Science.gov

Sample records for ans topical meeting

  1. Proceedings of the 2007 ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization - DD and R 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization (DD and R 2007), 'Capturing Decommissioning Lessons Learned', is sponsored by the ANS Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization; Environmental Sciences; and Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Divisions. This meeting provides a forum for an international exchange of technical knowledge and project management experience gained from the ongoing process of decommissioning nuclear facilities. Of particular note is the number of projects that are approaching completion. This document gathers 113 presentations given at this meeting.

  2. Topical antifungal-corticosteroid combination therapy for the treatment of superficial mycoses: conclusions of an expert panel meeting.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Martin; Friedrich, Markus; Papini, Manuela; Pujol, Ramon M; Veraldi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Superficial fungal infections affect 20-25% of people worldwide and can cause considerable morbidity, particularly if an inflammatory component is present. As superficial fungal infections can be diverse, the treatment should be tailored to the individual needs of the patient and several factors should be taken into account when deciding on the most appropriate treatment option. These include the type, location and surface area of the infection, patient age, degree of inflammation and underlying comorbidities. Although several meta-analyses have shown that there are no significant differences between the numerous available topical antifungal agents with regard to mycological cure, agents differ in their specific intrinsic properties, which can affect their clinical use. The addition of a corticosteroid to an antifungal agent at the initiation of treatment can attenuate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection and is thought to increase patient compliance, reduce the risk of bacterial superinfection and enhance the efficacy of the antifungal agent. However, incorrect use of antifungal-corticosteroid therapy may be associated with treatment failure and adverse effects. This review summarises available treatment options for superficial fungal infections and provides general treatment recommendations based on the consensus outcomes of an Expert Panel meeting on the topical treatment of superficial mycoses. PMID:26916648

  3. Topical antifungal-corticosteroid combination therapy for the treatment of superficial mycoses: conclusions of an expert panel meeting.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Martin; Friedrich, Markus; Papini, Manuela; Pujol, Ramon M; Veraldi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Superficial fungal infections affect 20-25% of people worldwide and can cause considerable morbidity, particularly if an inflammatory component is present. As superficial fungal infections can be diverse, the treatment should be tailored to the individual needs of the patient and several factors should be taken into account when deciding on the most appropriate treatment option. These include the type, location and surface area of the infection, patient age, degree of inflammation and underlying comorbidities. Although several meta-analyses have shown that there are no significant differences between the numerous available topical antifungal agents with regard to mycological cure, agents differ in their specific intrinsic properties, which can affect their clinical use. The addition of a corticosteroid to an antifungal agent at the initiation of treatment can attenuate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection and is thought to increase patient compliance, reduce the risk of bacterial superinfection and enhance the efficacy of the antifungal agent. However, incorrect use of antifungal-corticosteroid therapy may be associated with treatment failure and adverse effects. This review summarises available treatment options for superficial fungal infections and provides general treatment recommendations based on the consensus outcomes of an Expert Panel meeting on the topical treatment of superficial mycoses.

  4. Meeting communication needs: topics of talk in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristine Nordlie; Ilten, Teresa Buchhorn; Bower, Helen

    2005-07-01

    Nursing home residents primarily rely on staff for communication and interpersonal relationships. Challenged by staffing shortages and increasingly complex care, staff who provide the most communication with residents lack awareness and skills to effectively communicate with older adults. This study, a secondary analysis of staff-resident interactions from one nursing home, explores communication topics and the effects of an intervention. Staff from one unit were recorded during 2 hours of caregiving to provide a representative sample of their communication with residents. Staff then attended an educational program targeting improved awareness of communication needs and reducing "elderspeak". Recording was repeated post-intervention. Baseline conversations focused on activities of daily living (ADLs), personal-social, technical care, and health assessment. Post-intervention ADL talk decreased in staff-resident interactions, while personal-social topics increased. These findings suggest that residents' limited opportunities for communication with staff are primarily focused on care tasks. With increased communication awareness, staff can learn to modify conversational topics to better meet older adults' psychosocial needs.

  5. 1st meeting on topical drug delivery to the nail.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2007-07-01

    The first ever symposium dedicated solely to drug delivery to the nail following topical application was held on the 2nd April 2007, in London, UK, organised by Dr Clive Roper (Charles River Laboratories, Scotland) and Dr Sudaxshina Murdan (School of Pharmacy, University of London, UK), under the auspices of Skin Forum. The 1-day meeting was attended by approximately 35 delegates from industry, academia and hospitals, and provided a much-needed forum for the presentation and discussion of research and problems in this emerging field. Topical drug delivery is especially suitable for onychomycosis (fungal infections of the nail plate and/or nail bed) and nail psoriasis, which affect 2 - 13 and 1 - 3% of the general population, respectively, and make up the bulk of nail disorders. Topical therapy would avoid the adverse events and drug interactions of systemic antifungal agents and the pain of injection when antipsoriatic agents are injected into affected nail folds. However, successful topical therapy is extremely challenging due to the very low permeability of the nail plate. Five speakers spoke about various aspects of topical drug delivery to the nail, including review of the nail plate structure, function, diseases, their existing therapies (systemic and topical), limitations and global sales. The need for effective topical drug delivery to the nail to overcome the problems associated with present treatment, and the fact that there are few topical formulations available for the treatment of nail fungal infections and psoriasis, and the even fewer effective formulations, was highlighted. PMID:17683257

  6. 1st meeting on topical drug delivery to the nail.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2007-07-01

    The first ever symposium dedicated solely to drug delivery to the nail following topical application was held on the 2nd April 2007, in London, UK, organised by Dr Clive Roper (Charles River Laboratories, Scotland) and Dr Sudaxshina Murdan (School of Pharmacy, University of London, UK), under the auspices of Skin Forum. The 1-day meeting was attended by approximately 35 delegates from industry, academia and hospitals, and provided a much-needed forum for the presentation and discussion of research and problems in this emerging field. Topical drug delivery is especially suitable for onychomycosis (fungal infections of the nail plate and/or nail bed) and nail psoriasis, which affect 2 - 13 and 1 - 3% of the general population, respectively, and make up the bulk of nail disorders. Topical therapy would avoid the adverse events and drug interactions of systemic antifungal agents and the pain of injection when antipsoriatic agents are injected into affected nail folds. However, successful topical therapy is extremely challenging due to the very low permeability of the nail plate. Five speakers spoke about various aspects of topical drug delivery to the nail, including review of the nail plate structure, function, diseases, their existing therapies (systemic and topical), limitations and global sales. The need for effective topical drug delivery to the nail to overcome the problems associated with present treatment, and the fact that there are few topical formulations available for the treatment of nail fungal infections and psoriasis, and the even fewer effective formulations, was highlighted.

  7. Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings (OIC'2001): manufacturing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, J. A.; Browning, Stephen; Jacobson, Michael; Nadal, Maria

    2002-06-01

    Measurements are presented of the experimental filters submitted to the first optical thin-film manufacturing problem posed in conjunction with the Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings, in which the object was to produce multilayers with spectral transmittance and reflectance curves that were as close as possible to the target values that were specified in the 400- to 600-nm spectral region. No limit was set on the overall thickness of the solutions or the number of layers used in their construction. The participants were free to use the coating materials of their choice. Six different groups submitted a total of 11 different filters for evaluation. Three different physical vapor deposition processes were used for the manufacture of the coatings: magnetron sputtering, ion-beam sputtering, and plasma-ion-assisted, electron-beam gun evaporation. The solutions ranged in metric thickness from 758 to 4226 nm and consisted of between 8 and 27 layers. For all but two of the samples submitted, the average rms departure of the measured transmittances and reflectances from the target values in the spectral region of interest was between 0.98% and 1.55%.

  8. Fifth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-04-01

    s are presented of the approximately 250 papers that were presented at the conference. Some of the main topics included the following: (1) next generation devices, (2) tritium, (3) hybrids, (4) alternate fuels, (5) materials engineering, (6) blanket and first wall engineering, and (7) inertial confinement.

  9. Research on Estrogen and Behavior Is a 'Hot Topic' at the 2011 Society for Neuroscience Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Anat Biegon

    2011-11-14

    The Society for Neuroscience has selected recent research on estrogen and its effect on behavior conducted at BNL for its "hot topics" book distributed to reporters attending the society's 2011 meeting in Washington, D.C., November 12-16.

  10. Research on Estrogen and Behavior Is a 'Hot Topic' at the 2011 Society for Neuroscience Meeting

    ScienceCinema

    Anat Biegon

    2016-07-12

    The Society for Neuroscience has selected recent research on estrogen and its effect on behavior conducted at BNL for its "hot topics" book distributed to reporters attending the society's 2011 meeting in Washington, D.C., November 12-16.

  11. US Support Program Topical Meetings 1999 to 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper,S.

    2008-06-10

    In 1999, the International Safeguards Project Office began organizing topical workshops to explore technical issues facing the International Atomic Energy Agency's Department of Safeguards. Representatives from IAEA member states including the United States, national laboratories and companies were invited to the workshops to discuss the technical issues. In some cases professional facilitators were hired to lead the discussions and in some cases business gaming techniques were employed. Since 1999, the following topics have been addressed Data Communication Technologies (1999), Information Security (2000), Design and Testing for High Reliability (2001), Standardization and Integration of Unattended and Remote Monitoring Systems (2002), Roadmapping: Surveillance (2003), IAEA Seals Technology Roadmapping Workshop (2004), Turning Information Into Knowledge (2004), Safeguards Tools of the Future (2005), and Advanced Sensors for Safeguards (2007). This paper will review the scope of the workshops and summarize their results.

  12. SETAC Focused Topic Meeting on endocrine-disrupting chemicals: Overview and outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    A SETAC North America Focused Topic Meeting (FTM), “Endocrine Disruption: Chemical testing, Risk Assessment Approaches and Implications”, was held 4-6 February, 2014 at the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) conference facility in Research Triangle Park, NC. The meeting,...

  13. Topical and peripheral ketamine as an analgesic.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, Jana

    2014-07-01

    Ketamine, in subanesthetic doses, produces systemic analgesia in chronic pain settings, an action largely attributed to block of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the spinal cord and inhibition of central sensitization processes. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors also are located peripherally on sensory afferent nerve endings, and this provided the initial impetus for exploring peripheral applications of ketamine. Ketamine also produces several other pharmacological actions (block of ion channels and receptors, modulation of transporters, anti-inflammatory effects), and while these may require higher concentrations, after topical (e.g., as gels, creams) and peripheral application (e.g., localized injections), local tissue concentrations are higher than those after systemic administration and can engage lower affinity mechanisms. Peripheral administration of ketamine by localized injection produced some alterations in sensory thresholds in experimental trials in volunteers and in complex regional pain syndrome subjects in experimental settings, but many variables were unaltered. There are several case reports of analgesia after topical application of ketamine given alone in neuropathic pain, but controlled trials have not confirmed such effects. A combination of topical ketamine with several other agents produced pain relief in case, and case series, reports with response rates of 40% to 75% in retrospective analyses. In controlled trials of neuropathic pain with topical ketamine combinations, there were improvements in some outcomes, but optimal dosing and drug combinations were not clear. Given orally (as a gargle, throat swab, localized peritonsillar injections), ketamine produced significant oral/throat analgesia in controlled trials in postoperative settings. Topical analgesics are likely more effective in particular conditions (patient factors, disease factors), and future trials of topical ketamine should include a consideration of factors that could predispose

  14. Proceedings of the 1992 topical meeting on advances in reactor physics. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents proceedings of the 1992 Topical Meeting on Advances in Reactor Physics on March 8--11, 1992 at Charleston, SC. Session topics were as follows: Transport Theory; Fast Reactors; Plant Analyzers; Integral Experiments/Measurements & Analysis; Core Computational Systems; Reactor Physics; Monte Carlo; Safety Aspects of Heavy Water Reactors; and Space-Time Core Kinetics. The individual reports have been cataloged separately. (FI)

  15. Topical antimicrobials for burn infections - an update.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Mert; Toklu, Ani; Vecchio, Daniela; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    The relentless rise in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria and fungi, coupled with the high susceptibility of burn wounds to infection, and the difficulty of systemically administered antibiotics to reach damaged tissue, taken together have made the development of novel topical antimicrobials for burn infections a fertile area of innovation for researchers and companies. We previously covered the existing patent literature in this area in 2010, but the notable progress made since then, has highlighted the need for an update to bring the reader up to date on recent developments. New patents in the areas of topically applied antibiotics and agents that can potentiate the action of existing antibiotics may extend their useful lifetime. Developments have also been made in biofilm-disrupting agents. Antimicrobial peptides are nature's way for many life forms to defend themselves against attack by pathogens. Silver has long been known to be a highly active antimicrobial but new inorganic metal derivatives based on bismuth, copper and gallium have emerged. Halogens such as chlorine and iodine can be delivered by novel technologies. A variety of topically applied antimicrobials include chitosan preparations, usnic acid, ceragenins and XF porphyrins. Natural product derived antimicrobials such as tannins and essential oils have also been studied. Novel techniques to deliver reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in situ have been developed. Light-mediated techniques include photodynamic therapy, ultraviolet irradiation, blue light, low-level laser therapy and titania photocatalysis. Passive immunotherapy employs antibodies against pathogens and their virulence factors. Finally an interesting new area uses therapeutic microorganisms such as phages, probiotic bacteria and protozoa to combat infections.

  16. Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1986-02-12

    These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

  17. Biotech in medicine--the topic of the Olten Meeting 2010.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the biotechnet--the national network of competence in biotech research--has been helping partners from industry to access excellence in R&D, giving them optimal support at low cost. Its annual 'Olten Meeting' is a dynamic hub for companies and research institutes as it highlights the latest trends in biotech. On November 24, 2010, the topical subject was biotech in medicine.

  18. PREFACE: Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, David; de Jager, Kees; Roberts, Craig; Sheldon, Paul; Swanson, Eric

    2007-06-01

    The Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics was held on 22-24 October 2006 at the Opryland Resort in Nashville, Tennessee. Keeping with tradition, the meeting was held in conjunction with the Fall meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics. Approximately 90 physicists participated in the meeting, presenting 25 talks in seven plenary sessions and 48 talks in 11 parallel sessions. These sessions covered a wide range of topics related to strongly interacting matter. Among these were charm spectroscopy, gluonic exotics, nucleon resonance physics, RHIC physics, electroweak and spin physics, lattice QCD initiatives, and new facilities. Brad Tippens and Brad Keister provided perspective from the funding agencies. The organisers are extremely grateful to the following institutions for financial and logistical support: the American Physical Society, Jefferson Lab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Vanderbilt University. We thank the following persons for assisting in organising the parallel sessions: Ted Barnes, Jian-Ping Chen, Ed Kinney, Krishna Kumar, Harry Lee, Mike Leitch, Kam Seth, and Dennis Weygand. We also thank Gerald Ragghianti for designing the conference poster, Will Johns for managing the audio-visual equipment and for placing the talks on the web, Sandy Childress for administrative expertise, and Vanderbilt graduate students Eduardo Luiggi and Jesus Escamillad for their assistance. David Ernst, Kees de Jager, Craig Roberts (Chair), Paul Sheldon and Eric Swanson Editors

  19. Preface to Special Topic: Papers from the 2006 Annual Meeting of the American Electrophoresis Society, San Francisco, CA

    PubMed Central

    Minerick, Adrienne R.; Ugaz, Victor M.

    2007-01-01

    This Special Topic section of Biomicrofluidics is dedicated to original papers from the 2006 Annual Meeting of the American Electrophoresis Society (AES: http:∕/www.aesociety.org). This five-day meeting held in San Francisco, California, included five sessions on BioMEMS and Microfluidics and four sessions on Advances in Electrokinetics and Electrophoresis. AES and its corresponding symposia provide the most focused and well-organized meeting forum for diverse biological and engineering researchers working on electrokinetics. The work featured in this Special Topic section is no exception; it ranges from nanochannel electrophoresis to bioparticle sorting. PMID:19693374

  20. Topics in lipoprotein glomerulopathy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takao; Matsunaga, Akira; Ito, Kenji; Nakashima, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    Here, we introduce four topics in lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG). To date, approximately 150 cases of LPG have been reported worldwide. Recently two groups studied hot spots of APOE-Sendai and APOE-Kyoto, the representative variants of LPG, in narrow areas of Japan and China, respectively. They suggest that both variants have descended through a founder effect. APOE-Sendai and APOE-Kyoto cause different transformations of apolipoproteins aggregating lipoproteins and resulting in lipoprotein thrombi within the glomerulus. Moreover, the macrophage impairment in LPG may provide another mechanism for lipoprotein thrombi in which massive lipoproteins accumulate in the glomerulus without foam cells. On the other hand, the administration of fibrate with the intensive control of triglyceride and apolipoprotein E particularly from the early phase will ameliorate LPG and prevent renal dysfunction. PMID:24149835

  1. Topics in lipoprotein glomerulopathy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takao; Matsunaga, Akira; Ito, Kenji; Nakashima, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    Here, we introduce four topics in lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG). To date, approximately 150 cases of LPG have been reported worldwide. Recently two groups studied hot spots of APOE-Sendai and APOE-Kyoto, the representative variants of LPG, in narrow areas of Japan and China, respectively. They suggest that both variants have descended through a founder effect. APOE-Sendai and APOE-Kyoto cause different transformations of apolipoproteins aggregating lipoproteins and resulting in lipoprotein thrombi within the glomerulus. Moreover, the macrophage impairment in LPG may provide another mechanism for lipoprotein thrombi in which massive lipoproteins accumulate in the glomerulus without foam cells. On the other hand, the administration of fibrate with the intensive control of triglyceride and apolipoprotein E particularly from the early phase will ameliorate LPG and prevent renal dysfunction.

  2. Theme: Special Needs Students. Topic II: "Meeting the Needs of Special Needs Students through Individualized Instruction".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Michael R.

    Individualized instruction is an important tool in mainstreaming special needs students in industrial arts, as experience has shown. Important steps toward meeting these needs include (1) making an individualized assessment of each student, of student needs, and of the present state of student accomplishments; and (2) developing an individualized…

  3. Meetings in Academe: It's Time for an "EXTREME MEETING MAKEOVER!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Meetings have a bad reputation with faculty. Rarely does one hear a positive word uttered about an upcoming or past meeting. That reputation has metastasized throughout higher education. The primary reason is because meetings can be major time wasters, accomplishing very little, often deteriorating into just another social event, or they may be…

  4. Selected topics in particle accelerators: Proceedings of the CAP meetings. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1995-10-01

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Editing and changes to the authors` contributions in this Report were made only to fulfill the publication requirements. This volume includes notes and transparencies on eight presentations: ``Application of Accelerator-Driven Spallation Targets - Including Tritium Production and Nuclear Waste Transmutation``, ``BNL 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source Study``, ``Designing and Understanding of Magnets with the Help of Conformal Mapping``, ``Laser - Electron Beam Scattering Coherent Compton X-Ray Sources``, ``The LHC Project``, ``Optimization of the Photocathode-Linac Separation for the ATF [Accelerator Test Facility] Injection System``, ``On CEBAF Commissioning: First Results``, and ``The Proposed Booster Application Facility at BNL``. An Appendix lists dates, topics, and speakers from October 1989 to December 1994.

  5. Generalized Hypertrichosis Induced by Topical Minoxidil in an Adult Woman.

    PubMed

    Chellini, Patrícia Rocha; Pirmez, Rodrigo; Raso, Paula; Sodré, Celso T

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is a common side effect of topical minoxidil and has been reported to occur mainly close to the areas of application. In this paper, we present a case of a 26-year-old woman who developed generalized hypertrichosis 8 weeks after treatment with 5% topical minoxidil solution for alopecia areata. Generalized hypertrichosis is a rare side effect and has been described mainly in children and adolescents. Even though minoxidil is commonly prescribed for alopecia areata, there is insufficient evidence to support its systematic use and the occurrence of adverse effects should prompt drug interruption. Nonetheless, topical minoxidil has been shown to be a safe medication for adult patients, and we believe that the present case was an isolated one, possibly resulting from the misuse of the drug. PMID:26903750

  6. Generalized Hypertrichosis Induced by Topical Minoxidil in an Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Chellini, Patrícia Rocha; Pirmez, Rodrigo; Raso, Paula; Sodré, Celso T

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is a common side effect of topical minoxidil and has been reported to occur mainly close to the areas of application. In this paper, we present a case of a 26-year-old woman who developed generalized hypertrichosis 8 weeks after treatment with 5% topical minoxidil solution for alopecia areata. Generalized hypertrichosis is a rare side effect and has been described mainly in children and adolescents. Even though minoxidil is commonly prescribed for alopecia areata, there is insufficient evidence to support its systematic use and the occurrence of adverse effects should prompt drug interruption. Nonetheless, topical minoxidil has been shown to be a safe medication for adult patients, and we believe that the present case was an isolated one, possibly resulting from the misuse of the drug. PMID:26903750

  7. Current topics in red cell biology: report on the Red Cell Special Interest Group meeting held at NHS Blood and Transplant Bristol on 30 October 2015.

    PubMed

    Bullock, T; Bruce, L J; Ridgwell, K

    2016-08-01

    The Red Cell Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting, hosted by the British Blood Transfusion Society, provides an annual forum for the presentation of UK- and European-based red cell research. The 2015 meeting was held on Friday 30 October at the National Health Service Blood & Transplant (NHSBT) facility in Filton, Bristol and provided an exciting and varied programme on the themes of erythropoiesis, malaria biology and pathophysiology and red cells properties in stress and disease. Ten speakers presented on these topics over the course of one day. The meeting was well attended by over 90 delegates. Posters were presented during the lunch break, and abstracts from the posters are published at the end of this issue.

  8. NASA Physical Sciences - Presentation to Annual Two Phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis; Motil, Brian; McQuillen, John

    2014-01-01

    The Two-phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team consists of researchers and members from various space agencies including ESA, JAXA, CSA, and RSA. This presentation included descriptions various fluid experiments either being conducted by or planned by NASA for the International Space Station in the areas of two-phase flow, flow boiling, capillary flow, and crygenic fluid storage.

  9. Fast reactor safety: proceedings of the international topical meeting. Volume 2. [R

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The emphasis of this meeting was on the safety-related aspects of fast reactor design, analysis, licensing, construction, and operation. Relative to past meetings, there was less emphasis on the scientific and technological basis for accident assessment. Because of its broad scope, the meeting attracted 217 attendees from a wide cross section of the design, safety analysis, and safety technology communities. Eight countries and two international organizations were represented. A total of 126 papers were presented, with contributions from the United States, France, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy. Sessions covered in Volume 2 include: safety design concepts; operational transient experiments; analysis of seismic and external events; HCDA-related codes, analysis, and experiments; sodium fires; instrumentation and control/PPS design; whole-core accident analysis codes; and impact of safety design considerations on future LMFBR developments.

  10. Fast reactor safety: proceedings of the international topical meeting. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The emphasis of this meeting was on the safety-related aspects of fast reactor design, analysis, licensing, construction, and operation. Relative to past meetings, there was less emphasis on the scientific and technological basis for accident assessment. Because of its broad scope, the meeting attracted 217 attendees from a wide cross section of the design, safety analysis, and safety technology communities. Eight countries and two international organizations were represented. A total of 126 papers were presented, with contributions from the United States, France, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy. Sessions covered in Volume 1 include: impact of safety and licensing considerations on fast reactor design; safety aspects of innovative designs; intra-subassembly behavior; operational safety; design accommodation of seismic and other external events; natural circulation; safety design concepts; safety implications derived from operational plant data; decay heat removal; and assessment of HCDA consequences.

  11. Topical meeting on tunable solid state lasers. Digest of technical papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included lidar remote sensing, advances in alexandrite technology, photoluminescence, tunable laser materials selection, flash-pumped titanium lasers, color center lasers, Q-switching, alexandrite lasers, transparent glass ceramics, diode-pumped solid-state lasers for NASA space station lidar experiments, sources for optically pumped solid-state lasers, laser tuning, and monochromator wavelength measurement devices.

  12. Proceedings of the topical meeting on advances in human factors research on man/computer interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: expert systems and knowledge engineering-I; verification and validation of software; methods for modeling UMAN/computer performance; MAN/computer interaction problems in producing procedures -1-2; progress and problems with automation-1-2; experience with electronic presentation of procedures-2; intelligent displays and monitors; modeling user/computer interface; and computer-based human decision-making aids.

  13. The Shaping of School Students' General Culture: Topic of the Pedagogical Council Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churkina, Liudmila

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a pedagogical council meeting that was convened to discuss "The Shaping of the General Culture of School Students." The purpose of this council was to focus the teachers' attention on the question of whether they were successfully demonstrating a combination of high professionalism, intellectuality, and…

  14. EDITORIAL: Selected Papers from OMS'07, the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2008-06-01

    OMS'07 was the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society (EOS) on Optical Microsystems (OMS). It was organized by the EOS in the frame of its international topical meeting activity, and after the success of the inaugural meeting was once again held in Italy, 30 September to 3 October 2007, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. The local organizing committee was composed of researchers from `La Sapienza' University in Rome and the National Council of Research (CNR) in Naples, Italy. A selected group of leading scientists in the field formed the international scientific committee. The conference was fully dedicated to the most recent advancements carried out in the field of optical microsystems. More then 150 scientists coming from five continents attended the conference and more than 100 papers were presented, organized into the following sessions: Photonic cystals and metamaterials Optofluidic microsystems and devices Optical microsystems and devices New characterization methods for materials and devices Application of optical systems Optical sources and photodetectors Optical resonators Nonlinear optic devices Micro-optical devices. Four keynote lecturers were invited for the Plenary sessions: Federico Capasso, Harvard University, USA; Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut, USA (Distinguished Lecturer, Emeritus of LEOS--IEEE Society); Demetri Psaltis, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland; Ammon Yariv, California Institute of Technology, USA. Furthermore, 21 invited speakers opened each session of the conference with their talks. In addition a special session was organized to celebrate eighty years of the Isituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata (INOA) of CNR. The special invited speaker for this session was Professor Theodor W Hänsch (Nobel Prize in Physics, 2005), who gave a lecture entitled `What can we do with optical frequency combs?' In this special issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics, a selection of the most interesting

  15. Topical Antimicrobials for Burn Infections – An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sevgi, Mert; Toklu, Ani; Vecchio, Daniela; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The relentless rise in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria and fungi, coupled with the high susceptibility of burn wounds to infection, and the difficulty of systemically administered antibiotics to reach damaged tissue, taken together have made the development of novel topical antimicrobials for burn infections a fertile area of innovation for researchers and companies. We previously covered the existing patent literature in this area in 2010, but the notable progress made since then, has highlighted the need for an update to bring the reader up to date on recent developments. New patents in the areas of topically applied antibiotics and agents that can potentiate the action of existing antibiotics may extend their useful lifetime. Developments have also been made in biofilm-disrupting agents. Antimicrobial peptides are nature’s way for many life forms to defend themselves against attack by pathogens. Silver has long been known to be a highly active antimicrobial but new inorganic metal derivatives based on bismuth, copper and gallium have emerged. Halogens such as chlorine and iodine can be delivered by novel technologies. A variety of topically applied antimicrobials include chitosan preparations, usnic acid, ceragenins and XF porphyrins. Natural product derived antimicrobials such as tannins and essential oils have also been studied. Novel techniques to deliver reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in situ have been developed. Light-mediated techniques include photodynamic therapy, ultraviolet irradiation, blue light, low-level laser therapy and titania photocatalysis. Passive immunotherapy employs antibodies against pathogens and their virulence factors. Finally an interesting new area uses therapeutic microorganisms such as phages, probiotic bacteria and protozoa to combat infections. PMID:24215506

  16. Second national topical meeting on tritium technology in fission, fusion and isotopic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.; Barlit, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    This conference presented information on the following topics: the development of a tritium dispersion code; global environmental transport models for tritium; HT/HTO conversion in mammals; tritium production, releases and population doses at nuclear power reactors; design of tritium processing facilities and equipment for aqueous and gaseous streams; tritium removal from circulating helium by hydriding of rare earth metals; the determination of deuterium and tritium in effluent wastewater by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; tritium surface contamination: process calculations for a moderator detritiation plant; recent developments in magnetically coupled vane pumps for tritium service; recovery and storage of tritium by Zr-V-Fe getter; gas handling systems using titanium-sponge and uranium bulk getters; isotope effects and helium retention behavior in vanadium tritide; interaction of hydrogen isotopes with stainless steel 316 L; and the interaction of polyethylene and tritium gas as monitored by Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Minoxidil topical solution: an unsafe product for children.

    PubMed

    Claudet, Isabelle; Cortey, Caroline; Honorat, Raphaele; Franchitto, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Minoxidil hair formulation is commonly used for the treatment of male or female androgenic alopecia. This over-the-counter product is wrongly considered safe. The ingestion of a few milliliters by a child can lead to significant intoxication. We report a case of significant intoxication after the ingestion of topical minoxidil (Alopexy; Pierre Fabre Laboratoires, SA, Switzerland). A 7-year-old girl, who accidentally ingested a teaspoon of minoxidil hair solution, presented to the pediatric emergency department for emesis. At admission, she had a blood pressure of 86/56 mm Hg and a pulse of 149 beats per minute. Hypotension lasted 40 hours with the lowest value 24 hours after ingestion (79/33 mm Hg). She presented electrocardiogram changes (sinus tachycardia and flattening T-waves) but normal cardiac enzymes. Infusion of 20 mL/kg of normal saline fluid had no hemodynamic effect. Her blood pressure normalized on day 2. Minoxidil topical solution is an unsafe product for children. This formulation should be strictly kept out of reach of children and manufacturers should enhance child-resistance security of packaging. The over-the-counter availability must be questioned. PMID:25426682

  18. An update on topical therapies for mild-moderate psoriasis.

    PubMed

    van de Kerkhof, Peter C M

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapies are the mainstream treatment of psoriasis because most patients have mild disease. First-line treatments are vitamin D derivatives and corticosteroids. These treatments are usually given in combination schedules. For topical treatments the selection of the most appropriate vehicle is of major importance, thus improving adherence to the treatment, which frequently is impaired by the complexities of topical therapeutic choices. Evidence for efficacy and safety of topical treatments is readily available for vitamin D treatments and short-term treatment with corticosteroids. However, the scientific evidence for longer-term treatments is limited. Multiple new small molecules are in various stages of development and are reviewed.

  19. Spatially varying index of refraction: An open ended undergraduate topic

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, D.A.

    1980-03-01

    There are many commonplace examples of waves moving along a curved path in an inhomogeneous media. There are reports of a simple lecture demonstration of light bending in a sugar solution being used to motivate students in physics, geophysics, and acoustics courses. For those students who wish to pursue this topic we discuss many avenues of additional research. With relatively simple equipment one can measure the index of refraction n (y,t) and its first and second spatial derivatives as well as the time dependence. The analysis can be approached from a generalization of Snell's law, the equations for the eikonal, Fermat's principle, and the classical approximation and analogies with trajectories of particles.

  20. An undergraduate neuroscience seminar based on the annual meeting of the society for neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Bucci, David J; Falls, William A

    2007-01-01

    We have recently planned and taught an advanced undergraduate seminar at our respective institutions that uses a unique mechanism to explore topics that are on the cutting edge of neuroscience. The course material is centered on the topics of presentations scheduled for the Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience held each fall. The instructor and students (∼15) select several topics that are the subject of special lectures, panels, and keynote addresses included in the Program for the Annual Meeting. Each week the class reads and discusses several articles on the topic of one of the lectures, panels or addresses. By the time the Annual Meeting is held, the class is intimately familiar with the content of the planned presentations. The class then travels to the Annual Meeting and attends these presentations along with events of personal interest and keeps a journal of what they learn. Upon returning from the Annual Meeting, the students discuss the assigned presentations and also prepare and deliver their own presentation on a neuroscience topic of personal interest using information obtained at the meeting. Students also prepare an in-depth final paper on their presentation topic in the form of a Current Opinions in Neurobiology review article. The outcomes for the students are many fold: Students explore topics on the cutting edge of neuroscience through the review of primary literature and experience a major scientific conference first hand, which is attended by over 30,000 neuroscientists from around the world. This experience helps neuroscience "come alive" for the students and provides them with valuable opportunities to meet world-renowned researchers, prospective graduate mentors, and possibly future employers. Students also have the chance to develop important professional skills through critical evaluation of research, exposure to different presentation styles, and preparation of an in-depth research paper and oral presentation.

  1. Highlights of the ASPE 2004 Winter Topical Meeting on Free-Form Optics: Design, Fabrication, Metrology, Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Dow, Thomas A.; Sohn, alex

    2004-01-01

    We present highlights from the American Society for Precision Engineering's 2004 winter topical meeting entitled Free-Form Optics: Design, Fabrication, Metrology, Assembly. We emphasize those papers that are most relevant to astronomical optics. Optical surfaces that transcend the bounds of rotational symmetry have been implemented in novel optical systems with fantastic results since the release of Polaroid's first instant camera. Despite these successes, free-form optics have found only a few niche applications and have yet to enter the mainstream. The purpose of this meeting is to identify the state of the art of free-form optics design, fabrication, metrology and assembly and to identify the technical and logistical challenges that inhibit their widespread use. Issues that will be addressed include: What are free-form optics? How can optical systems be made better with free-form optics? How can designers use free-form optics? How can free-form optics be fabricated? How can they be measured? How are free-form optical systems assembled? Control of multi-axis systems.

  2. Highlights of the ASPE 2004 Winter Topical Meeting on Free-Form Optics: Design, Fabrication, Metrology, Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Raymond G., IV; Dow, Thomas A.; Sohn, Alex; Garrard, Kenneth

    2004-09-01

    We present highlights from the American Society for Precision Engineering"s 2004 Winter Topical Meeting entitled "Free-Form Optics: Design, Fabrication, Metrology, Assembly." We emphasize those papers that are most relevant to astronomical optics. Optical surfaces that transcend the bounds of rotational symmetry have been implemented in novel optical systems with fantastic results since the release of Polaroid"s first instant camera. Despite these successes, free-form optics have found only a few niche applications and have yet to enter the mainstream. The purpose of this meeting was to identify the state of the art of free-form optics design, fabrication, metrology and assembly and to identify the technical and logistical challenges that inhibit their widespread use. Issues that were addressed include: What are free-form optics? How can optical systems be made better with free-form optics? How can designers use free-form optics? How can free-form optics be fabricated? How can they be measured? How are free-form optical systems assembled?

  3. CONFERENCE NOTE: European Optical Society, Topical Meeting Optical Metrology and Nanotechnology, Engelberg, Switzerland, 27 30 March 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-01-01

    This meeting, organized by the Paul Scherrer Institute's Department of Applied Solid State Physics, will be held from 27 30 March 1994 at the Hotel Regina-Titlis, Engelberg, Switzerland. The aim is to bring together scientists from two important fields of current research and increasing industrial relevance. Optical metrology is a traditional discipline of applied optics which reached the nanometre scale a long time ago. Nanotechnology is setting new limits and represents a major challenge to metrology, as well as offering new opportunities to optics. The meeting is intended to help define a common future for optical metrology and nanotechnology. Topics to be covered include: nanometre position control and measuring techniques ultrahigh precision interferometry scanning probe microscopy (AFM, SNOM, etc.) surface modification by scanning probe methods precision surface fabrication and characterization nanolithography micro-optics, diffractive optics components, including systems and applications subwavelength optical structures synthetic optical materials structures and technologies for X-ray optics. For further information please contact: Jens Gobrecht (Secretary), Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI, Switzerland.Tel. (41)56992529; Fax (41) 5698 2635.

  4. 78 FR 38009 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... ] Public Comment, Open Topics All meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. An assistive listening system, Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART), and sign language interpreters will...

  5. Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As the first Meeting Chairman for the Spring and Fall meetings, Martin Walt has achieved notable success in realizing the many goals set forth by the Union for its annual meetings. Under his guidance, the Meeting Program Committee has been able to reduce the number of conflicting sessions and provide for the presentation of well-organized and effectively displayed poster sessions. The early planning of Union sessions and the introduction of ‘mini-frontiers,’ along with careful scheduling, has provided an increased opportunity for participation. A record high of 2785 registrants was recorded during the 1981 Fall Meeting, topping very slightly the old record of 2775 for the 1974 Spring Meeting.

  6. An update on the role of topical metronidazole in rosacea.

    PubMed

    Zip, C

    2006-03-01

    Topical metronidazole (Noritate 1% Cream, Dermik; MetroCream 0.75% Cream, MetroLotion 0.75% Lotion, Metrogel 0.75% and 1% Topical Gel, Galderma) has been used for the treatment of rosacea for over 30 years. Several placebo-controlled trials have demonstrated its effectiveness in the treatment of moderate-to-severe rosacea. It is also effective in preventing relapses of disease and is well tolerated by most patients. A growing number of formulations are available.

  7. Development of an adherence-enhancing intervention in topical treatment termed the topical treatment optimization program (TTOP).

    PubMed

    Reich, Kristian; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Karakasili, Eleni; Zschocke, Ina

    2014-09-01

    Psoriasis is a common, disabling, chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorder of the skin with a worldwide prevalence of 2-3 % in which adherence to treatment is often poor. The majority of individuals have limited disease that is being treated with topical medication according to existing guidelines. Adherence rates are lower for topical compared with systemic treatment. Low medication adherence is a major problem for patients with chronic disorders as it results in suboptimal treatment outcomes, increased risk for development of concomitant diseases, inefficient use of health resources and considerable losses to society. However, to date no adherence-enhancing intervention has been developed for psoriasis patients under topical treatment. In this article, we report the development of the topical treatment optimization program (TTOP). The TTOP intervention aims to improve the information given to the patients and to result in an engaged patient-physician relationship. Application of the TTOP intervention in daily clinical practice may lead to a significant increase of adherence and the successful management of psoriasis and other chronic skin disorders.

  8. Understanding topics and sentiment in an online cancer survivor community.

    PubMed

    Portier, Kenneth; Greer, Greta E; Rokach, Lior; Ofek, Nir; Wang, Yafei; Biyani, Prakhar; Yu, Mo; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Zhao, Kang; Mitra, Prasenjit; Yen, John

    2013-12-01

    Online cancer communities help members support one another, provide new perspectives about living with cancer, normalize experiences, and reduce isolation. The American Cancer Society's 166000-member Cancer Survivors Network (CSN) is the largest online peer support community for cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers. Sentiment analysis and topic modeling were applied to CSN breast and colorectal cancer discussion posts from 2005 to 2010 to examine how sentiment change of thread initiators, a measure of social support, varies by discussion topic. The support provided in CSN is highest for medical, lifestyle, and treatment issues. Threads related to 1) treatments and side effects, surgery, mastectomy and reconstruction, and decision making for breast cancer, 2) lung scans, and 3) treatment drugs in colon cancer initiate with high negative sentiment and produce high average sentiment change. Using text mining tools to assess sentiment, sentiment change, and thread topics provides new insights that community managers can use to facilitate member interactions and enhance support outcomes.

  9. Motivation: a new look at an age-old topic.

    PubMed

    Sumrow, Allison

    2003-01-01

    Employee motivation is a shared responsibility. An employee has to have some amount of intrinsic desire to perform a task. You can't create that desire. But, you can create an environment that brings out that desire, and allows an employee to shine. Abraham Maslow developed one of the most useful of all motivation theories--the "Hierarchy of Needs"--in the 1940s, and it is still the prevailing theory today. The Needs Hierarchy begins with the basic idea that only an unfulfilled need is a motivator. Or, in plain English, people perform specific actions to meet specific personal needs. Maslow defines five levels of needs that all people experience: 1: Physiological, Food, shelter, and yes, sex. 2: Safety/Security. No personal harm and the current lifestyle is safe. 3: Social. The need for acceptance by others, for belonging, friendship and affection. 4: Self-Esteem/Ego. Recognition, status and prestige. 5: Self-Actualization. Self-fulfillment and the need for achieving one's personal best. What makes this needs theory so interesting and so useful in the workplace is the clarity with which a position in the hierarchy can be determined. The basic premise is that lower-level needs must be satisfied before moving upward to the next level. Consider your own employees and what you know about them. Look at their situations, and evaluate where they may be in the hierarchy. Remember, it's difficult to separate their personal situations from their work personas. Try using Abraham Maslow as a starting point to identify motivations of your staff.

  10. Motivation: a new look at an age-old topic.

    PubMed

    Sumrow, Allison

    2003-01-01

    Employee motivation is a shared responsibility. An employee has to have some amount of intrinsic desire to perform a task. You can't create that desire. But, you can create an environment that brings out that desire, and allows an employee to shine. Abraham Maslow developed one of the most useful of all motivation theories--the "Hierarchy of Needs"--in the 1940s, and it is still the prevailing theory today. The Needs Hierarchy begins with the basic idea that only an unfulfilled need is a motivator. Or, in plain English, people perform specific actions to meet specific personal needs. Maslow defines five levels of needs that all people experience: 1: Physiological, Food, shelter, and yes, sex. 2: Safety/Security. No personal harm and the current lifestyle is safe. 3: Social. The need for acceptance by others, for belonging, friendship and affection. 4: Self-Esteem/Ego. Recognition, status and prestige. 5: Self-Actualization. Self-fulfillment and the need for achieving one's personal best. What makes this needs theory so interesting and so useful in the workplace is the clarity with which a position in the hierarchy can be determined. The basic premise is that lower-level needs must be satisfied before moving upward to the next level. Consider your own employees and what you know about them. Look at their situations, and evaluate where they may be in the hierarchy. Remember, it's difficult to separate their personal situations from their work personas. Try using Abraham Maslow as a starting point to identify motivations of your staff. PMID:14603593

  11. The Iodine Spectrum: A New Look at an Old Topic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, George; Sauder, Deborah; Shalhoub, George M.; Stout, Roland; Hamby Towns, Marcy; Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes a new approach to the traditional iodine gas absorption spectrum experiment often performed in undergraduate physical chemistry labs. The approach is student centered and designed to emphasize the conceptual richness in this classic experiment. It gives students the opportunity to examine the conceptual and mathematical connections between spectroscopic data and quantum models by organizing the material in conceptual chunks, which they work through sequentially. Students use symbolic mathematics software, Mathcad, to expedite the sophisticated numerical calculations required. The curricular chunks were specifically constructed to make the sophisticated concepts embedded in the project accessible. The focus activities remind the students of information they already know and require them to employ both paper and pencil and computer worksheets to complete calculations. Five Mathcad templates provide a rich mathematical treatment of the topics in this experiment. This paper describes how the documents MorsePotential.mcd, BirgeSponer.mcd, IodineSpectrum.mcd, FranckCondonBackground.mcd, and FranckCondonComputation.mcd are used during the three weeks in which this experiment can be performed by a typical physical chemistry student. Although originally designed to use the WWW to disseminate information and promote interaction among physical chemistry students at geographically dispersed institutions, this segmented focus-question approach to the iodine experiment has also been used by a physical chemistry class at a single campus. In both formats, faculty noticed decreased anxiety of the students towards the experiment and an increase in the quality of laboratory reports that indicated better understanding of the chemical concepts.

  12. Supervisory Conferences: An Exploration of Some Difficult Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Real, Francis; Stimpson, Philip; Bunton, David

    2001-01-01

    Investigated student teachers' and university supervisors' views regarding difficult areas to discuss in conferences and how to tackle the problem. Students and supervisors had many similar perceptions. Difficult topics included possible failure, general attitude, and lack of presence, commitment, and enthusiasm. Solutions included identifying the…

  13. Learning Spaces in Higher Education: An Under-Researched Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The connections between the design and use of space in higher education, and the production of teaching and learning, and of research, are not well understood. This paper reports on a literature review on these topics, and shows that higher education spaces can be considered in various ways: in terms of campus design, in terms of how space can…

  14. An Empirical Study of Knowledge Structures of Research Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Peiling

    1999-01-01

    Examines cognitive maps on research topics generated by experts and non-experts. Both experts and non-experts modified the given vocabulary by either adding or dropping terms. The dominant configuration for the maps was top-down. Experts tended to use a problem-oriented approach to organize vocabulary while non-experts often applied a…

  15. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from OMS'05, the 1st Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2006-07-01

    OMS'05 is the first international conference wholly dedicated to optical microsystems. It was organized by the European Optical Society (EOS) in the frame of its international topical meeting activity and was held in Italy, September 2005, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. A possible definition of an optical microsystem is a complex system, able to perform one or more sensing and actuation functions, where optical devices are integrated in a smart way with electronic, mechanical and sensing components by taking advantage of the progress in micro- and nano-technologies. The increasing interest in this field arises from the expected applications that would significantly improve the quality of life. The list of possibilities offered by the optical microsystem enabling technologies is very long and seems to increase day by day. We are not only thinking about the next generation of optical telecommunication networks and computers, but also about low-cost, compact microsystems for environmental monitoring, in order to improve safety in the avionic and automotive fields, medical diagnostics and proteomic/genomic studies, or just finding general applications in several industrial fields. The goal of the conference was to involve scientists and young researchers from the main public and private laboratories, giving them the opportunity to present new scientific results and compare their know-how in the exciting and emerging field of optical microsystems. We believe that we succeeded in this. More than 200 scientists from all over the world attended the conference. We had more than 100 oral presentations and approximately 20 from the keynote lectures and invited speeches. It was an opportunity to define the most recent progress carried out in the field and to outline the possible road-map leading to the expected results in the industrial and social fields. We strongly believe that research and technology are closely interconnected at present and cannot

  16. Strategies for Finding and Selecting an Ideal Thesis or Dissertation Topic: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Simon A.

    2009-01-01

    Choosing an ideal master's thesis or doctoral dissertation topic is probably one of the most important decisions students will make while in graduate school. Some graduate students may spend a year or even longer looking for potential topics before finally selecting one for their thesis or dissertation. There are a number of successful strategies…

  17. Organizing Learning Materials through Hierarchical Topic Maps: An Illustration through Chinese Herb Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, B.-J.; Shih, J.-L.; Chen, R.-L.

