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Sample records for antagonist sr141716 rimonabant

  1. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists rimonabant (SR141716) and AM251 directly potentiate GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Baur, R; Gertsch, J; Sigel, E

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Rimonabant (SR141716) and the structurally related AM251 are widely used in pharmacological experiments as selective cannabinoid receptor CB1 antagonists / inverse agonists. Concentrations of 0.5–10 µM are usually applied in in vitro experiments. We intended to show that these drugs did not act at GABAA receptors but found a significant positive allosteric modulation instead. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Recombinant GABAA receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Receptors were exposed to AM251 or rimonabant in the absence and presence of GABA. Standard electrophysiological techniques were used to monitor the elicited ionic currents. KEY RESULTS AM251 dose-dependently potentiated responses to 0.5 µM GABA at the recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor with an EC50 below 1 µM and a maximal potentiation of about eightfold. The Hill coefficient indicated that more than one binding site for AM251 was located in this receptor. Rimonabant had a lower affinity, but a fourfold higher efficacy. AM251 potentiated also currents mediated by α1β2, αxβ2γ2 (x = 2,3,5,6), α1β3γ2 and α4β2δ GABAA receptors, but not those mediated by α1β1γ2. Interestingly, the CB1 receptor antagonists LY320135 and O-2050 did not significantly affect α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor-mediated currents at concentrations of 1 µM. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study identified rimonabant and AM251 as positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors. Thus, potential GABAergic effects of commonly used concentrations of these compounds should be considered in in vitro experiments, especially at extrasynaptic sites where GABA concentrations are low. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21470203

  2. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists rimonabant (SR141716) and AM251 directly potentiate GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Baur, R; Gertsch, J; Sigel, E

    2012-04-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716) and the structurally related AM251 are widely used in pharmacological experiments as selective cannabinoid receptor CB(1) antagonists / inverse agonists. Concentrations of 0.5-10 µM are usually applied in in vitro experiments. We intended to show that these drugs did not act at GABA(A) receptors but found a significant positive allosteric modulation instead. Recombinant GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Receptors were exposed to AM251 or rimonabant in the absence and presence of GABA. Standard electrophysiological techniques were used to monitor the elicited ionic currents. AM251 dose-dependently potentiated responses to 0.5 µM GABA at the recombinant α(1) β(2) γ(2) GABA(A) receptor with an EC(50) below 1 µM and a maximal potentiation of about eightfold. The Hill coefficient indicated that more than one binding site for AM251 was located in this receptor. Rimonabant had a lower affinity, but a fourfold higher efficacy. AM251 potentiated also currents mediated by α(1) β(2) , α(x) β(2) γ(2) (x = 2,3,5,6), α(1) β(3) γ(2) and α(4) β(2) δ GABA(A) receptors, but not those mediated by α(1) β(1) γ(2) . Interestingly, the CB(1) receptor antagonists LY320135 and O-2050 did not significantly affect α(1) β(2) γ(2) GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents at concentrations of 1 µM. This study identified rimonabant and AM251 as positive allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors. Thus, potential GABAergic effects of commonly used concentrations of these compounds should be considered in in vitro experiments, especially at extrasynaptic sites where GABA concentrations are low. This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology

  3. Effects of the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant) and d-amphetamine on palatable food and food pellet intake in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Foltin, Richard W.; Haney, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist would selectively decrease consumption of highly palatable food in non-human primates. The CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant; 0.12 - 1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) and the stimulant anorectic drug d-amphetamine (0.12 - 1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) were administered to non-food deprived baboons for the purpose of measuring the effect of each drug on consumption of the normal diet, and a large single meal of a high-carbohydrate candy. Four male and four female baboons had access to food 24 hr each day, but they had to complete a two phase operant procedure in order to eat. Responding on one lever during a 30-min appetitive phase was required before animals could start a consumption phase, where responding on another lever led to food delivery, i.e., a meal. Three days a week baboons received a jelly sugar-coated candy (Skittles®) during the first meal and then pellets were available in subsequent meals. All baboons ate as many individual candies in one meal as they did pellets throughout the entire day. Acute d-amphetamine and, to a lesser extent, SR141716 decreased both candy intake in a single meal and pellet intake in a single meal and over 24 hr. d-Amphetamine, but not SR141716 increased latency to the candy meal and the first pellet meal indicating that the two drugs differentially altered feeding topography. Although males ate more food pellets than females, few other sex differences were observed. Thus, although effective in decreasing food intake, there was no evidence of a specific effect of CB1 receptor antagonism on consumption of a large meal or a palatable food. PMID:17445873

  4. Effects of the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant) and d-amphetamine on palatable food and food pellet intake in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Foltin, Richard W; Haney, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist would selectively decrease consumption of highly palatable food in non-human primates. The CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant; 0.12-1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) and the stimulant anorectic drug d-amphetamine (0.12-1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) were administered to non-food deprived baboons for the purpose of measuring the effect of each drug on consumption of the normal diet, and a large single meal of a high-carbohydrate candy. Four male and four female baboons had access to food 24 h each day, but they had to complete a two phase operant procedure in order to eat. Responding on one lever during a 30-min appetitive phase was required before animals could start a consumption phase, where responding on another lever led to food delivery, i.e., a meal. Three days a week baboons received a jelly sugar-coated candy (Skittles) during the first meal and then pellets were available in subsequent meals. All baboons ate as many individual candies in one meal as they did pellets throughout the entire day. Acute d-amphetamine and, to a lesser extent, SR141716 decreased both candy intake in a single meal and pellet intake in a single meal and over 24 h. d-Amphetamine, but not SR141716, increased latency to the candy meal and the first pellet meal indicating that the two drugs differentially altered feeding topography. Although males ate more food pellets than females, few other sex differences were observed. Thus, although effective in decreasing food intake, there was no evidence of a specific effect of CB(1) receptor antagonism on consumption of a large meal or a palatable food.

  5. The CB1 antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) blocks cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking and other context and extinction phenomena predictive of relapse.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sara Jane; Rosenberg, Marisa; Dykstra, Linda A; Walker, Ellen A

    2009-12-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists decrease self-administration of palatable food and several abused drugs in animals and modulate extinction of conditioned fear responses. Less is known, however, about whether and how CB1 antagonists might modulate the extinction of appetitive behavior. Therefore, this study examined the effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) during extinction of responding maintained either by cocaine or by palatable foods (corn oil or Ensure), as well as responding elicited by stimulus cues that had been paired with the presentation of cocaine (i.e., cue-induced reinstatement) or a prime (presentation of cocaine or food). The effect of rimonabant on high rate responding in water-deprived mice trained to self-administer water was also examined. In mice self-administering cocaine, rimonabant attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine self-administration, the initial burst of responding during cocaine extinction and responding during spontaneous recovery. In mice self-administering corn oil, rimonabant decreased responding during extinction and also attenuated responding that had been reinstated by a priming presentation of corn oil. Moreover, mice treated with rimonabant required fewer daily sessions to reach criterion for extinction of cocaine-maintained responding than vehicle treated mice. Also, rimonabant had no effect on the rate of operant responding in mice trained to respond for water under an FR5 schedule of reinforcement. Taken together, these data suggest that in addition to attenuating the primary reinforcing effects of both palatable foods and drugs of abuse, CB1 receptor antagonism can attenuate context and cue reactivity during extinction learning and potentially enhance extinction learning in this way.

  6. Analogs of SR-141716A (Rimonabant) alter d-amphetamine-evoked [3H] dopamine overflow from preloaded striatal slices and amphetamine-induced hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Rodvelt, Kelli R; Constales, Consuela; Putnam, William C

    2007-06-13

    The CB(1) cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR-141716A (Rimonabant) markedly diminishes the behavioral effects of opiates and nicotine and has been an important tool to ascertain the role of cannabinoid receptors in drug addiction. The present goal was to determine the less-explored interaction of SR-141716A and d-amphetamine in neurochemical and behavioral assays. Additionally, the effect of the substituents and substitution patterns on the phenyl ring located at the 5 position of SR-141716A (4-chlorophenyl), and of the CB(1)/CB(2) cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55,212-2, was determined. SR-141716A, AM-251 (4-iodophenyl) and NIDA-41020 (4-methoxyphenyl) did not alter amphetamine-evoked [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine. MRI-8273-30-1 (4-fluorophenyl; 0.1-10 microM) attenuated amphetamine (3 microM)-evoked [(3)H]overflow, and MRI-8273-59 (3,4-dichlorphenyl; 0.01-10 microM) augmented amphetamine (0.3-3 microM)-evoked [(3)H]overflow. WIN-55,212-2 was without effect. In a locomotor activity experiment, SR-141716A and MRI-8273-30-1 did not alter amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. However, MRI-8273-59 (1-3 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated amphetamine (1 mg/kg)-induced hyperactivity. The present results suggest that SR-141716A is less efficacious to alter amphetamine effects than its reported efficacy to diminish the effects of opiates and nicotine. Modification of the 5-phenyl position of SR-141716A affords compounds that do interact with amphetamine in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Early tolerance to the hypophagic effect of the cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716 does not impede blockade of an orexigenic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Antonello E; Giordani, Claudio; Bonomo, Sara M; Cella, Silvano G; Müller, Eugenio E

    2006-08-07

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (Rimonabant) is known to reduce food intake by central and peripheral mechanisms. Recently, SR141716 has been reported to block the orexigenic effect of ghrelin, a potent orexigenic peptide produced by the stomach. This study investigated whether in rats, made tolerant to the hypophagic effect of SR141716, the drug was still capable to block the orexigenic activity of another non-natural (hypothalamic) peptide, i.e., the growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP) hexarelin, a ghrelin mimetic. In the acute experiments, each dose of SR141716 (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg i.p.) reduced food intake with respect to vehicle-treated rats, whereas hexarelin (160 microg/kg s.c.) markedly stimulated feeding. All doses of SR141716 were capable to reduce the orexigenic effect of the GHRP. A 15-day administration of SR141716 (10 mg/kg i.p.) reduced both food intake and body weight. Tolerance to the hypophagic effect of SR141716 developed within 5 days, but in contrast, body weight remained markedly below that of vehicle-treated group throughout the entire treatment period. Interestingly, despite development of tolerance to its hypophagic effect, SR141716 was capable to suppress the orexigenic effect of repeated hexarelin challenge tests performed throughout the chronic experiments. In conclusion, the results of the present study confirm and broaden the existence of a functional relationship between ghrelin and endocannabinoids in the control of food intake, and bespeak the ability of a CB1 receptor antagonist to suppress orexia caused by stimuli alien to direct stimulation of the cannabinoid system.

  8. Quantification of rimonabant (SR 141716A) in monkey plasma using HPLC with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Javors, Martin A; Sanchez, Jesus J; McMahon, Lance R

    2010-07-01

    Using an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system and UV detection, a simple and precise analytical procedure was developed to quantify levels of the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant in the plasma of rhesus monkeys. Rimonabant was extracted from plasma samples into 5% isopropanol in hexane. After separation, the isopropanol-hexane fractions were dried to residue, redissolved in mobile phase, and then injected into the HPLC. The HPLC system included an acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (62:38, v/v) mobile phase (pH 6.7), flow rate of 1.5 mL/min, C(18) column (4.6 mm i.d. x 150 mm length, 5 microm), and UV detection at 280 nm. Retention times for rimonabant and doxepin (internal standard) were 9.9 and 2.4 min, respectively. The regression of the spiked calibrator curve was linear from 60 to 4000 ng/mL (r(2) = 0.996). The lower limit of quantification was 60 ng/mL, and recovery was 83.6%. Rimonabant was stable in stock solutions and monkey plasma across a range of temperatures and concentrations. To demonstrate utility, plasma rimonabant was measured in six rhesus monkeys at 60 and 240 min after intramuscular administration of 1 mg/kg rimonabant. Rimonabant levels ranged from 175 to 1290 ng/mL. The analytical assay described here provides a simple and accurate procedure for multiple within-subject measurements of the CB(1) antagonist rimonabant.

  9. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A affects A9 dopamine neuronal activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gueudet, C; Santucci, V; Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Soubrié, P; Le Fur, G

    1995-07-10

    CB1 receptors and their putative natural ligand anandamide, have been tentatively involved in the control of midbrain extrapyramidal function. Electrophysiological activity of dopamine neurones was measured after acute and repeated administration of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A (0.3-3 mg kg-1) in rats. Acute SR 141716A increased A9, but not A10 cell population response without affecting either their spontaneous firing rate or apomorphine-induced rate inhibition and prevented amphetamine-induced inhibition of A9, but not of A10 cell firing. After repeated administration SR 141716A (1 or 5 mg kg-1) decreased population response of A9 cells, which was reversed by apomorphine. These results suggest that CB1 receptor blockade by SR 141716A interrupts a cannabinoid-like endogenous tone controlling extrapyramidal function.

  10. Suppression of conditioned nicotine and sucrose seeking by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist SR141716A.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Taco J; de Vries, Wendy; Janssen, Mieke C W; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M

    2005-06-03

    The present study shows that the selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated responding for both nicotine- and sucrose-associated stimuli in a long-term extinction-reinstatement model. The results suggest that endocannabinoids play a general role in modulating cue reactivity or conditioned reinforcement following prolonged abstinence of both drug and natural reinforcers. In line with previous preclinical and recent clinical observations, our results provide a strong rationale for the use of CB1 antagonists in the treatment of addictive behaviors.

  11. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 blocks the orexigenic effects of intrahypothalamic ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Sonia A; Rogers, Elizabeth K; Korbonits, Márta; Kirkham, Tim C

    2004-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus plays a key role in the control of appetite and energy balance. Both ghrelin and cannabinoid receptor agonists increase food intake when administered into this nucleus: this study investigated possible interactions between the two systems in relation to eating. The orexigenic effect of ghrelin (100 pmol) when infused in to the PVN was reversed by a small, systemic dose of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716 (1 mg kg−1). This is the first demonstration of a functional relationship between brain ghrelin and endocannabinoid systems, and, although it needs to be further investigated, the effect of ghrelin on food intake when injected into the PVN seems to be mediated by stimulation of cannabinoid release. PMID:15381634

  12. The CB₁ receptor antagonist SR141716A reverses adult male mice overweight and metabolic alterations induced by early stress.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carina A; Castillo, Valeska A; Aguirre, Carolina A; Ronco, Ana M; Llanos, Miguel N

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal stress may cause metabolic and hormonal disruptions during adulthood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of early postnatal nociceptive stimulation (NS) on body weight and other metabolic parameters during adulthood and to determine whether CB₁ endocannabinoid receptors (CB₁Rs) may be involved in these effects. Male mice were subjected to NS during lactation with a daily subcutaneous injection of saline solution. Subsequently, both control and NS-mice were treated from day 40 to 130, with an oral dose (1 µg/g body weight) of SR141716A, a specific CB₁R antagonist/inverse agonist. Mice body weight and food intake was periodically evaluated. Adult animals were then killed to evaluate epididymal fat pads and metabolic parameters. NS did not influence food intake in adult animals, but caused significant increases in body weight, epididymal fat pads, and circulating levels of leptin, corticosterone, and triglycerides (TGs). Chronic treatment with SR141716A normalized these parameters, with the exception of corticosterone levels. This treatment also reduced plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and total cholesterol in both adult control and NS-mice. In addition, fatty acid (FA) amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity (the enzyme able to hydrolyze endocannabinoids) from liver and epididymal fat of adult NS-mice was decreased by 40-50% in comparison to activities found in same tissues of control mice. Results suggest that overactive liver and epididymal fat CB₁R due to early NS may be involved in late metabolic alterations, which are sensitive to chronic treatment with SR141716A.

  13. A beneficial aspect of a CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist: SR141716A is a potent inhibitor of macrophage infection by the intracellular pathogen Brucella suis.

    PubMed

    Gross, A; Terraza, A; Marchant, J; Bouaboula, M; Ouahrani-Bettache, S; Liautard, J P; Casellas, P; Dornand, J

    2000-03-01

    The psychoactive component of marijuana, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) suppresses different functions of immunocytes, including the antimicrobicidal activity of macrophages. The triggering of cannabinoid receptors of CB1 and CB2 subtypes present on leukocytes may account for these effects. We investigated the influence of specific CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716A and SR144528, respectively) and nonselective CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonists (CP55,940 or WIN 55212-2) on macrophage infection by Brucella suis, an intracellular gram-negative bacteria. None of the compounds tested affected bacterial phagocytosis. By contrast, the intracellular multiplication of Brucella was dose-dependently inhibited in cells treated with 10-500 nM SR141716A and 1 microM SR141716A-induced cells exerted a potent microbicidal effect against the bacteria. SR144528, CP55,940, or WIN 55212-2 did not affect (or slightly potentiated) the growth of phagocytized bacteria. However, CP55,940 or WIN 55212-2 reversed the SR141716A-mediated effect, which strongly suggested an involvement of macrophage CB1 receptors in the phenomenon. SR141716A was able to pre-activate macrophages and to trigger an activation signal that inhibited Brucella development. The participation of endogenous cannabinoid ligand(s) in Brucella infection was discussed. Finally, our data show that SR141716A up-regulates the antimicrobial properties of macrophages in vitro and might be a pharmaceutical compound useful for counteracting the development of intramacrophagic gram-negative bacteria.

  14. Effect of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR-141716A on ethanol self-administration and ethanol-seeking behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Economidou, Daina; Mattioli, Laura; Cifani, Carlo; Perfumi, Marina; Massi, Maurizio; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Trabace, Luigia; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that endocannabinoid mechanisms are involved in the control of ethanol consumption. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the role of the endocannabinoid system in the control of operant ethanol self-administration and in the reinstatement of ethanol seeking, when induced by stress or conditioned stimuli and (2) to offer new insights on the specificity of such a role. Rats were administered intraperitoneally with the selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, SR-141716A, 30 min before operant self-administration or reinstatement sessions. Two schedules of reinforcement, the fixed-ratio 1 (FR1) and the progressive ratio (PR), were used to study 10% (w/v) alcohol and 5.0% sucrose self-administration. NaCl (2% w/v) intake in sodium-depleted rats was studied only under the FR1 program. Treatment with SR-141716A (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) significantly attenuated FR1 alcohol self-administration and lowered the break point for ethanol under PR. SR-141716A also markedly inhibited the reinstatement of alcohol seeking elicited by presentation of cues predictive of drug availability. Conversely, the cannabinoid antagonist did not prevent the reinstatement of alcohol seeking induced by foot-shock stress. Lever pressing for sucrose under FR1 and PR schedules was also significantly decreased by SR-141716A treatment, whereas the drug modestly and only at the highest dose decreased 2% NaCl self-administration. Results emphasize that endocannabinoid mechanisms play a major role in the control of ethanol self-administration and in the reinstatement of conditioned ethanol seeking. However, these effects extend to the control of operant behaviours motivated by natural rewards (i.e. sucrose). On the other hand, SR-141716A only weakly reduces NaCl self-administration in sodium-depleted rats, in which salt intake is largely controlled by homeostatic mechanisms. Overall, these observations demonstrate that the inhibition of operant behaviour following blockade

  15. Effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55,940 and the cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716 on intracranial self-stimulation in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J C; Hunt, G E; McGregor, I S

    2001-11-21

    Lewis rats were trained to self-stimulate the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) using a rate-frequency paradigm. They were then tested for the effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55,940, the selective cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716 and the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. CP 55,940 (0, 10, 25 and 50 microg/kg i.p.) had no effect on MFB self-stimulation behaviour as assessed by the M50, the stimulation frequency at which half-maximal response rates were obtained. With SR 141716, only a very high dose (20 mg/kg i.p.) caused a significant inhibition of the rewarding efficacy of the stimulation. This was seen as an increase in the M50. All other doses of SR 141716 (0, 1, 3, 10 mg/kg i.p.) were ineffective in modulating the M50. By comparison, a relatively low dose (0.06 mg/kg i.p.) of SCH 23390 caused a large increase in M50. These results indicate a relatively modest influence, if any at all, of exogenous or endogenous cannabinoids on reward-relevant neurotransmission.

  16. FAAH inhibitor, URB-597, promotes extinction and CB(1) antagonist, SR141716, inhibits extinction of conditioned aversion produced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal, but not extinction of conditioned preference produced by morphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Manwell, Laurie A; Satvat, Elham; Lang, Stefan T; Allen, Craig P; Leri, Francesco; Parker, Linda A

    2009-11-01

    Converging evidence suggests that the endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system is involved in extinction of learned behaviours. Using operant and classical conditioning procedures, the potential of the fatty acid amide (FAAH) inhibitor, URB-597, and the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist, SR141716, to promote and inhibit (respectively) extinction of learned responses previously motivated by either rewarding or aversive stimuli was investigated. In the operant conditioning procedure (Expt. 1), rats previously trained to lever press for sucrose reward were administered URB-597 (0.3 mg/kg) or the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716 (2.5 mg/kg) prior to each of three extinction trials. In the conditioned floor preference procedure (Expts 2a-d), rats trained to associate morphine with one of two distinctive floors were administered one of several doses of the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist, AM-251 (Expt 2a) or URB-597 (Expt 2b and 2d) prior to each extinction/test trial wherein a choice of both floors was presented and prior to forced exposure to each floor (Expt 2c). In the conditioned floor aversion procedure (Expt. 3), rats trained to associate a naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal with a floor cue were administered URB-597 or SR141716 prior to each of 24 extinction/testing trials. URB-597 did not promote and SR141716 did not reduce extinction rates for sucrose reward-induced operant responding (Expt. 1) or morphine-induced conditioned floor preference (Expts. 2a-d). In contrast, URB-597 facilitated, whereas SR141716 impaired, extinction of the conditioned floor aversion (Expt. 3). These data support previous reports that the eCB system selectively facilitates extinction of aversive memories. URB-597 may prove useful in targeting extinction of aversively motivated behaviours.

  17. Effects of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant in models of emotional reactivity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Griebel, Guy; Stemmelin, Jeanne; Scatton, Bernard

    2005-02-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the modulation of emotional processes. These experiments aimed to investigate the effects of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) in animal models measuring aspects of emotional reactivity and depression. Rimonabant had weak anxiolytic-like activity in the elevated plus-maze and failed to affect flight and risk assessment activities in the mouse defense test battery (MDTB). It produced clear anxiolytic-like effects in the Vogel conflict test (.3-3 mg/kg intraperitoneal [i.p.]) and on defensive aggression in the MDTB (1 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of rimonabant in the MDTB paralleled those observed with CB1 receptor knockout mice in this procedure. In the forced-swimming test in rats and the tonic immobility paradigm in gerbils, rimonabant (3 and 10 mg/kg per os [p.o.]) produced antidepressant-like effects that were comparable to those observed with the reference antidepressant, fluoxetine. In the chronic mild stress model in mice, repeated administration of rimonabant (10 mg/kg, p.o.) for 5 weeks improved the deleterious effects produced by stress. These findings point further to a role for the endocannabinoid system in the modulation of emotional processes and suggest that it may be primarily involved in the adaptive responses to unavoidable stressful stimuli.

  18. The cannabinoid CB1 antagonist N-piperidinyl-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl) -4-methylpyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR-141716A) differentially alters the reinforcing effects of heroin under continuous reinforcement, fixed ratio, and progressive ratio schedules of drug self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Solinas, M; Panlilio, L V; Antoniou, K; Pappas, L A; Goldberg, S R

    2003-07-01

    Activation or blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors markedly alters many effects of opioids. In the present study, we investigated whether the cannabinoid antagonist (N-piperidinyl-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methylpyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR-141716A) could alter the reinforcing effects of heroin in rats. A Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) drug-discrimination procedure was first used to determine effective CB1 antagonist doses of SR-141716A and optimal pretreatment times for self-administration studies. Subsequently, Sprague-Dawley rats learned to self-administer heroin under three different schedules of intravenous drug injection: a continuous reinforcement schedule [fixed ratio (FR)1], a five-response, fixed ratio schedule (FR5), and a progressive ratio schedule. Then, SR-141716A (1 mg/kg i.p.) was administered 60 min before the start of the session for three consecutive daily sessions. SR-141716A markedly decreased heroin self-administration under the progressive ratio schedule at heroin doses ranging from 12.5 to 100 micro g/kg/injection. In contrast, SR-141716A had no effect on heroin self-administration under the FR1 schedule at heroin doses of 50 or 100 micro g/kg/injection, but produced small decreases in self-administration at lower doses (25 and 12.5 micro g/kg/injection). Consistent with a behavioral economics evaluation, SR-141716A produced a small but significant decrease in self-administration of the higher 50 micro g/kg/injection dose of heroin when the fixed ratio requirement was raised to five (FR5). Thus, blockade of CB1 receptors differentially decreased the reinforcing efficacy of heroin depending on the number of responses required for each injection (price). These findings indicate a facilitatory modulation of opioid reward by endogenous cannabinoid activity and provide support for the use of cannabinoid CB1 antagonists as medications for heroin addiction.

  19. The disruptive effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant on extinction learning in mice are task-specific.

    PubMed

    Niyuhire, Floride; Varvel, Stephen A; Thorpe, Andrew J; Stokes, Rene J; Wiley, Jenny L; Lichtman, Aron H

    2007-04-01

    Disruption of CB(1) receptor signaling through the use of CB(1) (-/-) mice or the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) has been demonstrated to impair extinction of learned responses in conditioned fear and Morris water maze tasks. In contrast, CB(1) (-/-) mice exhibited normal extinction rates in an appetitively motivated operant conditioning task. The purpose of this study was to test whether rimonabant would differentially disrupt extinction learning between fear-motivated and food-motivated tasks. Separate groups of C57BL/6J mice were trained in two aversively motivated tasks, conditioned freezing and passive avoidance, and an appetitively motivated operant conditioning task at a fixed ratio (FR-5) schedule of food reinforcement. After acquisition, the respective reinforcers in each task were withheld, and an intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or rimonabant was given 30 min before each extinction session. Rimonabant (3 mg/kg) treatment significantly disrupted extinction in both the conditioned freezing and passive avoidance tasks but failed to affect extinction rates in the operant conditioning task, whether using daily or weekly extinction sessions. Interestingly, rimonabant (3 mg/kg) prevented the significant increases in lever pressing (i.e., extinction burst) that occurred during the first extinction session of the operant conditioning task. These results support the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor plays a vital role in the extinction of aversive memories but is not essential for extinction of learned responses in appetitively motivated tasks.

  20. The inverse agonist effect of rimonabant on G protein activation is not mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor: evidence from postmortem human brain.

    PubMed

    Erdozain, A M; Diez-Alarcia, R; Meana, J J; Callado, L F

    2012-01-15

    Rimonabant (SR141716) was the first potent and selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist synthesized. Several data support that rimonabant behaves as an inverse agonist. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that this inverse agonism may be CB1 receptor-independent. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the effect of rimonabant over G protein activation in postmortem human brain is CB1 dependent or independent. [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays and antibody-capture [(35)S]GTPγS scintillation proximity assays (SPA) were performed in human and mice brain. [(3)H]SR141716 binding characteristics were also studied. Rimonabant concentration-dependently decreased basal [(35)S]GTPγS binding to human cortical membranes. This effect did not change in the presence of either the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2, the CB1 receptor neutral antagonist O-2050, or the CB1 allosteric modulator Org 27569. [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays performed in CB1 knockout mice brains revealed that rimonabant inhibited the [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the same manner as it did in wild-type mice. The SPA combined with the use of specific antibody-capture of G(α) specific subunits showed that rimonabant produces its inverse agonist effect through G(i3), G(o) and G(z) subtypes. This effect was not inhibited by the CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050. Finally, [(3)H]SR141716 binding assays in human cortical membranes demonstrated that rimonabant recognizes an additional binding site other than the CB1 receptor orthosteric binding site recognized by O-2050. This study provides new data demonstrating that at least the inverse agonist effect observed with >1μM concentrations of rimonabant in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays is not mediated by the CB1 receptor in human brain.

  1. Revealing the role of the endocannabinoid system modulators, SR141716A, URB597 and VDM-11, in sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Machado, Sergio; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Budde, Henning; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2016-12-17

    The endocannabinoid system comprises receptors (CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors), enzymes (Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase [FAAH], which synthesizes the endocannabinoid anandamide), as well as the anandamide membrane transporter (AMT). Importantly, previous experiments have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system modulates multiple neurobiological functions, including sleep. For instance, SR141716A (the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist) as well as URB597 (the FAAH inhibitor) increase waking in rats whereas VDM-11 (the blocker of the AMT) enhances sleep in rodents. However, no further evidence is available regarding the neurobiological role of the endocannabinoid system in the homeostatic control of sleep. Therefore, the aim of the current experiment was to test if SR141716A, URB597 or VDM-11 would modulate the sleep rebound after sleep deprivation. Thus, these compounds were systemically injected (5, 10, 20mg/kg; ip; separately each one) into rats after prolonged waking. We found that SR141716A and URB597 blocked in dose-dependent fashion the sleep rebound whereas animals treated with VDM-11 displayed sleep rebound during the recovery period. Complementary, injection after sleep deprivation of either SR141716A or URB597 enhanced dose-dependently the extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), serotonin (5-HT), as well as adenosine (AD) while VDM-11 caused a decline in contents of these molecules. These findings suggest that SR141716A or URB597 behave as a potent stimulants since they suppressed the sleep recovery period after prolonged waking. It can be concluded that elements of the endocannabinoid system, such as the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, FAAH and AMT, modulate the sleep homeostasis after prolonged waking.

  2. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells.

    PubMed

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-06-20

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction.

  3. SR141716A reduces the reinforcing properties of heroin but not heroin-induced increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Caillé, Stéphanie; Parsons, Loren H

    2003-12-01

    The present experiments tested the hypothesis that the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A alters heroin self-administration by attenuating heroin-induced increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine levels. SR141716A pretreatment dose-dependently (0.3-3 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced operant heroin self-administration by male Wistar rats under a fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement, and significantly lowered the breaking point of responding for heroin under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. These observations are consistent with recent reports that CB1 receptor inactivation reduces the rewarding properties of opiates. Operant responding for water reinforcement by water-restricted rats was unaltered by these SR141716A doses. Microdialysis tests revealed that heroin self-administration significantly increases interstitial dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell of vehicle-pretreated control rats. However, whereas SR141716A pretreatment dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration, it did not alter the heroin-associated increase in nucleus accumbens dopamine. These findings suggest that the CB1 antagonist-induced attenuation of heroin reward does not involve dopaminergic mechanisms in the nucleus accumbens shell.

  4. 3-Substituted pyrazole analogs of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB₁) receptor antagonist rimonabant: cannabinoid agonist-like effects in mice via non-CB₁, non-CB₂ mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Selley, Dana E; Wang, Pinglang; Kottani, Rudresha; Gadthula, Srinivas; Mahadeven, Anu

    2012-02-01

    The prototypic cannabinoid type 1 (CB₁) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, is comprised of a pyrazole core surrounded by a carboxyamide with terminal piperidine group (3-substituent), a 2,4-dichlorophenyl group (1-substituent), a 4-chlorophenyl group (5-substituent), and a methyl group (4-substituent). Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis has suggested that the 3-position may be involved in receptor recognition and agonist activity. The goal of the present study was to develop CB₁-selective compounds and explore further the SAR of 3-substitution on the rimonabant template. 3-Substituted analogs with benzyl and alkyl amino, dihydrooxazole, and oxazole moieties were synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Several notable patterns emerged. First, most of the analogs exhibited CB₁ selectivity, with many lacking affinity for the CB₂ receptor. Affinity tended to be better when [³H]5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichloro-phenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716), rather than [³H](-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4(1,1-dimethyl-heptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxy-propyl)cyclohexanol (CP55,940), was used as the binding radioligand. Second, many of the analogs produced an agonist-like profile of effects in mice (i.e., suppression of activity, antinociception, hypothermia, and immobility); however, their potencies were not well correlated with their CB₁ binding affinities. Further assessment of selected analogs showed that none were effective antagonists of the effects of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol in mice, their agonist-like effects were not blocked by rimonabant, they were active in vivo in CB₁⁻/⁻ mice, and they failed to stimulate guanosine-5'-O-(3-[³⁵S]thio)-triphosphate binding. Several analogs were inverse agonists in the latter assay. Together, these results suggest that this series of 3-substituted pyrazole analogs represent a novel class of CB₁-selective cannabinoids that produce agonist

  5. (-)-Adamantyl-delta8-tetrahydrocannabinol (AM-411), a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist: effects on open-field behaviors and antagonism by SR-141716 in rats.

    PubMed

    Järbe, T U C; DiPatrizio, N V; Lu, D; Makriyannis, A

    2004-11-01

    (-)-Adamantyl-Delta8-tetrahydrocannabinol (AM-411) is a 'classical' tricyclic cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist in which the C-3 alkyl side-chain has been replaced with an adamantyl group. The compound is cannabinoid CB1 receptor subtype selective (CB1 Ki=6.86 nmol/l, CB2 Ki=52.0 nmol/l). We examined the effects of AM-411 alone and in combination with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, SR-141716, on open-field behaviors of rats. The lowest effective dose of AM-411, 3 mg/kg, suppressed ambulation (horizontal activity) and rearing (vertical activity) and increased circling frequency compared to vehicle control levels. Co-administration of SR-141716 normalized these changes. SR-141716 (3 and 5.6 mg/kg) also produced significant increases in scratching and grooming (both frequency and duration), effects that were not eliminated in the presence of AM-411. Coupled with previous drug discrimination data, the open-field profile of AM-411 suggests that this high-affinity CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist induces behavioral effects similar to the natural cannabinoid Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and different from (R)-methanandamide, a chiral analog of the endogenous ligand anandamide.

  6. Antidepressant-induced undesirable weight gain: prevention with rimonabant without interference with behavioral effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Gobshtis, Nikolai; Ben-Shabat, Shimon; Fride, Ester

    2007-01-12

    Antidepressant pharmacotherapy has dramatically improved the quality of life for many patients. However, prolonged use may induce weight gain, resulting in enhanced risk for treatment noncompliance. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonists decrease food intake and body weight, but may also affect mood. We investigated in female Sabra mice first, whether acute treatment with the cannabinoid receptor antagonist rimonabant (5-(4-Chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, SR141716, 5 mg/kg) interfered with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (15 mg/kg) or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in the Porsolt forced swimming test. Second, whether chronic treatment (3 months) with desipramine (5 mg/kg) enhanced weight gain and whether cotreatment with rimonabant (2 mg/kg), prevented the excessive weight gain, while retaining antidepressant effectiveness. Motor activity and anxiety-like behavior were also investigated. The acute studies indicated that rimonabant did not influence 'antidepressant' activity of desipramine or fluoxetine. In the chronic studies, desipramine enhanced weight gain, despite the observation that the injection procedure reduced weight gain. The enhanced weight gain continued at least 35 days after treatment ended. Rimonabant reduced weight gain to which no tolerance developed and which persisted at least 30 days beyond treatment. Mice cotreated with rimonabant and desipramine had body weights closer to controls or to those receiving rimonabant alone than to those treated with desipramine alone. The antidepressant effects of desipramine were maintained throughout treatment; this was not altered by the chronic rimonabant treatment at any time, although rimonabant together with desipramine transiently enhanced anxiety-like behavior. These observations suggest that combined treatment with antidepressants and cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist to prevent undesirable weight

  7. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant reverses the diet-induced obesity phenotype through the regulation of lipolysis and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Jbilo, Omar; Ravinet-Trillou, Christine; Arnone, Michèle; Buisson, Isabelle; Bribes, Estelle; Péleraux, Annick; Pénarier, Géraldine; Soubrié, Philippe; Le Fur, Gérard; Galiègue, Sylvaine; Casellas, Pierre

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the molecular events involved in the long-lasting reduction of adipose mass by the selective CB1 antagonist, SR141716. Its effects were assessed at the transcriptional level both in white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues in a diet-induced obesity model in mice. Our data clearly indicated that SR141716 reversed the phenotype of obese adipocytes at both macroscopic and genomic levels. First, oral treatment with SR141716 at 10 mg/kg/d for 40 days induced a robust reduction of obesity, as shown by the 50% decrease in adipose mass together with a major restoration of white adipocyte morphology similar to lean animals. Second, we found that the major alterations in gene expression levels induced by obesity in WAT and BAT were mostly reversed in SR141716-treated obese mice. Importantly, the transcriptional patterns of treated obese mice were similar to those obtained in the CB1 receptor knockout mice fed a high-fat regimen and which are resistant to obesity, supporting a CB1 receptor-mediated process. Functional analysis of these modulations indicated that the reduction of adipose mass by the molecule resulted from an enhanced lipolysis through the induction of enzymes of the beta-oxidation and TCA cycle, increased energy expenditure, mainly through futile cycling (calcium and substrate), and a tight regulation of glucose homeostasis. These changes accompanied a significant cellular remodeling and contributed to a reduction of the obesity-related inflammatory status. In addition to a transient reduction of food consumption, increases of both fatty acid oxidation and energy expenditure induced by the molecule summate leading to a sustained weight loss. Altogether, these data strongly indicate that the endocannabinoid system has a major role in the regulation of energy metabolism.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Zottola, Antonio Christian Pagano; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction. SIGNIFICANCE CB1 is implicated in the regulation of cellular processes linked to survival, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in several physio-pathological conditions. We shed light on previously unrecognized molecular mechanism of CB1-mediated modulation of human glioma progression and provide the first and original demonstration of CB1-STAT3 axis as a new target and predictor biomarkers of the benefit from specific therapies. Indeed CB1 antagonism capable of tumoral cell division' control while making the glioma immunovisible and engaging the immune system to fight it may represent a hopeful alternative to other established

  9. Recent advances in CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jos H M; Kruse, Chris G

    2004-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists are currently the subject of intensive research due to their highly promising therapeutic prospects. Novel chemical entities having CB1 antagonistic properties have recently been disclosed by several pharmaceutical companies and some academic research groups, some of which are close structural analogs of the leading compound rimonabant (SR-141716A; Sanofi-Synthélabo). A considerable number of these CB1 antagonists are bioisosteres that are derived from rimonabant by the replacement of the pyrazole moiety with an alternative heterocycle. As well as these achiral compounds, Solvay Pharmaceuticals have disclosed a novel class of chiral pyrazolines that are potent and CB1/CB2 subtype-selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists, in which the interactions with the CB1 receptor are highly stereoselective.

  10. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant disrupts nicotine reward-associated memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qin; Li, Fang-Qiong; Li, Yan-Qin; Xue, Yan-Xue; He, Ying-Ying; Liu, Jian-Feng; Lu, Lin; Wang, Ji-Shi

    2011-10-01

    Exposure to cues previously associated with drug intake leads to relapse by activating previously acquired memories. Based on previous findings, in which cannabinoid CB(1) receptors were found to be critically involved in specific aspects of learning and memory, we investigated the role of CB(1) receptors in nicotine reward memory using a rat conditioned place preference (CPP) model. In Experiment 1, rats were trained for CPP with alternating injections of nicotine (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) and saline to acquire the nicotine-conditioned memory. To examine the effects of rimonabant on the reconsolidation of nicotine reward memory, rats were administered rimonabant (0, 0.3, and 3.0mg/kg, i.p.) immediately after reexposure to the drug-paired context. In Experiment 2, rats were trained for CPP similarly to Experiment 1. To examine the effects of rimonabant on the reinstatement of nicotine reward memory, rimonabant (0, 0.3, and 3.0mg/kg, i.p.) was administered before the test of nicotine-induced CPP reinstatement. In Experiment 3, to evaluate whether rimonabant itself produces a reward memory, rats were trained for CPP with alternating injections of different doses of rimonabant (0, 0.3, and 3.0mg/kg) and saline. Rimonabant at a dose of 3.0mg/kg significantly disrupted the reconsolidation of nicotine memory and significantly blocked the reinstatement of nicotine-induced CPP. However, rimonabant itself did not produce CPP. These findings provide clear evidence that CB(1) receptors play a role in nicotine reward memory, suggesting that CB(1) receptor antagonists may be a potential target for managing nicotine addiction.

