMID:26634191

  1. Assessment of "corticophobia" as an indicator of non-adherence to topical corticosteroids: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Simon M; Itin, Peter; Vogt, Deborah R; Walter, Marc; Lang, Undine; Griffin, Liezel L; Euler, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    Concerns regarding topical corticosteroid (TCS) use, broadly known as "corticophobia", are highly prevalent among dermatology patients and often result in non-adherence to TCS. This non-adherence contributes to poor disease control and increased health care costs. However, it is unknown if assessment of these concerns might help to identify patients at risk of TCS-non-adherence. Clinical tools indicating non-adherence could be helpful to improve management of this patient group. To assess whether the available tools for measuring concerns regarding corticosteroids, the TOPICOP scale and the 0-10 Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), could help to detect non-adherence to TCS. In 75 patients with concerns regarding TCS use both the TOPICOP scale and VAS were anonymously assessed. A comparison was made between TCS-adherent and non-adherent patients regarding the intensity and characteristics of their concerns. The intensity and quality of the concerns varied broadly among the patients. When using the VAS, a score of ≥5 detected 87% of non-adherent patients. The answers to the TOPICOP scale did not discriminate non-adherent from adherent patients. Using the VAS to assess concerns to use TCS could help identify patients at risk of TCS-non-adherence and facilitate discussion with the patient about potential non-adherence in a more substantiated, non-judgemental way.

  2. Topical fluorouracil. II. Postoperative administration in an animal model of glaucoma filtering surgery.

    PubMed

    Heuer, D K; Gressel, M G; Parrish, R K; Folberg, R; Dillberger, J E; Altman, N H

    1986-01-01

    Unilateral posterior lip sclerectomies were performed in ten owl monkeys. Five milligrams of fluorouracil was injected subconjunctivally in each operated eye immediately after surgery. Three drops (approximately 2.4 mg/drop) of fluorouracil were instilled ten minutes apart in each operated eye twice daily on postoperative days 1 through 7 and once daily on postoperative days 8 through 15, 17, 19, and 21. One monkey died on the seventh postoperative day; its death could not be attributed to systemic fluorouracil toxicity. All of the operated eyes had filtering blebs after the full course of fluorouracil, but seven also had corneal epithelial defects. By the seventh postoperative week, two of the operated eyes manifested moderately severe corneal opacification. Ten weeks postoperatively, the electroretinographic a- and b-wave amplitudes averaged 17% and 12% less, respectively, in the seven operated eyes without clinically significant corneal opacification than in the unoperated fellow eyes. Only two eyes had blebs after the 12th postoperative week. Histopathologic examination was performed on five eyes, of which only two revealed patent sclerostomies. Although topical fluorouracil appears to delay bleb scarring, the corneal findings suggest that it may be more toxic than subconjunctival fluorouracil.

  3. Visualization and Treatment of Subclinical Actinic Keratoses with Topical Imiquimod 5% Cream: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kopera, Daisy; Kerl, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Background. Imiquimod 5% is licensed for the treatment of external genital warts, superficial basal cell carcinoma, and actinic keratosis (AK) and is being used experimentally in various other dermato-oncological conditions. Objective. This observational study shall show that nonmelanoma skin cancer can be detected at its earliest subclinical stage by its reaction with imiquimod and can be cleared by finishing the course of treatment. Material and Methods. In this single arm trial 15 patients with chronically sun-exposed skin who had no clinical evidence of AK were treated with 5% imiquimod cream on the face or scalp for 4 weeks three times per week. Results. During treatment, all patients developed multiple areas with mild to moderate inflammatory skin reactions, such as erythema, induration, and scaling. Biopsies obtained from 12 patients prior to treatment revealed no malignancies. However, in cases with more pronounced inflammation during treatment, targeted biopsies indicated very early malignant alterations. Conclusion. Topical imiquimod treatment of chronically sun-exposed skin without overt clinical signs of AK is able to detect subclinical actinic keratoses (SAK) and to completely clear the lesions, even before they can be clinically diagnosed as AK. In such patients, imiquimod might be able to prevent the evolution of SCC. PMID:24900953

  4. Topical applications of ozone and ozonated oils as anti-infective agents: an insight into the patent claims.

    PubMed

    Travagli, Valter; Zanardi, Iacopo; Bocci, Velio

    2009-06-01

    Orthodox medicine has been very active in the field of topical anti-infective agents and current chemotherapy has procured valid antibiotics, antivirals, vaccines, antibodies, and antiparasitic drugs to be parenterally and/or topically used. However, these drugs may cause side effects and sometimes provide unsatisfactory results because pathogens become drug-resistant. Another drawback is represented by their cost, which compromise their use or their availability in poor Countries. Therefore, there is a critical need for new strategies to treat dermatological affections. The old intuition for using ozone in the treatment of necrotic wounds, especially if due to anaerobic bacteria, is now justified by the studies about reactive oxygen species generation by granulocytes and macrophages as the first line of defense during an infection. As a consequence, the disinfectant value of ozone has been increasingly appreciated during the last fifteen years. This review summarizes the patents filed and issued, with particular emphasis to the more recent patents, about the anti-infective topical use of ozone: i) in the gaseous form; ii) after gaseous ozone saturation of aqueous, not-oily pharmaceutical vehicles and solvents; iii) where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. We hope that recent advances and a better understanding of the ozone chemistry and biology will be able to create the mental attitude to prove the validity of large-scale therapeutic use of both ozone and ozone derivatives as topical anti-infective agents by performing multicenter, randomized clinical studies, as aptly requested by orthodox medicine.

  5. An in vivo comparison of commonly used topical antimicrobials on skin graft healing after full-thickness burn injury.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ozan L; Borman, Huseyin; Bahar, Taner; Ertaş, Nilgün M; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Topical antimicrobials are frequently used for local control of infections in burn patients. It has been postulated that these agents retard wound healing. There are limited data about the effects of topical antimicrobial agents on skin graft healing. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of nitrofurazone, 1% silver sulfadiazine, and povidone-iodine on skin graft healing. Forty male rats were used in this study. A meshed skin graft, placed on an excised burn wound, was used as a model to compare topical agents with a control group. Skin graft survival rates, closure of meshed graft interstices (based on physical parameters, namely epithelialization and wound contraction), and histological changes were analyzed. Graft take was more than 85% in all groups. There was no difference between the mean values of the percent graft survival for each group (P > .05). Epithelialization occurred significantly earlier in animals in the nitrofurazone group (P < .05). There was no significant difference between groups in wound contraction rates (P >.05). There was no histological difference between the biopsy specimens of skin grafts. In specimens obtained from the interstices of the meshed graft, no significant differences were found among the groups regarding the wound healing parameters (P > .05). We found that nitrofurazone, silver sulfadiazine, and povidone-iodine had no negative effect on graft healing and take in noncontaminated burn wounds.

  6. An analysis of topics and vocabulary in Chinese oral narratives by normal speakers and speakers with fluent aphasia.

    PubMed

    Law, Sam-Po; Kong, Anthony Pak-Hin; Lai, Christy

    2017-07-13

    This study analysed the topic and vocabulary of Chinese speakers based on language samples of personal recounts in a large spoken Chinese database recently made available in the public domain, i.e. Cantonese AphasiaBank ( http://www.speech.hku.hk/caphbank/search/ ). The goal of the analysis is to offer clinicians a rich source for selecting ecologically valid training materials for rehabilitating Chinese-speaking people with aphasia (PWA) in the design and planning of culturally and linguistically appropriate treatments. Discourse production of 65 Chinese-speaking PWA of fluent types (henceforth, PWFA) and their non-aphasic controls narrating an important event in their life were extracted from Cantonese AphasiaBank. Analyses of topics and vocabularies in terms of part-of-speech, word frequency, lexical semantics, and diversity were conducted. There was significant overlap in topics between the two groups. While the vocabulary was larger for controls than that of PWFA as expected, they were similar in distribution across parts-of-speech, frequency of occurrence, and the ratio of concrete to abstract items in major open word classes. Moreover, proportionately more different verbs than nouns were employed at the individual level for both speaker groups. The findings provide important implications for guiding directions of aphasia rehabilitation not only of fluent but also non-fluent Chinese aphasic speakers.

  7. Efficacy of topical treatment for herpes simplex virus infections: predictions from an index of drug characteristics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Freeman, D J; Spruance, S L

    1986-01-01

    Topical antiviral treatments for recurrent infection with herpes simplex virus in immunocompetent patients have been generally ineffective. We investigated whether in vitro drug measures could predict in vivo efficacy. Twelve topical antiviral formulations were evaluated in vitro by measuring inhibition of viral plaque formation in cell culture (ID50) and drug penetration through excised guinea pig skin. In vivo efficacy for each treatment was determined in an experimental cutaneous infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 in guinea pigs and expressed as the percent reduction in lesion number, lesion area, and virus titer in the lesions. The in vitro findings were correlated with the results in the animal model. ID50 was a poor predictor of in vivo efficacy, whereas stronger correlations were found between the degree of skin penetration and in vivo activity. The best correlation was noted by using a summary expression of the in vitro results as follows: the ratio of drug penetration through skin at 37 C to ID50 (r = .95, .94, and .92 for lesion number, area, and virus titer, respectively, P less than .0005). Determination of this in vitro index should be included in the preclinical evaluation of new topical antiviral formulations.

  8. Cryotherapy and Topical Minocycline as Adjunctive Measures to Control Pain After Third Molar Surgery: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Gelesko, Savannah; Long, Leann; Faulk, Jan; Phillips, Ceib; Dicus, Carolyn; White, Raymond P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of cryotherapy or topical minocycline on patients’ perceptions of recovery from pain after third molar surgery in an exploratory comparative-effectiveness study. Patients and Methods Subjects aged at least 14 years who were having all 4 third molars removed were enrolled in 3 separate institutional review board–approved studies. Study groups included subjects treated with a passively applied cold wrap for 24 hours postoperatively, subjects treated with topical minocycline during surgery, and subjects enrolled in a nonconcurrent comparison group who had received neither topical minocycline nor directed cryotherapy. Third molar surgery was performed in all cases by trained surgeons using the same protocol. An exact Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the distributions of the worst and average pain scores and a Fisher exact test to compare verbal responses from Gracely pain scales among the 3 groups for postsurgical days (PSDs) 1 to 3. Results This study comprised 51 cryotherapy subjects (2005–2009), 63 minocycline subjects (2003–2004), and 92 comparison-group subjects (2002–2006) who were treated at academic centers and in community practices across the United States (N = 206). Demographic descriptors were similar among all groups. For PSDs 1 through 3 (unadjusted), the highest scores for worst pain (6–7 [out of 7] on Likert-type scale) were reported less frequently in each of the study groups than in subjects in the comparison group, although the numbers of subjects reporting the highest scores were few. The distribution of pain outcomes was significantly different among the 3 groups for worst pain and affective words on PSD 1 (P = .04 for both). However, the small number of subjects who reported the highest pain scores precluded adequate multivariate statistical analyses for all outcomes on PSD 1 to 3. Conclusions Data from this exploratory study suggest that adjunctive therapy to decrease postoperative pain

  9. Topical Meeting on Optics in Adverse Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-31

    nozzle spacing of 5 cm and a wetting angle of 15 degrees are plotted in Figure 4. The envelope of evaporative cooling is bounded by the Leidenfrost ...being cooled. The Leidenfrost temperature is the temperature where vapor will form between the droplet and the surface, reducing the conduction of heat

  10. Conference Digest LEOS Summer Topical Meetings 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-09

    unequal grating mirrors to enhance the electroabsorption of light within the active medium, consisting of Ill-V semiconductor quantum wells (QWs) and/or...R1057 AQUA Advanced Quantum Well Lasers for Multi-Gigabit Alcatel SEL AG (+ 8) Transmission Systems "R2001 WTDM Pilot Installation British Broadcasting...heterostructure single quantum well for the active guide and a bulk phase shifter for the passive guide. Figure 3 plots the design curves based on this

  11. An audit of best evidence topic reviews in the International Journal of Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Klimach, Stefan; Eisner, Mark; Rodrigues, Jeremy Neil

    2015-05-01

    IJS launched best evidence topic reviews (BETs) in 2011, when the guidelines for conducting and reporting these reviews were published in the journal. (1) Audit the adherence of all published BETs in IJS to these guidelines. (2) Assess the reach and impact of BETs published in IJS. BETs published between 2011 and February 2014 were identified from http://www.journal-surgery.net/. Standards audited included: completeness of description of study attrition, and independent verification of searches. Other extracted data included: relevant subspecialty, duration between searches and publication, and between acceptance and publication. Each BET's number of citations (http://scholar.google.co.uk/), number of tweets (http://www.altmetric.com/) and number of Researchgate views (https://www.researchgate.net/) were recorded. Thirty-four BETs were identified: the majority, 19 (56%), relating to upper gastrointestinal surgery and none to cardiothoracic, orthopaedic or paediatric surgery. Twenty-nine BETs (82%) fully described study attrition. Twenty-one (62%) had independently verified search results. The mean times from literature searching to publication and acceptance to publication were 38.5 weeks and 13 days respectively. There were a mean 40 (range 0-89) Researchgate views/article, mean 2 (range 0-7) citations/article and mean 0.36 (range 0-2) tweets/article. Adherence to BET guidelines has been variable. Authors are encouraged to adhere to journal guidelines and reviewers and editors to enforce them. BETs have received similar citation levels to other IJS articles. Means of increasing the visibility of published BETs such as social media sharing, conference presentation and deposition of abstracts in public repositories should be explored. More work is required to encourage more submissions from other surgical subspecialties other than gastrointestinal specialties. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extending an evidence hierarchy to include topics other than treatment: revising the Australian 'levels of evidence'.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Tracy; Weston, Adele; Tooher, Rebecca

    2009-06-11

    judge the likelihood of bias in individual studies evaluating interventional, diagnostic accuracy, prognostic, aetiologic or screening topics. Detailed quality appraisal of these individual studies, as well as grading of the body of evidence to answer each clinical, research or policy question, can then be undertaken as required.

  13. Extending an evidence hierarchy to include topics other than treatment: revising the Australian 'levels of evidence'

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    standard against which to initially judge the likelihood of bias in individual studies evaluating interventional, diagnostic accuracy, prognostic, aetiologic or screening topics. Detailed quality appraisal of these individual studies, as well as grading of the body of evidence to answer each clinical, research or policy question, can then be undertaken as required. PMID:19519887

  14. [Topical contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Alipov, V I; Korkhov, V V

    1982-02-01

    Recently there has been little interest in topical contraceptives. The most popular are the cervical cap and the diaphragm. Other types of mechanical contraceptive devices are being investigated. Standley and Kessler have developed a device for introduction into the cervical canal with a reservoir of spermatocide, it does not block the flow of blood during menstruation. New models of vaginal rings are also being developed which are simple enough for self-insertion and also contain a reservoir of spermatocide. Work is being done on spermatocide-containing sponges in many countries. Another project being investigated is the possibility of using natural proteins, collagens, and other substances which absorb spermatozoids. The ancients used various vaginal suppositories to kill spermatozoids; in the late 19th century quinine sulfate was used for this, and a variety of substances have been used recently. These spermicidal creams also have the advantage of acting as anti-infectious agents in many cases. But they do have some negative effects. They are about 85% effective, are local irritants, and some cause discomfort during intercourse. And it is possible that some are resorbed by the body and act on the liver and other organs. Vaginal globules and suppositories are also popular. The "Kontraceptin-T" brand contains quinosol, boric acid, and tannin. There are also foaming tablets which are mixed with water and then introduced. New locally-active chemical substances are being developed in Japan, West Germany, and the USSR. Kontraceptin-E contains paranonyl-phenoxypolyethylene glycol and sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate. The "Norforks" and other preparations contain mercurial compounds which may turn out to be harmful. The future promises the development of products which will act to prevent fertilization by acting on the hyaluronidase and the acrosine of the spermatozoid, thus preventing it from penetrating the ovum. It would be best to find enzyme inhibitors which are

  15. Mortality and morbidity meetings: an untapped resource for improving the governance of patient safety?

    PubMed Central

    Higginson, Juliet; Walters, Rhiannon

    2012-01-01

    Introduction National Health Service hospitals and government agencies are increasingly using mortality rates to monitor the quality of inpatient care. Mortality and Morbidity (M&M) meetings, established to review deaths as part of professional learning, have the potential to provide hospital boards with the assurance that patients are not dying as a consequence of unsafe clinical practices. This paper examines whether and how these meetings can contribute to the governance of patient safety. Methods To understand the arrangement and role of M&M meetings in an English hospital, non-participant observations of meetings (n=9) and semistructured interviews with meeting chairs (n=19) were carried out. Following this, a structured mortality review process was codesigned and introduced into three clinical specialties over 12 months. A qualitative approach of observations (n=30) and interviews (n=40) was used to examine the impact on meetings and on frontline clinicians, managers and board members. Findings The initial study of M&M meetings showed a considerable variation in the way deaths were reviewed and a lack of integration of these meetings into the hospital's governance framework. The introduction of the standardised mortality review process strengthened these processes. Clinicians supported its inclusion into M&M meetings and managers and board members saw that a standardised trust-wide process offered greater levels of assurance. Conclusion M&M meetings already exist in many healthcare organisations and provide a governance resource that is underutilised. They can improve accountability of mortality data and support quality improvement without compromising professional learning, especially when facilitated by a standardised mortality review process. PMID:22556308

  16. Mortality and morbidity meetings: an untapped resource for improving the governance of patient safety?

    PubMed

    Higginson, Juliet; Walters, Rhiannon; Fulop, Naomi

    2012-07-01

    National Health Service hospitals and government agencies are increasingly using mortality rates to monitor the quality of inpatient care. Mortality and Morbidity (M&M) meetings, established to review deaths as part of professional learning, have the potential to provide hospital boards with the assurance that patients are not dying as a consequence of unsafe clinical practices. This paper examines whether and how these meetings can contribute to the governance of patient safety. To understand the arrangement and role of M&M meetings in an English hospital, non-participant observations of meetings (n=9) and semistructured interviews with meeting chairs (n=19) were carried out. Following this, a structured mortality review process was codesigned and introduced into three clinical specialties over 12 months. A qualitative approach of observations (n=30) and interviews (n=40) was used to examine the impact on meetings and on frontline clinicians, managers and board members. The initial study of M&M meetings showed a considerable variation in the way deaths were reviewed and a lack of integration of these meetings into the hospital's governance framework. The introduction of the standardised mortality review process strengthened these processes. Clinicians supported its inclusion into M&M meetings and managers and board members saw that a standardised trust-wide process offered greater levels of assurance. M&M meetings already exist in many healthcare organisations and provide a governance resource that is underutilised. They can improve accountability of mortality data and support quality improvement without compromising professional learning, especially when facilitated by a standardised mortality review process.

  17. 40 CFR 62.14555 - What if I do not meet an increment of progress?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... violation of the standards under this subpart. If you fail to meet an increment of progress, you must submit... continue to submit reports each subsequent calendar month until the increment of progress is met. ...

  18. Programming as an Instrument for Community Involvement: Designing Topical Television Programs for Rural Adult Audiences. Satellite Technology Demonstration Technical Report No. 0503.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Keith

    The overall objective of the Satellite Technology Demonstration (STD) was to test the feasibility of delivering television Programing via satellite to isolated, rural locations. Community members at various STD sites were surveyed to determine how they felt about a variety of topics which were planned for an adult evening series. Topics in…

  19. Comparative analysis of stakeholder experiences with an online approach to prioritizing patient-centered research topics.

    PubMed

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Grant, Sean; Meeker, Daniella; Booth, Marika; Pacheco-Santivanez, Nathaly; Kim, Katherine K

    2017-05-01

    to in-person meetings.

  20. Sustained clinical resolution of acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis in an immunocompromised patient after discontinuation of oral acitretin with topical imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Osei-Tutu, Achiamah; Hugh, Jeremy M

    2013-03-01

    Increased cases of acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EDV) have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). With regard to management, there are no randomized controlled trials in either immunocompetent or immunocompromised patients, and only a limited number of anecdotal treatment options. Systemic retinoids, either independently or in combination with other treatment modalities, have been used with limited success, demonstrating transient clinical response and recurrence of lesions after cessation of therapy. We report a case of an HIV-positive patient with acquired EDV who achieved sustained clinical resolution even after discontinuation of oral acitretin by applying topical imiquimod to prevent recurrence of his lesions.

  1. Topical imiquimod 5% as an alternative therapy in periocular basal cell carcinoma in two patients with surgical contraindication.