    2007-01-01

    This research aims to use hierarchical topic maps to compile digital learning material and to discuss its design and application possibilities. The system renders tremendous original assets and then embeds a self-organizing map (SOM) in the material database to produce topical learning materials, as in this case, an illustration through Chinese…

  18. 78 FR 44922 - Notice of an Education Listening Session Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Notice of an Education Listening Session Meeting SUMMARY: The Education... an Education Listening Session stakeholder meeting for all interested agricultural education stakeholders. DATES: The Education Listening Session will be held August 1, 2013. The public may file...

  19. Spatially Varying Index of Refraction: An Open Ended Undergraduate Topic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an experiment on the bending of light in a medium with a continuously varying index of refraction. Several theoretical approaches for the analysis of this experiment, designed for college physics students, are also presented. (HM)

  20. Laparoscopy in trauma: An overview of complications and related topics

    PubMed Central

    Kindel, Tammy; Latchana, Nicholas; Swaroop, Mamta; Chaudhry, Umer I; Noria, Sabrena F; Choron, Rachel L; Seamon, Mark J; Lin, Maggie J; Mao, Melissa; Cipolla, James; El Chaar, Maher; Scantling, Dane; Martin, Niels D; Evans, David C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of laparoscopy has provided trauma surgeons with a valuable diagnostic and, at times, therapeutic option. The minimally invasive nature of laparoscopic surgery, combined with potentially quicker postoperative recovery, simplified wound care, as well as a growing number of viable intraoperative therapeutic modalities, presents an attractive alternative for many traumatologists when managing hemodynamically stable patients with selected penetrating and blunt traumatic abdominal injuries. At the same time, laparoscopy has its own unique complication profile. This article provides an overview of potential complications associated with diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in trauma, focusing on practical aspects of identification and management of laparoscopy-related adverse events. PMID:26557490

  1. Classroom Meetings: An Approach to Transpersonal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVoe, Marianne

    1979-01-01

    Glasser's classroom meetings provide a promising structure for teachers' transpersonal skills and for providing a forum for discussion of transpersonal experiences, concerns, and questions. A preplanning worksheet developed by Bosner and Poppen demonstrating how to use the thinking meeting as a medium to teach relaxation skills is presented here.…

  2. Topical application of antibiotics in primary teeth: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kayalvizhi, Gurusamy; Subramaniyan, Balaji; Suganya, Gurusamy

    2013-01-01

    Root canal infections are polymicrobial in nature, consisting of both aerobic and anaerobic species. The successful treatment of both primary and secondary endodontic infections involves effective eradication of the causative microorganisms during root canal treatment procedures. Reduction and elimination of microorganisms from the infected root canal provides optimal opportunity for treatment success. Local application of antibiotics has been considered an effective way to deliver antibiotics. A combination of antibiotic drugs have been tried under the concept of lesion sterilization and tissue repair therapy to eliminate the target bacteria, which are possible sources of endodontic lesions. The purpose of this article is to discuss the lesion sterilization and tissue repair therapy technique in primary teeth.

  3. Successful Treatment of Plasmacytosis Circumorificialis with Topical Tacrolimus: Two Case Reports and an Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Taku; Furudate, Sadanori; Ishibashi, Masaya; Kambayashi, Yumi; Tojo, Gen-ichi; Wakusawa, Chihiro; Mayama, Hiroshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytosis circumorificialis (PLC), a benign chronic inflammatory disease with an unknown pathogenesis, is characterized by erythema, erosion nodules and ulcers around the openings of the human body. In this report, we describe two cases of PLC successfully treated with topical tacrolimus. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining revealed that prominent CD163+ proinflammatory macrophages and IL-17-producing cells were infiltrating around plasma cells, which might suggest the reason for the therapeutic effect of topical tacrolimus on PLC. PMID:23626544

  4. Outer planets; Proceedings of Symposium 4 and the Topical Meeting of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V. (Editor); Atreya, S. K. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on the magnetospheres, atmospheres, satellites, and rings of the outer planets are presented. Individual topics addressed include: thermal plasma in outer planet magnetospheres, neutral gas-plasma interaction in the Io plasma torus, satellite-plasma interactions, comparison of planetary magnetic fields, energization process of trapped particles in outer planets, remote sensing of planetary plasma, comparison of the deep atmospheres of the giant planets, seasonal thermal structure of giant planet atmospheres, CCD imaging of Neptune at methane-band wavelengths, physical parameters for the Uranus atmosphere, Uranus photochemistry, Uranus electroglow production, vibrationally excited H2 in Saturn's upper atmosphere, Titan, origin of outer planet satellite systems, microphysical modeling of Titan's aerosols, tectonics of icy satellites, geological evolution of Ganymede, photometric techniques for atmosphereless solar system bodies, the new rings, narrow rings, and time variability of the Jovian system.

  5. Life sciences and space research XXI(1); Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Graz, Austria, June 25-July 7, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P. (Editor); Horneck, G. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Space research in biology is presented with emphasis on flight experiment results and radiation risks. Topics discussed include microorganisms and biomolecules in the space-environment experiment ES 029 on Spacelab-1, the preliminary characterization of persisting circadian rhythms during space flight; plant growth, development, and embryogenesis during the Salyut-7 flight, and the influence of space-flight factors on viability and mutability of plants. Consideration is also given to radiation-risk estimation and its application to human beings in space, the radiation situation in space and its modification by the geomagnetic field and shielding, the quantitative interpretation of cellular heavy-ion action, and the effects of heavy-ion radiation on the brain vascular system and embryonic development.

  6. Active experiments in space; Proceedings of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission D (Meeting D3) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R.

    1992-12-01

    The present volume on active experiments in space discusses dynamic trapping of electrons in the Porcupine ionospheric ion beam experiment, plasma wave observations during electron gun experiments on ISEE-1, spatial coherence and electromagnetic wave generation during electron beam experiments in space, and recent experimental measurements of space platform charging at LEO altitudes. Attention is given to high voltage spheres in an unmagnetized plasma, energetic ion emission for active spacecraft control, the collective gyration of a heavy ion cloud in a magnetized plasma, and remote sensing of artificial luminous clouds by lidars. Topics addressed include modulation of the background flux of energetic particles by artificial injection, wave measurements in active experiments on plasma beam injection, field formation around negatively biased solar arrays in the LEO-plasma, and the registration of ELF waves in rocket-satellite experiments with plasma injection.

  7. Topical Steroid Damaged/Dependent Face (TSDF): An Entity of Cutaneous Pharmacodependence

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Koushik; Coondoo, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Topical Steroid Damaged/Dependent face (TSDF) is a phenomenon which has been described very recently (2008). It is characterized by a plethora of symptoms caused by an usually unsupervised misuse/abuse/overuse of topical corticosteroid of any potency on the face over an unspecified and/or prolonged period of time. This misuse and damage have a serious effect on the quality of life of the patients in general and the skin of the face in particular. Management is difficult and necessitates psychological counseling as well as physical soothing of the sensitive skin. PMID:27293246

  8. Topical Steroid Damaged/Dependent Face (TSDF): An Entity of Cutaneous Pharmacodependence.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Koushik; Coondoo, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Topical Steroid Damaged/Dependent face (TSDF) is a phenomenon which has been described very recently (2008). It is characterized by a plethora of symptoms caused by an usually unsupervised misuse/abuse/overuse of topical corticosteroid of any potency on the face over an unspecified and/or prolonged period of time. This misuse and damage have a serious effect on the quality of life of the patients in general and the skin of the face in particular. Management is difficult and necessitates psychological counseling as well as physical soothing of the sensitive skin. PMID:27293246

  9. The effect of topical negative pressure on wound biofilms using an in vitro wound model.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Quan D; Vickery, Karen; Deva, Anand K

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds affect a significant number of patients worldwide. Although the etiologies of these wounds are varied, bacterial infection has been suggested as a major factor responsible for the perpetual inflammation and tissue destruction observed in such wounds. Recent evidence has emerged suggesting that bacterial biofilms in particular may have a significant role in this process. At the same time, topical negative pressure dressing is gaining acceptance as a therapy which promotes healing in recalcitrant wounds. In this study an in vitro Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm model was developed to mimic potential surface wound biofilms. Topical negative pressure dressing was applied to the model and the effects of topical negative pressure dressing on the in vitro wound biofilms were examined using both quantitative microbiological counting technique and imaging studies. The results demonstrated a small but statistically significant reduction in biofilm bacteria at 2 weeks when exposed to topical negative pressure. When this was combined with silver impregnated foam, the reduction was far more significant and was observable within 24 hours. Microscopically, it was also noted that topical negative pressure compressed the biofilm architecture with a reduction in thickness and diffusion distance.

  10. IFPA Meeting 2008 Workshops Report

    PubMed Central

    Lash, G.E.; Ansari, T.; Bischof, P.; Burton, G.J.; Chamley, L.; Crocker, I.; Dantzer, V.; Desoye, G.; Drewlo, S.; Fazleabas, A.; Jansson, T.; Keating, S.; Kliman, H.J.; Lang, I.; Mayhew, T.; Meiri, H.; Miller, R.K.; Nelson, D.M.; Pfarrer, C.; Roberts, C.; Samar, M.; Sharma, S.; Shiverick, K.; Strunk, D.; Turner, M.A.; Huppertz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At the IFPA meeting 2008 diverse topics were discussed in 12 themed workshops. Topics covered included: immunology of placentation; galectins and trophoblast invasion; signaling in implantation and invasion; markers to identify trophoblast subpopulations; placental pathology; placental toxicology; stereology; placental transport of fatty acids; placental mesenchymal stem cells; comparative placentation; trophoblast and neoplasia; trophoblast differentiation. This report is a summary of the various topics covered. PMID:19084270

  11. Teaching Medication Compliance to Psychiatric Residents: Placing an Orphan Topic into a Training Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiden, Peter J.; Rao, Nyapati

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Medication compliance is an orphan topic. Training in the understanding and management of noncompliance does not neatly fall within the domain of psychopharmacology, nor does it clearly fit into other core curricula areas, such as clinical interviewing or psychotherapy training. The objective of this article is to increase awareness…

  12. Highlights and prizes of an international meeting.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2008-01-01

    A short description selected from the presentations which had been awarded prizes in the 4th International Meeting of Nuclear Medicine, of the Hellenic Society of Nuclear Medicine, in Thessaloniki, Greece, is as follows: Professor L.G. Strauss from Heidelberg received the first prize for his original paper under the title: "Modulation of FDG kinetics in tumors by gene expression". He studied 25 patients with colorectal tumors with dynamic PET-FDG within 2 days prior to surgery and he finally came to the conclusion that angiogenesis has a significant impact primarily on the kinetic data (k1, k3), but also on the global FDG uptake. A detailed analysis of the FDG kinetics can help to classify the grade of angiogenesis in primary colorectal tumors. The cell cycle associated genes have a comparable impact on the FDG kinetics as compared to the angiogenesis related genes. Furthermore, hypoxia was associated with the FDG parameters. Enhanced expression of HIF-1a was primarily associated with an enhanced influx of FDG. The results demonstrated the impact of dedicated groups of genes on the FDG kinetics. Furthermore, if the FDG kinetics are quantitatively analyzed, the expression of certain genes may be predicted from these data. Dr. P. Bouziotis et al. received the second prize for their original paper under the title: "Labeling of bevacizumab, an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody, with technetium-99m and rhenium-188". The authors were from Athens and Oxford and studied the reduction of the endogenous disulphide bonds of bevacizumab by treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol and TCEP-HCl. The number of generated-SH groups was estimated before each labelling experiment. The results of the present study show that VEGF expression in tumors can be detected and visualized specifically with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, labelled with gamma-emitting radioisotopes. The third prize went to Dr C. H. Tsopelas et al. from Adelaide who presented an original paper under the title

  13. The 4-H Club Meeting: An Essential Youth Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassels, Alicia; Post, Liz; Nestor, Patrick I.

    2015-01-01

    The club meeting has served as a key delivery method for 4-H programming across the United States throughout its history. A survey of WV 4-H community club members reinforces the body of evidence that the 4-H club meeting is an effective vehicle for delivering positive youth learning opportunities within the umbrella of the Essential Elements of…

  14. Spotlight Topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A Spotlight Topic consists of a set of two or more review articles focused on a specific subject in surface science. The topics are recommended by the Board of Editors. A topic may be chosen because it is particularly new or fast-breaking, thus deserving introduction to the general readership. Or, it may be because a topic is especially controversial or confusing, requiring clarification by experts. Each review will give a critical assessment rather than an encyclopedic report. While our editors always will insist on fairness and accuracy, any review which forwards an opinion is bound to be somewhat subjective. Therefore, it is the editors' wish that the set of reviews written by different authors on the same subject matter will provide a broad and balanced viewpoint. It is often the case that an author who is an expert in a technique or method may be especially enthusiastic or critical about this technique or method. A companion review in the set may provide a different viewpoint. We are hopeful that the reader, after studying these reviews and checking some of the key references, will obtain an informed opinion of the subject. We think the set of reviews in a spotlight area will considerably shorten the ``learning time'' that a nonexpert would otherwise need to become knowledgeable about a subject. In this issue, we feature a spotlight topic on oxide surfaces. The set contains an overview article by Jacques Jupille, and four articles written by G. Pacchioni, F. Cosandey and T. E. Madey, B. G. Daniels, R. Lindsay and G. Thornton, and C. Noguera respectively. Of these, the article by Pacchioni has already appeared in SRL 7, 277 (2000). The other three articles appear in this issue. A reader who wishes to suggest a spotlight topic or recommend authors to write such reviews should contact the Editor-in-Chief. We would like to hear from you.

  15. Selecting their Own Research Topic: An Effective Means of Engaging Undergraduates in Geoscience Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, V.; Haacker-Santos, R.

    2012-12-01

    Research experiences have been shown to successfully help draw undergraduates into STEM fields. In the SOARS and RESESS summer internship programs, which focus on the atmospheric and Earth sciences respectively, we attempt to match each intern with a project that is of specific interest to them, and to place the student with a science mentor with that expertise. Initially interns are solicited before the summer on their preferred topics of interest by having applicants or reapplicants choose fields of study from a list of topics. Follow-up conversations help to better define their area of interest. We then match those with the projects that have been proposed by prospective mentors, or seek scientists in the community who do research in that subdiscipline. Mentors also evaluate the intern's course background to determine if they have the foundation necessary for that work. Interns report that the opportunity to work on a topic that they perceive as interesting is vital to their engagement in the research. One intern wrote, "One of the most important components of internships like this is definitely letting the students somewhat chose their project. I think that a really good way to turn students OFF from research is by having them spend a summer researching something they are not even close to interested in." Another commented, "I really appreciated being matched with a project in my interest area. I think that's really important, even if it just teaches you that you might want to work in a different field than you initially thought." Being immersed in such a research group or lab provides interns with a rich opportunity to learn relevant content and skills, and to start developing a professional support network. Interns continue to engage with experts in their field of interest when they present at at scientifically relevant meeting sessions during the following academic year. Many of our interns go on to study the same subdiscipline of atmospheric or Earth

  16. Current perspectives on the pediatric hip: selected topics in hip dysplasia, Perthes disease, and chondrolysis: synopsis of the hip subspecialty session at the POSNA Annual Meeting, May 1, 2013, Toronto.

    PubMed

    Millis, Michael B; Zaltz, Ira

    2014-01-01

    The following are proceedings from the Hip Breakout Session held at the 2013 annual meeting of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America in Toronto, Canada. The organizer's goal of the meeting was to gather experts with years of clinical experience to discuss topics based upon both experience and current clinical evidence. The topics that were selected represented the most commonly encountered pathology where there are wide variations of clinical practice. The invited speakers were asked to summarize both their clinical experience and the current scientific evidence and to summarize areas that require further scientific investigation. PMID:25207735

  17. Topical antiseptics as an alternative in the treatment of acute vulvovaginal candidosis.

    PubMed

    Friese, K; Neumann, G; Siebert, J

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this prospective, multicenter, randomized, case-control study was to investigate the efficacy of a nonspecific mucosal antiseptic (octenidine dihydrochloride, phenoxyethanol) with proven antifungal effects, in patients with acute symptomatic vaginal candidosis, in comparison with a specific topical antifungal agent (clotrimazole), particularly in respect to non-Candida albicans yeasts. A total of 491 patients from 29 gynecological practices, who had new clinical vaginal mycosis, not treated with antifungal agents in the last 12 months, were included in the study. The diagnosis in each case was confirmed by microscopy or positive culture. The majority of the vaginal mycoses were infections with C. albicans (72%). In 28% of patients a non- Candida species (mainly C. glabrata) contributed to the infection. Except for vaginal discharge, the success of treatment was between 71% and 91% for both clinical and subjective parameters. The control preparation was significantly better than the treatment in the test group. Mycological cure rate on the basis of cultures was 78% in the test group and 87% in the control group. These results were also significantly different. The relatively high proportion of C. glabrata isolates in this study tended to be more successfully treated by the antiseptic (to 72%) than by the administration of clotrimazole (59%). Even though therapeutic success with clotrimazole was overall significantly better than with the test preparation, the success of treatment with the antiseptic used was within the range between 70% and 90% described for topical antifungal agents. Both the good efficacy of the topical antiseptic and the increased prevalence of non-Candida albicans species causing vaginal infections mean that the use of an antiseptic may be considered a suitable alternative therapeutic concept to an appropriate topical antifungal agent in the treatment of acute vaginal candidosis.

  18. Better Group Meetings: An Aid to Better Management. Supervisory Development Conference Series. Training Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration, Washington, DC.

    A guide to conducting group meetings is presented. It contains the following sections. I. Participating in Meetings: A. Purposes: (1) to discuss the uses and benefits of the meeting as a tool of group participation and get an appreciation of meetings as dynamic situations; (2) to define the word "meeting" and discuss the uses of meetings; and (3)…

  19. Non-hormonal topical treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy: an up-to-date overview.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A; Ewies, A A A

    2013-06-01

    Vulvovaginal atrophy-related symptoms exert a negative impact on the quality of life of up to 50% of postmenopausal women. Many of them decline to use topical vaginal estrogen, which is the standard effective therapy, due to the adverse publicity over recent years, and seek for alternatives. Further, there are no safety studies to support the use of topical vaginal estrogen in breast cancer survivors, and it is considered as contraindicated by many health-care professionals. Vaginal moisturizers and lubricants as well as regular sexual activity may be helpful to such women. Vaginal moisturizers may have an equivalent efficacy to topical vaginal estrogen and should be offered to women wishing to avoid the use of hormonal therapy. Lubricants are usually used during sexual intercourse to provide temporary relief from vaginal dryness and dyspareunia; however, they have no long-term therapeutic effects. We provide in this systematic review up-to-date information, for women and health-care professionals, about the use, safety and efficacy of the available vaginal moisturizers and lubricants.

  20. Examining Accumulated Emotional Traits in Suicide Blogs With an Emotion Topic Model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fuji; Kang, Xin; Quan, Changqin

    2016-09-01

    Suicide has been a major cause of death throughout the world. Recent studies have proved a reliable connection between the emotional traits and suicide. However, detection and prevention of suicide are mostly carried out in the clinical centers, which limit the effective treatments to a restricted group of people. To assist detecting suicide risks among the public, we propose a novel method by exploring the accumulated emotional information from people's daily writings (i.e., Blogs), and examining these emotional traits that are predictive of suicidal behaviors. A complex emotion topic model is employed to detect the underlying emotions and emotion-related topics in the Blog streams, based on eight basic emotion categories and five levels of emotion intensities. Since suicide is caused through an accumulative process, we propose three accumulative emotional traits, i.e., accumulation, covariance, and transition of the consecutive Blog emotions, and employ a generalized linear regression algorithm to examine the relationship between emotional traits and suicide risk. Our experiment results suggest that the emotion transition trait turns to be more discriminative of the suicide risk, and that the combination of three traits in linear regression would generate even more discriminative predictions. A classification of the suicide and nonsuicide Blog articles in our additional experiment verifies this result. Finally, we conduct a case study of the most commonly mentioned emotion-related topics in the suicidal Blogs, to further understand the association between emotions and thoughts for these authors. PMID:26208372

  1. An overview of topical antifungal therapy in dermatomycoses. A North American perspective.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Einarson, T R; Summerbell, R C; Shear, N H

    1998-05-01

    Dermatophytes cause fungal infections of keratinised tissues, e.g. skin, hair and nails. The organisms belong to 3 genera, Trichophyton, Epidermophyton and Microsporum. Dermatophytes may be grouped into 3 categories based on host preference and natural habitat. Anthropophilic species predominantly infect humans, geophilic species are soil based and may infect both humans and animals, zoophilic species generally infect non-human mammals. It is important to confirm mycologically the clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis and other tinea infections prior to commencing therapy. The identity of the fungal organism may provide guidance about the appropriateness of a given topical antifungal agent. Special techniques may be required to obtain the best yield of fungal organisms from a given site, especially the scalp and nails. It is also important to realise the limitations of certain diagnostic aids e.g., Wood's light examination is positive in tinea capitis due to M. canis and M. audouinii (ectothrix organisms); however, Wood's light examination is negative in T. tonsurans (endothrix organism). Similarly, it is important to be aware that cicloheximide in culture medium will inhibit growth of non-dermatophytes. Appropriate media are therefore required to evaluate the growth of some significant non-dermatophyte moulds. For tinea infections other than tinea capitis and tinea unguium, topical antifungals may be considered. For effective therapy of tinea capitis an oral antifungal is generally necessary. Similarly, oral antifungals are the therapy of choice, especially if onychomycosis is moderate to severe. Furthermore, where the tinea infection involves a large area, in an immunocompromised host or if infection is recurrent with poor response to topical agents, then oral antifungal therapy may be necessary. Topical antifungal agents may be broadly divided into specific and nonspecific agents. The former group includes the polyenes, azoles, allylamines, amorolfine, ciclopirox

  2. Dogmas and controversies in compression therapy: report of an International Compression Club (ICC) meeting, Brussels, May 2011.

    PubMed

    Flour, Mieke; Clark, Michael; Partsch, Hugo; Mosti, Giovanni; Uhl, Jean-Francois; Chauveau, Michel; Cros, Francois; Gelade, Pierre; Bender, Dean; Andriessen, Anneke; Schuren, Jan; Cornu-Thenard, André; Arkans, Ed; Milic, Dragan; Benigni, Jean-Patrick; Damstra, Robert; Szolnoky, Gyozo; Schingale, Franz

    2013-10-01

    The International Compression Club (ICC) is a partnership between academics, clinicians and industry focused upon understanding the role of compression in the management of different clinical conditions. The ICC meet regularly and from these meetings have produced a series of eight consensus publications upon topics ranging from evidence-based compression to compression trials for arm lymphoedema. All of the current consensus documents can be accessed on the ICC website (http://www.icc-compressionclub.com/index.php). In May 2011, the ICC met in Brussels during the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) annual conference. With almost 50 members in attendance, the day-long ICC meeting challenged a series of dogmas and myths that exist when considering compression therapies. In preparation for a discussion on beliefs surrounding compression, a forum was established on the ICC website where presenters were able to display a summary of their thoughts upon each dogma to be discussed during the meeting. Members of the ICC could then provide comments on each topic thereby widening the discussion to the entire membership of the ICC rather than simply those who were attending the EWMA conference. This article presents an extended report of the issues that were discussed, with each dogma covered in a separate section. The ICC discussed 12 'dogmas' with areas 1 through 7 dedicated to materials and application techniques used to apply compression with the remaining topics (8 through 12) related to the indications for using compression.

  3. ‘The concept of information in physics’: an interdisciplinary topical lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T.

    2015-01-01

    I present a didactical project, introducing the concept of information with all its interdisciplinary ramifications to students of physics and the neighbouring sciences. Proposed by Boltzmann as entropy, information has evolved into a common paradigm in science, economy, and culture, superseding energy in this role. As an integrating factor of the natural sciences at least, it lends itself as guiding principle for innovative teaching that transcends the frontiers of the traditional disciplines and emphasizes general viewpoints. Based on this idea, the postgraduate topical lecture presented here is intended to provide a firm conceptual basis, technically precise but versatile enough to be applied to specific topics from a broad range of fields. Basic notions of physics like causality, chance, irreversibility, symmetry, disorder, chaos, complexity can be reinterpreted on a common footing in terms of information and information flow. Dissipation and deterministic chaos, exemplifying information currents between macroscopic and microscopic scales, receive special attention. An important part is dedicated to quantum mechanics as an approach to physics that takes the finiteness of information systematically into account. Emblematic features like entanglement and non-locality appear as natural consequences. The course has been planned and tested for an audience comprising, besides physicists, students of other natural sciences as well as mathematics, informatics, engineering, sociology, and philosophy. I sketch history and objectives of this project, provide a resume of the course, report on experiences gained teaching it in various formats, and indicate possible future developments.

  4. Topical distribution of acyclovir in normal equine skin and equine sarcoids: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Haspeslagh, M; Taevernier, L; Maes, A A; Vlaminck, L E M; De Spiegeleer, B; Croubels, S M; Martens, A M

    2016-06-01

    Topical acyclovir application is an owner-friendly treatment for occult equine sarcoids, without the caustic side-effects other topical treatments have. Variable clinical success rates have been described, but it is not known to what rate and extent acyclovir penetrates in and through equine skin from a topical formulation. In the current study, an in vitro Franz diffusion model was used to determine the permeation parameters for a generic 5% acyclovir cetomacrogol cream for both healthy and sarcoid equine skin. The distribution of acyclovir between different layers of both skin types was also evaluated. While acyclovir penetrated through both skin types, significantly less acyclovir permeated to the deep dermis of sarcoid skin (197.62ng/mm(3)) compared to normal skin (459.41ng/mm(3)). Within sarcoid skin samples, significantly higher acyclovir concentrations were found in the epidermis (983.59ng/mm(3)) compared to the superficial dermis (450.02ng/mm(3)) and the deep dermis. At each sample point, significantly more acyclovir permeated to the receptor fluid through normal skin compared to sarcoid skin, which is reflected in the significantly higher permeation parameters of normal skin. Normal skin was found to be more permissive for acyclovir, but even in sarcoid skin, enough acyclovir reached the deep dermis to treat a Herpes simplex virus infection. In the case of equine sarcoids, the treatment is aimed at the Bovine papillomavirus and no information is available on the susceptibility of the DNA polymerase of this virus for acyclovir. Therefore, further research is needed to determine the efficacy of acyclovir to treat equine sarcoids. PMID:27234546

  5. Topical rosiglitazone is an effective anti-scarring agent in the cornea.

    PubMed

    Huxlin, Krystel R; Hindman, Holly B; Jeon, Kye-Im; Bühren, Jens; MacRae, Scott; DeMagistris, Margaret; Ciufo, David; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Corneal scarring remains a major cause of blindness world-wide, with limited treatment options, all of which have side-effects. Here, we tested the hypothesis that topical application of Rosiglitazone, a Thiazolidinedione and ligand of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), can effectively block scar formation in a cat model of corneal damage. Adult cats underwent bilateral epithelial debridement followed by excimer laser ablation of the central corneal stroma to a depth of ~160 µm as a means of experimentally inducing a reproducible wound. Eyes were then left untreated, or received 50 µl of either 10 µM Rosiglitazone in DMSO/Celluvisc, DMSO/Celluvisc vehicle or Celluvisc vehicle twice daily for 2 weeks. Cellular aspects of corneal wound healing were evaluated with in vivo confocal imaging and post-mortem immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Impacts of the wound and treatments on optical quality were assessed using wavefront sensing and optical coherence tomography at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-operatively. In parallel, cat corneal fibroblasts were cultured to assess the effects of Rosiglitazone on TGFβ-induced αSMA expression. Topical application of Rosiglitazone to cat eyes after injury decreased αSMA expression and haze, as well as the induction of lower-order and residual, higher-order wavefront aberrations compared to vehicle-treated eyes. Rosiglitazone also inhibited TGFβ-induced αSMA expression in cultured corneal fibroblasts. In conclusion, Rosiglitazone effectively controlled corneal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro, while restoring corneal thickness and optics. Its topical application may represent an effective, new avenue for the prevention of corneal scarring with distinct advantages for pathologically thin corneas.

  6. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p < 0.05). Histological analysis indicated a reduction in mast cell tryptase and chymase positive cell numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p < 0.05). Determination of transdermal uptake indicated that GTCs were detected in the biopsies. This model could be adapted to study a range of different topical formulations in both normal and diseased skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment. PMID:27086034

  7. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p < 0.05). Histological analysis indicated a reduction in mast cell tryptase and chymase positive cell numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p < 0.05). Determination of transdermal uptake indicated that GTCs were detected in the biopsies. This model could be adapted to study a range of different topical formulations in both normal and diseased skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment.

  8. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Hamed, Maha I; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin's ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  9. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  10. Bexarotene Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may bathe, shower, or swim during your treatment with topical bexarotene, but you should use only a mild, ... your treatment. If you become pregnant during your treatment with topical bexarotene, call your doctor immediately.tell your doctor ...

  11. 75 FR 61175 - Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Species (ANS) Task Force. The meeting is open to the public. The meeting topics are identified in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section. DATES: The ANS Task Force will meet from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on...

  12. Topical Steroids.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Gretchen M; Harvey, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an inflammatory condition with heterogeneous pathophysiology. A cornerstone of the management of this condition is the use of anti-inflammatory agents. Corticosteroids are very effective and the most commonly used, but other drugs with immunodulatory activity such as anti-IL5, doxycycline (Th2), and macrolides (anti-neutrophilic/IL8) have been shown to have efficacy. Although systemic corticosteroids have shown benefit in managing this condition, the frequency of use often required in this condition is associated with significant adverse effects. Topical corticosteroids, particularly when utilized after endoscopic sinus surgery and delivered in a high volume, high pressure manner, provide the desired anti-inflammatory effects with nearly negligible systemic absorption. Studies assessing the long-term use of second generation topical corticosteroids have demonstrated no significant effects on cortisol levels, growth rate, intraocular pressures or lens opacification, or local mucosal atrophy. Patients who often respond most favorably to corticosteroid treatment are those with a Th2-mediated, highly eosinophilic CRSwNP. However, there is a subset of patients who are steroid resistant. In the case of a predominantly neutrophilic CRSwNP, it is important to be aware that patients may respond well to the use of macrolide therapy. Additionally, the use of verapamil has shown promise in increasing steroid responsiveness in a difficult to treat group of patients with steroid resistance. Topical corticosteroids play a key role in the long term management of this complicated inflammatory condition by providing the much needed pharmacologic local control with minimal systemic adverse effects. PMID:27466854

  13. An Investigation of Children's Interested and Not Interested Science Topics in Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Fu-Pei; Lee, Sung-Tao

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the science topics that children felt interested and not interested in textbooks for compiling science texts to improve their learning. Four hundred and eighty-eight fifth and sixth graders were invited to finish ISTQ (interested science topics questionnaire) which was composed of three subscales: (1)…

  14. Arts Education: An ASCD Topic Pack. Revised for 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA.

    This topic pack, revised for 2000-2001, is designed to provide timely information on arts education. The topic pack includes the following: full-text articles from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development's (ASCD) publications which have been carefully chosen and may include articles from "Educational Leadership" magazine,…

  15. Efficacy of beta-carotene topical application in melasma: an open clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kar, H K

    2002-01-01

    B-carotene, a structural analogue of vitamin A, works as an agonist of this vitamin, by reversibly sticking the chemical mechanism of melanogenesis by saturating the nuclear receptors of melanocytes and/or binding protein. To study the safety and efficacy of b-carotene lotion on topical application in melasma, clinically diagnosed 31 adults (26F and 5M) with melasma were included in this trial. All of them applied b-carotene lotion daily, morning and evening to the affected areas. Twenty six of them completed regular 8 weeks treatment. Nine of them continued same treatment for 16 more weeks. All cases were evaluated clinically using melasma intensity (MPi) index (Grade I, II, III) and size of the lesion. Clinical photograph was taken for each case at 0 week, 8th week and 24th week. Initial 8 weeks treatment revealed that the single case with grade-I pigmentation included in this study recovered completely. Two out of 13 cases with grade-II pigmentation, showed no change, in 10 cases, pigmentation became lighter to grade-I (76.9%) and one case recovered completely. Out of 12 grade-III cases, one did not show any change, 10 (83.3%) converted to grade-II and one to grade-I. At the end of 24 weeks, all the nine cases (2 grade-II and 7 grade III) showed further clearing of the pigmentation to the next lower grade. Side-effects like mild erythema and local irritation were observed in two cases each, who were advised to discontinue treatment as per the protocol. In conclusion, topical application of b-carotene lotion appears to bean effective and safe for melasma. Longer duration of application is associated with better result.

  16. Topical Products for Human Hair Regeneration: A Comparative Study on an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Orasan, Meda Sandra; Coneac, Andrei; Muresan, Adriana; Mihu, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background Hair loss and hair growth is the subject of tremendous amount of research. Objective This study investigated the efficacy of three chemical treatments used in humans for hair loss, using a rat model of hair regrowth. The products tested were 2% minoxidil, Hairgrow (Dar-Al-Dawa Pharma), Aminexil, Dercos (Vichy Laboratoires), and Kerium, Anti-chute (La Roche-Posay). Methods Thirty-two adult female Wistar-Bratislava rats were assigned to 4 groups. Two rectangular areas (2×4 cm) were shaved on either sides of the mid dorsal line (left side - control; right side - test area). Group I was treated topically with 2% minoxidil, group II with Aminexil, and group III with Kerium. Each rat received 0.3 ml of substance applied topically to the shaved dorsal skin every day for 28 days. Rats in group IV served as sham controls receiving no treatment. Hair regrowth was evaluated by trichoscopy (with a dermatoscope), grown hair weight (from a surface area of 1 cm2), and histopathological examination for skin thickness, follicle count, and percentage of anagen induction (morphometric assessment). Results Treatment with 2% minoxidil significantly induced hair regrowth as assessed by trichoscopy, hair weight examination, and morphometric evaluation. Hair weight examination and morphometric assessment demonstrated the lowest hair growth effect with Aminexil among the tested products. Treatment with Kerium was found to significantly induce hair regrowth (p<0.05 as compared to the control group). Conclusion Our study demonstrates that hair regrowth efficacy of products recommended for human use is not similar when tested on an animal model. PMID:26848220

  17. Efinaconazole Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat fungal toenail infections (infections that may cause nail discoloration, splitting, or pain). Efinaconazole topical solution is ... antifungals. It works by stopping the growth of nail fungus.

  18. 78 FR 64025 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Matter Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Matter Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency Meeting FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: October 21, 2013 (78 FR 62364). TIME AND DATE: 10:00 a...'' notice is hereby given that the NCUA Board gave notice on October 21, 2013 (78 FR 62364) of the...

  19. Functional assessment and treatment of perseverative speech about restricted topics in an adolescent with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Wayne W; Rodriguez, Nicole M; Owen, Todd M

    2013-01-01

    A functional analysis showed that a 14-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome displayed perseverative speech (or "restricted interests") reinforced by attention. To promote appropriate speech in a turn-taking format, we implemented differential reinforcement (DR) of nonperseverative speech and DR of on-topic speech within a multiple schedule with stimuli that signaled the contingencies in effect and who was to select the topic. Both treatments reduced perseverative speech, but only DR of on-topic speech increased appropriate turn taking during conversation. Treatment effects were maintained when implemented by family members and novel therapists.

  20. Functional assessment and treatment of perseverative speech about restricted topics in an adolescent with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Wayne W; Rodriguez, Nicole M; Owen, Todd M

    2013-01-01

    A functional analysis showed that a 14-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome displayed perseverative speech (or "restricted interests") reinforced by attention. To promote appropriate speech in a turn-taking format, we implemented differential reinforcement (DR) of nonperseverative speech and DR of on-topic speech within a multiple schedule with stimuli that signaled the contingencies in effect and who was to select the topic. Both treatments reduced perseverative speech, but only DR of on-topic speech increased appropriate turn taking during conversation. Treatment effects were maintained when implemented by family members and novel therapists. PMID:24114104

  1. Topical oral cavity pharmacokinetic modeling of a stannous fluoride dentifrice: an unusual two compartment model.

    PubMed

    Scott, Douglas C; Coggan, John W; Cruze, Charles A; He, Tao; Johnson, Robert D

    2009-10-01

    A pharmacokinetic model was developed describing the pharmacokinetics of stannous fluoride in human subjects after oral topical application of a stannous fluoride dentifrice. Twenty subjects participated in an investigation of an experimental dentifrice. Subjects rinsed their mouths with the experimental dentifrice slurry. Saliva and plaque samples were obtained from the subjects at various times up to 6 h after administration. Samples were analyzed for total tin content, used as an analytical marker for the active stannous fluoride ingredient, using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. The modeling indicates that there is an obvious kinetic relationship between saliva and plaque compartments and that stannous fluoride is very well retained in and slowly released from plaque (and oral surfaces) into saliva. Additionally, both compartments are simultaneously loaded during administration unlike typical systemic drug behavior, and the elimination rate "constant" from the central compartment (saliva) changes due to changes in salivary flow. Stannous fluoride is cleared from saliva rapidly but very well retained in gingival plaque. The model with simultaneous loading of plaque and saliva describes these observations and may account for the prolonged antiplaque and antigingivitis benefits of stannous fluoride.

  2. OSA Proceedings on Advanced Solid-State Lasers. Vol. 10 - Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Hilton Head, SC, Mar. 18-20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, G.; Chase, L. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advanced solid-state lasers discusses Cr(3+), Cr(4+), short-pulse, titanium, F-center, mid-IR, and diode-pumped lasers, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to the stabilization and a spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements, crystal growth and spectroscopy of Cr:LiBaAlF6, a Q-switched tunable forsterite laser, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of chromium-doped forsterite. Topics addressed include efficient frequency doubling of a self-starting additive-pulse mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, recent advances in Ti:Al2O3 unstable-resonator lasers, all-solid-state operation of a CW Ti:Al2O3 laser, and upconversion studies of flashlamp-pumped Cr,T,Ho:YAG. Also discussed are the top output parameters of an Ho-laser, spectroscopy and the 3-micron laser potential of Er crystals, the pulsed operation of microchip lasers, and blue optical parametric generation in LiB3O5.

  3. The development of an in vitro screening strategy for topically applied products.

    PubMed

    Horan, Ian; Clotworthy, Margaret; Fokunang, Charles N; Tomkins, Paul T

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was the pharmaco-toxicological understanding of the constituents of an authenticated herbal mixture. The mixture was prepared by maceration in ethanol and subsequent dilution to produce a topically applied lotion, for which the intended target conditions are psoriasis and eczema. A three-tiered in vitro screening strategy was adopted for evaluating this product, comprising cytotoxicity assays; mutagenicity screening and therapeutic evaluation. Viability assays performed with dilutions of both the herbal concentrate and final product on organotypic cell lines indicated that neither preparation acted as an irritant. Genotoxicity screening using six strains of Salmonella typhimurium showed no mutagenic potential, and furthermore significant anti-microbial activity was evident. Therapeutic evaluation involved assessing the antioxidant potential of the extract, which can be correlated to an anti-inflammatory effect. Nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) assay results indicate that the extract can reduce superoxide anion generation by 45%. The extract also increased cell viability on exposure to hydrogen peroxide by 28%, illustrating its dismutation potential. A 3-D skin culture system, EpiDerm, released 3000 microg/ml upon exposure to the extract, implying that the components enhance arachidonic acid metabolism. Overall, it may be concluded that the herbal extract is sufficiently non-toxic for dermal application and possesses anti-inflammatory activity.

  4. [An essay on the topicality and problem complex. Ethics of the Reverence for Life].

    PubMed

    Benz-Schwarzburg, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer developed an egalitarian biocentrism which follows the maxim "I am life that wants to live, in the midst of life that wants to live". Following Schweitzer's idea of the Reverence for Life obviously leads to ethical dilemmas - as for example in the case of animal experimentation. In many situations we cannot but kill or harm, even if we don't want to, and must live at the cost of other living beings. How can the Reverence for Life stand up to that? Overcoming ethical dilemmas often means agreeing to compromises, which often leave us behind in discomfort. This discomfort and its meaning for Schweitzer's ethical concept can be illustrated by means of an example. Imagine two biologists, both conducting animal experiments that seem ethically justified and necessary to them. Nevertheless they can hold very different positions concerning their action. In some respect Schweitzer's ideas may be problematic and fairly radical. But they are also interesting and topical in so far as they don't let us get away easily after the decision-making process in an ethical dilemma. His theory opens up for the idea of compensation and development of alternative methods arising from what he calls a unique solidarity between human and non-human animals. PMID:18360730

  5. A study of an ethics education topic for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzidis, Evdokia; Schmitz, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to explore nursing students' perceptions of the relative value of various aspects of the ethical component of the undergraduate topic, 'Ethics and Law applied to Nursing' (topic NURS2104). To enable time for reflection on ethics in nursing, sampling occurred 1 year after successful completion of the above-mentioned topic and after successful completion of all but the final clinical experience components of the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) degree. A significant proportion of respondents perceived ethics education as relevant to professional practices. It is also noteworthy that the ethical decision-making strategies that had been incorporated into the topic (NURS2104) became transformed by the clinical experience of each particular student. While results of this study are not conclusive, they nevertheless provide important information for future nursing students on the evolutionary development of ethics education.

  6. Transient hypothyroidism in premature infants after short-term topical iodine exposure: an avoidable risk?

    PubMed

    Pinsker, Jordan E; McBayne, Krista; Edwards, Mary; Jensen, Kirk; Crudo, David F; Bauer, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    Studies in preterm infants have shown that prolonged treatment with topical iodine (multiple doses, often over multiple days) can transiently suppress thyroid function. However, it is uncertain if topical iodine exposure for very short periods of time can cause significant changes in thyroid function. We report two cases of transient hypothyroidism in preterm infants after short-term exposure to topical iodine during surgical preparation, and review their clinical and laboratory findings before and after iodine exposure. We conclude that premature infants are at risk of developing transient hypothyroidism in response to a single, short-term exposure to topical iodine, even in iodine-sufficient geographical areas. We advise monitoring of thyroid function in these infants after iodine exposure, as treatment with levothyroxine may be needed for a limited duration to prevent the sequelae of untreated hypothyroidism. Consideration of using alternative cleansing agents is also advised.

  7. Topical minoxidil fortified with finasteride: An account of maintenance of hair density after replacing oral finasteride

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, B. S.; Nandhini, T.; Vasanth, Vani; Sriram, Rashmi; Navale, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Finasteride acts by reducing dihydrotestosterone levels, thereby inhibiting miniaturization of hair follicles in patients with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Oral finasteride is associated with side effects such as decreased libido, sexual dysfunction, and gynecomastia. Aim: The aim of the following study is to assess the efficacy of maintaining hair growth with 5% topical minoxidil fortified with 0.1% finasteride in patients with AGA after initial treatment with 5% topical minoxidil and oral finasteride for two years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective assessment was done in 50 male patients aged 20-40 years with AGA. All the patients had been initially treated with topical minoxidil and oral finasteride for a period of two years, after which the oral finasteride was replaced with topical minoxidil fortified with finasteride. Five of 50 patients had discontinued the treatment for a period of 8-12 months and were then resumed with only topical minoxidil fortified with finasteride. The patients’ case sheets and photographs were reviewed by independent observers and the efficacy of minoxidil-finasteride combination was assessed. Results: Of the 45 patients who underwent a continuous treatment for AGA, 84.44% maintained a good hair density with topical minoxidil-finasteride combinatio. Of the five patients who discontinued oral finasteride for 8-12 months, four demonstrated good improvement in hair density when treatment was resumed with topical minoxidil-finasteride combination. Conclusion: Topical finasteride can be considered for hair density maintenance after initial improvement with oral finasteride, thereby obviating the indefinite use of oral finasteride. PMID:25657911

  8. Remote sensing of the earth's surface; Proceedings of the Symposium 2, Topical Meeting, and Workshop I of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V. (Editor); Walter, L. S. (Editor); Maetzler, C. (Editor); Rott, H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the spaceborne study of the earth's surface, crust, and lithosphere, recent results from SPOT and Landsat TM investigations, and microwave observations of snowpack and soil properties. Attention is given to airborne and satellite-borne gravimetry, stereoviewing from space, TM studies of volcanism and tectonism in central Mexico, remote sensing of volcanoes, the uses of SPOT in forest management, the tectonics of the central Andes, and the application of VLBI to crustal movement studies. Also discussed are Landsat TM band ratios for soil investigations, snow dielectric measurements, the microwave radiometry of snow, microwave signatures of bare soil, the estimation of Alpine snow properties from Landsat TM data, and an experimental study of vegetable canopy microwave emissions.

  9. Efficacy of beta-carotene topical application in melasma--an open clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kar, H K

    2003-01-01

    Beta-carotene, a structural analogue of vitamin A, works as an agonist of this vitamin, by reversibly sticking the chemical mechanism of melanogenesis by saturating the nuclear receptors of melanocytes and/or binding protein. To study the safety and efficacy of Beta-carotene lotion on topical application in melasma, clinically diagnosed 31 adults (26F and 5M) with melasma were included in this trial. All of them applied Beta-carotene lotion daily, morning and evening to the affected areas. Twenty six of them, completed regular 8 weeks treatment. Nine of them continued same treatment for 16 more weeks. All cases were evaluated clinically using melasma intensity (MPI) index (Grade I, II, III) and size of the lesion. Clinical photograph was taken for each case at 0 week, 8th week and 24th week. Initial 8 weeks treatment revealed that the single case with grade-I pigmentation included in this study recovered completely. Two out of 13 cases with grade-II pigmentation, showed no change, in 10 cases, pigmentation became lighter to grade-I (76.9%) and one case recovered completely. Out of 12 grade-III cases, one did not show any change, 10 (83.3%) converted to grade-II and one to grade-I. At the end of 24 weeks, all the nine cases (2 grade-II and 7 grade-III) showed further clearing of the pigmentation to the next lower grade. Side effects like mild erythemo and local irritation were observed in two cases each, who were advised to discontinue treatment as per the protocol. In control group, out of 12 (two with grade-II, six in grade-II, and four in grade-III) cases 11 showed no improvement, only one case with grade-II melasma revealed reduction of pigmentation to grade-I. One case developed local irritation. In conclusion, topical application of Beta-carotene lotion appears to be an effective and safe for melasma. Longer duration of application is associated with better result.