  11. 3-Substituted Pyrazole Analogs of the Cannabinoid Type 1 (CB1) Receptor Antagonist Rimonabant: Cannabinoid Agonist-Like Effects in Mice via Non-CB1, Non-CB2 Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Selley, Dana E.; Wang, Pinglang; Kottani, Rudresha; Gadthula, Srinivas; Mahadeven, Anu

    2012-01-01

    The prototypic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, is comprised of a pyrazole core surrounded by a carboxyamide with terminal piperidine group (3-substituent), a 2,4-dichlorophenyl group (1-substituent), a 4-chlorophenyl group (5-substituent), and a methyl group (4-substituent). Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis has suggested that the 3-position may be involved in receptor recognition and agonist activity. The goal of the present study was to develop CB1-selective compounds and explore further the SAR of 3-substitution on the rimonabant template. 3-Substituted analogs with benzyl and alkyl amino, dihydrooxazole, and oxazole moieties were synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Several notable patterns emerged. First, most of the analogs exhibited CB1 selectivity, with many lacking affinity for the CB2 receptor. Affinity tended to be better when [3H]5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichloro-phenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716), rather than [3H](−)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4(1,1-dimethyl-heptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxy-propyl)cyclohexanol (CP55,940), was used as the binding radioligand. Second, many of the analogs produced an agonist-like profile of effects in mice (i.e., suppression of activity, antinociception, hypothermia, and immobility); however, their potencies were not well correlated with their CB1 binding affinities. Further assessment of selected analogs showed that none were effective antagonists of the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mice, their agonist-like effects were not blocked by rimonabant, they were active in vivo in CB1(−/−) mice, and they failed to stimulate guanosine-5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate binding. Several analogs were inverse agonists in the latter assay. Together, these results suggest that this series of 3-substituted pyrazole analogs represent a novel class of CB1-selective cannabinoids that produce agonist-like effects in mice

  12. Single Application of a CB1 Receptor Antagonist Rapidly Following Head Injury Prevents Long-Term Hyperexcitability in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Echegoyen, Julio; Armstrong, Caren; Morgan, Robert J.; Soltesz, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Effective prophylaxis for post-traumatic epilepsy currently does not exist, and clinical trials using anticonvulsant drugs have yielded no long-term antiepileptogenic effects. We report that a single, rapid post-traumatic application of the proconvulsant cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (Rimonabant-- Acomplia®) abolishes the long-term increase in seizure susceptibility caused by head injury in rats. These results indicate that, paradoxically, a seizure-enhancing drug may disrupt the epileptogenic process if applied within a short therapeutic time window. PMID:19369036

  13. Cannabinoid Discrimination and Antagonism by CB1 Neutral and Inverse Agonist Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Delatte, Marcus S.; Vemuri, V. Kiran; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Nikas, Spyridon P.; Subramanian, Kumara V.; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Bergman, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) inverse agonists (e.g., rimonabant) have been reported to produce adverse effects including nausea, emesis, and anhedonia that limit their clinical applications. Recent laboratory studies suggest that the effects of CB1 neutral antagonists differ from those of such inverse agonists, raising the possibility of improved clinical utility. However, little is known regarding the antagonist properties of neutral antagonists. In the present studies, the CB1 inverse agonist SR141716A (rimonabant) and the CB1 neutral antagonist AM4113 were compared for their ability to modify CB1 receptor–mediated discriminative stimulus effects in nonhuman primates trained to discriminate the novel CB1 full agonist AM4054. Results indicate that AM4054 serves as an effective CB1 discriminative stimulus, with an onset and time course of action comparable with that of the CB1 agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and that the inverse agonist rimonabant and the neutral antagonist AM4113 produce dose-related rightward shifts in the AM4054 dose-effect curve, indicating that both drugs surmountably antagonize the discriminative stimulus effects of AM4054. Schild analyses further show that rimonabant and AM4113 produce highly similar antagonist effects, as evident in comparable pA2 values (6.9). Taken together with previous studies, the present data suggest that the improved safety profile suggested for CB1 neutral antagonists over inverse agonists is not accompanied by a loss of antagonist action at CB1 receptors. PMID:23287700

  14. Cannabinoid discrimination and antagonism by CB(1) neutral and inverse agonist antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Delatte, Marcus S; Vemuri, V Kiran; Thakur, Ganesh A; Nikas, Spyridon P; Subramanian, Kumara V; Shukla, Vidyanand G; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Bergman, Jack

    2013-03-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)) inverse agonists (e.g., rimonabant) have been reported to produce adverse effects including nausea, emesis, and anhedonia that limit their clinical applications. Recent laboratory studies suggest that the effects of CB(1) neutral antagonists differ from those of such inverse agonists, raising the possibility of improved clinical utility. However, little is known regarding the antagonist properties of neutral antagonists. In the present studies, the CB(1) inverse agonist SR141716A (rimonabant) and the CB(1) neutral antagonist AM4113 were compared for their ability to modify CB(1) receptor-mediated discriminative stimulus effects in nonhuman primates trained to discriminate the novel CB(1) full agonist AM4054. Results indicate that AM4054 serves as an effective CB(1) discriminative stimulus, with an onset and time course of action comparable with that of the CB(1) agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and that the inverse agonist rimonabant and the neutral antagonist AM4113 produce dose-related rightward shifts in the AM4054 dose-effect curve, indicating that both drugs surmountably antagonize the discriminative stimulus effects of AM4054. Schild analyses further show that rimonabant and AM4113 produce highly similar antagonist effects, as evident in comparable pA(2) values (6.9). Taken together with previous studies, the present data suggest that the improved safety profile suggested for CB(1) neutral antagonists over inverse agonists is not accompanied by a loss of antagonist action at CB(1) receptors.

  15. Rimonabant-mediated changes in intestinal lipid metabolism and improved renal vascular dysfunction in the JCR:LA-cp rat model of prediabetic metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Kelly, Sandra E; Diane, Abdoulaye; Wang, Ye; Mangat, Rabban; Novak, Susan; Vine, Donna F; Proctor, Spencer D

    2010-08-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716) is a specific antagonist of the cannabinoid-1 receptor. Activation of the receptor initiates multiple effects on central nervous system function, metabolism, and body weight. The hypothesis that rimonabant has protective effects against vascular disease associated with the metabolic syndrome was tested using JCR:LA-cp rats. JCR:LA-cp rats are obese if they are cp/cp, insulin resistant, and exhibit associated micro- and macrovascular disease with end-stage myocardial and renal disease. Treatment of obese rats with rimonabant (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), 12-24 wk of age) caused transient reduction in food intake for 2 wk, without reduction in body weight. However, by 4 wk, there was a modest, sustained reduction in weight gain. Glycemic control improved marginally compared with controls, but at the expense of increased insulin concentration. In contrast, rimonabant normalized fasting plasma triglyceride and reduced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and acute phase protein haptoglobin in cp/cp rats. Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by reduced postprandial intestinal lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48, cholesterol, and haptoglobin. While macrovascular dysfunction and ischemic myocardial lesion frequency were unaffected by rimonabant treatment, both microalbuminuria and glomerular sclerosis were substantially reduced. In summary, rimonabant has a modest effect on body weight in freely eating obese rats and markedly reduces plasma triglyceride levels and microvascular disease, in part due to changes in intestinal metabolism, including lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48 and haptoglobin. We conclude that rimonabant improves renal disease and intestinal lipid oversecretion associated with an animal model of the metabolic syndrome that appears to be independent of hyperinsulinemia or macrovascular dysfunction.

  16. AM-251 and rimonabant act as direct antagonists at mu-opioid receptors: implications for opioid/cannabinoid interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Zimmerman, Sarah M; Fantegrossi, William E; Prather, Paul L

    2012-10-01

    Mu-opioid and CB1-cannabinoid agonists produce analgesia; however, adverse effects limit use of drugs in both classes. Additive or synergistic effects resulting from concurrent administration of low doses of mu- and CB1-agonists may produce analgesia with fewer side effects. Synergism potentially results from interaction between mu-opioid receptors (MORs) and CB1 receptors (CB1Rs). AM-251 and rimonabant are CB1R antagonist/inverse agonists employed to validate opioid-cannabinoid interactions, presumed to act selectively at CB1Rs. Therefore, the potential for direct action of these antagonists at MORs is rarely considered. This study determined if AM-251 and/or rimonabant directly bind and modulate the function of MORs. Surprisingly, AM-251 and rimonabant, but not a third CB1R inverse agonist AM-281, bind with mid-nanomolar affinity to human MORs with a rank order of affinity (K(i)) of AM-251 (251 nM) > rimonabant (652 nM) > AM281 (2135 nM). AM-251 and rimonabant, but not AM-281, also competitively antagonize morphine induced G-protein activation in CHO-hMOR cell homogenates (K(b) = 719 or 1310 nM, respectively). AM-251 and rimonabant block morphine inhibition of cAMP production, while only AM-251 elicits cAMP rebound in CHO-hMOR cells chronically exposed to morphine. AM-251 and rimonabant (10 mg/kg) attenuate morphine analgesia, whereas the same dose of AM-281 produces little effect. Therefore, in addition to high CB1R affinity, AM-251 and rimonabant bind to MORs with mid-nanomolar affinity and at higher doses may affect morphine analgesia via direct antagonism at MORs. Such CB1-independent of these antagonists effects may contribute to reported inconsistencies when CB1/MOR interactions are examined via pharmacological methods in CB1-knockout versus wild-type mice.

  17. Reduced neural response to reward following 7 days treatment with the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist rimonabant in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Horder, Jamie; Harmer, Catherine J; Cowen, Philip J; McCabe, Ciara

    2010-09-01

    Reduced subjective experience of reward (anhedonia) is a key symptom of major depression. The anti-obesity drug and cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB(1)) antagonist, rimonabant, is associated with significant rates of depression and anxiety in clinical use and was recently withdrawn from the market because of these adverse effects. Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) model of reward we hypothesized that rimonabant would impair reward processing. Twenty-two healthy participants were randomly allocated to receive rimonabant (20 mg), or placebo, for 7 d in a double-blind, parallel group design. We used fMRI to measure the neural response to rewarding (sight and/or flavour of chocolate) and aversive (sight of mouldy strawberries and/or an unpleasant strawberry taste) stimuli on the final day of drug treatment. Rimonabant reduced the neural response to chocolate stimuli in key reward areas such as the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex. Rimonabant also decreased neural responses to the aversive stimulus condition in the caudate nucleus and ventral striatum, but increased lateral orbitofrontal activations to the aversive sight and taste of strawberry condition. Our findings are the first to show that the anti-obesity drug rimonabant inhibits the neural processing of rewarding food stimuli in humans. This plausibly underlies its ability to promote weight loss, but may also indicate a mechanism for inducing anhedonia which could lead to the increased risk of depressive symptomatology seen in clinical use. fMRI may be a useful method of screening novel agents for unwanted effects on reward and associated clinical adverse reactions.

  18. Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, protects against light-induced retinal degeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yuki; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Ogami, Shiho; Yamane, Shinsaku; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-03-16

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous constellation of proteins related to cannabinoid1 receptor signaling, including free fatty acids, diacylglycerol lipase, and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase, are localized in the murine retina. Moreover, the expression levels of endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors are changed in the vitreous fluid. However, the role of the endocannabinoid system in the retina, particularly in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration, remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated involvement of the cannabinoid1 receptor in light-induced retinal degeneration using in vitro and in vivo models. To evaluate the effect of cannabinoid1 receptors in light irradiation-induced cell death, the mouse retinal cone-cell line (661W) was treated with a cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Time-dependent changes of expression and localization of retinal cannabinoid1 receptors were measured using Western blot and immunostaining. Retinal damage was induced in mice by exposure to light, followed by intravitreal injection of rimonabant. Electroretinograms and histologic analyses were performed. Rimonabant suppressed light-induced photoreceptor cell death. Cannabinoid1 receptor expression was upregulated by light exposure. Treatment with rimonabant improved both a- and b-wave amplitudes and the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. These results suggest that the cannabinoid1 receptor is involved in light-induced retinal degeneration and it may represent a therapeutic target in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration related diseases.

  19. The CB(1) antagonist rimonabant is adjunctively therapeutic as well as monotherapeutic in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J E; Harris, O; Cassin, J

    2009-11-05

    Acute injections of 8mg/kg of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (l-DOPA) or 0.05mg/kg rimonabant equally improved contralateral forepaw stepping in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions, and their combination improved stepping more than either drug alone. However, 0.05mg/kg rimonabant did not alter the changes in stepping produced by acute injections of a dyskinesic dose of 35mg/kg l-DOPA. Thus, not only is a cannabinoid antagonist monotherapeutic in this animal model of Parkinson's disease, but it also enhances the therapeutic effect of a moderate, but not a high, dose of l-DOPA.

  20. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and evaluation of SR141716 analogues: development of central cannabinoid receptor ligands with lower lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Katoch-Rouse, Reeti; Pavlova, Olga A; Caulder, Tara; Hoffman, Alexander F; Mukhin, Alexey G; Horti, Andrew G

    2003-02-13

    Exploration of the central CB1 cannabinoid receptors using positron emission tomography (PET) will allow for an understanding of the pharmacological and physiological role played by these receptors in the CNS. Current tracers are highly lipophilic compounds that exhibit very high nonspecific to specific binding ratios and as a result are inapt for use in humans. We have synthesized a series of less lipophilic analogues of SR141716 to serve as potential radioligands. Binding affinities of the series and a functional electrophysiological assay of three of our compounds have been presented.

  1. Potential role of the endocannabinoid receptor antagonist rimonabant in the management of cardiometabolic risk: a narrative review of available data.

    PubMed

    Bronander, Kirk A; Bloch, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an endogenous physiological system composed of two cannabinoid receptors and several endogenous ligands. The ECS is intimately involved in appetite regulation and energy homeostasis, which makes it an intriguing target for pharmacological treatment of obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. Rimonabant is the first cannabinoid receptor (CB-1) antagonist being studied and utilized to treat obesity (it is approved in Europe but is currently under review in the United States). Large randomized trials with rimonabant have demonstrated efficacy in treatment of overweight and obese individuals with weight loss significantly greater than a reduced calorie diet alone. In addition, multiple other cardiometabolic parameters were improved in the treatment groups including increased levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, reduced triglycerides, reduced waist circumference, improved insulin sensitivity, decreased insulin levels, and in diabetic patients improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin percentage. There was an increase in the adverse effects of depression, anxiety, irritability, and nausea in rimonabant-treated groups. This novel medication may become an important therapeutic option in the fight to reduce cardiovascular disease worldwide through its unique action on cardiometabolic risk.

  2. Rimonabant: an antagonist drug of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Leite, Carlos E; Mocelin, Clei A; Petersen, Guilherme O; Leal, Mirna B; Thiesen, Flavia V

    2009-01-01

    Obesity, an ever-increasing problem in the industrialized world, has long been a target of research for a cure or, at least, control of its expansion. In the search for treatment, the recently discovered endocannabinoid system has emerged as a new target for controlling obesity and its associated conditions. The endocannabinoid system plays an important role in controlling weight and energy balance in humans. This system is activated to a greater extent in obese patients, and the specific blockage of its receptors is the aim of rimonabant, one of the most recent drugs created for the treatment of obesity. This drug acts as a blockade for endocannabinoid receptors found in the brain and peripheral organs that play an important role on carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Clinical studies have confirmed that, when used in combination with a low calorie diet, rimonabant promotes loss in body weight, loss in abdominal circumference, and improvements in dyslipidemia. Rimonabant is also being tested as a potential anti-smoking treatment since endocannabinoids are related to the pleasurable effect of nicotine. Thus, rimonabant constitutes a new therapeutic approach to obesity and cardiovascular risk factors. Studies show effectiveness in weight loss; however, side effects such as psychiatric alterations have been reported, including depression and anxiety. These side effects have led the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) to not approve this drug in the United States. For a more complete evaluation on the safety of this drug, additional studies are in progress.

  3. Pyrazole antagonists of the CB1 receptor with reduced brain penetration.

    PubMed

    Fulp, Alan; Zhang, Yanan; Bortoff, Katherine; Seltzman, Herbert; Snyder, Rodney; Wiethe, Robert; Amato, George; Maitra, Rangan

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonists might be useful for treating obesity, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemias. Unfortunately, inhibition of CB1 in the central nervous system (CNS) produces adverse effects, including depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation in some patients, which led to withdrawal of the pyrazole inverse agonist rimonabant (SR141716A) from European markets. Efforts are underway to produce peripherally selective CB1 antagonists to circumvent CNS-associated adverse effects. In this study, novel analogs of rimonabant (1) were explored in which the 1-aminopiperidine group was switched to a 4-aminopiperidine, attached at the 4-amino position (5). The piperidine nitrogen was functionalized with carbamates, amides, and sulfonamides, providing compounds that are potent inverse agonists of hCB1 with good selectivity for hCB1 over hCB2. Select compounds were further studied using in vitro models of brain penetration, oral absorption and metabolic stability. Several compounds were identified with predicted minimal brain penetration and good metabolic stability. In vivo pharmacokinetic testing revealed that inverse agonist 8c is orally bioavailable and has vastly reduced brain penetration compared to rimonabant.

  4. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied whether cannabinoid receptor (CB1) blockade with rimonabant has an anti-inflammatory effect in obese mice, and whether this effect depends on weight loss and/or diet consumption. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice were treated orally with rimonabant (HFD-R) or vehicle (HFD-V) for 4 we...

  5. Effects of the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist rimonabant on hepatic mitochondrial function in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Flamment, Mélissa; Gueguen, Naïg; Wetterwald, Céline; Simard, Gilles; Malthièry, Yves; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of rimonabant treatment on hepatic mitochondrial function in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet (35% lard) for 13 wk were treated with rimonabant (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) during the last 3 wk and matched with pair-fed controls. Oxygen consumption with various substrates, mitochondrial enzyme activities on isolated liver mitochondria, and mitochondrial DNA quantity were determined. Body weight and fat mass were decreased in rats treated with rimonabant compared with pair-fed controls. Moreover, the serum adiponectin level was increased with rimonabant. Hepatic triglyceride content was increased, while serum triglycerides were decreased. An increase of mitochondrial respiration was observed in rats treated with rimonabant. The increase of mitochondrial respiration with palmitoyl-CoA compared with respiration with palmitoyl-l-carnitine stating that the entry of fatty acids into mitochondria via carnitine palmitoyltransferase I was increased in rats treated with rimonabant. Moreover, rimonabant treatment led to a reduction in the enzymatic activity of ATP synthase, whereas the quantity of mitochondrial DNA and the activity of citrate synthase remained unchanged. To summarize, rimonabant treatment leads to an improvement of hepatic mitochondrial function by increasing substrate oxidation and fatty acid entry into mitochondria for the β-oxidation pathway and by increasing proton leak. However, this increase of mitochondrial oxidation is regulated by a decrease of ATP synthase activity in order to have only ATP required for the cell function.

  6. Endocannabinoid release from midbrain dopamine neurons: a potential substrate for cannabinoid receptor antagonist treatment of addiction.

    PubMed

    Lupica, Carl R; Riegel, Arthur C

    2005-06-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that all commonly abused drugs act upon the brain reward circuitry to ultimately increase extracellular concentrations of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and other forebrain areas. Many drugs of abuse appear to increase dopamine levels by dramatically increase the firing and bursting rates of dopamine neurons located in the ventral mesencephalon. Recent clinical evidence in humans and behavioral evidence in animals indicate that cannabinoid receptor antagonists such as SR141716A (Rimonabant) can reduce the self-administration of, and craving for, several commonly addictive drugs. However, the mechanism of this potentially beneficial effect has not yet been identified. We propose, on the basis of recent studies in our laboratory and others, that these antagonists may act by blocking the effects of endogenously released cannabinoid molecules (endocannabinoids) that are released in an activity- and calcium-dependent manner from mesencephalic dopamine neurons. It is hypothesized that, through the antagonism of cannabinoid CB1 receptors located on inhibitory and excitatory axon terminals targeting the midbrain dopamine neurons, the effects of the endocannabinoids are occluded. The data from these studies therefore suggest that the endocannabinoid system and the CB1 receptors located in the ventral mesencephalon may play an important role in regulating drug reward processes, and that this substrate is recruited whenever dopamine neuron activity is increased.

  7. Rimonabant: From RIO to Ban

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Amir H.; Salem, Victoria; Ghatei, Mohammad A.

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoid antagonism as a treatment for obesity and the metabolic syndrome became a hugely anticipated area of pharmacology at the start of the century. The CB1 receptor antagonist Rimonabant entered the European mass market on the back of several trials showing weight loss benefits alongside improvements in numerous other elements of the metabolic syndrome. However, the drug was quickly withdrawn due to the emergence of significant side effects—notably severe mood disorders. This paper provides a brief overview of the Rimonabant story and places the recent spate of FDA rejections of other centrally acting weight loss drugs entering Phase 3 trials in this context. PMID:21773005

  8. The CB1 Neutral Antagonist AM4113 Retains the Therapeutic Efficacy of the Inverse Agonist Rimonabant for Nicotine Dependence and Weight Loss with Better Psychiatric Tolerability.

    PubMed

    Gueye, Aliou B; Pryslawsky, Yaroslaw; Trigo, Jose M; Poulia, Nafsika; Delis, Foteini; Antoniou, Katerina; Loureiro, Michael; Laviolette, Steve R; Vemuri, Kiran; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-12-01

    Multiple studies suggest a pivotal role of the endocannabinoid system in regulating the reinforcing effects of various substances of abuse. Rimonabant, a CB1 inverse agonist found to be effective for smoking cessation, was associated with an increased risk of anxiety and depression. Here we evaluated the effects of the CB1 neutral antagonist AM4113 on the abuse-related effects of nicotine and its effects on anxiety and depressive-like behavior in rats. Rats were trained to self-administer nicotine under a fixed-ratio 5 or progressive-ratio schedules of reinforcement. A control group was trained to self-administer food. The acute/chronic effects of AM4113 pretreatment were evaluated on nicotine taking, motivation for nicotine, and cue-, nicotine priming- and yohimbine-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking. The effects of AM4113 in the basal firing and bursting activity of midbrain dopamine neurons were evaluated in a separate group of animals treated with nicotine. Anxiety/depression-like effects of AM4113 and rimonabant were evaluated 24h after chronic (21 days) pretreatment (0, 1, 3, and 10mg/kg, 1/d). AM4113 significantly attenuated nicotine taking, motivation for nicotine, as well as cue-, priming- and stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior. These effects were accompanied by a decrease of the firing and burst rates in the ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons in response to nicotine. On the other hand, AM4113 pretreatment did not have effects on operant responding for food. Importantly, AM4113 did not have effects on anxiety and showed antidepressant-like effects. Our results indicate that AM4113 could be a promising therapeutic option for the prevention of relapse to nicotine-seeking while lacking anxiety/depression-like side effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  9. The CB1 Neutral Antagonist AM4113 Retains the Therapeutic Efficacy of the Inverse Agonist Rimonabant for Nicotine Dependence and Weight Loss with Better Psychiatric Tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Gueye, Aliou B.; Pryslawsky, Yaroslaw; Trigo, Jose M.; Poulia, Nafsika; Delis, Foteini; Antoniou, Katerina; Loureiro, Michael; Laviolette, Steve R.; Vemuri, Kiran; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple studies suggest a pivotal role of the endocannabinoid system in regulating the reinforcing effects of various substances of abuse. Rimonabant, a CB1 inverse agonist found to be effective for smoking cessation, was associated with an increased risk of anxiety and depression. Here we evaluated the effects of the CB1 neutral antagonist AM4113 on the abuse-related effects of nicotine and its effects on anxiety and depressive-like behavior in rats. Methods: Rats were trained to self-administer nicotine under a fixed-ratio 5 or progressive-ratio schedules of reinforcement. A control group was trained to self-administer food. The acute/chronic effects of AM4113 pretreatment were evaluated on nicotine taking, motivation for nicotine, and cue-, nicotine priming- and yohimbine-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking. The effects of AM4113 in the basal firing and bursting activity of midbrain dopamine neurons were evaluated in a separate group of animals treated with nicotine. Anxiety/depression-like effects of AM4113 and rimonabant were evaluated 24h after chronic (21 days) pretreatment (0, 1, 3, and 10mg/kg, 1/d). Results: AM4113 significantly attenuated nicotine taking, motivation for nicotine, as well as cue-, priming- and stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior. These effects were accompanied by a decrease of the firing and burst rates in the ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons in response to nicotine. On the other hand, AM4113 pretreatment did not have effects on operant responding for food. Importantly, AM4113 did not have effects on anxiety and showed antidepressant-like effects. Conclusion: Our results indicate that AM4113 could be a promising therapeutic option for the prevention of relapse to nicotine-seeking while lacking anxiety/depression-like side effects. PMID:27493155

  10. ENP11, a potential CB1R antagonist, induces anorexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Amancio-Belmont, Octavio; Hernández-Vázquez, Eduardo; Ruiz-Contreras, Alejandra E; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Prospéro-García, Oscar

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, pharmacological manipulation of cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) has become an interesting approach for the management of food ingestion disorders, among other physiological functions. Searching for new substances with similar desirable effects, but fewer side-effects we have synthesized a SR141716A (a cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist also called Rimonabant) analog, 1-(2,4-Difluorophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidinyl)-5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, ENP11, that so far, as we have previously shown, has induced changes in glucose availability, i.e. hypoglycemia, in rats. In this study we tested the effects, if any, of ENP11 (0.5, 1.0, and 3.0mg/kg) in food ingestion, core temperature, pain perception and motor control in adult Wistar rats. Results showed that ENP11 reduced food ingestion during the first hour immediately after administration. Likewise, ENP11 (1.0mg/kg) blocked anandamide (AEA)-induced hyperphagia during the first 4h of the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, and it also blocked AEA-induced hypothermia. However, none of the ENP11 doses used affected pain perception or motor control. We believe that ENP11 is a potential useful CB1R antagonist that reduces food ingestion and regulates core temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of a shortened model of diet alternation in female rats: effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant on food intake and anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Blasio, Angelo; Rice, Kenner C; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of eating disorders and obesity in western societies is epidemic and increasing in severity. Preclinical research has focused on the development of animal models that can mimic the maladaptive patterns of food intake observed in certain forms of eating disorders and obesity. This study was aimed at characterizing a recently established model of palatable diet alternation in female rats. For this purpose, females rats were fed either continuously with a regular chow diet (Chow/Chow) or intermittently with a regular chow diet for 2 days and a palatable, high-sucrose diet for 1 day (Chow/Palatable). Following diet cycling, rats were administered rimonabant (0, 0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg intraperitoneally) during access to either palatable diet or chow diet and were assessed for food intake and body weight. Finally, rats were pretreated with rimonabant (0, 3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and tested in the elevated plus maze during withdrawal from the palatable diet. Female rats with alternating access to palatable food cycled their intake, overeating during access to the palatable diet and undereating upon returning to the regular chow diet. Rimonabant treatment resulted in increased chow hypophagia and anxiety-like behavior in Chow/Palatable rats. No effect of drug treatment was observed on the compulsive eating of palatable food in the diet-cycled rats. The results of this study suggest that withdrawal from alternating access to the palatable diet makes individuals vulnerable to the anxiogenic effects of rimonabant and provides etiological factors potentially responsible for the emergence of severe psychiatric side-effects following rimonabant treatment in obese patients.

  12. Characterization of a shortened model of diet alternation in female rats: effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant on food intake and anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blasio, Angelo; Rice, Kenner C; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of eating disorders and obesity in Western societies is epidemic and increasing in severity. Preclinical research focused on the development of animal models which can mimic the maladaptive patterns of food intake observed in certain forms of eating disorders and obesity. This study was aimed at characterizing a recently established model of palatable diet alternation in female rats. For this purpose, females rats were fed either continuously with a regular chow diet (Chow/Chow) or intermittently with a regular chow diet for 2 days and a palatable, high-sucrose diet for 1 day (Chow/Palatable). Following diet cycling, rats were administered rimonabant (0, 0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg i.p.) during access to either palatable diet or chow diet and were assessed for food intake and body weight. Finally, rats were pretreated with rimonabant (0 – 3 mg/kg, i.p.) and tested in the elevated plus maze during withdrawal from the palatable diet. Female rats with alternating access to palatable food cycled their intake, overeating during access to the palatable diet, and under-eating upon returning to the regular chow diet. Rimonabant treatment resulted in increased chow hypophagia and anxiety-like behavior in Chow/Palatable rats. No effect of drug treatment was observed on the compulsive eating of palatable food in the diet cycled rats. The results of this study suggest that withdrawal from alternating access to the palatable diet makes individuals vulnerable to the anxiogenic effects of rimonabant and provide etiological factors potentially responsible for the emergence of severe psychiatric side-effects following rimonabant treatment in obese patients. PMID:25011007

  13. Rimonabant, Gastrointestinal Motility and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Chen, Jiande

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obesity and overweight affect more than half of the US population and are associated with a number of diseases. Rimonabant, a cannabinoid receptor 1 blocker in the endocannabinoid (EC) system, was indicated in Europe for the treatment of obesity and overweight patients with associated risk factors but withdrawn on Jan, 2009 because of side effects. Many studies have reported the effects of rimonabant on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and food intake. The aims of this review are: to review the relationship of EC system with GI motility and food intake;to review the studies of rimonabant on GI motility, food intake and obesity;and to report the tolerance and side effects of rimonabant. Methods: the literature (Pubmed database) was searched using keywords: rimonabant, obesity and GI motility. Results: GI motility is related with appetite, food intake and nutrients absorption. The EC system inhibits GI motility, reduces emesis and increases food intake; Rimonabant accelerates gastric emptying and intestinal transition but decreases energy metabolism and food intake. There is rapid onset of tolerance to the prokinetic effect of rimonabant. The main side effects of rimonabant are depression and GI symptoms. Conclusions: Rimonabant has significant effects on energy metabolism and food intake, probably mediated via its effects on GI motility. PMID:23449551

  14. Rimonabant effects on anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in healthy humans: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Mateus M; Queiroz, Regina H C; Chagas, Marcos H N; Linares, Ila M P; Arrais, Kátia C; de Oliveira, Danielle C G; Queiroz, Maria E; Nardi, Antonio E; Huestis, Marilyn A; Hallak, Jaime E C; Zuardi, Antonio W; Moreira, Fabrício A; Crippa, José A S

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that rimonabant, a cannabinoid antagonist/inverse agonist, would increase anxiety in healthy subjects during a simulation of the public speaking test. Participants were randomly allocated to receive oral placebo or 90 mg rimonabant in a double-blind design. Subjective effects were measured by Visual Analogue Mood Scale. Physiological parameters, namely arterial blood pressure and heart rate, also were monitored. Twelve participants received oral placebo and 12 received 90 mg rimonabant. Rimonabant increased self-reported anxiety levels during the anticipatory speech and performance phase compared with placebo. Interestingly, rimonabant did not modulate anxiety prestress and was not associated with sedation, cognitive impairment, discomfort, or blood pressure changes. Cannabinoid-1 antagonism magnifies the responses to an anxiogenic stimulus without interfering with the prestress phase. These data suggest that the endocannabinoid system may work on-demand to counteract the consequences of anxiogenic stimuli in healthy humans. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Rimonabant effects on anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in healthy humans: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Queiroz, Regina H. C.; Chagas, Marcos H. N.; Linares, Ila M. P.; Arrais, Kátia C.; de Oliveira, Danielle C. G.; Queiroz, Maria E.; Nardi, Antonio E.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Zuardi, Antonio W.; Moreira, Fabrício A.; Crippa, José A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the hypothesis that rimonabant, a cannabinoid antagonist/inverse agonist, would increase anxiety in healthy subjects during a simulation of the public speaking test. Methods Participants were randomly allocated to receive oral placebo or 90 mg rimonabant in a double-blind design. Subjective effects were measured by Visual Analogue Mood Scale. Physiological parameters, namely arterial blood pressure and heart rate, also were monitored. Results Twelve participants received oral placebo and 12 received 90 mg rimonabant. Rimonabant increased self-reported anxiety levels during the anticipatory speech and performance phase compared with placebo. Interestingly, rimonabant did not modulate anxiety prestress and was not associated with sedation, cognitive impairment, discomfort, or blood pressure changes. Conclusions Cannabinoid-1 antagonism magnifies the responses to an anxiogenic stimulus without interfering with the prestress phase. These data suggest that the endocannabinoid system may work on-demand to counteract the consequences of anxiogenic stimuli in healthy humans. PMID:24424711

  16. Single and multiple doses of rimonabant antagonize acute effects of smoked cannabis in male cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Huestis, Marilyn A; Boyd, Susan J; Heishman, Stephen J; Preston, Kenzie L; Bonnet, Denis; Le Fur, Gerard; Gorelick, David A

    2007-11-01

    A single 90-mg dose of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant attenuates effects of smoked cannabis in humans. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether repeated daily 40-mg doses of rimonabant can attenuate effects of smoked cannabis to the same extent as a single higher (90 mg) dose. Forty-two male volunteers received one of three oral drug regimens in a randomized, double blind, parallel group design: (1) 40 mg rimonabant daily for 15 days, (2) placebo for 14 days, then 90 mg rimonabant on day 15, or (3) placebo for 15 days. All participants smoked an active or placebo cannabis cigarette 2 h after medication on days 8 and 15. Subjective effects were measured with visual analog scales and the marijuana-scale of the Addiction Research Center Inventory. Cannabis-induced tachycardia was significantly lower for the 40-mg group on day 8 and for the 40 and 90 mg rimonabant groups on day 15 as compared to placebo. The 40-mg dose significantly decreased peak subjective effects on day 8. Neither the 90-mg nor 40-mg doses significantly decreased peak subjective effects on day 15. Rimonabant treatment did not significantly affect Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinnol pharmacokinetics. Repeated lower daily rimonabant doses (40 mg) attenuated the acute physiological effects of smoked cannabis to a similar degree as a single 90-mg dose; repeated 40-mg doses attenuated subjective effects after 8 but not 15 days.

  17. Intra-accumbal blockade of endocannabinoid CB1 receptors impairs learning but not retention of conditioned relief.

    PubMed

    Bergado Acosta, Jorge R; Schneider, Miriam; Fendt, Markus

    2017-10-01

    Humans and animals are able to associate an environmental cue with the feeling of relief from an aversive event, a phenomenon called relief learning. Relief from an aversive event is rewarding and a relief-associated cue later induces an attenuation of the startle magnitude or approach behavior. Previous studies demonstrated that the nucleus accumbens is essential for relief learning. Here, we asked whether accumbal cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors are involved in relief learning. In rats, we injected the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A (rimonabant) directly into the nucleus accumbens at different time points during a relief learning experiment. SR141716A injections immediately before the conditioning inhibited relief learning. However, SR141716A injected immediately before the retention test was not effective when conditioning was without treatment. These findings indicate that accumbal CB1 receptors play an important role in the plasticity processes underlying relief learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antagonist-Elicited Cannabis Withdrawal in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, David A.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; McMahon, Robert P.; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40–120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0–8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  19. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  20. Context-dependent effects of rimonabant on ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in female mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aline A F; Barbosa-Souza, Evelyn; Confessor-Carvalho, Cassio; Silva, Raiany R R; De Brito, Ana Carolina L; Cata-Preta, Elisangela G; Silva Oliveira, Thaynara; Berro, Lais F; Oliveira-Lima, Alexandre J; Marinho, Eduardo A V

    2017-10-01

    The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant has been previously found to prevent behavioral effects of drugs of abuse in a context-dependent manner, suggesting an important role of endocannabinoid signaling in drug-induced environmental conditioning. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of rimonabant on ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in female mice. Animals were conditioned with saline or ethanol (1.8g/kg) during 8 sessions, and subsequently treated with either saline or rimonabant (1 or 10mg/kg) in the CPP environment previously associated with saline (unpaired) or ethanol (paired) for 6 consecutive days. Animals were then challenged with ethanol (1.8g/kg) in the ethanol-paired environment and ethanol-induced CPP was quantified on the following day. While treatment with 1mg/kg rimonabant in the saline-associated environment had no effects on the subsequent expression of ethanol-induced CPP, it blocked the expression of CPP to ethanol when paired to the ethanol-associated environment. When given in the ethanol-paired environment, 10mg/kg rimonabant induced aversion to the ethanol-associated environment. The same aversion effect was observed for 10mg/kg rimonabant when given in the saline-associated environment, thereby potentiating the expression of ethanol-induced CPP. Importantly, rimonabant did not induce CPP or conditioned place aversion on its own. Controlling for the estrous cycle phase showed no influences of hormonal cycle on the development and expression of ethanol-induced CPP. Our data suggest that rimonabant reduces the rewarding properties of ethanol by abolishing drug-environment conditioning in the CPP paradigm in a context-dependent manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Additive subthreshold dose effects of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in antidepressant behavioral tests.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiki; Katayama, Mariko; Niimi, Kimie; Itakura, Chitoshi

    2008-07-28

    The main clinically used antidepressant drugs are selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram, sertraline), selective dopamine reuptake inhibitor (nomifensine) and selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (reboxetine), but they have various side effects. Because cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonists (SR141716A, AM251) enhance monoamine release, they might be beneficial in the therapy of affective disorders. We hypothesized that the use of monoamine reuptake inhibitors in combination with cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonists would allow a lower dose of monoamine reuptake inhibitors to be used in the therapy of depression, thereby reducing or eliminating the side effects. To test this hypothesis, we examined the combination of SR141716A or AM251 with citalopram, sertraline, nomifensine or reboxetine at subthreshold doses to see whether these combinations would show an additive effect in the forced swimming test and the tail suspension test with mice. Subthreshold doses of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which separately had no effect on the immobility of mice in the tests, showed a clear effect when the drugs were administered at 40 and 30 min, respectively, before the tests, without any change of motor activity. Therefore, the use of subthreshold doses of these agents in combination might be useful to enhance mainly serotonergic neurotransmission, and to reduce or eliminate the side effects of citalopram and sertraline.

  2. Rimonabant prevents additional accumulation of visceral and subcutaneous fat during high-fat feeding in dogs.

    PubMed

    Richey, Joyce M; Woolcott, Orison O; Stefanovski, Darko; Harrison, L Nicole; Zheng, Dan; Lottati, Maya; Hsu, Isabel R; Kim, Stella P; Kabir, Morvarid; Catalano, Karyn J; Chiu, Jenny D; Ionut, Viorica; Kolka, Cathryn; Mooradian, Vahe; Bergman, Richard N

    2009-06-01

    We investigated whether rimonabant, a type 1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, reduces visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in dogs maintained on a hypercaloric high-fat diet (HHFD). To determine whether energy expenditure contributed to body weight changes, we also calculated resting metabolic rate. Twenty male dogs received either rimonabant (1.25 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), orally; n = 11) or placebo (n = 9) for 16 wk, concomitant with a HHFD. VAT, SAT, and nonfat tissue were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Resting metabolic rate was assessed by indirect calorimetry. By week 16 of treatment, rimonabant dogs lost 2.5% of their body weight (P = 0.029), whereas in placebo dogs body weight increased by 6.2% (P < 0.001). Rimonabant reduced food intake (P = 0.027), concomitant with a reduction of SAT by 19.5% (P < 0.001). In contrast with the VAT increase with placebo (P < 0.01), VAT did not change with rimonabant. Nonfat tissue remained unchanged in both groups. Body weight loss was not associated with either resting metabolic rate (r(2) = 0.24; P = 0.154) or food intake (r(2) = 0.24; P = 0.166). In conclusion, rimonabant reduced body weight together with a reduction in abdominal fat, mainly because of SAT loss. Body weight changes were not associated with either resting metabolic rate or food intake. The findings provide evidence of a peripheral effect of rimonabant to reduce adiposity and body weight, possibly through a direct effect on adipose tissue.

  3. Rimonabant Precipitates Anxiety in Rats Withdrawn from Palatable Food: Role of the Central Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Blasio, Angelo; Iemolo, Attilio; Sabino, Valentina; Petrosino, Stefania; Steardo, Luca; Rice, Kenner C; Orlando, Pierangelo; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Zorrilla, Eric P; Cottone, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The anti-obesity medication rimonabant, an antagonist of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor, was withdrawn from the market because of adverse psychiatric side effects, including a negative affective state. We investigated whether rimonabant precipitates a negative emotional state in rats withdrawn from palatable food cycling. The effects of systemic administration of rimonabant on anxiety-like behavior, food intake, body weight, and adrenocortical activation were assessed in female rats during withdrawal from chronic palatable diet cycling. The levels of the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the CB1 receptor mRNA and the protein in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) were also investigated. Finally, the effects of microinfusion of rimonabant in the CeA on anxiety-like behavior, and food intake were assessed. Systemic administration of rimonabant precipitated anxiety-like behavior and anorexia of the regular chow diet in rats withdrawn from palatable diet cycling, independently from the degree of adrenocortical activation. These behavioral observations were accompanied by increased 2-AG, CB1 receptor mRNA, and protein levels selectively in the CeA. Finally, rimonabant, microinfused directly into the CeA, precipitated anxiety-like behavior and anorexia. Our data show that (i) the 2-AG-CB1 receptor system within the CeA is recruited during abstinence from palatable diet cycling as a compensatory mechanism to dampen anxiety, and (ii) rimonabant precipitates a negative emotional state by blocking the beneficial heightened 2-AG-CB1 receptor signaling in this brain area. These findings help elucidate the link between compulsive eating and anxiety, and it will be valuable to develop better pharmacological treatments for eating disorders and obesity. PMID:23793355

  4. Rimonabant precipitates anxiety in rats withdrawn from palatable food: role of the central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Blasio, Angelo; Iemolo, Attilio; Sabino, Valentina; Petrosino, Stefania; Steardo, Luca; Rice, Kenner C; Orlando, Pierangelo; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Zorrilla, Eric P; Cottone, Pietro

    2013-11-01

    The anti-obesity medication rimonabant, an antagonist of cannabinoid type-1 (CB(1)) receptor, was withdrawn from the market because of adverse psychiatric side effects, including a negative affective state. We investigated whether rimonabant precipitates a negative emotional state in rats withdrawn from palatable food cycling. The effects of systemic administration of rimonabant on anxiety-like behavior, food intake, body weight, and adrenocortical activation were assessed in female rats during withdrawal from chronic palatable diet cycling. The levels of the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the CB(1) receptor mRNA and the protein in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) were also investigated. Finally, the effects of microinfusion of rimonabant in the CeA on anxiety-like behavior, and food intake were assessed. Systemic administration of rimonabant precipitated anxiety-like behavior and anorexia of the regular chow diet in rats withdrawn from palatable diet cycling, independently from the degree of adrenocortical activation. These behavioral observations were accompanied by increased 2-AG, CB(1) receptor mRNA, and protein levels selectively in the CeA. Finally, rimonabant, microinfused directly into the CeA, precipitated anxiety-like behavior and anorexia. Our data show that (i) the 2-AG-CB(1) receptor system within the CeA is recruited during abstinence from palatable diet cycling as a compensatory mechanism to dampen anxiety, and (ii) rimonabant precipitates a negative emotional state by blocking the beneficial heightened 2-AG-CB(1) receptor signaling in this brain area. These findings help elucidate the link between compulsive eating and anxiety, and it will be valuable to develop better pharmacological treatments for eating disorders and obesity.

  5. The intracerebroventricular injection of rimonabant inhibits systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arnold; Neumann, Paul H; Peng, Jianya; James, Janey; Russo, Vincenzo; MacDonald, Hunter; Gertzberg, Nancy; Feleder, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    We investigated the role of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of rimonabant (500ng), a CB1 antagonist, on lipopolysaccharide ((LPS) 5mg/kg)-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats in an isolated perfused lung model. There were decreases in pulmonary capillary pressure (Ppc) and increases in the ((Wet-Dry)/Dry lung weight)/(Ppc) ratio in the ICV-vehicle/LPS group at 4h. There were decreases in TLR4 pathway markers, such as interleukin receptor-associated kinase-1, IκBα, Raf1 and phospho-SFK (Tyr416) at 30min and at 4h increases in IL-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and myeloperoxidase in lung homogenate. Intracerebroventricular rimonabant attenuated these LPS-induced responses, indicating that ICV rimonabant modulates LPS-initiated pulmonary inflammation.