    PubMed

    Costales-Álvarez, C; Álvarez-Coronado, M; Rozas-Reyes, P; González-Rodríguez, C M; Fernández-Vega, L

    2017-02-01

    The cases are presented of two patients with periocular basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid who received topical imiquimod 5%, with a good response. Both had a functional state that contraindicated surgical treatment. Imiquimod cream 5% was shown to be an effective alternative to surgical treatment of periocular basal cell carcinoma, especially in those cases where surgery is not possible. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and Implementation of an Advising Program’s Meet-and-Greet Session

    PubMed Central

    Candelario, Danielle M.; Bridgeman, Mary Barna

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation and perceptions of an advising program’s meet-and-greet session on student/faculty interactions. Design. Student advisees and faculty advisors attended a meet-and-greet program designed to facilitate introductions. Two online surveys evaluating program perceptions were electronically distributed to participants. Assessment. Twenty-eight advisors and 226 students attended; 17 faculty members and 42% (n=95) of students completed the survey. Advisors and advisees found the program valuable (100%, 85%) and recommended holding it again (100%, 93%), respectively. Most advisors agreed that the event improved success in meeting advisees while reducing time needed to schedule and meet with advisees. Students felt more comfortable contacting advisors after participating, with 83% agreeing it was more convenient than scheduling separate meeting times. Conclusion. An advising meet-and-greet program facilitated initial advisee/advisor meetings while reducing self-reported faculty time/resources. This activity could be implemented by other institutions seeking to promote student advising relationships. PMID:26889062

  3. NAS Forums Focus on National Science Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A series of public meetings designed to focus on complex and persistent problems of national importance involving science has been launched. Topics such as drugs, energy, and natural disasters are included. (DF)

  4. Case Study Exploring the Use of an Interdisciplinary Approach to Teach a High School Mathematics and Science Topic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelhake, Kelly M.

    This participatory case study was conducted to describe the value of an interdisciplinary teaching approach for a high school mathematics and science topic from the perspective of the students and the teacher. The topic of logarithms was selected for this lesson because it is a concept that students learn in both their high school mathematics and science courses. The teacher researcher, a high school mathematics teacher, worked with twelve student participants from a 9th and 10th grade Geometry class, along with four science and two mathematics teachers. The data collected in this study serves as a reminder of the many complexities of interdisciplinary work. This specific interdisciplinary study, signified by three overall themes, unraveled some of these complexities of the interdisciplinary approach in general. In all, the study demonstrated the utility of developing a shared language, gaining understanding of the complexities of interdisciplinary work, and sharing positive student experiences of an interdisciplinary lesson. These three themes serve as a step forward in the overall research of interdisciplinary mathematics and science work. A significant amount of additional research is needed to compare the actual student learning outcomes for interdisciplinary work versus discipline specific work. The data from this study, however, shows that as teachers work to create an interdisciplinary approach, teachers from different disciplines produce such a thoughtful and positive dialogue that only enhances student learning.

  5. Development and evaluation of curcumin-loaded elastic vesicles as an effective topical anti-inflammatory formulation.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rumjhum; Sandhu, Simarjot Kaur; Sharma, Ikksheta; Kaur, Indu Pal

    2015-04-01

    Curcumin has diverse biological activities including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. However, its clinical use for topical application is limited due to its poor aqueous solubility and thus, minimal cutaneous bioavailability. Elastic vesicles (EVs) of curcumin were prepared to improve its cutaneous bioavailability and to use it for topical anti-inflammatory effect. Ex vivo skin permeation and retention studies were performed to check if incorporation of curcumin into EVs could improve its permeation into and retention in the skin. Evaluation of acute and chronic anti-inflammatory effect was done using xylene-induced acute ear edema in mice and cotton pellet-induced chronic inflammation in rats, respectively. A significant improvement in flux (nine times) across murine skin was observed when aqueous dispersion of curcumin (flux - 0.46 ± 0.02 μg/h/cm(2)) was compared with curcumin-loaded EVs (flux - 4.14 ± 0.04 μg/h/cm(2)). Incorporation of these curcumin-loaded EVs into a hydrophilic ointment base resulted in higher skin retention (51.66%) in contrast to free curcumin ointment (1.64%) and a marketed formulation (VICCO® turmeric skin cream). The developed ointment showed an effect similar (p < 0.05) to the marketed diclofenac sodium ointment (Omni-gel®) in suppression of acute inflammation in mouse; a significant inhibition (28.8% versus 3.91% for free curcumin) of cotton pellet-induced chronic inflammation was also observed. Thus, curcumin-loaded EVs incorporated in hydrophilic ointment is a promising topical anti-inflammatory formulation.

  6. Effects of Topical Fucosyl-Lactose, a Milk Oligosaccharide, on Dry Eye Model: An Example of Nutraceutical Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Bucolo, Claudio; Musumeci, Maria; Salomone, Salvatore; Romano, Giovanni Luca; Leggio, Gian Marco; Gagliano, Caterina; Reibaldi, Michele; Avitabile, Teresio; Uva, Maurizio G.; Musumeci, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colostrum has been proposed to treat severe dryness and problematic eye lesions showing a beneficial effect. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of 2-fucosyl-lactose, a natural sugar present in the human colostrum, in an experimental dry eye. Methods: Dry eye was induced in adult male New Zealand albino rabbits by topical administration of 1% atropine. Tear volume (Schirmer’s test), tear film breakup time (TBUT), corneal staining and tear osmolarity were assessed. Fucosyl-lactose eye drops was instilled at different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and, 1%). Results: After 24 h from first atropine administration, tear volume and TBUT values were significantly improved in groups treated with 2-fucosyl-lactose in a dose-dependent manner. Tear volume increased from 5.25 to 10.75 mm and TBUT values from 8.75 to 34.5 s with 0.01% or 1% 2-fucosyl-lactose treatment, respectively. No changes were observed in terms of corneal staining among the all groups treated with 2-fucosyl-lactose. Atropine instillation caused an increase of tear osmolarity (428 mOsm/L), which was reversed by topical treatment with 2-fucosyl-lactose at all doses. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 2-fucosyl-lactose, a human milk oligosaccharide, has protective effect on tear film stability. PMID:26635610

  7. 40 CFR 63.3091 - What emission limits must I meet for an existing affected source?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must I meet for an existing affected source? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section....3082(c) to no more than 0.072 kg/liter (0.60 lb/gal) of coating solids deposited during each month, determined according to the requirements in § 63.3161. (b) If you meet the operating limits of § 63.3092(a...

  8. "Her husband doesn't speak much English": conducting a family meeting with an interpreter.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Yael; Smith, Alexander K; Arnold, Robert M; Fernandez, Alicia

    2012-04-01

    A growing percentage of critically ill patients and their families in the United States speak limited English. We present the case of a palliative care consult conducted across language barriers to frame a discussion about the use of interpreters for family meetings, including the evidence for using a professional interpreter, the burden experienced by interpreters involved in end-of-life discussions, potential challenges encountered when conducting a family meeting with an interpreter, and recommended best practices for interpreter use in these settings.

  9. Super-Cationic Carbon Quantum Dots Synthesized from Spermidine as an Eye Drop Formulation for Topical Treatment of Bacterial Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Jian, Hong-Jyuan; Wu, Ren-Siang; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Li, Yu-Jia; Lin, Han-Jia; Harroun, Scott G; Lai, Jui-Yang; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2017-07-25

    We have developed a one-step method to synthesize carbon quantum dots (CQDPAs) from biogenic polyamines (PAs) as an antibacterial agent for topical treatment of bacterial keratitis (BK). CQDs synthesized by direct pyrolysis of spermidine (Spd) powder through a simple dry heating treatment exhibit a solubility and yield much higher than those from putrescine and spermine. We demonstrate that CQDs obtained from Spds (CQDSpds) possess effective antibacterial activities against non-multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis bacteria and also against the multidrug-resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CQDSpds is ∼2500-fold lower than that of spermidine alone, demonstrating their strong antibacterial capabilities. Investigation of the possible mechanisms behind the antibacterial activities of the as-synthesized CQDSpds indicates that the super-cationic CQDSpds with small size (diameter ca. 6 nm) and highly positive charge (ζ-potential ca. +45 mV) cause severe disruption of the bacterial membrane. In vitro cytotoxicity, hemolysis, hemagglutination, genotoxicity, and oxidative stress and in vivo morphologic and physiologic cornea change evaluations show the good biocompatibility of CQDSpds. Furthermore, topical ocular administration of CQDSpds can induce the opening of the tight junction of corneal epithelial cells, thereby leading to great antibacterial treatment of S. aureus-induced BK in rabbits. Our results suggest that CQDSpds are a promising antibacterial candidate for clinical applications in treating eye-related bacterial infections and even persistent bacteria-induced infections.

  10. One model for an integrated math/physics course focusing on electricity and magnetism and related calculus topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jason W.; Barbanel, Julius

    2000-08-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increasing, widespread pedagogical interest in developing various types of integrated curricula for science and engineering programs. Over the last three years, a year-long Integrated Math/Physics course has been developed at Union College. This paper will focus on a model for a one-quarter integrated course organized around a traditional set of electricity and magnetism (E&M) physics topics, integrated with appropriate mathematical topics. Traditional, nonintegrated E&M physics students often struggle with challenging vector calculus ideas which may have been forgotten, not yet encountered, or introduced with different notation in different contexts. Likewise, traditional vector calculus mathematics students are often unable to gain intuitive insight, or fail to grasp the physical significance of many of the vector calculus ideas they are learning. Many of these frustrations are due to the fact that at many schools, the physics and calculus teachers teaching separate courses probably have little or no idea what their fellow educators are actually doing in these courses. Substantial differences in context, notation, and philosophy can cause breakdowns in the transfer of knowledge between mathematics and physics courses. We will discuss the methods, philosophy, and implementation of our course, and then go on to present what we feel were the substantial strengths and insights gained from a thoughtful integration of the two subjects. In addition, some problem areas and recommendations for probable student difficulties will be addressed.

  11. Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, an antihistamine drug, on skin inflammation induced by repeated topical application of oxazolone in mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Matsubara, M; Takada, C; Hasegawa, K; Suzuki, K; Ohmori, K; Karasawa, A

    2004-12-01

    Olopatadine hydrochloride (olopatadine) is one of the second-generation antihistamines, which is prescribed for allergic disorders such as rhinitis, urticaria and eczema dermatitis. To investigate the possible anti-inflammatory effect of olopatadine on the chronic contact hypersensitivity response to repeated topical application of oxazolone in mice. The preventive and therapeutic effects of oral olopatadine were quantified by measurements of ear swelling, cytokine protein and mRNA expression in the ear lesion, and were compared with those of topical betamethasone 17-valerate (betamethasone). The ear receiving repeated applications of oxazolone exhibited erythema, oedema and abrasion. Both preventive and therapeutic administration of olopatadine (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) significantly inhibited the ear swelling and the increased production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-1beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and nerve growth factor. In the histopathological analysis, olopatadine ameliorated epidermal hyperplasia and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Consistent with these results, olopatadine significantly reduced the increased expression of interferon-gamma and IL-4 mRNA. Although betamethasone (0.012 mg ear(-1) day(-1)) showed similar activities to olopatadine against these responses, it caused atrophy of the ear skin. These results indicate that olopatadine is an antihistamine agent having inhibitory activities against chronic inflammatory dermatitis, possibly resulting from its diminishing effect on elevated cytokines.

  12. Combination of oral zinc gluconate and topical triclosan: An anti-inflammatory treatment modality for initial hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Hessam, Schapoor; Sand, Michael; Meier, Nina Mareike; Gambichler, Thilo; Scholl, Lisa; Bechara, Falk G

    2016-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is often a therapeutic challenge with relapses and chronicity which can severely impact patients' quality of life. To evaluate the efficacy of anti-inflammatory oral zinc gluconate, 90mg/day, combined with topical triclosan, 2% twice daily. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of HS patients in our HS Center of the Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, Ruhr-University Bochum, regarding change of disease severity and quality of life. Secondary outcome measures were the number of nodules and fistulas, the number of boils or flair-ups, and the intensity of pain. Sixty-six patients in Hurley stage I and II were included. After 3 months of combination therapy, the modified HS Score and the Dermatology Life Quality Index improved significantly (p<0.0001 and p=0.0386, respectively). The number of inflammatory nodules, new boils or flare-ups, and erythema scores decreased significantly. Fistula count and the visual analogue scale score showed no significant difference. Side-effects (mostly abdominal pain and nausea) were reported by 12 (22.2%) patients. The combination therapy of zinc gluconate and topical triclosan can be considered as an anti-inflammatory treatment for HS patients in Hurley stage I and initial Hurley stage II. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Report from an expert meeting at United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monstein, C.

    2014-03-01

    Between February 10 and 11, 2014 there was an expert meeting organized by the UN and NASA with the title "Improving Space Weather Forecasting in the Next Decade" (figure 1). The meeting was held at the United Nations Office in Vienna, Austria on the margins of the 51st Session of the Scientific and Technical Subcommittee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS), also in Vienna. The meeting place was Conference Room C6, Building "C", 7th floor, Vienna International Centre (figure 2). In total 46 participants from 18 countries attended the meeting. Many very interesting talks were given about different instrument arrays, distributed worldwide [Talks2014]. I made a presentation on the e-Callisto solar radio spectrometer network, which is one of the instruments in the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) [Monstein].

  14. 40 CFR 86.1912 - How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meets the vehicle-pass criteria? 86.1912 Section 86.1912 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....1912 How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria? In general, the average... steps to determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria: (a) Determine the NTE...

  15. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.14 Section 1232.14 Parks... RECORDS TO RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES § 1232.14 What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility? An agency must meet the following requirements before it transfers...

  16. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.14 Section 1232.14 Parks... RECORDS TO RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES § 1232.14 What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility? An agency must meet the following requirements before it transfers...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1912 - How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meets the vehicle-pass criteria? 86.1912 Section 86.1912 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria? In general, the average emissions for... to determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria: (a) Determine the NTE threshold for...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1912 - How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meets the vehicle-pass criteria? 86.1912 Section 86.1912 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....1912 How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria? In general, the average... steps to determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria: (a) Determine the NTE threshold...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1912 - How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meets the vehicle-pass criteria? 86.1912 Section 86.1912 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....1912 How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria? In general, the average... steps to determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria: (a) Determine the NTE threshold...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1912 - How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meets the vehicle-pass criteria? 86.1912 Section 86.1912 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....1912 How do I determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria? In general, the average... steps to determine whether an engine meets the vehicle-pass criteria: (a) Determine the NTE threshold...

  1. Acquired factor V inhibitor after exposure to topical human thrombin related to an otorhinolaryngological procedure.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, K; Levine, R

    2015-10-01

    Acquired factor V (FV) inhibitors occur rarely and classically develop after exposure to bovine thrombin. The clinical presentation is variable, ranging from asymptomatic with incidental laboratory abnormalities to significant bleeding. With the development of human-derived thrombin agents, bovine thrombin is less frequently used. We report a case of an acquired FV inhibitor that developed in a patient after exposure to human thrombin used as a hemostatic agent during an otorhinolaryngology surgical procedure. Our review of the literature revealed only one prior reported case of FV inhibitor after exposure to human thrombin. Hematologists and surgeons should be aware of this rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication in the postprocedural setting.

  2. An Online Union List of Serials: Meeting the User Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Settel, Barbara; Gearty, Tom

    This paper reports on the development of an online union catalog of serials using OCLC by the Central New York Library Resources Council. The project, now in the third of four years, is converting from a hard copy union catalog of serials to an online catalog that will have the important advantage of immediate update. Using the OCLC interlibrary…

  3. Impact of an electronic meeting system on the group decision-making process.

    PubMed

    Gross, Dean; Gross, Carla

    2005-01-01

    Traditional face-to-face meetings are effective for many meeting formats; however, there are occasions when communication needs to be conducted in a more open, anonymous style. When the discussion centers on controversial and/or emotional issues, such as curriculum planning, the need for a nontraditional style may even be greater. Our nursing program decided to utilize a new campus resource called the Group Decision Center to facilitate undergraduate curriculum planning. The Group Decision Center is an electronic meeting system in which the discussion takes place in a face-to-face electronic format. The advantages of an electronic meeting system format include participant anonymity, equal and increased participation by group members, increased productivity and efficiency, automated record keeping, group synergy, and a more structured meeting. The disadvantages include the potential for inappropriate or hostile conversations, loss of acknowledgment for individual idea generation, breakdown of linear conversation, and lack of the nonverbal communication that often influences the meaning within a traditional conversation. The process of developing, planning, and participating in the electronic meeting and the automated record are discussed.

  4. Change in Moral Outlook Is an Important Topic of Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suohua, Li

    2004-01-01

    It is a common recognition that humankind is facing an ecological environmental crisis. In order to protect the ecological system, to protect nature and thus to safeguard the continued existence of humankind, not only technological, economic, and managerial measures are needed, but more importantly, a change must take place in people's thinking so…

  5. Change in Moral Outlook Is an Important Topic of Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suohua, Li

    2004-01-01

    It is a common recognition that humankind is facing an ecological environmental crisis. In order to protect the ecological system, to protect nature and thus to safeguard the continued existence of humankind, not only technological, economic, and managerial measures are needed, but more importantly, a change must take place in people's thinking so…

  6. The Future of Sleep Technology: Report from an American Association of Sleep Technologists Summit Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Rita; Trimble, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    integrated care will include an increased focus on patient education, monitoring, and follow-up. The most effective treatments will require an individualized, patient-centered approach. A workforce analysis shows that the number of trained physician specialists will be inadequate to provide this care. Well-trained sleep medicine practitioners at many levels will be needed to meet treatment goals, including some roles appropriate for sleep technologists. These factors provide challenges and opportunities for sleep technologists. In order to maintain viability as an allied health profession, the majority of sleep technologists will need to be better educated and demonstrate competency in more roles than overnight monitoring and record scoring. Models for this transition already exist, with several programs moving technologists from night work to days and from diagnosis to patient education, provision of treatment, and monitoring of adherence. The challenge for the professional association is to define new roles for sleep technologists and provide the education that the membership will require to flourish in those new roles. Citation: Brooks R, Trimble M. The future of sleep technology: report from an American Association of Sleep Technologists summit meeting. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):589-593. PMID:24812546

  7. 75 FR 39014 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... agenda topics. DATES: The meeting will be held on July 27, 2010, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. To request..., identified by docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPP-2009-0879, must be received on or before July 22, 2010. IV. Topics for the Meeting Topics for the meeting will include presentations related to ground water modeling...

  8. Beating the odds: an approach to the topic of resilience in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Skala, Katrin; Bruckner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The concept of good mental functioning despite negative influences first arose more than a hundred years ago and has received increasing interest during the last decades. For a long time, lack of unified definition of concept and terms rendered research difficult to compare. Nowadays, consent is reached on a definition of resilience as "an individual's ability to properly adapt to stress and adversity" and a large number of studies have been performed trying to identify factors that render children resilient. Among these, interpersonal factors like gender, intelligence, aspects of character and temperament as well as genes; factors within the family like a stable and positive relation to an adult; and factors of the broader environment like being integrated into the community have been those most articulately pointed out by research. Although, to date, research on resilience has been extensive, there is still a lack of robust, comparative, empirical studies allowing policy formulation for fostering resilience in children at risk.

  9. Topical Negative Pressure on Burns: An Innovative Method for Wound Exudate Collection

    PubMed Central

    Baudoin, Julien; Jafari, Paris; Meuli, Joachim; Raffoul, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Burn wound exudate is an important source of information on the wound-healing process and systemic improvement of burn patients. Identification of biomarkers for the prediagnosis of local or systemic complications in patients will have a great impact on adapting personalized procedures in burn treatment. No efficient exudate collection method exists that offers a direct and continuous collection over time. We developed an innovative system based on the negative pressure wound therapy technique to directly collect exudate from burn wounds over several days after burn. This method did not cause any complication or pain for patients, and positive influence on wound healing was seen. Exudate samples were further used in different projects for studying biochemical profile, trace element content, kinetics of bacterial growth, and cell cytotoxicity. PMID:27975022

  10. Cost benefit analysis of excess flow valves: An update. Topical report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-26

    Calculations and analysis of the cost-to-benefit ratio of using excess flow valves (EFVs) of all U.S. new and renewed gas services operating at 10 psig or more are presented. The study is an update of an earlier evaluation performed by the same contractor, entitled 'Costs and Benefits of Excess Flow Valves in Gas Distribution Services' (GRI-86/0022). As calculated with up-to-date information and average operating cost data, the ratio continues to be unfavorable even when using high value for human life and injury and low operating cost data. Data collected from EFV users indicate that EFVs are highly reliable and generally perform as required with very few problems. The report expresses the opinion that the cost-to-benefit ratio is highly dependent on individual company operations, location, and pipeline characteristics, and that the decision to use EFVs should be left to individual companies after performing their own cost benefit analysis, which should include an assessment of alternative accident mitigation measures.