  10. An innovative, promising topical treatment for psoriasis: a Romanian clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gianfaldoni, S; Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Wollina, U; Tirant, M; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with negative impacts both physically and psychologically. It is a common disorder affecting 2-3% of the total world population, in some cases causing changes to the nail and joints as well as skin lesions. The cutaneous manifestations of psoriasis can vary in morphology and severity and therapy should be tailored accordingly. Even if today many therapeutic options are available for psoriasis treatment, none of them provide excellent clinical results without the risk of side effects. The authors investigate the efficacy of Dr. Michaels® (Soratinex®) natural products in the topical treatments of a group of psoriatic patients. Sixty-two patients (34 male/28 female) from Romania, aged 18-70 years (mean age: 52 years), affected by a mild to severe form of chronic plaque psoriasis were included in this study. Each patient has been treated with a triphasic application of Dr. Michaels® (Soratinex®) natural products, twice a day for six weeks. The products were applied on skin and scalp lesions, but not on the face, genital and flexures. The evaluation of the tested products was based on the PASI of each patient at time 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks. The tested products were ineffective in five of 57 patients. Eleven patients had a moderate improvement (PASI decrease 26-50%); 11 patients had a good improvement (PASI decrease 51-75%) and 30 patients an outstanding one (PASI decrease 76-100%). Twenty-three% of patients developed folliculitis that regressed upon discontinuation of the application. Five patients developed pruritus, which regressed spontaneously. The cosmetic effect was evaluated as indifferent by 44% of patients, as good by 40% of patients and as excellent by 16% of patients. Ninety-five% of patients stated that they would continue to use the tested products, because it was effective and with poor side effects since the products were natural. In our experimental study, the topical application of Dr. Michaels

  11. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch early cancer lesions: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Liu, Kuang-Ting; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Liu, Chung-Ji; Chen, Chih-Ping

    2011-03-01

    Oral cancer has becomes the most prominent cancer disease in recent years in Taiwan. The reason is the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people results in oral cancer becomes the fastest growth incident cancer amongst other major cancer diseases. In previous studies showed that photosan, haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), has demonstrated effective PDT results on human head and neck disease studies. To avoid the systemic phototoxic effect of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when photosan reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan gel. We found that photosan reached its peak level in cancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical photosan-mediated PDT (fluence rate: 600 mW/cm2; light exposure dose 200 J/cm2) using the portable Lumacare 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that topical photosan-mediated PDT was an applicable treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions.

  12. An Experimental In Vivo Model to Characterize “Heavy Legs” Symptom in Topical Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pedro Contreiras; Rodrigues, Luís Monteiro

    2009-01-01

    The “Heavy legs” symptom is regarded as an early expression of chronic venous failure, estimated to affect 40% of the population in developing countries. A new methodology is proposed to approach the “tired or heavy legs” symptom. Seven females with this complaint applied a standard topical formulation during 28 days in one leg randomly chosen. Local blood flow records were obtained instantaneously and during postural change with a laser doppler flowmeter (LDF). High-frequency sonography and local morphometry were also obtained at Days 0, 14, and 28. When compared with D0, LDF values present a significant decrease of both basal and dynamical values after Day 14 and Day 28 suggesting that this effect may result from the formulation application, also involving the related massage. Centimetric measurements and sonographic analysis also supported those inferences. The proposed methodology can evaluate the dynamical changes of  “heavy legs” symptom and eventually be very useful to assess the related claim support. PMID:20585480

  13. Comparison of skin permeability for three diclofenac topical formulations: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Folzer, E; Gonzalez, D; Singh, R; Derendorf, H

    2014-01-01

    Diclofenac is a hydrophilic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) widely used in humans and animals. There are limited published studies evaluating diclofenac's skin permeation following topical administration. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the in vitro permeation of three different diclofenac-containing formulations (patch, gel, solution) over 24 hours. These formulations were applied (n = 6 per formulation) to pig skin sandwiched between the two chambers in a static Franz diffusion cell and aliquots from the receptor medium were sampled at pre-defined time points. An HPLC method with UV detection was developed and validated with the aim of characterizing the transepidermal penetration in the in vitro system. Using this assay to determine the permeation parameters, results at 24 hours showed that the Flector patch released the highest drug amount (54.6%), whereas a lower drug amount was delivered with the Voltaren Emulgel (38.2%) and the solution (34.4%). The commercial gel showed the highest flux (39.9 +/- 0.9 microg/cm2/h) and the shortest lag-time (1.97 +/- 0.02 h). Based on these in vitro results using pig skin, the transdermal patch resulted in a long-lasting controlled release of diclofenac, while the gel had the shortest lag-time.

  14. Successful use of topical "Ankaferd Blood Stopper" for repetitive bleedings in an infant with infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Annagür, Ali; Altunhan, Hüseyin; Konak, Murat; Ors, Rahmi

    2012-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common vascular tumor of childhood. A major feature of this tumor is rapid growth during a proliferation phase in the first year of life, followed by contraction through a slow involution phase. Several complications may emerge during this course. Bleeding at the site of the lesion and infection are the most common complications. 'Ankaferd Blood Stopper' (ABS) is a hemostatic agent produced as a mixture of five separate plant extracts. Provision of hemostasis by ABS is independent from coagulation factors and the standard coagulation cascade. Furthermore, ABS has an antimicrobial effect. In this article, we have presented a seven-year-old infant with IH on the lower lip who had been admitted with the symptoms of frequent bleedings and infection, and who was successfully treated with topical ABS in terms of control of bleeding and infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of IH that has been treated with ABS for bleeding. PMID:22993655

  15. Systematic review of antibiotic resistance in acne: an increasing topical and oral threat.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Timothy R; Efthimiou, John; Dréno, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Topical and oral antibiotics are routinely used to treat acne. However, antibiotic resistance is increasing, with many countries reporting that more than 50% of Propionibacterium acnes strains are resistant to topical macrolides, making them less effective. We reviewed the current scientific literature to enable proposal of recommendations for antibiotic use in acne treatment. References were identified through PubMed searches for articles published from January, 1954, to March 7, 2015, using four multiword searches. Ideally, benzoyl peroxide in combination with a topical retinoid should be used instead of a topical antibiotic to minimise the impact of resistance. Oral antibiotics still have a role in the treatment of moderate-to-severe acne, but only with a topical retinoid, benzoyl peroxide, or their combination, and ideally for no longer than 3 months. To limit resistance, it is recommended that benzoyl peroxide should always be added when long-term oral antibiotic use is deemed necessary. The benefit-to-risk ratio of long-term antibiotic use should be carefully considered and, in particular, use alone avoided where possible. There is a need to treat acne with effective alternatives to antibiotics to reduce the likelihood of resistance.

  16. Systematic review of antibiotic resistance in acne: an increasing topical and oral threat.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Timothy R; Efthimiou, John; Dréno, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Topical and oral antibiotics are routinely used to treat acne. However, antibiotic resistance is increasing, with many countries reporting that more than 50% of Propionibacterium acnes strains are resistant to topical macrolides, making them less effective. We reviewed the current scientific literature to enable proposal of recommendations for antibiotic use in acne treatment. References were identified through PubMed searches for articles published from January, 1954, to March 7, 2015, using four multiword searches. Ideally, benzoyl peroxide in combination with a topical retinoid should be used instead of a topical antibiotic to minimise the impact of resistance. Oral antibiotics still have a role in the treatment of moderate-to-severe acne, but only with a topical retinoid, benzoyl peroxide, or their combination, and ideally for no longer than 3 months. To limit resistance, it is recommended that benzoyl peroxide should always be added when long-term oral antibiotic use is deemed necessary. The benefit-to-risk ratio of long-term antibiotic use should be carefully considered and, in particular, use alone avoided where possible. There is a need to treat acne with effective alternatives to antibiotics to reduce the likelihood of resistance. PMID:26852728

  17. Clindamycin Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... topical clindamycin.you should know that abrasive or medicated soaps and skin products that contain alcohol may ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from ...

  18. Fluorouracil Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by years of too much exposure to sunlight). Fluorouracil cream and topical solution are also used ... plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and UV light (such as tanning booths) and ...

  19. Mometasone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Mometasone comes as a topical cream, ointment, and lotion. It usually is applied externally once a day. ... affected skin areas once daily.To apply the lotion, place a few drops on the affected areas ...

  20. Dapsone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Dapsone topical is used to treat acne. Dapsone is in a class of medications called sulfone antibiotics. It works ... taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  1. Bimatoprost Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... much medication. Talk to your doctor about using topical bimatoprost if you are also using the eyedrops.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  2. Mining FDA drug labels using an unsupervised learning technique - topic modeling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug labels contain a broad array of information, ranging from adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to drug efficacy, risk-benefit consideration, and more. However, the labeling language used to describe these information is free text often containing ambiguous semantic descriptions, which poses a great challenge in retrieving useful information from the labeling text in a consistent and accurate fashion for comparative analysis across drugs. Consequently, this task has largely relied on the manual reading of the full text by experts, which is time consuming and labor intensive. Method In this study, a novel text mining method with unsupervised learning in nature, called topic modeling, was applied to the drug labeling with a goal of discovering “topics” that group drugs with similar safety concerns and/or therapeutic uses together. A total of 794 FDA-approved drug labels were used in this study. First, the three labeling sections (i.e., Boxed Warning, Warnings and Precautions, Adverse Reactions) of each drug label were processed by the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) to convert the free text of each label to the standard ADR terms. Next, the topic modeling approach with latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) was applied to generate 100 topics, each associated with a set of drugs grouped together based on the probability analysis. Lastly, the efficacy of the topic modeling was evaluated based on known information about the therapeutic uses and safety data of drugs. Results The results demonstrate that drugs grouped by topics are associated with the same safety concerns and/or therapeutic uses with statistical significance (P<0.05). The identified topics have distinct context that can be directly linked to specific adverse events (e.g., liver injury or kidney injury) or therapeutic application (e.g., antiinfectives for systemic use). We were also able to identify potential adverse events that

  3. Successful treatment of ligneous conjunctivitis with topical fresh frozen plasma in an infant.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Zuhal Özen; Özdemir, Özdemir; Acar, Damla; Gül, Ece; Akbay, Serap

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old female infant presented to our clinic with bilateral eyelid swelling, yellowish-white membranes under both lids, and mucoid ocular discharge. Her aunt had similar ocular problems that were undiagnosed. The conjunctival membranes were excised and histopathological investigation of these membranes showed ligneous conjunctivitis. Further, laboratory examination revealed plasminogen deficiency. A good response was observed to topical fresh frozen plasma (FFP) treatment without systemic therapy, and the membranes did not recur during the treatment. Topical FFP treatment may facilitate rapid rehabilitation and prevent recurrence in patients with ligneous conjunctivitis.

  4. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Li, Yun-Yao; Debnath, Asim K

    2004-01-01

    Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1) infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2) binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s) to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored. PMID:15485580

  5. An essential primer for understanding the role of topical hemostats, surgical sealants, and adhesives for maintaining hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Gabay, Michael; Boucher, Bradley A

    2013-09-01

    A wide variety of topical hemostats are approved as adjunctive therapies in the maintenance of hemostasis during surgical procedures in which conventional methods are insufficient or not practical. A multidisciplinary approach to the selection and application of these agents requires input from all members of the surgical team including surgeons, perioperative nurses, blood bank specialists, and pharmacists. However, pharmacist knowledge regarding topical hemostats may be limited based on lack of formal education within college of pharmacy curricula as well as their use being predominantly in the operating room setting. Furthermore, some of these agents might be procured through central supply rather than the hospital pharmacy. Topical hemostats include agents that act as a mechanical barrier to bleeding and provide a physical matrix for clotting, biologically active agents that catalyze coagulation, combination therapies, and synthetic sealants and adhesives. Although many of the topical hemostats were approved for use before the requirement for clinical trials, this review provides an overview of the available clinical evidence regarding the appropriate uses and safety considerations associated with these agents. Proper use of these agents is vital to achieving the best clinical outcomes. Specifically, knowledge of the contraindications and potential adverse events associated with topical hemostats can help prevent unwanted outcomes. Therefore, an understanding of the benefits and potential risks associated with these agents will allow hospital pharmacists to assist in the development and implementation of institutional policies regarding the safe and effective use of hemostatic agents commonly used in the surgical suite.

  6. An essential primer for understanding the role of topical hemostats, surgical sealants, and adhesives for maintaining hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Gabay, Michael; Boucher, Bradley A

    2013-09-01

    A wide variety of topical hemostats are approved as adjunctive therapies in the maintenance of hemostasis during surgical procedures in which conventional methods are insufficient or not practical. A multidisciplinary approach to the selection and application of these agents requires input from all members of the surgical team including surgeons, perioperative nurses, blood bank specialists, and pharmacists. However, pharmacist knowledge regarding topical hemostats may be limited based on lack of formal education within college of pharmacy curricula as well as their use being predominantly in the operating room setting. Furthermore, some of these agents might be procured through central supply rather than the hospital pharmacy. Topical hemostats include agents that act as a mechanical barrier to bleeding and provide a physical matrix for clotting, biologically active agents that catalyze coagulation, combination therapies, and synthetic sealants and adhesives. Although many of the topical hemostats were approved for use before the requirement for clinical trials, this review provides an overview of the available clinical evidence regarding the appropriate uses and safety considerations associated with these agents. Proper use of these agents is vital to achieving the best clinical outcomes. Specifically, knowledge of the contraindications and potential adverse events associated with topical hemostats can help prevent unwanted outcomes. Therefore, an understanding of the benefits and potential risks associated with these agents will allow hospital pharmacists to assist in the development and implementation of institutional policies regarding the safe and effective use of hemostatic agents commonly used in the surgical suite. PMID:23686938

  7. Meeting report for "OddPols" 2014: the odds invite an even.

    PubMed

    Roy-Engel, Astrid M

    2015-02-01

    The Ninth International Biennial Conference on RNA Polymerases I and III (the "OddPols") was held on June 19-21, 2014 at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. Sponsored by New England Biolabs, the Cayman Chemical Company, the Rackham Graduate School and the University of Michigan Health System, and organized by David Engelke, Craig Pikaard, Lawrence Rothblum, Andrzej Wierzbicki and Astrid Engel. This year at the conference, the "odds" were increased by expanding the usual topics on the advances in RNA polymerases I and III research to include presentations on RNA polymerase IV and V. The keynote speaker, Craig Pikaard, opened the meeting with his presentation entitled "Five nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases". The meeting drew attendees from fourteen countries that shared their research discoveries through oral and poster presentations. The talks were organized into 11 sessions covering seven distinct topics. Here we present some of the highlights from the meeting using summaries provided by the participants.

  8. Investigation of an angiogenesis-promoting topical treatment for diabetic wounds using multimodal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Joanne; Bower, Andrew J.; Arp, Zane A.; Olson, Eric; Holland, Claire; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Impaired skin wound healing is a significant co-morbid condition of diabetes that is caused by poor microcirculation among other factors. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcription factors that mediate the effects of decreased levels of oxygen in biological environments. Inducing mild hypoxia in the tissue could promote angiogenesis, a critical step in the wound healing process in diabetic wounds. To investigate the relationship between hypoxia and diabetic wound healing, a topical treatment consisting of a HIF-activating prolyl-hydroxylase inhibitor was administered to the wounded skin of diabetic (db/db) mice. Studies were conducted in accordance with the GSK Policy on the Care, Welfare and Treatment of Laboratory Animals and were reviewed at GSK or by the ethical review process at the institution where the work was performed. The wounded area was tracked in vivo for 28 days utilizing a custom-built multimodal microscopy system. An increase in vascular density around the wounds of treated animals was observed using phase-variance optical coherence tomography (PV-OCT), in comparison to normal controls. In addition, second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) were utilized to examine the collagen regeneration and cellular metabolic activity, respectively, in the wounded skin. The utilization of these light based methods can follow metabolic and morphologic changes in the wound healing process in ways not possible with current evaluation processes. Insights demonstrated in these studies could lead to new endpoints for evaluation of the efficacy of drugs and lead to more direct ways of detecting patient response to treatment.

  9. Transient spreading and swelling behavior of a gel deploying an anti-HIV topical microbicide.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Katz, David F; Szeri, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    Drug delivery of topical microbicidal molecules against HIV offers promise as a modality to prevent sexual transmission of the virus. Success of any microbicide product depends, in an interactive way, upon its drug (the microbicide active pharmaceutical ingredient, API) and its delivery system (e.g. a gel, film or intravaginal ring). There is a widespread agreement that more effective drug delivery vehicles, as well as better APIs, must be developed to improve the efficacy of microbicide products. Non-Newtonian gels are primary microbicide vehicles, but those to date have been created with limited understanding of how their properties govern their spreading and retention in the vagina, which, in turn, govern successful drug delivery. Here, we apply fundamental fluid mechanical and physicochemical transport theory to help better understand how successful microbicide API delivery depends upon properties of a gel and the vaginal environment. We address several critical components of this complex process, including: elastohydrodynamic flow of the bolus of a non-Newtonian fluid; and mass transfer due to inhomogeneous dilution of the gel by vaginal fluid contacting it along a moving boundary (the locally deforming vaginal epithelial surface). Local dilution of gel alters local rheological properties. We evaluated this experimentally, delin-eating the way that constitutive parameters of a shear-thinning gel are modified by dilution. We supplement the Reynolds lubrication equation with a mass conservation equation to model diluting fluid movement across the moving vaginal epithelial surface and into the gel bolus. This is a physicochemically complex phenomenon that is not well understood. We implement a boundary flux model based upon the elevated hydrodynamic pressures in the cells. Results show that this model produces fluxes that lie within the range of mean values that have been reported. Further experimental characterization of the vaginal wall is required for a more

  10. An Analysis of Two Textbooks on the Topic of Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Daniel Kim Chwee; Seng, Chan Kim

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of two commonly used high school (Grades 11 and 12) chemistry textbooks in Singapore to determine if the content presented in the topic of intermolecular forces is consistent with the concepts and propositional knowledge identified by the authors as essential for the learning and understanding of the topic…

  11. The Systems Analysis and Design Course: An Educators' Assessment of the Importance and Coverage of Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidry, Brandi N.; Stevens, David P.; Totaro, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines instructors' perceptions regarding the skills and topics that are most important in the teaching of a Systems Analysis and Design ("SAD") course and the class time devoted to each. A large number of Information Systems ("IS") educators at AACSB accredited schools across the United States were surveyed. Shannon's entropy is used…

  12. DNA, Drugs, and Detectives: An Interdisciplinary Special Topics Course for Undergraduate Students in Forensic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coticone, Sulekha Rao; Van Houten, Lora Bailey

    2015-01-01

    A special topics course combining two relevant and contemporary themes (forensic DNA analysis and illicit drug detection) was developed to stimulate student enthusiasm and enhance understanding of forensic science. Building on the interest of popular television shows such as "CSI" and "Breaking Bad," this course connects…

  13. Sustainable Energy: An Energy Education Topic that Belongs in the Social Studies Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marker, Gerald W.

    This paper examines the impending crisis of depletion of natural resources and explores the development of alternative resources for use. The topic of energy education needs to be included in the social studies curriculum. The program must focus around the following three principles: (1) the coming transition from fossil fuels to some other energy…

  14. An NLP Framework for Non-Topical Text Analysis in Urdu--A Resource Poor Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukund, Smruthi

    2012-01-01

    Language plays a very important role in understanding the culture and mindset of people. Given the abundance of electronic multilingual data, it is interesting to see what insight can be gained by automatic analysis of text. This in turn calls for text analysis which is focused on non-topical information such as emotions being expressed that is in…

  15. Topic Repetitiveness after Traumatic Brain Injury: An Emergent, Jointly Managed Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Body, Richard; Parker, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Topic repetitiveness is a common component of pragmatic impairment and a powerful contributor to social exclusion. Despite this, description, characterization and intervention remain underdeveloped. This article explores the nature of repetitiveness in traumatic brain injury (TBI). A case study of one individual after TBI provides the basis for a…

  16. "Touch It Lightly": Israeli Students' Construction of Pedagogical Paradigms about an Emotionally Laden Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, David L.; Cohen, Hindy

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood educators are increasingly being called upon to deal with emotionally charged topics, which include natural and manmade disasters, war, terror, death, and other traumatic events. At our teachers college, we prepare students to deal with a challenging issue, memory of the Holocaust, through a series of activities and workshops…

  17. The human heart and the circulatory system as an interesting interdisciplinary topic in lessons of physics and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volná, M.; Látal, F.; Kubínek, R.; Richterek, L.

    2014-01-01

    Many topics which are closely related can be found in the national curriculum of the Czech Republic for physics and biology. One of them is the heart and the circulatory system in the human body. This topic was examined cross curriculum, a teaching module was created and the topic was chosen for our research. The task was to determine if the students of bachelor study are aware of connections between physics and biology within this topic and whether we can help them effectively to describe the corresponding physics phenomena in the human body connected, for example, with a heart attack or with the measurement of blood pressure. In this paper, the heart and the circulatory system are presented as suitable topics for an interdisciplinary teaching module which includes both theoretical and experimental parts. The module was evaluated by a group of first-year undergraduate students of physics at the Faculty of Science, Palacký University. The acquired knowledge was compared with another control group through a test. The highest efficiency of the module was evaluated on the basis of questions that covered the calculation problems.

  18. Topics in Biomedical Optics: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Boas, David A.; George, John S.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2003-06-01

    The field of biomedical optics is experiencing tremendous growth. Biomedical technologies contribute in the creation of devices used in healthcare of various specialties (ophthalmology, cardiology, anesthesiology, and immunology, etc.). Recent research in biomedical optics is discussed. Overviews of meetings held at the 2002 Optical Society of America Biomedical Topical Meetings are presented.

  19. Smaller solar system bodies and orbits; Proceedings of Symposium 3, Workshops II, III, and XXVI, and Topical Meetings of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runcorn, S. K.; Carr, M. H.; Moehlmann, D.; Stiller, H.; Matson, D. L.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Kessler, D. J.

    Topics discussed in this volume include the reappraisal of the moon and Mars/Phobos/Deimos; the origin and evolution of planetary and satellite systems; asteroids, comets, and dust (a post-IRAS perspective); satellite dynamics; future planetary missions; and orbital debris. Papers are presented on a comparison of the chemistry of moon and Mars, the use of a mobile surface radar to study the atmosphere and ionosphere, and laser-ionization studies with the technical models of the LIMA-D/Phobos. Attention is given to planetogonic scenarios and the evolution of relatively mass-rich preplanetary disks, the kinetic behavior of planetesimals revolving around the sun, the planetary evolution of Mars, and pre- and post-IRAS asteroid taxonomies. Consideration is also given to ocean tides and tectonic plate motions in high-precision orbit determination, the satellite altimeter calibration techniques, a theory of the motion of an artificial satellite in the earth atmosphere, ESA plans for planetary exploration, and the detection of earth orbiting objects by IRAS.

  20. Weather Avoidance Using Route Optimization as a Decision Aid: An AWIN Topical Study. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The aviation community is faced with reducing the fatal aircraft accident rate by 80 percent within 10 years. This must be achieved even with ever increasing, traffic and a changing National Airspace System. This is not just an altruistic goal, but a real necessity, if our growing level of commerce is to continue. Honeywell Technology Center's topical study, "Weather Avoidance Using Route Optimization as a Decision Aid", addresses these pressing needs. The goal of this program is to use route optimization and user interface technologies to develop a prototype decision aid for dispatchers and pilots. This decision aid will suggest possible diversions through single or multiple weather hazards and present weather information with a human-centered design. At the conclusion of the program, we will have a laptop prototype decision aid that will be used to demonstrate concepts to industry for integration into commercialized products for dispatchers and/or pilots. With weather a factor in 30% of aircraft accidents, our program will prevent accidents by strategically avoiding weather hazards in flight. By supplying more relevant weather information in a human-centered format along with the tools to generate flight plans around weather, aircraft exposure to weather hazards can be reduced. Our program directly addresses the NASA's five year investment areas of Strategic Weather Information and Weather Operations (simulation/hazard characterization and crew/dispatch/ATChazard monitoring, display, and decision support) (NASA Aeronautics Safety Investment Strategy: Weather Investment Recommendations, April 15, 1997). This program is comprised of two phases, Phase I concluded December 31, 1998. This first phase defined weather data requirements, lateral routing algorithms, an conceptual displays for a user-centered design. Phase II runs from January 1999 through September 1999. The second phase integrates vertical routing into the lateral optimizer and combines the user

  1. The topical niacin sensitivity test: an inter- and intra-rater reliability study in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Melissa; Cotton, Sue; Proffitt, Tina; McConchie, Mirabel; Markulev, Connie; Smesny, Stefan; McGorry, Patrick; Berger, Gregor

    2008-01-01

    Topical application of nicotinic acid results in erythema, and in some cases oedema of the skin, supporting a strong relationship between niacin sensitivity and prostaglandin D2. The aim of this study was to examine the inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of a 12-min niacin sensitivity test in healthy adults. Three raters assessed the skin reaction of 12 volunteers, over 3-min intervals across four niacin concentrations (0.1, 0.01, 0.001, and 0.0001), and over six sessions. Inter-rater reliability estimates ranged from 0.85 to 0.97 for the total niacin sensitivity score. Similar inter-rater reliability estimates were found for niacin sensitivity ratings by concentration and time. Intra-rater reliability estimates ranged from 0.63 to 0.93 for the total niacin sensitivity score. These data indicate that the 12-min topical niacin sensitivity test has excellent reliability.

  2. Contact allergy to topical medicaments becomes more common with advancing age: an age-stratified study.

    PubMed

    Green, Carl M; Holden, Catherine R; Gawkrodger, David J

    2007-04-01

    Eczema is common in the elderly people who often use topical medicaments. Previous studies in the elderly people have noted allergic positive patch tests in between 43% and 64% of those tested. We set out to assess whether medicament contact allergies are more common in elderly patients. We undertook a retrospective age-stratified study of all patients patch tested at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, between January 1994 and July 2005. We confirmed that contact allergy to topical medicaments is more common in those aged more than 70 years compared with the younger age groups. There was no sex difference. The commonest problematic allergen types found in medicaments were fragrances and preservatives. The most frequent individual allergens were fragrance mix, Myroxylon pereirae, lanolins, local anaesthetic agents, neomycin and gentamicin, and tixocortol pivolate. The pattern of medicament contact allergens was similar to that of the younger age groups except that multiple allergic positives were more frequent and sensitivities to local anaesthetics and Myroxylon pereirae were proportionally more common. Elderly patients were more likely to have multiple contact allergies than the younger ones. Care needs to be taken when prescribing topical medicaments to elderly patients with eczema, especially for preparations that contain perfumes, lanolins, and local anaesthetics.

  3. Global health ethics: an introduction to prominent theories and relevant topics

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Greg; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Laaser, Ulrich; Meershoek, Agnes; Popa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Global health ethics is a relatively new term that is used to conceptualize the process of applying moral value to health issues that are typically characterized by a global level effect or require action coordinated at a global level. It is important to acknowledge that this account of global health ethics takes a predominantly geographic approach and may infer that the subject relates primarily to macro-level health phenomena. However, global health ethics could alternatively be thought of as another branch of health ethics. It may then relate to specific topics in themselves, which might also include micro-level health phenomena. In its broadest sense, global health ethics is a normative project that is best characterized by the challenge of developing common values and universal norms for responding to global health threats. Consequently, many subjects fall within its scope. Whilst several accounts of global health ethics have been conceptualized in the literature, a concise demarcation of the paradigm is still needed. Through means of a literature review, this paper presents a two-part introduction to global health ethics. First, the framework of ‘borrowed’ ethics that currently form the core of global health ethics is discussed in relation to two essential ethical considerations: 1) what is the moral significance of health and 2) what is the moral significance of boundaries? Second, a selection of exemplar ethical topics is presented to illustrate the range of topics within global health ethics. PMID:24560262

  4. Global health ethics: an introduction to prominent theories and relevant topics.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Greg; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Laaser, Ulrich; Meershoek, Agnes; Popa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Global health ethics is a relatively new term that is used to conceptualize the process of applying moral value to health issues that are typically characterized by a global level effect or require action coordinated at a global level. It is important to acknowledge that this account of global health ethics takes a predominantly geographic approach and may infer that the subject relates primarily to macro-level health phenomena. However, global health ethics could alternatively be thought of as another branch of health ethics. It may then relate to specific topics in themselves, which might also include micro-level health phenomena. In its broadest sense, global health ethics is a normative project that is best characterized by the challenge of developing common values and universal norms for responding to global health threats. Consequently, many subjects fall within its scope. Whilst several accounts of global health ethics have been conceptualized in the literature, a concise demarcation of the paradigm is still needed. Through means of a literature review, this paper presents a two-part introduction to global health ethics. First, the framework of 'borrowed' ethics that currently form the core of global health ethics is discussed in relation to two essential ethical considerations: 1) what is the moral significance of health and 2) what is the moral significance of boundaries? Second, a selection of exemplar ethical topics is presented to illustrate the range of topics within global health ethics.

  5. An Innovative Website in the United States for Meeting the Emotional and Supportive Care Needs of Young Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fasciano, Karen M; Souza, Phoebe M; Braun, Ilana; Trevino, Kelly

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the development of an institution-specific website designed to meet the supportive and emotional needs of young adults (18-39 years old) with cancer in the United States. The website contains information about topics of particular interest to young adults, coping skills education, and resources; and has social networking capacity. In a survey of website users, participants reported increased "connectedness" and variable impact on feelings of sadness, fear, and worry. Recommendations are made for fostering peer interactions, encouraging staff to educate website users around self-monitoring for distress, and incorporating relevant content on the website. PMID:26812430

  6. 21 CFR 14.22 - Meetings of an advisory committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., e.g., the Board of Tea Experts and the Science Advisory Board of the National Center for Toxicological Research will generally hold meetings in Brooklyn, NY, and in the Little Rock, AR, vicinity... of taking final votes or otherwise confirming actions taken by the committee at other meetings; or...

  7. 21 CFR 14.22 - Meetings of an advisory committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., e.g., the Board of Tea Experts and the Science Advisory Board of the National Center for Toxicological Research will generally hold meetings in Brooklyn, NY, and in the Little Rock, AR, vicinity... of taking final votes or otherwise confirming actions taken by the committee at other meetings; or...

  8. Evaluating an Organizational Protocol to Implement Effective Leadership Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Erika

    2009-01-01

    The problem on which this study focused was the need to organize and implement effective leadership meetings that led to improved professional collaboration. The purpose was to evaluate the use of a protocol in organizing and implementing such meetings. The research questions were framed around the four levels of the Kirkpatrick (1996) evaluation…

  9. Global issues from an African point of view. 7th International Women and Health Meeting in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Shallat, L

    1993-01-01

    The seventh International Women and Health Meeting (IWHM) was held in Kampala, Uganda, during September 12-17, 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to devise strategies to confront such issues as the impact of economic policies on women's health, the implementation of reproductive rights, population control and policies, contraceptive technologies, AIDS, and sexual abuse and violence. In addition to these topics, discussion centered on interaction with the upcoming 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. Some participants were frustrated, however, by the procedural problems that prevented creation of a cohesive position paper and left important strategic questions unanswered. Women from Latin America and the Caribbean were kept from full participation by the lack of a Spanish translator but nevertheless held an information session on regional developments in abortion reform and population policy. These women were also successful in their bid to host the eighth IWHM in Brazil in 1996.

  10. JAK3 as an Emerging Target for Topical Treatment of Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alves de Medeiros, Ana Karina; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Desmet, Eline; Van Gele, Mireille; De Schepper, Sofie; Lambert, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The recent interest and elucidation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway created new targets for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases (ISDs). JAK inhibitors in oral and topical formulations have shown beneficial results in psoriasis and alopecia areata. Patients suffering from other ISDs might also benefit from JAK inhibition. Given the development of specific JAK inhibitors, the expression patterns of JAKs in different ISDs needs to be clarified. We aimed to analyze the expression of JAK/STAT family members in a set of prevalent ISDs: psoriasis, lichen planus (LP), cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), atopic dermatitis (AD), pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and alopecia areata (AA) versus healthy controls for (p)JAK1, (p)JAK2, (p)JAK3, (p)TYK2, pSTAT1, pSTAT2 and pSTAT3. The epidermis carried in all ISDs, except for CLE, a strong JAK3 signature. The dermal infiltrate showed a more diverse expression pattern. JAK1, JAK2 and JAK3 were significantly overexpressed in PG and AD suggesting the need for pan-JAK inhibitors. In contrast, psoriasis and LP showed only JAK1 and JAK3 upregulation, while AA and CLE were characterized by a single dermal JAK signal (pJAK3 and pJAK1, respectively). This indicates that the latter diseases may benefit from more targeted JAK inhibitors. Our in vitro keratinocyte psoriasis model displayed reversal of the psoriatic JAK profile following tofacitinib treatment. This direct interaction with keratinocytes may decrease the need for deep skin penetration of topical JAK inhibitors in order to exert its effects on dermal immune cells. In conclusion, these results point to the important contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway in several ISDs. Considering the epidermal JAK3 expression levels, great interest should go to the investigation of topical JAK3 inhibitors as therapeutic option of ISDs. PMID:27711196

  11. The formulation of an effective topical antibacterial product containing Ocimum gratissimum leaf essential oil.

    PubMed

    Orafidiya, L O; Oyedele, A O; Shittu, A O; Elujoba, A A

    2001-08-14

    The antibacterial potential of Ocimum gratissimum essential oil was explored. Liquid and semisolid formulations of the oil were designed in a variety of bases for topical antiseptic medication. The products were evaluated by agar diffusion assay against type strains and clinical isolates from boil, wound and pimples. Remarkable antibacterial effects, higher than those of commercial antiseptic products, were demonstrated at 2% Ocimum oil concentration in some bases. The properties of base into which the oil was incorporated affected its activity. It was more effective in hydrophilic bases than in lipophilic bases. Solubilization and microemulsification grossly reduced its activity. PMID:11472827

  12. Topical retinol and the stratum corneum response to an environmental threat.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Henry, F; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1997-01-01

    The functional consequences of using topical retinol on skin have not been thoroughly studied so far. The aim of this open study was to compare two preparations containing either retinol or vitamin E, using biometric evaluations. Three methods, namely the sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) corneosurfametry bioassay, the ultraviolet (UV) squamometry test and optical profilometry of the UV-induced wrinkling process, were used to assess some properties of the stratum corneum. The retinol preparation achieved better scores than the vitamin-E cream in all three tests and appears to improve the resistance of the stratum corneum against some chemical (SLS) and physical (UV) threats. It also limits UV-induced shallow wrinkling.

  13. Itch Management: Topical Agents.

    PubMed

    Metz, Martin; Staubach, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is a common problem in patients with inflammatory skin diseases as well as in subjects with dry or sensitive skin. Regardless of the underlying cause of the pruritus, a topical therapy is not only useful but most often necessary to achieve symptom control. A good topical therapy should fulfill different functions. An optimal basic therapy based on the condition of the skin is important to repair epithelial barrier defects and to rehydrate the skin. An adequate disease-specific topical therapy is crucial for inflamed skin, e.g. anti-inflammatory topical therapy is an important part in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Finally, the use of specific antipruritic substances can help to improve pruritus in patients irrespective of the underlying disease. Here, we summarize topical agents used in the treatment of chronic pruritus. PMID:27578070

  14. Topical anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects.

  15. Topical anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  16. Don't Plan Another Meeting--Without Calling An Airline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Delaine R.

    1977-01-01

    An increasing number of training managers and other meeting planners are taking advantage of the free meeting planning help--plus discounts on car rentals, meeting speakers, AV productions, and more--that the major airlines have begun to provide. The article presents a look at these services along with material from several airlines. (MF)

  17. Topical retinol and the stratum corneum response to an environmental threat.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Henry, F; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1997-01-01

    The functional consequences of using topical retinol on skin have not been thoroughly studied so far. The aim of this open study was to compare two preparations containing either retinol or vitamin E, using biometric evaluations. Three methods, namely the sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) corneosurfametry bioassay, the ultraviolet (UV) squamometry test and optical profilometry of the UV-induced wrinkling process, were used to assess some properties of the stratum corneum. The retinol preparation achieved better scores than the vitamin-E cream in all three tests and appears to improve the resistance of the stratum corneum against some chemical (SLS) and physical (UV) threats. It also limits UV-induced shallow wrinkling. PMID:9257377

  18. Meeting NPDES permit limits for an effluent-dependent stream

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, W.L.

    1998-09-01

    When the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina received a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit containing very low copper and toxicity limits for an effluent-dependent stream, an innovative and cost-effective method to meet them was sought. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control mandated that compliance with the new limits be achieved within three years of the effective date of the permit. SRS personnel studied various regulatory options for complying with the new limits including Water Effect Ratio, use of a Metals Translator, blending with additional effluents, and outfall relocation. Regulatory options were determined to not be feasible because the receiving stream is effluent dependent. Treatment options were studied after it was determined that none of the regulatory pathways were viable. Corrosion inhibitors were evaluated on a full-scale basis with only limited benefits. Ion exchange was promising, but not cost effective for a high flow effluent with a very low concentration of copper. A treatment wetlands, not normally given consideration for the removal of metals, proved to be the most cost effective method studied and is currently under construction.

  19. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded with Retinoic Acid and Lauric Acid as an Alternative for Topical Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; De Araújo, Lidiane Advíncula; Trindade, Mariana de Jesus Vaz; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Oréfice, Rodrigo Lambert; Farias, Luis de Macêdo; De Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Goulart, Gisele Assis Castro; Alves, Ricardo José; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is the first choice for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and all-trans retinoic acid is one of the most used drugs. The combination of retinoids and antimicrobials is an innovative approach for acne therapy. Recently, lauric acid, a saturated fatty acid, has shown strong antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes. However, topical application of retinoic acid is followed by high incidence of side-effects, including erythema and irritation. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent an alternative to overcome these side-effects. This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with retinoic acid and lauric acid and evaluate their antibacterial activity. The influence of lipophilic stearylamine on the characteristics of solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated. Solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was evaluated against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. High encapsulation efficiency was obtained at initial time (94 ± 7% and 100 ± 4% for retinoic acid and lauric acid, respectively) and it was demonstrated that lauric acid-loaded-solid lipid nanoparticles provided the incorporation of retinoic acid. However, the presence of stearylamine is necessary to ensure stability of encapsulation. Moreover, retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus, representing an interesting alternative for the topical therapy of acne vulgaris. PMID:26328443

  20. Intra-articular drug delivery from an optimized topical patch containing teriflunomide and lornoxicam for rheumatoid arthritis treatment: does the topical patch really enhance a local treatment?

    PubMed

    Xi, Honglei; Cun, Dongmei; Xiang, Rongwu; Guan, Yanli; Zhang, Yuxiu; Li, Yuanru; Fang, Liang

    2013-07-10

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often bear joint destruction and symptomatic pain. The aim of this work is to develop a compound transdermal patch containing teriflunomide (TEF) and lornoxicam (LOX) to transport these drugs across the skin with the isochronous permeation rates for RA therapy and investigate intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX following transdermal patches applied topically. The salts of TEF and LOX with organic amines diethylamine (DEtA), triethylamine (TEtA), diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA) and N-(2'-hydroxy-ethanol)-piperdine (NP) were prepared to improve the skin permeation of the parent drug. The optimized patch formulation is obtained from a 3-factor, 2-level central composite design. After topical application of the optimized compound patch to only one knee joint in rabbit, intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX on the application site was compared with that on the non-application site. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the optimized compound patch were evaluated using the adjuvant arthritis model and the pain model induced by acetic acid, respectively. The in vitro experiment results showed that the amine salts of TEF and LOX, especially TEF-TEtA and LOX-TEtA, enhanced the skin permeation of TEF and LOX from the transdermal patch system. The optimal formulation successfully displayed isochronous permeation rates for TEF and LOX across rabbit skin, and was defined with 5% of TEF-TEtA, 10% of LOX-TEtA and 15% of azone. The in vivo study showed that TEF and LOX from transdermal patches were transferred into skin, ligament and fat pad on the application site by direct diffusion and on the non-application site by the redistribution of systemic blood supply, while local absorption of TEF and LOX in synovial fluid originated from the systemic blood supply rather than direct diffusion. In the RA rat model, the results of swelling inhibition on primary arthritis of bilateral hind paws further confirmed the above

  1. Recruitment of underage test persons: motivators and barriers in an anthropological EU-survey on a sensitive topic.

    PubMed

    Nohrdent, Dörte; Cattaneo, Cristina; Gabriel, Peter; Ohlrogge, Sabine; Poppa, Pasquale; Schmitt, Roland; Tutkuviene, Janina; Rizgeliene, Renata; Ratnayake, Melanie; Obertová, Zuzana; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    Recruiting test persons is crucial in many scientific fields. The recognition of motivators or barriers to survey participation may support the design and recruitment strategy of future studies. The recruitment of under age test persons is very complex and sensitive. This paperpresents and analyses the experiences in recruitment of female juveniles (10-18 years old) in Germany, Italy and Lithuania within the context of an EU funded project concerning the extremely sensitive topic of "child pornography". The purpose of the project was to develop a method for age estimation of juveniles on photographs and videos. The faces of the test persons were photographed and anthropologically measured after an informed consent was signed by their parents and themselves. The analysis of the recruitment strategies and response rates revealed that culturally influenced factors played a significant role in the individual decision for or against a participation in the study. In all countries, the sensitive topic of child pornography had a great influence on the decision process. Many German parents agreed especially in light of this topic while in Italy and Lithuania the word "child pornography" triggered a very negative response. In Germany, the anthropological investigation of the faces provoked negative associations with the anthropometric surveys in the Third Reich. Social and political climate were further relevant factors for decision-making especially in Lithuania. The "top-down" principle of recruitment proved to be very effective for this kind of study. The authorities of headmasters, scientists and institutions positively influenced the decisions of the parents. PMID:20954459

  2. Life sciences and space research XXIV(1) - Gravitational biology; Proceedings of Symposia 10 and 13 of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission F (Meetings F1 and F2) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S. (Editor); Cogoli, A. (Editor); Planel, H. (Editor); Ubbels, G. A. (Editor); Sievers, A. (Editor); Oser, H. (Editor); Horneck, G. (Editor); Wagner, H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Topics presented include an introduction to theories and models of biological response to gravity, gravity effects on biological systems, the function of calcium in plant graviperception, developmental biology on unmanned spacecraft, and the effect of microgravity on the development of plant protoplasts flown on Biocosmos 9. Also presented are the mechanism by which an asymmetric distribution of plant growth hormone is attained, the perception of gravity by plants, an animal research facility for Space Station Freedom, the long-term effects of microgravity and possible countermeasures, and an experimental system for determining the influence of microgravity on B lymphocyte activation and cell fusion.

  3. Publication rate of presentations at an annual military orthopaedic meeting.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Carey, Paul A; Frye, Brandon D; Weaver, Courtney R; Belmont, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Many research abstracts presented at orthopaedic conferences do not undergo a formal editorial, or peer-review process; however, abstracts are frequently referenced in textbooks and influence clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine the publication rate of abstracts formally presented at the Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons (SOMOS) annual meetings from 1998 to 2006 that went to full-text publication. Using Google Scholar and PubMed, a literature search was performed for each abstract presented at the annual SOMOS meeting in the years 1998-2006, to calculate the overall full-text publication rate, the average duration from presentation to publication, and the distribution of publications in the various journals. A total of 770 abstracts were presented at the annual SOMOS meetings. The overall full-text publication rate at a minimum of 3 years was 45.7% (352 publications). The average time from presentation to publication was 2.7 years. The published articles appeared in 65 peer-reviewed journals, with notable distribution in Spine (10.0%), The American Journal of Sports Medicine (9.4%), and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (9.4%). The full-text publication rate of abstracts presented at the annual SOMOS meetings compares favorably with that of other major orthopaedic conferences in the United States. Nonetheless, more than half of abstracts presented at the SOMOS meetings remain unpublished. PMID:23327844

  4. An analysis of four ways of assessing student beliefs about sts topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikenhead, Glen S.

    The study investigated the degree of ambiguity harbored by four different response modes used to monitor student beliefs about science-technology-society topics: Likert-type, written paragraph, semistrue tured interview, and empirically developed multiple choice. The study also explored the sources of those beliefs. Grade-12 students in a Canadian urban setting responded, in each of the four modes, to statements from Views on Science-Technology-Society. It was discovered that TV had far more influence on what students believed about science and its social, technological context than did numerous science courses. The challenge to science educators is to use the media effectively in combating naive views about science. Regarding ambiguity in student assessment, the Likert-type responses were the most inaccurate, offering only a guess at student beliefs. Such guesswork calls into question the use of Likert-type standardized tests that claim to assess student views about science. Student paragraph responses contained significant ambiguities in about 50% of the cases. The empirically developed multiple choices, however, reduced the ambiguity to the 20% level. Predictably, the semistructured interview was the least ambiguous of all four response modes, but it required the most time to administer. These findings encourage researchers to develop instruments grounded in the empirical data of student viewpoints, rather than relying solely on instruments structured by the philosophical stances of science educators.