  6. Rimonabant: endocannabinoid inhibition for the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, A S

    2006-12-01

    Rimonabant is the first drug to target the endocannabinoid (CB) pathway by inhibiting the actions of anandamide and 2-archidonyl-glycerol on CB1 receptors. This review gives an overview of rimonabant and the CB system and how this system relates to obesity. Rimonabant blocks the central effects of this neurotransmitter pathway involved in obesity and weight control and also blocks the direct effects of CBs on adipocyte and hepatocyte metabolism. Blockade of CB1 receptors leads to a decrease in appetite and also has direct actions in adipose tissue and the liver to improve glucose, fat and cholesterol metabolism so improving insulin resistance, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and in some patients, blood pressure. The Rimonabant in Obesity (RIO) trials have shown that rimonabant induces weight loss > 5% in 30-40% of patients and > 10% in 10-20% above both a dietary run-in and long-term hypocaloric management over a 2 year period with a low level of drug-related side effects. Rimonabant therapy is associated with an extra 8-10% increase in HDL-C and a 10-30% reduction in triglycerides and improvements in insulin resistance, glycaemic control in patients with diabetes and also adipokines and cytokines including C-reactive protein over hypocaloric diet therapy. In addition rimonabant abolishes the weight gain associated with smoking cessation and improves the chances of quitting smoking. Thus rimonabant has major effects on both the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors thus has the potential to reduce the risks of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease associated with the cardiometabolic phenotype.

  7. [New obesity and metabolic syndrome treatment: rimonabant].

    PubMed

    Makoundou, V; Golay, A

    2006-01-04

    CBI endocannabinoid system receptors localized in the hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens are known to regulate hunger. Hyperstimulation of the CBI receptors lead to an increase of food intake, but also to an increase of lipogenesis, decrease of adiponectin and increase of insulin resistance. Rimonabant is the first CBI central and peripheral blocker, tested in international trials (RIO-lipids, RIO-Europe and RIO-North America). Significant results on weight reduction, increased adiponectin and improved metabolic syndrome have been demonstrated. Rimonabant is a new pharmacological therapy and very interesting for tackling obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  8. Increased energy expenditure contributes more to the body weight-reducing effect of rimonabant than reduced food intake in candy-fed wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Herling, Andreas W; Kilp, Susanne; Elvert, Ralf; Haschke, Guido; Kramer, Werner

    2008-05-01

    The CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant, affects the endocannabinoid system and causes a sustained reduction in body weight (BW) despite the transient nature of the reduction in food intake. Therefore, in a multiple-dose study, female candy-fed Wistar rats were treated with rimonabant (10 mg/kg) and matched with pair-fed rats to distinguish between hypophagic action and hypothesized effects on energy expenditure. Within the first week of treatment, rimonabant reduced BW nearly to levels of standard rat chow-fed rats. Evaluation of energy balance (energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry in relation to metabolizable energy intake calculated by bomb calorimetry) revealed that increased energy expenditure based on increased fat oxidation contributed more to sustained BW reduction than reduced food intake. A mere food reduction through pair feeding did not result in comparable effects because animals reduced their energy expenditure to save energy stores. Because fat oxidation measured by indirect calorimetry increased immediately after dosing in the postprandial state, the acute effect of rimonabant on lipolysis was investigated in postprandial male rats. Rimonabant elevated free fatty acids postprandially, demonstrating an inherent pharmacological activity of rimonabant to induce lipolysis and not secondarily postabsorptively due to reduced food intake. We conclude that the weight-reducing effect of rimonabant was due to continuously elevated energy expenditure based on increased fat oxidation driven by lipolysis from fat tissue as long as fat stores were elevated. When the amount of endogenous fat stores declined, rimonabant-induced increased energy expenditure was maintained by a re-increase in food intake.

  9. Combining rimonabant and fentanyl in a single entity: preparation and pharmacological results.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, Cristina; Callado, Luis F; Girón, Rocío; Sánchez, Eva; Erdozain, Amaia M; López-Moreno, José Antonio; Morales, Paula; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Goya, Pilar; Meana, J Javier; Martín, M Isabel; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Based on numerous pharmacological studies that have revealed an interaction between cannabinoid and opioid systems at the molecular, neurochemical, and behavioral levels, a new series of hybrid molecules has been prepared by coupling the molecular features of two wellknown drugs, ie, rimonabant and fentanyl. The new compounds have been tested for their affinity and functionality regarding CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid and μ opioid receptors. In [(35)S]-GTPγS (guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) binding assays from the post-mortem human frontal cortex, they proved to be CB1 cannabinoid antagonists and μ opioid antagonists. Interestingly, in vivo, the new compounds exhibited a significant dual antagonist action on the endocannabinoid and opioid systems.

  10. Combining rimonabant and fentanyl in a single entity: preparation and pharmacological results

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fernández, Cristina; Callado, Luis F; Girón, Rocío; Sánchez, Eva; Erdozain, Amaia M; López-Moreno, José Antonio; Morales, Paula; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Goya, Pilar; Meana, J Javier; Martín, M Isabel; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Based on numerous pharmacological studies that have revealed an interaction between cannabinoid and opioid systems at the molecular, neurochemical, and behavioral levels, a new series of hybrid molecules has been prepared by coupling the molecular features of two wellknown drugs, ie, rimonabant and fentanyl. The new compounds have been tested for their affinity and functionality regarding CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid and μ opioid receptors. In [35S]-GTPγS (guanosine 5′-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) binding assays from the post-mortem human frontal cortex, they proved to be CB1 cannabinoid antagonists and μ opioid antagonists. Interestingly, in vivo, the new compounds exhibited a significant dual antagonist action on the endocannabinoid and opioid systems. PMID:24591816

  11. Effect of chronic exposure to rimonabant and phytocannabinoids on anxiety-like behavior and saccharin palatability.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lesley D; Wills, Kiri L; Segsworth, Blair; Dashney, Brittany; Rock, Erin M; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Parker, Linda A

    2013-01-01

    The acute effects of cannabinoid compounds have been investigated in animal models of anxiety-like behavior and palatability processing. However, the chronic effects of cannabinoids in such models are poorly understood. Experiment 1 compared the effects of both acute and chronic (14 days) exposure to the CB(1) receptor inverse agonist/antagonist, rimonabant, and the cannabis-derived CB(1) receptor neutral antagonist, tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), on: 1) time spent in the open, lit box in the Light-Dark (LD) immersion model of anxiety-like behavior and 2) saccharin hedonic reactions in the taste reactivity (TR) test of palatability processing. Experiment 2 compared the effects of chronic administration of cannabis-derived Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG) in these models. Tests were administered on Days 1, 7 and 14 of drug administration. In Experiment 1, rimonabant, but not THCV, produced an anxiogenic-like reaction in the LD immersion test and reduced saccharin palatability in the TR test; both of these effects occurred acutely and were not enhanced by chronic exposure. In Experiment 2, Δ(9)-THC also produced an acute anxiogenic-like reaction in the LD immersion test, without enhancement by chronic exposure. However, Δ(9)-THC enhanced saccharin palatability in the TR test on Day 1 of drug exposure only. CBD and CBG did not modify anxiety-like responding, but CBG produced a weak enhancement of saccharin palatability on Day 1 only. The results suggest that the anxiogenic-like reactions and the suppression of hedonic responding produced by rimonabant, are mediated by inverse agonism of the CB(1) receptor and these effects are not enhanced with chronic exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rimonabant's reductive effects on high densities of food reinforcement, but not palatability, in lean and obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jessica L; Rasmussen, Erin B

    2014-05-01

    Cannabinoid antagonists purportedly have greater effects in reducing the intake of highly palatable food compared to less palatable food. However, this assertion is based on free-feeding studies in which the amount of palatable food eaten under baseline conditions is often confounded with other variables, such as unequal access to both food options and differences in qualitative features of the foods. We attempted to reduce these confounds by using a model of choice that programmed the delivery rates of sucrose and carrot-flavored pellets. Lever pressing of ten lean (Fa/Fa or Fa/fa) and ten obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats was placed under three conditions in which programmed ratios for food pellets on two levers were 5:1, 1:1, and 1:5. In phase 1, responses on the two levers produced one type of pellet (sucrose or carrot); in phase 2, responses on one lever produced sucrose pellets and on the other lever produced carrot pellets. After responses stabilized under each food ratio, acute doses of rimonabant (0, 3, and 10 mg/kg) were administered before experimental sessions. The number of reinforcers and responses earned per session under each ratio and from each lever was compared. Rimonabant reduced reinforcers in 1:5 and 5:1 food ratios in phase 1, and across all ratios in phase 2. Rimonabant reduced sucrose and carrot-flavored pellet consumption similarly; rimonabant did not affect bias toward sucrose, but increased sensitivity to amount differences in lean rats. This suggests that relative amount of food, not palatability, may be an important behavioral mechanism in the effects of rimonabant.

  13. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor: another arrow in the adipocytes' bow.

    PubMed

    Bellocchio, L; Cervino, C; Vicennati, V; Pasquali, R; Pagotto, U

    2008-05-01

    The endocannabinoid system has recently emerged as an important modulator of several functions of adipose tissue, including cell proliferation, differentiation and secretion. Here, we will review the effects of cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor activation/blockade in adipocytes by summarising the data in the literature since the discovery of the presence of this receptor in adipose tissue. We will also discuss our original data obtained in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells using WIN55 212, a CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist and SR141716 (rimonabant), a specific CB(1) receptor antagonist, respectively, in different experimental settings.

  14. Combination cannabinoid and opioid receptor antagonists improves metabolic outcomes in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Sarah H; Stefanidis, Aneta; Tschöp, Matthias H; Oldfield, Brian J

    2015-12-05

    The CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant, causes weight loss but also produces undesirable psychiatric side effects. We investigated using a combination of rimonabant with the opioid receptor antagonists naloxone and norBNI to treat the metabolic sequelae of long-term high fat diet feeding in mice. This combination has previously been shown to have positive effects on both weight loss and mood related behaviour. Diet-induced obese mice were treated chronically with either low dose rimonabant (1 mg/kg) or the combination of rimonabant, naloxone and norBNI (rim nal BNI). After 6 days of treatment, glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed and body composition analysed using DEXA. Changes in BAT thermogenesis were assessed using implantable radio telemetry probes. Behavioural responses to acute rimonabant or rim nal BNI were examined in the forced swim test and elevated plus maze. Separately, we assessed shifts in Fos immunoreactivity in response to rimonabant or rim nal BNI. Rim nal BNI was significantly better than rimonabant treatment alone at reducing body weight and food intake. In addition, it improved fasting blood glucose and fat mass. Acute low dose rimonabant did not alter behaviour in either the forced swim test or elevated plus maze. Combination rim nal BNI reversed the behavioural effects of high dose (10 mg/kg) rimonabant in obese mice. Rim nal BNI altered Rimonabant-induced Fos in a number of nuclei, with particular shifts in expression in the central and basolateral amygdala, and insular cortex. This study demonstrates that the combination of rimonabant, naloxone and norBNI is effective at producing weight loss over a sustained period of time without altering performance in standardised mouse behaviour tests. Fos expression patterns offer insight into the neuroanatomical substrates subserving these physiological and behavioural changes. These results indicate that CB1-targeted drugs for weight loss may still be feasible.

  15. Cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor inhibition decreases vascular smooth muscle migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Hasko, Gyoergy; Pacher, Pal

    2008-12-26

    Vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration triggered by inflammatory stimuli and chemoattractants such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are key events in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Cannabinoids may modulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types through cannabinoid receptors. Here we investigated the effects of CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A), which has recently been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic effects both in mice and humans, on PDGF-induced proliferation, migration, and signal transduction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). PDGF induced Ras and ERK 1/2 activation, while increasing proliferation and migration of HCASMCs, which were dose dependently attenuated by CB{sub 1} antagonist, rimonabant. These findings suggest that in addition to improving plasma lipid alterations and decreasing inflammatory cell migration and inflammatory response, CB{sub 1} antagonists may exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and restenosis by decreasing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

  16. The central cannabinoid CB1 receptor is required for diet-induced obesity and rimonabant's antiobesity effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhen; Wu, Nancy N; Zhao, Weiguang; Chain, David C; Schaffer, Erica; Zhang, Xin; Yamdagni, Preeti; Palejwala, Vaseem A; Fan, Chunpeng; Favara, Sarah G; Dressler, Holly M; Economides, Kyriakos D; Weinstock, Daniel; Cavallo, Jean S; Naimi, Souad; Galzin, Anne-Marie; Guillot, Etienne; Pruniaux, Marie-Pierre; Tocci, Michael J; Polites, H Greg

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid receptor CB1 is expressed abundantly in the brain and presumably in the peripheral tissues responsible for energy metabolism. It is unclear if the antiobesity effects of rimonabant, a CB1 antagonist, are mediated through the central or the peripheral CB1 receptors. To address this question, we generated transgenic mice with central nervous system (CNS)-specific knockdown (KD) of CB1, by expressing an artificial microRNA (AMIR) under the control of the neuronal Thy1.2 promoter. In the mutant mice, CB1 expression was reduced in the brain and spinal cord, whereas no change was observed in the superior cervical ganglia (SCG), sympathetic trunk, enteric nervous system, and pancreatic ganglia. In contrast to the neuronal tissues, CB1 was undetectable in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) or the liver. Consistent with the selective loss of central CB1, agonist-induced hypothermia was attenuated in the mutant mice, but the agonist-induced delay of gastrointestinal transit (GIT), a primarily peripheral nervous system-mediated effect, was not. Compared to wild-type (WT) littermates, the mutant mice displayed reduced body weight (BW), adiposity, and feeding efficiency, and when fed a high-fat diet (HFD), showed decreased plasma insulin, leptin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, and elevated adiponectin levels. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of rimonabant on food intake (FI), BW, and serum parameters were markedly reduced and correlated with the degree of CB1 KD. Thus, KD of CB1 in the CNS recapitulates the metabolic phenotype of CB1 knockout (KO) mice and diminishes rimonabant's efficacy, indicating that blockade of central CB1 is required for rimonabant's antiobesity actions.

  17. Cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist treatment induces glucagon release and shows an additive therapeutic effect with GLP-1 agonist in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kartikkumar Navinchandra; Joharapurkar, Amit Arvind; Patel, Vishal; Kshirsagar, Samadhan Govind; Bahekar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists reduce body weight and improve insulin sensitivity. Preclinical data indicates that an acute dose of CB1 antagonist rimonabant causes an increase in blood glucose. A stable analog of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), exendin-4 improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreas, and reduces appetite through activation of GLP-1 receptors in the central nervous system and liver. We hypothesized that the insulin secretagogue effect of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 may synergize with the insulin-sensitizing action of rimonabant. Intraperitoneal as well as intracerebroventricular administration of rimonabant increased serum glucose upon glucose challenge in overnight fasted, diet-induced obese C57 mice, with concomitant rise in serum glucagon levels. Exendin-4 reversed the acute hyperglycemia induced by rimonabant. The combination of exendin-4 and rimonabant showed an additive effect in the food intake, and sustained body weight reduction upon repeated dosing. The acute efficacy of both the compounds was additive for inducing nausea-like symptoms in conditioned aversion test in mice, whereas exendin-4 treatment antagonized the effect of rimonabant on forced swim test upon chronic dosing. Thus, the addition of exendin-4 to rimonabant produces greater reduction in food intake owing to increased aversion, but reduces the other central nervous system side effects of rimonabant. The hyperglucagonemia induced by rimonabant is partially responsible for enhancing the antiobesity effect of exendin-4.

  18. BLOCKING CANNABINOID CB1 RECEPTORS FOR THE TREATMENT OF NICOTINE DEPENDENCE: INSIGHTS FROM PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Le Foll, Bernard; Forget, Benoit; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco use is one of the leading preventable causes of death in developed countries. Since existing medications are only partially effective in treating tobacco smokers, there is a great need for improved medications for smoking cessation. It has been recently proposed that cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists represent a new class of therapeutic agents for drug dependence, and, notably, nicotine dependence. Here, we will review current evidence supporting the use of this class of drugs for smoking cessation treatment. Preclinical studies indicate that nicotine exposure produces changes in endocannabinoid content in the brain. In experimental animals, Rimonabant (SR141716) and AM251, two cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists, block nicotine self-administration behavior, an effect that may be related to the blockade of the dopamine-releasing effects of nicotine in the brain. Rimonabant also seems efficacious in decreasing the influence of nicotine-associated stimuli over behavior, suggesting that it may act on two distinct neuronal pathways, those implicated in drug-taking behavior and those involved in relapse phenomena. The utility of Rimonabant has been evaluated in several clinical trials. It seems that Rimonabant is an efficacious treatment for smoking cessation, although its efficacy doesn’t exceed that of nicotine replacement therapy and its use may be limited by emotional side effects (nausea, anxiety and depression, mostly). Rimonabant also appears to decrease relapse rates in smokers. These findings indicate significant, but limited, utility of Rimonabant for smoking cessation. PMID:18482433

  19. Therapeutic potential of targeting the endocannabinoids: implications for the treatment of obesity, metabolic syndrome, drug abuse and smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Tucci, S A; Halford, J C G; Harrold, J A; Kirkham, T C

    2006-01-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716, Acomplia) has been described as an antagonist/inverse agonist at the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). It has been widely used as a tool to evaluate the mechanisms by which cannabinoid agonists produce their pharmacological effects and to elucidate the respective physiological or pathophysiological roles of the CB1 receptor. It has become increasingly clear that rimonabant can exert its own intrinsic actions. These may be viewed as evidence of either the inverse agonist nature of rimonabant or of tonic activity of the endocannabinoid system. To date, data obtained from clinical trials (RIO North America, RIO Europe and RIO Lipid) indicate that rimonabant may have clinical benefits in relation to its anti-obesity properties and as a novel candidate for the treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders associated with overweight and obesity. Other clinical trials, such as the STRATUS study, have also shown that rimonabant may be effective in smoking cessation, and that the drug has a reasonable safety profile. Recently, it has been shown that rimonabant prevents indomethacin-induced intestinal injury by decreasing the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), thus indicating that CB1 receptor antagonists might exhibit potential anti-inflammatory activity in acute and chronic diseases.

  20. Rimonabant: a cannabinoid receptor type 1 blocker for management of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Eli V; Cannon, Christopher P

    2006-05-16

    Rimonabant is a first selective blocker of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) being developed for the treatment of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors, including abdominal obesity and smoking. In four large trials, after one year of treatment, rimonabant 20 mg led to greater weight loss and reduction in waist circumference compared with placebo. Therapy with rimonabant is also associated with favorable changes in serum lipid levels and an improvement in glycemic control in prediabetes patients and in type 2 diabetic patients. At the same dose, rimonabant significantly increased cigarette smoking quit rates as compared with placebo. Rimonabant seems to be well tolerated, with a primary side effect of mild nausea. As an agent with a novel mechanism of action, rimonabant has a potential to be a useful adjunct to lifestyle and behavior modification in treatment of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors, including abdominal obesity and smoking.

  1. [Cardiometabolic effects of rimonabant in obese/overweight subjects with dyslipidaemia or type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J; Van Gaal, L F

    2007-02-01

    Rimonabant (Acomplia) is the first selective CB1 receptor blocker of the endocannabinoid system. It has been evaluated in the RIO ("Rimonabant In Obesity and related disorders") programme including above 6.600 overweight/obese patients with or without comorbidities followed for 1 to 2 years. Compared to placebo, rimonabant 20 mg/day consistently increases weight loss, reduces waist circumference, increases HDL cholesterol, lowers triglyceride levels, diminishes insulin resistance, and reduces the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In patients with type 2 diabetes, rimonabant also diminishes HbA1c levels, an effect confirmed in the recent SERENADE trial. Almost half of the metabolic effects occurs beyond weight loss, suggesting direct peripheral effects of rimonabant. Rimonabant is indicated in Europe as an adjunct to diet and exercise for the treatment of obese patients, or overweight patients with associated risk factor(s), such as type 2 diabetes or dyslipidaemia.

  2. Apparent Affinity Estimates and Reversal of the Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoids AM-2201, CP-47,497, JWH-122, and JWH-250 by Rimonabant in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hruba, Lenka; McMahon, Lance R

    2017-08-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids have been prohibited due to abuse liability and toxicity. Four such synthetic cannabinoids, AM-2201 ([1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-ylmethanone), CP-47,497 (2-[(1R,3S)-3-hydroxycyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol), JWH-122 [(4-methylnaphthalen-1-yl)-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone], and JWH-250 [2-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)ethanone], were tested for their capacity to produce CB1 receptor-mediated discriminative stimulus effects in two groups of rhesus monkeys. One group (n = 4) discriminated Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆(9)-THC; 0.1 mg/kg i.v.), and a second group (n = 4) discriminated the cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg i.v.) while receiving 1 mg/kg/12 hours of ∆(9)-THC. AM-2201, JWH-122, CP-47,497, JWH-250, and ∆(9)-THC increased ∆(9)-THC lever responding. Duration of action was 1-2 hours for AM-2201, JWH-122, and JWH-250 and 4-5 hours for CP-47,497 and ∆(9)-THC. Rimonabant (1 mg/kg) surmountably antagonized the discriminative stimulus effects of all cannabinoid agonists; the magnitude of rightward shift was 10.6-fold for AM-2201, 10.7-fold for JWH-122, 11.0-fold for CP-47,497, and 15.7-fold for JWH-250. The respective pKB values were not significantly different: 6.61, 6.65, 6.66, and 6.83. In ∆(9)-THC-treated monkeys discriminating rimonabant, AM-2201 (0.1 and 0.32 mg/kg), JWH-122 (0.32 and 1 mg/kg), JWH-250 (1 and 3.2 mg/kg), and CP-47,497 (0.32, 1, and 3.2 mg/kg) produced not only rate-decreasing effects that were reversed by rimonabant, but also dose-dependent, rightward shifts in the rimonabant discrimination dose-effect function. These results show striking similarity in the CB1 receptor mechanism mediating the subjective effects of AM-2201, JWH-122, JWH-250, and CP-47,497. For products containing AM-2201 and JWH-122, a short duration of action could lead to more frequent use; moreover, inattention to differences in potency among synthetic cannabinoids could underlie unexpected

  3. Ghrelin-Induced Orexigenic Effect in Rats Depends on the Metabolic Status and Is Counteracted by Peripheral CB1 Receptor Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Francisco; Crespo, Inmaculada; Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Jagerovic, Nadine; Goya, Pilar; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; de Heras, Raquel Gómez; Orio, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous regulator of energy homeostasis synthesized by the stomach to stimulate appetite and positive energy balance. Similarly, the endocannabinoid system is part of our internal machinery controlling food intake and energy expenditure. Both peripheral and central mechanisms regulate CB1-mediated control of food intake and a functional relationship between hypothalamic ghrelin and cannabinoid CB1 receptor has been proposed. First of all, we investigated brain ghrelin actions on food intake in rats with different metabolic status (negative or equilibrate energy balance). Secondly, we tested a sub-anxiogenic ultra-low dose of the CB1 antagonist SR141716A (Rimonabant) and the peripheral-acting CB1 antagonist LH-21 on ghrelin orexigenic actions. We found that: 1) central administration of ghrelin promotes food intake in free feeding animals but not in 24 h food-deprived or chronically food-restricted animals; 2) an ultra-low dose of SR141716A (a subthreshold dose 75 folds lower than the EC50 for induction of anxiety) completely counteracts the orexigenic actions of central ghrelin in free feeding animals; 3) the peripheral-restricted CB1 antagonist LH-21 blocks ghrelin-induced hyperphagia in free feeding animals. Our study highlights the importance of the animaĺs metabolic status for the effectiveness of ghrelin in promoting feeding, and suggests that the peripheral endocannabinoid system may interact with ghrelińs signal in the control of food intake under equilibrate energy balance conditions. PMID:23565287

  4. A Role for the Endocannabinoid System in the Increased Motivation for Cocaine in Extended Access Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Orio, Laura; Edwards, Scott; George, Olivier; Parsons, Loren H.; Koob, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Extended access to cocaine produces an increase in cocaine self-administration in rats that mimics aspects of compulsive drug intake in human addicts. While emerging evidence implicates the endogenous cannabinoid system in aspects of opioid and ethanol addiction, a role of the endocannabinoid system in cocaine addiction remains largely inconclusive. Here, we investigate the effects of systemic and intra-accumbal administration of the CB1 antagonist SR141716A (Rimonabant) on cocaine self-administration (0.5 mg/kg/infusion) under a progressive ratio (PR) schedule in rats with extended (long access, LgA; 6 h/day) or limited (short access, ShA; 1 h/day) access to cocaine. LgA rats, but not ShA rats showed an increase in cocaine intake as previously reported, and responding for cocaine by LgA rats was higher than in ShA rats under a PR schedule. Systemic SR141716A induced a dramatic dose-dependent decrease in the break-point for cocaine by LgA rats, whereas only the highest dose of the antagonist had a significant effect in the ShA group. Anandamide levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell were decreased in ShA rats but unchanged in LgA rats during cocaine self-administration. Both phosphorylated and total CB1 receptor protein expression were upregulated in LgA rats in the NAc and the amygdala compared to ShA and drug-naïve rats, 24 h after last cocaine session. Finally, intra-NAc infusions of SR141716A reduced cocaine break-points selectively in LgA animals. These results suggest that neuroadaptations in the endogenous cannabinoid system may be part of the neuroplasticity associated with the development of cocaine addiction. PMID:19369553

  5. Cost-utility analysis of rimonabant in the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hampp, Christian; Hartzema, Abraham G; Kauf, Teresa L

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the incremental cost-utility ratio (ICUR) of rimonabant 20 mg/day in the treatment of obesity from a third-party payer's perspective. Pooled data from three randomized clinical trials were used to develop a decision tree with five treatment alternatives: 1- and 2-year treatment with rimonabant, 2-year placebo, 1-year rimonabant followed by 1-year placebo, and no treatment. All alternatives, except no treatment, were accompanied by lifestyle interventions. Treatment benefits included gains in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and reduced incidence of type-2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease (CHD). Drug acquisition cost was based on the average wholesale price of a comparator drug minus 15%. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the stability of the base-case results. One-year rimonabant and 1-year rimonabant followed by placebo were extensively dominated. Rimonabant for 2 years showed an average weight reduction of 8.49 kg, a body mass index reduction of 2.98 kg/m(2) and reduced waist circumference by 8.24 cm (placebo: 3.55 kg, 1.22 kg/m(2), 4.18 cm). Two-year rimonabant was associated with a relative reduction in the 5-year incidence of CHD by 7.15% and of diabetes by 9.28%. Incremental benefits (costs) were 0.0984 QALYs ($5209) compared to no treatment and 0.0581 QALYs ($4182) compared to placebo, producing ICURs of $52,936/QALY (95% confidence interval $39K-$69K) and $71,973/QALY ($51K-$98K), respectively. Rimonabant combined with lifestyle interventions has the potential to decrease the rate of obesity-related comorbidities and improve health-related quality of life, albeit at considerable cost.

  6. Effects of rimonabant, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor ligand, on energy expenditure in lean rats.

    PubMed

    Kunz, I; Meier, M K; Bourson, A; Fisseha, M; Schilling, W

    2008-05-01

    To determine the effect of rimonabant on energy expenditure (O2 consumption) in rats at different metabolic states and in cannabinoid CB1 receptor-deficient (CB1R-/-) mice. Animals were exposed to light-dark cycles and fed only during dark cycles. Rimonabant or vehicle was administered together with food (absorptive), following overnight feeding (postabsorptive) or following a whole day of no food (fasting). Indirect calorimetric measurements, physical activity and food intake were measured continuously. Compared with vehicle-treated rats, rats administered 3 and 10 mg kg(-1) rimonabant showed an 18 and 49% increase in O2 consumption, respectively after 3 h. A second dose of rimonabant administered 9-14.5 h after the first one failed to affect O2 consumption, suggesting the development of tolerance. Similarly, stereotypic behaviors and ambulatory activity increased following the first dose but these effects were not observed after the second dose. Respiratory quotients revealed no effect of rimonabant on rates of carbohydrate and fat oxidation. Analysis of the correlation between O2 consumption and physical activity indicated that factors other than increased physical activity may contribute to the increase in O2 consumption. Similar studies in mice demonstrated that wild type but not CB1R-/- mice showed a change in O2 consumption and physical activity following rimonabant administration, suggesting that these effects are mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor. Previous studies suggested that reduced food intake alone may not explain the weight reduction observed with rimonabant. Our studies suggest that rimonabant stimulates significant acute energy expenditure in non-obese rodents, which could not be completely accounted for by an increase in physical activity. However, with the observation that there is rapid development of tolerance, these results suggest that there may be additional mechanism(s) that lead to weight loss in these rodents.

  7. Rimonabant abolishes sensitivity to workload changes in a progressive ratio procedure.

    PubMed

    Marusich, Julie A; Wiley, Jenny L

    2012-06-01

    Despite its propensity to increase motivation for food consumption, marijuana use in humans has been associated with "amotivational syndrome." This "amotivational syndrome" can be characterized by a reduction in response persistence in tasks requiring sustained, but not maximal, effort. To examine this hypothesis, dose-effect functions for THC (0.03-10 mg/kg) and rimonabant (0.1-10 mg/kg) were first determined under a time-constrained PR 5 schedule. During the second phase of the study, doses of THC and rimonabant that did not affect the responses/total reinforced responses were chosen for further evaluation in a series of PR schedules with step sizes of PR 3, PR 5, PR 10, and PR exponential. THC and rimonabant produced decreases in responses per reinforcer, and response rate when behavior was maintained on a PR 5. Rimonabant also decreased session length. During the PR step size manipulation phase, rimonabant decreased responses/total reinforced responses, response rate, and session length, whereas THC only decreased response rate. These results are consistent with previous literature demonstrating that rimonabant decreases motivation for food both in cases where it is earned, as well as under free-feeding conditions, whereas the effects of cannabinoid agonists such as THC on responding for food exhibit greater dependence upon motivational and non-motivational factors, including workload and duration of the task. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Synergic insulin sensitizing effect of rimonabant and BGP-15 in Zucker-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Literati-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Tory, Kálmán; Literáti-Nagy, Botond; Bajza, Agnes; Vígh, László; Vígh, László; Mandl, József; Szilvássy, Zoltán

    2013-07-01

    Abdominal obesity is referred for as a common pathogenic root of multiple risk factors, which include insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and a pro-atherogenic and pro-inflammatory state. Irrespective of its psychiatric side effects, rimonabant through blocking cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) induces an increase in whole body insulin sensitivity. The aim of this work was to study the effect of selected doses of another insulin sensitizer compound BGP-15, and rimonabant on insulin resistance in Zucker obese rats with a promise of inducing insulin sensitization together at lower doses than would have been expected by rimonabant alone. We found that BGP-15 potentiates the insulin sensitizing effect of rimonabant. The combination at doses, which do not induce insulin sensitization by themselves, improved insulin signaling. Furthermore our results suggest that capsaicin-induced signal may play a role in insulin sensitizing effect of both molecules. Our data might indicate that a lower dose of rimonabant in the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is sufficient to administer, thus a lower incidence of the unfavorable psychiatric side effects of rimonabant are to be expected.

  9. Rimonabant attenuates sensitization, cross-sensitization and cross-reinstatement of place preference induced by nicotine and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Biała, Grażyna; Budzyńska, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The present study focused on the evaluation of behavioral sensitization, cross-sensitization, and cross-reinstatement processes induced by nicotine and ethanol in rodents. First, we showed that nicotine (0.175 mg/kg, base, intraperitoneally, ip) produced a conditioned place preference in rats. When the nicotine place preference was extinguished, nicotine-experienced animals were challenged with nicotine (0.175 mg/kg, ip) or ethanol (0.5 g/kg, ip), which reinstated a preference for the compartment previously paired with nicotine. In the second series of experiments, we demonstrated that after 9 days of nicotine administration (0.175 mg/kg, subcutaneously, sc) every other day and following its 7-day withdrawal, challenge doses of nicotine (0.175 mg/kg, sc) and ethanol (2 g/kg, ip) induced locomotor sensitization in mice. Finally, when we examined the influence of rimonabant (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, ip), we found that this cannabinoid CB₁ receptor antagonist attenuated reinstatement effect of ethanol priming as well as nicotine sensitization and locomotor cross-sensitization between nicotine and ethanol. Our results indicate that similar endocannabinoid-dependent mechanisms re involved in the locomotor stimulant and reinforcing effects of nicotine and ethanol in rodents, and as such these data may provide further evidence for the use of cannabinoid CB₁ receptor antagonists in treatment of tobacco addiction with or without concomitant ethanol dependence.

  10. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists: pharmacological opportunities, clinical experience, and translational prognosis.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-03-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid) signaling system is involved in a variety of (patho)physiological processes, primarily by virtue of natural, arachidonic acid-derived lipids (endocannabinoids) that activate G protein-coupled CB1 and CB2 receptors. A hyperactive endocannabinoid system appears to contribute to the etiology of several disease states that constitute significant global threats to human health. Consequently, mounting interest surrounds the design and profiling of receptor-targeted CB antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics that attenuate endocannabinoid transmission for salutary gain. Experimental and clinical evidence supports the therapeutic potential of CB1 receptor antagonists to treat overweight/obesity, obesity-related cardiometabolic disorders, and substance abuse. Laboratory data suggest that CB2 receptor antagonists might be effective immunomodulatory and, perhaps, anti-inflammatory drugs. One CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, has emerged as the first-in-class drug approved outside the United States for weight control. Select follow-on agents (taranabant, otenabant, surinabant, rosonabant, SLV-319, AVE1625, V24343) have also been studied in the clinic. However, rimonabant's market withdrawal in the European Union and suspension of rimonabant's, taranabant's, and otenabant's ongoing development programs have highlighted some adverse clinical side effects (especially nausea and psychiatric disturbances) of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists. Novel CB1 receptor ligands that are peripherally directed and/or exhibit neutral antagonism (the latter not affecting constitutive CB1 receptor signaling) may optimize the benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists while minimizing any risk. Indeed, CB1 receptor-neutral antagonists appear from preclinical data to offer efficacy comparable to or better than that of prototype CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, with less propensity to induce nausea. Continued

  11. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and its synthetic analog R(+)-methanandamide are intravenously self-administered by squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Justinova, Zuzana; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Redhi, Godfrey H; Goldberg, Steven R

    2005-06-08

    Anandamide, an endogenous ligand for brain cannabinoid CB(1) receptors, produces many behavioral effects similar to those of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Reinforcing effects of THC have been demonstrated in experimental animals, but there is only indirect evidence that endogenous cannabinoids such as anandamide participate in brain reward processes. We now show that anandamide serves as an effective reinforcer of drug-taking behavior when self-administered intravenously by squirrel monkeys. We also show that methanandamide, a synthetic long-lasting anandamide analog, similarly serves as a reinforcer of drug-taking behavior. Finally, we show that the reinforcing effects of both anandamide and methanandamide are blocked by pretreatment with the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716). These findings strongly suggest that release of endogenous cannabinoids is involved in brain reward processes and that activation of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors by anandamide could be part of the signaling of natural rewarding events.

  12. Inhibition of fatty-acid amide hydrolase enhances cannabinoid stress-induced analgesia: sites of action in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray and rostral ventromedial medulla.

    PubMed

    Suplita, Richard L; Farthing, Jesse N; Gutierrez, Tannia; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2005-12-01

    Recent research in our laboratory has demonstrated that stress activates an endogenous cannabinoid mechanism that suppresses sensitivity to pain [Nature 435 (2005) 1108]. In this work, CB(1) antagonists administered systemically blocked stress-induced analgesia induced by brief, continuous foot-shock. The present studies were conducted to examine the role of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the brainstem rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and midbrain dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) in cannabinoid stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Pharmacological blockade of vanilloid TRPV1 receptors with capsazepine, administered systemically, did not alter cannabinoid SIA, suggesting that cannabinoid SIA was not dependent upon TRPV1. Microinjection of the competitive CB(1) antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A) into either the RVM or dorsolateral PAG suppressed stress antinociception in this model. Rimonabant was maximally effective following microinjection into the dorsolateral PAG. The fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5-HT) was subsequently used to block hydrolysis of endocannabinoids and enhance SIA. Systemic and site-specific injections of AA-5-HT into either the dorsolateral PAG or RVM induced CB(1)-mediated enhancements of SIA. Palmitoyltrifluoromethylketone, a potent inhibitor of FAAH and phospholipase A2 activity, administered systemically, exerted similar effects. In all conditions, the antinociceptive effects of each FAAH inhibitor were completely blocked by coadministration of the CB(1) antagonist rimonabant. The present results provide evidence that a descending cannabinergic neural system is activated by environmental stressors to modulate pain sensitivity in a CB(1)-dependent manner.

  13. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-González, Maria; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS. PMID:27589806

  14. Rimonabant improves obesity but not the overall cardiovascular risk and quality of life; results from CARDIO-REDUSE (CArdiometabolic Risk reDuctIOn by Rimonabant: the Effectiveness in Daily practice and its USE).

    PubMed

    Boesten, Jolien E J; Kaper, Janneke; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Kroon, Abraham A; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2012-10-01

    Rimonabant treatment, examined in Phase 3 trials, showed improvement of cardiovascular risk factors in obese patients. The objective of this Phase 4 trial is to assess the effectiveness of rimonabant plus lifestyle counselling when used in daily practice, namely in the general practice. The hypothesis was that the effectiveness in Phase 4 would be smaller than the efficacy in Phase 3 due to different patient selection and treatment conditions. At the end of this trial, rimonabant was suspended of all markets due to psychiatric side effects. This trial randomly assigned 222 patients with enlarged waist circumferences and hyperglycaemia or diabetes mellitus type 2, recruited from Dutch general practices, to double-blinded therapy with either placebo or rimonabant (20 mg/day) for 1 year in addition to lifestyle counselling. Compared with placebo, the rimonabant group showed significant improvements in body weight, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and the main outcome waist circumference after 1 year. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk calculation showed no significant difference. The rimonabant group showed statistically deterioration, compared with the placebo group, in the quality of life in the EuroQol and two domains of the SF-36: role limitations due to physical health problems and bodily pain. The unique real life data of this Phase 4 trial showed that the effectiveness of rimonabant in daily practice is indeed lower than in controlled circumstances (Phase 3). Rimonabant treatment showed improvement of obesity and the HDL cholesterol, but had no positive effect on the other cardiovascular risk factors and the quality of life.

  15. Rimonabant for prevention of cardiovascular events (CRESCENDO): a randomised, multicentre, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Topol, Eric J; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Fox, Keith A A; Creager, Mark A; Despres, Jean-Pierre; Easton, J Donald; Hamm, Christian W; Montalescot, Gilles; Steg, P Gabriel; Pearson, Thomas A; Cohen, Eric; Gaudin, Christophe; Job, Bernard; Murphy, Judith H; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2010-08-14

    Blockade of the endocannabinoid receptor reduces obesity and improves metabolic abnormalities such as triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose. We assessed whether rimonabant would improve major vascular event-free survival. This double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken in 974 hospitals in 42 countries. 18,695 patients with previously manifest or increased risk of vascular disease were randomly assigned to receive either rimonabant 20 mg (n=9381) or matching placebo (n=9314). Randomisation was stratified by centre, implemented with an independent interactive voice response system, and all study personnel and participants were masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint was the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke, as determined via central adjudication. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00263042. At a mean follow-up of 13.8 months (95% CI 13.6-14.0), the trial was prematurely discontinued because of concerns by health regulatory authorities in three countries about suicide in individuals receiving rimonabant. All randomised participants were analysed. At the close of the trial (Nov 6, 2008), the composite primary endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 364 (3.9%) patients assigned to rimonabant and 375 (4.0%) assigned to placebo (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% CI 0.84-1.12, p=0.68). With rimonabant, gastrointestinal (3038 [33%] vs 2084 [22%]), neuropsychiatric (3028 [32%] vs 1989 [21%]), and serious psychiatric side-effects (232 [2.5%] vs 120 [1.3%]) were significantly increased compared with placebo. Four patients in the rimonabant group and one in the placebo group committed suicide. The premature termination of this trial has important lessons for drug development. A drug that was being marketed for weight loss, but being tested for improving cardiovascular outcomes, induced a level of serious

  16. Role of the Endogenous Cannabinoid System in Nicotine Addiction: Novel Insights

    PubMed Central

    Gamaleddin, Islam Hany; Trigo, Jose M.; Gueye, Aliou B.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R.; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that the endogenous cannabinoids are implicated in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Notably, preclinical and human clinical studies have shown a pivotal role of the cannabinoid system in nicotine addiction. The CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant (also known as SR141716) was effective to decrease nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking in rodents, as well as the elevation of dopamine induced by nicotine in brain reward area. Rimonabant has been shown to improve the ability of smokers to quit smoking in randomized clinical trials. However, rimonabant was removed from the market due to increased risk of psychiatric side-effects observed in humans. Recently, other components of the endogenous cannabinoid system have been explored. Here, we present the recent advances on the understanding of the role of the different components of the cannabinoid system on nicotine’s effects. Those recent findings suggest possible alternative ways of modulating the cannabinoid system that could have implication for nicotine dependence treatment. PMID:25859226

  17. Effects of cannabinoid drugs on the reinforcing properties of food in gestationally undernourished rats.

    PubMed

    Wakley, Alexa A; Rasmussen, Erin B

    2009-11-01

    Involvement of the endocannabinoids in hyperphagia has been demonstrated, however, behavioral characterization of its role in food reinforcement is limited. The present study investigated whether 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, an endocannabinoid ligand, and rimonabant, a CB1 antagonist, change the reinforcing properties of food in gestationally undernourished rats (a putative model of obesity) vs controls. Albino dams were food deprived by 0 to 45% of their free-feeding weights up to day 18 of their gestational period. Their offspring were allowed to free-feed until postnatal day 75. Then, behavior of the offspring was placed under progressive ratio schedules of sucrose reinforcement. After baseline data were established, intraperitoneal injections of 2-AG (0.03-3.75 mg/kg), and rimonabant (SR141716, 0.3-3.0 mg/kg) were administered and compared across group. Results show gestationally undernourished (GU) rats as adults weighed less than controls at the time of testing and female offspring allowed to free-feed for over 35 weeks exhibited lower body weights than controls. Under baseline, GU rats had lower breakpoints than controls. 2-AG and rimonabant significantly increased and decreased, respectively, breakpoint and responses made per session, suggesting involvement of the cannabinoid system in food reinforcement. When comparing peak doses of 2-AG on breakpoint, gestationally undernourished rats exhibited lower peak doses than controls. These data suggest that under the gestation deprivation method employed, GU rats were thinner and had lower food reinforcer efficacy than controls, and may have heightened sensitivity to 2-AG.