  11. Topical tretinoin in the treatment of vulvar lichen sclerosus: an advisable option?

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alessandro; Corazza, Monica; Minghetti, Sara; Virgili, Annarosa

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of a 24-week application of tretinoin 0.025% cream, with an alternate-day regimen, in achieving control of VLS signs and symptoms. 17 patients affected with VLS were included. The main efficacy parameters were the response rate, as defined by protocol parameters, the rate of patients achieving an improvement from baseline of ≥75% in the subjective and objective scores, and the mean reduction in subjective and objective scores throughout the treatment. The safety of the treatment was also assessed. By the end of the 24-week treatment, 12 patients (70.6%) experienced a response; 35.3% and 17.6% of patients achieved an improvement of at least 75% in subjective and objective scores, respectively. Mean scores of itching, leukoderma (pallor) and hyperkeratosis decreased significantly in the study patients, and none presented itching-related excoriations. Erythema increased compared with baseline. Six patients (35.29%) experienced some side effects related to tretinoin, mainly mild erythema and burning. None of the subjects discontinued the treatment because of side effects. Tretinoin 0.025% cream applied for 24 weeks may represent a useful alternative option to corticosteroids in the treatment of active VLS, acting particularly on hyperkeratosis and pallor.

  12. Topical delivery of leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis treatment: evaluation of local tissue deposition of teriflunomide and its anti-inflammatory effects in an arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Bae, Joonho; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether leflunomide can be delivered topically and metabolized into teriflunomide through the skin, and evaluated the therapeutic effect of topical leflunomide. Permeation of leflunomide across and formation of its active metabolite within the skin was examined ex vivo. Deposition of teriflunomide in micropig knee joints after applying topical and transdermal patches containing leflunomide was investigated by determining the plasma and joint tissue concentrations. Finally, the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibition of skin sensitization by topical leflunomide were evaluated in a rat adjuvant arthritis model and mice with delayed-type induced hypersensitivity. We found that after topical application of leflunomide on freshly excised mouse, rat and guinea pig skin, ∼24% of the permeated drug existed as teriflunomide. In micropigs treated topically with leflunomide on the knee joint, significantly lower teriflunomide concentrations were found in plasma, but its concentrations in the knee joint were 3.4-fold to 54.6-fold higher than those after oral administration. In a rat arthritis model, the plasma concentration of teriflunomide after treatment with 10% leflunomide topical solution was 7.54-fold lower than that after 10 mg/kg oral leflunomide. However, topical leflunomide was nearly as effective as oral in inhibiting paw edema (37% versus 56%, respectively). The values for hypersensitized mouse ear weight after treatment with topical leflunomide decreased significantly by 26% compared to vehicle. These results demonstrate that topically applied leflunomide can be delivered effectively and deposited as teriflunomide in an arthritic joint, possibly allowing better compliance in rheumatoid arthritis patients by avoiding leflunomide's side effects.

  13. An overview of viral oncology in Italy - report from the Pavia meeting on solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Ricotti, Mattia; Buonaguro, Franco; Tirelli, Umberto; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2012-09-05

    This is a report on some of the research activities currently ongoing in Italy as outlined at the "Viruses and solid tumors" meeting jointly organized by the Oncology Sections of IRCCS Policlinico "San Matteo" (Pavia) and IRCCS National Cancer Institute (Aviano), held in Pavia, Italy, on October 2011. Experts from the various disciplines involved in the study of the complex relationships between solid tumors and viruses met to discuss recent developments in the field and to report their personal contributions to the specified topics. Secondary end point was to establish a multidisciplinary work group specifically devoted to solid tumors and infectious agents, aimed to identify areas of common interest, promoting and establishing collaborative projects and programs, and to coordinate clinical and research activities. The group, which will be named IVOG (Italian Viral Oncology Group), will operate under the patronage of the various scientific societies of interest.

  14. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application: an ex vivo study in human skin.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N; Sorensen, J A; Brosen, K; Nielsen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin - dermal microdialysis (DMD) - is a unique technique for sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling of dermatological drug concentrations in the dermis. Debate has concerned the existence of a correlation between the depth of the sampling device - the probe - in the dermis and the amount of drug sampled following topical drug administration. This study evaluates the relation between probe depth and drug sampling using dermal DMD sampling ex vivo in human skin. We used superficial (<1 mm), intermediate (1-2 mm) and deep (>2 mm) positioning of the linear MD probe in the dermis of human abdominal skin, followed by topical application of 4 mg/ml of benzoic acid (BA) in skin chambers overlying the probes. Dialysate was sampled every hour for 12 h and analysed for BA content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial probes: 3,335 ± 1,094 μg·h/ml (mean ± SD); intermediate probes: 2,178 ± 1,068 μg·h/ml, and deep probes: 1,159 ± 306 μg·h/ml. AUC(0-12) sampled by the superficial probes was significantly higher than that of samples from the intermediate and deeply positioned probes (p value <0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between probe depth and AUC(0-12) sampled by the same probe (p value <0.001, r(2) value = 0.5). The mean extrapolated lag-times (±SD) for the superficial probes were 0.8 ± 0.1 h, for the intermediate probes 1.7 ± 0.5 h, and for the deep probes 2.7 ± 0.5 h, which were all significantly different from each other (p value <0.05). In conclusion, this paper demonstrates that there is an inverse relationship between the depth of the probe in the dermis

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Solid polymer electrolytes: materials designing and all-solid-state battery applications: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, R. C.; Pandey, G. P.

    2008-11-01

    Polymer electrolytes are promising materials for electrochemical device applications, namely, high energy density rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, electrochromic displays, etc. The area of polymer electrolytes has gone through various developmental stages, i.e. from dry solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) systems to plasticized, gels, rubbery to micro/nano-composite polymer electrolytes. The polymer gel electrolytes, incorporating organic solvents, exhibit room temperature conductivity as high as ~10-3 S cm-1, while dry SPEs still suffer from poor ionic conductivity lower than 10-5 S cm-1. Several approaches have been adopted to enhance the room temperature conductivity in the vicinity of 10-4 S cm-1 as well as to improve the mechanical stability and interfacial activity of SPEs. In this review, the criteria of an ideal polymer electrolyte for electrochemical device applications have been discussed in brief along with presenting an overall glimpse of the progress made in polymer electrolyte materials designing, their broad classification and the recent advancements made in this branch of materials science. The characteristic advantages of employing polymer electrolyte membranes in all-solid-state battery applications have also been discussed.

  16. Absence of systemic hormonal effects in an oestradiol diether topically active on the vaginal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J P; Cachelou, R; Guéritée, N

    1982-12-01

    The women in this study were either post-menopausal or ovariectomised for at least 1 yr prior to the study. They had also been treated for cancer of the cervix (27 women), endometrium (5), ovaries (5) or breast (1). All women presented with sexual troubles, mainly genital discomfort (dyspareunia or vaginism). In a double-blind fashion, gynaecological capsules containing either an oestradiol diether (ICD: promestriene) or only the excipient were administered for 40 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, the FSH, LH, oestrone (E1) and oestradiol (E2) plasma levels were not found to be significantly different from the pre-therapeutic values. These results suggest that promestriene acts on the vaginal mucosa, therefore not being converted back into the hormone from which it was derived. Also, in its dietheroxide form, promestriene is incapable of crossing the malpighian (vaginal or epidermal) epithelium and of reaching the general blood circulation. This discrepancy between the local anti-atrophic effects and the inability to exert systemic oestrogen activities singles out promestriene and justifies its therapeutic use when hormonally active oestrogens are contra-indicated, as in patients who have an oestrogen-sensitive cancer in their medical history.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Emergent geometry and gravity from matrix models: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, Harold

    2010-07-01

    An introductory review to emergent noncommutative gravity within Yang-Mills matrix models is presented. Spacetime is described as a noncommutative brane solution of the matrix model, i.e. as a submanifold of {\\mathbb R}^D. Fields and matter on the brane arise as fluctuations of the bosonic resp. fermionic matrices around such a background, and couple to an effective metric interpreted in terms of gravity. Suitable tools are provided for the description of the effective geometry in the semi-classical limit. The relation to non-commutative gauge theory and the role of UV/IR mixing are explained. Several types of geometries are identified, in particular 'harmonic' and 'Einstein' types of solutions. The physics of the harmonic branch is discussed in some detail, emphasizing the non-standard role of vacuum energy. This may provide a new approach to some of the big puzzles in this context. The IKKT model with D = 10 and close relatives are singled out as promising candidates for quantum theory of fundamental interactions including gravity.

  18. Adverse Selection and an Individual Mandate: When Theory Meets Practice*

    PubMed Central

    Hackmann, Martin B.; Kolstad, Jonathan T.; Kowalski, Amanda E.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a model of selection that incorporates a key element of recent health reforms: an individual mandate. Using data from Massachusetts, we estimate the parameters of the model. In the individual market for health insurance, we find that premiums and average costs decreased significantly in response to the individual mandate. We find an annual welfare gain of 4.1% per person or $51.1 million annually in Massachusetts as a result of the reduction in adverse selection. We also find smaller post-reform markups. PMID:25914412

  19. 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2011-03-01

    The 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society covered numerous topics of educational and practical research interest. Biopolymers - the theme of the keynote address - were presented as essential components of medical devices, diagnostic tools, biosensors, human tissue engineering and pharmaceutical formulations for optimized drug delivery. Toxicology and SP investigators - the topic of the Distinguished Service Award Lecture - were encouraged to collaborate in the development of SP technologies and protocols applicable to toxicology studies. Pharmaceutical companies, originally organizations bearing all risks for developing their portfolios, are increasingly moving towards fully integrated networks which outsource core activities (including SP studies) to large contract research organizations. Future nonclinical data are now expected to be of such high quality and predictability power that they may obviate the need for certain expensive and time-consuming clinical investigations. In this context, SP is called upon to extend its risk assessment purview to areas which currently are not systematically covered, such as drug-induced QRS interval prolongation, negative emotions and feelings (e.g., depression), and minor chronic cardiovascular and metabolic changes (e.g., as produced by drugs for type 2 diabetes) which can be responsible for delayed morbidity and mortality. The recently approved ICH S9 guidance relaxes the traditional regulatory SP package in order to accelerate the clinical access to anticancer drugs for patients with advanced malignancies. The novel FDA 'Animal Rule' guidance proposes that for clinical candidates with well-understood toxicities, marketing approval may be granted exclusively on efficacy data generated in animal studies as human clinical investigations for these types of drugs are either unfeasible or unethical. In conclusion, the core messages of this meeting are that SP should consistently operate according to the 'fit

  20. Meetings with Elaine, an African and Native American Woman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Melanie Merola

    2006-01-01

    The author, a Caucasian doctoral student of clinical psychology, examined her ongoing interaction with Elaine, an adult woman of African and Native American descent. Incidents of learning during the interaction process are reviewed and qualitative and quantitative assessments are provided to examine the effectiveness of such interactions in a…

  1. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Magnetospheres of planets with an intrinsic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenkaya, Elena S.

    2009-08-01

    This review presents modern views on the physics of magnetospheres of Solar System planets having an intrinsic magnetic field, and on the structure of magnetospheric magnetic fields. Magnetic fields are generated in the interiors of Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune via the dynamo mechanism. These fields are so strong that they serve as obstacles for the plasma stream of the solar wind. A magnetosphere surrounding a planet forms as the result of interaction between the solar wind and the planetary magnetic field. The dynamics of magnetospheres are primary enforced by solar wind variations. Each magnetosphere is unique. The review considers common and individual sources of magnetic fields and the properties of planetary magnetospheres.

  2. European water policy and research on water-related topics - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevauviller, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    European water policy developments are essentially linked to the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive and parent legislation, which is built upon the principle of river basin management planning with the objective of achieving good status for all European water bodies. Recent policy developments in the climate change area call for ‘climate proofing' of EU actions through mainstreaming of adaptation measures into policies and programmes. These policy trends are very closely related to the capacity to get access to supporting scientific information and to bridge the knowledge gap. This paper is about these features, serving as an introduction to the special issue of Journal of Hydrology on climatic change impact on water: overcoming data and science gaps.

  3. [Generative potential in advanced age. Sociological intergenerational considerations of an old topic].

    PubMed

    Höpflinger, F

    2002-08-01

    The concept of generativity--at first related to middle age--is increasingly used to describe developmental processes at higher ages. In previous discussions, however, the concept of generativity has been used without clear references either to stages in later life (independent retirement versus dependent old age) or to different concepts of generations. A stage-oriented approach--based on ideas developed by Margret Baltes--indicates that the dimensions of generativity change with aging (more active generativity for younger retired people, more passive and compensating generativity among fragile and dependent persons). A generational approach--looking at different concepts of generations (family generations, societal generations, welfare generations)--shows that generativity within family generations is underlined by social norms, whereas generativity concerning welfare generations or societal generations remains an unstructured or even anomic developmental task.

  4. Using an information system to meet Hazardous Waste Management needs

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.J. Jr.; Howe, R.E.; Townsend, S.L.; Maloy, D.T.; Kochhar, R.K.

    1995-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large quantity RCRA hazardous waste generator. LLNL also generates low level and transuranic radioactive waste that is managed in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) orders. The mixed low level and mixed transuranic waste generated must be managed to comply with both RCRA regulations and DOE orders. LLNL`s hazardous and radioactive waste generation is comprised of 900 generators who contribute to nearly two hundred waste streams. LLNL has a permitted EPA treatment and storage (TSD) facility for handling RCRA hazardous waste that is operated by LLNL`s Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) division. In HWM we have developed an information system, the Total Waste Management System (TWMS), to replace an inadequate ``cradle to grave`` tracking of all the waste types described above. The goals of this system are to facilitate the safe handling and storage of these hazardous wastes, provide compliance with the regulations and serve as an informational tool to help HWM manage and dispose of these wastes in a cost effective manner.

  5. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  6. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-07

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis.

  7. EDAM: an ontology of bioinformatics operations, types of data and identifiers, topics and formats

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Jon; Kalaš, Matúš; Jonassen, Inge; Bolser, Dan; Uludag, Mahmut; McWilliam, Hamish; Malone, James; Lopez, Rodrigo; Pettifer, Steve; Rice, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Advancing the search, publication and integration of bioinformatics tools and resources demands consistent machine-understandable descriptions. A comprehensive ontology allowing such descriptions is therefore required. Results: EDAM is an ontology of bioinformatics operations (tool or workflow functions), types of data and identifiers, application domains and data formats. EDAM supports semantic annotation of diverse entities such as Web services, databases, programmatic libraries, standalone tools, interactive applications, data schemas, datasets and publications within bioinformatics. EDAM applies to organizing and finding suitable tools and data and to automating their integration into complex applications or workflows. It includes over 2200 defined concepts and has successfully been used for annotations and implementations. Availability: The latest stable version of EDAM is available in OWL format from http://edamontology.org/EDAM.owl and in OBO format from http://edamontology.org/EDAM.obo. It can be viewed online at the NCBO BioPortal and the EBI Ontology Lookup Service. For documentation and license please refer to http://edamontology.org. This article describes version 1.2 available at http://edamontology.org/EDAM_1.2.owl. Contact: jison@ebi.ac.uk PMID:23479348

  8. Special Topics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    have been saved by the application of tourniquets during the current conflicts.1 This es- timate is based on an analysis of pre- ventable deaths when no...directly related to duty hours and fatigue. Commitment requires altruism and professionalism, which are discour - aged by a shift-work orientation

  9. Validation of an Evidence-Based Medicine Critically Appraised Topic Presentation Evaluation Tool (EBM C-PET).

    PubMed

    Kersten, Hans B; Frohna, John G; Giudice, Erin L

    2013-06-01

    Competence in evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important clinical skill. Pediatrics residents are expected to acquire competence in EBM during their education, yet few validated tools exist to assess residents' EBM skills. We sought to develop a reliable tool to evaluate residents' EBM skills in the critical appraisal of a research article, the development of a written EBM critically appraised topic (CAT) synopsis, and a presentation of the findings to colleagues. Instrument development used a modified Delphi technique. We defined the skills to be assessed while reviewing (1) a written CAT synopsis and (2) a resident's EBM presentation. We defined skill levels for each item using the Dreyfus and Dreyfus model of skill development and created behavioral anchors using a frame-of-reference training technique to describe performance for each skill level. We evaluated the assessment instrument's psychometric properties, including internal consistency and interrater reliability. The EBM Critically Appraised Topic Presentation Evaluation Tool (EBM C-PET) is composed of 14 items that assess residents' EBM and global presentation skills. Resident presentations (N  =  27) and the corresponding written CAT synopses were evaluated using the EBM C-PET. The EBM C-PET had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach α  =  0.94). Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess interrater reliability. Intraclass correlation coefficients for individual items ranged from 0.31 to 0.74; the average intraclass correlation coefficients for the 14 items was 0.67. We identified essential components of an assessment tool for an EBM CAT synopsis and presentation with excellent internal consistency and a good level of interrater reliability across 3 different institutions. The EBM C-PET is a reliable tool to document resident competence in higher-level EBM skills.

  10. Validation of an Evidence-Based Medicine Critically Appraised Topic Presentation Evaluation Tool (EBM C-PET)

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hans B.; Frohna, John G.; Giudice, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Competence in evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important clinical skill. Pediatrics residents are expected to acquire competence in EBM during their education, yet few validated tools exist to assess residents' EBM skills. Objective We sought to develop a reliable tool to evaluate residents' EBM skills in the critical appraisal of a research article, the development of a written EBM critically appraised topic (CAT) synopsis, and a presentation of the findings to colleagues. Methods Instrument development used a modified Delphi technique. We defined the skills to be assessed while reviewing (1) a written CAT synopsis and (2) a resident's EBM presentation. We defined skill levels for each item using the Dreyfus and Dreyfus model of skill development and created behavioral anchors using a frame-of-reference training technique to describe performance for each skill level. We evaluated the assessment instrument's psychometric properties, including internal consistency and interrater reliability. Results The EBM Critically Appraised Topic Presentation Evaluation Tool (EBM C-PET) is composed of 14 items that assess residents' EBM and global presentation skills. Resident presentations (N  =  27) and the corresponding written CAT synopses were evaluated using the EBM C-PET. The EBM C-PET had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach α  =  0.94). Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess interrater reliability. Intraclass correlation coefficients for individual items ranged from 0.31 to 0.74; the average intraclass correlation coefficients for the 14 items was 0.67. Conclusions We identified essential components of an assessment tool for an EBM CAT synopsis and presentation with excellent internal consistency and a good level of interrater reliability across 3 different institutions. The EBM C-PET is a reliable tool to document resident competence in higher-level EBM skills. PMID:24404268

  11. Cycle therapy of actinic keratoses of the face and scalp with 5% topical imiquimod cream: An open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Salasche, Stuart J; Levine, Norman; Morrison, Lynne

    2002-10-01

    Preliminary studies indicate that topically applied immune response modifiers may be an effective and safe method of treating actinic keratoses (AKs). Our aim was to study the potential efficacy of topical 5% imiquimod cream in the treatment of facial or scalp AKs and improve the safety profile by using a novel "cycle" dosing regimen. This pilot study is an open-label trial that included 25 patients who had between 5 and 20 discrete AKs within a cosmetic unit of the forehead, scalp, or cheek. Treatment consisted of once-daily application of 5% imiquimod cream, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. to the entire cosmetic unit, followed by a rest period of 4 weeks. The cycle was repeated if any AKs remained after a complete 8-week cycle. A maximum of 3 cycles was permitted (24 weeks). Thirty-three sites in 25 patients were evaluated. Compliance was excellent with a very tolerable safety profile. Complete clearing of all AKs was noted in 82% (27/33) of anatomic sites in 25 study subjects. Almost half the sites (15/33) were clear at the end of the first cycle. A "therapeutic interval" was noted during the rest period wherein clinical inflammation subsided but AKs continued to clear. An added effect was the uncovering and clinical appearance and subsequent eradication of incipient (subclinical) AKs in the treatment area. There was excellent compliance with the cycle therapy regimen. The observations and hypotheses made in this pilot study will be tested in controlled, randomized trials with larger study populations. The identification of a therapeutic interval may prove to be beneficial in formulating individualized dosing regimens.