  5. Effect of topical honey on limitation of radiation-induced oral mucositis: an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Khanal, B; Baliga, M; Uppal, N

    2010-12-01

    Radiation therapy for oral carcinoma is therapeutically useful in dose of at least 6000 cGy but causes mucositis that severely interferes with oral function. The literature indicates that honey appears to promote wound healing, so the authors investigated whether its anti-inflammatory properties might limit the severity of radiation-induced oral mucositis. A single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial was carried out to compare the mucositis-limiting qualities of honey with lignocaine. A visual assessment scale permitted scoring of degrees of mucositis and statistical evaluation of the results was performed using the χ(2) test. Only 1 of 20 patients in the honey group developed intolerable oral mucositis compared with the lignocaine group, indicating that honey is strongly protective (RR=0.067) against the development of mucositis. The proportion of patients with intolerable oral mucositis was lower in the honey group and this was statistically significant (p=0.000). Honey applied topically to the oral mucosa of patients undergoing radiation therapy appears to provide a distinct benefit by limiting the severity of mucositis. Honey is readily available, affordable and well accepted by patients making it useful for improving the quality of life in irradiated patients.

  6. An Infectious Topic in Reticulate Evolution: Introgression and Hybridization in Animal Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Detwiler, Jillian T.; Criscione, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the role that introgression and hybridization have played in the evolution of parasites. Most studies are host-centric and ask if the hybrid of a free-living species is more or less susceptible to parasite infection. Here we focus on what is known about how introgression and hybridization have influenced the evolution of protozoan and helminth parasites of animals. There are reports of genome or gene introgression from distantly related taxa into apicomplexans and filarial nematodes. Most common are genetic based reports of potential hybridization among congeneric taxa, but in several cases, more work is needed to definitively conclude current hybridization. In the medically important Trypanosoma it is clear that some clonal lineages are the product of past hybridization events. Similarly, strong evidence exists for current hybridization in human helminths such as Schistosoma and Ascaris. There remain topics that warrant further examination such as the potential hybrid origin of polyploid platyhelminths. Furthermore, little work has investigated the phenotype or fitness, and even less the epidemiological significance of hybrid parasites. PMID:24710013

  7. Maximal Usage Trial: An Overview of the Design of Systemic Bioavailability Trial for Topical Dermatological Products

    PubMed Central

    Bashaw, Edward Dennis; Tran, Doanh C.; Shukla, Chinmay G.; Liu, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Dermatologic diseases can present in varying forms and severity, ranging from the individual lesion and up to almost total skin involvement. Pharmacokinetic assessment of topical drug products has previously been plagued by bioanalytical assay limitations and the lack of a standardized study design. Since the mid-1990's the US Food and Drug Administration has developed and implemented a pharmacokinetic maximal usage trial (MUsT) design to help address these issues. The MUsT design takes into account the following elements: the enrollment of patients rather than normal volunteers, the frequency of dosing, duration of dosing, use of highest proposed strength, total involved surface area to be treated at one time, amount applied per square centimeter, application method and site preparation, product formulation, and use of a sensitive bioanalytical method that has been properly validated. This paper provides a perspective of pre-MUsT study designs and a discussion of the individual elements that make up a MUsT. PMID:26634191

  8. Analgesic Efficacy and Transdermal Penetration of Topical Gabapentin Creams: Finding an Optimal Dose and Pre-treatment Time.

    PubMed

    Heustess, Allie; Spigener, Shuler; Sweitzer, Sarah; Romero-Sandoval, Alfonso; Asbill, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with chronic neuropathic pain continue to suffer despite traditional pharmacotherapy. As a result, pharmacists commonly compound gabapentin into creams, gels, and ointments as an alternative treatment option. In this study, various concentrations (1%, 5%, and 10%) of topical gabapentin compounded in Lipoderm were applied at various pre-treatment times (30 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours) to investigate what gabapentin concentration and pre-treatment time best attenuates formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors in a rodent model. A 30-minute pre-treatment with 5% gabapentin demonstrated maximum attenuation of nociceptive behaviors in this in vivo preclinical pain model. Nociceptive behaviors unexpectedly increased when gabapentin concentration or pre-treatment time was increased, suggesting both antinociceptive and pronociceptive effects of transdermal gabapentin administration. Gabapentin permeation into the skin and deeper tissues of the hindpaw was measured following the in vivo study. Skin and deep tissue permeation of gabapentin was both dose and time-dependent. Maximum deep-tissue permeation occurred within 30 minutes of topical application. Skin concentrations increased with a longer 1-hour pre-treatment. Minimal skin and deeper tissue levels were found following a 4-hour pre-treatment. These results suggest that topical gabapentin may be antinociceptive in a rodent formalin model at specific doses and pre-treatment intervals.

  9. Life sciences and space research XXIII(3): Natural and artificial ecosystems; Proceedings of the Topical Meetings of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D. (Editor); Tibbitts, T. W. (Editor); Thompson, B. G. (Editor); Volk, T. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of higher plant growth under controlled environmental conditions, waste oxidation, carbon cycling, and biofermentor design and operation. Attention is given to CO2 and O2 effects on the development and fructification of wheat in closed systems, transpiration during life cycle in controlled wheat growth, sources and processing of CELSS wastes, waste-recycling in bioregenerative life support, and the effect of iodine disinfection products on higher plants. Also discussed are carbon cycling by cellulose-fermenting nitrogen-fixing bacteria, a bioreactor design with sunlight supply and operations systems for use in the space environment, gas bubble coalescence in reduced gravity conditions, and model system studies of a phase-separated membrane bioreactor.

  10. Timelines: An Opportunity for Meeting Standards through Textbook Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brugar, Kristy A.; Roberts, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    In this article we identify opportunities for students to use timelines and textbooks to meet standards. Through the use of timelines, textbooks, and selected activities, upper elementary and middle school students are able to (1) be engaged in content area reading and writings; (2) understand large themes in social studies including time,…

  11. Calcitriol 3 microg/g ointment: an effective and safe addition to the armamentarium in topical psoriasis therapy.

    PubMed

    Abramovits, William

    2009-08-01

    High-potency topical corticosteroids are very effective for the treatment of psoriasis, but are associated with a number of cutaneous adverse effects. Vitamin D modulators have emerged as an important alternative to corticosteroids for the long-term topical treatment of psoriasis. Calcitriol 3 microg/g ointment has long been used to treat psoriasis in Europe and is now the only vitamin D3 ointment available for use in the United States (U.S.). Several randomized clinical trials have compared the safety, efficacy, and cosmetic acceptability of calcitriol ointment with other topical psoriasis therapies. In a three-week investigator-blinded study of 25 healthy subjects, calcitriol 3microg/g ointment was associated with markedly less cumulative skin irritation than was calcipotriene ointment. A multicenter, investigator-blinded study of patients with psoriasis found that investigator-rated global improvement of psoriasis symptoms with calcitriol ointment was statistically noninferior to calcipotriene ointment and that calcitriol use produced significantly fewer patients with cutaneous reactions or discomfort. A multicenter clinical trial of patients with psoriasis who had lesions affecting sensitive skin areas found that calcitriol use produced less skin irritation than did calcipotriene and was generally preferred to calcipotriene ointment by patients. Calcitriol was also significantly more effective for the treatment of psoriasis lesions affecting flexural areas. In another study, patients who received calcitriol ointment exhibited improvement in psoriasis symptoms that was similar to the corticosteroid betamethasone propionate, but were much less likely to have relapsed eight weeks after treatment discontinuation. Two clinical studies also suggested that calcitriol is similar in efficacy to short-contact dithranol, but with a lower incidence of skin irritation and staining. Together, the results of these studies demonstrate that calcitriol 3 microg/g ointment is a

  12. Adverse external ocular effects of topical ophthalmic therapy: an epidemiologic, laboratory, and clinical study.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, F M

    1983-01-01

    New knowledge of adverse external ocular reactions to topical ophthalmic medications was obtained by means of a computerized epidemiologic study, laboratory studies, and clinical observations. Listed below are the major findings and conclusions that represent facts or concepts that were previously unknown, uncertain, misunderstood, or forgotten: The incidence of clinically important drug reactions among all cases was at least 13.09% and may have been as high as 16.02%. Among treated patients it was at least 16.26% to 19.90%. Taken together, drug reactions were the second most common external disease diagnosis. The incidence of each kind of drug reaction was determined. Toxic papillary reactions accounted for 79.10% of drug cases and 10.35% of all cases. Toxic papillary keratoconjunctivitis was the third most common single diagnosis. The following epidemiologic factors were found to be related to the development or presence of drug reactions: number and variety of treating practitioners, number of practitioners consulted, number of practitioners consulted who treated, specific ophthalmologist consulted (8.24% of ophthalmologists referred 39.55% of all drug cases and showed a tendency habitually to overtreat), number and kinds of patients' symptomatic complaints, number of medications prescribed and used, number of days of treatment, particular drugs and preservatives used (but not their strengths or vehicles), underlying (primary) diagnoses, and inaccuracy of referring ophthalmologists' diagnoses. Patients with dry eyes were especially at risk for the development of toxic papillary reactions. Among all cases, the incidence of reactions to preservatives (mainly thimerosal) in contact lens solutions was 0.39% to 1.95%, depending on whether definite or probable cases, respectively, were considered. The incidence among the 54 patients who used daily-wear lenses (excluding extended-wear therapeutic and optical contacts) was 7.41% for definite reactions and 37.04% for

  13. The Notch meeting: an odyssey from structure to function.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Ajay; Balle-Cuif, Laure

    2016-02-15

    The Notch signaling pathway plays fundamental roles in diverse developmental processes. Studies of the basic biology of Notch function have provided insights into how its dysfunction contributes to multi-systemic diseases and cancer. In addition, our understanding of Notch signaling in maintaining stem/progenitor cell populations is revealing new avenues for rekindling regeneration. The Notch IX meeting, which was held in Athens, Greece in October 2015, brought together scientists working on different model systems and studying Notch signaling in various contexts. Here, we provide a summary of the key points that were presented at the meeting. Although we focus on the molecular mechanisms that determine Notch signaling and its role in development, we also cover talks describing roles for Notch in adulthood. Together, the talks revealed how interactions between adjacent cells mediated by Notch regulate development and physiology at multiple levels. PMID:26884393

  14. Impact on quality activities of measurement systems meeting an L:1 rule

    DOE PAGES

    Hamada, M. S.; Burkhardt, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    This study considers the impact of a measurement system that meets an L:1 rule on various quality activities. These activities include inspection, acceptance sampling, and control charting. A measurement system that meets a 10:1 rule performs much better than one that meets a 4:1 rule. R code is provided so that the practitioner is able to evaluate these activities to his or her particular situation.

  15. Impact on quality activities of measurement systems meeting an L:1 rule

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, M. S.; Burkhardt, J. H.

    2015-04-30

    This study considers the impact of a measurement system that meets an L:1 rule on various quality activities. These activities include inspection, acceptance sampling, and control charting. A measurement system that meets a 10:1 rule performs much better than one that meets a 4:1 rule. R code is provided so that the practitioner is able to evaluate these activities to his or her particular situation.

  16. Topic-Prominence in Interlanguage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Judith W.; Gundel, Jeannette K.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates the role of topic-comment structure and the frequency of topic-prominence in the oral interlanguage of Chinese- Japanese-, Korean-, Arabic-, Farsi-, and Spanish-speaking adult students of English as a second language. Results indicate that second language learning is generally characterized by an early topic-comment stage, independent…

  17. Case Study Exploring the Use of an Interdisciplinary Approach to Teach a High School Mathematics and Science Topic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelhake, Kelly M.

    This participatory case study was conducted to describe the value of an interdisciplinary teaching approach for a high school mathematics and science topic from the perspective of the students and the teacher. The topic of logarithms was selected for this lesson because it is a concept that students learn in both their high school mathematics and science courses. The teacher researcher, a high school mathematics teacher, worked with twelve student participants from a 9th and 10th grade Geometry class, along with four science and two mathematics teachers. The data collected in this study serves as a reminder of the many complexities of interdisciplinary work. This specific interdisciplinary study, signified by three overall themes, unraveled some of these complexities of the interdisciplinary approach in general. In all, the study demonstrated the utility of developing a shared language, gaining understanding of the complexities of interdisciplinary work, and sharing positive student experiences of an interdisciplinary lesson. These three themes serve as a step forward in the overall research of interdisciplinary mathematics and science work. A significant amount of additional research is needed to compare the actual student learning outcomes for interdisciplinary work versus discipline specific work. The data from this study, however, shows that as teachers work to create an interdisciplinary approach, teachers from different disciplines produce such a thoughtful and positive dialogue that only enhances student learning.

  18. Background meeting and technology demonstration: Chromium electroplating of superconductor strand

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    A meeting concerned with electroplating copper onto superconducting wires was held. Topics of discussion were concerned with the market, strand cleanliness, and an improved rinsing system for the process.

  19. Workshop on gas potential of New Albany shale held in conjunction with the 1995 Ioga meeting in Evansville, Indiana on March 1, 1995. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This workshop is intended to provide an overview of the organic lithofacies, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, and gas potential of the Devonian and Mississippian New Albany Shale in the Illinois Basin. In addition, the reservoir characteristics and completion technology for productive organic-rich Devonian shales in the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are also reviewed. Emphasis is being placed on how proven technologies together with appropriate geologic and geochemical information can be used to explore for gas in the New Albany Shale.

  20. One model for an integrated math/physics course focusing on electricity and magnetism and related calculus topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jason W.; Barbanel, Julius

    2000-08-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increasing, widespread pedagogical interest in developing various types of integrated curricula for science and engineering programs. Over the last three years, a year-long Integrated Math/Physics course has been developed at Union College. This paper will focus on a model for a one-quarter integrated course organized around a traditional set of electricity and magnetism (E&M) physics topics, integrated with appropriate mathematical topics. Traditional, nonintegrated E&M physics students often struggle with challenging vector calculus ideas which may have been forgotten, not yet encountered, or introduced with different notation in different contexts. Likewise, traditional vector calculus mathematics students are often unable to gain intuitive insight, or fail to grasp the physical significance of many of the vector calculus ideas they are learning. Many of these frustrations are due to the fact that at many schools, the physics and calculus teachers teaching separate courses probably have little or no idea what their fellow educators are actually doing in these courses. Substantial differences in context, notation, and philosophy can cause breakdowns in the transfer of knowledge between mathematics and physics courses. We will discuss the methods, philosophy, and implementation of our course, and then go on to present what we feel were the substantial strengths and insights gained from a thoughtful integration of the two subjects. In addition, some problem areas and recommendations for probable student difficulties will be addressed.

  1. Change in Moral Outlook Is an Important Topic of Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suohua, Li

    2004-01-01

    It is a common recognition that humankind is facing an ecological environmental crisis. In order to protect the ecological system, to protect nature and thus to safeguard the continued existence of humankind, not only technological, economic, and managerial measures are needed, but more importantly, a change must take place in people's thinking so…

  2. 13 CFR 125.15 - What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... meet to submit an offer on a contract? 125.15 Section 125.15 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS Contracting with SDVO SBCs § 125.15 What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract? (a) Representation of SDVO SBC status....

  3. 13 CFR 125.15 - What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... meet to submit an offer on a contract? 125.15 Section 125.15 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS Contracting with SDVO SBCs § 125.15 What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract? (a) Representation of SDVO SBC status....

  4. 13 CFR 125.15 - What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... meet to submit an offer on a contract? 125.15 Section 125.15 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS Contracting with SDVO SBCs § 125.15 What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract? (a) Representation of SDVO SBC status....

  5. 13 CFR 125.15 - What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... meet to submit an offer on a contract? 125.15 Section 125.15 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS Contracting with SDVO SBCs § 125.15 What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract? (a) Representation of SDVO SBC status....

  6. 13 CFR 125.15 - What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... meet to submit an offer on a contract? 125.15 Section 125.15 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS Contracting with SDVO SBCs § 125.15 What requirements must an SDVO SBC meet to submit an offer on a contract? (a) Representation of SDVO SBC status....

  7. Meeting National Science Standards in an Integrative Curriculum: Classroom Examples from a Rural Middle Level Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Bruno G.

    1997-01-01

    Rural schools perceive small size, geographic isolation, and sparse resources as limiting factors in meeting new science standards. A study of an integrated curriculum in a rural middle-level program found that this model, based on Beane's integrative curriculum planning strategies, had no trouble meeting the national life-science curriculum…

  8. 77 FR 68150 - Meeting of the SANE/SART AI/AN Initiative Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Meeting of the SANE/SART AI/AN Initiative Committee AGENCY: Office for Victims of Crime, Justice. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Coordination Committee on the...

  9. 78 FR 25254 - Announcing an Open Meeting of the Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... changing reporting categories, and --Update of NIST Computer Security Division. Note that agenda items may... National Institute of Standards and Technology Announcing an Open Meeting of the Information Security and.... SUMMARY: The Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board (ISPAB) will meet Wednesday, June 12,...

  10. 78 FR 89 - Announcing an Open Meeting of the Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ..., --Legislative Updates, and --Update of NIST Computer Security Division. Note that agenda items may change... National Institute of Standards and Technology Announcing an Open Meeting of the Information Security and.... SUMMARY: The Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board (ISPAB) will meet Wednesday, February...

  11. Beating the odds: an approach to the topic of resilience in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Skala, Katrin; Bruckner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The concept of good mental functioning despite negative influences first arose more than a hundred years ago and has received increasing interest during the last decades. For a long time, lack of unified definition of concept and terms rendered research difficult to compare. Nowadays, consent is reached on a definition of resilience as "an individual's ability to properly adapt to stress and adversity" and a large number of studies have been performed trying to identify factors that render children resilient. Among these, interpersonal factors like gender, intelligence, aspects of character and temperament as well as genes; factors within the family like a stable and positive relation to an adult; and factors of the broader environment like being integrated into the community have been those most articulately pointed out by research. Although, to date, research on resilience has been extensive, there is still a lack of robust, comparative, empirical studies allowing policy formulation for fostering resilience in children at risk. PMID:25413940

  12. Cost benefit analysis of excess flow valves: An update. Topical report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-26

    Calculations and analysis of the cost-to-benefit ratio of using excess flow valves (EFVs) of all U.S. new and renewed gas services operating at 10 psig or more are presented. The study is an update of an earlier evaluation performed by the same contractor, entitled 'Costs and Benefits of Excess Flow Valves in Gas Distribution Services' (GRI-86/0022). As calculated with up-to-date information and average operating cost data, the ratio continues to be unfavorable even when using high value for human life and injury and low operating cost data. Data collected from EFV users indicate that EFVs are highly reliable and generally perform as required with very few problems. The report expresses the opinion that the cost-to-benefit ratio is highly dependent on individual company operations, location, and pipeline characteristics, and that the decision to use EFVs should be left to individual companies after performing their own cost benefit analysis, which should include an assessment of alternative accident mitigation measures.

  13. Nuclear waste management and environmental mediation: an exploratory analysis Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.R.; Lindell, M.K.; Nealey, S.M.; Drexler, J.A. Jr.

    1980-09-01

    Two types of mediation efforts are identified: settlement-oriented mediation and participation-oriented mediation. A range of environmental mediation efforts that have taken place to date are discussed. Within the context of the two identified types of mediation, these characteristics are discussed for the waste management controversy. Emphasis was placed on the complexity of the issues and the range of participants. Also discussed are the relationship between an environmental mediation effort and alternative mechanisms for conflict resolution, such as NEPA based litigation, consultation and concurrence and state veto or federal preemption. Participation-oriented mediation may be more suitable than settlement-oriented mediation for encouraging constructive communication and reducing conflict among participants in the controversy. Several limitations to participation-oriented mediation need to be considered. One is that environmental mediation is such a very new field that it might not be possible to find an experienced mediator willing to attempt such a complex problem. Two is the compatibility of participation-oriented and settlement-oriented mediation.

  14. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application: an ex vivo study in human skin.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N; Sorensen, J A; Brosen, K; Nielsen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin - dermal microdialysis (DMD) - is a unique technique for sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling of dermatological drug concentrations in the dermis. Debate has concerned the existence of a correlation between the depth of the sampling device - the probe - in the dermis and the amount of drug sampled following topical drug administration. This study evaluates the relation between probe depth and drug sampling using dermal DMD sampling ex vivo in human skin. We used superficial (<1 mm), intermediate (1-2 mm) and deep (>2 mm) positioning of the linear MD probe in the dermis of human abdominal skin, followed by topical application of 4 mg/ml of benzoic acid (BA) in skin chambers overlying the probes. Dialysate was sampled every hour for 12 h and analysed for BA content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial probes: 3,335 ± 1,094 μg·h/ml (mean ± SD); intermediate probes: 2,178 ± 1,068 μg·h/ml, and deep probes: 1,159 ± 306 μg·h/ml. AUC(0-12) sampled by the superficial probes was significantly higher than that of samples from the intermediate and deeply positioned probes (p value <0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between probe depth and AUC(0-12) sampled by the same probe (p value <0.001, r(2) value = 0.5). The mean extrapolated lag-times (±SD) for the superficial probes were 0.8 ± 0.1 h, for the intermediate probes 1.7 ± 0.5 h, and for the deep probes 2.7 ± 0.5 h, which were all significantly different from each other (p value <0.05). In conclusion, this paper demonstrates that there is an inverse relationship between the depth of the probe in the dermis

  15. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application: an ex vivo study in human skin.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N; Sorensen, J A; Brosen, K; Nielsen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin - dermal microdialysis (DMD) - is a unique technique for sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling of dermatological drug concentrations in the dermis. Debate has concerned the existence of a correlation between the depth of the sampling device - the probe - in the dermis and the amount of drug sampled following topical drug administration. This study evaluates the relation between probe depth and drug sampling using dermal DMD sampling ex vivo in human skin. We used superficial (<1 mm), intermediate (1-2 mm) and deep (>2 mm) positioning of the linear MD probe in the dermis of human abdominal skin, followed by topical application of 4 mg/ml of benzoic acid (BA) in skin chambers overlying the probes. Dialysate was sampled every hour for 12 h and analysed for BA content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial probes: 3,335 ± 1,094 μg·h/ml (mean ± SD); intermediate probes: 2,178 ± 1,068 μg·h/ml, and deep probes: 1,159 ± 306 μg·h/ml. AUC(0-12) sampled by the superficial probes was significantly higher than that of samples from the intermediate and deeply positioned probes (p value <0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between probe depth and AUC(0-12) sampled by the same probe (p value <0.001, r(2) value = 0.5). The mean extrapolated lag-times (±SD) for the superficial probes were 0.8 ± 0.1 h, for the intermediate probes 1.7 ± 0.5 h, and for the deep probes 2.7 ± 0.5 h, which were all significantly different from each other (p value <0.05). In conclusion, this paper demonstrates that there is an inverse relationship between the depth of the probe in the dermis

  16. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis.

  17. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  18. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis.

  19. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  20. EDAM: an ontology of bioinformatics operations, types of data and identifiers, topics and formats

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Jon; Kalaš, Matúš; Jonassen, Inge; Bolser, Dan; Uludag, Mahmut; McWilliam, Hamish; Malone, James; Lopez, Rodrigo; Pettifer, Steve; Rice, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Advancing the search, publication and integration of bioinformatics tools and resources demands consistent machine-understandable descriptions. A comprehensive ontology allowing such descriptions is therefore required. Results: EDAM is an ontology of bioinformatics operations (tool or workflow functions), types of data and identifiers, application domains and data formats. EDAM supports semantic annotation of diverse entities such as Web services, databases, programmatic libraries, standalone tools, interactive applications, data schemas, datasets and publications within bioinformatics. EDAM applies to organizing and finding suitable tools and data and to automating their integration into complex applications or workflows. It includes over 2200 defined concepts and has successfully been used for annotations and implementations. Availability: The latest stable version of EDAM is available in OWL format from http://edamontology.org/EDAM.owl and in OBO format from http://edamontology.org/EDAM.obo. It can be viewed online at the NCBO BioPortal and the EBI Ontology Lookup Service. For documentation and license please refer to http://edamontology.org. This article describes version 1.2 available at http://edamontology.org/EDAM_1.2.owl. Contact: jison@ebi.ac.uk PMID:23479348

  1. "There is Space, and There are Limits": The Challenge of Teaching Controversial Topics in an Illiberal Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Li-Ching; Alviar-Martin, Theresa; Leviste, Enrique Niño P.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Research indicates that across democratic societies, teachers face numerous intellectual and emotional challenges when handling controversial topics in the classroom. Less attention, however, has been paid to how teachers' willingness to teach controversial topics intersects with political and other societal factors in…

  2. Safety and anti-HIV assessments of natural vaginal cleansing products in an established topical microbicides in vitro testing algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no effective vaccine or other approved product for the prevention of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. It has been reported that women in resource-poor communities use vaginally applied citrus juices as topical microbicides. These easily accessible food products have historically been applied to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of these substances using an established topical microbicide testing algorithm. Freshly squeezed lemon and lime juice and household vinegar were tested in their original state or in pH neutralized form for efficacy and cytotoxicity in the CCR5-tropic cell-free entry and cell-associated transmission assays, CXCR4-tropic entry and fusion assays, and in a human PBMC-based anti-HIV-1 assay. These products were also tested for their effect on viability of cervico-vaginal cell lines, human cervical explant tissues, and beneficial Lactobacillus species. Results Natural lime and lemon juice and household vinegar demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity in transformed cell lines. Neutralization of the products reduced both anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity, resulting in a low therapeutic window for both acidic and neutralized formulations. For the natural juices and vinegar, the IC50 was ≤ 3.5 (0.8-3.5)% and the TC50 ≤ 6.3 (1.0-6.3)%. All three liquid products inhibited viability of beneficial Lactobacillus species associated with vaginal health. Comparison of three different toxicity endpoints in the cervical HeLa cell line revealed that all three products affected membrane integrity, cytosolic enzyme release, and dehydrogenase enzyme activity in living cells. The juices and vinegar also exerted strong cytotoxicity in cervico-vaginal cell lines, mainly due to their acidic pH. In human cervical explant tissues, treatment with 5% lemon or lime juice or 6% vinegar induced

  3. Treatment of incipient peri-implant infections using topical minocycline microspheres versus topical chlorhexidine gel as an adjunct to mechanical debridement.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Lessem, Jan; Lindahl, Christel; Svensson, Mari

    2004-10-01

    This report presents the clinical results three months after application of minocycline microspheres as an adjunct to mechanical treatment of incipient peri-implant infections compared to adjunctive treatment employing 1% chlorhexidine gel application. Sixteen patients in the minocycline group and 14 in the chlorhexidine group completed the study. Each patient had one or more implants with probing depth > or = 4 mm combined with bleeding and/or exudate on probing and presence of putative pathogenic bacteria. At baseline, patients were randomly assigned to minocycline or chlorhexidine treatment. Follow-up examinations were carried out after 10, 30, 60 and 90 days. The combined mechanical/antimicrobial treatment for the chlorhexidine group did not result in any reduction in probing depth and only limited reduction of bleeding scores. The adjunctive use of minocycline microspheres, on the other hand, resulted in improvements in both probing depths and bleeding scores. For the deepest sites of the treated implants, mean probing depth was reduced from 5.0 mm to 4.1 mm. The reductions in bleeding scores, although greater than for the chlorhexidine group, were modest. Thus, the question as to what extent the combined mechanical/minocycline treatment could be considered adequate for the treated lesions remains to be answered. The present short-term findings, however, encourage further studies with longer observation intervals on adjunctive use of minocycline microspheres in the treatment of periimplant lesions.

  4. Orlando 2006: plastic surgeons rate the "Hot Topics".

    PubMed

    Gryskiewicz, Joe M; Adams, William P

    2006-01-01

    During the "Hot Topics" seminar at The Aesthetic Meeting 2006, authors polled participants to gain insight into how plastic surgeons evaluate current hot topics. Here are the results as well as the authors' notes on additional presentations.

  5. Testosterone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... tear across the packet along the perforation. If you are using a tube, unscrew the cap. If you are using an ... the medication. Apply the medication to the area you have chosen. Dispose of the empty packet or tube in a trash can safely, out of the ...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2835 - What if I do not meet an increment of progress?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or Before November 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2835 What if I do not meet an... Administrator postmarked within 10 business days after the date for that increment of progress in table 1...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2595 - What if I do not meet an increment of progress?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or Before November 30, 1999 Model Rule-Increments of Progress § 60.2595 What if I do not meet an... Administrator postmarked within 10 business days after the date for that increment of progress in table 1...

  8. Effect of topical vitamin D on chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus: An open-label pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung Eun; Woo, Yu Ri; Lee, Joong Sun; Shin, Jong Ho; Jeong, Jin Uk; Koo, Dae Won; Bang, Ki Tae

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus (CKD-aP) is a troublesome symptom in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Recently, vitamin D deficiency has been known to be one of the possible etiologic factors in CKD-aP. However, limited data is available on whether topical vitamin D treatment is effective for relieving CKD-aP. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of topically vitamin D for CKD-aP. Twenty-three patients with CKD-aP were enrolled in a single center, open-label study. Patients were instructed to apply a topical vitamin D (calcipotriol) agent (Daivonex solution; LEO Pharma) or vehicle solution twice daily for a month. We assessed the efficacy and safety of topical vitamin D on CKD-aP using clinical and dermoscopic photographs, and questionnaires including the validated modified pruritus assessment score (VMPAS) and visual analog scale (VAS) every 2 weeks. Dry dermoscopic findings showed significant improvement of scale (dryness) on the skin of topical vitamin D-treated patients compared with those of the vehicle group. Both VMPAS and VAS were significantly decreased after 2 and 4 weeks of the topical vitamin D treatment compared with the vehicle, respectively (P < 0.05). No significant side-effects were observed. Topical vitamin D may be one of the safe and effective therapeutic candidates for CKD-aP.

  9. Topical vitamins.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Cheryl

    2008-07-01

    Vitamins are a natural constituent of human skin and are part of a system of antioxidants that protect the skin from oxidative stress. There has been an increased interest in the use of natural antioxidants such as vitamins to help restore dermal antioxidant activity. Vitamins A, C, E, and B3 have been shown to have potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, but to achieve optimal effectiveness, products must be delivered in appropriate formulations. Products containing alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), retinol (vitamin A), and niacinamide (vitamin B3), are effective for the treatment of photoaging. These compounds have also shown effectiveness in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, acne, and pigmentation disorders and wound healing. There is emerging evidence that combinations of vitamins have additive effects that provide enhanced efficacy compared with individual compounds.

  10. Development and Implementation of an Advising Program’s Meet-and-Greet Session

    PubMed Central

    Candelario, Danielle M.; Bridgeman, Mary Barna

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation and perceptions of an advising program’s meet-and-greet session on student/faculty interactions. Design. Student advisees and faculty advisors attended a meet-and-greet program designed to facilitate introductions. Two online surveys evaluating program perceptions were electronically distributed to participants. Assessment. Twenty-eight advisors and 226 students attended; 17 faculty members and 42% (n=95) of students completed the survey. Advisors and advisees found the program valuable (100%, 85%) and recommended holding it again (100%, 93%), respectively. Most advisors agreed that the event improved success in meeting advisees while reducing time needed to schedule and meet with advisees. Students felt more comfortable contacting advisors after participating, with 83% agreeing it was more convenient than scheduling separate meeting times. Conclusion. An advising meet-and-greet program facilitated initial advisee/advisor meetings while reducing self-reported faculty time/resources. This activity could be implemented by other institutions seeking to promote student advising relationships. PMID:26889062

  11. 77 FR 46445 - Environmental Topics Related to the International Maritime Organization's Development of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... FR 3316). Public Meeting The Coast Guard will hold a public meeting regarding environmental topics... Harmful Anti- fouling Systems on Ships; and Other considerations including voyage planning,...

  12. An integrated large- and small-group approach for conducting meetings that lead to social action.

    PubMed

    Peck, H B

    1997-01-01

    Large meetings and small-group sessions each have advantages and deficiencies in dealing with social issues. The goals of conveying information, effectively changing attitudes, and encouraging action are often best achieved by integrating small-group sessions within the context of a large meeting. An approach involving three phases for a 2-hour meeting is described: (1) and initial plenary of all participants; (2) small-group sessions conducted by previously trained group facilitators drawn from the host organization; (3) a concluding plenary session centering around brief reports from the small groups. The application of some concepts of positive mental health, contracting, and empowerment to facilitate social action are discussed.

  13. A bibliography of stockwork molybdenite deposits and related topics (with an emphasis on the North American literature)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steigerwald, Celia H.; Mutschler, Felix E.; Ludington, Steve

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography of 1117 citations brings together references on stockwork molybdenite deposits and related topics in a format that can be sorted by topic and(or) geographic area. Each reference is preceded by a key, or keys, which may be read and sorted visually or by computer, The bibliography is available in two formats: (1) paper- or microfiche-hardcopy, and (2) fixed format computer reasonable magnetic tape, A FORTRAN program is provided for sorting the magnetic tape version,

  14. Polymeric nanosponges as an alternative carrier for improved retention of econazole nitrate onto the skin through topical hydrogel formulation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Renuka; Pathak, Kamla

    2011-08-01

    The present study was carried out to exploit the feasibility of using polymeric nanosponges as an alternative carrier for targeting econazole nitrate (EN) to the skin through topical hydrogel formulation. Nanosponges prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method were evaluated for various physicochemical parameters and in vitro drug release. The nanosponges of EN were discrete free flowing nanosized particles with perforated orange peel like morphology as visualized by SEM. The nanosponge formulated using PVA:EC (3:2) displayed highest in vitro release after 12?h in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) that fitted matrix model. Selected nanosponge was formulated as Carbopol 934 NF hydrogel using varying concentrations of permeation enhancers propylene glycol and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. The EN nanosponge-loaded hydrogels (F0?F7) were evaluated for pharmacotechnical properties and irritation studies on rat skin. On the basis of various evaluation parameters F7 with an equilibrium swelling of 0.944?g/g after 4?h, low firmness and high adhesiveness, a flux rate of 1540.2 (?g/cm(2).h) and that exhibited a controlled release of EN for 12?h was selected as best hydrogel. The DRS and DSC spectra of F7 confirmed stability of drug in the delivery system and absence of drug polymer interaction in nanosponges.

  15. Topical spironolactone inhibits dihydrotestosterone receptors in human sebaceous glands: an autoradiographic study in subjects with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Berardesca, E; Gabba, P; Ucci, G; Borroni, G; Rabbiosi, G

    1988-01-01

    The interaction between spironolactone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) receptors was evaluated with an autoradiographic technique. The inhibition of DHT receptors by spironolactone was found to be related to the decrease of tritiated DHT granules in the sebaceous glands of the treated site. 6 male patients affected by acne vulgaris entered the study. The acute study was performed by applying to 25 cm2 of the back a cream containing 5% spironolactone under occlusive dressing. The dosage of spironolactone applied was 4 mg/cm2 for 48 h. The long-term study was performed by applying the same amount to the entire back, without occlusion, twice daily for 1 month. Skin biopsies were taken at the end of the treatment, incubated with tritiated DHT and processed for autoradiography. Both the acute and the long-term study revealed a decrease of the autoradiographic granules in the treated site. This effect is related to the binding of spironolactone with dihydrotestosterone receptors in the sebaceous glands. Our study demonstrates that 5% topical spironolactone cream acts as an antiandrogen in human sebaceous glands, competing with DHT receptors and producing a decrease of labelled DHT. At the concentrations used the effect has been only local. No side-effects were recorded during both studies. PMID:2972662

  16. History of the APS Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-10-19

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wavehigh pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  17. The History of the APS Shock Compression of Condensed Matter Topical Group

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-05-02

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wave/high pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  18. Differential Topic Models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyou; Buntine, Wray; Ding, Nan; Xie, Lexing; Du, Lan

    2015-02-01

    In applications we may want to compare different document collections: they could have shared content but also different and unique aspects in particular collections. This task has been called comparative text mining or cross-collection modeling. We present a differential topic model for this application that models both topic differences and similarities. For this we use hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric models. Moreover, we found it was important to properly model power-law phenomena in topic-word distributions and thus we used the full Pitman-Yor process rather than just a Dirichlet process. Furthermore, we propose the transformed Pitman-Yor process (TPYP) to incorporate prior knowledge such as vocabulary variations in different collections into the model. To deal with the non-conjugate issue between model prior and likelihood in the TPYP, we thus propose an efficient sampling algorithm using a data augmentation technique based on the multinomial theorem. Experimental results show the model discovers interesting aspects of different collections. We also show the proposed MCMC based algorithm achieves a dramatically reduced test perplexity compared to some existing topic models. Finally, we show our model outperforms the state-of-the-art for document classification/ideology prediction on a number of text collections. PMID:26353238

  19. Temperature-sensitive microemulsion gel: an effective topical delivery system for simultaneous delivery of vitamins C and E.

    PubMed

    Rozman, Branka; Zvonar, Alenka; Falson, Francoise; Gasperlin, Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Microemulsions (ME)--nanostructured systems composed of water, oil, and surfactants--have frequently been used in attempts to increase cutaneous drug delivery. The primary objective addressed in this work has been the development of temperature-sensitive microemulsion gel (called gel-like ME), as an effective and safe delivery system suitable for simultaneous topical application of a hydrophilic vitamin C and a lipophilic vitamin E. By changing water content of liquid o/w ME (o/w ME), a gel-like ME with temperature-sensitive rheological properties was formed. The temperature-driven changes in its microstructure were confirmed by rotational rheometry, viscosity measurements, and droplet size determination. The release studies have shown that the vitamins' release at skin temperature from gel-like ME were comparable to those from o/w ME and were much faster and more complete than from o/w ME conventionally thickened with polymer (o/w ME carbomer). According to effectiveness in skin delivery of both vitamins, o/w ME was found the most appropriate, followed by gel-like ME and by o/w ME carbomer, indicating that no simple correlation between vitamins release and skin absorption could be found. The cytotoxicity studies revealed good cell viability after exposure to ME and confirmed all tested microemulsions as nonirritant.

  20. Discovering Health Topics in Social Media Using Topic Models

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Michael J.; Dredze, Mark

    2014-01-01

    By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM), as well as our system for filtering general Twitter data based on health keywords and supervised classification. We show how ATAM and other topic models can automatically infer health topics in 144 million Twitter messages from 2011 to 2013. ATAM discovered 13 coherent clusters of Twitter messages, some of which correlate with seasonal influenza (r = 0.689) and allergies (r = 0.810) temporal surveillance data, as well as exercise (r = .534) and obesity (r = −.631) related geographic survey data in the United States. These results demonstrate that it is possible to automatically discover topics that attain statistically significant correlations with ground truth data, despite using minimal human supervision and no historical data to train the model, in contrast to prior work. Additionally, these results demonstrate that a single general-purpose model can identify many different health topics in social media. PMID:25084530

  1. Quincy Meets Perry Mason: An Experience in Chemistry and Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murcia, Noel S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity based on a fictitious poisoning incident that is designed to challenge gifted and talented high school students. Discussed are the laboratory procedures, reagents, instrumentation, and results. (CW)

  2. 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2011-03-01

    The 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society covered numerous topics of educational and practical research interest. Biopolymers - the theme of the keynote address - were presented as essential components of medical devices, diagnostic tools, biosensors, human tissue engineering and pharmaceutical formulations for optimized drug delivery. Toxicology and SP investigators - the topic of the Distinguished Service Award Lecture - were encouraged to collaborate in the development of SP technologies and protocols applicable to toxicology studies. Pharmaceutical companies, originally organizations bearing all risks for developing their portfolios, are increasingly moving towards fully integrated networks which outsource core activities (including SP studies) to large contract research organizations. Future nonclinical data are now expected to be of such high quality and predictability power that they may obviate the need for certain expensive and time-consuming clinical investigations. In this context, SP is called upon to extend its risk assessment purview to areas which currently are not systematically covered, such as drug-induced QRS interval prolongation, negative emotions and feelings (e.g., depression), and minor chronic cardiovascular and metabolic changes (e.g., as produced by drugs for type 2 diabetes) which can be responsible for delayed morbidity and mortality. The recently approved ICH S9 guidance relaxes the traditional regulatory SP package in order to accelerate the clinical access to anticancer drugs for patients with advanced malignancies. The novel FDA 'Animal Rule' guidance proposes that for clinical candidates with well-understood toxicities, marketing approval may be granted exclusively on efficacy data generated in animal studies as human clinical investigations for these types of drugs are either unfeasible or unethical. In conclusion, the core messages of this meeting are that SP should consistently operate according to the 'fit

  3. 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2011-03-01

    The 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society covered numerous topics of educational and practical research interest. Biopolymers - the theme of the keynote address - were presented as essential components of medical devices, diagnostic tools, biosensors, human tissue engineering and pharmaceutical formulations for optimized drug delivery. Toxicology and SP investigators - the topic of the Distinguished Service Award Lecture - were encouraged to collaborate in the development of SP technologies and protocols applicable to toxicology studies. Pharmaceutical companies, originally organizations bearing all risks for developing their portfolios, are increasingly moving towards fully integrated networks which outsource core activities (including SP studies) to large contract research organizations. Future nonclinical data are now expected to be of such high quality and predictability power that they may obviate the need for certain expensive and time-consuming clinical investigations. In this context, SP is called upon to extend its risk assessment purview to areas which currently are not systematically covered, such as drug-induced QRS interval prolongation, negative emotions and feelings (e.g., depression), and minor chronic cardiovascular and metabolic changes (e.g., as produced by drugs for type 2 diabetes) which can be responsible for delayed morbidity and mortality. The recently approved ICH S9 guidance relaxes the traditional regulatory SP package in order to accelerate the clinical access to anticancer drugs for patients with advanced malignancies. The novel FDA 'Animal Rule' guidance proposes that for clinical candidates with well-understood toxicities, marketing approval may be granted exclusively on efficacy data generated in animal studies as human clinical investigations for these types of drugs are either unfeasible or unethical. In conclusion, the core messages of this meeting are that SP should consistently operate according to the 'fit

  4. Adverse Selection and an Individual Mandate: When Theory Meets Practice*

    PubMed Central

    Hackmann, Martin B.; Kolstad, Jonathan T.; Kowalski, Amanda E.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a model of selection that incorporates a key element of recent health reforms: an individual mandate. Using data from Massachusetts, we estimate the parameters of the model. In the individual market for health insurance, we find that premiums and average costs decreased significantly in response to the individual mandate. We find an annual welfare gain of 4.1% per person or $51.1 million annually in Massachusetts as a result of the reduction in adverse selection. We also find smaller post-reform markups. PMID:25914412

  5. Meetings with Elaine, an African and Native American Woman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Melanie Merola

    2006-01-01

    The author, a Caucasian doctoral student of clinical psychology, examined her ongoing interaction with Elaine, an adult woman of African and Native American descent. Incidents of learning during the interaction process are reviewed and qualitative and quantitative assessments are provided to examine the effectiveness of such interactions in a…

  6. Facts about an implantable contraceptive: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    This Memorandum reviews the results of research undertaken in animals and human subjects on the implantable contraceptive, Norplant, and where relevant, its components, levonorgestrel and Silastic. Results from clinical trials, including effectiveness and side-effects, are evaluated and service delivery aspects commented on. The Memorandum concludes with a statement regarding the use of Norplant as an option for long-term reversible contraception. PMID:3930082

  7. Choosing an information system to meet specific needs.

    PubMed

    Burton, J A

    1983-07-01

    Because of the increasing number of information systems on the market today, the user must select the system wisely according to the vendor's ability to solve specific company needs. An organization must know its filing and retrieval requirements, its potential for growth, etc., and must then contact only those vendors that fit specific company requirements. The vendor's reputation in the field, service history, "after-sales support," and ability to supply cost analyses should all be examined. PMID:10263971

  8. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premaligant lesions: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Chen, Jian Wen; Chen, Ying-Ru; Lee, Jeng-Woei

    2010-02-01

    One of the best strategies to prevent the occurrence of oral cancer is to eliminate oral precancers and block their further malignant transformation. Previous studies showed that photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy (photosan-PDT) is very effective for human head and neck cancers. To avoid the systemic photodynamic toxicity of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. Twelve 10-week-old male Syrian golden hamsters were used in this study. DMBA was applied to the left buccal pouches thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks and mineral oil was painted on the right buccal pouches thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks as the normal controls. Six hamsters were euthanized for tissue harvest. Precancerous lesions of moderate to severe dysplasia were consistently induced and proven by histological examination. These induced precancerous lesions in the remaining 6 hamsters were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan-gel. We found that PpIX reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan-gel. The precancerous lesions in 4 hamsters were treated with topical photosan-PDT using the 635-nm LED light once or twice a week. Complete regression of the precancerous lesions was found after 2-4 PDT treatments by visual and histological examination. Our findings indicate that topical photosan-PDT is a very effective treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  9. Special topical approach to the treatment of acne. Suppression of sweating with aluminum chloride in an anhydrous formulation.

    PubMed

    Hurley, H J; Shelley, W B

    1978-12-01

    A new topical approach to acne treatment--the use of aluminum chloride hexahydrate in anhydrous ethanol (ACAE)--was studied in 141 patients. Using sequential treatment schedules, paired comparison techniques, and various concentrations of ACAE, we established maximal efficacy with minimal local irritation for the 6.25% strength solution. Clinical efficacy and lack of toxicity of this formulation were confirmed by the additional clinical study of 65 patients. The antiperspirant and antibacterial actions of 6.25% ACAE solution were then verified on acne skin areas. It is postulated that the clinical improvement in acne that follows the topical use of ACAE results from one or both of these actions.

  10. Topical diphenhydramine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, D T

    1991-08-01

    This paper will review an acute onset of mental confusion associated with hallucinations secondary to vigorous administration of topical Caladryl lotion and Benadryl spray in an 8-year-old boy with chickenpox. The article discusses the toxicity of both oral and topical diphenhydramine use, along with the differentiation of varicella encephalitis from diphenhydramine toxicity. Delirium can be described as an acute clouding of consciousness associated with visual and tactile hallucinations, disorientation, and misperceptions. In a child who is already suffering from an infectious illness, encephalitis must be high on the list of the physician's differential diagnosis. The physician, however, must never overlook ingestions, even from topical, over-the-counter medications. The case described illustrates this point. Although this appears to be the fourth case report on this subject, the diagnosis was partially obscured by the fact that the local pharmacist could not find any documented cases despite a computer search of diphenhydramine toxicity at the time of admission and the report of only one or two cases by the Parke-Davis pharmacist.