  18. Rimonabant Eliminates Responsiveness to Workload Changes in a Time-Constrained Food-Reinforced Progressive Ratio Procedure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marusich, Julie A.; Wiley, Jenny L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its propensity to increase motivation for food consumption, marijuana use in humans has been associated with “amotivational syndrome.” This “amotivational syndrome” can be characterized by a reduction in response persistence in tasks requiring sustained, but not maximal, effort. To examine this hypothesis, dose-effect functions for THC (0.03–10 mg/kg) and rimonabant (0.1–10 mg/kg) were first determined under a time-constrained PR 5 schedule. During the second phase of the study, doses of THC and rimonabant that did not affect the responses/total reinforced responses were chosen for further evaluation in a series of PR schedules with step sizes of PR 3, PR 5, PR 10, and PR exponential. THC and rimonabant produced decreases in responses per reinforcer, and response rate when behavior was maintained on a PR 5. Rimonabant also decreased session length. During the PR step size manipulation phase, rimonabant decreased responses/total reinforced responses, response rate, and session length, whereas THC only decreased response rate. These results are consistent with previous literature demonstrating that rimonabant decreases motivation for food both in cases where it is earned, as well as under free-feeding conditions, whereas the effects of cannabinoid agonists such as THC on responding for food exhibit greater dependence upon motivational and non-motivational factors, including workload and duration of the task. PMID:22425597

  19. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonists for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kate; Ussher, Michael H

    2011-03-16

    Selective type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor antagonists may assist with smoking cessation by restoring the balance of the endocannabinoid system, which can be disrupted by prolonged use of nicotine. They also seeks to address many smokers' reluctance to persist with a quit attempt because of concerns about weight gain. To determine whether selective CB1 receptor antagonists (currently rimonabant and taranabant) increase the numbers of people stopping smoking To assess their effects on weight change in successful quitters and in those who try to quit but fail. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Review Group specialized register for trials, using the terms ('rimonabant' or 'taranabant') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, using major MESH terms. We acquired electronic or paper copies of posters of preliminary trial results presented at the American Thoracic Society Meeting in 2005, and at the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco European Meeting 2006. We also attempted to contact the authors of ongoing studies of rimonabant, and Sanofi Aventis (manufacturers of rimonabant). The most recent search was in January 2011. Types of studies Randomized controlled trialsTypes of participants Adult smokersTypes of interventions Selective CB1 receptor antagonists, such as rimonabant and taranabant. Types of outcome measures The primary outcome is smoking status at a minimum of six months after the start of treatment. We preferred sustained cessation rates to point prevalence, and biochemically verified cessation to self-reported quitting. We regarded smokers who drop out or are lost to follow up as continuing smokers. We have noted any adverse effects of treatment.A secondary outcome is weight change associated with the cessation attempt. Two authors checked the abstracts for relevance, and attempted to acquire full trial reports. One author extracted the data, and a second author checked

  20. Apparent CB1 Receptor Rimonabant Affinity Estimates: Combination with THC and Synthetic Cannabinoids in the Mouse In Vivo Triad Model.

    PubMed

    Grim, T W; Morales, A J; Thomas, B F; Wiley, J L; Endres, G W; Negus, S S; Lichtman, A H

    2017-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) represent an emerging class of abused drugs associated with psychiatric complications and other substantial health risks. These ligands are largely sold over the internet for human consumption, presumably because of their high cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) affinity and their potency in eliciting pharmacological effects similar to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), as well as circumventing laws illegalizing this plant. Factors potentially contributing to the increased prevalence of SC abuse and related hospitalizations, such as increased CB1R efficacy and non-CB1R targets, highlight the need for quantitative pharmacological analyses to determine receptor mediation of the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids. Accordingly, the present study used pA2 and pKB analyses for quantitative determination of CB1R mediation in which we utilized the CB1R-selective inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant to elicit rightward shifts in the dose-response curves of five SCs (i.e., A-834,735D; WIN55,212-2; CP55,950; JWH-073; and CP47,497) and THC in producing common cannabimimetic effects (i.e., catalepsy, antinociception, and hypothermia). The results revealed overall similarity of pA2 and pKB values for these compounds and suggest that CB1Rs, and not other pharmacological targets, largely mediated the central pharmacological effects of SCs. More generally, affinity estimation offers a powerful pharmacological approach to assess potential receptor heterogeneity subserving in vivo pharmacological effects of SCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Effect of Intermittent Hypoxia and Rimonabant on Glucose Metabolism in Rats: Involvement of Expression of GLUT4 in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoya; Yu, Qin; Yue, Hongmei; Zeng, Shuang; Cui, Fenfen

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its main feature, chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, is closely associated with insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. Rimonabant can regulate glucose metabolism and improve IR. The present study aimed to assess the effect of IH and rimonabant on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and to explore the possible mechanisms. Material/Methods Thirty-two rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups: Control group, subjected to intermittent air only; IH group, subjected to IH only; IH+NS group, subjected to IH and treated with normal saline; and IH+Rim group, subjected to IH and treated with 10 mg/kg/day of rimonabant. All rats were killed after 28 days of exposure. Then, the blood and skeletal muscle were collected. We measured fasting blood glucose levels, fasting blood insulin levels, and the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in both mRNA and protein levels in skeletal muscle. Results IH can slow weight gain, increase serum insulin level, and reduce insulin sensitivity in rats. The expressions of GLUT4 mRNA, total GLUT4, and plasma membrane protein of GLUT4 (PM GLUT4) in skeletal muscle were decreased. Rimonabant treatment was demonstrated to improve weight gain and insulin sensitivity of the rats induced by IH. Rimonabant significantly upregulated the expression of GLUT4 mRNA, PM GLUT4, and total GLUT4 in skeletal muscle. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that IH can cause IR and reduced expression of GLUT4 in both mRNA and protein levels in skeletal muscle of rats. Rimonabant treatment can improve IH – induced IR, and the upregulation of GLUT4 expression may be involved in this process. PMID:26503060

  2. Acute and chronic systemic CB1 cannabinoid receptor blockade improves blood pressure regulation and metabolic profile in hypertensive (mRen2)27 rats.

    PubMed

    Schaich, Chris L; Shaltout, Hossam A; Brosnihan, K Bridget; Howlett, Allyn C; Diz, Debra I

    2014-08-01

    We investigated acute and chronic effects of CB1 cannabinoid receptor blockade in renin-angiotensin system-dependent hypertension using rimonabant (SR141716A), an orally active antagonist with central and peripheral actions. In transgenic (mRen2)27 rats, a model of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension with increased body mass and insulin resistance, acute systemic blockade of CB1 receptors significantly reduced blood pressure within 90 min but had no effect in Sprague-Dawley rats. No changes in metabolic hormones occurred with the acute treatment. During chronic CB1 receptor blockade, (mRen2)27 rats received daily oral administration of SR141716A (10 mg/kg/day) for 28 days. Systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced within 24 h, and at Day 21 of treatment values were 173 mmHg in vehicle versus 149 mmHg in drug-treated rats (P < 0.01). This accompanied lower cumulative weight gain (22 vs. 42 g vehicle; P < 0.001), fat mass (2.0 vs. 2.9% of body weight; P < 0.05), and serum leptin (2.8 vs. 6.0 ng/mL; P < 0.05) and insulin (1.0 vs. 1.9 ng/mL; P < 0.01), following an initial transient decrease in food consumption. Conscious hemodynamic recordings indicate twofold increases occurred in spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (P < 0.05) and heart rate variability (P < 0.01), measures of cardiac vagal tone. The beneficial actions of CB1 receptor blockade in (mRen2)27 rats support the interpretation that an upregulated endocannabinoid system contributes to hypertension and impaired autonomic function in this angiotensin II-dependent model. We conclude that systemic CB1 receptor blockade may be an effective therapy for angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and associated metabolic syndrome.

  3. The endocannabinoid system and rimonabant: a new drug with a novel mechanism of action involving cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonism--or inverse agonism--as potential obesity treatment and other therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Xie, S; Furjanic, M A; Ferrara, J J; McAndrew, N R; Ardino, E L; Ngondara, A; Bernstein, Y; Thomas, K J; Kim, E; Walker, J M; Nagar, S; Ward, S J; Raffa, R B

    2007-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that the endocannabinoid (endogenous cannabinoid) system plays a significant role in appetitive drive and associated behaviours. It is therefore reasonable to hypothesize that the attenuation of the activity of this system would have therapeutic benefit in treating disorders that might have a component of excess appetitive drive or over-activity of the endocannabinoid system, such as obesity, ethanol and other drug abuse, and a variety of central nervous system and other disorders. Towards this end, antagonists of cannabinoid receptors have been designed through rational drug discovery efforts. Devoid of the abuse concerns that confound and impede the use of cannabinoid receptor agonists for legitimate medical purposes, investigation of the use of cannabinoid receptor antagonists as possible pharmacotherapeutic agents is currently being actively investigated. The compound furthest along this pathway is rimonabant, a selective CB(1) (cannabinoid receptor subtype 1) antagonist, or inverse agonist, approved in the European Union and under regulatory review in the United States for the treatment of obesity. This article summarizes the basic science of the endocannabinoid system and the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid receptor antagonists, with emphasis on the treatment of obesity.

  4. Oleoylethanolamide: A Novel Potential Pharmacological Alternative to Cannabinoid Antagonists for the Control of Appetite

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Adele; Coccurello, Roberto; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Bedse, Gaurav; Moles, Anna; Gaetani, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    The initial pharmaceutical interest for the endocannabinoid system as a target for antiobesity therapies has been restricted by the severe adverse effects of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. This study points at oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a monounsaturated analogue, and functional antagonist of anandamide, as a potential and safer antiobesity alternative to CB1 antagonism. Mice treated with equal doses (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) of OEA or rimonabant were analyzed for the progressive expression of spontaneous behaviors (eating, grooming, rearing, locomotion, and resting) occurring during the development of satiety, according to the paradigm called behavioral satiety sequence (BSS). Both drugs reduced food (wet mash) intake to a similar extent. OEA treatment decreased eating activity within the first 30 min and caused a temporary increase of resting time that was not accompanied by any decline of horizontal, vertical and total motor activity. Besides decreasing eating activity, rimonabant caused a marked increase of the time spent grooming and decreased horizontal motor activity, alterations that might be indicative of aversive nonmotivational effects on feeding. These results support the idea that OEA suppresses appetite by stimulating satiety and that its profile of action might be predictive of safer effects in humans as a novel antiobesity treatment. PMID:24800213

  5. Oleoylethanolamide: a novel potential pharmacological alternative to cannabinoid antagonists for the control of appetite.

    PubMed

    Romano, Adele; Coccurello, Roberto; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Bedse, Gaurav; Moles, Anna; Gaetani, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    The initial pharmaceutical interest for the endocannabinoid system as a target for antiobesity therapies has been restricted by the severe adverse effects of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. This study points at oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a monounsaturated analogue, and functional antagonist of anandamide, as a potential and safer antiobesity alternative to CB1 antagonism. Mice treated with equal doses (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) of OEA or rimonabant were analyzed for the progressive expression of spontaneous behaviors (eating, grooming, rearing, locomotion, and resting) occurring during the development of satiety, according to the paradigm called behavioral satiety sequence (BSS). Both drugs reduced food (wet mash) intake to a similar extent. OEA treatment decreased eating activity within the first 30 min and caused a temporary increase of resting time that was not accompanied by any decline of horizontal, vertical and total motor activity. Besides decreasing eating activity, rimonabant caused a marked increase of the time spent grooming and decreased horizontal motor activity, alterations that might be indicative of aversive nonmotivational effects on feeding. These results support the idea that OEA suppresses appetite by stimulating satiety and that its profile of action might be predictive of safer effects in humans as a novel antiobesity treatment.

  6. Inhibition of Wnt/β-Catenin pathway and Histone acetyltransferase activity by Rimonabant: a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Proto, Maria Chiara; Fiore, Donatella; Piscopo, Chiara; Franceschelli, Silvia; Bizzarro, Valentina; Laezza, Chiara; Lauro, Gianluigi; Feoli, Alessandra; Tosco, Alessandra; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Sbardella, Gianluca; Bifulco, Maurizio; Gazzerro, Patrizia

    2017-09-15

    In a high percentage (≥85%) of both sporadic and familial adenomatous polyposis forms of colorectal cancer (CRC), the inactivation of the APC tumor suppressor gene initiates tumor formation and modulates the Wnt/β-Catenin transduction pathways involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and metastasis. Increasing evidence showed that the endocannabinoids control tumor growth and progression, both in vitro and in vivo. We evaluated the effect of Rimonabant, a Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) inverse agonist, on the Wnt/β-Catenin pathway in HCT116 and SW48 cell lines carrying the genetic profile of metastatic CRC poorly responsive to chemotherapies. In these models, Rimonabant inhibited the Wnt/β-Catenin canonical pathway and increased β-Catenin phosphorylation; in HCT116 cells, but not in SW48, the compound also triggered the Wnt/β-Catenin non canonical pathway activation through induction of Wnt5A and activation of CaMKII. The Rimonabant-induced downregulation of Wnt/β-Catenin target genes was partially ascribable to a direct inhibition of p300/KAT3B histone acetyltransferase, a coactivator of β-Catenin dependent gene regulation. Finally, in HCT116 xenografts, Rimonabant significantly reduced tumor growth and destabilized the nuclear localization of β-Catenin. Obtained data heavily supported the rationale for the use of cannabinoids in combined therapies for metastatic CRC harbouring activating mutations of β-Catenin.

  7. Neuroprotective potential of adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists in an animal model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Silvia; Levandis, Giovanna; Ambrosi, Giulia; Montepeloso, Elena; Antoninetti, Gian Filippo; Franco, Rafael; Lanciego, José Luis; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Pinna, Annalisa; Blandini, Fabio; Armentero, Marie Therese

    2014-05-01

    The development of nondopaminergic therapeutic strategies that may improve motor and nonmotor deficits, while possibly slowing down the neurodegenerative process and associated neuroinflammation,is a primary goal of Parkinson disease (PD) research. We investigated the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory potential of combined and single treatment with adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists MSX-3 and rimonabant, respectively, in a rodent model of PD. Rats bearing a unilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion were treated chronically with MSX-3 (0.5or 1 mg/kg/d) and rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg/d) given as monotherapy or combined. The effects of the treatments to counteract dopaminergic cell death and neuroinflammation were assessed by immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and glial cell markers, respectively. Both rimonabant and MSX-3 (1 mg/kg/d) promoted dopaminergic neuron survival in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) when given alone; this effect was weakened when the compounds were combined. Glial activation was not significantly affected by MSX-3 (1 mg/kg/d), whereas rimonabant seemed to increase astrocyte cell density in the SNc. Our findings demonstrate the neuroprotective potential of single treatments and suggest that glial cells might be involved in this protective effect. The results also indicate that the neuroprotective potential of combined therapy may not necessarily reflect or promote single-drug effects and point out that special care should be taken when considering multidrug therapies in PD.

  8. Roles for the endocannabinoid system in ethanol-motivated behavior

    PubMed Central

    Henderson-Redmond, Angela N; Guindon, Josée; Morgan, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder represents a significant human health problem that leads to substantial loss of human life and financial cost to society. Currently available treatment options do not adequately address this human health problem, and thus, additional therapies are desperately needed. The endocannabinoid system has been shown, using animal models, to modulate ethanol-motivated behavior, and it has also been demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure can have potentially long-lasting effects on the endocannabinoid system. For example, chronic exposure to ethanol, in either cell culture or preclinical rodent models, causes an increase in endocannabinoid levels that results in down-regulation of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and uncoupling of this receptor from downstream G protein signaling pathways. Using positron emission tomography (PET), similar down-regulation of CB1 has been noted in multiple regions of the brain in human alcoholic patients. In rodents, treatment with the CB1 inverse agonist SR141716A (Rimonabant), or genetic deletion of CB1 leads to a reduction in voluntary ethanol drinking, ethanol-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, operant self-administration of ethanol, sensitization to the locomotor effects of ethanol, and reinstatement/relapse of ethanol-motivated behavior. Although the clinical utility of Rimonabant or other antagonists/inverse agonists for CB1 is limited due to negative neuropsychiatric side effects, negative allosteric modulators of CB1 and inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolism represent therapeutic targets worthy of additional examination. PMID:26123153

  9. Roles for the endocannabinoid system in ethanol-motivated behavior.

    PubMed

    Henderson-Redmond, Angela N; Guindon, Josée; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-02-04

    Alcohol use disorder represents a significant human health problem that leads to substantial loss of human life and financial cost to society. Currently available treatment options do not adequately address this human health problem, and thus, additional therapies are desperately needed. The endocannabinoid system has been shown, using animal models, to modulate ethanol-motivated behavior, and it has also been demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure can have potentially long-lasting effects on the endocannabinoid system. For example, chronic exposure to ethanol, in either cell culture or preclinical rodent models, causes an increase in endocannabinoid levels that results in down-regulation of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and uncoupling of this receptor from downstream G protein signaling pathways. Using positron emission tomography (PET), similar down-regulation of CB1 has been noted in multiple regions of the brain in human alcoholic patients. In rodents, treatment with the CB1 inverse agonist SR141716A (Rimonabant), or genetic deletion of CB1 leads to a reduction in voluntary ethanol drinking, ethanol-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, operant self-administration of ethanol, sensitization to the locomotor effects of ethanol, and reinstatement/relapse of ethanol-motivated behavior. Although the clinical utility of Rimonabant or other antagonists/inverse agonists for CB1 is limited due to negative neuropsychiatric side effects, negative allosteric modulators of CB1 and inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolism represent therapeutic targets worthy of additional examination.

  10. Pharmacological activation/inhibition of the cannabinoid system affects alcohol withdrawal-induced neuronal hypersensitivity to excitotoxic insults.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Marina; Villain, Hélène; Docagne, Fabian; Roussel, Benoit D; Ramos, José Antonio; Vivien, Denis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; Ali, Carine

    2011-01-01

    Cessation of chronic ethanol consumption can increase the sensitivity of the brain to excitotoxic damages. Cannabinoids have been proposed as neuroprotectants in different models of neuronal injury, but their effect have never been investigated in a context of excitotoxicity after alcohol cessation. Here we examined the effects of the pharmacological activation/inhibition of the endocannabinoid system in an in vitro model of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal followed by an excitotoxic challenge. Ethanol withdrawal increased N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked neuronal death, probably by altering the ratio between GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. The stimulation of the endocannabinoid system with the cannabinoid agonist HU-210 decreased NMDA-induced neuronal death exclusively in ethanol-withdrawn neurons. This neuroprotection could be explained by a decrease in NMDA-stimulated calcium influx after the administration of HU-210, found exclusively in ethanol-withdrawn neurons. By contrast, the inhibition of the cannabinoid system with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) during ethanol withdrawal increased death of ethanol-withdrawn neurons without any modification of NMDA-stimulated calcium influx. Moreover, chronic administration of rimonabant increased NMDA-stimulated toxicity not only in withdrawn neurons, but also in control neurons. In summary, we show for the first time that the stimulation of the endocannabinoid system is protective against the hyperexcitability developed during alcohol withdrawal. By contrast, the blockade of the endocannabinoid system is highly counterproductive during alcohol withdrawal.

  11. The endocannabinoid signaling system: a potential target for next-generation therapeutics for alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.

    2007-01-01

    Research into the endocannabinoid signaling system has grown exponentially in recent years following the discovery of cannabinoid receptors (CB) and their endogenous ligands, such as anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Important advances have been made in our understanding of the endocannabinoid signaling system in various aspects of alcoholism, including alcohol-seeking behavior. Alcohol increases the synthesis or impairs the degradation of endocannabinoids, leading to a locally elevated endocannabinoid tone within the brain. Elevated endocannabinoid tone might be expected to result in compensatory down-regulation of CB1 receptors or dampened signal transduction. Following release, endocannabinoids diffuse back to the presynaptic neuron where they act as short-range modulators of synaptic activity by altering neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Mice treated with the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (rimonabant) or homozygous for a deletion of the CB1 receptor gene exhibit reduced voluntary alcohol intake. CB1 knockout mice also show increased alcohol sensitivity, withdrawal, and reduced conditioned place preference. Conversely, activation of CB1 receptor promotes alcohol intake. Recent studies also suggest that elevated endocannabinoid tone due to impaired degradation contributes to high alcohol preference and self-administration. These effects are reversed by local administration of rimonabant, suggesting the participation of the endocannabinoid signaling system in high alcohol preference and self-administration. These recent advances will be reviewed with an emphasis on the endocannabinoid signaling system for possible therapeutic interventions of alcoholism. PMID:17692039

  12. The future of endocannabinoid-oriented clinical research after CB1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Bernard; Gorelick, David A; Goldberg, Steven R

    2009-07-01

    Great interest has been shown by the medical community and the public in the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonists, such as rimonabant, for treatment of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and possibly drug addiction. This novel class of drug has therapeutic potential for other disorders, as the endocannabinoid system is involved in various health conditions. However, rimonabant, the first clinically available member of this class of drugs, has been linked to increased risk of anxiety, depression, and suicidality. Due to those risks, the European Medicines Agency called for its withdrawal from the market in October, 2008. Shortly after this decision, several pharmaceutical companies (Sanofi-aventis, Merck, Pfizer, Solvay) announced that they would stop further clinical research on this class of drug. Here, we provide an overview of those events and make several suggestions for continuing such clinical research, while safeguarding the safety of patients and clinical trial subjects.

  13. Rimonabant reduces the essential value of food in the genetically obese Zucker rat: an exponential demand analysis.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Erin B; Reilly, William; Buckley, Jessica; Boomhower, Steven R

    2012-02-01

    Research on free-food intake suggests that cannabinoids are implicated in the regulation of feeding. Few studies, however, have characterized how environmental factors that affect food procurement interact with cannabinoid drugs that reduce food intake. Demand analysis provides a framework to understand how cannabinoid blockers, such as rimonabant, interact with effort in reducing demand for food. The present study examined the effects rimonabant had on demand for sucrose in obese Zucker rats when effort to obtain food varied and characterized the data using the exponential ("essential value") model of demand. Twenty-nine male (15 lean, 14 obese) Zucker rats lever-pressed under eight fixed ratio (FR) schedules of sucrose reinforcement, in which the number of lever-presses to gain access to a single sucrose pellet varied between 1 and 300. After behavior stabilized under each FR schedule, acute doses of rimonabant (1-10mg/kg) were administered prior to some sessions. The number of food reinforcers and responses in each condition was averaged and the exponential and linear demand equations were fit to the data. These demand equations quantify the value of a reinforcer by its sensitivity to price (FR) increases. Under vehicle conditions, obese Zucker rats consumed more sucrose pellets than leans at smaller fixed ratios; however, they were equally sensitive to price increases with both models of demand. Rimonabant dose-dependently reduced reinforcers and responses for lean and obese rats across all FR schedules. Data from the exponential analysis suggest that rimonabant dose-dependently increased elasticity, i.e., reduced the essential value of sucrose, a finding that is consistent with graphical depictions of normalized demand curves.

  14. Intrinsic effects of AM4113, a putative neutral CB1 receptor selective antagonist, on open-field behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Järbe, T.U.C.; LeMay, B.J.; Olzewska, T.; Vemuri, V.K.; Wood, J.T.; Makriyannis, A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined open-field effects in rats of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 3 mg/kg) and its interaction with the CB1R putative neutral antagonist AM4113 (0.3 to 3 mg/kg). Separate studies examined AM4113 alone (0.3 to 5.6 mg/kg). Unlike the CB1R antagonist rimonabant, in vitro (e.g., Sink et al., 2007) AM4113 produced no change in cAMP accumulation (neutral antagonism vis-a-vie inverse agonism). Recorded behaviors were: ambulation, rearing, circling, latency, scratching, grooming, defecation, urination and vocalization/squeaking. WIN reduced ambulation and rearing; AM4113 completely (ambulation) or partially (rearing) antagonized these behaviors. WIN alone resulted in circling and an increased latency to leave the start-area; effects blocked by AM4113. AM4113 increased scratching and grooming, effects attenuated but not abolished by WIN. AM4113 alone tended to reduce ambulation and rearing and had no effect on latency or circling. AM4113 alone increased scratching and grooming. Effects on defecation, urination and vocalization were non-significant. The open-field effects of AM4113 are similar to those reported for rimonabant in rats. Yet, unlike the inverse agonists rimonabant and AM251, the putative neutral CB1R antagonist AM4113 did not produce signs of nausea in ferrets and rats (Chambers et al., 2007; Sink et al., 2007). PMID:18640150

  15. Novel pyrazole derivatives as neutral CB₁ antagonists with significant activity towards food intake.

    PubMed

    Manca, Ilaria; Mastinu, Andrea; Olimpieri, Francesca; Falzoi, Matteo; Sani, Monica; Ruiu, Stefania; Loriga, Giovanni; Volonterio, Alessandro; Tambaro, Simone; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Zanda, Matteo; Pinna, Gérard Aimè; Lazzari, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    In spite of rimonabant's withdrawal from the European market due to its adverse effects, interest in the development of drugs based on CB1 antagonists is revamping on the basis of the peculiar properties of this class of compounds. In particular, new strategies have been proposed for the treatment of obesity and/or related risk factors through CB1 antagonists, i.e. by the development of selectively peripherally acting agents or by the identification of neutral CB1 antagonists. New compounds based on the lead CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant have been synthesized with focus on obtaining neutral CB1 antagonists. Amongst the new derivatives described in this paper, the mixture of the two enantiomers (±)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(2-cyclohexyl-1-hydroxyethyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole ((±)-5), and compound 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-[(Z)-2-cyclohexyl-1-fluorovinyl]-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole ((Z)-6), showed interesting pharmacological profiles. According to the preliminary pharmacological evaluation, these novel pyrazole derivatives showed in fact both neutral CB1 antagonism behaviour and significant in vivo activity towards food intake.

  16. Peripheral selectivity of the novel cannabinoid receptor antagonist TM38837 in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Linda E; Fridberg, Marianne; de Kam, Marieke L; Little, Paul B; Jensen, Niels Ole; Kleinloog, Hendrik D; Elling, Christian E; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2013-01-01

    Aim Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists show central side effects, whereas beneficial effects are most likely peripherally mediated. In this study, the peripherally selective CB1 antagonist TM38837 was studied in humans. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. On occasions 1–4, 24 healthy subjects received 5 × 4 mg THC with TM38837 100 mg, 500 mg or placebo, or placebos only. During occasion 5, subjects received placebo TM38837 + THC with rimonabant 60 mg or placebo in parallel groups. Blood collections and pharmacodynamic (PD) effects were assessed frequently. Pharmacokinetics (PK) and PD were quantified using population PK−PD modelling. Results The TM38837 plasma concentration profile was relatively flat compared with rimonabant. TM38837 showed an estimated terminal half-life of 771 h. THC induced effects on VAS feeling high, body sway and heart rate were partly antagonized by rimonabant 60 mg [−26.70% [90% confidence interval (CI) −40.9, −12.6%]; −7.10%, (90%CI −18.1, 5.3%); −7.30%, (90% CI −11.5%, −3.0%) respectively] and TM38837 500 mg [−22.10% (90% CI −34.9, −9.4%); −12.20% (90% CI −21.6%, −1.7%); −8.90% (90% CI −12.8%, −5.1%) respectively]. TM38837 100 mg had no measurable feeling high or body sway effects and limited heart rate effects. Conclusions Rimonabant showed larger effects than TM38837, but the heart rate effects were similar. TM38837 100 mg had no impact on CNS effects, suggesting that this dose does not penetrate the brain. This TM38837 dose is predicted to be at least equipotent to rimonabant with regard to metabolic disorders in rodent models. These results provide support for further development of TM38837 as a peripherally selective CB1 antagonist for indications such as metabolic disorders, with a reduced propensity for psychiatric side effects. PMID:23601084

  17. Reversal of inflammation-induced impairment of glucose uptake in adipocytes by direct effect of CB1 antagonism on adipose tissue macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miranville, Alexandra; Herling, Andreas W; Biemer-Daub, Gabriele; Voss, Marc D

    2010-12-01

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue (AT-MP) is thought to induce insulin resistance and diabetes in obesity. Here, we investigated the effect of the antiobesity drug SR141716 (a CB1 antagonist) on macrophage-mediated inhibition of insulin signaling in adipocytes. THP1 macrophages (THP1) were stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and SR141716 or vehicle. The resulting conditioned medium (CM) was analyzed and incubated on human adipocytes. CM from LPS-stimulated THP1 inhibited insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation in adipocytes, in contrast to CM from nonactivated THP1. Moreover, it contained higher concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and lower levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. SR141716 reduced TNFα production and increased IL-10 secretion, resulting in a rescue of insulin signaling in adipocytes. To confirm these findings in vivo, AT-MP CM from cafeteria diet-fed or Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats that had received SR141716 for 3 weeks were isolated, analyzed, and incubated with adipocytes. Cafeteria diet induced macrophage-mediated inhibition of insulin signaling in adipocytes. Interestingly, SR141716 rescued insulin-induced glucose uptake in adipocytes. Finally, AT-MP CM from obese ZDF rats inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes in contrast to AT-MP CM from lean ZDF rats. After treatment with SR141716, AT-MP CM rescued insulin-induced glucose uptake in adipocytes. In summary, our data indicate that CB1 receptor antagonism in macrophages modified their cytokine production and improved the insulin responsiveness of adipocytes that had been incubated with macrophage CM. Thus, SR141716 ameliorated adipose tissue insulin resistance by direct action on AT-MP demonstrating a novel peripheral mode of action of CB1 antagonism.

  18. Structural and pharmacological analysis of O-2050, a putative neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Breivogel, Christopher S.; Mahadevan, Anu; Pertwee, Roger G.; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Bolognini, Daniele; Huffman, John W.; Walentiny, D. Matthew; Vann, Robert E.; Razdan, Raj K.; Martin, Billy R.

    2010-01-01

    Rimonabant, the prototypic antagonist of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, has been reported to have inverse agonist properties at higher concentrations, which may complicate its use as a tool for mechanistic evaluation of cannabinoid pharmacology. Consequently, recent synthesis efforts have concentrated on discovery of a neutral antagonist using a variety of structural templates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological properties of the putative neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050, a sulfonamide side chain analog of Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinol. O-2050 and related sulfonamide cannabinoids exhibited good affinity for both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. While the other sulfonamide analogs produced cannabinoid agonist effects in vivo (e.g., activity suppression, antinociception, and hypothermia), O-2050 stimulated activity and was inactive in the other two tests. O-2050 also decreased food intake in mice, an effect that was reminiscent of that produced by rimonabant. Unlike rimonabant, however, O-2050 did not block the effects of cannabinoid agonists in vivo, even when administered i.c.v. In contrast, O-2050 antagonized the in vitro effects of cannabinoid agonists in [35S]GTPγS and mouse vas deferens assays without having activity on its own in either assay. Further evaluation revealed that O-2050 fully and dose-dependently substituted for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in a mouse drug discrimination procedure (a cannabinoid agonist effect) and that it inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP signaling with a maximum efficacy of approximately half that of the full agonist CP55,940 [(−)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4(1,1-dimethyl-heptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxy-propyl)cyclohexanol]. Together, these results suggest that O-2050 is not a viable candidate for classification as a neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist. PMID:21114999

  19. Neural Effects of Cannabinoid CB1 Neutral Antagonist Tetrahydrocannabivarin on Food Reward and Aversion in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Tudge, Luke; Williams, Clare; Cowen, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disturbances in the regulation of reward and aversion in the brain may underlie disorders such as obesity and eating disorders. We previously showed that the cannabis receptor subtype (CB1) inverse agonist rimonabant, an antiobesity drug withdrawn due to depressogenic side effects, diminished neural reward responses yet increased aversive responses (Horder et al., 2010). Unlike rimonabant, tetrahydrocannabivarin is a neutral CB1 receptor antagonist (Pertwee, 2005) and may therefore produce different modulations of the neural reward system. We hypothesized that tetrahydrocannabivarin would, unlike rimonabant, leave intact neural reward responses but augment aversive responses. Methods: We used a within-subject, double-blind design. Twenty healthy volunteers received a single dose of tetrahydrocannabivarin (10mg) and placebo in randomized order on 2 separate occasions. We measured the neural response to rewarding (sight and/or flavor of chocolate) and aversive stimuli (picture of moldy strawberries and/or a less pleasant strawberry taste) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Volunteers rated pleasantness, intensity, and wanting for each stimulus. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in subjective ratings. However, tetrahydrocannabivarin increased responses to chocolate stimuli in the midbrain, anterior cingulate cortex, caudate, and putamen. Tetrahydrocannabivarin also increased responses to aversive stimuli in the amygdala, insula, mid orbitofrontal cortex, caudate, and putamen. Conclusions: Our findings are the first to show that treatment with the CB1 neutral antagonist tetrahydrocannabivarin increases neural responding to rewarding and aversive stimuli. This effect profile suggests therapeutic activity in obesity, perhaps with a lowered risk of depressive side effects. PMID:25542687

  20. Kisspeptin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Roseweir, Antonia Kathryn; Millar, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin is now known to be an important regulator of the hypothalamic--pituitary-gonadal axis and is the target of a range of regulators, such as steroid hormone feedback, nutritional and metabolic regulation. Kisspeptin binds to its cognate receptor, KISS1R (also called GPR54), on GnRH neurons and stimulates their activity, which in turn provides an obligatory signal for GnRH secretion-thus gating down-stream events supporting reproduction. The development of peripherally active kisspeptin antagonists could offer a unique therapeutic agent for treating hormone-dependent disorders of reproduction, including precocious puberty, endometriosis, and metastatic prostate cancer. The following chapter discusses the advances made in the search for both peptide and small molecule kisspeptin antagonists and their use in delineating the role of kisspeptin within the reproductive system. To date, four peptide antagonists and one small molecule antagonist have been designed.

  1. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    receptor in WIN-55,212-2 induced cell death, the effect of their antagonists was evaluated using MTT assay. Cells pretreated with 2 jIM of SR141716 ( CB1 ...time-dependent (24-48 h) inhibition of cell growth, blocking of CBi and CB2 receptors by their antagonists SR141716 (CBi) and SR144528 (CB2...tissues: the "central" CB1 receptor (13), and the "peripheral" CB 2 receptor (14). The major purpose of this research supported by the Award W81XWH-04

  2. A PET study comparing receptor occupancy by five selective cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonists in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Hjorth, Stephan; Karlsson, Cecilia; Jucaite, Aurelija; Varnäs, Katarina; Hamrén, Ulrika Wählby; Johnström, Peter; Gulyás, Balázs; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2015-01-01

    There is a medical need for safe and efficacious anti-obesity drugs with acceptable side effect profiles. To mitigate the challenge posed by translating target interaction across species and balancing beneficial vs. adverse effects, a positron emission tomography (PET) approach could help guide clinical dose optimization. Thus, as part of a compound differentiation effort, three novel selective CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonists, developed by AstraZeneca (AZ) for the treatment of obesity, were compared with two clinically tested reference compounds, rimonabant and taranabant, with regard to receptor occupancy relative to dose and exposure. A total of 42 PET measurements were performed in 6 non-human primates using the novel CB1R antagonist radioligand [11C]SD5024. The AZ CB1R antagonists bound in a saturable manner to brain CB1R with in vivo affinities similar to that of rimonabant and taranabant, compounds with proven weight loss efficacy in clinical trials. Interestingly, it was found that exposures corresponding to those needed for optimal clinical efficacy of rimonabant and taranabant resulted in a CB1R occupancy typically around ~20–30%, thus much lower than what would be expected for classical G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists in other therapeutic contexts. These findings are also discussed in relation to emerging literature on the potential usefulness of ‘neutral’ vs. ‘classical’ CB1R (inverse agonist) antagonists. The study additionally highlighted the usefulness of the radioligand [11C]SD5024 as a specific tracer for CB1R in the primate brain, though an arterial input function would ideally be required in future studies to further assure accurate quantitative analysis of specific binding. PMID:25791528

  3. Modulation of l-α-Lysophosphatidylinositol/GPR55 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling by Cannabinoids*

    PubMed Central

    Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Baillie, Gemma; Irving, Andrew J.; Gertsch, Jürg; Greig, Iain R.; Pertwee, Roger G.; Ross, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    GPR55 is activated by l-α-lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) but also by certain cannabinoids. In this study, we investigated the GPR55 pharmacology of various cannabinoids, including analogues of the CB1 receptor antagonist Rimonabant®, CB2 receptor agonists, and Cannabis sativa constituents. To test ERK1/2 phosphorylation, a primary downstream signaling pathway that conveys LPI-induced activation of GPR55, a high throughput system, was established using the AlphaScreen® SureFire® assay. Here, we show that CB1 receptor antagonists can act both as agonists alone and as inhibitors of LPI signaling under the same assay conditions. This study clarifies the controversy surrounding the GPR55-mediated actions of SR141716A; some reports indicate the compound to be an agonist and some report antagonism. In contrast, we report that the CB2 ligand GW405833 behaves as a partial agonist of GPR55 alone and enhances LPI signaling. GPR55 has been implicated in pain transmission, and thus our results suggest that this receptor may be responsible for some of the antinociceptive actions of certain CB2 receptor ligands. The phytocannabinoids Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin, cannabidivarin, and cannabigerovarin are also potent inhibitors of LPI. These Cannabis sativa constituents may represent novel therapeutics targeting GPR55. PMID:22027819

  4. Modulation of L-α-lysophosphatidylinositol/GPR55 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Baillie, Gemma; Irving, Andrew J; Gertsch, Jürg; Greig, Iain R; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2012-01-02

    GPR55 is activated by l-α-lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) but also by certain cannabinoids. In this study, we investigated the GPR55 pharmacology of various cannabinoids, including analogues of the CB1 receptor antagonist Rimonabant®, CB2 receptor agonists, and Cannabis sativa constituents. To test ERK1/2 phosphorylation, a primary downstream signaling pathway that conveys LPI-induced activation of GPR55, a high throughput system, was established using the AlphaScreen® SureFire® assay. Here, we show that CB1 receptor antagonists can act both as agonists alone and as inhibitors of LPI signaling under the same assay conditions. This study clarifies the controversy surrounding the GPR55-mediated actions of SR141716A; some reports indicate the compound to be an agonist and some report antagonism. In contrast, we report that the CB2 ligand GW405833 behaves as a partial agonist of GPR55 alone and enhances LPI signaling. GPR55 has been implicated in pain transmission, and thus our results suggest that this receptor may be responsible for some of the antinociceptive actions of certain CB2 receptor ligands. The phytocannabinoids Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin, cannabidivarin, and cannabigerovarin are also potent inhibitors of LPI. These Cannabis sativa constituents may represent novel therapeutics targeting GPR55.

  5. Hippocampal endocannabinoids inhibit spatial learning and limit spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lianne; McKillop-Smith, Susan; Ross, Nicola L; Pertwee, Roger G; Hampson, Robert E; Platt, Bettina; Riedel, Gernot

    2008-07-01

    As exogenous cannabinoid agonists impair memory formation, could it be that antagonists have opposing effects and act as memory-enhancing drugs? Here, we studied the effects of the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716A (SR; Rimonabant) on spatial learning and memory formation and assessed the possible involvement of hippocampal CB(1) receptor in these actions. In the water maze, spatial reference memory was probed using different training protocols followed by assessment of behavioral flexibility. The CB(1) receptor antagonist SR (3 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered before or immediately after training in experiment 1, or via minipumps intrahippocampally (0.89 ng and 0.089 ng/day) either during or after spatial learning, or subcutaneously in experiment 2. In experiment 1, systemic SR impaired spatial learning when given intraperitoneally (ip) before training coincident with increasing swim speed and thigmotaxis. Pretraining before drug treatment eliminated these effects while post-training injections had no effect. In experiment 2, intrahippocampal infusion of 0.089 ng SR during training enhanced acquisition learning, but did not affect long-term consolidation of spatial memory. In contrast, subcutaneous infusion of SR via minipumps had no effect. Post-training infusion of SR did not affect reversal learning, but short-term memory (1 h post-training) was weaker, and long-term memory for the reversal platform location was enhanced. Systemic Rimonabant-induced deficits are due to anxiogenic properties of the drug. The difference between administration regimes is discussed in terms of CB(1) receptor blockade in multiple non-memory and memory-related brain regions and the possibility that selective inactivation of hippocampal CB(1) receptors may be memory enhancing.