  12. Ask an anatomist: Identifying global trends, topics and themes of academic anatomists using twitter.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Madeleine J; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2017-10-04

    Social media (SoMe) is increasingly used in higher education (HE) to access knowledge and enable global communication. The SoMe platform Twitter(®) is particularly beneficial in these contexts because it is readily accessible, easily searchable (via hashtags) and global. Given these advantages, the twitter platform @AskAnatomist was created to foster a global weekly tweet chat, where students and academics from can ask and address anatomy-related questions. The aim of this study was to identify themes arising in the early stages of the @AskAnatomy Twitter community to gain insights into current needs/key areas for academic anatomists, students, and other followers. A qualitative analysis of tweets including the hashtag #AnatQ, (the associated @AskAnatomist hashtag), was undertaken to achieve this aim. Thematic analysis revealed three core themes arising in the formative stages of the @AskAnatomist Twitter site: (1) anatomical education modalities, (2) specific anatomy content, and (3) research motivations. These themes reveal controversies within the field of anatomical sciences, areas for potential education resource improvement and research, as well as the humor of anatomists. Though the original intent of the @AskAnatomist site was to engage the general public in anatomy content and knowledge, tweet analysis suggests that academic anatomists were the primary active "tweeters". Interestingly, this analysis reveals that the @AskAnatomist site progressed into a web-based community of practice (CoP), suggesting an additional benefit of SoMe communities in the field of anatomy. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. An accelerator-driven reactor for meeting future energy demand

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yang, Y.; Yu, A.

    1997-12-31

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor which avoids encountering a shortage of Pu during a high growth rate in the production of nuclear energy. Furthermore, the necessity of the early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options along with high neutron economy for producing the fuel, for transmuting high-level waste such as minor actinides, and for efficiently converting excess and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel.

  14. Topical tretinoin 0.1% for pregnancy-related abdominal striae: an open-label, multicenter, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Rangel, O; Arias, I; García, E; Lopez-Padilla, S

    2001-01-01

    In an open-label, multicenter, prospective study, 20 women applied tretinoin (retinoic acid) cream 0.1% daily for 3 months to pregnancy-related stretch marks in the abdominal area. Efficacy was evaluated by analysis of one preselected target lesion, which was rated on a six-point scale (-1 = worse to 4 = cleared). At week 12, significant global improvement was noted from baseline in all stretch marks, and the target lesion decreased in length by 20% (P = .01). Erythema and scaling, the most common adverse events, occurred in 11 patients, decreased in severity after the first month of treatment, and were controlled with continued application of tretinoin and petroleum jelly ointment. In this small study, topical application of tretinoin significantly improved the clinical appearance of pregnancy-related stretch marks.

  15. Evolution meets biopsychosociality: an analysis of addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Lende, Daniel H; Smith, E O

    2002-04-01

    Evolutionary theory can inform the biopsychosocial approach to addictive behavior through the use of adaptationist thinking, or how natural selection has shaped the mechanisms and processes underlying addiction. Covering how evolutionary theory relates to biology, psychology and sociality, this paper examines three components to drug use and abuse: a biological mechanism (mesolimbic dopamine), a developmental trajectory (attachment) and a social phylogeny (dominance, submission, social dependence). The paper argues for a salience (or wanting) view of the function of dopamine; outlines how attachment affects time perspective, closure of internal models and self-regulation; and examines how inequality affects drug abuse and how social dependence and manipulative behaviors can play a role in relationships with drugs. The article concludes with an analysis of how the adaptive approach applies to interventions against addictive behavior.

  16. Meeting An Unmet Need in Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma with Regorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a global issue, affecting men and women equally. Over the last 25 years, advances in therapy and multidisciplinary care have led to improvements in survival for those with colorectal cancer. Despite these advances, more therapeutic options are needed for those being treated for this disease. Regorafenib is an oral drug that is a new therapeutic option for our patients. The CORRECT and CONCUR trials demonstrate the efficacy of regorafenib in the last line setting. This article summarizes some of the regorafenib clinical trial data and discusses the strategies to help manage the side effects of this drug including patient education, dose reductions and interruptions, and monitoring hypertension and liver function. PMID:27981140

  17. An early history of human breast cancer: West meets East.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shou-He

    2013-09-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a global issue. This is especially true in countries like China, where cancer incidence has increased likely because of changes in environment and lifestyle. However, cancer is not a modern disease; early cases have been recorded in ancient medical books in the West and in China. Here, we provide a brief history of cancer, focusing on cancer of the breast, and review the etymology of ai, the Chinese character for cancer. Notable findings from both Western and Chinese traditional medicine are presented to give an overview of the most important, early contributors to our evolving understanding of human breast cancer. We also discuss the earliest historical documents to record patients with breast cancer.

  18. An early history of human breast cancer: West meets East

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shou-He

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a global issue. This is especially true in countries like China, where cancer incidence has increased likely because of changes in environment and lifestyle. However, cancer is not a modern disease; early cases have been recorded in ancient medical books in the West and in China. Here, we provide a brief history of cancer, focusing on cancer of the breast, and review the etymology of ai, the Chinese character for cancer. Notable findings from both Western and Chinese traditional medicine are presented to give an overview of the most important, early contributors to our evolving understanding of human breast cancer. We also discuss the earliest historical documents to record patients with breast cancer. PMID:23958056

  19. "There is Space, and There are Limits": The Challenge of Teaching Controversial Topics in an Illiberal Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Li-Ching; Alviar-Martin, Theresa; Leviste, Enrique Niño P.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Research indicates that across democratic societies, teachers face numerous intellectual and emotional challenges when handling controversial topics in the classroom. Less attention, however, has been paid to how teachers' willingness to teach controversial topics intersects with political and other societal factors in…

  20. "There is Space, and There are Limits": The Challenge of Teaching Controversial Topics in an Illiberal Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Li-Ching; Alviar-Martin, Theresa; Leviste, Enrique Niño P.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Research indicates that across democratic societies, teachers face numerous intellectual and emotional challenges when handling controversial topics in the classroom. Less attention, however, has been paid to how teachers' willingness to teach controversial topics intersects with political and other societal factors in…

  1. An Analysis of the Most Commonly Tested Topics and Their Taxonomy From Recent Self-Assessment Examinations.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Chad A; Moroze, Sean; Murtha, Andrew S; Rivera, Jessica C

    2017-07-03

    The purpose of this study is to determine the most commonly tested topics and the question taxonomy of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Self-Assessment Examinations (SAE) from 2009 through 2014. All SAEs were analyzed from 2009 through 2014. The SAEs were separated by subject and the questions of each SAE were analyzed for topic, taxonomic classification, and question type. A total of 2107 questions were reviewed from 10 different subjects. In all, 6 of the 9 subjects had roughly 1/3 of their questions composed of the 3 most commonly tested topics. Each subject had at least 1 trauma-related question within its top 5 most commonly tested topics. Almost half (47%) of all questions were of taxonomy 1 classification and 29% were taxonomy 3. The Basic Science SAEs had the greatest percentage of taxonomy 1 questions of any subject (83%) whereas Trauma contained the highest percentage of taxonomy 3 questions (47%). Certain topics within each subject are consistently tested more often than other topics. In general, the 3 most commonly tested topics comprise about one-third of total questions and orthopedic surgeons should be very familiar with these topics in order to best prepare for standardized examinations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Same Content, Less Time--And Online, Too?: An Assignment for Meeting the Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresap, Linda M.

    2002-01-01

    Considers combining topics in a virtual class as an attempt to assist incoming Master of Science Management students in accomplishing their long list of managerial communication learning objectives in a shorter delivery time and within the virtual environment. Describes the contemporary book review and discussion assignment and considers benefits…

  3. Safety and anti-HIV assessments of natural vaginal cleansing products in an established topical microbicides in vitro testing algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no effective vaccine or other approved product for the prevention of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. It has been reported that women in resource-poor communities use vaginally applied citrus juices as topical microbicides. These easily accessible food products have historically been applied to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of these substances using an established topical microbicide testing algorithm. Freshly squeezed lemon and lime juice and household vinegar were tested in their original state or in pH neutralized form for efficacy and cytotoxicity in the CCR5-tropic cell-free entry and cell-associated transmission assays, CXCR4-tropic entry and fusion assays, and in a human PBMC-based anti-HIV-1 assay. These products were also tested for their effect on viability of cervico-vaginal cell lines, human cervical explant tissues, and beneficial Lactobacillus species. Results Natural lime and lemon juice and household vinegar demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity in transformed cell lines. Neutralization of the products reduced both anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity, resulting in a low therapeutic window for both acidic and neutralized formulations. For the natural juices and vinegar, the IC50 was ≤ 3.5 (0.8-3.5)% and the TC50 ≤ 6.3 (1.0-6.3)%. All three liquid products inhibited viability of beneficial Lactobacillus species associated with vaginal health. Comparison of three different toxicity endpoints in the cervical HeLa cell line revealed that all three products affected membrane integrity, cytosolic enzyme release, and dehydrogenase enzyme activity in living cells. The juices and vinegar also exerted strong cytotoxicity in cervico-vaginal cell lines, mainly due to their acidic pH. In human cervical explant tissues, treatment with 5% lemon or lime juice or 6% vinegar induced

  4. Carbocyanines in an RNA environment: experiment meets simulation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Richard; Steffen, Fabio; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of carbocyanine dyes in single molecule spectroscopy of nucleic acids is unbroken [1]. Studying the dynamics of large RNA constructs and the binding kinetics such as the exon/intron binding side interaction of the group II intron in S. Cerevisiae [2,3] have motivated a thorough photophysical characterization of the FRET pair Cy3/Cy5 in context of nucleic acids and RNA in particular. We show that Mg2+ as a mediator of RNA-dye interactions enhances the cyanine fluorescence lifetime. The increasing window for depolarization as monitored by time-resolved anisotropy further revealed a dynamic equilibrium between free tumbling and stacking on the RNA backbone, with the stacked conformation preventing photoisomerization [4]. Tracking fluorophore mobility covalently bound to the RNA on an atomistic level by means of molecular dynamics [5] allow to disentangle different types of dye-dye and dye-RNA interactions. Our hybrid approach combining time-correlated single photon counting and computer simulations will benefit the interpretation of absolute distance measurement by smFRET. [1] M.Levitus and S.Ranjit, Q. Rev. Biophys 2011, 44, 123-151. [2] D.Kowerko, S.L.B.König, M.Skilandat, D.Kruschel, M.C.A.S.Hadzic, L.Cardo, R.K.O.Sigel, PNAS 2015, 112, 3403-3408. [3] M. Khier, D. Kowerko, F. Steffen, R. Börner and R.K.O.Sigel, in preparation. [4] F.Steffen, R.K.O. Sigel, R.Börner, in preparation. [5] R.Best, H. Hofmann, D. Nettels, B. Schuler, Biophys J 2015, 11,2721-2731.

  5. The History of the APS Shock Compression of Condensed Matter Topical Group

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-05-02

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wave/high pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  6. History of the APS Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-10-19

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wavehigh pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  7. The History of the APS Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jerry W.

    2002-07-01

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wave/high pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  8. Antibiotic resistance: shifting the paradigm in topical acne treatment.

    PubMed

    Andriessen, Anneke; Lynde, Charles W

    2014-11-01

    Multiple topical therapies are available for mild to moderate acne vulgaris. The role of antibiotics and their resistance in the treatment of acne was reviewed by an expert panel of dermatologists who practice in Canada. Prior to the consensus meeting, the panel members filled out a survey on their current practice using topical treatment for acne. A literature review was carried out using information obtained from PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medline, and EMBASE. During a consensus meeting organized at the Spring Dermatology Update on April 27, 2014 in Toronto, ON, the panel had a blind vote on the issues at hand. The panel reached consensus on: 1) Antibiotics are an integral part of acne treatment not only due to their antibiotic effect but also by their anti-inflammatory action. 2) Oral antibiotics should be used for a short period of time if possible. 3) Topical antibiotics should not be used in monotherapy. 4) Retinoids are effective in reducing antibiotic resistance. 5) A benzoyl peroxide wash is as effective as topical benzoyl peroxide in reducing antibiotic resistance. 6) Therapy needs to be re-evaluated in 6-8 weeks versus 12 weeks. The recommendations given by the panel are to be disseminated to both general practitioners and dermatologists. For mild to moderate acne treatment, topical antibiotics in monotherapy are not to be used but may be combined with a retinoid or BPO to safely achieve more successful outcomes.

  9. 7 CFR 1794.52 - Scoping meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Procedure for Environmental Assessments With Scoping § 1794... environmental document is the subject of the hearing or meeting, that document will be made available to the... information on topics or issues of interest within an established time period. The applicant or its...

  10. 7 CFR 1794.52 - Scoping meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Procedure for Environmental Assessments With Scoping § 1794... environmental document is the subject of the hearing or meeting, that document will be made available to the... information on topics or issues of interest within an established time period. The applicant or its...

  11. 7 CFR 1794.52 - Scoping meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Procedure for Environmental Assessments With Scoping § 1794... environmental document is the subject of the hearing or meeting, that document will be made available to the... information on topics or issues of interest within an established time period. The applicant or its...

  12. 77 FR 74665 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement, Public Scoping Meeting, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental... Human Services (HHS) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the...), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice of intent; meeting announcement and request...

  13. EDITORIAL: The 21st Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    This Topical Issue contains works presented at the 21st Nordic Semiconductor Meeting (21NSM) held at Sundvolden, Norway, 18-19 August 2005. The institutions supporting 21NSM were: University of Oslo, SINTEF, the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment and Vestfold University College. The Nordic Semiconductor Meeting has become an international forum that has been held every other year in a relay fashion in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The focus of the meeting has been on original research and science being carried out on semiconductor materials, devices and systems. Reports on industrial activity have usually been featured at the meetings. The topics have ranged from fundamental research on point defects in a semiconductor to system architecture of semiconductor electronic devices. For the last five meetings the proceedings have been printed in a dedicated volume of Physica Scripta in the Topical Issue series. The papers in this Topical Issue have undergone critical peer review and we wish to thank the reviewers and the authors for their cooperation, which has been instrumental in meeting the expected high standards of the series. The range of topics covered by this volume is broad, reflecting the call for papers; most of the papers have an element of materials science and the largest portion of these deal with other semiconductor materials other than silicon. The 21NSM was supported by the following sponsors: Renewable Energy Corporation (REC), EMF III-V Innovations (EMF), and the Nordic Research Board (NordForsk). Terje G Finstad Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Norway Andrej Y Kuznetsov and Bengt G Svensson Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, Norway

  14. An uncommon presentation: Creative commons at the 2012 LES winter meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Meike, Annamarie

    2012-01-06

    Have you noticed that the subject matter of our LES meetings is heavily oriented toward patent rights? There is more IP business in the area of patents, but it is important to keep an eye on copyright, whether for the purpose of influencing software copyright policy, or observing the development of interesting business models. So it is with pleasure that I see Catherine Casserly of the non-profit organization, Creative Commons (CC) is our Luncheon speaker for the 2012 Winter meeting in Anaheim.

  15. An Illustrated Overview of the Origins and Development of the QSCP Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruani, Jean

    The origins and development of the QSCP meetings are recalled: from a congress organized in Paris in 1986 to honour Prof. Raymond Daudel, through Franco-Bulgarian cooperation between various teams then European contracts, in the frame of COST projects, involving a network of French, Spanish, British, Italian, Swedish, and Bulgarian scientists, till the holding of the first QSCP workshop near Pisa in 1996 to honour Prof. Stefan Christov. After that there was a meeting every year, always with proceedings published. This historical overview will be presented as an illustrated journey in picturesque cities of Western and Eastern Europe, North Africa, and North America, sprinkled with historical or philosophical anecdotes and insights.

  16. Information sharing in interdisciplinary team meetings: an evaluation of hospice goals.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine M

    2005-12-01

    The author observed interdisciplinary team (IDT) meetings of "Town Hospice" to examine how the company goal of providing for the "psychosocial needs of the patient and their loved ones" is addressed. More specifically, she used an ethnographic approach to explore how case managers negotiate the addition of psychosocial information about patients during IDT meetings. She found that psychosocial information on patients was primarily limited to three types of information sharing: (a) information related to care goals, (b) family issues related to bereavement and caretaking, and (c) the request of additional help from team members. Furthermore, she understood that the addition of psychosocial information creates a dialectical tension for the team.

  17. A bibliography of stockwork molybdenite deposits and related topics (with an emphasis on the North American literature)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steigerwald, Celia H.; Mutschler, Felix E.; Ludington, Steve

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography of 1117 citations brings together references on stockwork molybdenite deposits and related topics in a format that can be sorted by topic and(or) geographic area. Each reference is preceded by a key, or keys, which may be read and sorted visually or by computer, The bibliography is available in two formats: (1) paper- or microfiche-hardcopy, and (2) fixed format computer reasonable magnetic tape, A FORTRAN program is provided for sorting the magnetic tape version,

  18. Discovering health topics in social media using topic models.

    PubMed

    Paul, Michael J; Dredze, Mark

    2014-01-01

    By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM), as well as our system for filtering general Twitter data based on health keywords and supervised classification. We show how ATAM and other topic models can automatically infer health topics in 144 million Twitter messages from 2011 to 2013. ATAM discovered 13 coherent clusters of Twitter messages, some of which correlate with seasonal influenza (r = 0.689) and allergies (r = 0.810) temporal surveillance data, as well as exercise (r =  .534) and obesity (r =  -.631) related geographic survey data in the United States. These results demonstrate that it is possible to automatically discover topics that attain statistically significant correlations with ground truth data, despite using minimal human supervision and no historical data to train the model, in contrast to prior work. Additionally, these results demonstrate that a single general-purpose model can identify many different health topics in social media.

  19. Discovering Health Topics in Social Media Using Topic Models

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Michael J.; Dredze, Mark

    2014-01-01

    By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM), as well as our system for filtering general Twitter data based on health keywords and supervised classification. We show how ATAM and other topic models can automatically infer health topics in 144 million Twitter messages from 2011 to 2013. ATAM discovered 13 coherent clusters of Twitter messages, some of which correlate with seasonal influenza (r = 0.689) and allergies (r = 0.810) temporal surveillance data, as well as exercise (r = .534) and obesity (r = −.631) related geographic survey data in the United States. These results demonstrate that it is possible to automatically discover topics that attain statistically significant correlations with ground truth data, despite using minimal human supervision and no historical data to train the model, in contrast to prior work. Additionally, these results demonstrate that a single general-purpose model can identify many different health topics in social media. PMID:25084530

  20. EDITORIAL: Nano Meets Spectroscopy Nano Meets Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2012-08-01

    The multidisciplinary two-day Nano Meets Spectroscopy (NMS) event was held at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, in September 2011. The event was planned from the outset to be at the interface of several areas—in particular, spectroscopy and nanoscience, and to bring together topics and people with different approaches to achieving common goals in biomolecular science. Hence the meeting cut across traditional boundaries and brought together researchers using diverse techniques, particularly fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Despite engaging common problems, these techniques are frequently seen as mutually exclusive with the two communities rarely interacting at conferences. The meeting was widely seen to have lived up to its billing in good measure. It attracted the maximum capacity of ~120 participants, including 22 distinguished speakers (9 from outside the UK), over 50 posters and a vibrant corporate exhibition comprising 10 leading instrument companies and IOP Publishing. The organizers were Professor David Birch (Chair), Dr Karen Faulds and Professor Duncan Graham of the University of Strathclyde, Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh and Dr Alex Knight of NPL. The event was sponsored by the European Science Foundation, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The full programme and abstracts are available at http://sensor.phys.strath.ac.uk/nms/program.php. The programme was quite ambitious in terms of the breadth and depth of scope. The interdisciplinary and synergistic concept of 'X meets Y' played well, cross-fertilization between different fields often being a source of inspiration and progress. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy provided the core, but the meeting had little repetition and also attracted contributions on more specialist techniques such as CARS, super-resolution, single molecule and chiral methods. In terms of application the

  1. 20 CFR 641.440 - What are the responsibility conditions that an applicant must meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the responsibility conditions that an applicant must meet? 641.440 Section 641.440 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... fraud or criminal activity of a significant nature within the applicant's organization. (c) Serious...