  11. An early history of human breast cancer: West meets East

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shou-He

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a global issue. This is especially true in countries like China, where cancer incidence has increased likely because of changes in environment and lifestyle. However, cancer is not a modern disease; early cases have been recorded in ancient medical books in the West and in China. Here, we provide a brief history of cancer, focusing on cancer of the breast, and review the etymology of ai, the Chinese character for cancer. Notable findings from both Western and Chinese traditional medicine are presented to give an overview of the most important, early contributors to our evolving understanding of human breast cancer. We also discuss the earliest historical documents to record patients with breast cancer. PMID:23958056

  12. Evolution meets biopsychosociality: an analysis of addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Lende, Daniel H; Smith, E O

    2002-04-01

    Evolutionary theory can inform the biopsychosocial approach to addictive behavior through the use of adaptationist thinking, or how natural selection has shaped the mechanisms and processes underlying addiction. Covering how evolutionary theory relates to biology, psychology and sociality, this paper examines three components to drug use and abuse: a biological mechanism (mesolimbic dopamine), a developmental trajectory (attachment) and a social phylogeny (dominance, submission, social dependence). The paper argues for a salience (or wanting) view of the function of dopamine; outlines how attachment affects time perspective, closure of internal models and self-regulation; and examines how inequality affects drug abuse and how social dependence and manipulative behaviors can play a role in relationships with drugs. The article concludes with an analysis of how the adaptive approach applies to interventions against addictive behavior.

  13. Discourse Structure, Topicality, and Questioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kuppevelt, Jan

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach to discourse structure according to which topicality is the general organizing principle in discourse. This approach accounts for the fact that the segmentation structure of discourse is in correspondence with the hierarchy of topics defined for the discourse units. (52 references) (JL)

  14. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - part 2: Echinacea purpurea-Lavandula angustifolia.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, Sebastiano; Minciullo, Paola L; Miroddi, Marco; Chinou, Ioanna; Calapai, Gioacchino; Schmidt, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph has been produced. Part 2: Echinacea purpurea Moench-Lavandula angustifolia Mill. PMID:25600644

  15. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - part 1: Achillea millefolium-Curcuma longa.

    PubMed

    Calapai, Gioacchino; Miroddi, Marco; Minciullo, Paola L; Caputi, Achille P; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph has been produced. Part 1: Achillea millefolium L.-Curcuma longa L.

  16. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - part 1: Achillea millefolium-Curcuma longa.

    PubMed

    Calapai, Gioacchino; Miroddi, Marco; Minciullo, Paola L; Caputi, Achille P; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph has been produced. Part 1: Achillea millefolium L.-Curcuma longa L. PMID:24621152

  17. Devising an Instrument for Determining Students' Preparedness for an Education through Science Learning Approach within the Topic of Natural Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerulli, D.; Holbrook, J.; Mander, Ü.

    2016-01-01

    As global average temperatures rise, there has been an increase in the frequency and magnitude of meteorological natural hazards. To survive in the world and thrive in the work place, students need to utilize educational skills (such as creative thinking, non-routine problem solving, collaboration and systems thinking) and become independent…

  18. Carbocyanines in an RNA environment: experiment meets simulation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Richard; Steffen, Fabio; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of carbocyanine dyes in single molecule spectroscopy of nucleic acids is unbroken [1]. Studying the dynamics of large RNA constructs and the binding kinetics such as the exon/intron binding side interaction of the group II intron in S. Cerevisiae [2,3] have motivated a thorough photophysical characterization of the FRET pair Cy3/Cy5 in context of nucleic acids and RNA in particular. We show that Mg2+ as a mediator of RNA-dye interactions enhances the cyanine fluorescence lifetime. The increasing window for depolarization as monitored by time-resolved anisotropy further revealed a dynamic equilibrium between free tumbling and stacking on the RNA backbone, with the stacked conformation preventing photoisomerization [4]. Tracking fluorophore mobility covalently bound to the RNA on an atomistic level by means of molecular dynamics [5] allow to disentangle different types of dye-dye and dye-RNA interactions. Our hybrid approach combining time-correlated single photon counting and computer simulations will benefit the interpretation of absolute distance measurement by smFRET. [1] M.Levitus and S.Ranjit, Q. Rev. Biophys 2011, 44, 123-151. [2] D.Kowerko, S.L.B.König, M.Skilandat, D.Kruschel, M.C.A.S.Hadzic, L.Cardo, R.K.O.Sigel, PNAS 2015, 112, 3403-3408. [3] M. Khier, D. Kowerko, F. Steffen, R. Börner and R.K.O.Sigel, in preparation. [4] F.Steffen, R.K.O. Sigel, R.Börner, in preparation. [5] R.Best, H. Hofmann, D. Nettels, B. Schuler, Biophys J 2015, 11,2721-2731.

  19. Inflammation meets sensitization--an explanation for spontaneous nociceptor activity?

    PubMed

    Rukwied, Roman; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Main, Maurice; Obreja, Otilia; Schmelz, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Anti-nerve growth factor (anti-NGF) treatment is analgesic in chronic inflammatory pain conditions without reducing inflammation. Hypothesizing that ongoing pain induced by inflammatory mediators is increased by long term sensitization of nociceptors, we combined the non-inflammatory NGF-sensitization model with an inflammatory ultraviolet-B (UV-B) model in human volunteers. UV-B irradiation of the skin presensitized with NGF 3 weeks before intensified the pre-existing NGF hyperalgesia during the inflammatory phase of UV-B and caused spontaneous pain in about 70% of the subjects. Pain levels paralleled the intensity of UVB inflammation. Hyperalgesia recorded on a VAS (0-100) was additive after combined NGF/UV-B treatment versus single NGF or UV-B treatment for mechanical impact and tonic heat stimuli, again paralleling the intensity of the UV-B inflammation. In contrast, ratings to tonic mechanical pressure (100 kPa for 10 seconds, peak VAS 58 ± 7 vs VAS 21 ± 5 [NGF] and VAS 12 ± 3 [UV-B]) and pinprick (150 mN for 5 seconds, peak VAS 33 ± 7 vs VAS 10 ± 2 [NGF] and VAS 8 ± 3 [UV-B]) increased in a supra-additive manner. This supra-additive effect faded 24 hours after irradiation, although heat sensitization remained increased. Hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain coexisted in NGF/UV-B treated skin but did not significantly correlate (r < -0.1 at day 1 and r < 0.2 at day 3). We conclude that NGF can sensitize nociceptive endings such that inflammatory mediators may cause sufficient excitation to provoke spontaneous pain. Our results suggest that neuronal sensitization and level of inflammation represent independent therapeutic targets in chronic inflammatory pain conditions. PMID:23933233

  20. Versatility, Openness to Experience, and Topical Diversity in Creative Products: An Exploratory Historiometric Analysis of Scientists, Philosophers, and Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassandro, Vincent J.; Simonton, Dean Keith

    2010-01-01

    Creative individuals are considered "versatile" when their achievements extend beyond their most commonly cited domain, thus indicating remarkable and varied interests and abilities. The present study examined the association between versatility and (a) the personalities of eminent creators and (b) the topical diversity of their creative products.…

  1. Using conversation analysis to explore the recurrence of a topic in the talk of a boy with an autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Stribling, Penny; Rae, John; Dickerson, Paul

    2009-08-01

    Some higher functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are reported to produce perseverative talk, especially around 'special interests'. Topic perseveration is a form of pragmatic impairment captured in Prizant and Rydell's (1993) continuum of unconventional verbal behaviour in autism. Although widely reported, there is little systematic empirical research into this phenomenon. This paper considers the utility of Conversation Analysis in developing knowledge in this area, drawing upon data involving a boy with an ASD interacting with a researcher and a mobile robot platform. Although a frequency analysis of the boy's talk on a single topic may suggest that it is perseverative in nature, in a sequential analysis of both talk and non-spoken activities this study aims to show how these may be interactionally-embedded. It is suggested that, in considering the interactional salience of apparently perseverative talk, it can be useful to explore the participation framework in which the topic is revisited.

  2. 78 FR 17232 - Meeting of the SANE/SART AI/AN Initiative Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ..., victim-centered responses to sexual violence within AI/AN communities. DATES AND LOCATIONS: The meeting... to assist victims of sexual violence within AI/AN communities, and to promote culturally relevant, victim-centered responses to sexual violence within those communities. Webinar Agenda: The agenda...

  3. Management of symptomatic erosive-ulcerative lesions of oral lichen planus in an adult Egyptian population using Selenium-ACE combined with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal agent

    PubMed Central

    Belal, Mahmoud Helmy

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease with an immunological etiology. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of selenium combined with Vitamins A, C & E (Selenium-ACE) in the treatment of erosive-ulcerative OLP as an adjunctive to topical corticosteroids plus antifungal agent. Subjects and Methods: Thirty patients with a confirmed clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of OLP participated in this clinical trial. Patients were randomly allocated into one of three groups and treated as follows: (I) Topical corticosteroids, (II) topical corticosteroids plus antifungal, and (III) SE-ACE combined with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal. The patients were followed for 6 weeks. The pain and severity of the lesions were recorded at the initial and follow-up visits. All recorded data were analyzed using paired t-test and ANOVA test. A P ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The experimental groups showed a marked reduction in pain sensation and size of lesions, particularly in the final follow-up period, but there was no significant difference between the first two Groups I and II. However, healing of lesions and improvement of pain sensation was effective in Group III since a significant difference was found favoring Group III over both Groups I and II. Conclusion: No significant difference was found in treating erosive-ulcerative lesions of OLP by topical corticosteroids alone or combined with antifungal. However, when using SE-ACE in combination with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal, this approach may be effective in managing ulcerative lesions of OLP; but more research with a larger sample size and a longer evaluation period may be recommended. PMID:26681847

  4. Incorporating Topics That Aren't Distance-Friendly into an Online Program: One Development Team's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Valentin; Doner, Sue; Pivnick, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The Native Species and Natural Processes certificate at the University of Victoria is an advanced-level online program of four courses to introduce students to state-of-the-art topics in the field of ecological restoration. The program posed some unique challenges for course developers. The development team needed to find ways to create online…

  5. Risk assessment of bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) exposure to topical antiparasitics used in livestock within an ecotoxicovigilance framework.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Rafael; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Camarero, Pablo R; Martínez, José M

    2015-12-01

    Between 2004 and 2013, 486 suspected scavenger poisoning cases, including 24 bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus), were investigated in the Pyrenees and surrounding areas in Spain as part of a monitoring programme regarding accidental and intentional poisoning of wildlife. Poisoning was confirmed in 36% of all analysed cases where scavenger species were found dead within the distribution range of bearded vultures. Organophosphates and carbamates were the most frequently detected poisons. Four of the bearded vulture cases were positive for the presence of topical antiparasitics (3 with diazinon and 1 with permethrin). These likely represented accidental exposure due to the legal use of these veterinary pharmaceuticals. In order to confirm the risk of exposure to topical antiparasitics in bearded vultures, pig feet (n=24) and lamb feet (n=24) were analysed as these are one of the main food resources provided to bearded vultures at supplementary feeding stations. Pig feet had no detectable residues of topical antiparasitics. In contrast, 71.4% of lamb feet showed residues of antiparasitics including diazinon (64.3%), pirimiphos-methyl (25.4%), chlorpyrifos (7.1%), fenthion (1.6%), permethrin (0.8%) and cypermethrin (27.8%). Washing the feet with water significantly reduced levels of these topical antiparasitics, as such, this should be a recommended practice for lamb feet supplied at feeding stations for bearded vultures. Although the detected levels of antiparasitics were relatively low (≤1 μg/g), a risk assessment suggests that observed diazinon levels may affect brain acetylcholinesterase and thermoregulation in bearded vultures subject to chronic exposure.

  6. Risk assessment of bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) exposure to topical antiparasitics used in livestock within an ecotoxicovigilance framework.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Rafael; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Camarero, Pablo R; Martínez, José M

    2015-12-01

    Between 2004 and 2013, 486 suspected scavenger poisoning cases, including 24 bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus), were investigated in the Pyrenees and surrounding areas in Spain as part of a monitoring programme regarding accidental and intentional poisoning of wildlife. Poisoning was confirmed in 36% of all analysed cases where scavenger species were found dead within the distribution range of bearded vultures. Organophosphates and carbamates were the most frequently detected poisons. Four of the bearded vulture cases were positive for the presence of topical antiparasitics (3 with diazinon and 1 with permethrin). These likely represented accidental exposure due to the legal use of these veterinary pharmaceuticals. In order to confirm the risk of exposure to topical antiparasitics in bearded vultures, pig feet (n=24) and lamb feet (n=24) were analysed as these are one of the main food resources provided to bearded vultures at supplementary feeding stations. Pig feet had no detectable residues of topical antiparasitics. In contrast, 71.4% of lamb feet showed residues of antiparasitics including diazinon (64.3%), pirimiphos-methyl (25.4%), chlorpyrifos (7.1%), fenthion (1.6%), permethrin (0.8%) and cypermethrin (27.8%). Washing the feet with water significantly reduced levels of these topical antiparasitics, as such, this should be a recommended practice for lamb feet supplied at feeding stations for bearded vultures. Although the detected levels of antiparasitics were relatively low (≤1 μg/g), a risk assessment suggests that observed diazinon levels may affect brain acetylcholinesterase and thermoregulation in bearded vultures subject to chronic exposure. PMID:26254071

  7. An uncommon presentation: Creative commons at the 2012 LES winter meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Meike, Annamarie

    2012-01-06

    Have you noticed that the subject matter of our LES meetings is heavily oriented toward patent rights? There is more IP business in the area of patents, but it is important to keep an eye on copyright, whether for the purpose of influencing software copyright policy, or observing the development of interesting business models. So it is with pleasure that I see Catherine Casserly of the non-profit organization, Creative Commons (CC) is our Luncheon speaker for the 2012 Winter meeting in Anaheim.

  8. An Illustrated Overview of the Origins and Development of the QSCP Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruani, Jean

    The origins and development of the QSCP meetings are recalled: from a congress organized in Paris in 1986 to honour Prof. Raymond Daudel, through Franco-Bulgarian cooperation between various teams then European contracts, in the frame of COST projects, involving a network of French, Spanish, British, Italian, Swedish, and Bulgarian scientists, till the holding of the first QSCP workshop near Pisa in 1996 to honour Prof. Stefan Christov. After that there was a meeting every year, always with proceedings published. This historical overview will be presented as an illustrated journey in picturesque cities of Western and Eastern Europe, North Africa, and North America, sprinkled with historical or philosophical anecdotes and insights.

  9. EDITORIAL: The 21st Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    This Topical Issue contains works presented at the 21st Nordic Semiconductor Meeting (21NSM) held at Sundvolden, Norway, 18-19 August 2005. The institutions supporting 21NSM were: University of Oslo, SINTEF, the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment and Vestfold University College. The Nordic Semiconductor Meeting has become an international forum that has been held every other year in a relay fashion in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The focus of the meeting has been on original research and science being carried out on semiconductor materials, devices and systems. Reports on industrial activity have usually been featured at the meetings. The topics have ranged from fundamental research on point defects in a semiconductor to system architecture of semiconductor electronic devices. For the last five meetings the proceedings have been printed in a dedicated volume of Physica Scripta in the Topical Issue series. The papers in this Topical Issue have undergone critical peer review and we wish to thank the reviewers and the authors for their cooperation, which has been instrumental in meeting the expected high standards of the series. The range of topics covered by this volume is broad, reflecting the call for papers; most of the papers have an element of materials science and the largest portion of these deal with other semiconductor materials other than silicon. The 21NSM was supported by the following sponsors: Renewable Energy Corporation (REC), EMF III-V Innovations (EMF), and the Nordic Research Board (NordForsk). Terje G Finstad Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Norway Andrej Y Kuznetsov and Bengt G Svensson Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, Norway

  10. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for... exemptions listed in the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b), as implemented by 10 CFR 9.104,...

  11. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for... exemptions listed in the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b), as implemented by 10 CFR 9.104,...

  12. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for... exemptions listed in the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b), as implemented by 10 CFR 9.104,...

  13. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for... exemptions listed in the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b), as implemented by 10 CFR 9.104,...

  14. 10 CFR 7.15 - Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for closing an NRC advisory committee meeting. 7.15 Section 7.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.15 Procedures for... exemptions listed in the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b), as implemented by 10 CFR 9.104,...

  15. The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    DeLucia, Evan

    2016-07-12

    Evan DeLucia of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute talks about "The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  16. 75 FR 2159 - Notice of an Open Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Water Information (ACWI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... regional water quality monitoring organizations of the Integrated Ocean Observing Systems; and updates on..., represents a wide range of water resources interests and functions. Representation on the ACWI includes all... United States Geological Survey Notice of an Open Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Water...

  17. The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    DeLucia, Evan

    2010-03-25

    Evan DeLucia of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute talks about "The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  18. An Experiential Approach to Teaching Preservice Teachers about Group-Centered Teaching and Classroom Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a one-semester course in educational psychology for preservice teachers designed to give students the experience of participating in group-centered teaching and classroom meetings. A questionnaire was used to assess one aspect of the experiential approach An attempt was made to demonstrate that humanistic methods are viable in…

  19. 77 FR 25686 - Announcing an Open Meeting of the Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Management and Budget, and the Director of NIST on security and privacy issues pertaining to federal computer... NIST Computer Security Division. Note that agenda items may change without notice because of possible... National Institute of Standards and Technology Announcing an Open Meeting of the Information Security...

  20. The future of sleep technology: report from an American Association of Sleep Technologists summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Rita; Trimble, Melinda

    2014-05-15

    integrated care will include an increased focus on patient education, monitoring, and follow-up. The most effective treatments will require an individualized, patient-centered approach. A workforce analysis shows that the number of trained physician specialists will be inadequate to provide this care. Well-trained sleep medicine practitioners at many levels will be needed to meet treatment goals, including some roles appropriate for sleep technologists. These factors provide challenges and opportunities for sleep technologists. In order to maintain viability as an allied health profession, the majority of sleep technologists will need to be better educated and demonstrate competency in more roles than overnight monitoring and record scoring. Models for this transition already exist, with several programs moving technologists from night work to days and from diagnosis to patient education, provision of treatment, and monitoring of adherence. The challenge for the professional association is to define new roles for sleep technologists and provide the education that the membership will require to flourish in those new roles. PMID:24812546

  1. Mental mechanisms for topics identification.

    PubMed

    Massey, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Topics identification (TI) is the process that consists in determining the main themes present in natural language documents. The current TI modeling paradigm aims at acquiring semantic information from statistic properties of large text datasets. We investigate the mental mechanisms responsible for the identification of topics in a single document given existing knowledge. Our main hypothesis is that topics are the result of accumulated neural activation of loosely organized information stored in long-term memory (LTM). We experimentally tested our hypothesis with a computational model that simulates LTM activation. The model assumes activation decay as an unavoidable phenomenon originating from the bioelectric nature of neural systems. Since decay should negatively affect the quality of topics, the model predicts the presence of short-term memory (STM) to keep the focus of attention on a few words, with the expected outcome of restoring quality to a baseline level. Our experiments measured topics quality of over 300 documents with various decay rates and STM capacity. Our results showed that accumulated activation of loosely organized information was an effective mental computational commodity to identify topics. It was furthermore confirmed that rapid decay is detrimental to topics quality but that limited capacity STM restores quality to a baseline level, even exceeding it slightly. PMID:24744775

  2. Mental mechanisms for topics identification.

    PubMed

    Massey, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Topics identification (TI) is the process that consists in determining the main themes present in natural language documents. The current TI modeling paradigm aims at acquiring semantic information from statistic properties of large text datasets. We investigate the mental mechanisms responsible for the identification of topics in a single document given existing knowledge. Our main hypothesis is that topics are the result of accumulated neural activation of loosely organized information stored in long-term memory (LTM). We experimentally tested our hypothesis with a computational model that simulates LTM activation. The model assumes activation decay as an unavoidable phenomenon originating from the bioelectric nature of neural systems. Since decay should negatively affect the quality of topics, the model predicts the presence of short-term memory (STM) to keep the focus of attention on a few words, with the expected outcome of restoring quality to a baseline level. Our experiments measured topics quality of over 300 documents with various decay rates and STM capacity. Our results showed that accumulated activation of loosely organized information was an effective mental computational commodity to identify topics. It was furthermore confirmed that rapid decay is detrimental to topics quality but that limited capacity STM restores quality to a baseline level, even exceeding it slightly.

  3. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs.

  4. Major research topics in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hussaini, M.Y.; Kumar, A.; Voigt, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) and NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) hosted a workshop on October 2--4, 1989 to discuss some combustion problems of technological interest to LaRC and to foster interaction with the academic community in these research areas. The topics chosen for this purpose were flame structure, flame holding/extinction, chemical kinetics, turbulence-kinetics interaction, transition to detonation, and reacting free shear layers. This document contains the papers and edited versions of general discussions on these topics. The lead paper set the stage for the meeting by discussing the status and issues of supersonic combustion relevant to the scramjet engine. Experts were then called upon to review the current knowledge in the aforementioned areas, to focus on how this knowledge can be extended and applied to high-speed combustion, and to suggest future directions of research in these areas.

  5. 78 FR 10213 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... meeting includes the following topics: --International Space Station Utilization Status and Plans --Description of NASA's Agency Level Commercialization Study Plans It is imperative that the meeting be held...

  6. Intralesional cisplatin chemotherapy and topical cryotherapy for the control of choanal squamous cell carcinoma in an African penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Shannon T; Marlar, Annajane B; Garner, Michael; Lung, Nancy P

    2006-12-01

    A 3.5-yr-old, 2.5-kg female African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) was diagnosed with a choanal squamous cell carcinoma on the basis of biopsy after a history of choanal ulceration and anorexia with weight loss. Therapeutic modalities included the use of intralesional cisplatin followed by localized, topical cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen. The penguin remained free of clinical disease for a period of 9 mo, at which time a second cryotreatment was performed. The patient has remained free of all signs of choanal carcinoma for a period of 13 mo since the second cryotreatment.

  7. Freshman Health Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovde, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article examines a cluster of health topics that are frequently selected by students in lower division classes. Topics address issues relating to addictive substances, including alcohol and tobacco, eating disorders, obesity, and dieting. Analysis of the topics examines their interrelationships and organization in the reference literature.…

  8. Topical urea in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, P K; Choudhury, A K; Panja, S K

    1990-03-01

    For years research has been conducted to find a cutaneous moisturizer that is effective, easily available and relatively inexpensive urea, as a atopical agent, is all of this and is also a mild keratolytic. A trial was conducted over 200 patients suffering from a variety of disorders that were selected and using urea topically as urea 10 (10%), urea-20 lotion (20%), Urea-HC (with hydrocartisanl). The agent was applied twice daily for a maximum period of 8 weeks. Results indicate that urea is an effective moisturizer and in promotes the penetration of hydrocelisone into the skin.

  9. Topically induced diphenhydramine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J F; Weisse, M E

    1990-01-01

    We report the case of a 2 1/2-year-old child who manifested acute anticholinergic toxicity after the applications of a topical calamine-antihistamine lotion. This mechanism of diphenhydramine toxicity is uncommon, with only a few other case reports noted in the literature. This case is also intriguing in that this child had an underlying varicella illness with fever that tended to obscure the picture. This report describes the characteristic history and physical examination pertinent to anticholinergic toxicity, varicella complication considerations, and case management.

  10. Topical Steroid-Damaged Skin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Anil; Roga, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Topical steroids, commonly used for a wide range of skin disorders, are associated with side effects both systemic and cutaneous. This article aims at bringing awareness among practitioners, about the cutaneous side effects of easily available, over the counter, topical steroids. This makes it important for us as dermatologists to weigh the usefulness of topical steroids versus their side effects, and to make an informed decision regarding their use in each individual based on other factors such as age, site involved and type of skin disorder. PMID:25284849

  11. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - Part 3: Mentha × piperita - Solanum dulcamara.

    PubMed

    Calapai, Gioacchino; Minciullo, Paola L; Miroddi, Marco; Chinou, Ioanna; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph - now (since 2015)(†) called a European Union herbal monograph - has been produced. Part 3: Mentha × piperita L.-Solanum dulcamara L. PMID:26563681

  12. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - Part 3: Mentha × piperita - Solanum dulcamara.

    PubMed

    Calapai, Gioacchino; Minciullo, Paola L; Miroddi, Marco; Chinou, Ioanna; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph - now (since 2015)(†) called a European Union herbal monograph - has been produced. Part 3: Mentha × piperita L.-Solanum dulcamara L.

  13. Public understanding of geoscientific topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, Ute; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    Geoscientific topics and their consequences for the society are becoming more and more important for our daily life. Natural hazards such as flood and storm or the consequences of the climate change are urgent tasks and great challenges we have to tackle. Cascading natural hazards or environmental risks, can't be evaluated as single events by one scientific discipline, they rather need the expertise of different experts. The same applies for slowly progressive processes such as the climate change and its different aftereffects. More than ever politicians, decision makers, but also the public are asking for comprehensive background information and data to discuss activity options and to develop sustainable solutions. The improvement of public knowledge about science, their assets and drawbacks, chances and risks is getting crucial. To paint a comprehensive picture of different factors, correlations and dependencies the pooling of expertise is required. Thus eight research centres of the research field "Earth and Environment" of the Helmholtz-Association, Germany's largest scientific research organisation are currently building up a knowledge platform. Scientists of different disciplines will provide background information and explain their latest findings in an understandable way. Infographics, maps and animations will be applied to simplify and interpret complicated facts and findings. In addition to the web presence target group-specific products and activities will be organized. To meet the expectations of the different stakeholders an intensive dialog is aspired: round table discussions, exhibitions in museums and public places, tweeds are envisaged. In the beginning the partners will concentrate on the topics "consequences of the climate change", "pollutant dispersion" and "natural hazards/meteorological extreme events". The project is called Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP) coordinated by the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and the Helmholtz

  14. A Topical Trajectory on Survival: an Analysis of Link-Making in a Sequence of Lessons on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocksén, Miranda; Olander, Clas

    2016-04-01

    This study explores the concept of link-making in relation to communicative strategies applied in the teaching and studying of biological evolution. The analysis focused on video recordings of 11 lessons on biological evolution conducted in a Swedish 9th grade class of students aged 15 years. It reveals how the teacher and students connected classroom conversations, the frequency of references to conversations in whole-class settings, and the development of a theme focusing on species survival and extinction. Detailed examples from the data illustrate how this theme developed from its initiation during the first lesson, through discussion and clarification, to its wrapping up during the last lesson. They further illustrate how students made sense of what the teacher said and wrote, and how the teacher postponed issues, explained and developed topics, provided opportunities for link-making, organised the class, motivated students, and checked their understanding. The study's methodological approach offers a way of including several time dimensions within research. Based on our findings, we conclude that the excerpts examined here did succeed in building `islands of coherence' in the co-construction of curricular content. Moreover, the topical trajectory in relation to species survival provided opportunities for constructing a `scientific story' in the classroom.

  15. 75 FR 47274 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ...'s Advisory Panel (AP) will hold a meeting to discuss the topics contained in the agenda below. DATES... Caribbean Fishery Management Council's Advisory Panel will hold a meeting to discuss the topics contained...

  16. 77 FR 69837 - SFIREG Full Committee; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... meeting and sets forth the tentative agenda topics. DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday, December 10...://www.epa.gov/dockets . II. Tentative Agenda Topics 1. Responses to SFIREG Pyrethroid labeling...

  17. Topical gene silencing by iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide-dendrimer nanocomplex: the proof of concept in a skin cancer mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuganti, , Venkata Vamsi K.; Saraswathy, Manju; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Perumal, Omathanu P.

    2015-02-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex reduced the tumor volume by 45% and was consistent with the reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels. The iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex caused significant apoptosis in skin tumor. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that dendrimers are promising nanocarriers for developing topical gene silencing approaches for skin diseases.The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex

  18. Privacy-Preserving Discovery of Topic-Based Events from Social Sensor Signals: An Experimental Study on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Jung, Jai E.

    2014-01-01

    Social network services (e.g., Twitter and Facebook) can be regarded as social sensors which can capture a number of events in the society. Particularly, in terms of time and space, various smart devices have improved the accessibility to the social network services. In this paper, we present a social software platform to detect a number of meaningful events from information diffusion patterns on such social network services. The most important feature is to process the social sensor signal for understanding social events and to support users to share relevant information along the social links. The platform has been applied to fetch and cluster tweets from Twitter into relevant categories to reveal hot topics. PMID:24955388

  19. Acute poisoning in a child following topical treatment of head lice (pediculosis capitis) with an organophosphate pesticide.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Muddathir H; Adeel, Ahmed Awad; Alhaboob, Ali Abdu N; Ashri, Ahmed M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of acute organophosphate poisoning in a child treated with topical application of Diazinon-60 (WHO Class II toxicity) for head lice (pediculosis capitis). The patient presented with neurological symptoms and signs. After emergency respiratory and circulatory resuscitation the patient underwent dermal decontamination and was treated with atropine, high flow oxygen and pralidoxime. Scanning electron micrographs of scalp hair specimens revealed both viable and empty head lice nits (lice eggs that attach to the hair shaft). The patient was hospitalized for seven days and discharged after full recovery. The case highlights the importance of raising the awareness of health workers and the community about the danger of misusing pesticides for the treatment of head lice. PMID:27651556

  20. Acute poisoning in a child following topical treatment of head lice (pediculosis capitis) with an organophosphate pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad; Alhaboob, Ali Abdu N; Ashri, Ahmed M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of acute organophosphate poisoning in a child treated with topical application of Diazinon-60 (WHO Class II toxicity) for head lice (pediculosis capitis). The patient presented with neurological symptoms and signs. After emergency respiratory and circulatory resuscitation the patient underwent dermal decontamination and was treated with atropine, high flow oxygen and pralidoxime. Scanning electron micrographs of scalp hair specimens revealed both viable and empty head lice nits (lice eggs that attach to the hair shaft). The patient was hospitalized for seven days and discharged after full recovery. The case highlights the importance of raising the awareness of health workers and the community about the danger of misusing pesticides for the treatment of head lice. PMID:27651556

  1. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  2. Effect of Topical Fluoride on Surface of Cast Titanium and Nickel-Chromium: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nadiger, Ramesh Khandurao; Shetty, Omkar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effect of topical fluoride on surface of cast titanium and nickel-chromium. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine rectangular specimens of titanium (grade 2) and 39 rectangular specimens of nickel-chromium were cast in equal dimensions and divided into three groups of 13 samples each. Group one specimens of titanium and nickel-chromium were placed in 2% neutral sodium fluoride (NaF) solution for 16 minutes. Group two specimens of titanium and nickel-chromium were immersed in 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for eight minutes. Group three specimens of titanium and nickel-chromium were immersed in distilled water for 16 minutes. The surface roughness of the specimens was evaluated and the data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post-hoc comparison test with the level of significance set at 5% (P< 0.05). The surface of the specimens was further analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Results: Group two titanium specimens showed a statistically significant increase in surface roughness (P<0.05); but no statistically significant increase was noted in the surface roughness of nickel-chromium specimens in groups one, two and three (P>0.05). Qualitative SEM and EDS analyses further revealed the surface corrosion of titanium (group two) and localized mild corrosive pitting of nickel-chromium specimens (group two). Conclusion: Topical fluoride with acidic pH affects the surface roughness of titanium and to a certain extent, nickel-chromium. Neutral NaF solutions cause no significant change in corrosion resistance of titanium or nickel-chromium. PMID:26884773

  3. 49 CFR 40.15 - May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT... Responsibilities § 40.15 May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements? (a... DOT agency drug and alcohol testing regulations, consistent with the requirements of Subpart Q...

  4. Topics and Terms in Environmental Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holum, John R.

    This reference is an expanded glossary of topics and terms currently related to environmental problems. These topics and terms are associated with energy, air pollution, water pollution, wastes, and pesticides. Included are 239 main entries ranging from acaricide to weathering. Each entry briefly describes the topic or term and often presents a…

  5. EPR/spin-label technique as an analytical tool for determining the resistance of reactive topical skin protectants (rTSPs) to the breakthrough of vesicant agents.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, C M; Janny, S J

    1995-04-01

    Ointment formulations of reactive topical skin protectants (rTSPs) or topical skin protectants (TSPs) based on perfluorinated polyether material (PFPE, i.e., fomblin RT-15) were prepared and spin labeled. Four N-oxyl-4-4'-dimethyloxazolidine derivatives of stearic acid, 5-NS, 7-NS, 12-NS, and 16-NS, were used as spin probes. The spin-labeled vehicle, fomblin-RT-15, and vehicle containing chloroamide (S-330, an antivesicant) were exposed to various concentrations of half-mustard gas. The order parameter (S) was dependent on the depth of penetration of the paramagnetic group into the vehicle (fomblin) and on the chemical composition of the reactive antivesicant under investigation. The net change of the viscosity of the vehicle and the chemical composition were seen to affect the penetration profile. This will provide a useful in vitro screening technique to develop antivesicant TSPs.

  6. It's Elementary: Special Topics in Elementary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Patricia A., Ed.; Burriss, Kathleen Glascott, Ed.

    As elementary teachers work to educate and meet the needs of the students in their care, their job has become increasingly challenging and demanding. This volume addresses a variety of issues and topics related to elementary education around eight sectional themes relevant to the work of elementary teachers: celebrating diversity, classroom…

  7. An initiative to retain reserve soldiers failing to meet weight and physical fitness standards: the Wisconsin Army National Guard experience.

    PubMed

    Lalich, R A

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents the Wisconsin Army National Guard's attempt to retain soldiers failing to meet weight and annual physical fitness test standards. Soldiers failing or at risk of failing weight and fitness standards attend a wellness program one weekend per month for three consecutive months. Instruction includes topics in exercise training, nutrition, general wellness, stress reduction, and motivational lectures. A total of 324 soldiers who completed the program were evaluated for retention rates. At 48 months, graduates of the program had a 55% retention rate. This program is cost effective and soldier caring.

  8. [Topical therapy of rosacea].

    PubMed

    Schöfer, H

    2013-07-01

    Metronidazole and azelaic acid are the only topical medications approved for rosacea. All other topical treatments for rosacea and its special forms are used off-label. Topical steroids are not indicated in rosacea, because of their side effects (induction of steroid rosacea, high risk of facial skin atrophy, and high risk of rebound after cessation of therapy). Topical as well as systemic steroids are allowed only as initial and short term therapy for acute forms of rosacea (e.g. rosacea fulminans). Papular and pustular rosacea is the major indication for topical therapy. Sebaceous gland and connective tissue hyperplasia in glandular-hypertrophic rosacea as well as erythema in erythematous rosacea do not respond well to topical measures. A new active substance, the alpha-2-adrenoreceptor agonist brimonidine, will be approved soon for the topical treatment of erythema in rosacea. All severe forms of rosacea should initially be treated with a combination of topical and systemic agents. After improvement of the clinical symptoms, topical treatment alone is usually adequate to maintain the control.

  9. Evaluation of RU58841 as an anti-androgen in prostate PC3 cells and a topical anti-alopecia agent in the bald scalp of stumptailed macaques.

    PubMed

    Pan, H J; Wilding, G; Uno, H; Inui, S; Goldsmith, L; Messing, E; Chang, C

    1998-08-01

    The effect of androgen receptor transcriptional activation by RU58841, a nonsteroidal anti-androgen, was studied in the human prostate cancer PC3 cell line by cotransfection with wild-type androgen receptor (wt AR) and an androgen-responsive reporter (MMTV-ARE-CAT) construct. Anti-and rogens, hydroxyflutamide, and Casodex, and the antiestrogen, genistein, were studied in parallel for comparison with RU58841. The wt AR was activated only by the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Neither the anti-androgens nor antiestrogen can enhance AR transcriptional activity at 10(-11)-10(-7)M in PC3 cells. Hydroxyflutamide, RU58841, and Casodex, but not genistein, displayed competitively suppressive effects on DHT activation of wt AR. The potency of RU58841 was comparable to that of hydroxyflutamide. From this result, topical application of RU58841, which is considered to be a potential therapy for skin diseases, may induce systemic side effects. However, RU58841, on topical application, revealed a potent increase in density, thickening, and length of hair in the macaque model of androgenetic alopecia, whereas no systemic effects were detected. Together our results suggest that RU58841 may have potent antagonism to the wt AR and could be considered as a topically applied active anti-androgen for the treatment of androgen-dependent skin disorders, such as acne, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism.

  10. Evaluation of RU58841 as an anti-androgen in prostate PC3 cells and a topical anti-alopecia agent in the bald scalp of stumptailed macaques.

    PubMed

    Pan, H J; Wilding, G; Uno, H; Inui, S; Goldsmith, L; Messing, E; Chang, C

    1998-08-01

    The effect of androgen receptor transcriptional activation by RU58841, a nonsteroidal anti-androgen, was studied in the human prostate cancer PC3 cell line by cotransfection with wild-type androgen receptor (wt AR) and an androgen-responsive reporter (MMTV-ARE-CAT) construct. Anti-and rogens, hydroxyflutamide, and Casodex, and the antiestrogen, genistein, were studied in parallel for comparison with RU58841. The wt AR was activated only by the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Neither the anti-androgens nor antiestrogen can enhance AR transcriptional activity at 10(-11)-10(-7)M in PC3 cells. Hydroxyflutamide, RU58841, and Casodex, but not genistein, displayed competitively suppressive effects on DHT activation of wt AR. The potency of RU58841 was comparable to that of hydroxyflutamide. From this result, topical application of RU58841, which is considered to be a potential therapy for skin diseases, may induce systemic side effects. However, RU58841, on topical application, revealed a potent increase in density, thickening, and length of hair in the macaque model of androgenetic alopecia, whereas no systemic effects were detected. Together our results suggest that RU58841 may have potent antagonism to the wt AR and could be considered as a topically applied active anti-androgen for the treatment of androgen-dependent skin disorders, such as acne, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism. PMID:9798729

  11. HierarchicalTopics: visually exploring large text collections using topic hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenwen; Yu, Li; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ma, Zhiqiang; Ribarsky, William

    2013-12-01

    Analyzing large textual collections has become increasingly challenging given the size of the data available and the rate that more data is being generated. Topic-based text summarization methods coupled with interactive visualizations have presented promising approaches to address the challenge of analyzing large text corpora. As the text corpora and vocabulary grow larger, more topics need to be generated in order to capture the meaningful latent themes and nuances in the corpora. However, it is difficult for most of current topic-based visualizations to represent large number of topics without being cluttered or illegible. To facilitate the representation and navigation of a large number of topics, we propose a visual analytics system--HierarchicalTopic (HT). HT integrates a computational algorithm, Topic Rose Tree, with an interactive visual interface. The Topic Rose Tree constructs a topic hierarchy based on a list of topics. The interactive visual interface is designed to present the topic content as well as temporal evolution of topics in a hierarchical fashion. User interactions are provided for users to make changes to the topic hierarchy based on their mental model of the topic space. To qualitatively evaluate HT, we present a case study that showcases how HierarchicalTopics aid expert users in making sense of a large number of topics and discovering interesting patterns of topic groups. We have also conducted a user study to quantitatively evaluate the effect of hierarchical topic structure. The study results reveal that the HT leads to faster identification of large number of relevant topics. We have also solicited user feedback during the experiments and incorporated some suggestions into the current version of HierarchicalTopics.

  12. "1999 Bioastronomy Meeting"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meech, Karen J. (Editor); Owen, Tobias C.

    2000-01-01

    The 6th Bioastronomy Conference, Bioastronomy '99: A New Era in Bioastronomy, was held at the Hapuna Prince Beach hotel on the Big Island of Hawaii from August 2-6, 1999. The series of previous Bioastronomy meetings have played an important role in integrating the broader interests and techniques of both astronomy and biology to understand the origin and evolution of living systems in the universe, and to generating a context for exploration in our solar system and in extrasolar planetary systems. The scope of these interdisciplinary fields is captured in the topics discussed at the meeting: organic molecules in interstellar and interplanetary space; origin and evolution of planetary systems; comets, asteroids, and other small bodies and their role in the origin and evolution of life; Earth as a living planet; extreme environments on Earth; origin of life; transport of life between planets; evolution of life and intelligence; detection and characterization of extrasolar planets; search for extraterrestrial technology and life; future missions; and public acceptance and support of scientific studies of life in the universe. This paper gives an overview summary of the conference and briefly highlights some of the themes discussed at the meeting.

  13. The Science and Engineering Talent Pool. Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of the Scientific Manpower Commission and the Engineering Manpower Commission (Washington, District of Columbia, May 15, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scientific Manpower Commission, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of a meeting which focused on topics and issues related to the pipeline for scientists and engineers are presented. They include the meeting agenda, introductory comments, an overview, summaries of five presentations, the meeting summary, and a list of participants. The overview (by Betty Vetter) outlines some ways of measuring the…

  14. 77 FR 36329 - Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Scoping Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ..., environmental justice, and cumulative impacts. DATES: A public Scoping Meeting will be held on July 19, 2012... of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Scoping Meeting AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act...

  15. City tumour board Karachi: an innovative step in multidisciplinary consensus meeting and its two years audit.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Asghar Hussain; Abbasi, Ahmed Nadeem; Jamal, Abid; Haider, Ghulam; Rizvi, Sadia

    2013-12-01

    Management of cancer patients is a team work which usually comprises of surgeons, oncologists, radiologists, pathologists, psychiatrist, nutritionist and a nurse. Any patient who is suffering from any tumour needs a multimodality meeting as cancer treatment is not a single persons job. Most of the time, it is difficult to get the whole team together for a plan discussion due to their busy schedule. This problem was overcome by starting a tumour board meeting early morning of Sunday in Karachi which was named "City Tumour Board (CTB) Karachi". Its first meeting was held on Sunday March 28, 2010 and since then it takes place regularly fortnightly. Till March 2012, 44 sessions were conducted and total 264 cases were discussed. Here we present an audit of these two years. On average, in 60% of cases, tumour was up (36%) or down staged (12%) while in 52% of cases the stage remained unchanged. In 70% of cases (inclusive of above 60%), initial treatment plan was changed after discussion in the tumour board. This data signifies the importance of tumour board especially in a Pakistani setup where patient and even referring persons are not well aware of this disease and its outcome. It is advisable that every case should be discussed in tumour board before embarking on any treatment so that the best treatment plan can be given. It is also important that all relevant specialists should be present in the tumour board when planning for any treatment.

  16. Meeting report: the terabase metagenomics workshop and the vision of an Earth microbiome project.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Meyer, Folker; Antonopoulos, Dion; Balaji, Pavan; Brown, C Titus; Brown, Christopher T; Desai, Narayan; Eisen, Jonathan A; Evers, Dirk; Field, Dawn; Feng, Wu; Huson, Daniel; Jansson, Janet; Knight, Rob; Knight, James; Kolker, Eugene; Konstantindis, Kostas; Kostka, Joel; Kyrpides, Nikos; Mackelprang, Rachel; McHardy, Alice; Quince, Christopher; Raes, Jeroen; Sczyrba, Alexander; Shade, Ashley; Stevens, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Between July 18(th) and 24(th) 2010, 26 leading microbial ecology, computation, bioinformatics and statistics researchers came together in Snowbird, Utah (USA) to discuss the challenge of how to best characterize the microbial world using next-generation sequencing technologies. The meeting was entitled "Terabase Metagenomics" and was sponsored by the Institute for Computing in Science (ICiS) summer 2010 workshop program. The aim of the workshop was to explore the fundamental questions relating to microbial ecology that could be addressed using advances in sequencing potential. Technological advances in next-generation sequencing platforms such as the Illumina HiSeq 2000 can generate in excess of 250 billion base pairs of genetic information in 8 days. Thus, the generation of a trillion base pairs of genetic information is becoming a routine matter. The main outcome from this meeting was the birth of a concept and practical approach to exploring microbial life on earth, the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP). Here we briefly describe the highlights of this meeting and provide an overview of the EMP concept and how it can be applied to exploration of the microbiome of each ecosystem on this planet.

  17. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat skin conditions that involve scaling or overgrowth of skin ... water for 15 minutes.Do not apply topical salicylic acid to skin that is broken, red, swollen, irritated, or infected. ...