  6. Guineensine is a novel inhibitor of endocannabinoid uptake showing cannabimimetic behavioral effects in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Nicolussi, Simon; Viveros-Paredes, Juan Manuel; Gachet, María Salomé; Rau, Mark; Flores-Soto, Mario Eduardo; Blunder, Martina; Gertsch, Jürg

    2014-02-01

    High-content screening led to the identification of the N-isobutylamide guineensine from Piper nigrum as novel nanomolar inhibitor (EC50=290nM) of cellular uptake of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA). Noteworthy, guineensine did not inhibit endocannabinoid degrading enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) nor interact with cannabinoid receptors or fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), a major cytoplasmic AEA carrier. Activity-based protein profiling showed no inhibition of serine hydrolases. Guineensine also inhibited the cellular uptake of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Preliminary structure-activity relationships between natural guineensine analogs indicate the importance of the alkyl chain length interconnecting the pharmacophoric isobutylamide and benzodioxol moieties for AEA cellular uptake inhibition. Guineensine dose-dependently induced cannabimimetic effects in BALB/c mice shown by strong catalepsy, hypothermia, reduced locomotion and analgesia. The catalepsy and analgesia were blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A). Guineensine is a novel plant natural product which specifically inhibits endocannabinoid uptake in different cell lines independent of FAAH. Its scaffold may be useful to identify yet unknown targets involved in endocannabinoid transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Reverses Kainate-Induced Synchronized Population Burst Firing in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Rob; Cheer, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties in whole animal models of epilepsy. The present investigation sought to examine the effects of cannabinoid receptor activation on kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform neuronal excitability. Under urethane anesthesia, acute KA treatment (10 mg kg−1, i.p.) entrained the spiking mode of simultaneously recorded neurons from random firing to synchronous bursting (% change in burst rate). Injection of the high-affinity cannabinoid agonist (-)-11-hydroxy-8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethyl-heptyl (HU210, 100 μg kg−1, i.p.) following KA markedly reduced the burst frequency (% decrease in burst frequency) and reversed synchronized firing patterns back to baseline levels. Pre-treatment with the central cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonist N-piperidino-5-(4-clorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazole-carboxamide (rimonabant, SR141716A 3 mg kg−1, i.p.) completely prevented the actions of HU210. The present results indicate that cannabinoids exert their antiepileptic effects by impeding pathological synchronization of neuronal networks in the hippocampus. PMID:19562087

  8. Retention and Extinction of Delay Eyeblink Conditioning Are Modulated by Central Cannabinoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Rats administered the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 or the antagonist SR141716A exhibit marked deficits during acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning, as noted by Steinmetz and Freeman in an earlier study. However, the effects of these drugs on retention and extinction of eyeblink conditioning have not been assessed. The present study…

  9. Retention and Extinction of Delay Eyeblink Conditioning Are Modulated by Central Cannabinoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Rats administered the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 or the antagonist SR141716A exhibit marked deficits during acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning, as noted by Steinmetz and Freeman in an earlier study. However, the effects of these drugs on retention and extinction of eyeblink conditioning have not been assessed. The present study…

  10. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  11. Prospective therapeutic agents for obesity: molecular modification approaches of centrally and peripherally acting selective cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayank Kumar; Murumkar, Prashant R; Kanhed, Ashish M; Giridhar, Rajani; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2014-05-22

    Presently, obesity is one of the major health problems in the developed as well as developing countries due to lack of physical work and increasing sedentary life style. Endocannabinoid system (ECS) and especially cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor play a key role in energy homeostasis. Food intake and energy storage is enhanced due to the stimulation of ECS hence, inhibition of ECS by blocking CB1 receptors could be a promising approach in the treatment of obesity. Rimonabant, a diaryl pyrazole was the first potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonist that was introduced into the market in 2006 but was withdrawn in 2008 due to its psychiatric side effects. Researchers all over the world are interested to develop peripherally acting potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonists having a better pharmacokinetic profile and therapeutic index. In this development process, pyrazole ring of rimonabant has been replaced by different bioisosteric scaffolds like pyrrole, imidazole, triazole, pyrazoline, pyridine etc. Variations in substituents around the pyrazole ring have also been done. New strategies were also employed for minimizing the psychiatric side effects by making more polar and less lipophilic antagonists/inverse agonists along with neutral antagonists acting peripherally. It has been observed that some of the peripherally acting compounds do not show adverse effects and could be used as potential leads for the further design of selective CB1 receptor antagonists. Chemical modification strategies used for the development of selective CB1 receptor antagonists are discussed here in this review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural effects of cannabinoid CB1 neutral antagonist tetrahydrocannabivarin on food reward and aversion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tudge, Luke; Williams, Clare; Cowen, Philip J; McCabe, Ciara

    2014-12-25

    Disturbances in the regulation of reward and aversion in the brain may underlie disorders such as obesity and eating disorders. We previously showed that the cannabis receptor subtype (CB1) inverse agonist rimonabant, an antiobesity drug withdrawn due to depressogenic side effects, diminished neural reward responses yet increased aversive responses (Horder et al., 2010). Unlike rimonabant, tetrahydrocannabivarin is a neutral CB1 receptor antagonist (Pertwee, 2005) and may therefore produce different modulations of the neural reward system. We hypothesized that tetrahydrocannabivarin would, unlike rimonabant, leave intact neural reward responses but augment aversive responses. We used a within-subject, double-blind design. Twenty healthy volunteers received a single dose of tetrahydrocannabivarin (10mg) and placebo in randomized order on 2 separate occasions. We measured the neural response to rewarding (sight and/or flavor of chocolate) and aversive stimuli (picture of moldy strawberries and/or a less pleasant strawberry taste) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Volunteers rated pleasantness, intensity, and wanting for each stimulus. There were no significant differences between groups in subjective ratings. However, tetrahydrocannabivarin increased responses to chocolate stimuli in the midbrain, anterior cingulate cortex, caudate, and putamen. Tetrahydrocannabivarin also increased responses to aversive stimuli in the amygdala, insula, mid orbitofrontal cortex, caudate, and putamen. Our findings are the first to show that treatment with the CB1 neutral antagonist tetrahydrocannabivarin increases neural responding to rewarding and aversive stimuli. This effect profile suggests therapeutic activity in obesity, perhaps with a lowered risk of depressive side effects. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  13. Cue-conditioned alcohol seeking in rats following abstinence: involvement of metabotropic glutamate 5 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Adams, CL; Short, JL; Lawrence, AJ

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The current study was designed to: (i) examine whether functional interactions occur between receptors known to regulate alcohol self-administration; and (ii) characterize relapse to alcohol seeking following abstinence. Experimental approach: The selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (0.03–1.0 mg·kg−1 i.p.) resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in ethanol self-administration in ethanol-preferring Indiana-preferring rats. SR141716A was then co-administered with either the selective glutamate metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor antagonist 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine (MTEP) or the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261. Key results: When administered at individually sub-threshold doses, a combination of SR141716A (0.1 mg·kg−1) and SCH58261 (0.5 mg·kg−1 i.p.) produced a reduction (28%) in ethanol self-administration. Combinations of threshold doses of SR141716A (0.3 mg·kg−1) and SCH58261 (2.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) caused an essentially additive reduction (68%) in alcohol self-administration. A combination of individually sub-threshold doses of CB1 and mGlu5 receptor antagonists did not affect alcohol self-administration; however, combined threshold doses of SR141716A (0.3 mg·kg−1) and MTEP (1.0 mg·kg−1 i.p.) did reduce ethanol self-administration markedly (80%). Cue-conditioned alcohol seeking was attenuated by pretreatment with MTEP (1.0 mg·kg−1) co-administered with SR141716A (0.3 mg·kg−1 i.p.). In contrast, SCH58261 (2.0 mg·kg−1) co-administered with SR141716A (0.3 mg·kg−1 i.p.) did not reduce cue-conditioned alcohol seeking. Conclusions and implications: Adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors regulated alcohol self-administration additively, but combined low-dose antagonism of these receptors did not prevent cue-conditioned alcohol seeking after abstinence. In contrast, combined low-dose antagonism of mGlu5 and CB1 receptors did prevent relapse

  14. 6-Alkoxy-5-aryl-3-pyridinecarboxamides, a new series of bioavailable cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists including peripherally selective compounds.

    PubMed

    Röver, Stephan; Andjelkovic, Mirjana; Bénardeau, Agnès; Chaput, Evelyne; Guba, Wolfgang; Hebeisen, Paul; Mohr, Susanne; Nettekoven, Matthias; Obst, Ulrike; Richter, Wolfgang F; Ullmer, Christoph; Waldmeier, Pius; Wright, Matthew B

    2013-12-27

    We identified 6-alkoxy-5-aryl-3-pyridinecarboxamides as potent CB1 receptor antagonists with high selectivity over CB2 receptors. The series was optimized to reduce lipophilicity compared to rimonabant to achieve peripherally active molecules with minimal central effects. Several compounds that showed high plasma exposures in rats were evaluated in vivo to probe the contribution of central vs peripheral CB1 agonism to metabolic improvement. Both rimonabant and 14g, a potent brain penetrant CB1 receptor antagonist, significantly reduced the rate of body weight gain. However, 14h, a molecule with markedly reduced brain exposure, had no significant effect on body weight. PK studies confirmed similarly high exposure of both 14h and 14g in the periphery but 10-fold lower exposure in the brain for 14h. On the basis of these data, which are consistent with reported effects in tissue-specific CB1 receptor KO mice, we conclude that the metabolic benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists are primarily centrally mediated as originally believed.

  15. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists as potential pharmacotherapies for drug abuse disorders.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Patrick M; Thomas, Brian F; McMahon, Lance R

    2009-04-01

    Since the discovery of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) in 1988, and subsequently of the CB2 receptor (CB2R) in 1993, there has been an exponential growth of research investigating the functions of the endocannabinoid system. The roles of CB1Rs have been of particular interest to psychiatry because of their selective presence within the CNS and because of their association with brain-reward circuits involving mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. One potential role that has become of considerable focus is the ability of CB1Rs to modulate the effects of the drugs of abuse. Many drugs of abuse elevate dopamine levels, and the ability of CB1R antagonists or inverse agonists to modulate these elevations has suggested their potential application as pharmacotherapies for treating drug abuse disorders. With the identification of the selective CB1R antagonist, rimonabant, in 1994, and subsequently of other CB1R antagonists, there has been a rapid expansion of research investigating their ability to modulate the effects of the drugs of abuse. This review highlights some of the preclinical and clinical studies that have examined the effects of CB1R antagonists under conditions potentially predictive of their therapeutic efficacy as treatments for drug abuse disorders.

  16. The CB1 endocannabinoid system modulates adipocyte insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Motaghedi, Roja; McGraw, Timothy E

    2008-08-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system regulates energy metabolism through direct effects on peripheral tissues as well as central effects that regulate appetite. Here we examined the effect of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) signaling on insulin action in fat cells. We examined effects of the natural CB1 agonist, 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the synthetic CB1 antagonist, SR141716, on insulin action in cultured adipocytes. We used translocation of glucose transporter GLUT4 to plasma membrane (PM) as a measure of insulin action. 2-AG activation of the CB1 receptor promoted insulin sensitivity whereas antagonism by SR141716 reduced insulin sensitivity. Neither drug affected GLUT4 translocation in the absence of insulin or with high doses of insulin. Consistent with these results we found that insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was increased by 2-AG, attenuated by SR141716, and unaffected in the absence of insulin or by addition of high-dose insulin. These data provide a functional and molecular link between the CB1 receptor and insulin sensitivity, because insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt is required for GLUT4 translocation to the PM. The sensitizing effects of 2-AG were abrogated by SR141716 and Pertussis toxin, indicating that the effects are mediated by CB1 receptor. Importantly, neither 2-AG nor SR141716 alone or in combination with maximal dose of insulin had effects on GLUT4 translocation and Akt phosphorylation. These data are consistent with a model in which the endocannabinoid system sets the sensitivity of the insulin response in adipocytes rather than directly regulating the redistribution of GLUT4 or Akt phosphorylation.

  17. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol as a possible treatment for anorexia nervosa in animal model in mice.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Y; Paturski, I; Magen, I; Vorobiev, L; Berry, E M

    2017-09-01

    We have investigated the effects of 0.001mg/kg 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) administered in combination with compounds present in the body alongside 2-AG like 2-palmitoylglycerol and 2-linoleylglycerol (also termed "entourage"), on cognitive function,food intake, and neurotransmitter levels in the hippocampus and hypothalamus of mice under diet restriction. Young female Sabra mice were treated with vehicle, 2-AG, 2-AG+entourage, 2-AG+entourage+5-(4-Chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichloro-phenyl)- 4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A, a CB1 antagonist) and SR141716A. The mice were fed for 2.5h a day for 14days. Cognitive function was evaluated by the eight arm maze test, and neurotransmitter (norepinephrine, dopamine, L-DOPA and serotonin) levels were measured in the hippocampus and hypothalamus by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. Food intake was increased by 2-AG and, to an even greater extent, by 2-AG+entourage. SR141716A reversed the effect of 2-AG+entourage. The administration of 2-AG+entourage improved cognitive function compared to the vehicle mice, and this improvement was blocked by SR141716A. 2-AG+entourage-treated mice showed an increase in norepinephrine (NE), dopamine and L-DOPA levels in the hippocampus. SR141716A normalized NE and L-DOPA levels. There were no significant changes in hypothalamic neurotransmitter levels. The use of very low doses of the endocannabinoid 2-AG+entourage can improve cognitive function by elevating norepinephrine and L-DOPA levels in the hippocampus, without cannabinomimetic side effects. These findings may have implications for cognitive enhancement in anorexia nervosa. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. CB1 receptor antagonism in the granular insular cortex or somatosensory area facilitates consolidation of object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lesley D; Sticht, Martin A; Mitchnick, Krista A; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Parker, Linda A; Winters, Boyer D

    2014-08-22

    Cannabinoid agonists typically impair memory, whereas CB1 receptor antagonists enhance memory performance under specific conditions. The insular cortex has been implicated in object memory consolidation. Here we show that infusions of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 enhances long-term object recognition memory in rats in a dose-dependent manner (facilitation with 1.5, but not 0.75 or 3 μg/μL) when administered into the granular insular cortex; the SR141716 facilitation was seen with a memory delay of 72 h, but not when the delay was shorter (1 h), consistent with enhancement of memory consolidation. Moreover, a sub-group of rats with cannulas placed in the somatosensory area were also facilitated. These results highlight the robust potential of cannabinoid antagonists to facilitate object memory consolidation, as well as the capacity for insular and somatosensory cortices to contribute to object processing, perhaps through enhancement of tactile representation.

  19. Cannabinoid antagonist SLV326 induces convulsive seizures and changes in the interictal EEG in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Natasja; Heijink, Liesbeth; Kruse, Chris; Vinogradova, Lyudmila; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; van Rijn, Clementina M.

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists have been investigated for possible treatment of e.g. obesity-related disorders. However, clinical application was halted due to their symptoms of anxiety and depression. In addition to these adverse effects, we have shown earlier that chronic treatment with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant may induce EEG-confirmed convulsive seizures. In a regulatory repeat-dose toxicity study violent episodes of “muscle spasms” were observed in Wistar rats, daily dosed with the CB1 receptor antagonist SLV326 during 5 months. The aim of the present follow-up study was to investigate whether these violent movements were of an epileptic origin. In selected SLV326-treated and control animals, EEG and behavior were monitored for 24 hours. 25% of SLV326 treated animals showed 1 to 21 EEG-confirmed generalized convulsive seizures, whereas controls were seizure-free. The behavioral seizures were typical for a limbic origin. Moreover, interictal spikes were found in 38% of treated animals. The frequency spectrum of the interictal EEG of the treated rats showed a lower theta peak frequency, as well as lower gamma power compared to the controls. These frequency changes were state-dependent: they were only found during high locomotor activity. It is concluded that long term blockade of the endogenous cannabinoid system can provoke limbic seizures in otherwise healthy rats. Additionally, SLV326 alters the frequency spectrum of the EEG when rats are highly active, suggesting effects on complex behavior and cognition. PMID:28151935

  20. Cannabinoid antagonist SLV326 induces convulsive seizures and changes in the interictal EEG in rats.

    PubMed

    Perescis, Martin F J; de Bruin, Natasja; Heijink, Liesbeth; Kruse, Chris; Vinogradova, Lyudmila; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; van Rijn, Clementina M

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists have been investigated for possible treatment of e.g. obesity-related disorders. However, clinical application was halted due to their symptoms of anxiety and depression. In addition to these adverse effects, we have shown earlier that chronic treatment with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant may induce EEG-confirmed convulsive seizures. In a regulatory repeat-dose toxicity study violent episodes of "muscle spasms" were observed in Wistar rats, daily dosed with the CB1 receptor antagonist SLV326 during 5 months. The aim of the present follow-up study was to investigate whether these violent movements were of an epileptic origin. In selected SLV326-treated and control animals, EEG and behavior were monitored for 24 hours. 25% of SLV326 treated animals showed 1 to 21 EEG-confirmed generalized convulsive seizures, whereas controls were seizure-free. The behavioral seizures were typical for a limbic origin. Moreover, interictal spikes were found in 38% of treated animals. The frequency spectrum of the interictal EEG of the treated rats showed a lower theta peak frequency, as well as lower gamma power compared to the controls. These frequency changes were state-dependent: they were only found during high locomotor activity. It is concluded that long term blockade of the endogenous cannabinoid system can provoke limbic seizures in otherwise healthy rats. Additionally, SLV326 alters the frequency spectrum of the EEG when rats are highly active, suggesting effects on complex behavior and cognition.

  1. Characterisation of the vasorelaxant properties of the novel endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA).

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse E; Kendall, David A; Randall, Michael D

    2004-03-01

    1. We have investigated the vascular effects of N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA), a novel endocannabinoid/vanilloid. NADA caused vasorelaxant effects comparable to those of anandamide in small mesenteric vessels (G3), the superior mesenteric artery (G0) and in the aorta. 2. In G3, addition of N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (300 microm) or the dopamine (D(1)) receptor antagonist (SCH23390, 1 microm) did not affect responses to NADA. In the presence of 60 mm KCl, after de-endothelialisation, or after K(+) channel inhibition with charybdotoxin (100 nm) and apamin (500 nm), relaxant responses to NADA were inhibited. 3. In G3, pretreatment with the vanilloid receptor (VR) agonist capsaicin (10 microm) or the VR antagonist capsazepine (10 microm) reduced vasorelaxation to NADA. 4. In G3, application of the CB(1) antagonist SR141716A at 1 microm but not 100 nm reduced the potency of NADA. Another CB(1) antagonist, AM251 (100 nm and 1 microm), did not affect vasorelaxation to NADA. After endothelial denudation, SR141716A (1 microm) did not reduce the responses further. A combination of capsaicin and SR141716A (1 microm) reduced vasorelaxation to NADA further than with capsaicin pretreatment alone. The novel endothelial cannabinoid (CB) receptor antagonist O-1918 opposed vasorelaxation to NADA in G3. 5. In the superior mesenteric artery (G0), vasorelaxation to NADA was not dependent on an intact endothelium and was not sensitive to O-1918, but was sensitive to capsaicin and SR141716A or AM251 (both 100 nm). 6. The results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that NADA is a potent vasorelaxant. In G3, the effects of NADA are mediated by stimulation of the VR and the novel endothelial CB receptor, while in G0, vasorelaxation is mediated through VR(1) and CB(1) receptors.

  2. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Cazzola, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Parasympathetic activity is increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma and appears to be the major reversible component of airway obstruction. Therefore, treatment with muscarinic receptor antagonists is an effective bronchodilator therapy in COPD and also in asthmatic patients. In recent years, the accumulating evidence that the cholinergic system controls not only contraction by airway smooth muscle but also the functions of inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells has suggested that muscarinic receptor antagonists could exert other effects that may be of clinical relevance when we must treat a patient suffering from COPD or asthma. There are currently six muscarinic receptor antagonists licenced for use in the treatment of COPD, the short-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (SAMAs) ipratropium bromide and oxitropium bromide and the long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) aclidinium bromide, tiotropium bromide, glycopyrronium bromide and umeclidinium bromide. Concerns have been raised about possible associations of muscarinic receptor antagonists with cardiovascular safety, but the most advanced compounds seem to have an improved safety profile. Further beneficial effects of SAMAs and LAMAs are seen when added to existing treatments, including LABAs, inhaled corticosteroids and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors. The importance of tiotropium bromide in the maintenance treatment of COPD, and likely in asthma, has spurred further research to identify new LAMAs. There are a number of molecules that are being identified, but only few have reached the clinical development.

  3. Critical role of the endogenous cannabinoid system in mouse pup suckling and growth.

    PubMed

    Fride, E; Ginzburg, Y; Breuer, A; Bisogno, T; Di Marzo, V; Mechoulam, R

    2001-05-11

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active principle in marijuana, is a cannabinoid receptor agonist. Both the crude drug and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol have been used as appetite promoters. The endogenous cannabinoid, arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide), likewise a cannabinoid receptor agonist, has been shown to have the same effect. In contrast, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1-H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A) reduces food intake. Here, we report that administration of SR141716A to newly born mouse pups (either a single administration on postnatal day 1, or daily for a week as of postnatal day 2) had a devastating effect on milk ingestion and growth. The first 24 h after birth appeared the most critical for the growth stunting effect of SR141716A. Death followed within 4-8 days. Co-administration of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol almost fully reversed the effect of the antagonist in the week-long regimen. Co-administration of 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, an endocannabinoid, with 2-palmitoyl glycerol and 2-linoleoyl glycerol, which enhance 2-arachidonoyl glycerol potency, resulted in a significant delay in mortality rates caused by the antagonist. We conclude that the endocannabinoid system plays a vital role in milk suckling, and hence in growth and development during the early stages of mouse life.

  4. Metabolic side effects induced by olanzapine treatment are neutralized by CB1 receptor antagonist compounds co-administration in female rats.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, P; Serra, V; Marcello, S; Pira, M; Mastinu, A

    2017-07-01

    Weight gain is an important side effect of most atypical antipsychotic drugs such as olanzapine. Moreover, although many animal models with metabolic side effects have been well defined, the interaction with other pathways has to be considered. The endocannabinoid system and the CB1 receptor (CB1R) are among the most promising central and peripheral targets involved in weight and energy balance. In this study we developed a rat model based 15-days treatment with olanzapine that shows weight gain and an alteration of the blood parameters involved in the regulation of energy balance and glucose metabolism. Consequently, we analysed whether, and by which mechanism, a co-treatment with the novel CB1R neutral antagonist NESS06SM, could attenuate the adverse metabolic effects of olanzapine compared to the reference CB1R inverse agonist rimonabant. Our results showed alterations of the cannabinoid markers in the nucleus accumbens and of orexigenic/anorexigenic markers in the hypothalamus of female rats treated with olanzapine. These molecular modifications could explain the excessive food intake and the resulting weight gain. Moreover, we confirmed that a co-treatment with CB1R antagonist/inverse agonist compounds decreased food intake and weight increment and restored all blood parameters, without altering the positive effects of olanzapine on behaviour. Furthermore, rimonabant and NESS06SM restored the metabolic enzymes in the liver and fat tissue altered by olanzapine. Therefore, CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist compounds could be good candidate agents for the treatment of weight gain induced by olanzapine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. CCR2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Struthers, Mary; Pasternak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of CCR2 has been considered as a target for multiple therapeutic diseases including autoimmune disease, atherosclerosis, pain, and metabolic disease, based in part on the critical role this receptor plays on monocyte migration. Numerous companies have reported programs to identify CCR2 antagonists. Common challenges to the development of CCR2 agents have included poor activity at the rodent receptor and selectivity for both other chemokine receptors and ion channels. This review summarizes the rationale for targeting CCR2 in disease, the recent progress in the identification of potent and select CCR2 antagonists, and the current status of clinical trials for CCR2 agents.

  6. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  7. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  8. delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol excites rat VTA dopamine neurons through activation of cannabinoid CB1 but not opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    French, E D

    1997-05-02

    Behavioral, biochemical and recent electrophysiological data have increasingly implicated the involvement of dopamine in the central actions of cannabinoid compounds. However, the site and mechanism by which cannabinoids stimulate dopamine systems has been somewhat controversial. Central opioid systems have also been suggested to play a role in some cannabinoid-induced behaviors as evidenced by their attenuation in the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone. However, recent studies using the cannabinoid receptor-selective antagonist SR141716A suggest that the central actions of psychoactive cannabinoids are mediated principally through activation of CB1 receptors. Using single cell electrophysiological recordings in the rat we assessed the effects of both SR141716A and naloxone on delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-induced activation of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons. While dopamine cell firing was dose-dependently increased following cumulative dosing with delta9-THC it was partially or completely inhibited following pretreatment with 0.5 and 2 mg/kg SR141716A, respectively. However, 1 and 10 mg/kg naloxone failed to alter the response to delta9-THC. These data provide the first evidence that delta9-THC-induced changes in mesolimbic dopamine neuronal activity are mediated by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, but a causal link for the involvement of opioid systems could not be established.

  9. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  10. Targeting fatty acid amide hydrolase and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 simultaneously to modulate colonic motility and visceral sensation in the mouse: A pharmacological intervention with N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT).

    PubMed

    Bashashati, M; Fichna, J; Piscitelli, F; Capasso, R; Izzo, A A; Sibaev, A; Timmermans, J-P; Cenac, N; Vergnolle, N; Di Marzo, V; Storr, M

    2017-07-11

    Endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) inhibits intestinal motility and visceral pain, but it may also be proalgesic through transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). AEA is degraded by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). This study explored whether dual inhibition of FAAH and TRPV1 reduces diarrhea and abdominal pain. Immunostaining was performed on myenteric plexus of the mouse colon. The effects of the dual FAAH/TRPV1 inhibitor AA-5-HT on electrically induced contractility, excitatory junction potential (EJP) and fast (f) and slow (s) inhibitory junction potentials (IJP) in the mouse colon, colonic propulsion and visceromotor response (VMR) to rectal distension were studied. The colonic levels of endocannabinoids and fatty acid amides were measured. CB1-positive neurons exhibited TRPV1; only some TRPV1 positive neurons did not express CB1. CB1 and FAAH did not colocalize. AA-5-HT (100 nM-10 μM) decreased colonic contractility by ~60%; this effect was abolished by TRPV1 antagonist 5'-IRTX, but not by CB1 antagonist, SR141716. AA-5-HT (1 μM-10 μM) inhibited EJP by ~30% and IJPs by ~50%. The effects of AA-5-HT on junction potentials were reversed by SR141716 and 5`-IRTX. AA-5-HT (20 mg/kg; i.p.) inhibited colonic propulsion by ~30%; SR141716 but not 5`-IRTX reversed this effect. AA-5-HT decreased VMR by ~50%-60%; these effects were not blocked by SR141716 or 5`-IRTX. AA-5-HT increased AEA in the colon. The effects of AA-5-HT on visceral sensation and colonic motility are differentially mediated by CB1, TRPV1 and non-CB1/TRPV1 mechanisms, possibly reflecting the distinct neuromodulatory roles of endocannabinoid and endovanilloid FAAH substrates in the mouse intestine. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cannabinoid-induced mesenteric vasodilation through an endothelial site distinct from CB1 or CB2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Járai, Zoltán; Wagner, Jens A.; Varga, Károly; Lake, Kristy D.; Compton, David R.; Martin, Billy R.; Zimmer, Anne M.; Bonner, Tom I.; Buckley, Nancy E.; Mezey, Eva; Razdan, Raj K.; Zimmer, Andreas; Kunos, George

    1999-01-01

    Cannabinoids, including the endogenous ligand arachidonyl ethanolamide (anandamide), elicit not only neurobehavioral but also cardiovascular effects. Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, have been cloned, and studies with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A have implicated peripherally located CB1 receptors in the hypotensive action of cannabinoids. In rat mesenteric arteries, anandamide-induced vasodilation is inhibited by SR141716A, but other potent CB1 receptor agonists, such as HU-210, do not cause vasodilation, which implicates an as-yet-unidentified receptor in this effect. Here we show that “abnormal cannabidiol” (Abn-cbd) is a neurobehaviorally inactive cannabinoid that does not bind to CB1 receptors, yet causes SR141716A-sensitive hypotension and mesenteric vasodilation in wild-type mice and in mice lacking CB1 receptors or both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Hypotension by Abn-cbd is also inhibited by cannabidiol (20 μg/g), which does not influence anandamide- or HU-210-induced hypotension. In the rat mesenteric arterial bed, Abn-cbd-induced vasodilation is unaffected by blockade of endothelial NO synthase, cyclooxygenase, or capsaicin receptors, but it is abolished by endothelial denudation. Mesenteric vasodilation by Abn-cbd, but not by acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, or capsaicine, is blocked by SR141716A (1 μM) or by cannabidiol (10 μM). Abn-cbd-induced vasodilation is also blocked in the presence of charybdotoxin (100 nM) plus apamin (100 nM), a combination of K+-channel toxins reported to block the release of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These findings suggest that Abn-cbd and cannabidiol are a selective agonist and antagonist, respectively, of an as-yet-unidentified endothelial receptor for anandamide, activation of which elicits NO-independent mesenteric vasodilation, possibly by means of the release of EDHF. PMID:10570211

  12. Advantages of an antagonist: bicuculline and other GABA antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Graham AR

    2013-01-01

    The convulsant alkaloid bicuculline continues to be investigated more than 40 years after the first publication of its action as an antagonist of receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historical perspective highlights key aspects of the discovery of bicuculline as a GABA antagonist and the sustained interest in this and other GABA antagonists. The exciting advances in the molecular biology, pharmacology and physiology of GABA receptors provide a continuing stimulus for the discovery of new antagonists with increasing selectivity for the myriad of GABA receptor subclasses. Interesting GABA antagonists not structurally related to bicuculline include gabazine, salicylidene salicylhydrazide, RU5135 and 4-(3-biphenyl-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazole. Bicuculline became the benchmark antagonist for what became known as GABAA receptors, but not all ionotropic GABA receptors are susceptible to bicuculline. In addition, not all GABAA receptor antagonists are convulsants. Thus there are still surprises in store as the study of GABA receptors evolves. PMID:23425285

  13. Indications for Opioid Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Coppes, O J Michael; Sang, Christine N

    2017-06-01

    As opioids have become more common in clinical practice for the treatment of both acute and chronic pain, so too has the need for a deeper understanding of the clinical applications of opioid antagonists. The purpose of this review is to present both the longstanding and potential new indications for the use of drugs that block the effects of opioid receptors. There is a growing body of data demonstrating the modulation of pain by opioid antagonists. Additional clinical studies that show their direct antinociceptive effects and/or enhancement of the analgesic potency of opioid agonists are warranted. We briefly discuss the well-established role that these agents play in the reversal of life-threatening opioid toxicity and explore both existing and expanding clinical applications, including their apparent paradox that they may themselves be associated with analgesia.

  14. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  15. Calcium antagonists and vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F B

    1990-04-01

    A critical review of the clinical data supports the conclusion that nimodipine decreases the severity of neurologic deficits and improves outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The mechanisms by which mortality and morbidity are reduced are still controversial. First, the frequency of vasospasm is not altered (Figs. 5 and 6). Second, the consistent reversal of vasospasm once present has not been demonstrated either angiographically or by noninvasive cerebral blood flow studies. These observations suggest that there is either modification of microcirculatory flow (i.e., dilation of pial conducting vessels or decreased platelet aggregation) or a direct neuronal protective effect. As suggested previously, support for either mechanism is not resolute, and further investigation is necessary. Currently, nimodipine has been the most thoroughly investigated calcium antagonist both from an experimental and clinical perspective. Oral administration has had few reported complications. Therefore, the benefit/risk ratio clearly supports the prophylactic use of this calcium antagonist in patients of all clinical grades after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Evidence also indicates that starting nimodipine after the onset of delayed ischemic deficits is of benefit. Finally, it can be predicted that in the future additional calcium antagonists with more selective vascular or neuronal effects will be developed for use in neurologic disorders.

  16. Evidence for an interaction between CB1 cannabinoid and oxytocin receptors in food and water intake.

    PubMed

    Verty, A N A; McFarlane, J R; McGregor, I S; Mallet, P E

    2004-09-01

    Oxytocin and CB(1) cannabinoid receptors independently modulate food intake. Although an interaction between oxytocin and cannabinoid systems has been demonstrated with respect to the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome, the interaction between these systems in modulating food intake has not yet been examined. The present study had three primary purposes: (1) to determine whether oxytocin and a CB(1) receptor antagonist block food and fluid intake in a supra-additive manner, (2) to determine the relative position of the CB(1) receptors in the chain of control of food intake in relation to the oxytocin system, and (3) to determine whether the increase in fluid intake induced by an oxytocin antagonist is mediated via cannabinoid receptors. Rats were habituated to the test environment and injection procedure, and then received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of various combinations of the oxytocin receptor antagonist tocinoic acid, the cannabionid receptor agonist delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), oxytocin, or the cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716. Food and water intake and locomotor activity were then measured for 120 min. When administrated alone, SR 141716 and oxytocin dose-dependently attenuated baseline food intake, while oxytocin but not SR 141716 reduced water intake. Sub-anorectic doses of SR 141716 and oxytocin attenuated baseline feeding beyond what would be expected by the sum of the individual drug effects without affecting baseline water intake. THC stimulated feeding but not water intake. THC-induced feeding was not blocked by oxytocin, however, the oxytocin did attenuate water intake during such feeding. SR 141716 dose-dependently reduced tocinoic-acid-stimulated food intake and partially attenuated water intake. Locomotor activity was not significantly affected by any drug treatments, suggesting that effects on feeding were not due to a non-specific reduction in motivated behaviour. These findings reveal an interaction between

  17. Enhancement of endocannabinoid neurotransmission through CB1 cannabinoid receptors counteracts the reinforcing and psychostimulant effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Vlachou, Styliani; Stamatopoulou, Fygaleia; Nomikos, George G; Panagis, George

    2008-11-01

    Cannabinoids, in contrast to typical drugs of abuse, have been shown to exert complex effects on behavioural reinforcement and psychomotor function. We have shown that cannabinoid agonists lack reinforcing/rewarding properties in the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm and that the CB1 receptor (CB1R) agonist WIN55,212-2 attenuates the reward-facilitating actions of cocaine. We sought to determine the effects of the endocannabinoid neurotransmission enhancer AM-404 (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) on the changes in ICSS threshold and locomotion elicited by cocaine and extend the study of the effects of WIN55,212-2 (0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg) on cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. AM-404 did not exhibit reward-facilitating properties, and actually increased self-stimulation threshold at the highest dose. Cocaine significantly reduced self-stimulation threshold, without altering maximal rates of responding. AM-404 (10 mg/kg) attenuated this action of cocaine, an effect which was reversed by pretreatment with the selective CB1R antagonist SR141716A. WIN55,212-2 decreased locomotion at the two highest doses, an effect that was blocked by SR141716A; AM-404 had no effect on locomotion. Cocaine caused a significant, dose-dependent increase in locomotion, which was reduced by WIN55,212-2 and AM-404. SR141716A blocked the effects of WIN55,212-2 and AM-404 on cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. SR141716A alone had no effect on ICSS threshold or locomotion. These results indicate that cannabinoids may interfere with brain reward systems responsible for the expression of acute reinforcing/rewarding properties of cocaine, and provide further evidence that the cannabinoid system could be explored as a potential drug discovery target for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction and pathological states associated with psychomotor overexcitability.

  18. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  19. Tetrahydroindolizinone NK1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianming; Lu, Huagang; Morriello, Gregori J; Carlson, Emma J; Wheeldon, Alan; Chicchi, Gary G; Kurtz, Marc M; Tsao, Kwei-Lan C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Mills, Sander G; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    A new class of potent NK(1) receptor antagonists with a tetrahydroindolizinone core has been identified. This series of compounds demonstrated improved functional activities as compared to previously identified 5,5-fused pyrrolidine lead structures. SAR at the 7-position of the tetrahydroindolizinone core is discussed in detail. A number of compounds displayed high NK(1) receptor occupancy at both 1 h and 24 h in a gerbil foot tapping model. Compound 40 has high NK(1) binding affinity, good selectivity for other NK receptors and promising in vivo properties. It also has clean P(450) inhibition and hPXR induction profiles. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural Basis of Species-Dependent Differential Affinity of 6-Alkoxy-5-Aryl-3-Pyridinecarboxamide Cannabinoid-1 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Malliga R; Cinar, Resat; Liu, Jie; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Szanda, Gergö; Puhl, Henry; Ikeda, Stephen R; Deschamps, Jeffrey; Lee, Yong-Sok; Steinbach, Peter J; Kunos, George

    2015-08-01

    6-Alkoxy-5-aryl-3-pyridincarboxamides, including the brain-penetrant compound 14G: [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-6-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-hydroxy-cyclohexyl]-3-pyridinecarboxamide] and its peripherally restricted analog 14H: [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-hydroxycyclohexyl]-6-(2-methoxyethoxy)-3-pyridinecarboxamide], have been recently introduced as selective, high-affinity antagonists of the human cannabinoid-1 receptor (hCB1R). Binding analyses revealed two orders of magnitude lower affinity of these compounds for mouse and rat versus human CB1R, whereas the affinity of rimonabant is comparable for all three CB1Rs. Modeling of ligand binding to CB1R and binding assays with native and mutant (Ile105Met) hCB1Rs indicate that the Ile105 to Met mutation in rodent CB1Rs accounts for the species-dependent affinity of 14G: and 14H: . Our work identifies Ile105 as a new pharmacophore component for developing better hCB1R antagonists and invalidates rodent models for assessing the antiobesity efficacy of 14G: and 14H: .

  1. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist AM 251 and antagonist AM 4113 produce similar effects on the behavioral satiety sequence in rats.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Janel; Bow, Joshua P; Plyler, Kimberly S; Vemuri, V Kiran; Wisniecki, Ania; Salamone, John D; Makriyannis, Alexandros; McLaughlin, Peter J

    2008-11-21

    Cannabinoid CB1 inverse agonists such as rimonabant and AM 251 hold therapeutic promise as appetite suppressants, but the extent to which non-motivational factors contribute to their anorectic effects is not fully known. Examination of the behavioral satiety sequence (BSS) in rats, the orderly progression from eating to post-prandial grooming and then resting, has revealed that these compounds preserve the order of events but differ markedly from natural satiation. The most notable difference is that grooming (particularly scratching) is profoundly enhanced at anorectic doses, while eating and resting are diminished, raising the possibility that the anorectic effect is simply secondary to the grooming effect. In the current design, the neutral CB1 antagonist AM 4113, which has been found to lack some of the undesirable effects of AM 251, produced nearly identical effects on the BSS as AM 251. The possibility that competition from enhanced grooming could account for the anorectic effect of AM 4113 was examined by yoking the pattern of disruptions caused by grooming in the AM 4113-treated group to forced locomotion in a different group fed in a modified running wheel. This response competition did not significantly reduce food intake. It was concluded that AM 4113, a CB1 neutral antagonist, produces the same effects on the BSS as AM 251, but that response competition from enhanced grooming may not be a sufficient explanation for the anorectic effects of CB1 antagonists/inverse agonists.

  2. Small Molecule CXCR3 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Stephen P; Cox, Rhona J

    2016-04-14

    Chemokines and their receptors are known to play important roles in disease. More than 40 chemokine ligands and 20 chemokine receptors have been identified, but, to date, only two small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists have been approved by the FDA. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 was identified in 1996, and nearly 20 years later, new areas of CXCR3 disease biology continue to emerge. Several classes of small molecule CXCR3 antagonists have been developed, and two have shown efficacy in preclinical models of inflammatory disease. However, only one CXCR3 antagonist has been evaluated in clinical trials, and there remain many opportunities to further investigate known classes of CXCR3 antagonists and to identify new chemotypes. This Perspective reviews the known CXCR3 antagonists and considers future opportunities for the development of small molecules for clinical evaluation.

  3. Medullary Endocannabinoids Contribute to the Differential Resting Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats with Altered Brain Renin-Angiotensin System Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schaich, Chris L.; Grabenauer, Megan; Thomas, Brian F.; Shaltout, Hossam A.; Gallagher, Patricia E.; Howlett, Allyn C.; Diz, Debra I.

    2016-01-01

    CB1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed on vagal afferent fibers and neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS), providing anatomical evidence for their role in arterial baroreflex modulation. To better understand the relationship between the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and endocannabinoid expression within the NTS, we measured dorsal medullary endocannabinoid tissue content and the effects of CB1 receptor blockade at this brain site on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in ASrAOGEN rats with low glial angiotensinogen, normal Sprague-Dawley rats and (mRen2)27 rats with upregulated brain RAS expression. Mass spectrometry revealed higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol in (mRen2)27 compared to ASrAOGEN rats (2.70 ± 0.28 vs. 1.17 ± 0.09 ng/mg tissue; P < 0.01), while Sprague-Dawley rats had intermediate content (1.85 ± 0.27 ng/mg tissue). Microinjection of the CB1receptor antagonist SR141716A (36 pmol) into the NTS did not change cardiac BRS in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (1.04 ± 0.05 ms/mmHg baseline vs. 1.17 ± 0.11 ms/mmHg after 10 min). However, SR141716A in (mRen2)27 rats dose-dependently improved BRS in this strain: 0.36 pmol of SR141716A increased BRS from 0.43 ± 0.03 to 0.71 ± 0.04 ms/mmHg (P < 0.001), and 36 pmol of SR141716A increased BRS from 0.47 ± 0.02 to 0.94 ± 0.10 ms/mmHg (P < 0.01). In contrast, 0.36 pmol (1.50 ± 0.12 vs. 0.86 ± 0.08 ms/mmHg; P < 0.05) and 36 pmol (1.38 ± 0.16 vs. 0.46 ± 0.003 ms/mmHg; P < 0.01) of SR141716A significantly reduced BRS in ASrAOGEN rats. These observations reveal differential dose-related effects of the brain endocannabinoid system that influence cardiovagal BRS in animals with genetic alterations in the brain RAS. PMID:27375489

  4. A nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jeffrey N; Tyree, Curtis; Hu, Junlian; Berger, Elaine; Marschke, Keith; Nakane, Masaki; Coghlan, Michael J; Clemm, Dave; Lane, Ben; Rosen, Jon

    2003-01-01

    Selective intracellular receptor antagonists are used clinically to ameliorate hormone-dependent disease states. Patients with Cushing's syndrome have high levels of the glucocorticoid, cortisol, and suffer significant consequences from this overexposure. High levels of this hormone are also implicated in exacerbating diabetes and the stress response. Selectively inhibiting this hormone may have clinical benefit in these disease states. To this end, we have identified the first selective, nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. This compound is characterized by a tri-aryl methane core chemical structure. This GR-specific antagonist binds with nanomolar affinity to the GR and has no detectable binding affinity for the highly related receptors for mineralocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, and progestins. We demonstrate that this antagonist inhibits glucocorticoid-mediated transcriptional regulation. This compound binds competitively with steroids, likely occupying a similar site within the ligand-binding domain. Once bound, however, the compound fails to induce critical conformational changes in the receptor necessary for agonist activity.