  2. The Balancing Act: Meeting the Needs of All Children Including an Adolescent with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Cecelia; Mayes, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore parents' experiences and strategies used when meeting the needs of all their children, including an adolescent with disabilities. Materials and methods: A qualitative study design was employed. The study was conducted in two phases. (i) Secondary analysis of ecocultural interviews with 12…

  3. 34 CFR 271.20 - What conditions must an applicant meet to obtain funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What conditions must an applicant meet to obtain funding? 271.20 Section 271.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE EDUCATIONAL AGENCY DESEGREGATION...

  4. The Balancing Act: Meeting the Needs of All Children Including an Adolescent with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Cecelia; Mayes, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore parents' experiences and strategies used when meeting the needs of all their children, including an adolescent with disabilities. Materials and methods: A qualitative study design was employed. The study was conducted in two phases. (i) Secondary analysis of ecocultural interviews with 12…

  5. Meet an Astronaut Day at Space Center Houston with STS-118 astronauts

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-19

    JSC2007-E-03712 (19 Jan. 2007) --- Educator astronaut Barbara R. Morgan speaks with students during Space Center Houston's "Meet an Astronaut Day" on Jan. 19. Morgan has been named as a crew member for the STS-118 mission, scheduled to launch in the summer of 2007.

  6. An Experiential Approach to Teaching Preservice Teachers about Group-Centered Teaching and Classroom Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a one-semester course in educational psychology for preservice teachers designed to give students the experience of participating in group-centered teaching and classroom meetings. A questionnaire was used to assess one aspect of the experiential approach An attempt was made to demonstrate that humanistic methods are viable in…

  7. 40 CFR 62.15060 - What if I do not meet an increment of progress?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... increment of progress? If you fail to meet an increment of progress, you must submit a notification to the Administrator postmarked within 10 business days after the specified date in table 1 of this subpart for achieving that increment of progress. This notification must inform the Administrator that you did not...

  8. 34 CFR 271.20 - What conditions must an applicant meet to obtain funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What conditions must an applicant meet to obtain funding? 271.20 Section 271.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE EDUCATIONAL AGENCY DESEGREGATION...

  9. The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    DeLucia, Evan

    2016-07-12

    Evan DeLucia of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute talks about "The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  10. An in vitro approach to investigate ocular metabolism of a topical, selective β1-adrenergic blocking agent, betaxolol.

    PubMed

    Bushee, Jennifer L; Dunne, Christine E; Argikar, Upendra A

    2015-05-01

    1. Topical glaucoma treatments have often been limited by poor absorption and bioavailability. Betaxolol, a selective β1-blocker, has been well studied for its pharmacokinetics and disposition. Limited ocular, betaxolol metabolism data is available despite a growing number of novel ocular treatments. 2. In vitro ocular fractions indicated the formation of an active metabolite, across rat, rabbit and human, which was only observed historically in the liver. 3. Ocular metabolic profiles of preclinical toxicology species, rat and rabbit, were not predictive of human in vitro ocular data. M1 was specific to human and only captured by the liver data. 4. Liver S9 over predicted the extent of ocular metabolism compared to ocular fractions. Rabbit liver S9 fractions demonstrated extensive glucuronidation and higher parent turn-over in 1 h as compared to other matrices. 5. This research assesses in vitro species and organ differences across preclinical species and human. The complex data set highlights the need for an in vitro ocular system to explore poorly documented ocular metabolism.

  11. Development of a topically active imiquimod formulation.

    PubMed

    Chollet, J L; Jozwiakowski, M J; Phares, K R; Reiter, M J; Roddy, P J; Schultz, H J; Ta, Q V; Tomai, M A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a topical formulation of imiquimod, a novel immune response modifier, to induce local cytokine production for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts. A pH-solubility profile and titration data were used to calculate a pKa of 7.3, indicative of a weak base. Solubility experiments were conducted to identify a solvent that dissolves imiquimod to achieve a 5% formulation concentration. Studies to select surfactants, preservatives, and viscosity-enhancing excipients to formulate an oil-in-water cream indicated that fatty acids were the preferred solvent for topical imiquimod formulations, and isostearic acid (ISA) was selected. A relationship existed between the fatty acid composition of four commercially available ISA sources and the solubility of imiquimod. A combination of polysorbate 60, sorbitan monostearate, and xanthan gum was used to produce a physically stable cream. The preservative system included parabens and benzyl alcohol to meet the USP criteria for preservative activity. An in vitro method was developed to demonstrate that imiquimod was released from the formulation. Topical application of the formulation induced local cytokine activity in mice.

  12. Temperature-sensitive microemulsion gel: an effective topical delivery system for simultaneous delivery of vitamins C and E.

    PubMed

    Rozman, Branka; Zvonar, Alenka; Falson, Francoise; Gasperlin, Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Microemulsions (ME)--nanostructured systems composed of water, oil, and surfactants--have frequently been used in attempts to increase cutaneous drug delivery. The primary objective addressed in this work has been the development of temperature-sensitive microemulsion gel (called gel-like ME), as an effective and safe delivery system suitable for simultaneous topical application of a hydrophilic vitamin C and a lipophilic vitamin E. By changing water content of liquid o/w ME (o/w ME), a gel-like ME with temperature-sensitive rheological properties was formed. The temperature-driven changes in its microstructure were confirmed by rotational rheometry, viscosity measurements, and droplet size determination. The release studies have shown that the vitamins' release at skin temperature from gel-like ME were comparable to those from o/w ME and were much faster and more complete than from o/w ME conventionally thickened with polymer (o/w ME carbomer). According to effectiveness in skin delivery of both vitamins, o/w ME was found the most appropriate, followed by gel-like ME and by o/w ME carbomer, indicating that no simple correlation between vitamins release and skin absorption could be found. The cytotoxicity studies revealed good cell viability after exposure to ME and confirmed all tested microemulsions as nonirritant.

  13. Transforming growth factor β plays an important role in enhancing wound healing by topical application of Povidone-iodine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Qin, Wenhan; Zhou, Yaying; Chen, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Zhao, Hailin; Mi, Emma; Mi, Ella; Wang, Qingmei; Ning, Jiaolin

    2017-04-20

    Povidone-iodine (PVI) is principally used as an antimicrobial agent. It has been found that 0.5% PVI can attenuate congestion, edema and pain induced by pressure sores. Thus this study aimed to assess the effects of 0.5% PVI on acute skin wounds. Four full-thickness excisional wounds were generated on the dorsal skin of male Sprague-Dawley rats with a 10-mm sterile punch. Two wounds were left untreated and the other two were dressed with gauze with 0.5% PVI for 1 hour per day for the first 5 days after injury. 10-mm full-thickness excisional wounds were also generated on the dorsal skin of rats treated with 10 mg/kg SB431542 and all wounds were treated with 0.5% PVI for 5 days. PVI treatment enhanced wound healing via promotion of expression of α SMA and TGF β, neovascularization and re-epithelialization. Interleukin 6 was reduced following PVI treatment. Inhibition of TGF β abolished the effect of PVI treatment on wound closure. These data show that topical application of 0.5% PVI could promote acute skin wound healing though increased expression of TGF β leading to enhanced formation of granulation tissue, even in the absence of obvious infection.

  14. The future of sleep technology: report from an American Association of Sleep Technologists summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Rita; Trimble, Melinda

    2014-05-15

    integrated care will include an increased focus on patient education, monitoring, and follow-up. The most effective treatments will require an individualized, patient-centered approach. A workforce analysis shows that the number of trained physician specialists will be inadequate to provide this care. Well-trained sleep medicine practitioners at many levels will be needed to meet treatment goals, including some roles appropriate for sleep technologists. These factors provide challenges and opportunities for sleep technologists. In order to maintain viability as an allied health profession, the majority of sleep technologists will need to be better educated and demonstrate competency in more roles than overnight monitoring and record scoring. Models for this transition already exist, with several programs moving technologists from night work to days and from diagnosis to patient education, provision of treatment, and monitoring of adherence. The challenge for the professional association is to define new roles for sleep technologists and provide the education that the membership will require to flourish in those new roles.

  15. 75 FR 52328 - SFIREG Full Committee; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... tentative agenda topics. DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday, September 20, 2010, from 8:30 a.m. to 5... topics for the meeting. 1. Transitioning insect repellents from, section 25(b) to section 3 status....

  16. 77 FR 69837 - SFIREG Full Committee; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... meeting and sets forth the tentative agenda topics. DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday, December 10...://www.epa.gov/dockets . II. Tentative Agenda Topics 1. Responses to SFIREG Pyrethroid labeling...

  17. 75 FR 47274 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ...'s Advisory Panel (AP) will hold a meeting to discuss the topics contained in the agenda below. DATES... Caribbean Fishery Management Council's Advisory Panel will hold a meeting to discuss the topics contained...

  18. Long-term maintenance therapy for vulvar lichen sclerosus: the results of a randomized study comparing topical vitamin E with an emollient.

    PubMed

    Virgili, Annarosa; Minghetti, Sara; Borghi, Alessandro; Corazza, Monica

    2013-04-01

    The chronic and relapsing nature of vulvar lichen sclerosus (VLS) represents a challenge for its long-term management after an effective treatment with topical corticosteroids. To compare the effect of topical vitamin E with that of an emollient in reducing the risk of VLS relapse over a 52-week maintenance treatment. 156 patients with VLS were enrolled in a 12-week active treatment phase on topical 0.1% mometasone furoate ointment once daily. Those who achieved disease remission entered a 52-week maintenance phase in which patients were randomized to apply either an emollient or topical vitamin E once daily. 80 patients entered the maintenance phase. At 52 weeks, for the vitamin E maintenance group, the cumulative crude relapse rate was 27.8% and the cumulative modified crude relapse rate was 55.6%. For the emollient maintenance group, the cumulative crude relapse rate was 22.7% and the cumulative modified crude relapse rate was 50.0%. The median time to relapse was 20 weeks for the vitamin E group and 18.7 weeks for the emollient group. Once VLS has been stabilized with topical corticosteroids, long-term treatment with both vitamin E and emollients may be considered in maintain LS remission.

  19. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premaligant lesions: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Chen, Jian Wen; Chen, Ying-Ru; Lee, Jeng-Woei

    2010-02-01

    One of the best strategies to prevent the occurrence of oral cancer is to eliminate oral precancers and block their further malignant transformation. Previous studies showed that photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy (photosan-PDT) is very effective for human head and neck cancers. To avoid the systemic photodynamic toxicity of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. Twelve 10-week-old male Syrian golden hamsters were used in this study. DMBA was applied to the left buccal pouches thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks and mineral oil was painted on the right buccal pouches thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks as the normal controls. Six hamsters were euthanized for tissue harvest. Precancerous lesions of moderate to severe dysplasia were consistently induced and proven by histological examination. These induced precancerous lesions in the remaining 6 hamsters were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan-gel. We found that PpIX reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan-gel. The precancerous lesions in 4 hamsters were treated with topical photosan-PDT using the 635-nm LED light once or twice a week. Complete regression of the precancerous lesions was found after 2-4 PDT treatments by visual and histological examination. Our findings indicate that topical photosan-PDT is a very effective treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  20. The effect of propofol infusion with topical epinephrine on cochlear blood flow and hearing: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chul Ho; Cho, Yong Beom; Lee, Jun Sik; Kim, Geun Hyung; Jung, Won-Kyo; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2016-12-01

    Propofol is the most commonly used intravenous (IV) anesthetic agent and is associated with hypotension upon induction of anesthesia. Intravenous propofol infusion has several properties that may be beneficial to patients undergoing middle ear surgery. Topical application of concentrated epinephrine is a valuable tool for achieving hemostasis in the middle ear and during mastoid surgery. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of propofol infusion with topical epinephrine on cochlear blood flow (CBF) and hearing in rats. Twenty one male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. The rate of intravenous infusion of propofol was 4-6 ml/kg/hour. The first group (control group, n = 7) was given IV infusion of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) with topical application of PBS in the round window. In study group A (n = 7), the effect of topical phosphate buffered saline with IV infusion of propofol on CBF and hearing was evaluated. In study group B (n = 7), additional effects of topical epinephrine with IV infusion of propofol on CBF and hearing were evaluated. The laser Doppler blood flowmeter, CBF, and the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were measured and analyzed. Additionally, hearing test using auditory brainstem response (ABR) was performed in both groups. In both groups, infusion of propofol induced a time-dependent decrease in MAP. Approximately 30 min after the start of the propofol infusion, the CBF started to decrease slowly. The decrease in CBF was significantly greater in the study group compared to the control group. The threshold was elevated in the study group relative to the control group. During middle ear surgery, use of IV infusion of propofol with topical epinephrine cotton ball or cottonoid application is not recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How do disease perception, treatment features, and dermatologist–patient relationship impact on patients assuming topical treatment? An Italian survey

    PubMed Central

    Burroni, Anna Graziella; Fassino, Mariella; Torti, Antonio; Visentin, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriasis largely affects daily activities and social interactions and has a strong impact on patients’ quality of life. Psoriatic patients have different attitudes toward their condition. Topical medications are essential for the treatment of psoriasis, but the majority of patients do not adhere to these therapies. Objective The history of treatment success or failure seems to influence patient attitude toward topical therapy. Therefore, it is important to understand the psychological, experiential, and motivational aspects that could be critical for treatment adherence, and to describe the different attitudes toward topical treatment. Furthermore, the physician–patient relationship and the willingness to trust the dermatologist may have a substantial role in encouraging or discouraging patients’ attitudes toward topical therapy. Methods A survey was designed to collect aspects that could be relevant to understanding different patient attitudes toward psoriasis and its treatments. A total of 495 self-administered questionnaires compiled by psoriatic patients were analyzed from 20 Italian specialized hospital centers in order to provide a nationwide picture. Results Psoriatic patients have different perceptions and experiences in relation to their condition: half of them consider psoriasis as a disease, while the other half consider psoriasis as a disorder or a nuisance. Topical therapy is the most widely used treatment, even though it is not considered the most effective one and often perceived to be cosmetic. The main findings are: 1) inadequate patient education about this disease, 2) lack of information about topical treatment, and 3) lack of results within the expected time frame. Furthermore, physicians need to build a good relationship with psoriatic patients in order to motivate them, to trust in their care, and to adhere to treatment. Conclusion This survey adds new and important details about daily life and well-being and the needs of

  2. An Advertisement and Article Analysis of Skin Products and Topics in Popular Women's Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Basch, Corey H; Mongiovi, Jennifer; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Fullwood, M D; Ethan, Danna; Hammond, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, with an estimated 5 million people treated per year and annual medical treatment expenditures that exceed 8 billion dollars. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to enumerate the number of advertisements for skin products with and without Sun Protection Factor (SPF) and to further analyze the specific advertisements for sunblock to determine if models, when present, depict sun safe behaviors and 2) to enumerate the number of articles related to the skin for content. Both aims include an assessment for differences in age and in magazines targeting a Black or Latina population. The sample for this cross sectional study was comprised of 99 issues of 14 popular United States magazines marketed to women, four of which market to a Black or Latina audience. There were 6,142 advertisements, of which 1,215 (19.8%, 95% CI: 18.8-20.8%) were related to skin products. Among the skin product advertisements, 1,145 (93.8%, 95% CI: 93.9-96.3%) depicted skin products without SPF. The majority of skin articles (91.2%, 95% CI: 91.7-100.0%), skin product advertisements (89.9%, 95% CI: 88.2-91.6%), and sunblock advertisements featuring models (were found in magazines aimed at the older (>24 yr) audience. Future research on this topic could focus on the extent to which images in these magazines translate into risky health behaviors, such as sun seeking, or excessive other harmful effects of UV radiation.

  3. An in-service investigation of the additive effect of topical adrenergic agonists and beta-blockers.

    PubMed

    Gillies, W E; Brooks, A M

    1998-08-01

    We assessed the long-term additive effect of topical adrenaline or adrenaline precursor and beta-blockers because of doubts as to the presence and persistence of such an effect. In 43 patents (20 males and 23 females; mean (+/- SD) age 68.4+/-11.5 years, range 24-84 years) on combined therapy for a mean 4.6+/-4.4 years (range 3 months to 17 years) for chronic open-angle glaucoma, the adrenaline or adrenaline precursor drop was stopped for 4 weeks in both eyes of 27 patients and in one eye of 6 patients. There was a mean rise in intra-ocular pressure (IOP) for the whole group from 17.5+/-4.0 to 18.7+/-4.9 mmHg (range 10-28 and 9-31 mmHg, respectively) on stopping adrenergic agonist drops. Three different responses were identified: (i) a rise in IOP > 2 mmHg (mean 5.8+/-3.2 mmHg; range 3-14 mmHg) in 20 eyes of 15 patients; (ii) no rise or fall > 2 mmHg in 43 eyes of 23 patients, with a mean rise of 0.2+/-1.1 mmHg; and (iii) a fall in IOP of > 2 mmHg (mean 5.6+/-3.2 mmHg; range 3-11 mmHg) in seven eyes of five patients. The effect of adrenergic agonist and beta-blocker drops is variable, but an additive effect may be strong and persistent n some eyes, suggesting considerable variation in the distribution and density of adrenoceptors in different eyes. Therefore, there may be some variation in the effect of new alpha2-adrenoceptor agonists, but such effects should be additive to those of beta-blockers.

  4. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - part 2: Echinacea purpurea-Lavandula angustifolia.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, Sebastiano; Minciullo, Paola L; Miroddi, Marco; Chinou, Ioanna; Calapai, Gioacchino; Schmidt, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph has been produced. Part 2: Echinacea purpurea Moench-Lavandula angustifolia Mill.

  5. Aqueous humor and serum penetration of tacrolimus after topical and oral administration in rats: an absorption study.

    PubMed

    Yalçindağ, F Nilüfer; Batioğlu, Figen; Ari, Nuray; Ozdemir, Ozden

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the penetration of tacrolimus to the aqueous and serum after topical and oral administration. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into three groups. In the first group (n = 12), a single dose of 0.3 % isotonic tacrolimus solution was applied topically to the rat eyes. The second group (n = 12), received 0.1 mg/kg/day tacrolimus for three days. In control group (n = 6), the rats were administered a single drop of 0.3% salin solution topically. Following collection of samples, the amounts of tacrolimus in aqueous and serum samples were compared with each other. In group I, the mean concentration of tacrolimus was 35.16 ng/ml in aqueous and 2.22 ng/ml in serum. In group II, the mean concentration of tacrolimus was 13.08 ng/ml in aqueous and 13.45 ng/ml in serum. There was no significant difference in the serum concentration levels of tacrolimus between group I and control group. However there was a significant difference of the drug concentrations in aqueous between the groups (p < 0.001). The mean aqueous and serum concentrations of tacrolimus in group II, differed significantly from the mean concentrations in group I (p < 0.001) and the control group (p < 0.001). Tacrolimus may be a promising treatment modality in intraocular inflammation by topical application besides systemic administration.