  18. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    demonstrated. Dodonov derives a formula which predicts a photon generation rate in a cavity due to strong variations of the complex dielectric function in a thin layer near an ideally conducting wall (simulation of the dynamic Casimir effect). Skenderovic reports how photons from two femptosecond laser pulses prepare a large molecule in a coherent superposition of vibrational states. The time evolution of this state is interrogated with a third (delayed) pulse which creates a fourth wave, the signal, giving information on the molecular dynamics. Dimitrova et al present lecture demonstrations of interference and quantum erasing with single photons. By considering electromagnetic energy flow lines as photon paths Davidovic et al explain the emergence of an interference pattern in the process of the accumulation of single photon events behind an interference grating. Atoms in a cavity, atom-atom interactions, interactions of atoms with photons and macroscopic bodies is the next important topic in this topical issue. Khanbekyan et al deal with the problem of the spontaneous emission of an excited atom in a high-Q cavity and investigate the regime when the emitted photon belongs to a wave packet simultaneously located inside and outside the cavity. Sambale et al study the resonant Casimir-Polder potential of an excited atom in front of meta-material half-space and show that for long distances it exhibits attenuated oscillations, while close to the surface the potential becomes attractive or repulsive. Buhmann et al study the nonequilibrium Casimir-Polder force on an atom prepared in an incoherent superposition of internal energy-eigenstates, which is placed in a magnetoelectric environment of nonuniform temperature. Lazarou et al discuss how two atoms, interacting with a single cavity, can be coherently evolved into an entangled state when they are controlled by a sequence of Gaussian pulses, named frequency chirps. Bougouffa et al report on field quantization between two parallel

  19. Effects of topical travoprost 0.004% on intraocular pressure and corneal biomechanical properties in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Gomez, Gabriel; Ancona-Lezama, David; Gil-Carrasco, Felix; Jimenez-Roman, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether topical application of travoprost 0.004% induces changes in corneal biomechanical properties affecting intraocular pressure (IOP) values in rabbits. Methods Both eyes of 10 New Zealand rabbits were measured 3 times with the Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) before treatment. Each measurement included corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), corneal-corrected IOP (IOPcc), and Goldmann equivalent IOP (IOPg). A drop of travoprost 0.004% was applied once daily in right eyes for 3 months; left eyes received no treatments. After 3 months of treatment both eyes of all rabbits were again measured 3 times. After complete keratectomy of both eyes, tissues prepared with hematoxylin-eosin stain were analyzed by means of light microscopy. Results The mean pre- and post-treatment IOPg, respectively, for right eyes was 9.92 ± 5.64 mm Hg and 7.62 ± 2.99 mm Hg (P = 0.027); IOPcc, 19.81 ± 5.25 mm Hg and 17.79 ± 4.09 mm Hg (P = 0.063); CRF, 1.65 ± 1.63 mm Hg and 2.18 ± 2.50 mm Hg (P = 0.266); and CH, 2.79 ± 1.74 mm Hg and 2.64 ± 2.08 mm Hg (P = 0.72). Mean post-treatment right and left eye IOPg values were, respectively, 7.62 ± 2.99 and 10.30 ± 4.40 (P = 0.002); IOPcc, 17.79 ± 4.09 mm Hg and 20.37 ± 4.32 mm Hg (P = 0.009); CRF, 1.65 ± 1.63 mm Hg and 2.17 ± 2.47 mm Hg (P = 0.274); and CH, 2.79 ± 1.74 mm Hg and 2.54 ± 2.08 mm Hg (P = 0.575). No difference in CH and CRF was observed between treated and untreated eyes. Conclusions Post-treatment reduction of IOP in treated eyes was a direct hypotensive effect of travoprost 0.004% and was not affected by changes in corneal biomechanical properties (CH and CRF), resulting in real lower IOP values. PMID:27330476

  20. Influence of formulation, receptor fluid, and occlusion, on in vitro drug release from topical dosage forms, using an automated flow-through diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Rolland, A; Demichelis, G; Jamoulle, J C; Shroot, B

    1992-01-01

    An automated flow-through diffusion cell apparatus was used for comparing the release rates of a naphthoic acid derivative, CD 271, from different topical formulations. The influence of the following parameters on CD 271 release from the formulations was investigated: receptor fluid composition, occlusion, weight of tested formulation, and dosage form type. The amount of tested formulation was shown to have no significant effect on the apparent release constant and lag time for an anionic oil-in-water emulsion and an aqueous gel. Occlusion affected drug release from the different dosage forms. Thus, occlusion increased CD 271 pharmaceutical availability for a lotion and a hydroalcoholic gel containing 0.1% of solubilized drug. The release profile of CD 271 from the formulations was highly dependent on the receptor fluid composition. Drug release was dramatically enhanced with n-octanol as compared to an aqueous solution of surfactant. Using occlusive or nonocclusive procedures, CD 271 apparent release constant and lag time were found to be highly dependent on the type of tested formulation. The flow-through diffusion cell proposed in the present study allows an accurate comparison of drug release characteristics from prototype topical formulations and therefore represents a valuable tool for formulation research or quality control process.

  1. Topical diclofenac solution.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D

    2009-01-01

    Topical diclofenac solution (Pennsaid) is a liquid formulation containing the NSAID diclofenac sodium (1.5% w/w). The solution base contains 45% w/w dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to enhance the absorption of diclofenac through the skin. Topical diclofenac solution is applied directly to the knee for treatment of symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. In well designed 4- to 12-week trials in patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee, topical diclofenac solution (40 drops four times daily) was significantly more effective than placebo or vehicle control (carrier solution without diclofenac) for improving Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index pain and physical function, and improving patient global assessment (PGA) and/or patient overall health assessment scores from baseline to the final assessments. Topical diclofenac solution (50 drops three times daily) was as effective as oral diclofenac 150 mg/day for improving WOMAC pain and physical function and PGA scores in a 12-week double-blind study in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Topical diclofenac solution was generally well tolerated. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event experienced by topical diclofenac solution recipients was dry skin at the application site. Gastrointestinal adverse events and abnormal laboratory parameters were less common with topical diclofenac solution than with oral diclofenac. PMID:19943711

  2. Topical diclofenac solution.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D

    2009-01-01

    Topical diclofenac solution (Pennsaid) is a liquid formulation containing the NSAID diclofenac sodium (1.5% w/w). The solution base contains 45% w/w dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to enhance the absorption of diclofenac through the skin. Topical diclofenac solution is applied directly to the knee for treatment of symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. In well designed 4- to 12-week trials in patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee, topical diclofenac solution (40 drops four times daily) was significantly more effective than placebo or vehicle control (carrier solution without diclofenac) for improving Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index pain and physical function, and improving patient global assessment (PGA) and/or patient overall health assessment scores from baseline to the final assessments. Topical diclofenac solution (50 drops three times daily) was as effective as oral diclofenac 150 mg/day for improving WOMAC pain and physical function and PGA scores in a 12-week double-blind study in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Topical diclofenac solution was generally well tolerated. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event experienced by topical diclofenac solution recipients was dry skin at the application site. Gastrointestinal adverse events and abnormal laboratory parameters were less common with topical diclofenac solution than with oral diclofenac.

  3. Development of an Eastern Shale Oil Residue as an Asphalt Additive - Subtask 2.5: Topical report, February 1, 1994-February 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    An evaluation of eastern shale oil as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age hardening and moisture susceptibility is being conducted. An eastern shale oil residue having a viscosity of 1.30 Pa`s at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F) was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts that are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. In addition, blends of the eastern shale oil residue and the petroleum-derived asphalts are being coated onto three different aggregates that are known to be susceptible to water stripping. The oxidative age hardening portion of this study is not complete at this time. To date, information has been obtained on the unaged samples and two of the aged petroleum-derived asphalts (AAD-1 and AAK-1). When complete, this data will include rheological data on the unaged, RTFO-aged, and the RTFO/PAV-aged samples and infrared data on the unaged and RTFO/PAV-aged samples. With respect to the rheological data, asphalt AAD-1 meets the specifications of a PG 58 asphalt while asphalt AAK-1 does not. In the latter case this indicates that AAK-1 is more appropriately evaluated at a higher temperature range. The infrared spectroscopic data obtained for the eastern shale oil residue show that it contains appreciable amounts of carbonyl and sulfoxide compound types, 0.22 absorbance units and 0. 27 moles/L, respectively. Thus, upon the addition of this residue to the three petroleum-derived asphalts the blends contain increased amounts of these functional groups relative to the petroleum-derived asphalts. This has been observed with other additives and is not considered detrimental. In addition, the data that has been collected to date indicate that the moisture susceptibility of blends of eastern shale oil residue and asphalt AAK-1 are somewhat improved when coated onto Lithonia granite.

  4. Expert Meeting Report. Energy Savings You Can Bank On

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Mark; Springer, Jeremy; Smith, Pepper; Porse, Erik

    2013-02-01

    In October 2011, ARBI organized and conducted an Experts’ Meeting on the topic of performance guarantees and financing vehicles for Energy Efficiency Upgrades. The meeting brought together technical, policy, and financial experts, including researchers, experienced installation contractors, and innovative energy business leaders, in order to discuss the opportunities and challenges for the energy efficiency upgrade industry to increase market uptake of Home Energy Upgrades (HEUs) through innovative offerings, such as performance guarantees.

  5. Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Ahmet; Üsküdarlı, Suzan; Özgür, Arzucan

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail. PMID:26991442

  6. Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Ahmet; Üsküdarlı, Suzan; Özgür, Arzucan

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail. PMID:26991442

  7. Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Ahmet; Üsküdarlı, Suzan; Özgür, Arzucan

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail.

  8. Topics for Lehigh County Seniors II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Lauren; And Others

    This document consists of a final report and curriculum materials from a project that designed a set of curriculum packages to meet the needs and interests of senior citizens. The curriculum presented topics that were critical to the daily lives of older adults while integrating basic skills. Classes met for each topic approximately six to eight…

  9. Women's Health Topics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women's Health 10903 New Hampshire Avenue WO32-2333 Silver Spring, MD 20993 More in Women's Health Topics ... Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 1-888-INFO-FDA (1- ...

  10. Topical treatments for hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zurada, Joanna M; Kriegel, David; Davis, Ira C

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic scars represent an abnormal, exaggerated healing response after skin injury. In addition to cosmetic concern, scars may cause pain, pruritus, contractures, and other functional impairments. Therapeutic modalities include topical medications, intralesional corticosteroids, laser therapy, and cryosurgery. Topical therapies, in particular, have become increasingly popular because of their ease of use, comfort, noninvasiveness, and relatively low cost. This review will discuss the properties and effectiveness of these agents, including pressure therapy, silicone gel sheeting and ointment, polyurethane dressing, onion extract, imiquimod 5% cream, and vitamins A and E in the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scars. PMID:17097399

  11. Public Lectures and Exhibits: Outreach Activities at the 2013 Meeting of the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Hernández-Terrones, Laura; Pérez-Cruz, Ligia

    2013-09-01

    The 2013 Joint Assembly Meeting of the Americas (MOA), held 14-17 May in Cancun, Mexico, included an outreach program with public lectures, exhibits, and a planetarium dome show, all held in parallel to the sessions, plenary presentations, town halls, and other events. The outreach activities run by enthusiastic volunteers attracted local students, the public, and meeting attendees. The meeting was sponsored by 14 societies across the Americas, and the scientific program encompassed topics in all areas of Earth and space sciences.

  12. Current topics in plant biochemistry and physiology: Volume 4: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.D.; Blevins, D.G.; Larson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Fourth Annual Plant Biochemistry and Physiology Symposium held at the University of Missouri-Columbia, April 10-12, 1985 and hosted by the Interdisciplinary Plant Biochemistry and Physiology Group. This Interdisciplinary Group was organized to facilitate research and training through interdisciplinary and cooperative approaches to problems facing Plant Biochemistry and Physiology. A key objective of this group is to maintain an awareness of the advances in research in this field. This annual symposium is one means of meeting this objective. Topics are selected each year in three to five areas in order to broaden our individual horizons.

  13. Measuring the extent and effectiveness of protected areas as an indicator for meeting global biodiversity targets

    PubMed Central

    Chape, S; Harrison, J; Spalding, M; Lysenko, I

    2005-01-01

    There are now over 100 000 protected areas worldwide, covering over 12% of the Earth's land surface. These areas represent one of the most significant human resource use allocations on the planet. The importance of protected areas is reflected in their widely accepted role as an indicator for global targets and environmental assessments. However, measuring the number and extent of protected areas only provides a unidimensional indicator of political commitment to biodiversity conservation. Data on the geographic location and spatial extent of protected areas will not provide information on a key determinant for meeting global biodiversity targets: ‘effectiveness’ in conserving biodiversity. Although tools are being devised to assess management effectiveness, there is no globally accepted metric. Nevertheless, the numerical, spatial and geographic attributes of protected areas can be further enhanced by investigation of the biodiversity coverage of these protected areas, using species, habitats or biogeographic classifications. This paper reviews the current global extent of protected areas in terms of geopolitical and habitat coverage, and considers their value as a global indicator of conservation action or response. The paper discusses the role of the World Database on Protected Areas and collection and quality control issues, and identifies areas for improvement, including how conservation effectiveness indicators may be included in the database to improve the value of protected areas data as an indicator for meeting global biodiversity targets. PMID:15814356

  14. Meeting Temperature TMDL's Through the Development of an Ecosystem Marketplace Using a Systems Dynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, T. S.; Tidwell, V. C.; Cardwell, H. E.; Ockner, G.; Rea, M. T.; Primozich, D.

    2006-12-01

    Water managers on the Willamette River in the state of Oregon are facing a new biological opinion and potentially strict TMDL regulations for temperature that will require actions by various stakeholders over the next few decades. Considerable public planning has already been accomplished in the basin with much of the assessment and planning phases for solving the basin's problems codified in a TMDL that was issued in 2006. Various alternatives have been proposed to meet the TMDL requirement, including operational changes at US Army Corps-operated reservoirs, projects that increase stream shading or restore the floodplain or hyporheic zone, and operational or technological changes at point sources such as waste water treatment plants and pulp and paper plants. To help meet the TMDL in a shorter time horizon, a collection of stakeholders formed the Willamette Partnership to develop an ecosystem marketplace where water quality and conservation credits can be traded. The marketplace will develop currencies in temperature and other environmental goods and services, and requires tools to describe linkages between credit trades, water operations, and other management changes (e.g. increases in stream shading) that control water temperature. These tools will link basin hydrology to temperature, water quality, and other concerns using a systems dynamics approach to provide real-time feedback to support conflict negotiation and decision making. Here, we present the development and conceptualization of those tools and their use in evaluating the potential and implementation of the ecosystem marketplace.

  15. Tweeting the meeting: A comparative analysis of an Australian emergency medicine conference over four years

    PubMed Central

    Udovicich, Cristian; Barberi, Anthony; Perera, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Social media allows user-generated content and dialog between users and has also entered into the domain of healthcare. The purpose of this study was to compare the use of Twitter at the Australasian College of Emergency Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting (ACEM ASM) from 2011 to 2014 and analyze its ability to spread emergency medicine education. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, TweetReach was utilized to analyze relevant tweets. Each Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) had an associated Twitter account/s from, which data were collected. Duplicate tweets were excluded from the analysis. Information on the number of total tweets (regular tweets, retweets, and replies) and contributors was gathered. The potential audience, the reach, was calculated. Results: From 2011 to 2014 the number of tweets rose from 460 to 4694, a 920% increase. Only 54 Twitter users contributed to the 2011 ASM. This rose to 252 (2012), 291 (2013) and 572 (2014). The average number of tweets per contributor ranged from 8.2 to 10.9. The reach, the potential number of Twitter users exposed to posts, rose >30 times from 2011 (15,502 users) to 2014 (471,166). Conclusion: The use of Twitter at the ACEM ASM rose significantly from 2011 to 2014. It is a highly useful tool for the dissemination of emergency medicine education. Twitter has been harnessed by the ASM to enhance the conference experience by further generating interaction between delegates as well as those worldwide. PMID:26957823

  16. Topical vitamin D3 and low-calcemic analogs induce thymic stromal lymphopoietin in mouse keratinocytes and trigger an atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Hener, Pierre; Zhang, Zhikun; Kato, Shigeaki; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre

    2006-08-01

    We have demonstrated that cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), whose expression is rapidly induced upon keratinocyte-selective ablation of retinoid X receptors (RXRs) -alpha and -beta in the mouse (RXRalphabeta(ep-/-) mice), plays a key role in initiating a skin and systemic atopic dermatitis-like phenotype. We show here that topical application of the physiologically active ligand [1alpha,25-(OH)(2)D(3); calcitriol] of the vitamin D receptor, or of its low-calcemic analog MC903 (calcipotriol; Dovonex), induces TSLP expression in epidermal keratinocytes, which results in an atopic dermatitis-like syndrome mimicking that seen in RXRalphabeta(ep-/-) mutants and transgenic mice overexpressing TSLP in keratinocytes. Furthermore, topical application of retinoic acid receptor RARgamma-selective agonist BMS961 also induces TSLP expression either on its own or synergistically with 1alpha,25-(OH)(2)D(3). Our data demonstrate that RXR/vitamin D receptor and RXR/retinoic acid receptor-gamma heterodimers and their ligands cell-autonomously control the expression of TSLP in epidermal keratinocytes of the mouse. We propose molecular mechanisms through which vitamin D3 and retinoic acid signalings could be involved in the pathogenesis of atopic diseases.

  17. IP Internal Movement and Topicalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigate the phenomenon of internal topicalization cross-linguistically, using Chinese as a starting point. Internal topicalization refers to constructions in which a topic phrase is placed between the subject and the verb (in contrast to external topicalization, which involves a topic in the CP domain). I argue that…

  18. Development and Effectiveness of an Educational Card Game as Supplementary Material in Understanding Selected Topics in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Arnel F.

    2014-01-01

    The complex concepts and vocabulary of biology classes discourage many students. In this study, a pretest-posttest model was used to test the effectiveness of an educational card game in reinforcing biological concepts in comparison with traditional teaching methods. The subjects of this study were two biology classes at Bulacan State…

  19. 76 FR 21892 - SFIREG POM Working Committee; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... announces the location and times for the meeting and sets forth the tentative agenda topics. DATES: The.... II. Tentative Agenda Topics 1. Implementing and communicating major pesticide regulatory...

  20. Recent Topics in Instrumentation and Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Kazuo; Hirose, Masanobu; Otani, Akihito; Mochizuki, Ken; Uchida, Masafumi

    Instrumentation and measurement play a vital role in research and development in the science and engineering fields. Recently, the goals of instrumentation and measurement have expanded to meet not only the industrial and science requirements but also the needs in all fields of social life, such as medicine and welfare, the environment, and disaster and security. In this article, the state of TC-IM (Technical Committee of Instrumentation and Measurement of IEEJ) activities and technical topics in the instrumentation and measurement field are reported, mainly referring to over seventy papers presented at the IM Technical Meeting.

  1. A new way to teach an old topic: the cadaver-based anatomy short course for high school students.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Christopher J; Miller, Jon S; Olson, Dan

    2005-05-01

    An outreach program has been developed at the Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Illinois University (NIU), that offers an intensive short course in human gross anatomy to high school students and their teachers. Prior to the short course, the high school teachers attend a laboratory orientation, view the facilities, and then develop a syllabus suitable for the class needs. When the students arrive, they spend between 1 and 2 days rotating through five different work stations. Using their syllabus, they identify and learn the function of various structures on human cadavers and models. Evaluation and content testing of 143 students demonstrated a significant degree of enthusiasm and retention of the syllabus material at the end of the course. All teachers who participated in the program indicated that they wish to return the following year and new groups have already applied to attend. The results of the program demonstrate ways that universities can generate excitement about science and learning at the high school level.

  2. 76 FR 14106 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topic: --Astrophysics Division Update. It is imperative that the meeting...

  3. Organization of the topical meeting on tunable solid-state lasers. Held in North Falmouth, Massachusetts on May 1-3 1989. Final report, 30 August 1988-30 August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-30

    Progress and interest in solid-state lasers generally, and in tunable solid state-lasers specifically, continues to expand. Applications of these lasers include spectroscopy, remote sensing, ranging and imaging, and medicine. New solid-state materials are providing lasers with higher output power, broader tunability, and more-efficient pumping schemes. The quantum electronics and crystal-chemistry properties of these new materials are leading to enhanced laser performance. At the meeting, sessions were held on sapphire, novel laser schemes, Cr lasers, forsterite and excited-state absorption, solid-state lasers for specialized applications, alexandrite lasers, Cr-related issues, diode pumped lasers, nonlinear frequency conversion, 1.3-micrometer Nd lasers, infrared lasers and energy transfer, 2-micrometer lasers, rare earth laser materials, and Er lasers.

  4. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS: Active spectroscopy of excited iron atoms in an erosion laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, S. M.; Koroteev, Nikolai I.; Rychev, M. V.; Fedorov, A. B.

    1987-05-01

    The method of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) was used to probe the plasma of an optical spark formed on the surface of a steel target. Five strong resonances due to transitions between excited states of Fe I atoms were recorded in the CARS spectrum. A study was made of the kinetics and polarization properties of the scattered anti-Stokes radiation. The CARS method is recommended for the study of the plasma formed as a result of optical breakdown at solid targets because it can provide a universal means for the analysis of the chemical composition of the targets.

  5. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  6. An experimental double-blind irradiation study of a novel topical product (TPF 50) compared to other topical products with DNA repair enzymes, antioxidants, and growth factors with sunscreens: implications for preventing skin aging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Enzo; Spencer, James M; Braun, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a major risk factor for skin aging and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Although traditional sunscreens remain the mainstay for the prevention of UVR-induced skin damage, they cannot ensure a complete protection against the whole spectrum of molecular lesions associated with UVR exposure. The formation of helix-distorting photoproducts such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), as well as oxidative damage to DNA bases, including the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) are among the key DNA lesions associated with photoaging and tumorigenesis. Besides DNA lesions, UVR-induced formation of free radicals can result in protein carbonylation (PC), a major form of irreversible protein damage that inactivates their biological function. This study compares a complex novel topical product (TPF50) consisting of three actives, ie, 1) traditional physical sunscreens (SPF 50), 2) a liposome-encapsulated DNA repair enzymes complex (photolyase, endonuclease, and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase [OGG1]), and 3) a potent antioxidant complex (carnosine, arazine, ergothionine) to existing products. Specifically, we assessed the ability of TFP50 vs those of DNA repair and antioxidant and growth factor topical products used with SPF 50 sunscreens in preventing CPD, 8OHdG, and PC formation in human skin biopsies after experimental irradiations. In head-to-head comparison studies, TPF50 showed the best efficacy in reducing all of the three molecular markers. The results indicated that the three TPF50 components had a synergistic effect in reducing CPD and PC, but not 8OHdG. Taken together, our results indicate that TPF50 improves the genomic and proteomic integrity of skin cells after repeated exposure to UVR, ultimately reducing the risk of skin aging and NMSC.

  7. Development and effectiveness of an educational card game as supplementary material in understanding selected topics in biology.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Arnel F

    2014-01-01

    The complex concepts and vocabulary of biology classes discourage many students. In this study, a pretest-posttest model was used to test the effectiveness of an educational card game in reinforcing biological concepts in comparison with traditional teaching methods. The subjects of this study were two biology classes at Bulacan State University-Sarmiento Campus. Both classes received conventional instruction; however, the experimental group's instruction was supplemented with the card game, while the control group's instruction was reinforced with traditional exercises and assignments. The score increases from pretest to posttest showed that both methods effectively reinforced biological concepts, but a t test showed that the card game is more effective than traditional teaching methods. Additionally, students from the experimental group evaluated the card game using five criteria: goals, design, organization, playability, and usefulness. The students rated the material very satisfactory.

  8. Development and Effectiveness of an Educational Card Game as Supplementary Material in Understanding Selected Topics in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Arnel F.

    2014-01-01

    The complex concepts and vocabulary of biology classes discourage many students. In this study, a pretest–posttest model was used to test the effectiveness of an educational card game in reinforcing biological concepts in comparison with traditional teaching methods. The subjects of this study were two biology classes at Bulacan State University–Sarmiento Campus. Both classes received conventional instruction; however, the experimental group's instruction was supplemented with the card game, while the control group's instruction was reinforced with traditional exercises and assignments. The score increases from pretest to posttest showed that both methods effectively reinforced biological concepts, but a t test showed that the card game is more effective than traditional teaching methods. Additionally, students from the experimental group evaluated the card game using five criteria: goals, design, organization, playability, and usefulness. The students rated the material very satisfactory. PMID:24591506

  9. Topical Therapies for Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Elmariah, Sarina B.; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2011-01-01

    Itch, or pruritus, is the predominant symptom associated with acute and chronic cutaneous disease and in some cases, may be debilitating. To date, there is no single universally effective anti-itch treatment. As the pathophysiology of itch in most cutaneous or systemic disorders remains unclear, anti-pruritic therapy is often directed against a variety of targets, including the epidermal barrier, immune system, or the nervous system. Topical therapy is the mainstay of dermatologic management of acute or localized itch or in patients with contraindications to systemic therapies. This review will summarize current topical therapies to treat pruritus and discuss potential future therapies. PMID:21767774

  10. Topical ketoprofen patch.

    PubMed

    Mazières, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Although oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in the treatment of a variety of acute and chronic pain conditions, their use may be associated with serious systemic adverse effects, particularly gastrointestinal disorders. In order to minimise the incidence of systemic events related to such agents, topical NSAIDs have been developed. Topical NSAIDs, applied as gels, creams or sprays, penetrate the skin, subcutaneous fatty tissue and muscle in amounts that are sufficient to exert a therapeutic effect on peripheral and central mechanisms in the absence of high plasma concentrations. Data indicate that topical NSAIDs are effective at relieving pain in a number of acute and chronic pain indications. This review article discusses the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and tolerability of a new formulation of ketoprofen available as a topical patch. The topical patch containing ketoprofen 100mg as the active principle has been developed using a novel delivery system that dispenses therapeutic doses of the drug directly to the site of injury. Pharmacokinetic data indicate that although plasma levels of ketoprofen are higher when the drug is administered as a patch versus a gel, the total systemic bioavailability of ketoprofen 100 mg administered via a patch is no more than 10% of that reported for ketoprofen 100 mg administered orally. Because the patch facilitates ketoprofen delivery over a 24-hour period, the drug remains continually present in the tissue subjacent to the site of application. High tissue but low plasma ketoprofen concentrations mean that while tissue concentrations are high enough to exert a therapeutic effect, plasma concentrations remain low enough to not result in systemic adverse events caused by elevated serum NSAID levels. Phase III clinical trials in patients with non-articular rheumatism and traumatic painful soft tissue injuries showed that the topical ketoprofen patch was significantly more effective than placebo at

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: An efficient technique for solving the arbitrarily multilayered electrostatic problems with singularity arising from degenerate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyuan, Shiang-Woei; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan; Chen, Jeng-Tzong

    2004-09-01

    Engineers usually adopt multilayered design for semiconductor and electron devices, and an accurate electrostatic analysis is indispensable in the design stage. For variable design of electron devices, the BEM has become a better method than the domain-type FEM because BEM can provide a complete solution in terms of boundary values only, with substantial saving in modelling effort. Since dual BEM still has some advantages over conventional BEM for singularity arising from a degenerate boundary, the dual BEM accompanied by subregion technology, instead of tedious calculation of Fourier-Bessel transforms for the spatial Green's functions, was used to efficiently simulate the electric effect of diverse ratios of permittivity between arbitrarily multilayered domain and the fringing field around the edge of conductors. Results show that different ratios of permittivity will affect the electric field seriously, and the values of surface charge density on the edge of conductors are much higher than those on the middle part because of fringing effect. In addition, if using the DBEM to model the fringing field around the edge of conductors, the minimum allowable data of dielectric strength for keeping off dielectric breakdown can be obtained very efficiently.

  12. Recent Topics in Instrumentation and Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Kazuo; Fukuchi, Tetsuo; Arakawa, Satoru; Sayama, Shuji

    Instrumentation and measurement play a vital role in research and development in the science and engineering fields. Recently, the goals of instrumentation and measurement have expanded to meet not only the industrial and science requirements but also the needs in all fields of social life, such as medicine and welfare, the environment, and disaster and security. In this article, recent technical topics in the instrumentation and measurement field are reported.

  13. Tracking topic birth and death in LDA.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Andrew T.; Robinson, David Gerald

    2011-09-01

    Most topic modeling algorithms that address the evolution of documents over time use the same number of topics at all times. This obscures the common occurrence in the data where new subjects arise and old ones diminish or disappear entirely. We propose an algorithm to model the birth and death of topics within an LDA-like framework. The user selects an initial number of topics, after which new topics are created and retired without further supervision. Our approach also accommodates many of the acceleration and parallelization schemes developed in recent years for standard LDA. In recent years, topic modeling algorithms such as latent semantic analysis (LSA)[17], latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA)[10] and their descendants have offered a powerful way to explore and interrogate corpora far too large for any human to grasp without assistance. Using such algorithms we are able to search for similar documents, model and track the volume of topics over time, search for correlated topics or model them with a hierarchy. Most of these algorithms are intended for use with static corpora where the number of documents and the size of the vocabulary are known in advance. Moreover, almost all current topic modeling algorithms fix the number of topics as one of the input parameters and keep it fixed across the entire corpus. While this is appropriate for static corpora, it becomes a serious handicap when analyzing time-varying data sets where topics come and go as a matter of course. This is doubly true for online algorithms that may not have the option of revising earlier results in light of new data. To be sure, these algorithms will account for changing data one way or another, but without the ability to adapt to structural changes such as entirely new topics they may do so in counterintuitive ways.

  14. An integral topical gel for cellulite reduction: results from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled evaluation of efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Eric; Journet, Michel; Oula, Marie-Laure; Gomez, Juan; Léveillé, Claude; Loing, Estelle; Bilodeau, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellulite is a serious cosmetic concern for most of the 90% of women affected by it. Objective To assess the clinical efficacy of a complex integral anti-cellulite gel. Methods This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study involved 44 healthy women, aged 25–55 years. Subjects had a normal to slightly overweight body mass index and presented slight to moderate cellulite on their thighs, buttocks, and/or hips at baseline. Subjects were randomly assigned to either the treated or placebo group and accordingly applied the active product or placebo on their hips, stomach, buttocks, and thighs, twice daily for 3 months. Skin tonicity, orange-peel aspect, and stubborn cellulite were assessed at day 0, 28, 56, and 84. A self-evaluation questionnaire was completed by all volunteers. Results At the end of the study, an average of 81% of the subjects applying the active product presented improvement in their cellulite condition versus 32% for the placebo group (all descriptors and sites combined). At day 84, skin tonicity, orange-peel appearance, and stubborn cellulite were improved in a significant manner (P<0.05) over placebo, on all studied areas. Skin tonicity improved on average by +41% for buttocks, +35% for hips, and +31% for thighs. Orange peel appearance was reduced on average by −25% for buttocks, −22% for hips, and −22% for thighs. Stubborn cellulite was reduced on average by −19% for buttocks, −24% for hips, and −22% for thighs. Circumference measurements decreased in a significant manner (P<0.05) over placebo, for the abdomen (average value of −1.1 cm) and thighs (average value of −0.8 cm). The product was well tolerated and perceived by the volunteers themselves as better performing than placebo on all criteria. Conclusion All results validate the efficacy of the present integral formulation to significantly reduce signs of cellulite and reshape the silhouette. PMID:24600240

  15. Meeting the needs of cancer patients: is there a need for an organizational change?

    PubMed

    Foà, Chiara; Mancini, Tiziana; Prandi, Rossella; Ghirardi, Linda; De Vincenzi, Franca; Cornelli, Maria Cristina; Copelli, Patrizia; Artioli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    As stated in the literature the most important needs of cancer patients are not adequately meet. Improving information, communication and education provided have not led to incisive changes in the organizational model of the oncology departments. The study contributes to this direction, by planning an "Integrated Operating Point" (I.O.P.) dedicated to cancer patients and their relatives in Italy. 42 Some professionals, patients and relatives were involved and 42 of them participated in focus group/or interviews. Results of thematic content analysis allow us to sketch out some key elements that I.O.P. should have in order to support cancer patients and their families. Integration of services, continuity of care, and cooperation between professionals involved are key elements that might qualify such organizational development.

  16. Meeting the demographic challenges ahead: Toward culture change in an ageing New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Edward Alan; Booth, Mark; Mor, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    There are several innovative service delivery models in the United States (US) relevant to long-term care policy development and implementation in New Zealand. An especially fruitful source of innovation has been the culture change movement, which originated in the US but has begun to spread to New Zealand and other OECD countries. The culture change philosophy requires that providers respond to the values, preferences, and needs of care recipients. It also requires devolving authority to direct care workers who know their clients best, in addition to transitioning from sterile 'clinical' settings to more homelike environments. New Zealand has a more favourable policy context for improving long-term care than the US. Thus, it is critical that it build upon these short term advantages to promote further dissemination of the culture change ethos, thereby placing caregivers in a better position to meet current care challenges, not to mention those posed by growth in the elderly population ahead. PMID:18498640

  17. News Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

  18. 41 CFR 102-37.390 - What basic criteria must an applicant meet before a SASP can qualify it for eligibility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... an applicant meet before a SASP can qualify it for eligibility? 102-37.390 Section 102-37.390 Public... What basic criteria must an applicant meet before a SASP can qualify it for eligibility? To qualify for...) Demonstrate that it meets any approval, accreditation, or licensing requirements for operation of its...

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: A review and outlook for an anomaly of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM): superlattices on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pong, Wing-Tat; Durkan, Colm

    2005-11-01

    anomalous regime of STM; however, there is a lack of a systematic classification of this scattered information. This review article thus serves the purpose of organizing all these results so as to enable a more comprehensive understanding of this phenomenon. We review the discovery of graphite superlattices, the observation of the associated properties, and the research efforts on this subject. An effort is made to envision the future experimental and theoretical research possibilities to unveil the mystery of this anomaly of STM. Applications of graphite superlattices are also proposed.

  20. Water Management To Meet Challenges In Food Production ­ An Example From South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadananan, K.

    Demands for food and water have been increasing with fast increasing population in many developing countries. Availability of water and fertile land, the two basic requirements for food production do not meet together in certain regions. In such regions, cooperation and efficient management practices can solve the problem to a good extend. The southern states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu of India are divided by the mountain chains, the Western Ghats the orography of which makes Kerala one among the heaviest rainfall region in the World itself and Tamil Nadu a scanty rainfall region. Kerala receives more than 300cm average annual rainfall, giving birth to a number of perennial rivers and other water bodies whereas Tamil Nadu receives rainfall less than100cm. Most of the rivers of Tamil Nadu are seasonal and it depends on interstate water transfer to face the permanent water shortage. Owing to the high density of population, peculiar topography and soil types, agricultural production in Kerala is quite inadequate and the State depends on neighbouring States, especially Tamil Nadu for rice and vegetables, but not willing to share water. According to the Constitution of India, control of rivers is by individual states and this often leads to transboundary water disputes that retard development activities. Around 80% of the rainfall of Kerala wastefully flows into the Sea, when there is acute water shortage in Tamil Nadu. All the rivers in Kerala originate in the Ghats and its steep slopes makes more water storage difficult. Cooperation among the States become essential for meeting the increasing needs in water and food. If some of the water from the catchments in Kerala is diverted into Tamil Nadu, and the States can do joint agriculture, it can meet the challenges due to increase in population and environmental changes and minimize unemployment problems. Water diversion to Tamil Naduwill reduce flood damage and soil erosion in Kerala. The existing socio

  1. A novel gel based on an ionic complex from a dendronized polymer and ciprofloxacin: Evaluation of its use for controlled topical drug release.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica C; Cuggino, Julio C; Rosset, Clarisa I; Páez, Paulina L; Strumia, Miriam C; Manzo, Ruben H; Alovero, Fabiana L; Alvarez Igarzabal, Cecilia I; Jimenez-Kairuz, Alvaro F

    2016-12-01

    The development and characterization of a novel, gel-type material based on a dendronized polymer (DP) loaded with ciprofloxacin (CIP), and the evaluation of its possible use for controlled drug release, are presented in this work. DP showed biocompatible and non-toxic behaviors in cultured cells, both of which are considered optimal properties for the design of a final material for biomedical applications. These results were encouraging for the use of the polymer loaded with CIP (as a drug model), under gel form, in the development of a new controlled-release system to be evaluated for topical administration. First, DP-CIP ionic complexes were obtained by an acid-base reaction using the high density of carboxylic acid groups of the DP and the amine groups of the CIP. The complexes obtained in the solid state were broadly characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, XRP diffraction, DSC-TG analysis and optical microscopy techniques. Gels based on the DP-CIP complexes were easily prepared and presented excellent mechanical behaviors. In addition, optimal properties for application on mucosal membranes and skin were achieved due to their high biocompatibility and acute skin non-irritation. Slow and sustained release of CIP toward simulated physiological fluids was observed in the assays (in vitro), attributed to ion exchange phenomenon and to the drug reservoir effect. An in vitro bacterial growth inhibition assay showed significant CIP activity, corresponding to 38 and 58% of that exhibited by a CIP hydrochloride solution at similar CIP concentrations, against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. However, CIP delivery was appropriate, both in terms of magnitude and velocity to allow for a bactericidal effect. In conclusion, the final product showed promising behavior, which could be exploited for the treatment of topical and mucosal opportunistic infections in human or veterinary applications.

  2. A novel gel based on an ionic complex from a dendronized polymer and ciprofloxacin: Evaluation of its use for controlled topical drug release.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica C; Cuggino, Julio C; Rosset, Clarisa I; Páez, Paulina L; Strumia, Miriam C; Manzo, Ruben H; Alovero, Fabiana L; Alvarez Igarzabal, Cecilia I; Jimenez-Kairuz, Alvaro F

    2016-12-01

    The development and characterization of a novel, gel-type material based on a dendronized polymer (DP) loaded with ciprofloxacin (CIP), and the evaluation of its possible use for controlled drug release, are presented in this work. DP showed biocompatible and non-toxic behaviors in cultured cells, both of which are considered optimal properties for the design of a final material for biomedical applications. These results were encouraging for the use of the polymer loaded with CIP (as a drug model), under gel form, in the development of a new controlled-release system to be evaluated for topical administration. First, DP-CIP ionic complexes were obtained by an acid-base reaction using the high density of carboxylic acid groups of the DP and the amine groups of the CIP. The complexes obtained in the solid state were broadly characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, XRP diffraction, DSC-TG analysis and optical microscopy techniques. Gels based on the DP-CIP complexes were easily prepared and presented excellent mechanical behaviors. In addition, optimal properties for application on mucosal membranes and skin were achieved due to their high biocompatibility and acute skin non-irritation. Slow and sustained release of CIP toward simulated physiological fluids was observed in the assays (in vitro), attributed to ion exchange phenomenon and to the drug reservoir effect. An in vitro bacterial growth inhibition assay showed significant CIP activity, corresponding to 38 and 58% of that exhibited by a CIP hydrochloride solution at similar CIP concentrations, against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. However, CIP delivery was appropriate, both in terms of magnitude and velocity to allow for a bactericidal effect. In conclusion, the final product showed promising behavior, which could be exploited for the treatment of topical and mucosal opportunistic infections in human or veterinary applications. PMID:27612709

  3. Six Things to Never Say or Hear during an IEP Meeting: Educators as Advocates for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Gregory A.; Hart, Juliet E.; Malian, Ida; McDonald, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to support school professionals in their work with parents as they meet IDEA (2004) requirements during IEP meetings. The authors share tools to help recognize when IDEA principles are violated and provide alternative responses that school professionals and parents can offer. Definitions and brief explanations of the…

  4. Expert Meeting Report: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.

    2012-05-01

    This report describes results of a Building America expert meeting on September 13, 2011, in Las Vegas, Nevada, hosted by the Building America Retrofit Alliance (BARA). This meeting provided a forum for presentations and discussions on the use of new media to work with remodelers and retrofit projects to improve energy efficiency and deliver research results from the Building America program to remodelers.

  5. Expert Meeting Report: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media - An Idea Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Stacy

    2012-05-01

    This report describes results of a Building America expert meeting on September 13, 2011, in Las Vegas, Nevada, hosted by the Building America Retrofit Alliance (BARA). This meeting provided a forum for presentations and discussions on the use of new media to work with remodelers and retrofit projects to improve energy efficiency and deliver research results from the Building America program to remodelers.

  6. Meeting the Needs of the Teen-Age Pregnant Student: An In-School Program that Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, Marion L.; Geesey, Marjorie R.

    1984-01-01

    The York City school district has reduced the drop-out rate for pregnant students through the implementation of an in-school program called "Changing Roles." This program offers students information on prenatal medical care, fetus development, infant care, and several other topics of concern. Program design and curricular guidelines are offered.…

  7. Housing: Topic Paper F.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    This paper, one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, addresses the issue of housing. Major federal responsibilities are to develop additional housing opportunities for persons with disabilities and to assure that currently available housing is equally open to individuals with…

  8. Transportation: Topic Paper E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    As one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, this paper reviews the issue of transportation services. In the area of urban mass transit, four relevant pieces of legislation and public transportation accessibility regulations are cited, and cost issues are explored. Paratransit systems,…

  9. Topical Research: Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Karen

    This lesson plan can be used in social studies, language arts, or library research. The instructional objective is for students to select a topic of study relating to Africa, write a thesis statement, collect information from media sources, and develop a conclusion. The teacher may assign the lesson for written or oral evaluation. The teacher…

  10. Topics for Mathematics Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, LeRoy C., Ed.; Snyder, Henry D., Ed.

    The ten chapters in this booklet cover topics not ordinarily discussed in the classroom: Fibonacci sequences, projective geometry, groups, infinity and transfinite numbers, Pascal's Triangle, topology, experiments with natural numbers, non-Euclidean geometries, Boolean algebras, and the imaginary and the infinite in geometry. Each chapter is…

  11. The pharmacology of topical analgesics.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L

    2013-07-01

    Pain management of patients continues to pose challenges to clinicians. Given the multiple dimensions of pain--whether acute or chronic, mild, moderate, or severe, nociceptive or neuropathic--a multimodal approach may be needed. Fortunately, clinicians have an array of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment choices; however, each modality must be chosen carefully, because some often used oral agents are associated with safety and tolerability issues that restrict their use in certain patients. In particular, orally administered nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, opioids, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are known to cause systemic adverse effects in some patients. To address this problem, a number of topical therapies in various therapeutic classes have been developed to reduce systemic exposure and minimize the risks of patients developing adverse events. For example, topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug formulations produce a site-specific effect (ie, cyclo-oxygenase inhibition) while decreasing the systemic exposure that may lead to undesired effects in patients. Similarly, derivatives of acetylsalicylic acid (ie, salicylates) are used in topical analgesic formulations that do not significantly enter the patient's systemic circulation. Salicylates, along with capsaicin, menthol, and camphor, compose the counterirritant class of topical analgesics, which produce analgesia by activating and then desensitizing epidermal nociceptors. Additionally, patches and creams that contain the local anesthetic lidocaine, alone or co-formulated with other local anesthetics, are also used to manage patients with select acute and chronic pain states. Perhaps the most common topical analgesic modality is the cautious application of cutaneous cold and heat. Such treatments may decrease pain not by reaching the target tissue through systemic distribution, but by acting more directly on the affected tissue. Despite the tolerability benefits associated with avoiding

  12. Business Education Research: Identification and Prioritization of Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Martha H.; Wilhelm, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Using an affinity diagram, business educators generated 110 research topics. In a two-round modified Delphi, 15 business educators aggregated, categorized, and rank ordered the topics. Topics related to workplace soft skills, business communication, technology, and distance learning ranked highest. Topics related to traditional business education…

  13. An Approach to Meeting AACSB Assurance of Learning Standards in an IS Core Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attaway, Alan N.; Chandra, Satish; Dos Santos, Brian L.; Thatcher, Matt E.; Wright, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    AACSB accreditation is a much sought designation by business schools in the United States, and increasingly, around the world. Beginning in 2003, AACSB changed its focus on the business curriculum from an assessment of inputs to an assessment of outputs. This change has greatly increased the demands on faculty because programs must now demonstrate…

  14. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D.

    1995-03-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  15. 1999 Bioastronomy Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meech, Karen J.; Caroff, Lawrence J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 6th Bioastronomy Conference, Bioastronomy '99: A New Era in Bioastronomy, was held at the Hapuna Prince Beach hotel on the Big Island of Hawaii from August 2-6, 1999. The series of previous Bioastronomy meetings have played an important role in integrating the broader interests and techniques of both astronomy and biology to understand the origin and evolution of living systems in the universe, and to generating a context for exploration in our solar system and in extrasolar planetary systems. The scope of these interdisciplinary fields is captured in the topics discussed at the meeting: organic molecules in interstellar and interplanetary space; origin and evolution of planetary systems; comets, asteroids, and other small bodies and their role in the origin and evolution of life; Earth as a living planet; extreme environments on Earth; origin of life; transport of life between planets; evolution of life and intelligence; detection and characterization of extrasolar planets; search for extraterrestrial technology and life; future missions; and public acceptance and support of scientific studies of life in the universe.

  16. Insights from an expert group meeting on the definition and measurement of unsafe abortion.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Filippi, Veronique; Owolabi, Onikepe O; Singh, Susheela D; Askew, Ian; Bankole, Akinrinola; Benson, Janie; Rossier, Clementine; Pembe, Andrea B; Adewole, Isaac; Ganatra, Bela; MacDonagh, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    Until recently, WHO operationally defined unsafe abortion as illegal abortion. In the past decade, however, the incidence of abortion by misoprostol administration has increased in countries with restrictive abortion laws. Access to safe surgical abortions has also increased in many such countries. An important effect of these trends has been that, even in an illegal environment, abortion is becoming safer, and an updated system for classifying abortion in accordance with safety is needed. Numerous factors aside from abortion method or legality should be taken into consideration in developing such a classification system. An Expert Meeting on the Definition and Measurement of Unsafe Abortion was convened in London, UK, on January 9-10, 2014, to move toward developing a classification system that both reflects current conditions and acknowledges the gradient of risk associated with abortion. The experts also discussed the types of research needed to monitor the incidence of abortion at each level of safety. These efforts are urgently needed if we are to ensure that preventing unsafe abortion is appropriately represented on the global public health agenda. Such a classification system would also motivate investment in research to accurately measure and monitor abortion incidence across categories of safety. PMID:27062249

  17. Insights from an expert group meeting on the definition and measurement of unsafe abortion.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Filippi, Veronique; Owolabi, Onikepe O; Singh, Susheela D; Askew, Ian; Bankole, Akinrinola; Benson, Janie; Rossier, Clementine; Pembe, Andrea B; Adewole, Isaac; Ganatra, Bela; MacDonagh, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    Until recently, WHO operationally defined unsafe abortion as illegal abortion. In the past decade, however, the incidence of abortion by misoprostol administration has increased in countries with restrictive abortion laws. Access to safe surgical abortions has also increased in many such countries. An important effect of these trends has been that, even in an illegal environment, abortion is becoming safer, and an updated system for classifying abortion in accordance with safety is needed. Numerous factors aside from abortion method or legality should be taken into consideration in developing such a classification system. An Expert Meeting on the Definition and Measurement of Unsafe Abortion was convened in London, UK, on January 9-10, 2014, to move toward developing a classification system that both reflects current conditions and acknowledges the gradient of risk associated with abortion. The experts also discussed the types of research needed to monitor the incidence of abortion at each level of safety. These efforts are urgently needed if we are to ensure that preventing unsafe abortion is appropriately represented on the global public health agenda. Such a classification system would also motivate investment in research to accurately measure and monitor abortion incidence across categories of safety.