  5. Platelet-activating factor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Negro Alvarez, J M; Miralles López, J C; Ortiz Martínez, J L; Abellán Alemán, A; Rubio del Barrio, R

    1997-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), identified as 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine, exhibits potent proinflammatory properties. PAF is produced by numerous cell types, including endothelial cells, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, basophils, eosinophils and mastocytes. Since the discovery and identification of the chemical structure of PAF, a large variety of specific PAF-receptor antagonists, both natural and synthetic compounds, have been described. Intensive research has been conducted and development programs set up by more 25 pharmaceutical companies world-wide, studying the therapeutic interest of more than 50 PAF-receptors antagonists in various pathophysiological conditions. Medline (1966-1996), Embase (Excerpta Medica; 1974-1996), and other biomedical and drug directory databases were searched to identify English-language articles (basic science, clinical trial research, and review articles) and abstracts of conference proceedings on PAF receptor antagonists and related terms. The most important PAF receptor antagonists are reviewed with their effectiveness in various experimental tests. Fundamentally, PAF antagonists may be divided in two groups: natural and synthetic compounds. Natural (Ginkgolides, Kadsurenone, Chantancin, Phomactin, Swietemohonin A, Prehispalone, THC-7-oic acid, Aglafoline, FR 900452, PCA 4248 and SCH 37370), and synthetic antagonists (CV-3988, CV-6209, SRI 63-072, SRI 63-441, UR-10324, UR-11353, E-5880, CL 184005, 6-Mono and Bis-aryl phosphate antagonists, TCV-309, Ro-74719, WEB 2086, Y 24180, BN 50726, BN 50727, BN 50730, BN 50739, Ro 24-4736, Ro 24-0238, RP 55778, RP 59227, RP 66681, YM 264, YM 461, SM 10661, SR 27417, UK 74505, BB 182, BB 823, BB 654, SDZ 64-412, SDZ 65-123, L 652731, L 659898, L 668750, L 671284, L680573, L 680574, CIS 19, ABT-299 and Pinusolide) have a great variability in their chemical structure that might have importance in their different pharmacological profile. The great majority of these

  6. Cannabinoid modulation of the reinforcing and motivational properties of heroin and heroin-associated cues in rats.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Taco J; Homberg, Judith R; Binnekade, Rob; Raasø, Halfdan; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M

    2003-07-01

    Recently, we provided evidence for a cannabinoid mechanism in relapse to cocaine seeking in rats. There is also increasing evidence for functional cross-talk between cannabinoid and opioid systems in several physiological processes. This study was designed to evaluate whether the cannabinoid system plays a role in mediating the reinforcing and motivational effects of heroin and heroin-paired stimuli. Male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer heroin (50 microg/kg per infusion) on fixed (FR5) or progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement in the presence of a discriminative and discrete heroin-associated cue. The selective cannabinoid CB1 antagonist SR141716A was given 30 min before the session to determine its effect on responding for heroin. Separate groups of rats were subjected to extinction training during which heroin-associated cues were absent and no heroin was delivered. During subsequent reinstatement tests, the effects of the cannabinoid agonist HU210 and the antagonist SR141716A on reinstatement of heroin seeking were evaluated. The cannabinoid antagonist dose-dependently reduced responding for heroin on the FR5 schedule and to a greater extent on the progressive ratio schedule. HU210 (20 microg/kg) reinstated heroin seeking behaviour following a 2-week extinction period, whereas SR141716A dose-dependently attenuated heroin seeking that was provoked by a priming injection of heroin (0.25 mg/kg) and heroin seeking that was triggered by re-exposure to heroin paired stimuli. The results show that the reinforcing and motivational effects of heroin and heroin-paired stimuli are mediated, at least in part, by activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Therefore, the present study provides a rationale for the use of cannabinoid antagonists in the treatment of opiate addiction.

  7. Characterisation of the vasorelaxant properties of the novel endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA)

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse E; Kendall, David A; Randall, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the vascular effects of N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA), a novel endocannabinoid/vanilloid. NADA caused vasorelaxant effects comparable to those of anandamide in small mesenteric vessels (G3), the superior mesenteric artery (G0) and in the aorta. In G3, addition of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (300 μM) or the dopamine (D1) receptor antagonist (SCH23390, 1 μM) did not affect responses to NADA. In the presence of 60 mM KCl, after de-endothelialisation, or after K+ channel inhibition with charybdotoxin (100 nM) and apamin (500 nM), relaxant responses to NADA were inhibited. In G3, pretreatment with the vanilloid receptor (VR) agonist capsaicin (10 μM) or the VR antagonist capsazepine (10 μM) reduced vasorelaxation to NADA. In G3, application of the CB1 antagonist SR141716A at 1 μM but not 100 nM reduced the potency of NADA. Another CB1 antagonist, AM251 (100 nM and 1 μM), did not affect vasorelaxation to NADA. After endothelial denudation, SR141716A (1 μM) did not reduce the responses further. A combination of capsaicin and SR141716A (1 μM) reduced vasorelaxation to NADA further than with capsaicin pretreatment alone. The novel endothelial cannabinoid (CB) receptor antagonist O-1918 opposed vasorelaxation to NADA in G3. In the superior mesenteric artery (G0), vasorelaxation to NADA was not dependent on an intact endothelium and was not sensitive to O-1918, but was sensitive to capsaicin and SR141716A or AM251 (both 100 nM). The results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that NADA is a potent vasorelaxant. In G3, the effects of NADA are mediated by stimulation of the VR and the novel endothelial CB receptor, while in G0, vasorelaxation is mediated through VR1 and CB1 receptors. PMID:14769783

  8. Capsaicin affects brain function in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Magen, I; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiav, L; Zolotarev, O; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by liver failure. In view of the effects of cannabinoids in a thioacetamide-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy and liver disease and the beneficial effect of capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) in liver disease, we assumed that capsaicin may also affect hepatic encephalopathy. Experimental approach: Fulminant hepatic failure was induced in mice by thioacetamide and 24 h later, the animals were injected with one of the following compound(s): 2-arachidonoylglycerol (CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptor agonist); HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist), SR141716A (CB1 receptor antagonist); SR141716A+2-arachidonoylglycerol; SR144528 (CB2 receptor antagonist); capsaicin; and capsazepine (TRPV1 receptor agonist and antagonist respectively). Their neurological effects were evaluated on the basis of activity in the open field, cognitive function in an eight-arm maze and a neurological severity score. The mice were killed 3 or 14 days after thioacetamide administration. 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, respectively. Results: Capsaicin had a neuroprotective effect in this animal model as shown by the neurological score, activity and cognitive function. The effect of capsaicin was blocked by capsazepine. Thioacetamide induced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and the cerebellum and raised brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, which were decreased by capsaicin, SR141716A and HU-308. Thioacetamide lowered brain 2-arachidonoylglycerol levels, an effect reversed by capsaicin. Conclusions: Capsaicin improved both liver and brain dysfunction caused by thioacetamide, suggesting that both the endocannabinoid and the vanilloid systems play important roles in hepatic encephalopathy. Modulation of these systems may have therapeutic value. PMID:19764982

  9. A peripheral mechanism for CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent modulation of feeding.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Raquel; Navarro, Miguel; Ferrer, Belén; Trigo, José M; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Del Arco, Ignacio; Cippitelli, Andrea; Nava, Felice; Piomelli, Daniele; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2002-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that the endocannabinoid system modulates feeding. Despite the existence of central mechanisms for the regulation of food intake by endocannabinoids, evidence indicates that peripheral mechanisms may also exist. To test this hypothesis, we investigated (1) the effects of feeding on intestinal anandamide accumulation; (2) the effects of central (intracerebroventricular) and peripheral (intraperitoneal) administration of the endocannabinoid agonist anandamide, the synthetic cannabinoid agonist R-(+)-(2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrol[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl)(1-naphthalenyl) methanone monomethanesulfonate (WIN55,212-2), and the CB1-selective antagonist N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methylpyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A) on food intake in rats; and (3) the effects of sensory deafferentation on the modulation of feeding by cannabinoids. Food deprivation produced a sevenfold increase in anandamide content in the small intestine but not in the brain or stomach. Refeeding normalized intestinal anandamide levels. Peripheral but not central administration of anandamide or WIN55,212-2 promoted hyperphagia in partially satiated rats. Similarly, peripheral but not central administration of SR141716A reduced food intake. Capsaicin deafferentation abolished the peripheral effects of both cannabinoid agonists and antagonists, suggesting that these agents modulate food intake by acting on CB1 receptors located on capsaicin-sensitive sensory terminals. Oleoylethanolamide, a noncannabinoid fatty ethanolamide that acts peripherally, prevented hyperphagia induced by the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide. Pretreatment with SR141716A enhanced the inhibition of feeding induced by intraperitoneal administration of oleoylethanolamide. The results reveal an unexpected role for peripheral CB1 receptors in the regulation of feeding.

  10. Cardiovascular effects of 2-arachidonoyl glycerol in anesthetized mice.

    PubMed

    Járai, Z; Wagner, J A; Goparaju, S K; Wang, L; Razdan, R K; Sugiura, T; Zimmer, A M; Bonner, T I; Zimmer, A; Kunos, G

    2000-02-01

    Cannabinoids, including the endogenous ligand anandamide, elicit pronounced hypotension and bradycardia through the activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. A second endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), has been proposed to be the natural ligand of CB1 receptors. In the present study, we examined the effects of 2-AG on mean arterial pressure and heart rate in anesthetized mice and assessed the role of CB1 receptors through the use of selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists and CB1 receptor knockout (CB1(-/-)) mice. In control ICR mice, intravenous injections of 2-AG or its isomer 1-AG elicit dose-dependent hypotension and moderate tachycardia that are unaffected by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A. The same dose of SR141716A (6 nmol/g IV) completely blocks the hypotensive effect and attenuates the bradycardic effect of anandamide. 2-AG elicits a similar hypotensive effect, resistant to blockade by either SR141716A or the CB2 antagonist SR144528, in both CB1(-/-) mice and their homozygous (CB1(+/+)) control littermates. In ICR mice, arachidonic acid (AA, 15 nmol/g IV) elicits hypotension and tachycardia, and indomethacin (14 nmol/g IV) inhibits the hypotensive effect of both AA and 2-AG. Synthetic 2-AG incubated with mouse blood is rapidly (<2 minutes) and completely degraded with the parallel appearance of AA, whereas anandamide is stable under the same conditions. A metabolically stable ether analogue of 2-AG causes prolonged hypotension and bradycardia in ICR mice, and both effects are completely blocked by SR141716A, whereas the same dose of 2-AG-ether does not influence blood pressure and heart rate in CB1(-/-) mice. These findings are interpreted to indicate that exogenous 2-AG is rapidly degraded in mouse blood, probably by a lipase, which masks its ability to interact with CB1 receptors. Although the observed cardiovascular effects of 2-AG probably are produced by an arachidonate metabolite through a noncannabinoid mechanism, the

  11. Opioid antagonists for smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    David, Sean P; Lancaster, Tim; Stead, Lindsay F; Evins, A. Eden; Prochaska, Judith J

    2014-01-01

    Background The reinforcing properties of nicotine may be mediated through release of various neurotransmitters both centrally and systemically. People who smoke report positive effects such as pleasure, arousal, and relaxation as well as relief of negative affect, tension, and anxiety. Opioid (narcotic) antagonists are of particular interest to investigators as potential agents to attenuate the rewarding effects of cigarette smoking. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of opioid antagonists in promoting long-term smoking cessation. The drugs include naloxone and the longer-acting opioid antagonist naltrexone. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register for trials of naloxone, naltrexone and other opioid antagonists and conducted an additional search of MEDLINE using ’Narcotic antagonists’ and smoking terms in April 2013. We also contacted investigators, when possible, for information on unpublished studies. Selection criteria We considered randomised controlled trials comparing opioid antagonists to placebo or an alternative therapeutic control for smoking cessation. We included in the meta-analysis only those trials which reported data on abstinence for a minimum of six months. We also reviewed, for descriptive purposes, results from short-term laboratory-based studies of opioid antagonists designed to evaluate psycho-biological mediating variables associated with nicotine dependence. Data collection and analysis We extracted data in duplicate on the study population, the nature of the drug therapy, the outcome measures, method of randomisation, and completeness of follow-up. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up in patients smoking at baseline. Abstinence at end of treatment was a secondary outcome. We extracted cotinine- or carbon monoxide-verified abstinence where available. Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis, pooling risk ratios using a Mantel

  12. Mineralcorticoid antagonists in heart failure.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Emilia; Krum, Henry

    2014-10-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) have become mandated therapy in patients with reduced ejection fraction (systolic) heart failure (HF) across all symptom classes. These agents should also be prescribed in the early post-myocardial infarction setting in those with reduced ejection fraction and either HF symptoms or diabetes. This article explores the pathophysiological role of aldosterone, an endogenous ligand for the mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), and summarizes the clinical data supporting guideline recommendations for these agents in systolic HF. The use of MRAs in novel areas beyond systolic HF ejection is also explored. Finally, the current status of newer agents will be examined.

  13. NK-1 Antagonists and Itch.

    PubMed

    Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is an important mediator of pro-inflammatory mechanisms in the skin. It targets multiple cells such as keratinocytes, mast cells, and fibroblasts which are involved in the cutaneous generation of pruritus. This suggests that SP is an interesting target for therapy. In fact, in recent case reports and case series, SP antagonists demonstrated a significant antipruritic effect in acute and chronic pruritus such as drug-induced pruritus, paraneoplastic pruritus, prurigo nodularis, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and brachioradial pruritus.

  14. Role of cannabinoidergic mechanisms in ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking in rat adult offspring following perinatal exposure to {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Economidou, Daina; Mattioli, Laura; Ubaldi, Massimo; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Soverchia, Laura; Hardiman, Gary; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2007-08-15

    The present study evaluated the consequences of perinatal {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol ({delta}{sup 9}-THC) treatment (5 mg/kg/day by gavage), either alone or combined with ethanol (3% v/v as the only fluid available), on ethanol self-administration and alcohol-seeking behavior in rat adult offspring. Furthermore, the effect of the selective cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist, SR-141716A, on ethanol self-administration and on reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior induced either by stress or conditioned drug-paired cues was evaluated in adult offspring of rats exposed to the same perinatal treatment. Lastly, microarray experiments were conducted to evaluate if perinatal treatment with {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol, ethanol or their combination causes long-term changes in brain gene expression profile in rats. The results of microarray data analysis showed that 139, 112 and 170 genes were differentially expressed in the EtOH, {delta}{sup 9}-THC, or EtOH + {delta}{sup 9}-THC group, respectively. No differences in alcohol self-administration and alcohol seeking were observed between rat groups. Intraperitoneal (IP) administration of SR-141716A (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) significantly reduced lever pressing for ethanol and blocked conditioned reinstatement of alcohol seeking. At the same doses SR-141716A failed to block foot-shock stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking. The results reveal that perinatal exposure to {delta}{sup 9}-THC ethanol or their combination results in evident changes in gene expression patterns. However, these treatments do not significantly affect vulnerability to ethanol abuse in adult offspring. On the other hand, the results obtained with SR-141716A emphasize that endocannabinoid mechanisms play a major role in ethanol self-administration, as well as in the reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior induced by conditioned cues, supporting the idea that cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonists may represent interesting

  15. Synthetic peptide antagonists of glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Unson, C G; Andreu, D; Gurzenda, E M; Merrifield, R B

    1987-01-01

    Several glucagon analogs were synthesized in an effort to find derivatives that would bind with high affinity to the glucagon receptor of rat liver membranes but would not activate membrane-bound adenylate cyclase and, therefore, would serve as antagonists of the hormone. Measurements on a series of glucagon/secretin hybrids indicated that replacement of Asp9 in glucagon by Glu9, found in secretin, was the important sequence difference in the N terminus of the two hormones. Further deletion of His1 and introduction of a C-terminal amide resulted in des-His1-[Glu9]glucagon amide, which had a 40% binding affinity relative to that of native glucagon but caused no detectable adenylate cyclase activation in the rat liver membrane. This antagonist completely inhibited the effect of a concentration of glucagon that alone gave a full agonist response. It had an inhibition index of 12. The pA2 was 7.2. An attempt was made to relate conformation with receptor binding. The peptides were synthesized by solid-phase methods and purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on C18-silica columns. PMID:3035568

  16. Vitamin K antagonists: beyond bleeding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Floege, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is the most widely used oral anticoagulant in clinical use today. Indications range from prosthetic valve replacement to recurrent thromboembolic events due to antiphospholipid syndrome. In hemodialysis (HD) patients, warfarin use is even more frequent than in the nonrenal population due to increased cardiovascular comorbidities. The use of warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation requires particular caution because side effects may outweigh the assumed benefit of reduced stroke rates. Besides increased bleeding risk, coumarins exert side effects which are not in the focus of clinical routine, yet they deserve special consideration in dialysis patients and should influence the decision of whether or not to prescribe vitamin K antagonists in cases lacking clear guidelines. Issues to be taken into consideration in HD patients are the induction or acceleration of cardiovascular calcifications, a 10-fold increased risk of calciphylaxis and problems related to maintaining a target INR range. New anticoagulants like direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but have not yet been approved for ESRD patients. Here, we summarize the nontraditional side effects of coumarins and give recommendations about the use of vitamin K antagonists in ESRD patients.

  17. D2 dopamine receptors enable Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced memory impairment and reduction of hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration

    PubMed Central

    Nava, F; Carta, G; Battasi, A M; Gessa, G L

    2000-01-01

    The systemic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (2.5–7.5 mg kg−1) reduced hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration and impaired working memory in rats.Both effects were antagonized not only by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A (0.5 mg kg−1, i.p.) but also unexpectedly by the D2 dopamine receptor antagonist S(−)-sulpiride (5, 10 and 25 mg kg−1, i.p.). Conversely, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced memory impairment and inhibition of hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration were potentiated by the subcutaneous administration of the D2 dopamine receptor agonist (−)-quinpirole (25 and 500 μg kg−1). The inhibition of hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration and working memory produced by the combination of (−)-quinpirole and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol was suppressed by either SR141716A or S(−)-sulpiride.Our findings suggest that impairment of working memory and inhibition of hippocampal extracellular acetylcholine concentration are mediated by the concomitant activation of D2 dopamine and CB1 cannabinoid receptors, and that D2 dopamine receptor antagonists may be useful in the treatment of the cognitive deficits induced by marijuana. PMID:10903956

  18. Different mechanisms for dopaminergic excitation induced by opiates and cannabinoids in the rat midbrain.

    PubMed

    Melis, M; Gessa, G L; Diana, M

    2000-08-01

    1. The mechanism underlying morphine and cannabinoid-induced excitation of meso-accumbens and nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons was investigated by extracellular single unit recording techniques coupled with antidromic activation from the nucleus accumbens and striatum respectively, in unanesthetized rats. 2. The intravenous administration of cumulative doses (1-4 mg/kg) of morphine, dose-dependently increased the firing rate of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens and neostriatum, while the same doses inhibited the activity of pars reticulata neurons of the substantia nigra. Both effects were antagonized by naloxone (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) but not by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.). 3. The intravenous administration of cumulative doses (0.125-0.5 mg/kg) of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) also increased the firing rate of meso-accumbens and nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons; this effect was antagonized by SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.), but not by naloxone. 4. Furthermore, nor delta9-THC up to a dose of 1 mg/kg, maximally effective in stimulating dopamine neurons, neither SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.) at a dose able to reverse the stimulatory effect of delta9, THC on dopamine cells, did alter the activity of SNr neurons. 5. The results indicate that morphine and delta9-THC activate dopaminergic neurons through distinct receptor-mediated mechanisms; morphine may act by removing the inhibitory input from substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons (an effect mediated by mu-opioid receptors). Alternatively, the delta9-THC-induced excitation of dopaminergic neurons seems to be mediated by CB1 cannabinoid receptors, while neither mu-opioid receptors nor substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons are involved.

  19. Acute ethanol suppresses glutamatergic neurotransmission through endocannabinoids in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature post-synaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on pre-synaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of post-synaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities.

  20. Inhibition of the production of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor by cannabinoid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, I; Schermer, B; Popp, R; Busse, R

    1999-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, has been reported to induce an 'endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-like' relaxation in vitro. We therefore investigated the effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists; HU 210, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and anandamide, and a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist, SR 141716A, on nitric oxide (NO) and EDHF-mediated relaxation in precontracted rings of porcine coronary, rabbit carotid and mesenteric arteries. In rings of mesenteric artery HU 210 and Δ9-THC induced endothelium- and cyclo-oxygenase-independent relaxations which were sensitive to SR 141716A. Anandamide (0.03–30 μM) induced a slowly developing, endothelium-independent relaxation which was abolished by diclofenac and was therefore mediated by cyclo-oxygenase product(s). None of the CB1 agonists tested affected the tone of precontracted rings of rabbit carotid or porcine coronary artery. In endothelium-intact segments, HU 210, Δ9-THC and anandamide did not affect NO-mediated responses but under conditions of continuous NO synthase/cyclo-oxygenase blockade, significantly inhibited acetylcholine and bradykinin-induced relaxations which are attributed to the production of EDHF. The effects of HU 210 and Δ9-THC were not observed when experiments were performed in the presence of SR 141716A suggesting the involvement of the CB1 receptor. In a patch clamp bioassay of EDHF production, HU 210 decreased the EDHF-mediated hyperpolarization of detector smooth muscle cells when applied to the donor segment but was without effect on the membrane potential of detector cells. The inhibition of EDHF production was unrelated to alterations in Ca2+-signalling or cytochrome P450 activity. These results suggest that the activation of endothelial CB1 receptors appears to be negatively coupled to the production of EDHF. PMID:10193775

  1. Cholinergic antagonists in a solitary wasp venom.

    PubMed

    Piek, T; Mantel, P

    1986-01-01

    The venom of the solitary wasp Philanthus triangulum contains a cholinergic antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of the rectus abdominis muscle of the frog, Xenopus laevis. The venom of African P. triangulum contains two different cholinergic factors, a competitive and a non-competitive antagonist. The venom of the European P. triangulum may not contain a competitive antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of X. laevis, but only a very strong non-competitive antagonist. The possible non-synonymity of both groups of P. triangulum is discussed.

  2. A new alcohol antagonist: Phaclofen

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, A.M. ); Harris, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the GABA{sub B} receptor antagonist, phaclofen to alter behavioral effects of ethanol was evaluated by loss of righting reflex (sleep time), motor incoordination (bar holding), spontaneous locomotion (open field activity) and hypothermia. Pretreatment with phaclofen significantly decreased the effects of ethanol on motor incoordination, locomotor activity and hypothermia. However, phaclofen had no effect on either pentobarbital- or diazepam-induced motor incoordination. Phaclofen slightly increased the ED{sub 50} for loss of the righting reflex but did not alter either the duration of reflex loss produced by ethanol or blood ethanol levels at awakening. Our results suggest phaclofen is rapidly inactivated resulting in difficulty in observing antagonism of long duration ethanol effects. These findings suggest that the GABA{sub B} system may play a role in mediating several important actions of ethanol.

  3. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Melani, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of COPD pharmacological treatment. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are a major class of inhaled bronchodilators. Some LAMA/device systems with different characteristics and dosing schedules are currently approved for maintenance therapy of COPD and a range of other products are being developed. They improve lung function and patient-reported outcomes and reduce acute bronchial exacerbations with good safety. LAMAs are used either alone or associated with long-acting β₂-agonists, eventually in fixed dose combinations. Long-acting β₂-agonist/LAMA combinations assure additional benefits over the individual components alone. The reader will obtain a view of the safety and efficacy of the different LAMA/device systems in COPD patients.

  4. CB1R antagonist increases hepatic insulin clearance in fat-fed dogs likely via upregulation of liver adiponectin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Malini S.; Richey, Joyce M.; Woolcott, Orison O.; Asare Bediako, Isaac; Wu, Qiang; Kim, Stella P.; Stefanovski, Darko; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Hsu, Isabel R.; Catalano, Karyn J.; Chiu, Jenny D.; Ionut, Viorica; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    The improvement of hepatic insulin sensitivity by the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) antagonist rimonabant (RIM) has been recently been reported to be due to upregulation of adiponectin. Several studies demonstrated that improvement in insulin clearance accompanies the enhancement of hepatic insulin sensitivity. However, the effects of RIM on hepatic insulin clearance (HIC) have not been fully explored. The aim of this study was to explore the molecular mechanism(s) by which RIM affects HIC, specifically to determine whether upregulation of liver adiponectin receptors (ADRs) and other key genes regulated by adiponectin mediate the effects. To induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and liver, dogs were fed a hypercaloric high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 wk. Thereafter, while still maintained on a HFD, animals received RIM (HFD+RIM; n = 11) or placebo (HFD+PL; n = 9) for an additional 16 wk. HIC, calculated as the metabolic clearance rate (MCR), was estimated from the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. The HFD+PL group showed a decrease in MCR; in contrast, the HFD+RIM group increased MCR. Consistently, the expression of genes involved in HIC, CEACAM-1 and IDE, as well as gene expression of liver ADRs, were increased in the HFD+RIM group, but not in the HFD+PL group. We also found a positive correlation between CEACAM-1 and the insulin-degrading enzyme IDE with ADRs. Interestingly, expression of liver genes regulated by adiponectin and involved in lipid oxidation were increased in the HFD+RIM group. We conclude that in fat-fed dogs RIM enhances HIC, which appears to be linked to an upregulation of the adiponectin pathway. PMID:26306598

  5. Client Perceptions of Two Antagonist Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reports results of a questionnaire administered to participants in an antagonist drug outpatient clinic and an antagonist drug work-release program to obtain awareness of acceptance of the program participants. Naltrexone patients recommended an alternative method of administering the drug and changing the money system to award deserving inmates…

  6. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol stimulates glucose utilization in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C; Velasco, G; Guzmán, M

    1997-08-29

    The present work was undertaken to study the metabolic response of C6 glioma cells to physiologically relevant doses of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active component of marijuana. At those concentrations (i.e. nanomolar range), THC produced a dose-dependent increase in the rates of glucose oxidation to CO2 and glucose incorporation into phospholipids and glycogen. The THC-induced stimulation of glucose utilization was (i) dose-dependent up to 100 nM THC, (ii) mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210, and (iii) prevented by pertussis toxin and the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A. In contrast to THC, forskolin markedly depressed CO2 production, phospholipid synthesis and glycogen synthesis from glucose. The forskolin-induced inhibition of glucose utilization was (i) mimicked by dibutyryl-cAMP, and (ii) prevented by THC, HU-210 and H-7, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Likewise, THC was able to antagonize in part the forskolin-induced elevation of intracellular cAMP concentration, and this antagonistic effect was prevented by SR141716A. However, THC per se did not affect basal cAMP concentration. Results thus indicate that physiologically relevant doses of THC stimulate glucose metabolism in C6 glioma cells through a cannabinoid receptor-mediated process. Although cannabinoid receptors may be coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in C6 glioma cells, this does not seem to be the mechanism involved in the THC-induced stimulation of glucose metabolism.

  7. Antagonistic coevolution accelerates molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Steve; Vogwill, Tom; Buckling, Angus; Benmayor, Rebecca; Spiers, Andrew J.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Quail, Mike; Smith, Frances; Walker, Danielle; Libberton, Ben; Fenton, Andrew; Hall, Neil; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that coevolution of interacting species (such as hosts and parasites) should drive molecular evolution through continual natural selection for adaptation and counter-adaptation1–3. Although the divergence observed at some host-resistance4–6 and parasite-infectivity7–9 genes is consistent with this, the long time periods typically required to study coevolution have so far prevented any direct empirical test. Here we show, using experimental populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and its viral parasite, phage Φ2 (refs 10, 11), that the rate of molecular evolution in the phage was far higher when both bacterium and phage coevolved with each other than when phage evolved against a constant host genotype. Coevolution also resulted in far greater genetic divergence between replicate populations, which was correlated with the range of hosts that coevolved phage were able to infect. Consistent with this, the most rapidly evolving phage genes under coevolution were those involved in host infection. These results demonstrate, at both the genomic and phenotypic level, that antagonistic coevolution is a cause of rapid and divergent evolution, and is likely to be a major driver of evolutionary change within species. PMID:20182425

  8. Antianginal Actions of Beta-Adrenoceptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Angina pectoris is usually the first clinical sign of underlying myocardial ischemia, which results from an imbalance between oxygen supply and oxygen demand in the heart. This report describes the pharmacology of β-adrenoceptor antagonists as it relates to the treatment of angina. The β-adrenoceptor antagonists are widely used in long-term maintenance therapy to prevent acute ischemic episodes in patients with chronic stable angina. Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists competitively inhibit the binding of endogenous catecholamines to β1-adrenoceptors in the heart. Their anti-ischemic effects are due primarily to a reduction in myocardial oxygen demand. By decreasing heart rate, myocardial contractility and afterload, β-adrenoceptor antagonists reduce myocardial workload and oxygen consumption at rest as well as during periods of exertion or stress. Predictable adverse effects include bradycardia and cardiac depression, both of which are a direct result of the blockade of cardiac β1-adrenoceptors, but adverse effects related to the central nervous system (eg, lethargy, sleep disturbances, and depression) may also be bothersome to some patients. Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists must be used cautiously in patients with diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, heart failure, and asthma or other obstructive airway diseases. Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists may be used in combination with nitrates or calcium channel blockers, which takes advantage of the diverse mechanisms of action of drugs from each pharmacologic category. Moreover, concurrent use of β-adrenoceptor antagonists may alleviate the reflex tachycardia that sometimes occurs with other antianginal agents. PMID:17998992

  9. Ago-antagonist theory in Darwinian evolution.

    PubMed

    Bazzani, Armando; Freguglia, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a proposal on the essential structural aspects of Darwinian Evolution Theory. Using this point of view we apply a mathematical ago-antagonist theory inspired by Y. Cherruault's (1998) ideas, which we have extended. In the ago-antagonist model, the phenotype characters measure the individual propensity to perform an innovative x(t) (agonist) or conservative y(t) (antagonist) action with respect to mutation and to speciation process. We have mathematically introduced the conflict concept and we present a model that takes into account the environmental effects by means of a stochastic multiplicative process. We shortly discuss the properties of the related stochastic differential equations.

  10. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  11. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks.

  12. The Evolution of Sexually Antagonistic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jennifer C.; Rowe, Locke

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict occurs whenever there is sexually antagonistic selection on shared traits. When shared traits result from interactions (e.g., mating rate) and have a different genetic basis in each sex (i.e., interlocus conflict), then sex-specific traits that shift the value of these interaction traits toward the sex-specific optimum will be favored. Male traits can be favored that increase the fitness of their male bearers, but decrease the fitness of interacting females. Likewise, female traits that reduce the costs of interacting with harmful males may simultaneously impose costs on males. If the evolution of these antagonistic traits changes the nature of selection acting on the opposite sex, interesting coevolutionary dynamics will result. Here we examine three current issues in the study of sexually antagonistic interactions: the female side of sexual conflict, the ecological context of sexual conflict, and the strength of evidence for sexually antagonistic coevolution. PMID:26032715

  13. Emerging cardiovascular indications of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Yasir; Iqbal, Javaid; Pitt, Bertram; Adlam, David; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-04-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism is a well-established treatment modality for patients with hypertension, heart failure, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) post-myocardial infarction (MI). There are emerging data showing potential benefits of MR antagonists in other cardiovascular conditions. Studies have shown association between MR activation and the development of myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome, and cerebrovascular diseases. This review examines the preclinical and clinical data of MR antagonists for novel indications including heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, valvular heart disease, metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and stroke. MR antagonists are not licensed for these conditions yet; however, emerging data suggest that indication for MR antagonists are likely to broaden; further studies are warranted.

  14. Macrophages: micromanagers of antagonistic signaling nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Eggeling, Christian; Davis, Simon J

    2017-04-03

    How cells integrate antagonistic receptor signaling events is enigmatic. Using superresolution optical microscopy, Lopes et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201608094) demonstrate the nanometer-scale molecular reorganization of antagonistic signaling receptors in macrophages, after engagement by the receptors of activating and inhibitory ligands. They propose that large-scale rearrangements of this type underpin decision-making by these cells.

  15. Blockade of CB1 receptors prevents retention of extinction but does not increase low pre-incubated conditioned fear in the fear incubation procedure

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Charles L.; Theberge, Florence R.

    2015-01-01

    We recently developed a procedure to study fear incubation in which rats given 100 tone-shock pairings over 10 days show low fear 2 days after conditioned fear training and high fear after 30 days. Notably, fear 2 days after 10 sessions of fear conditioning is lower than fear seen 2 days after a single session of fear conditioning, suggesting that fear is suppressed. Here, we investigate the potential role of CB1 receptor activation by endocannabinoids in this fear suppression. We gave rats 10 days of fear conditioning and then gave systemic injections of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 before a conditioned fear test conducted 2 days later under extinction conditions. A second test was conducted without any injections on the following day (3 days post-training) to examine fear extinction retention. SR141716 injections did not increase fear expression 2 days after extended fear conditioning or affect within-session extinction, but impaired retention of between-session fear extinction in the day 3 test. These data suggest that CB1 receptor activation is not suppressing fear soon after extended fear conditioning in the fear incubation task. The data also add to an existing literature on the effects of CB1 receptors in extinction of conditioned fear. PMID:24346290

  16. Effects of cannabinoids in the rat model of Huntington's disease generated by an intrastriatal injection of malonate.

    PubMed

    Lastres-Becker, Isabel; Bizat, Nicolas; Boyer, Frédéric; Hantraye, Philippe; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2003-05-06

    Cannabinoids could provide neuroprotection in neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we examined whether a treatment with Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist, or with SR141716, a selective antagonist for the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor subtype, could affect the toxicity of the complex II reversible inhibitor malonate injected into the striatum, which replicates the mitochondrial complex II deficiency seen in Huntington's disease patients. As expected, malonate injection produced a significant reduction in cytochrome oxidase activity in the striatum consistent with the expected neurodegeneration caused by this toxin. The administration of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol increased malonate-induced striatal lesions compared to vehicle and, surprisingly, SR141716, far from producing effects opposite to those of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, also enhanced malonate effects, and to an even greater extent. In summary, our results are compatible with the idea that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can modify neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease, and suggest that highly selective CB(1) receptor agonists might be necessary to produce neuroprotective effects against indirect excitotoxicity.

  17. Potential role of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 in rapid eye movement sleep rebound.

    PubMed

    Navarro, L; Martínez-vargas, M; Murillo-rodríguez, E; Landa, A; Méndez-díaz, M; Prospéro-garcía, O

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is an unavoidable activity of the brain. The delay of the time to sleep (sleep deprivation), induces an increase of slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep (rebound) once the subject is allowed to sleep. This drive to sleep has been hypothesized to be dependent on the accumulation of sleep-inducing molecules and on the high expression of these molecule receptors. In this study we selectively deprived rats of REM sleep for 24 h by using the flowerpot technique. One group deprived of REM sleep was treated with SR141716A, a cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist and then allowed to sleep for the next 4 h. Two other groups were killed, one immediately after the REM sleep deprivation period and the other after 2 h of REM sleep rebound (REM sleep deprivation plus 2 h of rebound). In both groups we determined the expression of the CB1 receptor and its mRNA. Results indicated that SR141716A prevents REM sleep rebound and REM sleep deprivation does not modify the expression of the CB1 protein or mRNA. However, REM sleep deprivation plus 2 h of sleep rebound increased the CB1 receptor protein and, slightly but significantly, decreased mRNA expression. These results suggest that endocannabinoids may be participating in the expression of REM sleep rebound.

  18. Anandamide attenuates haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements in rats.

    PubMed

    Röpke, Jivago; Busanello, Alcindo; Leal, Caroline Queiroz; de Moraes Reis, Elizete; de Freitas, Catiuscia Molz; Villarinho, Jardel Gomes; Figueira, Fernanda Hernandes; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Ferreira, Juliano; Fachinetto, Roselei

    2014-10-03

    Antipsychotics may cause tardive dyskinesia in humans and orofacial dyskinesia in rodents. Although the dopaminergic system has been implicated in these movement disorders, which involve the basal ganglia, their underlying pathomechanisms remain unclear. CB1 cannabinoid receptors are highly expressed in the basal ganglia, and a potential role for endocannabinoids in the control of basal ganglia-related movement disorders has been proposed. Therefore, this study investigated whether CB1 receptors are involved in haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats. Adult male rats were treated for four weeks with haloperidol decanoate (38mg/kg, intramuscularly - i.m.). The effect of anandamide (6nmol, intracerebroventricularly - i.c.v.) and/or the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (30μg, i.c.v.) on haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) was assessed 28days after the start of the haloperidol treatment. Anandamide reversed haloperidol-induced VCMs; SR141716A (30μg, i.c.v.) did not alter haloperidol-induced VCM per se but prevented the effect of anandamide on VCM in rats. These results suggest that CB1 receptors may prevent haloperidol-induced VCMs in rats, implicating CB1 receptor-mediated cannabinoid signaling in orofacial dyskinesia. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Calcium antagonists and atherosclerosis protection in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Rafael Hernández; Armas-Hernández, María José; Velasco, Manuel; Israili, Zafar H; Armas-Padilla, María Cristina

    2003-01-01

    Calcium antagonists are effective in hypertensive patients of all ethnic groups, irrespective of age, dietary salt intake, salt-sensitivity status or plasma renin activity profile. Some prospective studies show that the calcium antagonists, nifedipine GITS and nitrendipine, reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality at least to the same extent as the diuretics. Other prospective studies are in progress to evaluate the effect of calcium antagonists on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the progression of atherosclerosis in hypertensive patients. Calcium antagonists, especially the highly lipophilic amlodipine, lacidipine and nisoldipine, are shown to possess antioxidant properties. These drugs reduce the oxidation of LDL and its influx into the arterial wall, and reduce atherosclerotic lesions in animals. Platelet production of malondialdehyde, a marker of oxygen free radical formation, is suppressed by amlodipine, lacidipine or nifedipine in hypertensive patients. New evidence from long-term clinical trials of calcium antagonists indicates that these drugs can reduce the rate of progression of atherosclerosis in hypertensive and coronary heart disease patients. In the Regression Growth Evaluation Statin Study (REGRESS), co-administration of calcium antagonist, amlodipine or nifedipine with pravasatin caused a significant reduction in the appearance of new angiographic lesions. In the Verapamil in Hypertension and Atherosclerosis Study (VHAS), verapamil was more effective than chlorthalidone in promoting regression of thicker carotid lesions in parallel with a reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular events. In the Prospective Randomized Evaluation of the Vascular Effects of Norvasc Trial (PREVENT), amlodipine slowed the progression of early coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease. In a subprotocol of the Intervention as a Goal in the Hypertension Treatment (INSIGHT) study, nifedipine GITS significantly decreased intima

  20. Embryo implantation and GnRH antagonists: embryo implantation: the Rubicon for GnRH antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, E R

    2000-06-01

    When gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was discovered, the agonist and antagonist of GnRH were developed to control the release of FSH and LH by the gonadotrophs. More than 10 years of research were needed to develop a GnRH antagonist free of histamine release. Recent studies have shown that these GnRH antagonists are effective in preventing a rise in LH during ovarian stimulation in IVF. However, a decrease in ongoing pregnancies seems to suggest that implantation rates per transferred embryo are reduced in GnRH antagonist-stimulated cycles. In my opinion, these data highlight an area less well known to clinicians: the role of the GnRH antagonist at the cellular level in extrapituitary tissues. There are sufficient data in the literature suggesting that GnRH antagonist is an inhibitor of the cell cycle by decreasing the synthesis of growth factors. Given that, for folliculogenesis, blastomere formation and endometrium development, mitosis is everything; the interaction between the GnRH antagonist and the GnRH receptor (present in all these cells and tissues) may compromise the mitotic programme of these cells. This is the Rubicon for the GnRH antagonist: to demonstrate irrevocably that, at the minimal doses necessary to suppress LH release, it does not affect processes such as implantation, embryo development and folliculogenesis.

  1. [Antagonistic activity of novel green microalgae strain].

    PubMed

    Selivanova, E A; Ignatenko, M E; Nemtseva, N V

    2014-01-01

    Screening of novel microalgae strains for the presence of pronounced antagonistic (antibacterial) activity against opportunistic bacteria. 11 pure cultures of green unicellular algae isolated from fresh and salt basins of Orenburg region were studied for the presence of antagonistic activity against 4 test-strains of opportunistic bacteria by a photometric method. The effect of water extracts of microalgae Astermonas gracilis on the speed of self-purification of brine from Escherichia coli as well as antibacterial activity of peloid were evaluated under co-cultivation conditions. Pure cultures of green unicellular algae Scenedesmus obliquus (Turpin) Kütz, Scenedesmus magnus Meyen var. magnus, Pediastru duplex Meyen var. duplex, Chlorella vulgaris Bory, Monoraphidium arcuatum (Korschikov) Hindak (=Ankistrodesmus arcuatus Korschikov), Dictyosphaerium sp. had the most pronounced antagonistic activit against opportunistic bacteria. Water extract ofA. gracilis microalgae accelerated brine self-purification fro E. coli due to antibacterial effect. Peloid containing extracts of microorganism cells had a pronounced antibacterial effect against opportunistic bacteria. Antagonistic substances localized inside cells of microalgae increased the speed of allochthonic microorganism elimination that is one of the mechanisms of self-purification of a basin and antibacterial effect of peloid. The novel green microalgae strains studied due to the presence of pronounced antagonistic activity may have a wide practical application.

  2. Cannabinoid and heroin activation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission by a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tanda, G; Pontieri, F E; Di Chiara, G

    1997-06-27

    The effects of the active ingredient of Cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), and of the highly addictive drug heroin on in vivo dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens were compared in Sprague-Dawley rats by brain microdialysis. Delta9-THC and heroin increased extracellular dopamine concentrations selectively in the shell of the nucleus accumbens; these effects were mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2. SR141716A, an antagonist of central cannabinoid receptors, prevented the effects of Delta9-THC but not those of heroin. Naloxone, a generic opioid antagonist, administered systemically, or naloxonazine, an antagonist of micro1 opioid receptors, infused into the ventral tegmentum, prevented the action of cannabinoids and heroin on dopamine transmission. Thus, Delta9-THC and heroin exert similar effects on mesolimbic dopamine transmission through a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism located in the ventral mesencephalic tegmentum.

  3. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  4. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J; Spaltenstein, A

    1995-09-26

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats.