  6. Aqueous humor and serum penetration of tacrolimus after topical and oral administration in rats: an absorption study

    PubMed Central

    Yalçındağ, F Nilüfer; Batıoğlu, Figen; Arı, Nuray; Özdemir, Özden

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the penetration of tacrolimus to the aqueous and serum after topical and oral administration. Methods: Thirty Wistar rats were divided into three groups. In the first group (n = 12), a single dose of 0.3 % isotonic tacrolimus solution was applied topically to the rat eyes. The second group (n = 12), received 0.1 mg/kg/day tacrolimus for three days. In control group (n = 6), the rats were administered a single drop of 0.3% salin solution topically. Following collection of samples, the amounts of tacrolimus in aqueous and serum samples were compared with each other. Results: In group I, the mean concentration of tacrolimus was 35.16 ng/ml in aqueous and 2.22 ng/ml in serum. In group II, the mean concentration of tacrolimus was 13.08 ng/ml in aqueous and 13.45 ng/ml in serum. There was no significant difference in the serum concentration levels of tacrolimus between group I and control group. However there was a significant difference of the drug concentrations in aqueous between the groups (p < 0.001). The mean aqueous and serum concentrations of tacrolimus in group II, differed significantly from the mean concentrations in group I (p < 0.001) and the control group (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Tacrolimus may be a promising treatment modality in intraocular inflammation by topical application besides systemic administration. PMID:19668467

  7. The Interest of Bavarian Primary School Pupils in Geographical Topics and Methods--Selected Results of an Empirical Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Aline; Roth, Anna; Priese, Carolin; Peukert, Eva; Mertel, Stefanie; Bloß, Susanne; Mehren, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Interest is a central learning prerequisite for teaching. The article deals with a survey among 1600 primary school pupils in forms 2, 3 and 4 (ages 7-10) in the German federal state of Bavaria who were interviewed on their interest in geographical topics and working methods. They were given a questionnaire including 40 items to indicate their…

  8. Topical Cathelicidin (LL-37) an Innate Immune Peptide Induces Acute Olfactory Epithelium Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Jeremiah A.; Qin, Xuan; Pulsipher, Abigail; Orb, Quinn; Orlandi, Richard R.; Zhang, Jianxing; Schults, Austin; Jia, Wanjian; Presson, Angela P.; Prestwich, Glenn; Oottamasathien, Siam

    2017-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an endogenous innate immune peptide that is elevated in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The role of LL-37 in olfactory epithelium (OE) inflammation remains unknown. We hypothesized that 1) LL-37 topically delivered would elicit profound OE inflammation, and 2) LL-37 induced inflammation is associated with increased infiltration of neutrophils and mast cells. Methods To test our hypothesis we challenged C57BL/6 mice intranasally with increasing concentrations of LL-37. At 24 hours tissues were examined histologically and scored for inflammatory cell infiltrate, edema, and secretory hyperplasia. In separate experiments, fluorescently conjugated LL-37 was instilled and tissues were examined at 0.5 and 24 hours. To test our last hypothesis, we performed tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) assays for neutrophil activity and immunohistochemistry for tryptase to determine the mean number of mast cells per mm2. Results LL-37 caused increased inflammatory cell infiltrate, edema, and secretory cell hyperplasia of the sinonasal mucosa with higher LL-37 concentrations yielding significantly more inflammatory changes (p < 0.01). Fluorescent LL-37 demonstrated global sinonasal epithelial binding and tissue distribution. Further, higher concentrations of LL-37 led to significantly greater MPO levels with dose-dependent increases in mast cell infiltration (p < 0.01). Conclusions LL-37 has dramatic inflammatory effects in the OE mucosa that is dose-dependent. The observed inflammatory changes in the olfactory mucosa were associated with the infiltration of both neutrophils and mast cells. Our biologic model represents a new model to further investigate the role of LL-37 in OE inflammation. PMID:26346056

  9. "1999 Bioastronomy Meeting"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meech, Karen J. (Editor); Owen, Tobias C.

    2000-01-01

    The 6th Bioastronomy Conference, Bioastronomy '99: A New Era in Bioastronomy, was held at the Hapuna Prince Beach hotel on the Big Island of Hawaii from August 2-6, 1999. The series of previous Bioastronomy meetings have played an important role in integrating the broader interests and techniques of both astronomy and biology to understand the origin and evolution of living systems in the universe, and to generating a context for exploration in our solar system and in extrasolar planetary systems. The scope of these interdisciplinary fields is captured in the topics discussed at the meeting: organic molecules in interstellar and interplanetary space; origin and evolution of planetary systems; comets, asteroids, and other small bodies and their role in the origin and evolution of life; Earth as a living planet; extreme environments on Earth; origin of life; transport of life between planets; evolution of life and intelligence; detection and characterization of extrasolar planets; search for extraterrestrial technology and life; future missions; and public acceptance and support of scientific studies of life in the universe. This paper gives an overview summary of the conference and briefly highlights some of the themes discussed at the meeting.

  10. Recent advances in topical anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Topical anesthetics act on the peripheral nerves and reduce the sensation of pain at the site of application. In dentistry, they are used to control local pain caused by needling, placement of orthodontic bands, the vomiting reflex, oral mucositis, and rubber-dam clamp placement. Traditional topical anesthetics contain lidocaine or benzocaine as active ingredients and are used in the form of solutions, creams, gels, and sprays. Eutectic mixtures of local anesthesia cream, a mixture of various topical anesthetics, has been reported to be more potent than other anesthetics. Recently, new products with modified ingredients and application methods have been introduced into the market. These products may be used for mild pain during periodontal treatment, such as scaling. Dentists should be aware that topical anesthetics, although rare, might induce allergic reactions or side effects as a result of an overdose. Topical anesthetics are useful aids during dental treatment, as they reduce dental phobia, especially in children, by mitigating discomfort and pain. PMID:28879311

  11. 41 CFR 102-80.100 - What performance objective should an automatic sprinkler system be capable of meeting?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... objective should an automatic sprinkler system be capable of meeting? 102-80.100 Section 102-80.100 Public... Automatic Sprinkler Systems § 102-80.100 What performance objective should an automatic sprinkler system be capable of meeting? The performance objective of the automatic sprinkler system is that it must be...

  12. Devising an Instrument for Determining Students' Preparedness for an Education through Science Learning Approach within the Topic of Natural Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerulli, D.; Holbrook, J.; Mander, Ü.

    2016-01-01

    As global average temperatures rise, there has been an increase in the frequency and magnitude of meteorological natural hazards. To survive in the world and thrive in the work place, students need to utilize educational skills (such as creative thinking, non-routine problem solving, collaboration and systems thinking) and become independent…

  13. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  14. Using conversation analysis to explore the recurrence of a topic in the talk of a boy with an autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Stribling, Penny; Rae, John; Dickerson, Paul

    2009-08-01

    Some higher functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are reported to produce perseverative talk, especially around 'special interests'. Topic perseveration is a form of pragmatic impairment captured in Prizant and Rydell's (1993) continuum of unconventional verbal behaviour in autism. Although widely reported, there is little systematic empirical research into this phenomenon. This paper considers the utility of Conversation Analysis in developing knowledge in this area, drawing upon data involving a boy with an ASD interacting with a researcher and a mobile robot platform. Although a frequency analysis of the boy's talk on a single topic may suggest that it is perseverative in nature, in a sequential analysis of both talk and non-spoken activities this study aims to show how these may be interactionally-embedded. It is suggested that, in considering the interactional salience of apparently perseverative talk, it can be useful to explore the participation framework in which the topic is revisited.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration: An Approach for Meeting Customer Standards Under Executive Order 12862.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE An Approach for Meeting Customer Standards Under Executive Order 12862 Summary Executive Order 12862, Setting...search Centers all operate and manage wind tunnels for both NASA and indus- try customers . Nonetheless, a separate wind-tunnel process should be...could include the man- ager of the process, selected members of the manager’s staff, a key customer , and a survey expert. The manager and staff would

  16. Management of symptomatic erosive-ulcerative lesions of oral lichen planus in an adult Egyptian population using Selenium-ACE combined with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal agent

    PubMed Central

    Belal, Mahmoud Helmy

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease with an immunological etiology. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of selenium combined with Vitamins A, C & E (Selenium-ACE) in the treatment of erosive-ulcerative OLP as an adjunctive to topical corticosteroids plus antifungal agent. Subjects and Methods: Thirty patients with a confirmed clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of OLP participated in this clinical trial. Patients were randomly allocated into one of three groups and treated as follows: (I) Topical corticosteroids, (II) topical corticosteroids plus antifungal, and (III) SE-ACE combined with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal. The patients were followed for 6 weeks. The pain and severity of the lesions were recorded at the initial and follow-up visits. All recorded data were analyzed using paired t-test and ANOVA test. A P ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The experimental groups showed a marked reduction in pain sensation and size of lesions, particularly in the final follow-up period, but there was no significant difference between the first two Groups I and II. However, healing of lesions and improvement of pain sensation was effective in Group III since a significant difference was found favoring Group III over both Groups I and II. Conclusion: No significant difference was found in treating erosive-ulcerative lesions of OLP by topical corticosteroids alone or combined with antifungal. However, when using SE-ACE in combination with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal, this approach may be effective in managing ulcerative lesions of OLP; but more research with a larger sample size and a longer evaluation period may be recommended. PMID:26681847

  17. Streak camera meeting summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.; Bliss, David E.

    2014-09-01

    Streak cameras are important for high-speed data acquisition in single event experiments, where the total recorded information (I) is shared between the number of measurements (M) and the number of samples (S). Topics of this meeting included: streak camera use at the national laboratories; current streak camera production; new tube developments and alternative technologies; and future planning. Each topic is summarized in the following sections.

  18. Major research topics in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hussaini, M.Y.; Kumar, A.; Voigt, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) and NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) hosted a workshop on October 2--4, 1989 to discuss some combustion problems of technological interest to LaRC and to foster interaction with the academic community in these research areas. The topics chosen for this purpose were flame structure, flame holding/extinction, chemical kinetics, turbulence-kinetics interaction, transition to detonation, and reacting free shear layers. This document contains the papers and edited versions of general discussions on these topics. The lead paper set the stage for the meeting by discussing the status and issues of supersonic combustion relevant to the scramjet engine. Experts were then called upon to review the current knowledge in the aforementioned areas, to focus on how this knowledge can be extended and applied to high-speed combustion, and to suggest future directions of research in these areas.

  19. Integrated Photonics Research: Summaries of Papers Presented at the Integrated Photonics Research Topical Meeting Held in Palm Springs, California on March 22-24, 1993. 1993 Technical Digest Series Volume 10. Conference Edition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The following symposium was held: The following topics were presented: (1) Advanced Solid State Lasers; (2) Compact Blue-Green Lasers; (3) Integrated ... Photonics Research; (4) Nonlinear Guide-Wave Optics; (5) Optical Amplifiers & Their Applications; (6) Optical Design for Photonics; (7) Photonics in

  20. Measuring the Strength of the Horned Passalus Beetle, Odontotaenius disjunctus: Revisiting an Old Topic with Modern Technology

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Andrew K.; Attarha, Barrett; Piefke, Taylor J.

    2013-01-01

    Over a century ago, a pioneering researcher cleverly devised a means to measure how much weight the horned passalus beetle, Odontotaenius disjunctus (Illiger) (Coleoptera: Passalidae), could pull using a series of springs, pulleys, and careful observation. The technology available in modern times now allows for more rigorous data collection on this topic, which could have a number of uses in scientific investigations. In this study, an apparatus was constructed using a dynamometer and a data logger in an effort to ascertain the pulling strength of this species. By allowing beetles to pull for 10 min, each beetle's mean and maximum pulling force (in Newtons) were obtained for analyses, and whether these measures are related was determined. Then, whether factors such as body length, thorax size, horn size, or gender affect either measure of strength was investigated. Basic body measurements, including horn size, of males versus females were compared. The measurements of 38 beetles (20 females, 18 males) showed there was no difference in overall body length between sexes, but females had greater girth (thorax width) than males, which could translate into larger muscle mass. A total of 21 beetles (10 females, 11 males) were tested for pulling strength. The grand mean pulling force was 0.14 N, and the grand mean maximum was 0.78 N. Despite the fact that beetles tended to pull at 20% of their maximum capacity most of the time, and that maximum force was over 5 times larger than the mean force, the 2 measures were highly correlated, suggesting they may be interchangeable for research purposes. Females had twice the pulling strength (both maximum and mean force) as males in this species overall, but when the larger thorax size of females was considered, the effect of gender was not significant. Beetle length was not a significant predictor of pulling force, but horn size was associated with maximum force. The best predictor of both measures of strength appeared to be

  1. Melasma treatment: A novel approach using a topical agent that contains an anti-estrogen and a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-04-01

    Melasma is an acquired disorder of pigmentation that presents with asymptomatic symmetric darkening of the face. The pathogenesis of this condition is multifactorial and influenced by several factors including female sex hormones, genetic predisposition and ultraviolet light exposure. The management of melasma is usually directed at more than one of the causative etiologic factors and often incorporates a combination of topical agents, with or without the addition of physical modalities. Estrogen and angiogenesis are significant factors in the etiology of melasma. A useful addition to the therapeutic armentarium for treating melasma would include a topical agent that could effect both of these causative factors. Specifically, a topical preparation consisting of an anti-estrogen and a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor would accomplish this goal. Suitable candidates that target estrogen receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor are currently used in medical oncology as systemic antineoplastic agents. The anti-estrogen could be either a selective estrogen receptor modulator (such as tamoxifen or raloxifene) or an aromatase inhibitor (such as anastrozole or letrozole or exemestane). The vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor would be bevacizumab. In conclusion, a novel-topically administered-therapy for melasma would combine an anti-estrogen and a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor.

  2. Therapeutic Effect of Topical Administration of SN50, an Inhibitor of Nuclear Factor-κB, in Treatment of Corneal Alkali Burns in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saika, Shizuya; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Osamu; Kato, Tadashi; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Flanders, Kathleen C.; Ikeda, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yuji; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Sato, Misako; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Ooshima, Akira

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of topical administration of SN50, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB, in a corneal alkali burn model in mice. An alkali burn was produced with 1 N NaOH in the cornea of C57BL/6 mice under general anesthesia. SN50 (10 μg/μl) or vehicle was topically administered daily for up to 12 days. The eyes were processed for histological or immunohistochemical examination after bromodeoxyuridine labeling or for semiquantification of cytokine mRNA. Topical SN50 suppressed nuclear factor-κB activation in local cells and reduced the incidence of epithelial defects/ulceration in healing corneas. Myofibroblast generation, macrophage invasion, activity of matrix metalloproteinases, basement membrane destruction, and expression of cytokines were all decreased in treated corneas compared with controls. To elucidate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in epithelial cell proliferation, we performed organ culture of mouse eyes with TNF-α, SN50, or an inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and examined cell proliferation in healing corneal epithelium in TNF-α−/− mice treated with SN50. An acceleration of epithelial cell proliferation by SN50 treatment was found to depend on TNF-α/JNK signaling. In conclusion, topical application of SN50 is effective in treating corneal alkali burns in mice. PMID:15855640

  3. The History of the APS Shock Compression of Condensed Matter Topical Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jerry W.

    2001-06-01

    To provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock-compressed condensed matter, a group of APS members worked within the Society to make this technical field an active part of APS. Individual papers were given at APS meetings starting in the 1950’s and then later whole sessions were organized starting at the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA where George Duvall and Dennis Hayes were co-chairs. Most all early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1985 were official APS meetings. In 1984, after consulting with a number of people in the shock wave field, Robert Graham circulated a petition to form an APS topical group. He obtained signatures from a balanced cross-section of the community. William Havens, the executive secretary of APS, informed Robert Graham by letter on November 28, 1984 that the APS Council had officially accepted the formation of this topical group at its October 28, 1984 meeting. The first election occurred July 23, 1985 where Robert Graham was elected chairman, William Nellis vice-chairman, and Jerry Forbes secretary/treasurer. The topical group remains viable today by holding a topical conference in odd numbered years and shock wave sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years A major benefit of being an official unit of APS is the allotment of APS fellows every year. The APS shock compression award established in 1987, has also provided broad recognition of many major scientific accomplishments in this field.

  4. Child Development & Behavior Topics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Child Topics Commentaries Featured Links Contact Us Child Development & Behavior Topics A B C D E F ... Seat Safety Carbon Monoxide Chewing Tobacco Child Care Child Development Milestones Child Development, What Do Grown-Ups Know ...

  5. Regulatory Information By Topic

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA develops and enforces regulations that span many environmental topics, from acid rain reduction to wetlands restoration. Each topic listed below may include related laws and regulations, compliance enforcement information, policies guidance

  6. Risk assessment of bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) exposure to topical antiparasitics used in livestock within an ecotoxicovigilance framework.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Rafael; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Camarero, Pablo R; Martínez, José M

    2015-12-01

    Between 2004 and 2013, 486 suspected scavenger poisoning cases, including 24 bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus), were investigated in the Pyrenees and surrounding areas in Spain as part of a monitoring programme regarding accidental and intentional poisoning of wildlife. Poisoning was confirmed in 36% of all analysed cases where scavenger species were found dead within the distribution range of bearded vultures. Organophosphates and carbamates were the most frequently detected poisons. Four of the bearded vulture cases were positive for the presence of topical antiparasitics (3 with diazinon and 1 with permethrin). These likely represented accidental exposure due to the legal use of these veterinary pharmaceuticals. In order to confirm the risk of exposure to topical antiparasitics in bearded vultures, pig feet (n=24) and lamb feet (n=24) were analysed as these are one of the main food resources provided to bearded vultures at supplementary feeding stations. Pig feet had no detectable residues of topical antiparasitics. In contrast, 71.4% of lamb feet showed residues of antiparasitics including diazinon (64.3%), pirimiphos-methyl (25.4%), chlorpyrifos (7.1%), fenthion (1.6%), permethrin (0.8%) and cypermethrin (27.8%). Washing the feet with water significantly reduced levels of these topical antiparasitics, as such, this should be a recommended practice for lamb feet supplied at feeding stations for bearded vultures. Although the detected levels of antiparasitics were relatively low (≤1 μg/g), a risk assessment suggests that observed diazinon levels may affect brain acetylcholinesterase and thermoregulation in bearded vultures subject to chronic exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders (report from an EBMT preceptorship meeting).

    PubMed

    Bruno, Benedetto; Auner, Holger W; Gahrton, Gösta; Garderet, Laurent; Festuccia, Moreno; Ladetto, Marco; Lemoli, Roberto M; Massaia, Massimo; Morris, Curly; Palumbo, Antonio; Schönland, Stefan; Boccadoro, Mario; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Chronic Malignancies Working Party held a preceptorship meeting in Turin, Italy on 25-26 September 2014, to discuss the role of stem cell transplantation (SCT) in the treatment of multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders. Scientists and clinicians working in the field gathered to discuss a variety of topics including the results of recent clinical trials, basic research, the concept of minimal residual disease, and immune modulation. As individual presentations revealed, important advances have occurred in our understanding of the pathophysiology of myeloma and the role that SCT, along with other forms of immunotherapy, plays in treating it. Each presentation stimulated discussion and exchange of ideas among the attendants. We decided to summarize and, importantly, to update the meeting proceedings in this review to share stimulating discussions and ideas on potentially novel treatment strategies among clinicians.

  8. Use of minipig skin biopsy model as an innovative tool to design topical formulation to achieve desired pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Amitava; Leyes, Aquiles; Manser, Kimberly; Roadcap, Brad; Mestre, Christine; Tatosian, Daniel; Jin, Lan; Uemura, Naoto

    2015-05-01

    In vitro cadaver skin permeation studies are often conducted to characterize the permeation profile of compounds for dermal delivery. However, its utility could be limited in the case of topical products because of lack of reliable prediction of in vivo skin kinetics. In this paper, the use of in vivo skin biopsy data to guide topical formulation development is described. A formulation was developed by compounding MK-0873, a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, into a commercially available cream base. The cream was characterized by skin pharmacokinetic studies in minipigs, which demonstrated that MK-0873 concentrations in the epidermis and dermis were substantially higher than the IC80 for human whole blood PDE4 inhibition of ∼200 nM, suggesting that cream should provide sufficient skin exposure to assess clinical efficacy. In toxicological studies, after 1 month repeat application in minipigs minor dermal irritation and minimal systemic exposure were observed. Based on these preclinical data, the cream formulation was chosen for single rising dose clinical studies, where plasma levels of MK-0873 were mostly below the LOQ, whereas skin biopsy concentrations ranged from 6.5 to 25.1 μM. These data suggested that minipig skin biopsy model can be a valuable tool to assess performance of topical formulations and guide formulation development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Healing pattern of experimental soft tissue lacerations after application of novel topical anesthetic agents - an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Al-Asfour, Adel; Al-Melh, Manal; Andersson, Lars; Joseph, Bobby

    2008-02-01

    Topical anesthetics based on a combination of 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine are efficient in eliminating pain from needle stick when placed on skin and oral mucosa. This suggests their application in soft tissue lacerations before suturing to enable pain-free exploration and suturing of traumatic lacerations without prior injection needle stick. The aim of the present study was to study the healing of experimental oral lacerations after topical anesthetic substances were placed in the lacerations. Thirty-six standardized incisions were made bilaterally in the lower and the upper labial mucosa of nine white New Zealand rabbits. All wounds were intentionally contaminated with saliva to simulate laceration wounds in trauma situation. EMLA cream and Oraqix thermosetting gel were applied into 30 lacerations and six lacerations were left untreated as control. In some lacerations the topical anesthetic agent was left in the wound, while in others they were rinsed off by saline before suturing the laceration wound. The rabbits were then killed after 3 days, 2 weeks and 4 weeks of healing and the lips were processed for histological evaluation. Similar normal histological healing patterns were seen in wounds in which EMLA and Oraqix were applied compared with control lacerations at all stages of healing. No adverse tissue or foreign body reactions were seen in any of the lacerations. We conclude that EMLA and Oraqix can be used in oral mucosal lacerations prior to suturing without the risk of adverse tissue reaction.