  18. Anesthesia: A Topic for Interdisciplinary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labianca, Dominick A.; Reeves, William J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary approach for teaching the topic of anesthesia as one aspect of a chemistry-oriented course for nonscience majors which focuses on timely topics such as the energy crisis and drugs. Historical treatment with the examination of literature is emphasized in teaching. (HM)

  19. Topics in Culture Learning, Volume 4, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brislin, Richard W., Ed.

    Volume 4 of an annual series, this issue focuses chiefly on a variety of perspectives relating to cross-cultural research. The major article is comprised of 15 topics encompassing cognitive and affective aspects of culture contact, language and communication, and culture exchange. The topics address Japanese perceptions of foreigners, learning of…

  20. Nuffield Advanced Chemistry Courses Topic 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Presents an alternative series of investigations replacing the propanone-trichloromethane system (Topic 10) in the Nuffield A-Level course. A trichloromethane-ethyl ethanoate (acetate) system presented in four experiments give good results and removed the dangers arising from the other system. Topic 10 need not be re-written, just the replacement…

  1. Fostering Topic Knowledge: Essential for Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proske, Antje; Kapp, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Several researchers emphasize the role of the writer's topic knowledge for writing. In academic writing topic knowledge is often constructed by studying source texts. One possibility to support that essential phase of the writing process is to provide interactive learning questions which facilitate the construction of an adequate situation…

  2. An Organizational Conception of Curriculum and an Application to Professional Education. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagen, H. Bradley; And Others

    Curriculum may be more adequately explained as the work of an organization than as a plan for individual learning. Research is reported based upon case studies of four allied health programs in one university with the intent to employ concepts from the organizational literature to describe a group of curriculums, and to determine if relationships…

  3. 76 FR 14974 - Meeting of the National Biodefense Science Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... they become available on the NBSB's April meeting Web page at http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/legal/boards/nbsb/meetings/Pages/110428meeting.aspx . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: E-mail: NBSB@HHS.GOV... topics will be added as priorities dictate. Any additional agenda topics will be available on the...

  4. 75 FR 9598 - Tribal Pesticide Program Council; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... times for the meeting and sets forth tentative agenda topics. DATES: The meeting will be held on.... II. Tentative Agenda Topics 1. Worker Protection Standard. 2. Container/Containment rule. 3....

  5. In vivo study of an instantly formed lipid-water cubic phase formulation for efficient topical delivery of aminolevulinic acid and methyl-aminolevulinate.

    PubMed

    Evenbratt, Hanne; Jonsson, Charlotte; Faergemann, Jan; Engström, Sven; Ericson, Marica B

    2013-08-16

    We demonstrate a rapidly formed cubic liquid crystalline phase, i.e. typically 1g cubic phase in less than 1 min confirmed by X-ray diffraction, consisting of an ether lipid, 1-glyceryl monooleyl ether (GME), an aprotic solvent (propylene glycol or pentane-1,5-diol) and water. The efficacy of the cubic formulation was tested in vivo by administrating formulations containing 3% (w/w) of the HCl salts of δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or methylaminolevulinate (MAL) to hairless mice. The endogenous formation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) was monitored spectrophotometrically as a marker for cellular uptake of active compound. As reference, a commercial product containing 16% (w/w) MAL in an oil-in-water emulsion (Metvix(®)), and a cubic phase based on an ester lipid (glyceryl monooleate, GMO), previously shown to facilitate topical delivery of both ALA and MAL, were applied. It was found that in general the cubic phases gave rise to higher fluorescence levels than the mice exposed to the commercial product. The instantly formed cubic formulations based on GME demonstrated the same efficiency as the GMO based formulations. The results imply that instantly formed cubic formulations opens up new opportunities, particularly for transdermal drug delivery of substances subject to stability problems in, e.g. aqueous environments.

  6. In vivo study of an instantly formed lipid-water cubic phase formulation for efficient topical delivery of aminolevulinic acid and methyl-aminolevulinate.

    PubMed

    Evenbratt, Hanne; Jonsson, Charlotte; Faergemann, Jan; Engström, Sven; Ericson, Marica B

    2013-08-16

    We demonstrate a rapidly formed cubic liquid crystalline phase, i.e. typically 1g cubic phase in less than 1 min confirmed by X-ray diffraction, consisting of an ether lipid, 1-glyceryl monooleyl ether (GME), an aprotic solvent (propylene glycol or pentane-1,5-diol) and water. The efficacy of the cubic formulation was tested in vivo by administrating formulations containing 3% (w/w) of the HCl salts of δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or methylaminolevulinate (MAL) to hairless mice. The endogenous formation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) was monitored spectrophotometrically as a marker for cellular uptake of active compound. As reference, a commercial product containing 16% (w/w) MAL in an oil-in-water emulsion (Metvix(®)), and a cubic phase based on an ester lipid (glyceryl monooleate, GMO), previously shown to facilitate topical delivery of both ALA and MAL, were applied. It was found that in general the cubic phases gave rise to higher fluorescence levels than the mice exposed to the commercial product. The instantly formed cubic formulations based on GME demonstrated the same efficiency as the GMO based formulations. The results imply that instantly formed cubic formulations opens up new opportunities, particularly for transdermal drug delivery of substances subject to stability problems in, e.g. aqueous environments. PMID:23727140

  7. 34 CFR 271.20 - What conditions must an applicant meet to obtain funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... governmental agencies in its State; (e) The assistance to be provided by the applicant must be designed to meet..., as determined by: (1) The experience and training of the project director and other key...

  8. An Innovative Approach to Pharmacy Law Education Utilizing a Mock Board of Pharmacy Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Bess, D. Todd; Taylor, Jade; Schwab, Carol A.; Wang, Junling; Carter, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of pharmacy law by students is important in the molding of future pharmacy practitioners but a standardized template for the best way to educate students in this area has not been created. A mock Board of Pharmacy meeting was designed and incorporated into the Pharmacy Law course to meet the ACPE accreditation standards at the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy. Students acted as Board of Pharmacy members and utilized technology to decide outcomes of cases and requests addressed in a typical 2 day Tennessee Board of Pharmacy meeting. The actual responses to those cases, as well as similar cases and requests addressed over a 5 year period, were revealed to students after they made motions on mock scenarios. Student participation in this interactive learning experience resulted in good understanding of the rules and regulations of pharmacy practice and the consequences associated with violating regulations. Such mock Board of Pharmacy meeting is recommended for future pharmacy law education. PMID:27347433

  9. Preparation of Nurses to Meet the Needs of an Ethnically Diverse Society: Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrish, Kate

    1997-01-01

    Culturally appropriate health care has yet to emerge in Britain. To prepare nurses to meet the health needs of ethnic minorities requires awareness of their own cultural identity, cross-cultural understanding, and recruitment of students from ethnic groups. (SK)

  10. 75 FR 79418 - Notice of an Open Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... 4510-FR-P .... ADDRESSES: The meeting location is U.S. Department of Labor, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution..., Office of Apprenticeship, ETA, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Room...

  11. Dew as an Adaptation Measure to Meet Agricultural and Reforestation Water Demand in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Marlene; Abou Najm, Majdi; Alameddine, Ibrahim; El Fadel, Mutasem

    2014-05-01

    Dew harvesting, believed to be an ancient technique, has recently re-emerged as a viable and sustainable water resource. Nightly yields are relatively low, yet non-negligible, and dew events occur more frequently than rainfall promoting its effectiveness, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions. In this study, we demonstrate how dew can be harvested and subsequently used for small-scale irrigation to meet agricultural and reforestation water demand. Polyethylene dew harvesting systems were constructed and placed in the field. Dew was harvested as a result of the radiative cooling during the night, thus allowing dew formation under conditions of high humidity. Condensed dew formed upon the planar surface was collected by gravity. Water demand for selected crops and trees within a pilot study area (Lebanon) was estimated using a deficit irrigation model. Simulations of water demand requirements of various plants and surfaces were performed and compared to dew volumes to assess the ability of the system to meet all or in part the plant water demands across seasons. Data from the polyethylene low-cost dew condensers have shown that within the pilot study, average nightly dew yields were 0.1 L m-2 of condensing surface with a maximum yield of 0.4 L m-2. Dew events occurred generally more frequently than precipitation events, with an estimated 40% of nights producing dew condensate. This translates to 50 mm of equivalent rainfall on average (during dew nights), with a maximum of 200 mm in one night, if one assumes using drip irrigation over a seedling within a 20 cm2 area. Using a simple deficit irrigation model, it was demonstrated that crops such as the tomato plant, which typically has a growing season during the dry summer, can potentially be irrigated solely by dew, thus eliminating the need for traditional irrigation sources. Similarly, young tree seedlings, such as the cedar tree, can depend upon dew as a primary water resource. Moreover, based on similar

  12. 25 CFR 39.410 - What qualifications must an audit firm meet to be considered for auditing ISEP administration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... considered for auditing ISEP administration? 39.410 Section 39.410 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... qualifications must an audit firm meet to be considered for auditing ISEP administration? To be considered for auditing ISEP administration under this subpart, an independent audit firm must: (a) Be a...

  13. [Topical cimetidine treatment of acne].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J B; Spona, J

    1986-08-01

    We present first results of topically applied cimetidine in acne. Ten patients suffering from papulopustular and comedone acne administered 2% cimetidine in indifferent lotion on their face twice a day. Clinical controls were performed every two weeks; sebum was monthly determined. After treatment of 13 weeks on the average, the clinical success was generally good. Comedones responded best, followed by papules. Pustules were hardly reduced. There was no significant reduction of SER and the lipid fractions at the end of treatment. Low concentration or insufficient penetration might be possible explanations. The efficient reduction of comedones might be an antiandrogenic effect due to modulation of the keratinization in the follicle excretory duct. Immune-modulatory effects of cimetidine and effects on the skin vessels are other possible explanations for the clinical efficacy of topical application of cimetidine in acne.

  14. State of the Union: AGU's evolving National Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    “Boston State-House is the hub of the solar system.”—Oliver Wendell Holmes, 1858 While the AGU Fall Meeting continues to grow, the Spring Meeting is undergoing several changes in venue, procedures, and focus.The principal purpose of a scientific society is to foster the exchange of scientific information, and AGU's meetings program achieves that aim admirably. Through the two annual national meetings and an everchanging menu of topical Chapman Conferences, AGU members are afforded opportunities to present and hear late-breaking research findings from every corner of the geophysical sciences. The national meetings, in particular, have become essential gatherings for the international Earth and space science community as well as for students presenting their first public papers.

  15. The Morphometrical and Histopathological Changes which were Observed after Topical Ozone Therapy on an Exophytic Fibrous Gingival Lesion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Punit Vaibhav; Gujjari, Sheela Kumar

    2013-06-01

    We are presenting 2 cases where ozone therapy was used in the form of ozonated oil on an exophytic fibrous gingival lesion. A 42-years female patient was selected, who presented with a mild to moderately painful, exophytic, fibrous lesion on the upper anterior gingiva. This gingival lesion was treated with 2ml of ozonated oil, thrice daily for one week. After the ozone therapy, the postoperative outcomes were measured and analyzed. Finally, the lesion was subjected to an excisional biopsy and a histopathological evaluation. After the ozone therapy, the patient revealed that there was less pain. On examination of the lesion, an improvement was observed in the clinical sign of the inflammation and also a reduction in the surface ulceration. During the final biopsy, less bleeding was observed. The morphometrical analysis showed a reduction in the size of the lesion. The histopathological analysis showed a reduction in the collagen fibres and in the inflammatory cells in the connective tissue stroma. Topical ozone therapy provides potential benefits for the treatment of exophytic gingival lesions. The observed benefits in present case report needs to be verified in future with well-controlled clinical trials.

  16. A prerecognition model for hot topic discovery based on microblogging data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tongyu; Yu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The microblogging is prevailing since its easy and anonymous information sharing at Internet, which also brings the issue of dispersing negative topics, or even rumors. Many researchers have focused on how to find and trace emerging topics for analysis. When adopting topic detection and tracking techniques to find hot topics with streamed microblogging data, it will meet obstacles like streamed microblogging data clustering, topic hotness definition, and emerging hot topic discovery. This paper schemes a novel prerecognition model for hot topic discovery. In this model, the concepts of the topic life cycle, the hot velocity, and the hot acceleration are promoted to calculate the change of topic hotness, which aims to discover those emerging hot topics before they boost and break out. Our experiments show that this new model would help to discover potential hot topics efficiently and achieve considerable performance. PMID:25254235

  17. A Prerecognition Model for Hot Topic Discovery Based on Microblogging Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tongyu

    2014-01-01

    The microblogging is prevailing since its easy and anonymous information sharing at Internet, which also brings the issue of dispersing negative topics, or even rumors. Many researchers have focused on how to find and trace emerging topics for analysis. When adopting topic detection and tracking techniques to find hot topics with streamed microblogging data, it will meet obstacles like streamed microblogging data clustering, topic hotness definition, and emerging hot topic discovery. This paper schemes a novel prerecognition model for hot topic discovery. In this model, the concepts of the topic life cycle, the hot velocity, and the hot acceleration are promoted to calculate the change of topic hotness, which aims to discover those emerging hot topics before they boost and break out. Our experiments show that this new model would help to discover potential hot topics efficiently and achieve considerable performance. PMID:25254235

  18. A prerecognition model for hot topic discovery based on microblogging data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tongyu; Yu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The microblogging is prevailing since its easy and anonymous information sharing at Internet, which also brings the issue of dispersing negative topics, or even rumors. Many researchers have focused on how to find and trace emerging topics for analysis. When adopting topic detection and tracking techniques to find hot topics with streamed microblogging data, it will meet obstacles like streamed microblogging data clustering, topic hotness definition, and emerging hot topic discovery. This paper schemes a novel prerecognition model for hot topic discovery. In this model, the concepts of the topic life cycle, the hot velocity, and the hot acceleration are promoted to calculate the change of topic hotness, which aims to discover those emerging hot topics before they boost and break out. Our experiments show that this new model would help to discover potential hot topics efficiently and achieve considerable performance.

  19. International Conference on Advances in Radiation Oncology (ICARO): Outcomes of an IAEA Meeting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The IAEA held the International Conference on Advances in Radiation Oncology (ICARO) in Vienna on 27-29 April 2009. The Conference dealt with the issues and requirements posed by the transition from conventional radiotherapy to advanced modern technologies, including staffing, training, treatment planning and delivery, quality assurance (QA) and the optimal use of available resources. The current role of advanced technologies (defined as 3-dimensional and/or image guided treatment with photons or particles) in current clinical practice and future scenarios were discussed. ICARO was organized by the IAEA at the request of the Member States and co-sponsored and supported by other international organizations to assess advances in technologies in radiation oncology in the face of economic challenges that most countries confront. Participants submitted research contributions, which were reviewed by a scientific committee and presented via 46 lectures and 103 posters. There were 327 participants from 70 Member States as well as participants from industry and government. The ICARO meeting provided an independent forum for the interaction of participants from developed and developing countries on current and developing issues related to radiation oncology. PMID:21294881

  20. International Conference on Advances in Radiation Oncology (ICARO): outcomes of an IAEA meeting.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Eeva K; Kiel, Krystyna; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Joiner, Michael C; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Wondergem, Jan; Meghzifene, Ahmed

    2011-02-04

    The IAEA held the International Conference on Advances in Radiation Oncology (ICARO) in Vienna on 27-29 April 2009. The Conference dealt with the issues and requirements posed by the transition from conventional radiotherapy to advanced modern technologies, including staffing, training, treatment planning and delivery, quality assurance (QA) and the optimal use of available resources. The current role of advanced technologies (defined as 3-dimensional and/or image guided treatment with photons or particles) in current clinical practice and future scenarios were discussed.ICARO was organized by the IAEA at the request of the Member States and co-sponsored and supported by other international organizations to assess advances in technologies in radiation oncology in the face of economic challenges that most countries confront. Participants submitted research contributions, which were reviewed by a scientific committee and presented via 46 lectures and 103 posters. There were 327 participants from 70 Member States as well as participants from industry and government. The ICARO meeting provided an independent forum for the interaction of participants from developed and developing countries on current and developing issues related to radiation oncology.

  1. Meeting the Imperative to Improve Physician Well-being: Assessment of an Innovative Program

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Bengt B.; Christensen, John F.; Homer, Louis

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improving physician health and performance is critical to successfully meet the challenges facing health systems that increasingly emphasize productivity. Assessing long-term efficacy and sustainability of programs aimed at enhancing physician and organizational well-being is imperative. OBJECTIVE To determine whether data-guided interventions and a systematic improvement process to enhance physician work-life balance and organizational efficacy can improve physician and organizational well-being. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS From 2000 to 2005, 22–32 physicians regularly completed 3 questionnaires coded for privacy. Results were anonymously reported to physicians and the organization. Data-guided interventions to enhance physician and organizational well-being were built on physician control over the work environment, order in the clinical setting, and clinical meaning. MEASUREMENTS Questionnaires included an ACP/ASIM survey on physician satisfaction, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and the Quality Work Competence (QWC) survey. RESULTS Emotional and work-related exhaustion decreased significantly over the study period (MBI, p = 0.002; QWC, p = 0.035). QWC measures of organizational health significantly improved initially and remained acceptable and stable during the rest of the study. CONCLUSIONS A data-guided program on physician well-being, using validated instruments and process improvement methods, enhanced physician and organizational well-being. Given the increases in physician burnout, organizations are encouraged to urgently create individual and systems approaches to lessen burnout risk. PMID:17891503

  2. Food: Where Nutrition Politics and Culture Meet. An Activities Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Deborah; Goodwin, Mary T.

    This book is designed to provide a comprehensive and contemporary view of food and nutrition for secondary level students. The activities and text address fundamental nutrition issues in a wide range of disciplines such as economics, government, anthropology, biology and journalism. The following major topics are covered: 1) eating patterns; 2)…

  3. TOPTRAC: Topical Trajectory Pattern Mining

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younghoon; Han, Jiawei; Yuan, Cangzhou

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of GPS-enabled mobile phones, geo-tagging, which refers to adding GPS information to media such as micro-blogging messages or photos, has seen a surge in popularity recently. This enables us to not only browse information based on locations, but also discover patterns in the location-based behaviors of users. Many techniques have been developed to find the patterns of people's movements using GPS data, but latent topics in text messages posted with local contexts have not been utilized effectively. In this paper, we present a latent topic-based clustering algorithm to discover patterns in the trajectories of geo-tagged text messages. We propose a novel probabilistic model to capture the semantic regions where people post messages with a coherent topic as well as the patterns of movement between the semantic regions. Based on the model, we develop an efficient inference algorithm to calculate model parameters. By exploiting the estimated model, we next devise a clustering algorithm to find the significant movement patterns that appear frequently in data. Our experiments on real-life data sets show that the proposed algorithm finds diverse and interesting trajectory patterns and identifies the semantic regions in a finer granularity than the traditional geographical clustering methods. PMID:26709365

  4. Compounded Topical Analgesics for Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cline, Abigail E; Turrentine, Jake E

    2016-01-01

    Analgesic medications compounded for topical use are gaining popularity for the management of chronic pain. The advantages of topical pain medications include reduction of systemic adverse effects, improved patient acceptance, few drug interactions, ease of dose determination, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, and direct access to the target site. Compounded topical medications typically use a mixture of 3 or more single medications to achieve multiple complementary effects at lower doses of each individual medication. Herein, we review the mechanisms, adverse effects, and evidence for some of the most commonly used medications in topical compounds for pain management. Because more topical medications are used for chronic pain, dermatologists can expect an increase in irritant and allergic contact dermatitis related to these medications. PMID:27649348

  5. 78 FR 69665 - SFIREG Full Committee; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... and sets forth the tentative agenda topics. DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday, December 9... information about the docket available at http://www.epa.gov/dockets . II. Tentative Agenda Topics 1....

  6. Meeting water needs for sustainable development: an overview of approaches, measures and data sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissner, Tabea; Reusser, Dominik E.; Sullivan, Caroline A.; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2013-04-01

    An essential part of a global transition towards sustainability is the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), providing a blueprint of goals to meet human needs. Water is an essential resource in itself, but also a vital factor of production for food, energy and other industrial products. Access to sufficient water has only recently been recognized as a human right. One central MDG is halving the population without access to safe drinking water and sanitation. To adequately assess the state of development and the potential for a transition towards sustainability, consistent and meaningful measures of water availability and adequate access are thus fundamental. Much work has been done to identify thresholds and definitions to measure water scarcity. This includes some work on defining basic water needs of different sectors. A range of data and approaches has been made available from a variety of sources, but all of these approaches differ in their underlying assumptions, the nature of the data used, and consequently in the final results. We review and compare approaches, methods and data sources on human water use and human water needs. This data review enables identifying levels of consumption in different countries and different sectors. Further comparison is made between actual water needs (based on human and ecological requirements), and recognised levels of water abstraction. The results of our review highlight the differences between different accounts of water use and needs, and reflect the importance of standardised approaches to data definitions and measurements, making studies more comparable across space and time. The comparison of different use and allocation patterns in countries enables levels of water use to be identified which allow for an adequate level of human wellbeing to be maintained within sustainable water abstraction limits. Recommendations are provided of how data can be defined more clearly to make comparisons of water use more meaningful and

  7. PREFACE: WMO/GEO Expert Meeting On An International Sand And Dust Storm Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science presents a selection of papers that were given at the WMO/GEO Expert Meeting on an International Sand and Dust Storm Warning System hosted by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center - Centro Nacional de Supercomputación in Barcelona (Spain) on 7-9 November 2007 (http://www.bsc.es/wmo). A sand and dust storm (SDS) is a meteorological phenomenon common in arid and semi-arid regions and arises when a gust front passes or when the wind force exceeds the threshold value where loose sand and dust are removed from the dry surface. After aeolian uptake, SDS reduce visibility to a few meters in and near source regions, and dust plumes are transported over distances as long as thousands of kilometres. Aeolian dust is unique among aerosol phenomena: (1) with the possible exception of sea-salt aerosol, it is globally the most abundant of all aerosol species, (2) it appears as the dominating component of atmospheric aerosol over large areas of the Earth, (3) it represents a serious hazard for life, health, property, environment and economy (occasionally reaching the grade of disaster or catastrophic event) and (4) its influence, impacts, complex interactions and feedbacks within the Earth System span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. From a political and societal point of view, the concern for SDS and the need for international cooperation were reflected after a survey conducted in 2005 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in which more than forty WMO Member countries expressed their interest for creating or improving capacities for SDS warning advisory and assessment. In this context, recent major advances in research - including, for example, the development and implementation of advanced observing systems, the theoretical understanding of the mechanisms responsible for sand and dust storm generation and the development of global and regional dust models - represent the basis for

  8. JGME-ALiEM Hot Topics in Medical Education Online Journal Club: An Analysis of a Virtual Discussion About Resident Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Sherbino, Jonathan; Joshi, Nikita; Lin, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Background  In health professionals' education, senior learners play a key role in the teaching of junior colleagues. Objective  We describe an online discussion about residents as teachers to highlight the topic and the online journal club medium. Methods  In January 2015, the Journal of Graduate Medical Education (JGME) and the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine blog facilitated an open-access, online, weeklong journal club on the JGME article “What Makes a Great Resident Teacher? A Multicenter Survey of Medical Students Attending an Internal Medicine Conference.” Social media platforms used to promote asynchronous discussions included a blog, a video discussion via Google Hangouts on Air, and Twitter. We performed a thematic analysis of the discussion. Web analytics were captured as a measure of impact. Results  The blog post garnered 1324 page views from 372 cities in 42 countries. Twitter was used to endorse discussion points, while blog comments provided opinions or responded to an issue. The discussion focused on why resident feedback was devalued by medical students. Proposed explanations included feedback not being labeled as such, the process of giving delivery, the source of feedback, discrepancies with self-assessment, and threats to medical student self-image. The blog post resulted in a crowd-sourced repository of resident teacher resources. Conclusions  An online journal club provides a novel discussion forum across multiple social media platforms to engage authors, content experts, and the education community. Crowd-sourced analysis of the resident teacher role suggests that resident feedback to medical students is important, and barriers to student acceptance of feedback can be overcome. PMID:26457152

  9. Viral vaccines: selected topics.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, M

    1996-01-01

    Significant role of viruses in pathology, their dominating position in etiology of infectious diseases point at the special position of active prophylactic procedures based on vaccination. The real role and value of viral vaccines of classic and modern generations, the limitation of immune potency in suppression of defence mechanisms, some problems of immunization against virus vertical transmission are presented in the paper. The reader may find tables which cumulate selected but significant patterns of viral vaccines and vaccinations, and selected papers devoted to topics discussed. PMID:9017153

  10. Novel topical therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Benjamin S

    2010-06-01

    Intranasal drug delivery is a rapidly growing field that offers the potential for enhanced treatment of local and systemic disease. Novel preclinical screening tools such as in vitro assays and 3-dimensional imaging are currently being used to improve drug design and delivery. In addition, new evidence has emerged underlining the importance of surgical marsupialization of the sinuses to allow for improved topical delivery. Although multiple barriers to administration and absorption exist, implantable therapeutics using new classes of drug-eluting polymers allow for prolonged, site-specific drug delivery and hold great promise in overcoming these obstacles.

  11. Recent topics in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Y

    1996-08-01

    In Japan, the concern about ethical issues in preventive medicine, especially in epidemiological investigation, has been gradually increasing in recent years. In this paper I introduce the following four topics: 1. privacy protection and the computer, 2. informed consent and publication, 3. the attitudes toward ethics among epidemiologists, 4. the attitudes toward epidemiological investigation among examinees. In my opinion, Japanese epidemiologists should give more attention to general ethical principles (Respect for persons, Beneficence) and to the practical methods to apply them in their research works.

  12. 40 CFR 63.6603 - What emission limitations and operating limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operating limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE located at an area... and operating limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE located at an... stationary CI RICE located at an area source of HAP emissions, you must comply with the requirements in...

  13. 40 CFR 63.6603 - What emission limitations and operating limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operating limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary RICE located at an area source... operating limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary RICE located at an area source... procedures in § 63.6620 and Table 4 to this subpart. (a) If you own or operate an existing stationary...

  14. Evaluation of clinical efficacy and safety of once daily topical administration of 1% oxiconazole cream and lotion in dermatophytosis : an open label, non comparative multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Jerajani, H R; Amladi, S T; Bongale, R; Adepu, V; Tendolkar, U M; Sentamilselvi, G; Janaki, V R; Janaki, C; Vidhya, S; Marfatia, Y S; Patel, K; Sharma, N; Cooverji, N D

    2000-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and safety of once daily topical administration of 1% oxiconazole cream and lotion was assessed in an open label, non comparative trial in tinea cruris, tinea corporis and tinea pedis patients. In treated patients, severity scores of erythema, pruritus, scaling, vesicles, papules and burning showed a progressive fall over a period of 4 weeks at all the study centres. With lotion, mean percentage improvement of symptoms varied from 35% (week 1) to 87.6 - 98.7% (week 4). With cream, it varied from 35% (week 1) to 82.5 - 99.5% (week 4). Overall global evaluation response showed clear, excellent and good response in 60%, 21% and 17% of the patients treated with lotion respectively. With cream, excellent and good response was observed in 71%, 10% and 16% of the patients respectively. In T. pedis patients, clear, excellent and good response was observed in 4/8, 2/8 and 1/8 patients respectively with lotion. Cream showed clear (8/15), excellent (4/15) and good (1/15) in these patients. None of the patients out of 178 enrolled, reported any side effect during the trial.

  15. An ionic liquid-in-water microemulsion as a potential carrier for topical delivery of poorly water soluble drug: Development, ex-vivo and in-vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Goindi, Shishu; Kaur, Ramanpreet; Kaur, Randeep

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, we report an ionic liquid-in-water (IL/w) microemulsion (ME) formulation which is able to solubilize etodolac (ETO), a poorly water soluble drug for topical delivery using BMIMPF6 (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) as IL, Tween 80 as surfactant and ethanol as co-surfactant. The prepared ME was characterized for physicochemical parameters, subjected to ex-vivo permeation studies as well as in-vivo pharmacodynamic evaluation. The ex-vivo drug permeation studies through rat skin was performed using Franz-diffusion cell and the IL/w based ME showed maximum mean cumulative percent permeation of 99.030±0.921% in comparison to oil-in-water (o/w) ME (61.548±1.875%) and oily solution (48.830±2.488%) of ETO. In-vivo anti-arthritic and anti-inflammatory activities of the prepared formulations were evaluated using different rodent models and the results revealed that ETO loaded IL/w based ME was found to be more effective in controlling inflammation than oily solution, o/w ME and marketed formulation of ETO. Histopathological studies also demonstrated that IL/w based ME caused no anatomical and pathological changes in the skin. PMID:26456294

  16. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 9. Part I. TCE degradation using nonbiological methods, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.P.; Sivavec, T.M.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge for in situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low-permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is used to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Draft Topical Report for Task No. 9 summarizes laboratory investigations into TCE degradation using nonbiological methods. These studies were conducted by the General Electric Company. The report concentrates on zero valent iron as the reducing agent and presents data on TCE and daughter product degradation rates in batch experiments, column studies, and electroosmotic cells. It is shown that zero valent iron effectively degrades TCE in electroosmotic experiments. Daughter product degradation and gas generation are shown to be important factors in designing field scale treatment zones for the Lasagna{trademark} process.

  17. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology: Task 1 -- Evaluation of treatment zone formation options. Topical report, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, S.H.; Landis, R.C.; Griffith, R.J.; Schultz, D.S.; Quinton, G.E.

    1997-05-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report presents the results of evaluations by E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc. of treatment zone and electrode emplacement alternatives for use in the integrated treatment process. Specifically, the scope of this study was limited to vertical configuration emplacements. Several promising alternatives were identified ranging from approaches involving standard excavation techniques to relatively specialized geotechnical construction methods which could be modified for the treatment zone emplacement purpose. Information developed in this report is designed to help the user select the most promising emplacement method(s) for a given site on the basis of (1) depth of emplacement, and (2) restrictions on handling excavated soils. Advantages, disadvantages, and estimated costs are identified for each alternative, and possible bases for improvement and cost reduction through further development are described.

  18. 41 CFR 102-79.15 - What objectives must an Executive agency strive to meet in providing assignment and utilization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What objectives must an Executive agency strive to meet in providing assignment and utilization of space services? 102-79.15 Section 102-79.15 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations...

  19. 76 FR 24921 - Sunshine Act; Meeting; Notice of a Matter To Be Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION Sunshine Act; Meeting; Notice of a Matter To Be Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency... Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-3428. STATUS: Closed. MATTERS TO BE ADDED: 2. Consideration of...

  20. 76 FR 56758 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice of Matters To Be Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice of Matters To Be Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency... hereby given that the following matters will be added to the ``discussion agenda'' for consideration...

  1. 78 FR 20624 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Scoping Meeting for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Conduct Scoping Meeting for the Berths 212-224 Container Terminal Project at the Port of Los Angeles, Los... Los Angeles Harbor Department (LAHD) Berths 212-224 Container Terminal Improvement Project. DATES... Information. The project site is located on Terminal Island within in an industrial area of the East...

  2. 34 CFR 654.60 - What requirements must an SEA meet in the administration of this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must an SEA meet in the administration of this program? 654.60 Section 654.60 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD...

  3. 34 CFR 692.100 - What requirements must a State meet to receive an allotment under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What requirements must a State meet to receive an allotment under this program? 692.100 Section 692.100 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  4. 34 CFR 692.100 - What requirements must a State meet to receive an allotment under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must a State meet to receive an allotment under this program? 692.100 Section 692.100 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  5. Complicated Choices: Struggling to Meet NCLB Requirements AND Remain Faithful to a School's Educational Vision and Practice. An Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Eva

    2009-01-01

    In an era of high-stakes accountability, school leaders often face contradictory pressures as they strive to improve student performance. They must meet the federal mandate of NCLB for student achievement; at the same time, many believe that NCLB constrains their professional judgment about how to best teach and assess students in the context of…

  6. Language Modeling Using PLSA-Based Topic HMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Atsushi; Takiguchi, Tetsuya; Ariki, Yasuo

    In this paper, we propose a PLSA-based language model for sports-related live speech. This model is implemented using a unigram rescaling technique that combines a topic model and an n-gram. In the conventional method, unigram rescaling is performed with a topic distribution estimated from a recognized transcription history. This method can improve the performance, but it cannot express topic transition. By incorporating the concept of topic transition, it is expected that the recognition performance will be improved. Thus, the proposed method employs a “Topic HMM” instead of a history to estimate the topic distribution. The Topic HMM is an Ergodic HMM that expresses typical topic distributions as well as topic transition probabilities. Word accuracy results from our experiments confirmed the superiority of the proposed method over a trigram and a PLSA-based conventional method that uses a recognized history.

  7. The Paleontology Portal: An online resource meeting the needs a spectrum of learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, D.; Scotchmoor, J. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Paleontology Portal website provides a central, interactive entry point to high-quality North American paleontology resources on the Internet for multiple audiences: the research community, government and industry, K-16 students, and the general public. The Portal successfully blends research and education, pulling together information with reviewed and annotated website links for a wide variety of informal learners. Using web-based technology and relational databases, users can explore an interactive map and associated stratigraphic column to access information about particular geographic regions, geologic time periods, depositional environments, and representative taxa. Users are also able to search multiple museum collection databases using a single query form of their own design. Other features include highlights of famous fossil sites and assemblages and a fossil image gallery. Throughout the site, users find images and links to information specific to each time period or geographic region, including current research projects and publications, websites, on-line exhibits and educational materials, and information on collecting fossils. The next phase of development will target the development of resource modules on topics such as collection management and fossil preparation, appropriate for users ranging from the general public to professional paleontologists. Another initiative includes developing methods of personalizing the Portal to support exhibits at museums and other venues on geological history and paleontology. The Paleontology Portal, built by the UC Museum of Paleontology, is a joint project of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, the Paleontological Society, and the US Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Paleontological Research Institution, the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, which serve as hubs for the project. Paleoportal serves as an effective model in two aspects: (1

  8. Educating social workers to meet the challenge of an aging urban population: a promising model.

    PubMed

    Volland, Patricia J; Berkman, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    As Americans live longer, they will require more health and social services to address the onset of acute and chronic conditions. The persistent changes in health care delivery and the increasingly diverse older adult population in urban settings, coupled with the high expectation for families to be responsible for home care needs, challenge social workers, who work alongside physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals, to provide services effectively. Because social workers are becoming more essential, social work education must increase the numbers of social workers with the knowledge and skills necessary for practice in the current U.S. health, mental health, and social service systems, particularly in caring for the aging populations in urban settings. A New York Academy of Medicine study identified the need for increased synergy between the two components of graduate social work education: the field experience and classroom instruction. One educational model, the Practicum Partnership Program, which is designed to better integrate field and classroom, is being tested at six sites. Early results from over 300 graduates are encouraging, with evidence that students' knowledge and skills regarding aging adults have increased, their satisfaction with the experience was very high, and those who were trained reflect the diversity of the population of older adults. The early success of this program suggests that innovative educational models that expose graduate social work students to diverse populations across the continuum of care are possible. Such models will be essential for the nation to be successful in producing a social work labor force qualified to meet the challenge of an aging urban population.

  9. Topical Therapy Primer for Nondermatologists.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jolene R; Myers, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    A representative assortment of topical therapies is discussed here with the goal of emphasizing the most commonly encountered diagnoses and treatments for nondermatologists. When using topical therapies, carefully consider the proper active ingredient, potency, vehicle, and quantity of medication. If topical therapy is ineffective, question whether the medication is being used properly, whether the diagnosis is correct, and whether the topical may be contributing to the problem. Examples of the topical contributing to the problem include tinea incognito exacerbated by topical steroid use and allergic contact dermatitis to topical steroid excipients. For some patients, even maximum topical therapy is insufficient and systemic treatment is required. At this point, consultation with a dermatologist may be helpful.

  10. Topical chlorophyll-pheophytin derivative-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premaligant lesions: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chiang, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jian Wen; Lee, Jeng-Woei; How, Mon-Hsin

    2010-02-01

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has become a prominent cancer because of its highest annual increase rate among all cancer diseases. Betel quid chewing habit is a major risk factor for oral precancerous and cancerous lesions and there are more than two million people who have this habit in Taiwan. Our previous studies showed that chlorophyll-pheophytin derivative (CPD)-mediated PDT is very effective for killing of SCC-4 cell lines in vitro. In order to decrease the systemic phototoxic effect of CPD, this study was designed to use a topical CPD-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks. Precancerous lesions of moderate to severe dysplasia were induced and proven by histological examination. These induced precancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical CPD-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when CPD reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of CPD gel. We found that CPD reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 1 hour (range, 0 to 30 hours) after topical application of CPD gel. The precancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical CPD-mediated PDT (fluence rate: 200 mW/cm2; light exposure dose 100 J/cm2) using the portable WonderLight LED 635 nm fiber-guided light device once or twice a week. Visual and histological examination demonstrated that topical CPD-mediated PDT was partially effective treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  11. An Analysis of Four Middle School Geography Textbooks: Meeting the Needs of Students with Learning Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jitendra, Asha; Nolet, Victor; Gomez, Ophelia; Xin, Yan Ping

    A study examined geography texts to evaluate their adequacy for meeting the diverse needs of students and to recommend modifications that will address specific deficits. Four geography textbooks were selected based on consultations with publishers, teachers, and school administrators to be representative of geography textbooks adopted in the…

  12. 75 FR 74042 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and To Conduct Scoping Meetings...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... consist of up to 100 wind turbine generators with a combined total generating capacity of 150 MW, located... probability of substantial natural resources conflicts. NextEra's siting process for the wind turbine strings... Meetings: Interconnection of the Proposed Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project, South Dakota...

  13. Meeting Student Needs in the Freedom Writers Movie: An Activity in a Classroom Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanase, Madalina

    2013-01-01

    The study described in this paper explored the understanding pre-service teachers' have of PK-12 student needs (i.e. Belonging, Mastery, Independence, and Generosity) and the importance of meeting these needs in a climate of Invitational Education. 71 undergraduate teacher education candidates enrolled in a Classroom Management course at a…

  14. Speak, Review, Change, Repeat: An Analysis of Discourse Surrounding Dilemmas at Admission, Review and Dismissal Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews-Perez, Amy Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the ways in which three parents of students with disabilities and three public school campus administrators negotiated dilemmas through discourse during Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) meetings in a South Texas public school district. The participants in this study included the stakeholders in ARD…

  15. An Innovative Parallel Test Sheet Composition Approach to Meet Multiple Assessment Criteria for National Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chu, Hui-Chun; Yin, Peng-Yeng; Lin, Ji-Yu

    2008-01-01

    The national certification tests and entrance examinations are the most important tests for proving the ability or knowledge level of a person. To accurately evaluate the professional skills or knowledge level, the composed test sheets must meet multiple assessment criteria such as the ratio of relevant concepts to be evaluated and the estimated…

  16. Commissions as information organizations: Meeting the information needs of an electronic society

    SciTech Connect

    Sevel, F.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes how commission-sponsored web sites can effectively meet electronic information needs. Demographics of internet users are presented and analyzed. Online activities and user access data are also described. The implications of the characteristics of internet users for commission-sponsored web sites are discussed, and guidelines for determining marketing objectives are presented.

  17. Landlabs: An Integrated Approach to Creating Agricultural Enterprises that Meet the Triple Bottom Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nicholas; Schulte, Lisa A.; Williams, Carol; Mulla, David; Pitt, David; Slotterback, Carissa Schively; Jackson, Randall; Landis, Douglas; Dale, Bruce; Becker, Dennis; Rickenbach, Mark; Helmers, Matt; Bringi, Bobby

    2013-01-01

    Global demand is increasing for food, feed, and fiber; for additional agricultural outputs, such as biofuels; and for ecosystem services, such as clean water and outdoor recreation. In response, new agricultural enterprises are needed that produce more outputs from existing lands while meeting the "triple bottom line" of high performance…

  18. An Advertisement and Article Analysis of Skin Products and Topics in Popular Women’s Magazines: Implications for Skin Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Corey H.; Mongiovi, Jennifer; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Fullwood, MD; Ethan, Danna; Hammond, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the United States, skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, with an estimated 5 million people treated per year and annual medical treatment expenditures that exceed 8 billion dollars. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to enumerate the number of advertisements for skin products with and without Sun Protection Factor (SPF) and to further analyze the specific advertisements for sunblock to determine if models, when present, depict sun safe behaviors and 2) to enumerate the number of articles related to the skin for content. Both aims include an assessment for differences in age and in magazines targeting a Black or Latina population. Methods: The sample for this cross sectional study was comprised of 99 issues of 14 popular United States magazines marketed to women, four of which market to a Black or Latina audience. Results: There were 6,142 advertisements, of which 1,215 (19.8%, 95% CI: 18.8-20.8%) were related to skin products. Among the skin product advertisements, 1,145 (93.8%, 95% CI: 93.9-96.3%) depicted skin products without SPF. The majority of skin articles (91.2%, 95% CI: 91.7-100.0%), skin product advertisements (89.9%, 95% CI: 88.2-91.6%), and sunblock advertisements featuring models (were found in magazines aimed at the older (>24 yr) audience. Conclusion: Future research on this topic could focus on the extent to which images in these magazines translate into risky health behaviors, such as sun seeking, or excessive other harmful effects of UV radiation. PMID:26933645

  19. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 5: Cost analysis, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Quinton, G.; Schultz, D.; Landis, R.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivering treatment reagents have rendered existing in situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The Lasagna{trademark} technology is an integrated in situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly into the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis if utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report presents the results of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis of the vertically configured treatment process completed by the DuPont Company. The cost evaluation was prepared by developing a cost optimization model of the overall treatment process. This model considers various input parameters such as soil properties, depth of contamination, cost for emplacing electrodes and treatment zones, required purge water volume, time constraints to achieve cleanup, and cost of power. Several example cases were run using the cost model to provide representative cost ranges for applying the technology to clean up trichloroethene contamination in clay. These costs are estimated to range from $40 to $95 per cubic yard of soil for a 1-acre site, with cost depending on depth of contamination (cost range valid from 15 to 45 ft), method of electrode/treatment zone emplacement (cost range valid from 15 to 45 ft), method of electrode/treatment zone emplacement (cost range valid for Lasagna{trademark} Phase I emplacement and optimized emplacement techniques), and time available to complete remediation (cost range valid for one- and three-year timeframe).

  20. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    .andrew.cmu.edu/projects/visual. David Sokoloff (University of Oregon) and Priscilla Laws (Dickinson College) led a discussion session on the Interactive Lecture Demonstrations that they have been developing to promote active learning in the classroom. Loren Winters of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics showed some very fine work done with digital video cameras, both in producing motion videos for frame-by-frame analysis and in producing still images of high-speed phenomena. Finally, Patrick Tam of Humboldt State University in California talked about the Multimedia Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT), a project to organize and review the proliferation of internet-based teaching materials that are rapidly becoming available. Their purpose is to make it easier for teachers like us to sift through the plethora of new innovations, to locate those that are potentially useful in our teaching, and finally to implement them effectively. You can check out the project on the web at www.merlot.org. As is evident from the number of sessions of contributed papers and the tandem conference, the quality and quantity of physics education research into new curricula and teaching methods continue to increase. A number of interesting areas were discussed including interactive lecture techniques, studio-classroom approaches combining lectures and labs, assessment techniques, and identifying and correcting student misconceptions. In addition to the plenary talks on current research topics in physics mentioned above, there were sessions on Space Physics and Hot Topics in Physics. There were sessions on professional and career concerns including Preparing Future Physics Faculty, New Faculty Experiences and Concerns, Balancing Career and Family, How Physics Topics Support the Job Market and Recruiting and Retaining Women in Physics. Whether one was a high school teacher or a university professor, this was an enjoyable and educational meeting. We all look forward to the Winter 2001 meeting from

  1. IFPA Meeting 2011 workshop report III: Placental immunology; epigenetic and microRNA-dependent gene regulation; comparative placentation; trophoblast differentiation; stem cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, W.E.; Bulmer, J.N.; Carter, A.M.; Chaillet, J.R.; Chamley, L.; Chen, C.P.; Chuong, E.B.; Coleman, S.J.; Collet, G.P.; Croy, B.A.; de Mestre, A.M.; Dickinson, H.; Ducray, J.; Enders, A.C.; Fogarty, N.M.E.; Gauster, M.; Golos, T.; Haider, S.; Heazell, A.E.; Holland, O.J.; Huppertz, B.; Husebekk, A.; John, R.M.; Johnsen, G.M.; Jones, C.J.P.; Kalionis, B.; König, J.; Lorenzon, A.R.; Moffett, A.; de Mello, J.C. Moreira; Nuzzo, A.M.; Parham, P.; Parolini, O.; Petroff, M.G.; Pidoux, G.; Ramírez-Pinilla, M.P.; Robinson, W.P.; Rolfo, A.; Sadovsky, Y.; Soma, H.; Southcombe, J.H.; Tilburgs, T.; Lash, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialised topics. At IFPA meeting 2011 there were twelve themed workshops, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology: 1) immunology; 2) epigenetics; 3) comparative placentation; 4) trophoblast differentiation; 5) stem cells. PMID:22154501

  2. Timely topics in pediatric psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Dineen Wagner, Karen

    2014-11-01

    This section of Focus on Childhood and Adolescent Mental Health presents findings on an array of topics including inflammation and child and adolescent depression, glutamatergic dysregulation and pediatric psychiatric disorders, predictors of bipolar disorder in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and the continuum between obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). There is increased interest in the role of inflammation in psychiatric disorders. Kim and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to examine the relationships between inflammatory processes, inflammation, medical conditions, and depression and suicidality in children and adolescents. PMID:25470084

  3. New patents on topical anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Macaluso, Laura; Frascani, Federica; Paolino, Giovanni; D'Andrea, Vito; Richetta, Antonio G; Calvieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia is defined as a total or partial loss of sensation and it may be general, local or topical, depending on the method of drug administration and area of the body affected. General anesthesia is a reversible state of unconsciousness produced by anesthetic agents, characterized by amnesia, muscle relaxation and loss of sensitivity to pain of the whole body. General anesthetic drugs can be classified into two main groups according to their predominant molecular pharmacological effects: volatile and intravenous agents. Local anesthesia produce a reversible loss of sensation in a portion of the body and it reversibly block impulse conduction along nerve axons and other excitable membrane. All local anesthetics (LA) are membrane stabilizing drugs; they reversibly decrease the rate of depolarization and repolarization of excitable membranes. They act mainly by inhibiting sodium influx through sodium-specific ion channels in the neuronal cell membrane, in particular the voltage-gated sodium channels. When the influx of sodium is interrupted, an action potential cannot arise and signal conduction is inhibited. The main local anesthetic (LA) agents for skin anesthesia are benzocaine (aminoester), prilocaine and lidocaine (aminoamides) which are commercially available as gels, ointments and creams (benzocaine and eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine) or as a bioadhesive (lidocaine) with different compositions (vehicles and excipients) for adults or pediatric use. Topical anesthetics decrease anxiety, pain and discomfort during cutaneous procedures and provide effective analgesia with rapid onset, prolonged duration and minimal side effects. This article outlines the different classes of topical anesthetics available and gives an overview of the mechanism of action, metabolism of each different class, of the possible complications that can occur because of their use and their possible treatment options and new patents.