  5. Behavioral effects of cannabinoid agents in animals.

    PubMed

    Chaperon, F; Thiébot, M H

    1999-01-01

    Two subtypes of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date, the CB1 receptor, essentially located in the CNS, but also in peripheral tissues, and the CB2 receptor, found only at the periphery. The identification of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) as the major active component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), the recent emergence of potent synthetic ligands and the identification of anandamide and sn-2 arachidonylglycerol as putative endogenous ligands for cannabinoid receptors in the brain, have contributed to advancing cannabinoid pharmacology and approaching the neurobiological mechanisms involved in physiological and behavioral effects of cannabinoids. Most of the agonists exhibit nonselective affinity for CB1/CB2 receptors, and delta9-THC and anandamide probably act as partial agonists. Some recently synthesized molecules are highly selective for CB2 receptors, whereas selective agonists for the CB1 receptors are not yet available. A small number of antagonists exist that display a high selectivity for either CB1 or CB2 receptors. Cannabinomimetics produce complex pharmacological and behavioral effects that probably involve numerous neuronal substrates. Interactions with dopamine, acetylcholine, opiate, and GABAergic systems have been demonstrated in several brain structures. In animals, cannabinoid agonists such as delta9-THC, WIN 55,212-2, and CP 55,940 produce a characteristic combination of four symptoms, hypothermia, analgesia, hypoactivity, and catalepsy. They are reversed by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist, SR 141716, providing good evidence for the involvement of CB1-related mechanisms. Anandamide exhibits several differences, compared with other agonists. In particular, hypothermia, analgesia, and catalepsy induced by this endogenous ligand are not reversed by SR 141716. Cannabinoid-related processes seem also involved in cognition, memory, anxiety, control of appetite, emesis, inflammatory, and immune responses. Agonists may

  6. Antagonistic Interactions among Marine Pelagic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Long, Richard A.; Azam, Farooq

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that bacterial abundance and species diversity in the ocean's water column are variable at the millimeter scale, apparently in response to the small-scale heterogeneity in the distribution of organic matter. We hypothesized that bacterium-bacterium antagonistic interactions may contribute to variations in community structure at the microscale. We examined each of the 86 isolates for their inhibition of growth of the remaining 85 isolates by the Burkholder agar diffusion assay. More than one-half of the isolates expressed antagonistic activity, and this trait was more common with particle-associated bacteria than with free-living bacteria. This was exemplified by members of the α subclass of the class Proteobacteria (α-proteobacteria), in which production of antagonistic molecules was dominated by attached bacteria. We found that γ-proteobacteria (members of the orders Alteromonadales and Vibrionales) are the most prolific producers of inhibitory materials and also the most resilient to them, while members of the Bacteriodetes were the organisms that were least productive and most sensitive to antagonistic interactions. Widespread interspecies growth inhibition is consistent with the role of this phenomenon in structuring bacterial communities at the microscale. Furthermore, our results suggest that bacteria from pelagic marine particles may be an underutilized source of novel antibiotics. PMID:11679315

  7. Antagonistic and synergistic interactions among predators.

    PubMed

    Huxel, Gary R

    2007-08-01

    The structure and dynamics of food webs are largely dependent upon interactions among consumers and their resources. However, interspecific interactions such as intraguild predation and interference competition can also play a significant role in the stability of communities. The role of antagonistic/synergistic interactions among predators has been largely ignored in food web theory. These mechanisms influence predation rates, which is one of the key factors regulating food web structure and dynamics, thus ignoring them can potentially limit understanding of food webs. Using nonlinear models, it is shown that critical aspects of multiple predator food web dynamics are antagonistic/synergistic interactions among predators. The influence of antagonistic/synergistic interactions on coexistence of predators depended largely upon the parameter set used and the degree of feeding niche differentiation. In all cases when there was no effect of antagonism or synergism (a ( ij )=1.00), the predators coexisted. Using the stable parameter set, coexistence occurred across the range of antagonism/synergism used. However, using the chaotic parameter strong antagonism resulted in the extinction of one or both species, while strong synergism tended to coexistence. Whereas using the limit cycle parameter set, coexistence was strongly dependent on the degree of feeding niche overlap. Additionally increasing the degree of feeding specialization of the predators on the two prey species increased the amount of parameter space in which coexistence of the two predators occurred. Bifurcation analyses supported the general pattern of increased stability when the predator interaction was synergistic and decreased stability when it was antagonistic. Thus, synergistic interactions should be more common than antagonistic interactions in ecological systems.

  8. Combining Elements from Two Antagonists of Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 Generates More Potent Peptidomimetic Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Holdfeldt, André; Nielsen, Christina; Hansen, Anna Mette; Perez-Gassol, Iris; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei; Franzyk, Henrik

    2017-08-24

    Structural optimization of a peptidomimetic antagonist of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) was explored by an approach involving combination of elements from the two most potent FPR2 antagonists described: a Rhodamine B-conjugated 10-residue gelsonin-derived peptide (i.e., PBP10, RhB-QRLFQVKGRR-OH) and the palmitoylated α-peptide/β-peptoid hybrid Pam-(Lys-βNspe)6-NH2. This generated an array of hybrid compounds from which a new subclass of receptor-selective antagonists was identified. The most potent representatives displayed activity in the low nanomolar range. The resulting stable and potent FPR2-selective antagonists (i.e., RhB-(Lys-βNphe)n-NH2; n = 4-6) are expected to become valuable tools in further elucidation of the physiological role of FPR2 in health and disease.

  9. Progress in corticotropin-releasing factor-1 antagonist development

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2010-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonists have been sought since the stress-secreted peptide was isolated in 1981. Although evidence suggests the limited efficacy of CRF1 antagonists as antidepressants, CRF1 antagonists might be novel pharmacotherapies for anxiety and addiction. Progress in understanding the two-domain model of ligand–receptor interactions for CRF family receptors might yield chemically novel CRF1 receptor antagonists, including peptide CRF1 antagonists, antagonists with signal transduction selectivity and nonpeptide CRF1 antagonists that act via the extracellular (rather than transmembrane) domains. Novel ligands that conform to prevalent pharmacophore and exhibit drug-like pharmacokinetic properties have been identified. The therapeutic utility of CRF1 antagonists should soon be clearer: several small molecules are currently in Phase II/III clinical trials for depression, anxiety and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:20206287

  10. Novel benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Andrew J; Al-Barazanji, Kamal A; Barvian, Kevin K; Bishop, Michael J; Britt, Christy S; Cooper, Joel P; Goetz, Aaron S; Grizzle, Mary K; Hertzog, Donald L; Ignar, Diane M; Morgan, Ronda O; Peckham, Gregory E; Speake, Jason D; Swain, Will R

    2006-10-01

    The identification of an MCH R1 antagonist screening hit led to the optimization of a class of benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists. Structure-activity relationships and efforts to optimize pharmacokinetic properties are detailed along with the demonstration of the effectiveness of an MCH R1 antagonist in an animal model of obesity.

  11. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    a novel hypocretiniorexin antagonist, almorexant (ALM), to a standard hypnotic , zolpidem (ZOL), and placebo (PBO) on neurocognitive performance at...Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Parallel- Group Study Comparing the Effect of a Novel HypocretiniOrexin Antagonist (Almorexant) Versus a Standard Hypnotic ...Group Study Comparing the Effect of a Novel HypocretiniOrexin Antagonist (Almorexant) Versus a Standard Hypnotic (Zolpidem) and Placebo on

  12. The treatment of hyponatraemia using vasopressin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Gross, P; Palm, C

    2000-03-01

    Hyponatraemia is a frequent electrolyte disorder. It is primarily attributable to vasopressin excess plus sustained fluid intake. Hyponatraemia causes CNS symptoms, especially during the first 2-4 days; these symptoms are related to brain swelling. Hyponatraemia occurs in the setting of liver cirrhosis and congestive cardiac failure, in which it is related to stimulation by low arterial blood pressure acting through baroreceptors. Hyponatraemia also occurs in the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, usually from neoplasms releasing vasopressin. The conventional treatment of hyponatraemia used to be fluid restriction and treatment of the underlying disorder. This kind of treatment has been unreliable, cumbersome and difficult to comply with for the patient. In the future, effective vasopressin V2 antagonists will become available for clinical use in the treatment of hyponatraemia, and are expected to improve the management of hyponatraemia. Pharmacological characteristics and observations of biological effects of three antagonists are reported in the present article.

  13. Development of Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, F. Ivy; Carlezon, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) belong to the G-protein coupled class of receptors (GPCRs). They are activated by the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin (DYN) and expressed at particularly high levels within brain areas implicated in modulation of motivation, emotion, and cognitive function. Chronic activation of KORs in animal models has maladaptive effects including increases in behaviors that reflect depression, the propensity to engage in drug-seeking behavior, and drug craving. The fact that KOR activation has such a profound influence on behaviors often triggered by stress has led to interest in selective KOR antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. This perspective provides a description of preclinical research conducted in the development of several different classes of selective KOR antagonists, a summary of the clinical studies conducted thus far, and recommendations for the type of work needed in the future to determine if these agents would be useful as pharmacotherapies for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:23360448

  14. [PAF antagonistic benzofuran neolignans from Piper kadsura].

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Han, G Q; Wang, Y Y

    1993-01-01

    In a continuing search for PAF antagonists, five benzofuran neolignans have been isolated from the aerial part of Piper kadsura (Choisy) Ohwi, a Chinese traditional drug used for the treatment of inflammation and rheumatic conditions. The structure determination was based upon spectroscopic analysis. Two of the neolignans were found to have new structures and were named as (-)-denudatin B (the enantiomer of denudatin B, II) and kadsurenin M (7S,8S-3,4,3'-trimethoxy-7'-oxo-nor-8',9'-7.O. 4',8,5'-neolignan, V). The known compounds kadsurenon (I), (-)-acuminatin(III) and (+)-licarin A(IV) were also obtained from the same source. (-)-Denudatin B (II) showed potent PAF antagonistic activity in 3H-PAF receptor binding assay.

  15. Interactions of Freshwater Cyanobacteria with Bacterial Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Grabherr, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyanobacterial and algal mass development, or blooms, have severe effects on freshwater and marine systems around the world. Many of these phototrophs produce a variety of potent toxins, contribute to oxygen depletion, and affect water quality in several ways. Coexisting antagonists, such as cyanolytic bacteria, hold the potential to suppress, or even terminate, such blooms, yet the nature of this interaction is not well studied. We isolated 31 cyanolytic bacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Delftia from three eutrophic freshwater lakes in Sweden and selected four phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains with strong-to-moderate lytic activity. To characterize their functional responses to the presence of cyanobacteria, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments on coculture incubations, with an initial predator-prey ratio of 1:1. Genes involved in central cellular pathways, stress-related heat or cold shock proteins, and antitoxin genes were highly expressed in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria. Heterotrophs in coculture expressed genes involved in cell motility, signal transduction, and putative lytic activity. l,d-Transpeptidase was the only significantly upregulated lytic gene in Stenotrophomonas rhizophila EK20. Heterotrophs also shifted their central metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to the glyoxylate shunt. Concurrently, cyanobacteria clearly show contrasting antagonistic interactions with the four tested heterotrophic strains, which is also reflected in the physical attachment to their cells. In conclusion, antagonistic interactions with cyanobacteria were initiated within 24 h, and expression profiles suggest varied responses for the different cyanobacteria and studied cyanolytes. IMPORTANCE Here, we present how gene expression profiles can be used to reveal interactions between bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacteria and antagonistic heterotrophic bacteria. Species

  16. TRPV1 antagonists as potential antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Correll, Craig C; Jia, Yanlin; Anthes, John C

    2008-01-01

    Cough is an important defensive pulmonary reflex that removes irritants, fluids, or foreign materials from the airways. However, when cough is exceptionally intense or when it is chronic and/or nonproductive it may require pharmacologic suppression. For many patients, antitussive therapies consist of OTC products with inconsequential efficacies. On the other hand, the prescription antitussive market is dominated by older opioid drugs such as codeine. Unfortunately, "codeine-like" drugs suppress cough at equivalent doses that also often produce significant ancillary liabilities such as GI constipation, sedation, and respiratory depression. Thus, the discovery of a novel and effective antitussive drug with an improved side effect profile relative to codeine would fulfill an unmet clinical need in the treatment of cough. Afferent pulmonary nerves are endowed with a multitude of potential receptor targets, including TRPV1, that could act to attenuate cough. The evidence linking TRPV1 to cough is convincing. TRPV1 receptors are found on sensory respiratory nerves that are important in the generation of the cough reflex. Isolated pulmonary vagal afferent nerves are responsive to TRPV1 stimulation. In vivo, TRPV1 agonists such as capsaicin elicit cough when aerosolized and delivered to the lungs. Pertinent to the debate on the potential use of TRPV1 antagonist as antitussive agents are the observations that airway afferent nerves become hypersensitive in diseased and inflamed lungs. For example, the sensitivity of capsaicin-induced cough responses following upper respiratory tract infection and in airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD is increased relative to that of control responses. Indeed, we have demonstrated that TRPV1 antagonism can attenuate antigen-induced cough in the allergic guinea pig. However, it remains to be determined if the emerging pharmacologic profile of TRPV1 antagonists will translate into a novel human antitussive drug. Current

  17. Interactions of Freshwater Cyanobacteria with Bacterial Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Osman, Omneya Ahmed; Beier, Sara; Grabherr, Manfred; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Cyanobacterial and algal mass development, or blooms, have severe effects on freshwater and marine systems around the world. Many of these phototrophs produce a variety of potent toxins, contribute to oxygen depletion, and affect water quality in several ways. Coexisting antagonists, such as cyanolytic bacteria, hold the potential to suppress, or even terminate, such blooms, yet the nature of this interaction is not well studied. We isolated 31 cyanolytic bacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Delftia from three eutrophic freshwater lakes in Sweden and selected four phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains with strong-to-moderate lytic activity. To characterize their functional responses to the presence of cyanobacteria, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments on coculture incubations, with an initial predator-prey ratio of 1:1. Genes involved in central cellular pathways, stress-related heat or cold shock proteins, and antitoxin genes were highly expressed in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria. Heterotrophs in coculture expressed genes involved in cell motility, signal transduction, and putative lytic activity. l,d-Transpeptidase was the only significantly upregulated lytic gene in Stenotrophomonas rhizophila EK20. Heterotrophs also shifted their central metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to the glyoxylate shunt. Concurrently, cyanobacteria clearly show contrasting antagonistic interactions with the four tested heterotrophic strains, which is also reflected in the physical attachment to their cells. In conclusion, antagonistic interactions with cyanobacteria were initiated within 24 h, and expression profiles suggest varied responses for the different cyanobacteria and studied cyanolytes.IMPORTANCE Here, we present how gene expression profiles can be used to reveal interactions between bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacteria and antagonistic heterotrophic bacteria. Species-specific responses in

  18. NMDA Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ates-Alagoz, Zeynep; Adejare, Adeboye

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a psychiatric disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Individuals battling this disorder commonly experience high rates of relapse, persistent residual symptoms, functional impairment, and diminished well-being. Medications have important utility in stabilizing moods and daily functions of many individuals. However, only one third of patients had considerable improvement with a standard antidepressant after 2 months and all patients had to deal with numerous side effects. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family has received special attention because of its critical role in psychiatric disorders. Direct targeting of the NMDA receptor could result in more rapid antidepressant effects. Antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists have been demonstrated in different animal models. MK-801 (a use-dependent channel blocker), and CGP 37849 (an NMDA receptor antagonist) have shown antidepressant properties in preclinical studies, either alone or combined with traditional antidepressants. A recent development is use of ketamine clinically for refractory depression. The purpose of this review is to examine and analyze current literature on the role of NMDA receptor antagonists for treatment of depression and whether this is a feasible route in drug discovery. PMID:24276119

  19. Medicinal Chemistry of Competitive Kainate Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1−5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure−activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  20. Medicinal chemistry of competitive kainate receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ann M; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-02-16

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1-5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure-activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field.

  1. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)(/sup 3/H)desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) (/sup 3/H)desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor.

  2. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  3. Investigation of orexin-2 selective receptor antagonists: Structural modifications resulting in dual orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Skudlarek, Jason W; DiMarco, Christina N; Babaoglu, Kerim; Roecker, Anthony J; Bruno, Joseph G; Pausch, Mark A; O'Brien, Julie A; Cabalu, Tamara D; Stevens, Joanne; Brunner, Joseph; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Wuelfing, W Peter; Garson, Susan L; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Harrell, Charles M; Gotter, Anthony L; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J

    2017-03-15

    In an ongoing effort to explore the use of orexin receptor antagonists for the treatment of insomnia, dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) were structurally modified, resulting in compounds selective for the OX2R subtype and culminating in the discovery of 23, a highly potent, OX2R-selective molecule that exhibited a promising in vivo profile. Further structural modification led to an unexpected restoration of OX1R antagonism. Herein, these changes are discussed and a rationale for selectivity based on computational modeling is proposed.

  4. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  5. Antagonistic functional duality of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Vassetzky, Y S; Kavsan, V M

    2013-10-25

    Cancer evolution is a stochastic process both at the genome and gene levels. Most of tumors contain multiple genetic subclones, evolving in either succession or in parallel, either in a linear or branching manner, with heterogeneous genome and gene alterations, extensively rewired signaling networks, and addicted to multiple oncogenes easily switching with each other during cancer progression and medical intervention. Hundreds of discovered cancer genes are classified according to whether they function in a dominant (oncogenes) or recessive (tumor suppressor genes) manner in a cancer cell. However, there are many cancer "gene-chameleons", which behave distinctly in opposite way in the different experimental settings showing antagonistic duality. In contrast to the widely accepted view that mutant NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases 1/2 (IDH1/2) and associated metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (R)-enantiomer are intrinsically "the drivers" of tumourigenesis, mutant IDH1/2 inhibited, promoted or had no effect on cell proliferation, growth and tumorigenicity in diverse experiments. Similar behavior was evidenced for dozens of cancer genes. Gene function is dependent on genetic network, which is defined by the genome context. The overall changes in karyotype can result in alterations of the role and function of the same genes and pathways. The diverse cell lines and tumor samples have been used in experiments for proving gene tumor promoting/suppressive activity. They all display heterogeneous individual karyotypes and disturbed signaling networks. Consequently, the effect and function of gene under investigation can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genomes that may explain antagonistic duality of cancer genes and the cell type- or the cellular genetic/context-dependent response to the same protein. Antagonistic duality of cancer genes might contribute to failure of chemotherapy. Instructive examples of unexpected activity of cancer genes and

  6. Neuromuscular adaptations following antagonist resisted training.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Sasho J; Rannelli, Luke A; Yurchevich, Jordan J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to assess a novel form of strength training, antagonist resisted training (ART), with potential use in microgravity and athletic rehabilitation settings. ART uses the force from antagonist muscles, during cocontractions, as the source of resistance for the agonists. Strength and electromyography (EMG) measurements were recorded before and after a 6-week training program during which participants trained the left arm while the right arm served as a control. Training was designed so that the elbow extensors (antagonists) served as resistance for the elbow flexors (agonists). Elbow flexor and extensor strengths were measured during maximal isometric contractions with the elbow fixed at 90 degrees. EMG was recorded from the biceps brachii and lateral head of the triceps brachii during all strength tests. EMG was also recorded from both muscles during a maximal isometric cocontraction of the elbow flexors and extensors. Elbow flexion strength increased significantly for the trained arm (5.8%) relative to the control (0.5%) (p = 0.003). Elbow extension strength of the trained limb also increased significantly (8.5%) relative to the control (4.5%) (p = 0.029). Biceps and triceps EMG, during maximum strength tests, increased significantly for the trained arm (18.5 and 18.6%) relative to the control (0.5 and -5.2%) (p = 0.035 and p = 0.01). Biceps and triceps EMG, during maximum cocontraction tests, increased significantly for the trained arm (30.1 and 61.1%) relative to the control (9.2 and 1.1%) (p = 0.042 and p = 0.0005). ART was found to increase strength and therefore could be an effective form of resistance training. Because it requires no equipment, ART may be especially applicable in microgravity environments, which have space and weight constraints.

  7. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  8. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists: Effects on Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Buels, Kalmia S.

    2014-01-01

    In healthy lungs, muscarinic receptors control smooth muscle tone, mucus secretion, vasodilation, and inflammation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, cholinergic mechanisms contribute to increased bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion that limit airflow. This chapter reviews neuronal and nonneuronal sources of acetylcholine in the lung and the expression and role of M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in lung physiology. It also discusses the evidence for and against the role of parasympathetic nerves in asthma, and the current use and therapeutic potential of muscarinic receptor antagonists in COPD and asthma. PMID:22222705

  9. Azetidinones as Vasopressin V1a Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Guillon, Christophe D.; Koppel, Gary A.; Brownstein, Michael J.; Chaney, Michael O.; Ferris, Craig F.; Lu, Shi-fang; Fabio, Karine M.; Miller, Marvin J.; Heindel, Ned D.; Hunden, David C.; Cooper, Robin D. G.; Kaldor, Stephen W.; Skelton, Jeffrey J.; Dressman, Bruce A.; Clay, Michael P.; Steinberg, Mitchell I.; Bruns, Robert F.; Simon, Neal G.

    2007-01-01

    The azetidinone LY307174 (1) was identified as a screening lead for the vasopressin V1a receptor (IC50 45 nM at the human V1a receptor) based on molecular similarity to ketoconazole (2), a known antagonist of the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone receptor. Structure-activity relationships for the series were explored to optimize receptor affinity and pharmacokinetic properties, resulting in compounds with Ki values < 1 nM and brain levels after oral dosing ~100-fold higher than receptor affinities. PMID:17234419

  10. Endothelin antagonists: new bullets against lung injury?

    PubMed

    Leeman, Marc

    2005-06-01

    Acute lung injury is a syndrome of inflammation and of increased permeability of the blood-gas barrier. Endothelins are thought to exert proinflammatory effects. Kuklin and colleagues show that the endothelin receptor antagonist tezosentan reduces pulmonary edema in endotoxemic sheep, in parallel with a prevention of protein kinase C-alpha activation. In turn, the level of some cytokines increased after tezosentan treatment. Whether these contrasting effects of endothelin blockade on inflammatory mechanisms have clinical relevance and whether these agents might benefit patients with acute lung injury is unknown.

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  12. N-acyl-dopamines: novel synthetic CB(1) cannabinoid-receptor ligands and inhibitors of anandamide inactivation with cannabimimetic activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bisogno, T; Melck, D; Bobrov MYu; Gretskaya, N M; Bezuglov, V V; De Petrocellis, L; Di Marzo, V

    2000-01-01

    We reported previously that synthetic amides of polyunsaturated fatty acids with bioactive amines can result in substances that interact with proteins of the endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS). Here we synthesized a series of N-acyl-dopamines (NADAs) and studied their effects on the anandamide membrane transporter, the anandamide amidohydrolase (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH) and the two cannabinoid receptor subtypes, CB(1) and CB(2). NADAs competitively inhibited FAAH from N18TG2 cells (IC(50)=19-100 microM), as well as the binding of the selective CB(1) receptor ligand, [(3)H]SR141716A, to rat brain membranes (K(i)=250-3900 nM). The arachidonoyl (20:4 omega 6), eicosapentaenoyl (20:5 omega 3), docosapentaenoyl (22:5 omega 3), alpha-linolenoyl (18:3 omega 3) and pinolenoyl (5c,9c,12c 18:3 omega 6) homologues were also found to inhibit the anandamide membrane transporter in RBL-2H3 basophilic leukaemia and C6 glioma cells (IC(50)=17.5-33 microM). NADAs did not inhibit the binding of the CB(1)/CB(2) receptor ligand, [(3)H]WIN55,212-2, to rat spleen membranes (K(i)>10 microM). N-arachidonyl-dopamine (AA-DA) exhibited 40-fold selectivity for CB(1) (K(i)=250 nM) over CB(2) receptors, and N-docosapentaenoyl-dopamine exhibited 4-fold selectivity for the anandamide transporter over FAAH. AA-DA (0.1-10 microM) did not displace D1 and D2 dopamine-receptor high-affinity ligands from rat brain membranes, thus suggesting that this compound has little affinity for these receptors. AA-DA was more potent and efficacious than anandamide as a CB(1) agonist, as assessed by measuring the stimulatory effect on intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in undifferentiated N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells. This effect of AA-DA was counteracted by the CB(1) antagonist SR141716A. AA-DA behaved as a CB(1) agonist in vivo by inducing hypothermia, hypo-locomotion, catalepsy and analgesia in mice (1-10 mg/kg). Finally, AA-DA potently inhibited (IC(50)=0.25 microM) the proliferation of human breast MCF

  13. Prosocial effects of nicotine and ethanol in adolescent rats through partially dissociable neurobehavioral mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Trezza, Viviana; Baarendse, Petra J J; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2009-11-01

    The widespread use of tobacco and alcohol among adolescents might be related to the ability of nicotine and ethanol to facilitate social interactions. To investigate the neurobehavioral mechanisms underlying the prosocial effects of nicotine and ethanol, we focused on social play behavior, the most characteristic social activity in adolescent rats. Social play behavior is rewarding, and it is modulated through opioid, cannabinoid and dopaminergic neurotransmission, which are also involved in the reinforcing properties of nicotine and ethanol. We found that nicotine and ethanol increased social play, without affecting locomotion or social exploration. Their effects depended on the level of social activity of the partner, and were comparable in familiar and unfamiliar environments. At doses that increased social play, nicotine and ethanol had no anxiolytic effects in the elevated plus-maze. By contrast, the prototypical anxiolytic drug diazepam reduced social play at doses that reduced anxiety. The effects of nicotine on social play were blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A, and the dopamine receptor antagonist alpha-flupenthixol. The effects of ethanol were blocked by SR141716A and alpha-flupenthixol, but not by naloxone. Combined administration of subeffective doses of nicotine and ethanol only modestly enhanced social play. These results show that the facilitatory effects of nicotine and ethanol on social play are behaviorally specific and mediated through neurotransmitter systems involved in positive emotions and motivation, through partially dissociable mechanisms. Furthermore, the stimulating effects of nicotine and ethanol on social play behavior are independent of their anxiolytic-like properties.

  14. Prosocial effects of nicotine and ethanol in adolescent rats through partially dissociable neurobehavioral mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Trezza, Viviana; Baarendse, Petra J.J.; Vanderschuren, Louk J.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The widespread use of tobacco and alcohol among adolescents might be related to the ability of nicotine and ethanol to facilitate social interactions. To investigate the neurobehavioral mechanisms underlying the prosocial effects of nicotine and ethanol, we focused on social play behavior, the most characteristic social activity in adolescent rats. Social play behavior is rewarding, and it is modulated through opioid, cannabinoid and dopaminergic neurotransmission, which are also involved in the reinforcing properties of nicotine and ethanol. We found that nicotine and ethanol increased social play, without affecting locomotion or social exploration. Their effects depended on the level of social activity of the partner, and were comparable in familiar and unfamiliar environments. At doses that increased social play, nicotine and ethanol had no anxiolytic effects in the elevated plus-maze. By contrast, the prototypical anxiolytic drug diazepam reduced social play at doses that reduced anxiety. The effects of nicotine on social play were blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A, and the dopamine receptor antagonist alpha-flupenthixol. The effects of ethanol were blocked by SR141716A and alpha-flupenthixol, but not by naloxone. Combined administration of subeffective doses of nicotine and ethanol only modestly enhanced social play. These results show that the facilitatory effects of nicotine and ethanol on social play are behaviorally specific and mediated through neurotransmitter systems involved in positive emotions and motivation, through partially dissociable mechanisms. Furthermore, the stimulating effects of nicotine and ethanol on social play behavior are independent of their anxiolytic-like properties. PMID:19657330

  15. Elucidating the `Jekyll and Hyde' Nature of PXR: The Case for Discovering Antagonists or Allosteric Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Arunima; Mani, Sridhar; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.; Li, Hao; Ekins, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and is involved in the transcriptional control of numerous genes. It was originally thought that it was a xenobiotic sensor controlling detoxification pathways. Recent studies have shown an increasingly important role in inflammation and cancer, supporting its function in abrogating tissue damage. PXR orthologs and PXR-like pathways have been identified in several non-mammalian species which corroborate a conserved role for PXR in cellular detoxification. In summary, PXR has a multiplicity of roles in vivo and is being revealed as behaving like a “Jekyll and Hyde” nuclear hormone receptor. The importance of this review is to elucidate the need for discovery of antagonists of PXR to further probe its biology and therapeutic applications. Although several PXR agonists are already reported, virtually nothing is known about PXR antagonists. Here, we propose the development of PXR antagonists through chemical, genetic and molecular modeling approaches. Based on this review it will be clear that antagonists of PXR and PXR-like pathways will have widespread utility in PXR biology and therapeutics. PMID:19415465

  16. Sexually Antagonistic Selection in Human Male Homosexuality

    PubMed Central

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling ‘Darwinian paradox’. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait. PMID:18560521

  17. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-06-18

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  18. Antagonistic coevolution between quantitative and Mendelian traits.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Masato; Ellner, Stephen P

    2016-03-30

    Coevolution is relentlessly creating and maintaining biodiversity and therefore has been a central topic in evolutionary biology. Previous theoretical studies have mostly considered coevolution between genetically symmetric traits (i.e. coevolution between two continuous quantitative traits or two discrete Mendelian traits). However, recent empirical evidence indicates that coevolution can occur between genetically asymmetric traits (e.g. between quantitative and Mendelian traits). We examine consequences of antagonistic coevolution mediated by a quantitative predator trait and a Mendelian prey trait, such that predation is more intense with decreased phenotypic distance between their traits (phenotype matching). This antagonistic coevolution produces a complex pattern of bifurcations with bistability (initial state dependence) in a two-dimensional model for trait coevolution. Furthermore, with eco-evolutionary dynamics (so that the trait evolution affects predator-prey population dynamics), we find that coevolution can cause rich dynamics including anti-phase cycles, in-phase cycles, chaotic dynamics and deterministic predator extinction. Predator extinction is more likely to occur when the prey trait exhibits complete dominance rather than semidominance and when the predator trait evolves very rapidly. Our study illustrates how recognizing the genetic architectures of interacting ecological traits can be essential for understanding the population and evolutionary dynamics of coevolving species. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Antagonistic coevolution between quantitative and Mendelian traits

    PubMed Central

    Ellner, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Coevolution is relentlessly creating and maintaining biodiversity and therefore has been a central topic in evolutionary biology. Previous theoretical studies have mostly considered coevolution between genetically symmetric traits (i.e. coevolution between two continuous quantitative traits or two discrete Mendelian traits). However, recent empirical evidence indicates that coevolution can occur between genetically asymmetric traits (e.g. between quantitative and Mendelian traits). We examine consequences of antagonistic coevolution mediated by a quantitative predator trait and a Mendelian prey trait, such that predation is more intense with decreased phenotypic distance between their traits (phenotype matching). This antagonistic coevolution produces a complex pattern of bifurcations with bistability (initial state dependence) in a two-dimensional model for trait coevolution. Furthermore, with eco-evolutionary dynamics (so that the trait evolution affects predator–prey population dynamics), we find that coevolution can cause rich dynamics including anti-phase cycles, in-phase cycles, chaotic dynamics and deterministic predator extinction. Predator extinction is more likely to occur when the prey trait exhibits complete dominance rather than semidominance and when the predator trait evolves very rapidly. Our study illustrates how recognizing the genetic architectures of interacting ecological traits can be essential for understanding the population and evolutionary dynamics of coevolving species. PMID:27009218

  20. D-Cycloserine: Agonist turned antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lanthorn, T H

    1994-10-01

    D-Cycloserine can enhance activation of the NMDA receptor complex and could enhance the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). In animals and humans, D-cycloserine can enhance performance in learning and memory tasks. This enhancing effect can disappear during repeated administration. The enhancing effects are also lost when higher doses are used, and replaced by behavioral and biochemical effects like those produced by NMDA antagonists. It has been reported that NMDA agonists, applied before or after tetanic stimulation, can block the induction of LTP. This may be the result of feedback inhibition of second messenger pathways stimulated by receptor activation. This may explain the antagonist-like effects of glycine partial agonists like D-cycloserine. In clinical trials of D-cycloserine in age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) and Alzheimer's disease, chronic treatment provided few positive effects on learning and memory. This may be due to inhibition of second messenger pathways following chronic stimulation of the receptor complex.

  1. Hypocretin antagonists in insomnia treatment and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Chad; Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep through stabilization of sleep promoting GABAergic and wake promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. Hypocretin also influences other physiologic processes such as metabolism, appetite, learning and memory, reward and addiction, and ventilatory drive. The discovery of hypocretin and its effect upon the sleep-wake cycle has led to the development of a new class of pharmacologic agents that antagonize the physiologic effects of hypocretin (i.e. hypocretin antagonists). Further investigation of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side-effect profile of currently available hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, confusional arousals, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle while also influencing non-sleep physiologic processes may create an entirely different but equally concerning side-effect profile such as transient loss of muscle tone (i.e. cataplexy) and a dampened respiratory drive. In this review, we will discuss the discovery of hypocretin and its receptors, hypocretin and the sleep-wake cycle, hypocretin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia, and other implicated functions of the hypocretin system.

  2. The antiatherogenic potential of calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, D B

    1988-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an arterial disease characterized by focal accumulation of collagen, elastin, lipids, and calcium at sites associated with macrophage infiltration and altered smooth muscle metabolic function. Studies in several types of animal models, especially cholesterol-fed rabbits, have shown that calcium competitors, calcium chelators, anticalcifying agents, and calcium channel blockers can reduce the accumulation of atherogenic lesion components and thus apparently decrease the progression of lesions. Although there are some conflicting data in the animal model studies using calcium channel antagonists, as a result of differences in experimental designs, it is now apparent that several classes of calcium channel blockers inhibit the progression of early arterial lesions induced by cholesterol feeding. The dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers appear to be more potent antiatherosclerotic agents than other classes of calcium channel antagonists. Several mechanisms involving regulation of endothelial cell, smooth muscle cell, and macrophage metabolic functions may be responsible for the calcium channel blocker effects on early lesion progression. For example, recent studies in cell culture model systems suggest that calcium channel blockers may significantly alter activities that regulate lipoprotein-derived cholesterol accumulation by cells. Some of these activities are independent of calcium flux across voltage-operated calcium channels. Thus, calcium channel blockers may reduce the progression of atherogenic lesions by a combination of decreasing calcium accumulation within arterial wall cells and by altering calcium-independent metabolic activities.

  3. Zebrafish phenotypic screen identifies novel Notch antagonists.

    PubMed

    Velaithan, Vithya; Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Ng, Mei Fong; Samat, Norazwana; Leong, Sze Wei; Faudzi, Siti Munirah Mohd; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Cheong, Sok Ching; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-04-01

    Zebrafish represents a powerful in vivo model for phenotype-based drug discovery to identify clinically relevant small molecules. By utilizing this model, we evaluated natural product derived compounds that could potentially modulate Notch signaling that is important in both zebrafish embryogenesis and pathogenic in human cancers. A total of 234 compounds were screened using zebrafish embryos and 3 were identified to be conferring phenotypic alterations similar to embryos treated with known Notch inhibitors. Subsequent secondary screens using HEK293T cells overexpressing truncated Notch1 (HEK293TΔE) identified 2 compounds, EDD3 and 3H4MB, to be potential Notch antagonists. Both compounds reduced protein expression of NOTCH1, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) in HEK293TΔE and downregulated Notch target genes. Importantly, EDD3 treatment of human oral cancer cell lines demonstrated reduction of Notch target proteins and genes. EDD3 also inhibited proliferation and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of ORL-150 cells through inducing p27(KIP1). Our data demonstrates the utility of the zebrafish phenotypic screen and identifying EDD3 as a promising Notch antagonist for further development as a novel therapeutic agent.

  4. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  5. Antioxidant effects of calcium antagonists in rat brain homogenates.

    PubMed

    Yao, K; Ina, Y; Nagashima, K; Ohmori, K; Ohno, T

    2000-06-01

    We studied the antioxidant activities of calcium antagonists against autoxidation in rat brain homogenates. The homogenates were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with or without a calcium antagonist and subsequently assayed for lipid peroxide content. Percent inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was used as an index of the antioxidant effect. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists exhibited concentration-dependent (3-300 micromol/l) inhibitory effects against lipid peroxidation. The relative order of antioxidant potency and associated IC50 values (micromol/l) of the calcium antagonists for inhibition of the lipid peroxidation were as follows: nifedipine (51.5)>barnidipine (58.6)>benidipine (71.2)>nicardipine (129.3)>amlodipine (135.5)>nilvadipine (167.3)>nitrendipine (252.1)> diltiazem (>300)=verapamil (>300). These results suggest that some dihydropyridine calcium antagonists show antioxidant properties. The antioxidant effects of the calcium antagonists may contribute to their pharmacological actions.

  6. Phenylacetamides as selective alpha-1A adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Patane, M A; DiPardo, R M; Newton, R C; Price, R P; Broten, T P; Chang, R S; Ransom, R W; Di Salvo, J; Nagarathnam, D; Forray, C; Gluchowski, C; Bock, M G

    2000-08-07

    A novel class of potent and selective alpha-1a receptor antagonists has been identified. The structures of these antagonists were derived from truncating the 4-aryl dihydropyridine subunit present in known alpha-1a antagonists. The design principles which led to the discovery of substituted phenylacetamides, the synthesis and SAR of key analogues, and the results of select in vitro and in vivo studies are described.

  7. Synthesis of actively adjustable springs by antagonistic redundant actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Byung-Ju; Freeman, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for active spring generation is presented based on antagonistic redundant actuation. Antagonistic properties are characterized using an effective system stiffness. 'Antagonistic stiffness' is generated by preloading a closed-chain (parallel) linkage system. Internal load distribution is investigated along with the necessary conditions for spring synthesis. The performance and stability of a proposed active spring are shown by simulation, and applications are discussed.

  8. Cannabidiol inhibits human glioma cell migration through a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vaccani, Angelo; Massi, Paola; Colombo, Arianna; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of cannabidiol (CBD) to impair the migration of tumor cells stimulated by conditioned medium. CBD caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the migration of U87 glioma cells, quantified in a Boyden chamber. Since these cells express both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the membrane, we also evaluated their engagement in the antimigratory effect of CBD. The inhibition of cell was not antagonized either by the selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists SR141716 (CB1) and SR144528 (CB2) or by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, indicating no involvement of classical cannabinoid receptors and/or receptors coupled to Gi/o proteins. These results reinforce the evidence of antitumoral properties of CBD, demonstrating its ability to limit tumor invasion, although the mechanism of its pharmacological effects remains to be clarified. PMID:15700028

  9. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  10. Drug effects: agonistic and antagonistic processes.

    PubMed

    Flaten, Magne Arve

    2009-12-01

    The research presented here has shown that tolerance to drugs can be accelerated by conditioning processes. Placebo effects may be considered the opposite of tolerance, and we have shown that placebo effects may be objectively recorded by physiological measures (electromyography, skin conductance responses, and event-related potentials), as well as by behavioral and subjective methods. The placebo response, or more precisely, the expectation of drug effects, can add to the effect of the drug. Drug antagonistic expectations can also reverse the effect of the drug. There is some evidence that placebo effects are strongest when expectations are reinforced by administration of an active drug. Expectations have graded effects and may affect symptoms to a smaller or larger degree. Although drug effects can be considered stimuli, the investigation of the role of classical conditioning in drug use and drug effects involves special issues that must be carefully considered.

  11. Antagonists of IAP proteins as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dynek, Jasmin N; Vucic, Domagoj

    2013-05-28

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular survival by blocking apoptosis, modulating signal transduction, and affecting cellular proliferation. Through their interactions with inducers and effectors of apoptosis IAP proteins can effectively suppress apoptosis triggered by diverse stimuli including death receptor signaling, irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, or growth factor withdrawal. Evasion of apoptosis, in part due to the action of IAP proteins, enhances resistance of cancer cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and contributes to tumor progression. Additionally, IAP genes are known to be subject to amplification, mutation, and chromosomal translocation in human malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this review we will discuss the role of IAP proteins in cancer and the development of antagonists targeting IAP proteins for cancer treatment.

  12. Pervasive antagonistic interactions among hybrid incompatibility loci.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Rafael F; Muir, Christopher D; Josway, Sarah; Moyle, Leonie C

    2017-06-01

    Species barriers, expressed as hybrid inviability and sterility, are often due to epistatic interactions between divergent loci from two lineages. Theoretical models indicate that the strength, direction, and complexity of these genetic interactions can strongly affect the expression of interspecific reproductive isolation and the rates at which new species evolve. Nonetheless, empirical analyses have not quantified the frequency with which loci are involved in interactions affecting hybrid fitness, and whether these loci predominantly interact synergistically or antagonistically, or preferentially involve loci that have strong individual effects on hybrid fitness. We systematically examined the prevalence of interactions between pairs of short chromosomal regions from one species (Solanum habrochaites) co-introgressed into a heterospecific genetic background (Solanum lycopersicum), using lines containing pairwise combinations of 15 chromosomal segments from S. habrochaites in the background of S. lycopersicum (i.e., 95 double introgression lines). We compared the strength of hybrid incompatibility (either pollen sterility or seed sterility) expressed in each double introgression line to the expected additive effect of its two component single introgressions. We found that epistasis was common among co-introgressed regions. Interactions for hybrid dysfunction were substantially more prevalent in pollen fertility compared to seed fertility phenotypes, and were overwhelmingly antagonistic (i.e., double hybrids were less unfit than expected from additive single introgression effects). This pervasive antagonism is expected to attenuate the rate at which hybrid infertility accumulates among lineages over time (i.e., giving diminishing returns as more reproductive isolation loci accumulate), as well as decouple patterns of accumulation of sterility loci and hybrid incompatibility phenotypes. This decoupling effect might explain observed differences between pollen and

  13. Pharmacological and clinical importance of narcotic antagonists and mixed antagonists — use in cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Coltart, D. John; Malcolm, Alasdair D.

    1979-01-01

    1 The treatment of pain of cardiac origin requires a knowledge of the haemodynamic action of the analgesic agents used. 2 The haemodynamic effects of morphine, diamorphine, pavaveretum, pethidine and pentazocine are reviewed. 3 Clinical experience with the new antagonist analgesic buprenorphine is reported. 4 These studies indicate that buprenorphine may be the agent of choice for the relief of severe pain in patients with unstable circulation. PMID:465292

  14. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  15. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  16. [Effects of PAF antagonists in experimental models. Therapeutical perspectives].

    PubMed

    Desquand, S

    1993-01-01

    The discovery, during the last ten years, of Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) antagonists with different frameworks, but efficient on platelets tests, led the authors to study their activity in vivo against PAF-induced effects. These antagonists inhibit, with various potencies, the effects of PAF administration such as hypotension and bronchoconstriction in different animal species. Since PAF is assumed to play a central role in many diseases, effects of its antagonists have been studied in experimentally induced pathologies and in few clinical studies. We have been particularly interested in their effects on the first manifestation of asthma which is hypersensitivity. This manifestation is experimentally reproduced by anaphylactic bronchoconstriction, usually in the guinea-pig. Our results showed that different sensitization procedures may determine the relative efficiency of a PAF antagonist on subsequent antigen challenge. Indeed, the booster injection of antigen to a pre-sensitized animal could account for the refractoriness of anaphylactic bronchoconstriction to PAF antagonists. This booster injection mimics the clinical situation of atopic patients repeatedly exposed to allergen. Thus, it seems that immediate hypersensitivity could not be treated by the unique administration of a PAF antagonist. However, those antagonists may have more benefit in the clinical management of the late phase of asthma and of hyperreactivity and could thus provide anti-asthmatic drugs. PAF antagonists may have also therapeutical effects in septic shock, in myocardial ischemia and cardiac rhythm disturbances, in brain damage following cerebral ischemia and neurological trauma, in gastric and intestinal damages or in some inflammatory reactions.