  10. Topically Delivered Adipose Derived Stem Cells Show an Activated-Fibroblast Phenotype and Enhance Granulation Tissue Formation in Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seok Jong; Xu, Wei; Leung, Kai P.; Mustoe, Thomas A.; Galiano, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are found in various tissues and can proliferate extensively in vitro. MSCs have been used in preclinical animal studies and clinical trials in many fields. Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) have several advantages compared to other MSCs for use in cell-based treatments because they are easy to isolate with relative abundance. However, quantitative approaches for wound repair using ASCs have been limited because of lack of animal models which allow for quantification. Here, we addressed the effect of topically delivered ASCs in wound repair by quantitative analysis using the rabbit ear model. We characterized rabbit ASCs, and analyzed their multipotency in comparison to bone marrow derived-MSCs (BM-MSCs) and dermal fibroblasts (DFs) in vitro. Topically delivered ASCs increased granulation tissue formation in wounds when compared to saline controls, whereas BM-MSCs or DFs did not. These studies suggest that ASCs and BM-MSCs are not identical, though they have similar surface markers. We found that topically delivered ASCs are engrafted and proliferate in the wounds. We showed that transplanted ASCs exhibited activated fibroblast phenotype, increased endothelial cell recruitment, and enhanced macrophage recruitment in vivo. PMID:23383253

  11. The Science and Engineering Talent Pool. Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of the Scientific Manpower Commission and the Engineering Manpower Commission (Washington, District of Columbia, May 15, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scientific Manpower Commission, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of a meeting which focused on topics and issues related to the pipeline for scientists and engineers are presented. They include the meeting agenda, introductory comments, an overview, summaries of five presentations, the meeting summary, and a list of participants. The overview (by Betty Vetter) outlines some ways of measuring the…

  12. The Science and Engineering Talent Pool. Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of the Scientific Manpower Commission and the Engineering Manpower Commission (Washington, District of Columbia, May 15, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scientific Manpower Commission, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of a meeting which focused on topics and issues related to the pipeline for scientists and engineers are presented. They include the meeting agenda, introductory comments, an overview, summaries of five presentations, the meeting summary, and a list of participants. The overview (by Betty Vetter) outlines some ways of measuring the…

  13. Mental Mechanisms for Topics Identification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Topics identification (TI) is the process that consists in determining the main themes present in natural language documents. The current TI modeling paradigm aims at acquiring semantic information from statistic properties of large text datasets. We investigate the mental mechanisms responsible for the identification of topics in a single document given existing knowledge. Our main hypothesis is that topics are the result of accumulated neural activation of loosely organized information stored in long-term memory (LTM). We experimentally tested our hypothesis with a computational model that simulates LTM activation. The model assumes activation decay as an unavoidable phenomenon originating from the bioelectric nature of neural systems. Since decay should negatively affect the quality of topics, the model predicts the presence of short-term memory (STM) to keep the focus of attention on a few words, with the expected outcome of restoring quality to a baseline level. Our experiments measured topics quality of over 300 documents with various decay rates and STM capacity. Our results showed that accumulated activation of loosely organized information was an effective mental computational commodity to identify topics. It was furthermore confirmed that rapid decay is detrimental to topics quality but that limited capacity STM restores quality to a baseline level, even exceeding it slightly. PMID:24744775

  14. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs.

  15. Mental mechanisms for topics identification.

    PubMed

    Massey, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Topics identification (TI) is the process that consists in determining the main themes present in natural language documents. The current TI modeling paradigm aims at acquiring semantic information from statistic properties of large text datasets. We investigate the mental mechanisms responsible for the identification of topics in a single document given existing knowledge. Our main hypothesis is that topics are the result of accumulated neural activation of loosely organized information stored in long-term memory (LTM). We experimentally tested our hypothesis with a computational model that simulates LTM activation. The model assumes activation decay as an unavoidable phenomenon originating from the bioelectric nature of neural systems. Since decay should negatively affect the quality of topics, the model predicts the presence of short-term memory (STM) to keep the focus of attention on a few words, with the expected outcome of restoring quality to a baseline level. Our experiments measured topics quality of over 300 documents with various decay rates and STM capacity. Our results showed that accumulated activation of loosely organized information was an effective mental computational commodity to identify topics. It was furthermore confirmed that rapid decay is detrimental to topics quality but that limited capacity STM restores quality to a baseline level, even exceeding it slightly.

  16. Antifungal activity of Cleome gynandra L. aerial parts for topical treatment of Tinea capitis: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Imanirampa, Lawrence; Alele, Paul E

    2016-07-08

    Cleome gynandra L. (Capparaceae) is an edible weed used in Uganda topically for its presumed antifungal activity against Tinea capitis. The goal of this study was to determine if this plant possesses antifungal activity in vitro, since T. capitis is a pervasive infection among especially rural children. Antifungal activity assay was performed by Broth dilution method, and testing done on clinical isolates of three common Tinea capitis-causing fungal strains. Evaluation of in vitro antifungal activity of the ethanol and water extracts of C. gynandra was done to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and the minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of the extracts. The MIC of C. gynandra ethanol extract ranged from 0.0313 to 0.0625 mg/ml for Trichophyton rubrum, and from 0.25 to 0.5 mg/ml for both Microsporum canis and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The MICs of C. gynandra aqueous extract ranged between 0.125 to 0.25 mg/ml for T. rubrum, and 0.25 to 0.5 mg/ml for both M. canis and T. mentagrophytes. T. rubrum was more sensitive than M. canis (p < 0.002) and more sensitive than T. mentagrophytes (p < 0.035) to the antifungal activity of C. gynandra. T. rubrum was 6.9 times (95 % CL: 1.15 - 41.6) more likely to have a better outcome (more sensitive) than T. mentagrophytes. Cleome gynandra aqueous extract had MFC of ≥0.0313 mg/ml for M. canis, ≥0.0156 mg/ml for T. mentagropyhtes, and ≥0.0625 mg/ml for T. rubrum. Cleome gynandra ethanol extract showed MFCs of ≥0.5 mg/ml for M. canis and T. mentagrophytes, and ≥0.125 mg/ml for T. rubrum. Both plant extracts demonstrated antifungal activity, shown by the MIC and MFC for the different extracts, which varied with the type of organism of the clinical fungal isolates. The ethanol extract exhibited comparable antifungal activity to the aqueous extract indicated by the MIC values seen. Conversely, after subculturing the fungal isolates, MFCs were lower for the aqueous than for the

  17. 41 CFR 102-79.15 - What objectives must an Executive agency strive to meet in providing assignment and utilization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Executive agency strive to meet in providing assignment and utilization of space services? 102-79.15 Section... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 79-ASSIGNMENT AND UTILIZATION OF SPACE Assignment and Utilization of Space § 102-79.15 What objectives must an Executive agency strive to meet in providing...

  18. 41 CFR 102-79.15 - What objectives must an Executive agency strive to meet in providing assignment and utilization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Executive agency strive to meet in providing assignment and utilization of space services? 102-79.15 Section... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 79-ASSIGNMENT AND UTILIZATION OF SPACE Assignment and Utilization of Space § 102-79.15 What objectives must an Executive agency strive to meet in providing...

  19. 41 CFR 102-79.15 - What objectives must an Executive agency strive to meet in providing assignment and utilization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Executive agency strive to meet in providing assignment and utilization of space services? 102-79.15 Section... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 79-ASSIGNMENT AND UTILIZATION OF SPACE Assignment and Utilization of Space § 102-79.15 What objectives must an Executive agency strive to meet in providing...

  20. 78 FR 57623 - Notification of an Open Meeting of the National Defense University Board of Visitors (BOV)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... compliance, organizational management, strategic planning, resource management, and other matters of interest... of the Secretary Notification of an Open Meeting of the National Defense University Board of Visitors (BOV) AGENCY: National Defense University, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The Department...

  1. Topicalization: A Stylistic Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penelope, Julia

    Although the nature of topicalization is complex and cannot be easily separated from considerations of syntactic structure and sentence focus, analysis of language usage has indicated that topicalization is more a stylistic than a syntactic process. Topicalization refers to moving a noun phrase (NP) into the initial position of a sentence.…

  2. Freshman Health Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovde, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article examines a cluster of health topics that are frequently selected by students in lower division classes. Topics address issues relating to addictive substances, including alcohol and tobacco, eating disorders, obesity, and dieting. Analysis of the topics examines their interrelationships and organization in the reference literature.…

  3. Freshman Health Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovde, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article examines a cluster of health topics that are frequently selected by students in lower division classes. Topics address issues relating to addictive substances, including alcohol and tobacco, eating disorders, obesity, and dieting. Analysis of the topics examines their interrelationships and organization in the reference literature.…

  4. Public understanding of geoscientific topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, Ute; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    Geoscientific topics and their consequences for the society are becoming more and more important for our daily life. Natural hazards such as flood and storm or the consequences of the climate change are urgent tasks and great challenges we have to tackle. Cascading natural hazards or environmental risks, can't be evaluated as single events by one scientific discipline, they rather need the expertise of different experts. The same applies for slowly progressive processes such as the climate change and its different aftereffects. More than ever politicians, decision makers, but also the public are asking for comprehensive background information and data to discuss activity options and to develop sustainable solutions. The improvement of public knowledge about science, their assets and drawbacks, chances and risks is getting crucial. To paint a comprehensive picture of different factors, correlations and dependencies the pooling of expertise is required. Thus eight research centres of the research field "Earth and Environment" of the Helmholtz-Association, Germany's largest scientific research organisation are currently building up a knowledge platform. Scientists of different disciplines will provide background information and explain their latest findings in an understandable way. Infographics, maps and animations will be applied to simplify and interpret complicated facts and findings. In addition to the web presence target group-specific products and activities will be organized. To meet the expectations of the different stakeholders an intensive dialog is aspired: round table discussions, exhibitions in museums and public places, tweeds are envisaged. In the beginning the partners will concentrate on the topics "consequences of the climate change", "pollutant dispersion" and "natural hazards/meteorological extreme events". The project is called Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP) coordinated by the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and the Helmholtz

  5. Meeting Report: The Terabase Metagenomics Workshop and the Vision of an Earth Microbiome Project

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Meyer, Folker; Antonopoulos, Dion; Balaji, Pavan; Brown, C. Titus; Brown, Christopher T.; Desai, Narayan; Eisen, Jonathan A; Evers, Dirk; Field, Dawn; Feng, Wu; Huson, Daniel; Jansson, Janet; Knight, Rob; Knight, James; Kolker, Eugene; Konstantindis, Kostas; Kostka, Joel; Kyrpides, Nikos; Mackelprang, Rachel; McHardy, Alice; Quince, Christopher; Raes, Jeroen; Sczyrba, Alexander; Shade, Ashley; Stevens, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Between July 18th and 24th 2010, 26 leading microbial ecology, computation, bioinformatics and statistics researchers came together in Snowbird, Utah (USA) to discuss the challenge of how to best characterize the microbial world using next-generation sequencing technologies. The meeting was entitled “Terabase Metagenomics” and was sponsored by the Institute for Computing in Science (ICiS) summer 2010 workshop program. The aim of the workshop was to explore the fundamental questions relating to microbial ecology that could be addressed using advances in sequencing potential. Technological advances in next-generation sequencing platforms such as the Illumina HiSeq 2000 can generate in excess of 250 billion base pairs of genetic information in 8 days. Thus, the generation of a trillion base pairs of genetic information is becoming a routine matter. The main outcome from this meeting was the birth of a concept and practical approach to exploring microbial life on earth, the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP). Here we briefly describe the highlights of this meeting and provide an overview of the EMP concept and how it can be applied to exploration of the microbiome of each ecosystem on this planet. PMID:21304727

  6. Meeting report: the terabase metagenomics workshop and the vision of an Earth microbiome project.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Meyer, Folker; Antonopoulos, Dion; Balaji, Pavan; Brown, C Titus; Brown, Christopher T; Desai, Narayan; Eisen, Jonathan A; Evers, Dirk; Field, Dawn; Feng, Wu; Huson, Daniel; Jansson, Janet; Knight, Rob; Knight, James; Kolker, Eugene; Konstantindis, Kostas; Kostka, Joel; Kyrpides, Nikos; Mackelprang, Rachel; McHardy, Alice; Quince, Christopher; Raes, Jeroen; Sczyrba, Alexander; Shade, Ashley; Stevens, Rick

    2010-12-25

    Between July 18(th) and 24(th) 2010, 26 leading microbial ecology, computation, bioinformatics and statistics researchers came together in Snowbird, Utah (USA) to discuss the challenge of how to best characterize the microbial world using next-generation sequencing technologies. The meeting was entitled "Terabase Metagenomics" and was sponsored by the Institute for Computing in Science (ICiS) summer 2010 workshop program. The aim of the workshop was to explore the fundamental questions relating to microbial ecology that could be addressed using advances in sequencing potential. Technological advances in next-generation sequencing platforms such as the Illumina HiSeq 2000 can generate in excess of 250 billion base pairs of genetic information in 8 days. Thus, the generation of a trillion base pairs of genetic information is becoming a routine matter. The main outcome from this meeting was the birth of a concept and practical approach to exploring microbial life on earth, the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP). Here we briefly describe the highlights of this meeting and provide an overview of the EMP concept and how it can be applied to exploration of the microbiome of each ecosystem on this planet.

  7. City tumour board Karachi: an innovative step in multidisciplinary consensus meeting and its two years audit.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Asghar Hussain; Abbasi, Ahmed Nadeem; Jamal, Abid; Haider, Ghulam; Rizvi, Sadia

    2013-12-01

    Management of cancer patients is a team work which usually comprises of surgeons, oncologists, radiologists, pathologists, psychiatrist, nutritionist and a nurse. Any patient who is suffering from any tumour needs a multimodality meeting as cancer treatment is not a single persons job. Most of the time, it is difficult to get the whole team together for a plan discussion due to their busy schedule. This problem was overcome by starting a tumour board meeting early morning of Sunday in Karachi which was named "City Tumour Board (CTB) Karachi". Its first meeting was held on Sunday March 28, 2010 and since then it takes place regularly fortnightly. Till March 2012, 44 sessions were conducted and total 264 cases were discussed. Here we present an audit of these two years. On average, in 60% of cases, tumour was up (36%) or down staged (12%) while in 52% of cases the stage remained unchanged. In 70% of cases (inclusive of above 60%), initial treatment plan was changed after discussion in the tumour board. This data signifies the importance of tumour board especially in a Pakistani setup where patient and even referring persons are not well aware of this disease and its outcome. It is advisable that every case should be discussed in tumour board before embarking on any treatment so that the best treatment plan can be given. It is also important that all relevant specialists should be present in the tumour board when planning for any treatment.

  8. Topically induced diphenhydramine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J F; Weisse, M E

    1990-01-01

    We report the case of a 2 1/2-year-old child who manifested acute anticholinergic toxicity after the applications of a topical calamine-antihistamine lotion. This mechanism of diphenhydramine toxicity is uncommon, with only a few other case reports noted in the literature. This case is also intriguing in that this child had an underlying varicella illness with fever that tended to obscure the picture. This report describes the characteristic history and physical examination pertinent to anticholinergic toxicity, varicella complication considerations, and case management.

  9. 78 FR 31626 - Notice of Public Meeting of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... and direction of PEPFAR evaluation and research, the content of national and international strategies... response. Topics for the meeting will include an update on PEPFAR-funded combination prevention studies and...

  10. IFPA meeting 2015 workshop report I: placental mitochondrial function, transport systems and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Bianco-Miotto, T; Blundell, C; Buckberry, S; Chamley, L; Chong, S; Cottrell, E; Dawson, P; Hanna, C; Holland, O; Lewis, R M; Moritz, K; Myatt, L; Perkins, A V; Powell, T; Saffery, R; Sferruzzi-Perri, A; Sibley, C; Simmons, D; O'Tierney-Ginn, P F

    2016-12-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2015 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops covered areas of placental regulation and nutrient handling: 1) placental epigenetics; 2) placental mitochondrial function; 3) placental transport systems.

  11. IFPA meeting 2016 workshop report I: Genomic communication, bioinformatics, trophoblast biology and transport systems.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Christiane; Baker, Julie C; Blundell, Cassidy; Chavez, Shawn L; Carbone, Lucia; Chamley, Larry; Hannibal, Roberta L; Illsley, Nick; Kurre, Peter; Laurent, Louise C; McKenzie, Charles; Morales-Prieto, Diana; Pantham, Priyadarshini; Paquette, Alison; Powell, Katie; Price, Nathan; Rao, Balaji M; Sadovsky, Yoel; Salomon, Carlos; Tuteja, Geetu; Wilson, Samantha; O'Tierney-Ginn, P F

    2017-01-11

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2016 there were twelve themed workshops, four of which are summarized in this report. These workshops covered innovative technologies applied to new and traditional areas of placental research: 1) genomic communication; 2) bioinformatics; 3) trophoblast biology and pathology; 4) placental transport systems.

  12. 78 FR 21911 - Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... notice sets forth the schedule and proposed agenda of a meeting of the Environmental Technologies Trade... available within 30 days of this meeting. Topics To Be Considered The agenda for this meeting will...

  13. 78 FR 46921 - Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... notice sets forth the schedule and proposed agenda of a meeting of the Environmental Technologies Trade... available within 30 days of this meeting. Topics to be considered: The agenda for this meeting will...

  14. 2015 RAD Fall Partner Meeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This meeting covered the following discussion topics: 2014 RAD partner achievements and trends, national and international efforts to address HFCs, enhancing RAD partner recognition, and communicating the benefits of RAD.

  15. 78 FR 6306 - Sunshine Act Meeting-Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting--Closed Meeting The following notice of a closed meeting is published... HOLDING THE MEETING: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. TIME AND DATE: February 4, 2013 at 12:00 p.m... meeting changes, an announcement of the change, along with the new time and place of the meeting will be...

  16. 78 FR 2961 - Sunshine Act Meeting-Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting--Closed Meeting The following notice of a closed meeting is published... HOLDING THE MEETING: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. TIME AND DATE: January 14, 2013 at 10:00 a.m... meeting changes, an announcement of the change, along with the new time and place of the meeting will be...

  17. Pharmacokinetic Profile, Safety, and Tolerability of Crisaborole Topical Ointment, 2% in Adolescents with Atopic Dermatitis: An Open-Label Phase 2a Study.

    PubMed

    Tom, Wynnis L; Van Syoc, Merrie; Chanda, Sanjay; Zane, Lee T

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) is an emerging target in treating inflammatory skin diseases. Crisaborole topical ointment, 2% is a novel, boron-based, topical PDE4 inhibitor under investigation for treatment of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis (AD). Adolescent patients aged 12 to 17 years with treatable AD lesions involving ≥ 10% to ≤ 35% body surface area (BSA) were enrolled into a phase 2a, open-label study comprising pharmacokinetic (PK), safety, tolerability, and efficacy assessments. Crisaborole topical ointment, 2% was applied twice daily to affected areas for 28 days, with dosage based on baseline treatable BSA. PK blood samples were collected on days 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 9. Safety assessments included adverse events (AEs), laboratory parameters, and vital signs. Efficacy assessments included the Investigator's Static Global Assessment (ISGA) score and severity of AD signs and symptoms. Twenty-three patients were enrolled; 22 completed the study (1 patient discontinued due to an AE [application site dermatitis]). PK analysis demonstrated limited exposure to crisaborole topical ointment, 2% after 8 days of dosing. Ten patients reported a total of 19 AEs, most commonly application site pain and nasopharyngitis (3 patients each). There were no clinically meaningful changes in laboratory or vital sign parameters. Efficacy was demonstrated by reductions in mean ISGA and AD sign and symptom severity scores. At day 29, eight patients (35%) had achieved an ISGA score ≤ 1 with ≥ 2-grade improvement. Mean treatable BSA declined from 17.6% to 8.2%. These results provide preliminary evidence for the limited systemic exposure, safety, and effectiveness of crisaborole topical ointment, 2% in adolescents with mild to moderate AD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Development of an Educational Continuum to Meet Agricultural Workforce Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, Sarah; Rubenstein, Eric; Thoron, Andrew; Hanlon, Edward

    2012-02-07

    The poster explains the basic issues of a development of an educational continuum to meet agricultural workforce needs of Hendry County. The community needs include primarily jobs within the community, training of local biofuels workforce, education for profession-bound students, services for biofuels entrepreneurs, private farming system alternatives and an improvement of overall education system. These needs are to be met in Hendry County on various levels by its secondary education institutions, Edison State College and University of Florida. Each of these parties has a specific role in the overall education and training process, while the outcome of each is a local educated and trained workforce.