  4. Design and formulation of a topical hydrogel integrating lemongrass-loaded nanosponges with an enhanced antifungal effect: in vitro/in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Aldawsari, Hibah M; Badr-Eldin, Shaimaa M; Labib, Gihan S; El-Kamel, Amal H

    2015-01-01

    Lemongrass oil (LGO) is a volatile oil extracted from the leaves of Cymbopogon citratus that has become one of the most important natural oils in the pharmaceutical industry because of its diverse pharmacologic and clinical effects. However, LGO suffers from low aqueous solubility, which could lead to a reduced effect. Moreover, the instability of its major active constituent, citral, could lead to volatilization, reaction with other formulation ingredients, and consequently, skin irritation. To surmount these problems, this research aims to formulate lemongrass-loaded ethyl cellulose nanosponges with a topical hydrogel with an enhanced antifungal effect and decreased irritation. The minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal fungicidal concentration of LGO against Candida albicans strain ATC 100231, determined using the broth macrodilution method, were found to be 2 and 8 μL/mL, respectively. The emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used for the preparation of the nanosponges. The nanosponge dispersions were then integrated into carbopol hydrogels (0.4%). Nine formulations were prepared based on a 32 full factorial design employing the ethyl cellulose:polyvinyl alcohol ratio and stirring rate as independent variables. The prepared formulations were evaluated for particle size, citral content, and in vitro release. Results revealed that all the nanosponge dispersions were nanosized, with satisfactory citral content and sustained release profiles. Statistical analysis revealed that both ethyl cellulose:polyvinyl alcohol ratio and stirring rate have significant effects on particle size and percentage released after 6 hours; however, the effect of the stirring rate was more prominent on both responses. The selected hydrogel formulation, F9, was subjected to surface morphological investigations, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, where results showed that the nanosponges possess a spherical uniform shape with a spongy structure, the integrity

  5. Design and formulation of a topical hydrogel integrating lemongrass-loaded nanosponges with an enhanced antifungal effect: in vitro/in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Aldawsari, Hibah M; Badr-Eldin, Shaimaa M; Labib, Gihan S; El-Kamel, Amal H

    2015-01-01

    Lemongrass oil (LGO) is a volatile oil extracted from the leaves of Cymbopogon citratus that has become one of the most important natural oils in the pharmaceutical industry because of its diverse pharmacologic and clinical effects. However, LGO suffers from low aqueous solubility, which could lead to a reduced effect. Moreover, the instability of its major active constituent, citral, could lead to volatilization, reaction with other formulation ingredients, and consequently, skin irritation. To surmount these problems, this research aims to formulate lemongrass-loaded ethyl cellulose nanosponges with a topical hydrogel with an enhanced antifungal effect and decreased irritation. The minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal fungicidal concentration of LGO against Candida albicans strain ATC 100231, determined using the broth macrodilution method, were found to be 2 and 8 μL/mL, respectively. The emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used for the preparation of the nanosponges. The nanosponge dispersions were then integrated into carbopol hydrogels (0.4%). Nine formulations were prepared based on a 32 full factorial design employing the ethyl cellulose:polyvinyl alcohol ratio and stirring rate as independent variables. The prepared formulations were evaluated for particle size, citral content, and in vitro release. Results revealed that all the nanosponge dispersions were nanosized, with satisfactory citral content and sustained release profiles. Statistical analysis revealed that both ethyl cellulose:polyvinyl alcohol ratio and stirring rate have significant effects on particle size and percentage released after 6 hours; however, the effect of the stirring rate was more prominent on both responses. The selected hydrogel formulation, F9, was subjected to surface morphological investigations, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, where results showed that the nanosponges possess a spherical uniform shape with a spongy structure, the integrity

  6. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 7 entitled: Development of degradation processes, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Brackin, M.J.; Heitkamp, M.A.; Ho, Sa V.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to law permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The Lasagna technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The general concept of the technology is to use electrokinetics to move contaminants from the soils into {open_quotes}treatment zones{close_quotes} where the contaminants can be removed from the water by either adsorption or degradation. The focus of technical task No. 7 was to optimize the conditions required for electro-osmotic movement of contaminants and microbial degradation in the treatment zones. This topical report summarizes the results of aerobic microbial research performed to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating the chemical-degrading organisms into biotreatment zones in laboratory-scale electro-osmosis units and to demonstrate the combination of electrokinetics and aerobic microbial degradation for the removal of contaminants from clay. Also included in this report are the results of investigating microbial movement during electro-osmosis and studies involving the optimization of the microbial support matrix in the biozone. The Stanford study was conducted in order to obtain a better understanding of rates of anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of TCE to ethylene and of factors affecting these rates in order to determine the potential for application of TCE biodegradation as part of the Lasagna technology.

  7. Recruitment of Engaged Couples for Premarital Counseling: An Empirical Examination of the Importance of Program Characteristics and Topics to Potential Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kieran T.; Anderson, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Study seeks to understand what potential participants perceive are attractive characteristics in premarital prevention approaches. Results indicate that leader characteristics, content, and topics such as communication, finances, and problem solving are the most important elements of premarital counseling to couples. Differences based on gender…

  8. Topical Treatment of White-Tailed Deer with an Acaricide for the Control of Ixodes Scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in a Connecticut Lyme Borreliosis Hyperendemic Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 4-Poster device for the topical treatment of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), against ticks using the acaricide amitraz, was evaluated in a Lyme borreliosis endemic community in Connecticut. As part of a 5-year project from 1997 to 2002, 21–24 of the 4-Posters were distrib...

  9. Using Conversation Analysis to Explore the Recurrence of a Topic in the Talk of a Boy with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stribling, Penny; Rae, John; Dickerson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Some higher functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are reported to produce perseverative talk, especially around "special interests". Topic perseveration is a form of pragmatic impairment captured in Prizant and Rydell's (1993) continuum of unconventional verbal behaviour in autism. Although widely reported, there is little…

  10. Exploring Perspectives of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities and Histories of Challenging Behaviors about Family Relationships: An Emergent Topic in a Grounded Theory Focus Group Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Julie F.; Hamilton-Mason, Johnnie; Maramaldi, Peter; Barnhill, L. Jarrett

    2016-01-01

    The perspectives of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) about family relationships are underrepresented in the literature. The topic of family relationships emerged in a grounded theory exploratory focus group study that involved thirty dually diagnosed participants with moderate or mild intellectual disabilities and histories of…

  11. Current Topics in Postnatal Behavioral Testing.

    PubMed

    Henck, Judith W; Elayan, Ikram; Vorhees, Charles; Fisher, J Edward; Morford, LaRonda L

    2016-09-01

    The study of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) continues to be an important component of safety evaluation of candidate therapeutic agents and of industrial and environmental chemicals. Developmental neurotoxicity is considered to be an adverse change in the central and/or peripheral nervous system during development of an organism and has been primarily evaluated by studying functional outcomes, such as changes in behavior, neuropathology, neurochemistry, and/or neurophysiology. Neurobehavioral evaluations are a component of a wide range of toxicology studies in laboratory animal models, whereas neurochemistry and neurophysiology are less commonly employed. Although the primary focus of this article is on neurobehavioral evaluation in pre- and postnatal development and juvenile toxicology studies used in pharmaceutical development, concepts may also apply to adult nonclinical safety studies and Environmental Protection Agency/chemical assessments. This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium held during the 2015 American College of Toxicology annual meeting and includes a discussion of the current status of DNT testing as well as potential issues and recommendations. Topics include the regulatory context for DNT testing; study design and interpretation; behavioral test selection, including a comparison of core learning and memory systems; age of testing; repeated testing of the same animals; use of alternative animal models; impact of findings; and extrapolation of animal results to humans. Integration of the regulatory experience and scientific concepts presented during this symposium, as well as from subsequent discussion and input, provides a synopsis of the current state of DNT testing in safety assessment, as well as a potential roadmap for future advancement.

  12. The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting was held in Kanazawa, Japan from 15-21 Aug. 1990. This was the first meeting of a new series of meetings for the American Geophysical Union, and it proved to be very successful in terms of the scientific program and attendance, which included over 1,000 participants. The intent of this meeting was an effort on the part of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and several Japanese geophysical societies to gather individual Earth and space scientists at a major scientific meeting to focus on geophysical problems being studied in the western Pacific rim. The meeting was organized along the lines of a typical AGU annual meeting with some invited talks, many contributed talks, poster sessions, and with emphasis on presentations and informal discussions. The program committee consisted of scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. This meeting provided ample opportunities for U.S. and Japanese scientists to get to know each other and their works on a one-to-one basis. It was also a valuable opportunity for students studying geophysics to get together and interact with each other and with scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. There were 939 abstracts submitted to the conference and a total of 102 sessions designed as a result of the abstracts received. The topics of interest are as follows: space geodetic and observatory measurements for earthquake and tectonic studies; gravity, sea level, and vertical motion; variations in earth rotation and earth dynamics; sedimentary magnetism; global processes and precipitation; subsurface contaminant transport; U.S. Western Pacific Rim initiatives in hydrology; shelf and coastal circulation; tectonics, magmatism, and hydrothermal processes; earthquake prediction and hazard assessment; seismic wave propagation in realistic media; and dynamics and structure of plate boundaries and of the Earth's deep interior.

  13. The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting was held in Kanazawa, Japan from 15-21 Aug. 1990. This was the first meeting of a new series of meetings for the American Geophysical Union, and it proved to be very successful in terms of the scientific program and attendance, which included over 1,000 participants. The intent of this meeting was an effort on the part of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and several Japanese geophysical societies to gather individual Earth and space scientists at a major scientific meeting to focus on geophysical problems being studied in the western Pacific rim. The meeting was organized along the lines of a typical AGU annual meeting with some invited talks, many contributed talks, poster sessions, and with emphasis on presentations and informal discussions. The program committee consisted of scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. This meeting provided ample opportunities for U.S. and Japanese scientists to get to know each other and their works on a one-to-one basis. It was also a valuable opportunity for students studying geophysics to get together and interact with each other and with scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. There were 939 abstracts submitted to the conference and a total of 102 sessions designed as a result of the abstracts received. The topics of interest are as follows: space geodetic and observatory measurements for earthquake and tectonic studies; gravity, sea level, and vertical motion; variations in earth rotation and earth dynamics; sedimentary magnetism; global processes and precipitation; subsurface contaminant transport; U.S. Western Pacific Rim initiatives in hydrology; shelf and coastal circulation; tectonics, magmatism, and hydrothermal processes; earthquake prediction and hazard assessment; seismic wave propagation in realistic media; and dynamics and structure of plate boundaries and of the Earth's deep interior.

  14. New insights into an old organelle: meeting report on biology of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Piali; Barr, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The rising interest of the scientific community in cilia biology was evident from the fact that registration for the third FASEB conference on 'The Biology of Cilia and Flagella' closed out before the early bird deadline. Cilia and flagella are organelles of profound medical importance; defects in their structure or function result in a plethora of human diseases called ciliopathies. 240 clinicians and basic scientists from around the world gathered from 23 June 2013 to 28 June 2013 at Sheraton at the Falls, Niagara Falls, NY to present and discuss their research on this intensely studied subcellular structure. The meeting was organized by Gregory Pazour (University of Massachusetts Medical School), Bradley Yoder (University of Alabama-Birmingham), and Maureen Barr (Rutgers University) and was sponsored by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). Here, we report highlights, points of discussion, and emerging themes from this exciting meeting. PMID:24612344

  15. Topic Congruence and Topic Interest: How Do They Affect Second Language Reading Comprehension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang-Ki

    2009-01-01

    Because human memory is largely reconstructive, people tend to reorganize and reevaluate an event in a way that is coherent to the truth values held in their belief system. This study investigated the role of topic congruence (defined as whether the reading content corresponds with readers' prior beliefs towards a contentious topic) in second…

  16. Perceptions of self-determination by special education and rehabilitation practitioners based on viewing a self-directed IEP versus an external-directed IEP meeting.

    PubMed

    Branding, Dave; Bates, Paul; Miner, Craig

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated perception of self-determination by special education and rehabilitation practitioners following their exposure to a videotaped simulation of a self-directed IEP meeting and an external-directed IEP meeting involving an adolescent with mild mental retardation. Groups of special education practitioners and rehabilitation practitioners did not differ from each other in their perceptions of self-determination before or after viewing either the self-directed or external-directed IEP meeting simulation. However, both groups of respondents had higher perceptions of the self-determination capability of the confederate student when they viewed her in a self-directed meeting. In addition, respondents consistently rated the self-directed meeting simulation as being of higher overall quality than the external-directed meeting. Results are discussed in relation to practitioner recommendations and future research in regard to the development and enabling of self-determination skills involving persons with disabilities.

  17. 75 FR 51116 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --2010 Astronomy...

  18. 75 FR 33837 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA... of the room. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division...

  19. 76 FR 59172 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... password APS@October20201. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics:...

  20. 76 FR 35481 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update. --Research and Analysis...

  1. 75 FR 74089 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --James Webb Space Telescope...

  2. 76 FR 5405 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Update from the James Webb...

  3. 75 FR 2893 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA... the room. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division...

  4. 77 FR 4370 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Update on Balloons Return...

  5. New music to an old melody: The 66th AAAAI meeting in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, Xavier

    2010-04-01

    With the images of the earthquake in Haiti still fresh in the memory, and a similar disaster just occurring in Chile, coming again to New Orleans brought back vivid images of the Hurricane Katrina disaster. The city has for the most part recovered from that experience, although molds persist in many historical and ancient buildings, putting allergy sufferers at risk as they breathe in allergens. The city of New Orleans is almost fully restored to its former glory, however, and music again pours out through doors and windows of the French Quarter, calling people in to share drinks and food while clearly stating which specific products contain or may contain traces of nuts, so that people with allergies do not need to run to their epinephrine autoinjector to treat life-threatening anaphylactic attacks. Against this background, and under heavy, rainy and windy skies, the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (AAAAI) held its 2010 annual meeting in the Ernst E. Memorial Convention Center, where 4 days packed with presentations and discussions displaced most other thoughts from the attendees' minds. Indeed, nights on Bourbon Street had never been so uncrowded as they were during the meeting, suggesting that attendees were perhaps sequestered in their hotel rooms, working with new information obtained at the meeting.

  6. New music to an old melody: The 66th AAAAI meeting in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, Xavier

    2010-04-01

    With the images of the earthquake in Haiti still fresh in the memory, and a similar disaster just occurring in Chile, coming again to New Orleans brought back vivid images of the Hurricane Katrina disaster. The city has for the most part recovered from that experience, although molds persist in many historical and ancient buildings, putting allergy sufferers at risk as they breathe in allergens. The city of New Orleans is almost fully restored to its former glory, however, and music again pours out through doors and windows of the French Quarter, calling people in to share drinks and food while clearly stating which specific products contain or may contain traces of nuts, so that people with allergies do not need to run to their epinephrine autoinjector to treat life-threatening anaphylactic attacks. Against this background, and under heavy, rainy and windy skies, the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (AAAAI) held its 2010 annual meeting in the Ernst E. Memorial Convention Center, where 4 days packed with presentations and discussions displaced most other thoughts from the attendees' minds. Indeed, nights on Bourbon Street had never been so uncrowded as they were during the meeting, suggesting that attendees were perhaps sequestered in their hotel rooms, working with new information obtained at the meeting. PMID:20440423

  7. Topical and oral therapeutic approach to rosacea.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Yolanda R; Maier, Lisa M

    2016-06-01

    Rosacea is an inflammatory condition of the skin, primarily affecting the central convexities of the face. Various topical and oral therapeutic approaches exist. Most have been developed to treat the papulopustular subtype of rosacea; however, other approaches can be used to treat the erythematotelangiectatic, ocular, and phymatous subtypes. This review provides a summary of available topical and oral approaches for the treatment of rosacea. PMID:27416312

  8. 26 CFR 1.404(a)-3 - Contributions of an employer to or under an employees' pension trust or annuity plan that meets...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... employees' pension trust or annuity plan that meets the requirements of section 401(a); application of... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(a)-3 Contributions of an employer to or under an employees'...

  9. 26 CFR 1.404(a)-3 - Contributions of an employer to or under an employees' pension trust or annuity plan that meets...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... employees' pension trust or annuity plan that meets the requirements of section 401(a); application of... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(a)-3 Contributions of an employer to or under an employees' pension trust or...

  10. Expert Meeting Report: Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.; Wiehagen, J.

    2012-09-01

    This report describes an expert meeting hosted by the Building America research team NAHB Research Center, which was held on February 8, 2012, in Orlando, Florida. The topic, Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects, was intended to provide direction to more focused efforts to increase the efficiency of existing homes; in this meeting, the focus was specifically for re-roofing and the opportunities for adding energy efficiency upgrades during this major home repair activity.

  11. Hybrid Fiber/Copper LAN Meets School's 25-Year Networking Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruso, Sam; Humes, Vince

    1994-01-01

    Describes an innovative new curriculum being implemented at Walnut Creek Middle School (Pennsylvania) and an advanced networked computer environment that supports it now and will also meet future needs. Topics addressed include physical facilities; networking goals, both short-term and long-term; fiber-optic cable versus copper; and future…

  12. 78 FR 15022 - Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... compartmentalization and challenges for an HIV cure; CNS- targeted ARV therapeutics; and neuroprotective strategies. An... topic of the meeting will be HIV-associated Neurological Manifestations and Disorders. The speakers at..., diagnosis, assessment, treatment, and prevention of Neuro-AIDS and HIV-associated neurological...

  13. At math meetings, enormous theorem eclipses fermat.

    PubMed

    Cipra, B

    1995-02-10

    Hardly a word was said about Fermat's Last Theorem at the joint meetings of the American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America, held this year from 4 to 7 January in San Francisco. For Andrew Wiles's proof, no news is good news: There are no reports of mistakes. But mathematicians found plenty of other topics to discuss. Among them: a computational breakthrough in the study of turbulent diffusion and progress in slimming down the proof of an important result in group theory, whose original size makes checking the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem look like an afternoon's pastime.

  14. At math meetings, enormous theorem eclipses fermat.

    PubMed

    Cipra, B

    1995-02-10

    Hardly a word was said about Fermat's Last Theorem at the joint meetings of the American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America, held this year from 4 to 7 January in San Francisco. For Andrew Wiles's proof, no news is good news: There are no reports of mistakes. But mathematicians found plenty of other topics to discuss. Among them: a computational breakthrough in the study of turbulent diffusion and progress in slimming down the proof of an important result in group theory, whose original size makes checking the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem look like an afternoon's pastime. PMID:17813892

  15. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage.

  16. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    This report provides highlights from the 1992 fall meeting of the Low LEvel Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: disposal options after 1992; interregional agreements; management alternatives; policy; and storage.

  17. (International meeting of ecology)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O.

    1990-09-14

    This report, dated September 14, 1990, covers the trip to Japan of Dr. Kimiko O. Bowman, Senior Research Member in the Mathematical Sciences Section. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The trip was supported by the Center for Indoor Air Research (CIAR). The purpose of the trip was to attend and present an invited talk at the Fifth International Congress of Ecology held at the Yokohama Prince Hotel in Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, August 23--30, 1990. The presented talk Testing the Mutagenicity of Components'' described two papers on research conducted under contract to the CIAR. The only other site visited was Tokyo Science University by invitation of Dr. T. Okuno,Provost of the University. The main activities consisted of attending the meeting, contributing to the discussion, and presenting an invited talk at the conference. The discussion with Dr. Okuno was on general biometric research topics. The main benefit was to gain greater international exposure for our work and to discover new applications for it.

  18. Topics in statistical mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Elser, V.

    1984-05-01

    This thesis deals with four independent topics in statistical mechanics: (1) the dimer problem is solved exactly for a hexagonal lattice with general boundary using a known generating function from the theory of partitions. It is shown that the leading term in the entropy depends on the shape of the boundary; (2) continuum models of percolation and self-avoiding walks are introduced with the property that their series expansions are sums over linear graphs with intrinsic combinatorial weights and explicit dimension dependence; (3) a constrained SOS model is used to describe the edge of a simple cubic crystal. Low and high temperature results are derived as well as the detailed behavior near the crystal facet; (4) the microscopic model of the lambda-transition involving atomic permutation cycles is reexamined. In particular, a new derivation of the two-component field theory model of the critical behavior is presented. Results for a lattice model originally proposed by Kikuchi are extended with a high temperature series expansion and Monte Carlo simulation. 30 references.

  19. MIENS Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence and The GSC's Not-for-Profit (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Yilmaz, Pelin [Max Planck Institute - Bremen; Kolker, Eugene [Seattle Childrens Hospital

    2016-07-12

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding Research Coordination Network from the National Science Foundation and was held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Pelin Yilmaz of the Max Planck Institute-Bremen talks about the MIENS specification and Eugene Kolker of Seattle Children's Hospital discusses the GSC's non-for-profit at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  20. 41 CFR 102-75.545 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet an educational or public health requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that was transferred to meet an educational or public health requirement is revested in the United... Educational and Public Health Purposes § 102-75.545 What happens if property that was transferred to meet an educational or public health requirement is revested in the United States for noncompliance with the terms...

  1. 41 CFR 102-75.545 - What happens if property that was transferred to meet an educational or public health requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... that was transferred to meet an educational or public health requirement is revested in the United... Educational and Public Health Purposes § 102-75.545 What happens if property that was transferred to meet an educational or public health requirement is revested in the United States for noncompliance with the terms...

  2. PREFACE: Brazil MRS Meeting 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    The annual meetings, organized by the Brazilian materials research society - B-MRS, are amongst the most import discussion forums in the area of materials science and engineering in Brazil, with a growing interest from the national and international scientific society. In the last 4 years, more than 1,500 participants have attended the B-MRS meetings, promoting an auspicious environment for presentation and discussion of scientific and technological works in the materials science area. The XIII Brazilian Materials Research Society Meeting was held from 28 September to 02 October, 2014, in João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. The Meeting congregated more than 1650 participants from the whole of Brazil and from 28 other countries. More than 2100 abstracts were accepted for presentation, distributed along 19 Symposia following the format used in traditional meetings of Materials Research Societies. These involved topics such as: synthesis of new materials, computer simulations, optical, magnetic and electronic properties, traditional materials as clays and cements, advanced metals, carbon and graphene nanostructures, nanomaterials for nanostructures, energy storage systems, composites, surface engineering and others. A novelty was a symposium dedicated to innovation and technology transfer in materials research. The program also included 7 Plenary Lectures presented by internationally renowned researchers: Alberto Salleo from Stanford University, United States of America; Roberto Dovesi from Universita' degli Studi di Torino, Italy; Luís Antonio F. M. Dias Carlos from Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal; Jean Marie Dubois from Institut Jean-Lamour, France; Sir Colin Humphreys from University of Cambridge, England; Karl Leo from Technische Universität Dresden, Germany; Robert Chang from Northwestern University, Evanston, United States of America. The numbers of participants in the B-MRS meetings have been growing continuously, and in this meeting we had almost 2200 presentations

  3. NOVEL APPROACHES TO Topical Psoriasis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Gregory; Liu, Jenny; Scaffidi, Alyse; Khazraee, Maryam; Epstein, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Topical corticosteroids are the cornerstone of treatment for the majority of psoriasis patients. However, potential side effects of topical corticosteroids (i.e., cutaneous atrophy, telangiectasias, hypothalamic-pituitary axis suppression), coupled with the complex pathophysiology of psoriasis and the individual needs/preferences of psoriasis patients, represent a few of the limitations associated with topical corticosteroid monotherapy. While the combination of some agents with varying mechanisms of action has proven to be an effective strategy for improving efficacy and reducing concomitant drug application, others have displayed less efficacy, harm, and/or reduced cost-effectiveness. The purpose of this article is to review novel topical therapeutic combinations for the management of psoriasis and explore the role compounding pharmacies can have in providing healthcare providers and patients with effective and affordable alternative psoriasis therapies. PMID:26775441

  4. Proceedings of the DOE/Industry Sensor Working Group meeting, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This paper report contains topics presented at a sensor workshop group meeting. The topics describe measuring instruments of use in the pulp and paper industry. Topics include: measurement of solids fraction; process instrumentation research for the pulp paper industry; real-time non-contact optical surface motion monitor; on-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties; hierarchical intelligent control of industrial processes -- an in-parallel lime kiln application; proposal for research on lignin concentration measurement in pulping liquors; and advanced polymeric sensor materials for industrial drying.

  5. Chapter VIII: Rules and Guidelines for IAU Scientific Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    The program of IAU scientific meetings is one of the most important means by which the IAU pursues its goal of promoting astronomy through international collaboration. A large fraction of the Union's budget is devoted to the support of these IAU scientific meetings. The IAU Executive Committee (EC) places great emphasis on maintaining high scientific standards, coverage of a balanced spectrum of topics, and an appropriately broad and international flavour for the program of IAU meetings. In that respect, the ICSU rules on non-discrimination in the access of qualified scientists from all parts of the world to any IAU meeting apply. The ICSU rules on non-discrimination are described in the document “Freedom, Responsibility and Universality of Science”, available on http://www.icsu.org/Gestion/img/ICSU_DOC_DOWNLOAD/2205_DD_FILE_Freedom_Responsibility_Universality_of_Science_booklet.pdf

  6. Managing Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Meetings are a means of giving people a chance to contribute. Meetings are also the nursery where the people's skills of listening, speaking, and building good working relationships are honed. They are where people practice being courteously challenging and confident, and they are where people are fascinated and fascinating. Meetings are where…

  7. Topical fat reduction.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L; Bray, G A; Heber, D

    1995-11-01

    The fat on women's thighs is more difficult to mobilize due to increased alpha-2 adrenergic receptor activity induced by estrogen. Lipolysis can be initiated through adipocyte receptor stimulation (beta adrenergic) or inhibition (adenosine or alpha-2 adrenergic) or by inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Since many women desire regional thigh fat loss, a series of clinical trials were initiated using one thigh as a double-blinded control. Trial #1: Five overweight women had injections of isoproterenol at intervals around the thigh three times a week for 4 weeks with diet and walking. Trial #2: Five overweight woman had ointment containing forskolin, yohimbine and aminophylline applied to the thigh five times a week for 4 weeks after hypertonic warm soaks with a diet and walking. Trial #3: Eighteen overweight women were divided into three groups of six and trial #2 was repeated with each agent alone vs. placebo using forskolin, yohimbine or aminophylline in separate ointments. Trial #4: Thirty overweight women had 10% aminophylline ointment applied to the thigh five times a week for 6 weeks with diet and walking. Chemistry panel, theophylline level and patch testing were performed. Trial #5: Twelve women had trial #4 repeated with 2% aminophylline cream without a diet or walking. Trial #6: Trial #5 was repeated with 0.5% aminophylline cream. All trials except yohimbine ointment gave significantly more girth loss from the treated thigh (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Chemistry panel showed no toxicity. Theophylline was undetectable and patch testing was negative. We conclude that topical fat reduction for women's thighs can be achieved without diet or exercise. PMID:8697059

  8. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis video project: an update from the 2012 GRAPPA annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Callis Duffin, Kristina; Armstrong, April W; Mease, Philip J

    2013-08-01

    The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) has developed online videos intended to provide training on the most commonly used physical examination measures for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). At the 2012 GRAPPA annual meeting, attendees were updated on the development, availability, use, and validation of these video modules. To date, 1300 users from 45 different countries have used the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) module at least once. Results were presented from a recently completed study of pre- and post-video scoring of the PASI by experienced and naive physicians and patient assessors. Future modifications of the video collection were also discussed.

  9. 76 FR 70709 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Emergency Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting; Emergency Meeting Notice This notice that an emergency meeting was held is... emergency closed meeting on November 9, 2011 at approximately 11:10 a.m. The Commission, by a recorded...

  10. 76 FR 68167 - Sunshine Act Meeting-Emergency Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting--Emergency Meeting Notice This notice that an emergency meeting was held is... emergency closed meeting on October 31, 2011 at 12 p.m. The Commission, by a recorded unanimous...

  11. HIV-Related Illnesses: Topics for Health Services Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Topics addressed in this report were suggested at a meeting of staff from the National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (NCHSR) and other Public Health Service representatives held in 1988 to update the Public Health Service's plan for the prevention and control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).…

  12. Coordinating Council. Eighth Meeting: Using the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program Coordinating Council meeting theme was entitled 'Using Internet'. Individual topics included STI LAN migration, NSF and NREN (National Science Foundation and the National Research and Education Network), and the New NASA Headquarters LAN. Discussions are recorded for each topic and visuals are provided for STI LAN migration and NSI - NASA Science Internet.

  13. Transcript CONTU Meeting #9. Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works, Washington, DC.

    Photocopying and other topics are presented in Vols. 1 and 2 of the transcript of the Ninth Commission Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in 1976. Topics in Vol. 1 include: (1) implications for the commission's work of the final provisions of the copyright bill; (2) study of a national periodical bank(s) for the U.S.; (3) the provision of…

  14. 78 FR 37589 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice of a Matter To Be Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice of a Matter To Be Added to the Agenda for Consideration at an Agency Meeting FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: June 17, 2013 (78 FR 36277). TIME AND DATE: 10..., Alexandria, VA 22314-3428. STATUS: Open. MATTERS TO BE ADDED: 2. NCUA's Rules and Regulations,...

  15. 30 CFR 203.67 - What economic criteria must I meet to get royalty relief on an authorized field or project?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What economic criteria must I meet to get royalty relief on an authorized field or project? 203.67 Section 203.67 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY... REDUCTION IN ROYALTY RATES OCS Oil, Gas, and Sulfur General § 203.67 What economic criteria must I meet...

  16. Meeting Report for Mobile DNA 2010

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An international conference on mobile DNA was held 24-28 April 2010 in Montreal, Canada. Sponsored by the American Society for Microbiology, the conference's goal was to bring together researchers from around the world who study transposition in diverse organisms using multiple experimental approaches. The meeting drew over 190 attendees and most contributed through poster presentations, invited talks and short talks selected from poster abstracts. The talks were organized into eight scientific sessions, which ranged in topic from the evolutionary dynamics of mobile genetic elements to transposition reaction mechanisms. Here we present highlights from the platform sessions with a focus on talks presented by the invited speakers. PMID:20735816

  17. 12 CFR 604.415 - Open meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Open meetings. 604.415 Section 604.415 Banks... MEETINGS § 604.415 Open meetings. Every meeting and portion of a meeting of the Board shall be open to... part, and that the public interest is not served by the discussion of such matters in an open meeting....

  18. The Short, Productive Board Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Donald R.

    2005-01-01

    Board meetings are the time and place where school boards act. In fact, only when coming together as a body in a legal meeting do school board members become a board. Effective board meetings are the first prerequisite for an effective board. Furthermore, what parents and voters see at board meetings determines largely what they think about their…

  19. Topic Negotiation in Peer Group Oral Assessment Situations: A Conversation Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Zhengdong; Davison, Chris; Hamp-Lyons, Liz

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the production of topical talk in peer collaborative negotiation in an interactive assessment innovation context. The ability to stay on topic, to move from topic to topic and to introduce new topics appropriately is at the core of communicative competence. Applying conversation analysis (CA), we describe and analyze how one…

  20. Topics in complex nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Linghang

    In the dissertation, I include two topics of my research in nonlinear dynamic systems. In the first topic, we use numerical optimization techniques to investigate the behavior of the success rates for two- and three-qubit entangling gates, first for perfect fidelity, and then extended to imperfect gates. We find that as the perfect fidelity condition is relaxed, the maximum attainable success rates increase in a predictable fashion depending on the size of the system, and we compare that rate of increase for several gates. Finally, we propose an experiment to test our imperfect LOQC gates using number-resolving photon detectors. We suggest a relatively simple physical apparatus capable of producing CZ gates with controllable fidelity less than 1 and success rates higher than the current theoretical maximum (S=2/27) for perfect fidelity. These experimental setups are within the reach of many experimental groups and would provide an interesting experiment in photonic quantum computing. In the second topic, we quantitatively study nonlinear effects on the evolution of surface gravity waves on the ocean, to explore systematically the effects of various input parameters on the probability of rogue wave formation. The fourth-order current-modified nonlinear Schrodinger equation (CNLS4) is employed to describe the wave evolution. First, we show that when the average wave steepness is small and nonlinear wave effects are subleading, the wave height distribution is well explained by a single "freak index" parameter, which describes the strength of (linear) wave scattering by random currents relative to the angular spread of the incoming random sea. When the average steepness is large, the wave height distribution takes a very similar functional form, but the key variables determining the probability distribution are the steepness, and the angular and frequency spread of the incoming waves. Then, we obtain quantitative predictions for the wave height distribution as a

  1. PREFACE: WMO/GEO Expert Meeting On An International Sand And Dust Storm Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science presents a selection of papers that were given at the WMO/GEO Expert Meeting on an International Sand and Dust Storm Warning System hosted by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center - Centro Nacional de Supercomputación in Barcelona (Spain) on 7-9 November 2007 (http://www.bsc.es/wmo). A sand and dust storm (SDS) is a meteorological phenomenon common in arid and semi-arid regions and arises when a gust front passes or when the wind force exceeds the threshold value where loose sand and dust are removed from the dry surface. After aeolian uptake, SDS reduce visibility to a few meters in and near source regions, and dust plumes are transported over distances as long as thousands of kilometres. Aeolian dust is unique among aerosol phenomena: (1) with the possible exception of sea-salt aerosol, it is globally the most abundant of all aerosol species, (2) it appears as the dominating component of atmospheric aerosol over large areas of the Earth, (3) it represents a serious hazard for life, health, property, environment and economy (occasionally reaching the grade of disaster or catastrophic event) and (4) its influence, impacts, complex interactions and feedbacks within the Earth System span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. From a political and societal point of view, the concern for SDS and the need for international cooperation were reflected after a survey conducted in 2005 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in which more than forty WMO Member countries expressed their interest for creating or improving capacities for SDS warning advisory and assessment. In this context, recent major advances in research - including, for example, the development and implementation of advanced observing systems, the theoretical understanding of the mechanisms responsible for sand and dust storm generation and the development of global and regional dust models - represent the basis for

  2. Expert Meeting Report. Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.; Wiehagen, J.

    2012-09-01

    This report describes an expert meeting hosted by the Building America research team NAHB Research Center, which was held on February 8, 2012, in Orlando, Florida. The topic focused on efforts to increase the efficiency of existing homes, specifically for re-roofing and the opportunities for adding energy efficiency upgrades during this major home repair activity.

  3. Proceedings [of the] Sixty Seventh Annual Meeting [of the ] National College Physical Education Association for Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This document contains the proceedings of the January 1964 Annual Meeting of the National College Physical Education Association for Men (NEPEAM). In addition to the President's address and a speech on physical education as an academic discipline, the Proceedings contain speeches on the following topics: (1) intramural athletics, (2) research, (3)…

  4. Meeting the educational needs of an aging population: The Australian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minichiello, Victor

    1992-07-01

    The number of older people in Australia is growing fast, and gerontology has recently become a recognised area of study in tertiary institutions. However, negative attitudes persist among health and welfare professionals, and ways in which gerontology courses can combat the myths associated with aging and the aged are discussed. It is pointed out that people do not grow old in isolation, but in a social context. Education for older people should be seen as a part of social policy, recognising the lifelong right to education. The University of the Third Age (U3A) is a response to the demand for education from older people. The origins of this movement in Europe, and its spread to North America and Australia, are outlined. To meet the needs of older people, courses offered by U3A's have to be multidisciplinary.

  5. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis educational initiatives: an update from the 2013 GRAPPA Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Kristina Callis; Garg, Amit; Armstrong, April W; Helliwell, Philip; Mease, Philip J

    2014-06-01

    At the 2013 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), members were updated on educational areas in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Discussions included (1) the psoriasis and PsA GRAPPA video project, comprising a set of educational online videos that provide standardized psoriatic disease endpoint training to clinicians and researchers; (2) the GRAPPA Educational Outreach Project, focused on cross-disciplinary education for rheumatologists and dermatologists and including several collaborations to expand educational sessions globally; (3) the Dermatology and Rheumatology Trainee Educational Initiative, that provides psoriatic disease education to medical students, residents, and fellows training in dermatology and/or rheumatology; and (4) the GRAPPA Educational Slide Library, developed as a resource for GRAPPA members for their own educational presentations.

  6. Current Topics in Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    USUI, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the current topics in the field of epilepsy surgery. Each type of epilepsy is associated with a different set of questions and goals. In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), postoperative seizure outcome is satisfactory. A recent meta-analysis revealed superior seizure outcome after anterior temporal lobectomy compared with selective amygdalohippocampectomy; in terms of cognitive outcome; however, amygdalohippocampectomy may be beneficial. In temporal lobe epilepsy with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative seizure outcome is not as favorable as it is in MTLE with HS; further improvement of seizure outcome in these cases is necessary. Focal cortical dysplasia is the most common substrate in intractable neocortical epilepsy, especially in children, as well as in MRI-invisible neocortical epilepsy. Postoperative seizure-free outcome is approximately 60–70%; further diagnostic and therapeutic improvement is required. Regarding diagnostic methodology, an important topic currently under discussion is wideband electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis. Although high-frequency oscillations and ictal direct current shifts are considered important markers of epileptogenic zones, the clinical significance of these findings should be clarified further. Regarding alternatives to surgery, neuromodulation therapy can be an option for patients who are not amenable to resective surgery. In addition to vagus nerve stimulation, intracranial stimulation such as responsive neurostimulation or anterior thalamic stimulation is reported to have a modest seizure suppression effect. Postoperative management such as rehabilitation and antiepileptic drug (AED) management is important. It has been reported that postoperative rehabilitation improves postoperative employment status. Pre- and post-operative comprehensive care is mandatory for postoperative improvement of quality of life. PMID:26984452

  7. Hot topics for leadership development.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Three areas stand out from a health systems perspective that should be on the development agenda for all leaders. These topics include population health, predictive analytics, and supply chain management. Together, these topics address access, quality, and cost management. PMID:25633301

  8. Resources for Topics in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This guide for conducting library research on topics in art or the work of a particular artist presents suggestions for utilizing four categories of resources: books, dictionaries and encyclopedias, indexes, and a periodicals and serials list (PASL). Three topics are researched as examples: the contemporary artist and author Frank Stella, the…

  9. Working Topics for Students' Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marting, Janet

    Students enrolled in composition classes may provide the answer to the dilemma of coming up with a writing topic: work--the "four letter word." Most, if not all, students have already become part of the labor force. The theme of "work" is naturally successful because it centers around a topic students know well, something that is within their…

  10. Linguistic Extensions of Topic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd-Graber, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    Topic models like latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) provide a framework for analyzing large datasets where observations are collected into groups. Although topic modeling has been fruitfully applied to problems social science, biology, and computer vision, it has been most widely used to model datasets where documents are modeled as exchangeable…

  11. 76 FR 41825 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council (NAC). The agenda topics for the meeting will include: DATES: Thursday, August 4, 2011, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., and Friday, August 5, 2011, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA...

  12. 78 FR 11632 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... SAFETY BOARD Sunshine Act Meeting Notice Federal Register CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUCEMENT: 78 FR 4393... January 22, 2013, (78 FR 4393), concerning a two-session public meeting and hearing on March 14, 2013, at... 6:30 p.m. instead of 7:00 p.m.; (3) the topic of safety culture at the Pantex Plant in Session...

  13. 77 FR 43806 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS Sunshine Act Meeting AGENCY: United States Commission on Civil Rights. ACTION: Notice of meeting. DATE AND... report; and (c) The topic of the civil rights of veterans, as set forth in the concept paper prepared...

  14. 76 FR 77559 - Meeting of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meeting of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the... EDISTEment program, specifically the creation of content on the topic of world history for the EDSITEment Web...: This meeting will provide advice about the creation of content for world history on the...

  15. Search tool plug-in: imploements latent topic feedback

    2011-09-23

    IRIS is a search tool plug-in that is used to implement latent topic feedback for enhancing text navigation. It accepts a list of returned documents from an information retrieval wywtem that is generated from keyword search queries. Data is pulled directly from a topic information database and processed by IRIS to determine the most prominent and relevant topics, along with topic-ngrams, associated with the list of returned documents. User selected topics are then used tomore » expand the query and presumabley refine the search results.« less

  16. Search tool plug-in: imploements latent topic feedback

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-23

    IRIS is a search tool plug-in that is used to implement latent topic feedback for enhancing text navigation. It accepts a list of returned documents from an information retrieval wywtem that is generated from keyword search queries. Data is pulled directly from a topic information database and processed by IRIS to determine the most prominent and relevant topics, along with topic-ngrams, associated with the list of returned documents. User selected topics are then used to expand the query and presumabley refine the search results.

  17. TT2014 meeting report on the 12th Transgenic Technology meeting in Edinburgh: new era of transgenic technologies with programmable nucleases in the foreground.

    PubMed

    Beck, Inken M; Sedlacek, Radislav

    2015-02-01

    The 12th Transgenic Technology meeting was held in Edinburgh on 6th-8th October 2014 and interest to participate in the meeting overcame all expectations. The TT2014 was the largest meeting ever with more than 540 scientists, technicians, and students from all over the world. The meeting had an excellent scientific program that brought information on the latest ground-breaking technologies for gene targeting and genome editing using programmable nucleases into the foreground. These presentations were well balanced with several highlights over viewing topics in embryonic stem cell research, embryogenesis, disease models, and animals in agriculture. Ample space was reserved also for short talks presenting technical development and for highlighting posters contributions. A highlight of the meeting was the award of the 10th International Society of Transgenic Technologies Prize to Janet Rossant for her outstanding contributions in the field of mouse embryogenesis.

  18. IFPA meeting 2014 workshop report: Animal models to study pregnancy pathologies; new approaches to study human placental exposure to xenobiotics; biomarkers of pregnancy pathologies; placental genetics and epigenetics; the placenta and stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Barbaux, S; Erwich, J J H M; Favaron, P O; Gil, S; Gallot, D; Golos, T G; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Guibourdenche, J; Heazell, A E P; Jansson, T; Laprévote, O; Lewis, R M; Miller, R K; Monk, D; Novakovic, B; Oudejans, C; Parast, M; Peugnet, P; Pfarrer, C; Pinar, H; Roberts, C T; Robinson, W; Saffery, R; Salomon, C; Sexton, A; Staff, A C; Suter, M; Tarrade, A; Wallace, J; Vaillancourt, C; Vaiman, D; Worton, S A; Lash, G E

    2015-04-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2014 there were six themed workshops, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of animal models, xenobiotics, pathological biomarkers, genetics and epigenetics, and stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

  19. COMPARISON OF TOPICAL INTERLEUKIN-1 VS TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA BLOCKADE WITH CORTICOSTEROID THERAPY ON MURINE CORNEAL INFLAMMATION, NEOVASCULARIZATION, AND TRANSPLANT SURVIVAL (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) play critical roles in mediating corneal inflammation. In this study, topical blockade of IL-1 and TNF-α, alone or in combination, was compared to conventional corticosteroid anti-inflammatory therapy in suppressing infiltration of the cornea by antigen-presenting Langerhans cells (LCs) and in promoting corneal transplant survival in a mouse model of keratoplasty. Methods: Study drugs included topical 2% IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), 1.5% soluble TNF-α receptor (sTNFR), and 1% prednisolone phosphate (Pred), all formulated in hyaluronic acid vehicle. Fifty eyes of BALB/c mice were used for LC studies where the numbers of LCs were determined 1 week after electrocautery to the corneal surface or transplantation of C57BL/6 corneas. Additionally, 65 BALB/c mice received corneal allografts and were randomized to receive one of the following for 8 weeks: (1) IL-1Ra, (2) sTNFR, (3) Pred, (4) combined IL-1Ra and Pred, or (5) vehicle alone. Results: Mean suppression of LC infiltration after electrocautery or transplantation was 67% and 71%, respectively, for IL-1Ra, 40% and 62% for sTNFR, 70% and 72% for sTNFR+IL-1Ra, and 77% and 78% for Pred alone. Rejection rates were 15% for IL-1Ra (P = .01), 38% for sTNFR (P = .1), 17% for Pred (P = .02), and 7% for combined IL-1Ra+Pred (P = .002) as compared to 69% for the vehicle-treated group. IL-1Ra and Pred, but not sTNFR, significantly inhibited post-transplantation neovascularization. Conclusions: Topical IL-1Ra and prednisolone are comparable in their capacity to promote graft survival. sTNFR therapy, though effective, has much lower efficacy as compared to IL-1Ra or Pred. Combination IL-1Ra and steroid therapy offers only minimal added efficacy over either agent used alone. PMID:18427620

  20. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

    PubMed

    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.