  19. Discrepancies between parent and adolescent beliefs about daily life topics and performance on an emotion recognition task.

    PubMed

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Lerner, Matthew D; Thomas, Sarah A; Daruwala, Samantha; Goepel, Katherine

    2013-08-01

    Parents and children and adolescents commonly disagree in their perceptions of a variety of behaviors, including the family relationship and environment, and child and adolescent psychopathology. To this end, numerous studies have examined to what extent increased discrepant perceptions-particularly with regard to perceptions of the family relationship and environment-predict increased child and adolescent psychopathology. Parents' and children and adolescents' abilities to decode and identify others' emotions (i.e., emotion recognition) may play a role in the link between discrepant perceptions and child and adolescent psychopathology. We examined parents' and adolescents' emotion recognition abilities in relation to discrepancies between parent and adolescent perceptions of daily life topics. In a sample of 50 parents and adolescents ages 14-to-17 years (M = 15.4 years, 20 males, 54 % African-American), parents and adolescents were each administered a widely used performance-based measure of emotion recognition. Parents and adolescents were also administered a structured interview designed to directly assess each of their perceptions of the extent to which discrepancies existed in their beliefs about daily life topics (e.g., whether adolescents should complete their homework and carry out household chores). Interestingly, lower parent and adolescent emotion recognition performance significantly related to greater parent and adolescent perceived discrepant beliefs about daily life topics. We observed this relation whilst accounting for adolescent age and gender and levels of parent-adolescent conflict. These findings have important implications for understanding and using informant discrepancies in both basic developmental psychopathology research and applied research in clinic settings (e.g., discrepant views on therapeutic goals).

  20. Discrepancies between Parent and Adolescent Beliefs about Daily Life Topics and Performance on an Emotion Recognition Task

    PubMed Central

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Lerner, Matthew D.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Daruwala, Samantha; Goepel, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Parents and children and adolescents commonly disagree in their perceptions of a variety of behaviors, including the family relationship and environment, and child and adolescent psychopathology. To this end, numerous studies have examined to what extent increased discrepant perceptions—particularly with regard to perceptions of the family relationship and environment—predict increased child and adolescent psychopathology. Parents’ and children and adolescents’ abilities to decode and identify others’ emotions (i.e., emotion recognition) may play a role in the link between discrepant perceptions and child and adolescent psychopathology. We examined parents’ and adolescents’ emotion recognition abilities in relation to discrepancies between parent and adolescent perceptions of daily life topics. In a sample of 50 parents and adolescents ages 14-to-17 years (M = 15.4 years, 20 males, 54% African-American), parents and adolescents were each administered a widely used performance-based measure of emotion recognition. Parents and adolescents were also administered a structured interview designed to directly assess each of their perceptions of the extent to which discrepancies existed in their beliefs about daily life topics (e.g., whether adolescents should complete their homework and carry out household chores). Interestingly, lower parent and adolescent emotion recognition performance significantly related to greater parent and adolescent perceived discrepant beliefs about daily life topics. We observed this relation whilst accounting for adolescent age and gender and levels of parent-adolescent conflict. These findings have important implications for understanding and using informant discrepancies in both basic developmental psychopathology research and applied research in clinic settings (e.g., discrepant views on therapeutic goals). PMID:23504303

  1. Herpes simplex virus keratitis: an update of the pathogenesis and current treatment with oral and topical antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Tsatsos, Michael; MacGregor, Cheryl; Athanasiadis, Ioannis; Moschos, Marilita M; Hossain, Parwez; Anderson, David

    2016-12-01

    Ophthalmic herpes simplex viral keratitis is responsible for a range of ocular manifestations from superficial epithelial disease to stromal keratitis and endotheliitis. The Herpetic Eye Disease Study has guided the management of herpetic eye disease for almost twenty years, but newer medications such as valacyclovir are now available and are considered to have better bioavailability than acyclovir. In this review, we examine the existing evidence on the pathogenesis of different ophthalmic herpes simplex viral keratitis disease modalities and the role of oral and topically administered antiviral drugs in the treatment of herpes simplex viral keratitis.

  2. Expert Meeting Report. Energy Savings You Can Bank On

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Mark; Springer, Jeremy; Smith, Pepper; Porse, Erik

    2013-02-01

    In October 2011, ARBI organized and conducted an Experts’ Meeting on the topic of performance guarantees and financing vehicles for Energy Efficiency Upgrades. The meeting brought together technical, policy, and financial experts, including researchers, experienced installation contractors, and innovative energy business leaders, in order to discuss the opportunities and challenges for the energy efficiency upgrade industry to increase market uptake of Home Energy Upgrades (HEUs) through innovative offerings, such as performance guarantees.

  3. The topical treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    van de Kerkhof, P C M; Vissers, W H P M

    2003-01-01

    According to the patients, improvement of efficacy, long-term safety and improvement of compliance are needed. The topical treatment has been innovated during the last decade. Most important are the introduction of two new classes of treatments: topical vitamin D(3) analogues and the retinoid tazarotene. To what extent, however, have we achieved developments which are in line with the needs as expressed by the patients? Improved efficacy has been realized by successful combinations of topical treatments. In particular, the combinations of dithranol, vitamin D(3) and tazarotene with a topical corticosteroid proved to be very effective with a reduced profile of side-effects. The efficacy of vitamin D(3) analogues and tazarotene is such that the efficacy of a potent corticosteroid (betamethasone-17-valerate) is approached; calcipotriol even showed an efficacy which is at least as good as this corticosteroid. The long-term safety of new compounds has been evaluated for at least 12 months in large studies. Remarkably for corticosteroids such information is available for only 12 weeks. However, intermittent applications of a topical corticosteroid in combination with another topical treatment provide an effective and safe long-term control of psoriasis. Compliance is a conditio sine qua non for an effective topical treatment. Important progress has been made to increase compliance. Short-contact dithranol has been popularized as an ambulatory treatment which is a highly effective approach as a care instruction programme. Formulations which are better from a cosmetical point of view have been developed for various topical treatments. Reduction of the frequency of applications proved to be possible for most treatments. Once daily applications for corticosteroids, vitamin D(3) analogues and retinoids have been developed, and intermittent applications, a few times per week, are possible for corticosteroids, which proved to be very effective with a reduced profile of side

  4. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - part 1: Achillea millefolium-Curcuma longa.

    PubMed

    Calapai, Gioacchino; Miroddi, Marco; Minciullo, Paola L; Caputi, Achille P; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph has been produced. Part 1: Achillea millefolium L.-Curcuma longa L. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. It's Elementary: Special Topics in Elementary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Patricia A., Ed.; Burriss, Kathleen Glascott, Ed.

    As elementary teachers work to educate and meet the needs of the students in their care, their job has become increasingly challenging and demanding. This volume addresses a variety of issues and topics related to elementary education around eight sectional themes relevant to the work of elementary teachers: celebrating diversity, classroom…

  6. It's Elementary: Special Topics in Elementary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Patricia A., Ed.; Burriss, Kathleen Glascott, Ed.

    As elementary teachers work to educate and meet the needs of the students in their care, their job has become increasingly challenging and demanding. This volume addresses a variety of issues and topics related to elementary education around eight sectional themes relevant to the work of elementary teachers: celebrating diversity, classroom…

  7. A Topical Trajectory on Survival: an Analysis of Link-Making in a Sequence of Lessons on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocksén, Miranda; Olander, Clas

    2017-04-01

    This study explores the concept of link-making in relation to communicative strategies applied in the teaching and studying of biological evolution. The analysis focused on video recordings of 11 lessons on biological evolution conducted in a Swedish 9th grade class of students aged 15 years. It reveals how the teacher and students connected classroom conversations, the frequency of references to conversations in whole-class settings, and the development of a theme focusing on species survival and extinction. Detailed examples from the data illustrate how this theme developed from its initiation during the first lesson, through discussion and clarification, to its wrapping up during the last lesson. They further illustrate how students made sense of what the teacher said and wrote, and how the teacher postponed issues, explained and developed topics, provided opportunities for link-making, organised the class, motivated students, and checked their understanding. The study's methodological approach offers a way of including several time dimensions within research. Based on our findings, we conclude that the excerpts examined here did succeed in building `islands of coherence' in the co-construction of curricular content. Moreover, the topical trajectory in relation to species survival provided opportunities for constructing a `scientific story' in the classroom.

  8. An 18-month follow-up study after randomized treatment of phimosis in boys with topical steroid versus placebo.

    PubMed

    Lund, L; Wai, K H; Mui, L M; Yeung, C K

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment of phimosis using topical steroid. This was a follow-up study after a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. A total of 137 boys with phimosis were randomly assigned to either betamethasone treatment or placebo for 4 weeks, with application of the cream twice daily. Non-responders to treatment were offered steroid treatment for a further 4 weeks. All patients were invited to a follow-up examination after 18 months. The mean pre-treatment phimosis grades in the steroid and control groups were 5.08+/-0.66 and 4.97+/-0.70, respectively. At the 4-week follow-up, 49 boys (74%) in the steroid group were cured, compared to only 31 (44%) in the control group. Fourteen boys were circumcised after another 4 weeks of treatment; 43 of the remaining 57 boys (17 in the steroid group; 40 in the control group) had been cured. After a total of 92 boys took part in the 18-month follow-up study: 79 had been cured and 13 had suffered a relapse. Twenty-six patients did not took part in the follow-up investigation. No side-effects were noted. When treatment is necessary for phimosis, we recommend application of topical steroid as first-line treatment because surgery can then be avoided in 85% of cases. This first randomized, double-blind, follow-up study shows that the treatment effect persists for at least 18 months.

  9. A Topical Trajectory on Survival: an Analysis of Link-Making in a Sequence of Lessons on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocksén, Miranda; Olander, Clas

    2016-04-01

    This study explores the concept of link-making in relation to communicative strategies applied in the teaching and studying of biological evolution. The analysis focused on video recordings of 11 lessons on biological evolution conducted in a Swedish 9th grade class of students aged 15 years. It reveals how the teacher and students connected classroom conversations, the frequency of references to conversations in whole-class settings, and the development of a theme focusing on species survival and extinction. Detailed examples from the data illustrate how this theme developed from its initiation during the first lesson, through discussion and clarification, to its wrapping up during the last lesson. They further illustrate how students made sense of what the teacher said and wrote, and how the teacher postponed issues, explained and developed topics, provided opportunities for link-making, organised the class, motivated students, and checked their understanding. The study's methodological approach offers a way of including several time dimensions within research. Based on our findings, we conclude that the excerpts examined here did succeed in building `islands of coherence' in the co-construction of curricular content. Moreover, the topical trajectory in relation to species survival provided opportunities for constructing a `scientific story' in the classroom.

  10. Dissociating Effects of Scrambling and Topicalization within the Left Frontal and Temporal Language Areas: An fMRI Study in Kaqchikel Maya

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinri; Koizumi, Masatoshi; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L.

    2017-01-01

    Some natural languages grammatically allow different types of changing word orders, such as object scrambling and topicalization. Scrambling and topicalization are more related to syntax and semantics/phonology, respectively. Here we hypothesized that scrambling should activate the left frontal regions, while topicalization would affect the bilateral temporal regions. To examine such distinct effects in our functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we targeted the Kaqchikel Maya language, a Mayan language spoken in Guatemala. In Kaqchikel, the syntactically canonical word order is verb-object-subject (VOS), but at least three non-canonical word orders (i.e., SVO, VSO, and OVS) are also grammatically allowed. We used a sentence-picture matching task, in which the participants listened to a short Kaqchikel sentence and judged whether a picture matched the meaning of the sentence. The advantage of applying this experimental paradigm to an understudied language such as Kaqchikel is that it will allow us to validate the universality of linguistic computation in the brain. We found that the conditions with scrambled sentences [+scrambling] elicited significant activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus and lateral premotor cortex, both of which have been proposed as grammar centers, indicating the effects of syntactic loads. In contrast, the conditions without topicalization [-topicalization] resulted in significant activation in bilateral Heschl’s gyrus and superior temporal gyrus, demonstrating that the syntactic and phonological processes were clearly dissociated within the language areas. Moreover, the pre-supplementary motor area and left superior/middle temporal gyri were activated under relatively demanding conditions, suggesting their supportive roles in syntactic or semantic processing. To exclude any semantic/phonological effects of the object-subject word orders, we performed direct comparisons while making the factor of topicalization constant, and

  11. Dissociating Effects of Scrambling and Topicalization within the Left Frontal and Temporal Language Areas: An fMRI Study in Kaqchikel Maya.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shinri; Koizumi, Masatoshi; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L

    2017-01-01

    Some natural languages grammatically allow different types of changing word orders, such as object scrambling and topicalization. Scrambling and topicalization are more related to syntax and semantics/phonology, respectively. Here we hypothesized that scrambling should activate the left frontal regions, while topicalization would affect the bilateral temporal regions. To examine such distinct effects in our functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we targeted the Kaqchikel Maya language, a Mayan language spoken in Guatemala. In Kaqchikel, the syntactically canonical word order is verb-object-subject (VOS), but at least three non-canonical word orders (i.e., SVO, VSO, and OVS) are also grammatically allowed. We used a sentence-picture matching task, in which the participants listened to a short Kaqchikel sentence and judged whether a picture matched the meaning of the sentence. The advantage of applying this experimental paradigm to an understudied language such as Kaqchikel is that it will allow us to validate the universality of linguistic computation in the brain. We found that the conditions with scrambled sentences [+scrambling] elicited significant activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus and lateral premotor cortex, both of which have been proposed as grammar centers, indicating the effects of syntactic loads. In contrast, the conditions without topicalization [-topicalization] resulted in significant activation in bilateral Heschl's gyrus and superior temporal gyrus, demonstrating that the syntactic and phonological processes were clearly dissociated within the language areas. Moreover, the pre-supplementary motor area and left superior/middle temporal gyri were activated under relatively demanding conditions, suggesting their supportive roles in syntactic or semantic processing. To exclude any semantic/phonological effects of the object-subject word orders, we performed direct comparisons while making the factor of topicalization constant, and

  12. An Evaluation of the Educational Effectiveness of a Relational Course Compared to Single Topic Courses Offered by the Management Department of the United States Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    Academy and courses offered at civilian business schools . However, because the goals of an organization drive methods used to attain them, one must first...Educational Research Journal. 10, 253-262 (1973). Mason, Julie Cohen. " Business Schools : Striving To Meet Customer Demand," Management Review. 81(9). 10-14

  13. Full text publication rates of studies presented at an international emergency medicine scientific meeting.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jannet W M; Graham, Colin A

    2011-09-01

    The publication rate of full text papers following an abstract presentation at a medical conference is variable, and few studies have examined the situation with respect to international emergency medicine conferences. This retrospective study aimed to identify the publication rate of abstracts presented at the 2006 International Conference on Emergency Medicine (ICEM) held in Halifax, Canada. The full text publication rate was 33.2%, similar to previous emergency medicine meetings. English language barriers may play a role in the low publication rate seen.

  14. Multi-disciplinary team meetings in stroke rehabilitation: an observation study and conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Tyson, S F; Burton, L; McGovern, A

    2014-12-01

    To explore how multi-disciplinary team meetings operate in stroke rehabilitation. Non-participant observation of multi-disciplinary team meetings and semi-structured interviews with attending staff. Twelve meetings were observed (at least one at each site) and 18 staff (one psychologist, one social worker; four nurses; four physiotherapists four occupational therapists, two speech and language therapists, one stroke co-ordinator and one stroke ward manager) were interviewed in eight in-patient stroke rehabilitation units. Multi-disciplinary team meetings in stroke rehabilitation were complex, demanding and highly varied. A model emerged which identified the main inputs to influence conduct of the meetings were personal contributions of the members and structure and format of the meetings. These were mediated by the team climate and leadership skills of the chair. The desired outputs; clinical decisions and the attributes of apparently effective meetings were identified by the staff. A notable difference between the meetings that staff considered effective and those that were not, was their structure and format. Successful meetings tended to feature a set agenda, structured documentation; formal use of measurement tools; pre-meeting preparation and skilled chairing. These features were often absent in meetings perceived to be ineffective. The main features of operation of multi-disciplinary team meetings have been identified which will enable assessment tools and interventions to improve effectiveness to be developed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Hierarchical Theme and Topic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jen-Tzung

    2016-03-01

    Considering the hierarchical data groupings in text corpus, e.g., words, sentences, and documents, we conduct the structural learning and infer the latent themes and topics for sentences and words from a collection of documents, respectively. The relation between themes and topics under different data groupings is explored through an unsupervised procedure without limiting the number of clusters. A tree stick-breaking process is presented to draw theme proportions for different sentences. We build a hierarchical theme and topic model, which flexibly represents the heterogeneous documents using Bayesian nonparametrics. Thematic sentences and topical words are extracted. In the experiments, the proposed method is evaluated to be effective to build semantic tree structure for sentences and the corresponding words. The superiority of using tree model for selection of expressive sentences for document summarization is illustrated.

  16. An Advance Directive Redesigned to Meet the Literacy Level of Most Adults: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sudore, Rebecca L.; Seth Landefeld, C.; Barnes, Deborah E.; Lindquist, Karla; Williams, Brie A.; Brody, Robert; Schillinger, Dean

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an advance directive redesigned to meet most adults’ literacy needs (5th grade reading level with graphics) was more useful for advance care planning than a standard form (>12th grade level). Methods We enrolled 205 English and Spanish-speaking patients, aged ≥ 50 years from an urban, general medicine clinic. We randomized participants to review either form. Main outcomes included acceptability and usefulness in advance care planning. Participants then reviewed the alternate form; we assessed form preference and six-month completion rates. Results 40% of enrolled participants had limited literacy. Compared to the standard form, the redesigned form was rated higher for acceptability and usefulness in care planning, P≤0.03, particularly for limited literacy participants (P for interaction ≤ 0.07). The redesigned form was preferred by 73% of participants. More participants randomized to the redesigned form completed an advance directive at six months (19% vs. 8%, P=0.03); of these, 95% completed the redesigned form. Conclusions The redesigned advance directive was rated more acceptable and useful for advance care planning and was preferred over a standard form. It also resulted in higher six month completion rates. Practice Implications An advance directive redesigned to meet most adults’ literacy needs may better enable patients to engage in advance care planning. PMID:17942272

  17. Eigenspace-based fuzzy c-means for sensing trending topics in Twitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muliawati, T.; Murfi, H.

    2017-07-01

    As the information and communication technology are developed, the fulfillment of information can be obtained through social media, like Twitter. The enormous number of internet users has triggered fast and large data flow, thus making the manual analysis is difficult or even impossible. An automated methods for data analysis is needed, one of which is the topic detection and tracking. An alternative method other than latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) is a soft clustering approach using Fuzzy C-Means (FCM). FCM meets the assumption that a document may consist of several topics. However, FCM works well in low-dimensional data but fails in high-dimensional data. Therefore, we propose an approach where FCM works on low-dimensional data by reducing the data using singular value decomposition (SVD). Our simulations show that this approach gives better accuracies in term of topic recall than LDA for sensing trending topic in Twitter about an event.

  18. Public Lectures and Exhibits: Outreach Activities at the 2013 Meeting of the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Hernández-Terrones, Laura; Pérez-Cruz, Ligia

    2013-09-01

    The 2013 Joint Assembly Meeting of the Americas (MOA), held 14-17 May in Cancun, Mexico, included an outreach program with public lectures, exhibits, and a planetarium dome show, all held in parallel to the sessions, plenary presentations, town halls, and other events. The outreach activities run by enthusiastic volunteers attracted local students, the public, and meeting attendees. The meeting was sponsored by 14 societies across the Americas, and the scientific program encompassed topics in all areas of Earth and space sciences.

  19. Topical gene silencing by iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide-dendrimer nanocomplex: the proof of concept in a skin cancer mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuganti, , Venkata Vamsi K.; Saraswathy, Manju; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Perumal, Omathanu P.

    2015-02-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex reduced the tumor volume by 45% and was consistent with the reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels. The iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex caused significant apoptosis in skin tumor. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that dendrimers are promising nanocarriers for developing topical gene silencing approaches for skin diseases.The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex

  20. Topics and Terms in Environmental Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holum, John R.

    This reference is an expanded glossary of topics and terms currently related to environmental problems. These topics and terms are associated with energy, air pollution, water pollution, wastes, and pesticides. Included are 239 main entries ranging from acaricide to weathering. Each entry briefly describes the topic or term and often presents a…