  17. Microbial antagonists of Verticillium dahliae colonize cotton root system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Verticillium wilt remains one of the most severe diseases affecting cotton production in Uzbekistan. We are investigating microbial antagonist to control this pathogen. To this end, we have identified several antagonists of Verticillium dahliae (Bacillus sp. 234, Bacillus sp. 3, Streptomyces roseofl...

  18. Identification of a sulfonamide series of CCR2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Peace, Simon; Philp, Joanne; Brooks, Carl; Piercy, Val; Moores, Kitty; Smethurst, Chris; Watson, Steve; Gaines, Simon; Zippoli, Mara; Mookherjee, Claudette; Ife, Robert

    2010-07-01

    A series of sulfonamide CCR2 antagonists was identified by high-throughput screening. Management of molecular weight and physical properties, in particular moderation of lipophilicity and study of pK(a), yielded highly potent CCR2 antagonists exhibiting good pharmacokinetic properties and improved potency in the presence of human plasma.

  19. Third Generation Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists; Why We Need a Fourth

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise

    2015-01-01

    The first mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, was developed almost 60 years ago to treat primary aldosteronism and pathological edema. Its use waned in part due to its lack of selectivity. Subsequently knowledge of the scope of MR function was expanded along with clinical evidence of the therapeutic importance of MR antagonists to prevent the ravages of inappropriate MR activation. Forty-two years elapsed between the first and MR-selective second generation of MR antagonists. Fifteen years later, despite serious shortcomings of the existing antagonists, a third generation antagonist has yet to be marketed. Progress has been slowed by the lack of appreciation of the large variety of cell types that express the MR and its diverse cell-type-specific actions, as well as its uniquely complex interactions actions at the molecular level. New MR antagonists should preferentially target the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of MR and perhaps its excitatory effects on sympathetic nervous system, but not the renal tubular epithelium or neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. This review briefly describes efforts to develop a third generation MR antagonist and why fourth generation antagonists and selective agonists based on structural determinants of tissue and ligand-specific MR activation should be contemplated. PMID:26466326

  20. Early gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist start improves follicular synchronization and pregnancy outcome as compared to the conventional antagonist protocol.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Woo; Hwang, Yu Im; Koo, Hwa Seon; Kang, Inn Soo; Yang, Kwang Moon; Song, In Ok

    2014-12-01

    To assess whether an early GnRH antagonist start leads to better follicular synchronization and an improved clinical pregnancy rate (CPR). A retrospective cohort study. A total of 218 infertile women who underwent IVF between January 2011 and February 2013. The initial cohort (Cohort I) that underwent IVF between January 2011 and March 2012 included a total of 68 attempted IVF cycles. Thirty-four cycles were treated with the conventional GnRH antagonist protocol, and 34 cycles with an early GnRH antagonist start protocol. The second cohort (Cohort II) that underwent IVF between June 2012 and February 2013 included a total of 150 embryo-transfer (ET) cycles. Forty-three cycles were treated with the conventional GnRH antagonist protocol, 34 cycles with the modified early GnRH antagonist start protocol using highly purified human menopause gonadotropin and an addition of GnRH agonist to the luteal phase support, and 73 cycles with the GnRH agonist long protocol. The analysis of Cohort I showed that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was significantly higher in the early GnRH antagonist start cycles than in the conventional antagonist cycles (11.9 vs. 8.2, p=0.04). The analysis of Cohort II revealed higher but non-significant CPR/ET in the modified early GnRH antagonist start cycles (41.2%) than in the conventional antagonist cycles (30.2%), which was comparable to that of the GnRH agonist long protocol cycles (39.7%). The modified early antagonist start protocol may improve the mature oocyte yield, possibly via enhanced follicular synchronization, while resulting in superior CPR as compared to the conventional antagonist protocol, which needs to be studied further in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  1. Effects of the endogeneous cannabinoid, anandamide, on neuronal activity in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A; Wilhelm, A; Simmet, T

    1999-04-01

    1. The arachidonic acid derivative arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide) is an endogeneous ligand of cannabinoid receptors that induces pharmacological actions similar to those of cannabinoids such as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). We examined whether anandamide can influence excessive neuronal activity by investigating stimulation-induced population spikes and epileptiform activity in rat hippocampal slices. For this purpose, the effects of anandamide were compared with those of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 and its inactive S(-)-enantiomer WIN 55,212-3. 2. Both anandamide (1 and 10 microM) and WIN 55,212-2 (0.1 and 1 microM) decreased the amplitude of the postsynaptic population spike and the slope of the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (field e.p.s.p.) without affecting the presynaptic fibre spike of the afferents. At a concentration of 1 microM, WIN 55,212-2 completely suppressed the postsynaptic spike, whereas the S(-)-enantiomer WIN 55,212-3 produced only a slight depression. The CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716 blocked the inhibition evoked by the cannabinoids. SR 141716 had a slight facilitatory effect on neuronal excitability by itself. 3. Anandamide shifted the input-output curve of the postsynaptic spike and the field e.p.s.p. to the right and increased the magnitude of paired-pulse facilitation indicating a presynaptic mechanism of action. 4. Anandamide and WIN 55,212-2, but not WIN 55,212-3, attenuated both stimulus-triggered epileptiform activity in CA1 elicited by omission of Mg2+ and spontaneously occurring epileptiform activity in CA3 elicited by omission of Mg2+ and elevation of K+ to 8 mM. The antiepileptiform effect of these cannabinoids was blocked by SR 141716. 5. In conclusion, cannabinoid receptors of the CB1 type as well as their endogeneous ligand, anandamide, are involved in the control of neuronal excitability, thus reducing excitatory neurotransmission at a presynaptic site, a mechanism which might be

  2. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced catalepsy-like immobilization is mediated by decreased 5-HT neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens due to the action of glutamate-containing neurons.

    PubMed

    Sano, K; Mishima, K; Koushi, E; Orito, K; Egashira, N; Irie, K; Takasaki, K; Katsurabayashi, S; Iwasaki, K; Uchida, N; Egawa, T; Kitamura, Y; Nishimura, R; Fujiwara, M

    2008-01-24

    Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been reported to induce catalepsy-like immobilization, but the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. In the present study, in order to fully understand the neural circuits involved, we determined the brain sites involved in the immobilization effect in rats. THC dose-dependently induced catalepsy-like immobilization. THC-induced catalepsy-like immobilization is mechanistically different from that induced by haloperidol (HPD), because unlike HPD-induced catalepsy, animals with THC-induced catalepsy became normal again following sound and air-puff stimuli. THC-induced catalepsy was reversed by SR141716, a selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist. Moreover, THC-induced catalepsy was abolished by lesions in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and central amygdala (ACE) regions. On the other hand, HPD-induced catalepsy was suppressed by lesions in the caudate putamen (CP), substantia nigra (SN), globus pallidus (GP), ACE and lateral hypothalamus (LH) regions. Bilateral microinjection of THC into the NAc region induced catalepsy-like immobilization. This THC-induced catalepsy was inhibited by serotonergic drugs such as 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP), a 5-HT precursor, and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT), a 5-HT receptor agonist, as well as by anti-glutamatergic drugs such as MK-801 and amantadine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. THC significantly decreased 5-HT and glutamate release in the NAc, as shown by in vivo microdialysis. SR141716 reversed and MK-801 inhibited this decrease in 5-HT and glutamate release. These findings suggest that the THC-induced catalepsy is mechanistically different from HPD-induced catalepsy and that the catalepsy-like immobilization induced by THC is mediated by decreased 5-HT neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens due to the action of glutamate-containing neurons.

  3. Prostanoid receptor antagonists: development strategies and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, RL; Giembycz, MA; Woodward, DF

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the primary products of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)/prostaglandin synthase(s), which occurred between 1958 and 1976, was followed by a classification system for prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1, EP2 …) based mainly on the pharmacological actions of natural and synthetic agonists and a few antagonists. The design of potent selective antagonists was rapid for certain prostanoid receptors (EP1, TP), slow for others (FP, IP) and has yet to be achieved in certain cases (EP2). While some antagonists are structurally related to the natural agonist, most recent compounds are ‘non-prostanoid’ (often acyl-sulphonamides) and have emerged from high-throughput screening of compound libraries, made possible by the development of (functional) assays involving single recombinant prostanoid receptors. Selective antagonists have been crucial to defining the roles of PGD2 (acting on DP1 and DP2 receptors) and PGE2 (on EP1 and EP4 receptors) in various inflammatory conditions; there are clear opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The vast endeavour on TP (thromboxane) antagonists is considered in relation to their limited pharmaceutical success in the cardiovascular area. Correspondingly, the clinical utility of IP (prostacyclin) antagonists is assessed in relation to the cloud hanging over the long-term safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors. Aspirin apart, COX inhibitors broadly suppress all prostanoid pathways, while high selectivity has been a major goal in receptor antagonist development; more targeted therapy may require an intermediate position with defined antagonist selectivity profiles. This review is intended to provide overviews of each antagonist class (including prostamide antagonists), covering major development strategies and current and potential clinical usage. PMID:19624532

  4. Deletion of Monoglyceride Lipase in Astrocytes Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neuroinflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Grabner, Gernot F.; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Wagner, Bernhard; Gao, Yuanqing; Farzi, Aitak; Taschler, Ulrike; Radner, Franz P. W.; Schweiger, Martina; Lass, Achim; Holzer, Peter; Zinser, Erwin; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Yi, Chun-Xia; Zimmermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) is required for efficient hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglyerol (2-AG) in the brain generating arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. This metabolic function makes MGL an interesting target for the treatment of neuroinflammation, since 2-AG exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and AA is a precursor for pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Astrocytes are an important source of AA and 2-AG, and highly express MGL. In the present study, we dissected the distinct contribution of MGL in astrocytes on brain 2-AG and AA metabolism by generating a mouse model with genetic deletion of MGL specifically in astrocytes (MKOGFAP). MKOGFAP mice exhibit moderately increased 2-AG and reduced AA levels in brain. Minor accumulation of 2-AG in the brain of MKOGFAP mice does not cause cannabinoid receptor desensitization as previously observed in mice globally lacking MGL. Importantly, MKOGFAP mice exhibit reduced brain prostaglandin E2 and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels upon peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. These observations indicate that MGL-mediated degradation of 2-AG in astrocytes provides AA for prostaglandin synthesis promoting LPS-induced neuroinflammation. The beneficial effect of astrocyte-specific MGL-deficiency is not fully abrogated by the inverse cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist SR141716 (Rimonabant) suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects are rather caused by reduced prostaglandin synthesis than by activation of cannabinoid receptors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that MGL in astrocytes is an important regulator of 2-AG levels, AA availability, and neuroinflammation. PMID:26565024

  5. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    PubMed Central

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  6. Autoimmune encephalomyelitis ameliorated by AMPA antagonists.

    PubMed

    Smith, T; Groom, A; Zhu, B; Turski, L

    2000-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system leading to progressive decline of motor and sensory functions and permanent disability. The therapy of multiple sclerosis is only partially effective, despite anti-inflammatory, immunosuppresive and immunomodulatory measures. White matter inflammation and loss of myelin, the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis, are thought to determine disease severity. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reproduces the features of multiple sclerosis in rodents and in nonhuman primates. The dominant early clinical symptom of acute autoimmune encephalomyelitis is progressive ascending muscle weakness. However, demyelination may not be profound and its extent may not correlate with severity of neurological decline, indicating that targets unrelated to myelin or oligodendrocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of acute autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Here we report that within the spinal cord in the course of autoimmune encephalomyelitis not only myelin but also neurons are subject to lymphocyte attack and may degenerate. Blockade of glutamate AMPA receptors ameliorated the neurological sequelae of autoimmune encephalomyelitis, indicating the potential for AMPA antagonists in the therapy of multiple sclerosis.

  7. Antagonists of alcohol inhibition of cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wilkemeyer, Michael F.; Sebastian, Anita B.; Smith, Sherri A.; Charness, Michael E.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that alcohols act within specific binding pockets of selective neural proteins; however, antagonists at these sites have not been identified. 1-Alcohols from methanol through 1-butanol inhibit with increasing potency the cell–cell adhesion mediated by the immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecule L1. An abrupt cutoff exists after 1-butanol, with 1-pentanol and higher 1-alcohols showing no effect. Here, we demonstrate surprisingly strict structural requirements for alcohol inhibition of cell–cell adhesion in L1-transfected NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and in NG108–15 neuroblastoma × glioma hybrid cells treated with BMP-7, an inducer of L1 and neural cell adhesion molecule. The target site discriminates the tertiary structure of straight-chain and branched-chain alcohols and appears to comprise both a hydrophobic binding site and an adjacent hydrophilic allosteric site. Modifications to the 2- and 3-carbon positions of 1-butanol increased potency, whereas modifications that restrict movement about the 4-carbon abolished activity. The effects of ethanol and 1-butanol on cell–cell adhesion were antagonized by 1-pentanol (IC50 = 715 μM) and 1-octanol (IC50 = 3.6 μM). Antagonism by 1-octanol was complete, reversible, and noncompetitive. 1-Octanol also antagonized ethanol inhibition of BMP-7 morphogenesis in NG108–15 cells. 1-Octanol and related compounds may prove useful in dissecting the role of altered cell adhesion in ethanol-induced injury of the nervous system. PMID:10725368

  8. Noradrenergic antagonists mitigate amphetamine-induced recovery.

    PubMed

    Hylin, M J; Brenneman, M M; Corwin, J V

    2017-09-15

    Brain injury, including that due to stroke, leaves individuals with cognitive deficits that can disrupt daily aspect of living. As of now there are few treatments that shown limited amounts of success in improving functional outcome. The use of stimulants such as amphetamine have shown some success in improving outcome following brain injury. While the pharmacological mechanisms for amphetamine are known; the specific processes responsible for improving behavioral outcome following injury remain unknown. Understanding these mechanisms can help to refine the use of amphetamine as a potential treatment or lead to the use of other methods that share the same pharmacological properties. One proposed mechanism is amphetamine's impact upon noradrenaline (NA). In the current, study noradrenergic antagonists were administered prior to amphetamine to pharmacologically block α- and β-adrenergic receptors. The results demonstrated that the blockade of these receptors disrupted amphetamines ability to induce recovery from hemispatial neglect using an established aspiration lesion model. This suggests that amphetamine's ability to ameliorate neglect deficits may be due in part to noradrenaline. These results further support the role of noradrenaline in functional recovery. Finally, the development of polytherapies and combined therapeutics, while promising, may need to consider the possibility that drug interactions can negate the effectiveness of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. HIGH AFFINITY ACYLATING ANTAGONISTS FOR MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Baumgold, Jesse; Karton, Yishai; Malka, Naftali; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The muscarinic antagonists pirenzepine and telenzepine were derivitized as alkylamino derivatives at a site on the molecules corresponding to a region of bulk tolerance in receptor binding. The distal primary amino groups were coupled to the cross-linking reagent meta-phenylene diisothiocyanate, resulting in two isothiocyanate derivatives that were found to inhibit muscarinic receptors irreversibly and in a dose-dependent fashion. Preincubation of rat forebrain membranes with an isothiocyanate derivative followed by radioligand binding using [3H]N-methylscopolamine diminished the Bmax value, but did not affect the Kd value. The receptor binding site was not restored upon repeated washing, indicating that irreversible inhibition had occurred. IC50 values for the irreversible inhibition at rat forebrain muscarinic receptors were 0.15 nM and 0.19 nM, for derivatives of pirenzepine and telenzepine, respectively. The isothiocyanate derivative of pirenzepine was non-selective as an irreversible muscarinic inhibitor, and the corresponding derivative prepared from telenzepine was 5-fold selective for forebrain (mainly m1) vs. heart (m2) muscarinic receptors. PMID:1625525

  10. Adrenergic antagonists restrict replication of Legionella.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher F; Kicka, Sébastien; Kranjc, Agata; Finsel, Ivo; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Soldati, Thierry; Scapozza, Leonardo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium, which upon inhalation can cause a potentially fatal pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The opportunistic pathogen grows in environmental amoebae and mammalian macrophages within a unique membrane-bound compartment, the 'Legionella-containing vacuole'. Bacteria are exposed to many environmental cues including small signalling molecules from eukaryotic cells. A number of pathogenic bacteria sense and respond to catecholamine hormones, such as adrenalin and noradrenalin, a process mediated via the QseBC two-component system in some bacteria. In this study, we examined the effect of adrenergic compounds on L. pneumophila, and discovered that the adrenergic receptor antagonists benoxathian, naftopidil, propranolol and labetalol, as well as the QseC sensor kinase inhibitor LED209, reduced the growth of L. pneumophila in broth or amoebae, while replication in macrophages was enhanced. Growth restriction was common to members of the genus Legionella and Mycobacterium, and was observed for L. pneumophila in the replicative but not stationary phase of the biphasic life cycle. Deletion of the L. pneumophila qseBC genes indicated that growth inhibition by adrenergics or LED209 is mediated only to a minor extent by this two-component system, implying the presence of other adrenergic sensing systems. This study identifies adrenergic molecules as novel inhibitors of extra- and intracellular growth of Legionella and reveals LED209 as a potential lead compound to combat infections with Legionella or Mycobacterium spp.

  11. Antagonistic interactions among coral-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rypien, Krystal L; Ward, Jessica R; Azam, Farooq

    2010-01-01

    Reef-building corals are comprised of close associations between the coral animal, symbiotic zooxanthellae, and a diversity of associated microbes (including Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi). Together, these comprise the coral holobiont - a paradigm that emphasizes the potential contributions of each component to the overall function and health of the coral. Little is known about the ecology of the coral-associated microbial community and its hypothesized role in coral health. We explored bacteria-bacteria antagonism among 67 bacterial isolates from the scleractinian coral Montastrea annularis at two temperatures using Burkholder agar diffusion assays. A majority of isolates exhibited inhibitory activity (69.6% of isolates at 25 degrees C, 52.2% at 31 degrees C), with members of the gamma-proteobacteria (Vibrionales and Alteromonadales) being especially antagonistic. Elevated temperatures generally reduced levels of antagonism, although the effects were complex. Several potential pathogens were observed in the microbial community of apparently healthy corals, and 11.6% of isolates were able to inhibit the growth of the coral pathogen Vibrio shiloi at 25 degrees C. Overall, this study demonstrates that antagonism could be a structuring force in coral-associated microbial communities and may contribute to pathogenesis as well as disease resistance.

  12. Antagonists for acute oral cadmium chloride intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Basinger, M.A.; Jones, M.M.; Holscher, M.A.; Vaughn, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    An examination has been carried out on the relative efficacy of a number of chelating agents when acting as antagonists for oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice. The compounds were administered orally after the oral administration of cadmium chloride at 1 mmol/kg. Of the compounds examined, several were useful in terms of enhancing survival, but by far the most effective in both enhancing survival and leaving minimal residual levels of cadmium in the liver and the kidney, was meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Several polyaminocarboxylic acids also enhanced survival. The most effective of these in reducing liver and kidney levels of cadmium were diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), and triethylenetetraminehexaacetic acid (TTHA). D-Penicillamine (DPA) was found to promote survival but also led to kidney cadmium levels higher than those found in the controls. Sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS) was as effective in promoting survival as DMSA but left levels of cadmium in the kidney and liver that were approximately four times greater than those found with DMSA.

  13. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles.

    PubMed

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks - the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  14. TRPV1 Antagonist Suppresses Allergic Conjunctivitis in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Young; Lee, Hyun Soo; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2016-10-11

    To determine the immunologic functions of TRPA1 or TRPV1 in allergic conjunctivitis (AC). Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA), after which TRPA1 antagonist or TRPV1 antagonist was administered before topical OVA challenge. Expression of TRPV1 or TRPA1 in AC was examined by western blotting and multicolor immunofluorescence. Clinical signs, OVA-specific IgE, infiltration of inflammatory cells into conjunctivae (CJs), and Th2 cytokine in draining lymph nodes (LNs) were evaluated by microscopy, flow cytometry, and ELISA. TRPV1 expression was increased in CJs and LNs from AC mice, but TRPA1 expression was only increased in LNs. TRPV1 antagonist but not TRPA1 antagonist attenuated the clinical signs of AC and OVA-specific IgE in sera. TRPV1 antagonist furthermore inhibited the infiltration of inflammatory cells into CJ and the production of Th2 cytokines in LNs. TRPV1 antagonist but not TRPA1 antagonist may ameliorate AC by suppressing the Th2 response in LNs.

  15. Single exposure of dopamine D1 antagonist prevents and D2 antagonist attenuates methylphenidate effect

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Witte, Lindsey J; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a readily prescribed drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and moreover is used illicitly by youths for its cognitive-enhancing effects and recreation. MPD exposure in rodents elicits increased locomotor activity. Repetitive MPD exposure leads to further augmentation of their locomotor activity. This behavioral response is referred to as behavioral sensitization. Behavioral sensitization is used as an experimental marker for a drug’s ability to elicit dependence. There is evidence that dopamine (DA) is a key player in the acute and chronic MPD effect; however, the role of DA in the effects elicited by MPD is still debated. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of D1 and/or D2 DA receptors in the acute and chronic effect of MPD on locomotor activity. The study lasted for 12 consecutive days. Seven groups of male Sprague Dawley® rats were used. A single D1 or D2 antagonist was given before and after acute and chronic MPD administration. Single injection of D1 DA antagonist was able to significantly attenuate the locomotor activity when given prior to the initial MPD exposure and after repetitive MPD exposure, while the D2 DA antagonist partially attenuated the locomotor activity only when given before the second MPD exposure. The results show the role, at least in part, of the D1 DA receptor in the mechanism of behavioral sensitization, whereas the D2 DA receptor only partially modulates the response to acute and chronic MPD. PMID:27186140

  16. The muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and atropine are competitive antagonists at 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Scopolamine is a high affinity muscarinic antagonist that is used for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used for the same purpose and are structurally related to scopolamine. To examine whether 5-HT3 receptors are affected by scopolamine we examined the effects of this drug on the electrophysiological and ligand binding properties of 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor-responses were reversibly inhibited by scopolamine with an IC50 of 2.09 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by Schild plot (pA2 = 5.02) and by competition with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists [(3)H]granisetron (Ki = 6.76 μM) and G-FL (Ki = 4.90 μM). The related molecule, atropine, similarly inhibited 5-HT evoked responses in oocytes with an IC50 of 1.74 μM, and competed with G-FL with a Ki of 7.94 μM. The reverse experiment revealed that granisetron also competitively bound to muscarinic receptors (Ki = 6.5 μM). In behavioural studies scopolamine is used to block muscarinic receptors and induce a cognitive deficit, and centrally administered concentrations can exceed the IC50 values found here. It is therefore possible that 5-HT3 receptors are also inhibited. Studies that utilise higher concentrations of scopolamine should be mindful of these potential off-target effects.

  17. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  18. Intractable pneumococcal meningoencephalitis associated with a TNF-α antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Jae; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Seo; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Hee Tae; Kim, Seung H

    2014-09-15

    A 34-year-old man was treated with a TNF-α antagonist for ankylosing spondylitis, and this subsequently developed a CNS infection. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse subcortical white matter lesions. Streptococcus pneumoniae was cultured from the cerebrospinal fluid and blood. The patient died of multifocal widespread brain damage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, despite intensive antibacterial medication. Pneumococcal meningoencephalitis can occur in association with TNF-α antagonists. Clinicians should be aware of both the risk of fatal bacterial meningoencephalitis associated with TNF-α antagonists and the possibility of an unusual presentation of bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  20. New potential uroselective NO-donor alpha1-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Donatella; Tron, Gian Cesare; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Poggesi, Elena; Motta, Gianni; Leonardi, Amedeo

    2003-08-14

    A recent uroselective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, REC15/2739, has been joined with nitrooxy and furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor alpha(1)-antagonists. All the compounds studied proved to be potent and selective ligands of human cloned alpha(1a)-receptor subtype. Derivatives 6 and 7 were able to relax the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens contracted by (-)-noradrenaline because of both their alpha(1A)-antagonist and their NO-donor properties.

  1. [Research progress of selective mGluR1 antagonists].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-lei; Sun, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-ye; Yang, Xiao-hong

    2011-10-01

    As an important member of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) plays an important role in the signal transduction of central nervous system. Selective mGluR1 antagonists can block the signaling pathway activated by mGluR1 and exert a series of physiological actions including analgesia, antianxiety, antidepression, etc. Currently, the discovery and modification of selective mGluR1 antagonists have become a hot research focus. This paper reviews the structural catalogs of selective mGluR1 antagonists and their structure-activity relationships in the last decade.

  2. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-08-20

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously.

  3. Central effects of the calcium antagonist, nifedipine.

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, D G; Currie, D; Nicholson, A N; Wright, N A; Zetlein, M B

    1991-01-01

    1. Central effects of the calcium antagonist, nifedipine retard (10, 20 and 40 mg) and nifedipine capsules (10 mg) were studied in 14 healthy male subjects. Two placebos and an active control drug, oxazepam (15 mg), were included. Medication was administered double-blind at 10.00 h. The effects of drugs on performance and subjective feelings were assessed before and from 1.5-2.5 h and 3.5-4.5 h after ingestion, and recordings of the electrical activity of the brain (EEG) and body sway carried out. 2. Performance was assessed using digit symbol substitution, continuous attention, letter cancellation, choice reaction time, finger tapping, immediate and short-term memory, together with critical flicker fusion and two flash fusion. The EEG was recorded with eyes open while the subjects carried out a mental arithmetic task, and with eyes closed, when they were required to relax. Body sway was recorded with eyes open and with eyes closed. Subjects assessed their mood and well-being on a series of 12 visual analogue scales. 3. Nifedipine did not alter performance levels on any of the skills tested, while oxazepam (15 mg) increased the number of errors (P less than 0.01) and reduced accuracy at continuous attention (P less than 0.01). 4. Nifedipine (10 mg) reduced total power of the EEG in the frequency range (0.5-30 Hz), and nifedipine (20 mg) increased total alpha power (7.5-13 Hz) (P less than 0.05). Oxazepam reduced alpha and increased beta 1 power (13.5-21 Hz).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1954069

  4. Calmodulin antagonists inhibit secretion in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Secretion in Paramecium is Ca2+-dependent and involves exocytic release of the content of the secretory organelle, known as the trichocyst. The content, called the trichocyst matrix, undergoes a Ca2+-induced reordering of its paracrystalline structure during release, and we have defined three stages in this expansion process. The stage I, or fully condensed trichocyst, is the 4 microns-long membrane-bounded form existing prior to stimulation. Stage II, the partially expanded trichocyst, we define as an intermediate stage in the transition, preceding stage III, the fully expanded extruded form which is a 20-40 microns-long needlelike structure. These stages have been used to assay the effects of trifluoperazine (TFP) and W-7, calmodulin (CaM) antagonists, on trichocyst matrix expansion in vivo. TFP and W-7 are shown to reversibly block matrix release induced by picric acid. Ultra- structural examination reveals that one effect of this inhibition is reflected in the organelles themselves, which are prevented from undergoing the stage I-stage II transition by preincubation in 14 microM TFP or 35 microM W-7 before fixation. This inhibition of expansion by TFP can be moderated but not abolished by high extracellular Ca2+ (5 mM). The moderation by high Ca2+ can be eliminated by raising TFP concentration to 20 microM. A possible explanation for the ability to titrate the inhibition in this manner is that TFP is acting to block expansion by binding to the Ca2+-CaM complex. Brief exposure of cells to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and 5 mM Ca2+ following TFP treatment promotes matrix expansion, although in 14 microM TFP a residual level of inhibition remains. These results suggest that, following stimulation, CaM regulates secretion in Paramecium, possibly by controlling the Ca2+-dependent matrix expansion which accompanies exocytosis in these cells. PMID:6403556

  5. The pharmacological properties of lipophilic calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    van Zwieten, P A

    1998-01-01

    Several types of calcium antagonists (CA) (verapamil, diltiazem, nifedipine and related drugs) may be used as antihypertensives. In practice, the dihydropyridines (nifedipine and related drugs) are the CA used most frequently as antihypertensives. Apart from the lowering of blood pressure CA may lead to other, theoretically beneficial, effects: regression of left ventricular and vascular hypertrophy, renal protection, weak natriuretic, weak antiplatelet, anti-ischaemic and antiatherogenic activity. Several new dihydropyridine CA have been introduced in recent years. The advantages of the newer compounds, such as amlodipine, felodipine, isradipine, lacidipine and lercanidipine, may include: vasoselectivity, hence little or no cardiodepressant activity; an improved kinetic profile, resulting in a slow onset and long duration of action, fewer side-effects such as reflex tachycardia and headache, owing to the slow onset of the antihypertensive action. For a few newer CA a predominant effect on specialized circulatory beds (renal, coronary and cerebral) has been claimed. The new CA, which are clearly lipophilic, deserve special attention. Owing to the lipophilic character of such compounds considerable concentration occurs in lipid-containing membrane depots. The CA thus concentrated are slowly released from these depots and, subsequently, reach their targets, the L-type calcium channels. This phenomenon explains both the slow onset and the long duration of action of these CA. Owing to the slow onset of action reflex tachycardia is virtually absent. The long duration of action allows satisfactory control of blood pressure in hypertensives by means of a single daily dose. A few lipophilic dihydropyridine CA are vasoselective. This property implies that at therapeutic, vasodilatory dosages no cardiodepressant activity occurs. Lercanidipine is a recently introduced example of a lipophilic and vasoselective dihydropyridine CA. It is an effective vasodilator

  6. [Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: different or equivalent?].

    PubMed

    Mounier-Vehier, C; Devos, P

    ARA-II: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) belong to a recent class of antihypertensive drugs whose mechanism of action is similar to converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI). ARA-II are particularly interesting due to the excellent clinical and biological tolerance, similar to placebo, and their antihypertensive efficacy, comparable with classical drug classes. PUBLISHED TRIALS: A meta-analysis, published by Conlin in the American Journal of Hypertension, suggests that ARA-II, specifically losartan, valsartan, irbesartan and candesartan, have an equipotent blood pressure lowering effect. The careful lecture of this meta-analysis however discloses a faulty methodology from which no valid conclusion can be drawn. Since this early publication, several other comparative studies have been published. These multicentric, randomized double-blind studies enrolled a sufficient number of patients and demonstrated a clinical difference between certain ARA-II at usual dosages. CLINICAL PRACTICE: These studies do have an impact on everyday practice. For the practitioner, the goal is to obtain and then maintain a long-term and optimal reduction in the blood pressure level (reduction or prevention of target-organ disorders and cardiovascular complications of high blood pressure). This reduction in the cardiovascular risk will also depend directly on tolerance and compliance to the antihypertensive treatment. This element must also be considered in assessing treatment efficacy, independent of the blood pressure lowering effect. The results of several other studies will be published in 2001-2003. These large-scale studies on ARA-II related morbidity and mortality will be most useful in determining the role of these drugs in different therapeutic strategies compared with other drug classes.

  7. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  8. Antagonistic interactions of soil pseudomonads are structured in time.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Susanne A; Soucy, Jean-Paul R; Kassen, Rees

    2017-04-06

    Social interactions have been invoked as potential major selective forces structuring natural microbial communities and thus may help explain the astonishing bacterial diversity of natural ecosystems. Here, we investigate the prevalence and structure of exotoxin-mediated antagonistic interactions among free-living soil Pseudomonas strains collected over the course of two years at distances of up to one kilometer. Unlike some previous studies on antagonistic interactions among natural isolates, we found the prevalence of exotoxin-mediated inhibitions to be relatively low. When present, antagonistic interactions show a weakly negative relationship with genetic relatedness and metabolic similarity. Intriguingly, isolates sampled from the same growing season were significantly more likely to inhibit each other than they were to inhibit isolates from different growing seasons. Exotoxin-mediated antagonistic interactions between soil pseudomonads thus seem to be structured in time but do not appear to be a major selective force structuring free-living soil bacterial communities of soil pseudomonads.

  9. Characterization and design of antagonistic shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, T.; Brailovski, V.; Terriault, P.

    2012-03-01

    Antagonistic shape memory actuators use opposing shape memory alloy (SMA) elements to create devices capable of producing differential motion paths and two-way mechanical work in a very efficient manner. There is no requirement for additional bias elements to ‘re-arm’ the actuators and allow repetitive actuation. The work generation potential of antagonistic shape memory actuators is determined by specific SMA element characteristics and their assembly conditions. In this study, the selected SMA wires are assembled in antagonistic configuration and characterized using a dedicated test bench to evaluate their stress-strain characteristics as a function of the number of cycles. Using these functional characteristics, a so-called ‘working envelope’ is built to assist in the design of such an actuator. Finally, the test bench is used to simulate a real application of an antagonistic actuator (case study).

  10. Structure-based drug design identifies novel LPA3 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Fells, James I.; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Liu, Jianxiong; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L.

    2009-01-01

    Compound 5 ([5-(3-nitrophenoxy)-1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2-isoindol-2-yl]acetic acid) was identified as a weak selective LPA3 antagonist (IC50=4504 nM) in a virtual screening effort to optimize a dual LPA2&3 antagonist. Structure-based drug design techniques were used to prioritize similarity search matches of compound 5. This strategy rapidly identified 10 novel antagonists. The two most efficacious compounds identified inhibit activation of the LPA3 receptor by 200 nM LPA with IC50 values of 752 nM and 2992 nM. These compounds additionally define changes to our previously reported pharmacophore that will improve its ability to identify more potent and selective LPA3 receptor antagonists. The results of the combined computational and experimental screening are reported. PMID:19800804

  11. Structure-based drug design identifies novel LPA3 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fells, James I; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Liu, Jianxiong; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L

    2009-11-01

    Compound 5 ([5-(3-nitrophenoxy)-1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2-isoindol-2-yl]acetic acid) was identified as a weak selective LPA(3) antagonist (IC(50)=4504 nM) in a virtual screening effort to optimize a dual LPA(2 and 3) antagonist. Structure-based drug design techniques were used to prioritize similarity search matches of compound 5. This strategy rapidly identified 10 novel antagonists. The two most efficacious compounds identified inhibit activation of the LPA(3) receptor by 200 nM LPA with IC(50) values of 752 nM and 2992 nM. These compounds additionally define changes to our previously reported pharmacophore that will improve its ability to identify more potent and selective LPA(3) receptor antagonists. The results of the combined computational and experimental screening are reported.

  12. Assortative mating by fitness and sexually antagonistic genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Arnqvist, Göran

    2011-07-01

    Recent documentations of sexually antagonistic genetic variation in fitness have spurred an interest in the mechanisms that may act to maintain such variation in natural populations. Using individual-based simulations, I show that positive assortative mating by fitness increases the amount of sexually antagonistic genetic variance in fitness, primarily by elevating the equilibrium frequency of heterozygotes, over most of the range of sex-specific selection and dominance. Further, although the effects of assortative mating by fitness on the protection conditions of polymorphism in sexually antagonistic loci were relatively minor, it widens the protection conditions under most reasonable scenarios (e.g., under heterozygote superiority when fitness is averaged across the sexes) but can also somewhat narrow the protection conditions under other circumstances. The near-ubiquity of assortative mating in nature suggests that it may contribute to upholding standing sexually antagonistic genetic variation in fitness.

  13. Vasopressin-receptor antagonist therapy in patients with hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Tushar; Vachharajani, Vidula

    2007-07-01

    Hyponatraemia often complicates the treatment of underlying conditions in patients who are seriously ill. Arginine vasopressin receptor antagonists block the action of arginine vasopressin and correct sodium and water imbalance in patients with euvolaemic or hypervolaemic hyponatraemia.

  14. Solution structures and molecular interactions of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lim, Sung-Kil; Lee, Weontae

    2010-12-01

    The solution structures and inter-molecular interaction of the cyclic melanocortin antagonists SHU9119, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 with receptor molecules have been determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. While SHU9119 is known as a nonselective antagonist, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 are selective for the melanocortin subtype-4 receptor (MC4R) involved in modulation of food intake. Data from NMR and molecular dynamics suggest that the conformation of the Trp9 sidechain in the three MC4R-selective antagonists is quite different from that of SHU9119. This result strongly supports the concept that the spatial orientation of the hydrophobic aromatic residue is more important for determining selectivity than the presence of a basic, "arginine-like" moiety responsible for biological activity. We propose that the conformation of hydrophobic residues of MCR antagonists is critical for receptor-specific selectivity.

  15. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  16. Celiprolol, a potent cardioselective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist with mild alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P S; Pruss, T P; Rand, M J; Smith, R D; Mann, W S; Romano, D V

    1985-12-01

    Celiprolol is a cardioselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, with interesting propranolol-insensitive cardiostimulatory, vasodilatory and bronchodilatory effects. Recent reports suggest that mild alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonism may contribute to these effects. The present investigation further explored the alpha 2 effects of celiprolol. In isolated electrically-stimulated rat atria celiprolol (1.0 and 10 mumol/l) significantly increased the release of [3H]-norepinephrine, consistent with the blockade of pre-junctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors. Evidence for post-synaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist activity was obtained in studies of the effects of celiprolol on the pressor response to clonidine and either phenylephrine or methoxamine in perfused hind-limbs of dogs (pretreated with mecamylamine and propranolol) and pithed rats. In the dog, celiprolol (10 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the vasoconstrictor response of clonidine while in the rat higher doses were required (> or = 12.5 mg/kg). Celiprolol did not affect the pressor response induced by alpha 1-agonists. We conclude that celiprolol possesses a mild alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking action which may contribute to its unconventional profile.

  17. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan [Mystic, CT; Jancarik, Jarmila [Walnut Creek, CA; Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Koths, Kirston [El Cerrito, CA; Halenbeck, Robert [San Rafael, CA; Fear, Anna Lisa [Oakland, CA; Taylor, Eric [Oakland, CA; Yamamoto, Ralph [Martinez, CA; Bohm, Andrew [Armonk, NY

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  18. Novel arylpiperazines as selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Murray, W V; Jolliffe, L; Pulito, V

    2000-05-15

    A novel series of arylpiperazines has been synthesized and identified as antagonists of alpha1a adrenergic receptor (alpha1a-AR) implicated in benign prostatic hyperplasia. These compounds selectively bind to membrane bound alpha1a-AR with K(i)s as low as 0.66 nM. As such, these potentially represent a viable treatment for BPH without the side effects associated with known alpha1-adrenergic antagonists.

  19. Discovery of Novel Triazole-Based Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Keenan, Susan M.; Peng, Youyi; Nair, Anil C.; Yu, Seong Jae; Howells, Richard D.; Welsh, William J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the computer-aided design, chemical synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel family of δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonists containing a 1,2,4-triazole core structure that are structurally distinct from other known opioid receptor active ligands. Among those δ antagonists sharing this core structure, 8 exhibited strong binding affinity (Ki = 50 nM) for the DOR and appreciable selectivity for δ over μ and opioid receptors (δ/μ = 80; δ/κ > 200). PMID:16821764

  20. Structure-activity relationships of benzothiazole GPR35 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Abdalhameed, Manahil M.; Zhao, Pingwei; Hurst, Dow P.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Abood, Mary E.; Croatt, Mitchell P.

    2017-01-01

    The first structure-activity relationships for a benzothiazole scaffold acting as an antagonist at GPR35 is presented. Analogues were designed based on a lead compound that was previously determined to have selective activity as a GPR35 antagonist. The synthetic route was modular in nature to independently explore the role of the middle and both ends of the scaffold. The activities of the analogues illustrate the importance of all three segments of the compound. PMID:27989666

  1. Structure-activity relationships of benzothiazole GPR35 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Abdalhameed, Manahil M; Zhao, Pingwei; Hurst, Dow P; Reggio, Patricia H; Abood, Mary E; Croatt, Mitchell P

    2017-02-01

    The first structure-activity relationships for a benzothiazole scaffold acting as an antagonist at GPR35 is presented. Analogues were designed based on a lead compound that was previously determined to have selective activity as a GPR35 antagonist. The synthetic route was modular in nature to independently explore the role of the middle and both ends of the scaffold. The activities of the analogues illustrate the importance of all three segments of the compound.

  2. Cannabinoids inhibit cholinergic contraction in human airways through prejunctional CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Naline, E; Buenestado, A; Faisy, C; Alvarez, J-C; Salvator, H; Abrial, C; Advenier, C; Zemoura, L; Devillier, P

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Marijuana smoking is widespread in many countries, and the use of smoked synthetic cannabinoids is increasing. Smoking a marijuana joint leads to bronchodilation in both healthy subjects and asthmatics. The effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and synthetic cannabinoids on human bronchus reactivity have not previously been investigated. Here, we sought to assess the effects of natural and synthetic cannabinoids on cholinergic bronchial contraction. Experimental Approach Human bronchi isolated from 88 patients were suspended in an organ bath and contracted by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the presence of the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the endogenous 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the synthetic dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940, the synthetic, CB2-receptor-selective agonist JWH-133 or the selective GPR55 agonist O-1602. The receptors involved in the response were characterized by using selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716 and SR144528 respectively). Key Results Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 induced concentration-dependent inhibition of cholinergic contractions, with maximum inhibitions of 39, 76 and 77% respectively. JWH-133 only had an effect at high concentrations. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and O-1602 were devoid of any effect. Only CB1 receptors were involved in the response because the effects of cannabinoids were antagonized by SR141716, but not by SR144528. The cannabinoids did not alter basal tone or contractions induced by exogenous Ach. Conclusions and Implications Activation of prejunctional CB1 receptors mediates the inhibition of EFS-evoked cholinergic contraction in human bronchus. This mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation produced by marijuana smoking. PMID:24467410

  3. Involvement of cannabinoid receptors in the intraocular pressure-lowering effects of WIN55212-2.

    PubMed

    Song, Z H; Slowey, C A

    2000-01-01

    It is known that marijuana smoking and administration of natural cannabinoids reduce intraocular pressure. However, it has not been established whether the intraocular pressure-lowering effects of cannabinoids are mediated by cannabinoid receptors. Aminoalkylindoles are a new class of cannabimimetics with structures entirely different from those of natural cannabinoids. WIN55212-2, a prototypic aminoalkylindole, has been shown to bind cannabinoid receptors and to exhibit cannabinoid-like activities. The objective of this study was to determine whether aminoalkylindoles lower intraocular pressure and whether the effects of aminoalkylindoles are mediated by ocular cannabinoid receptors. The intraocular pressure of New Zealand White rabbits was measured with the use of applanation pneumatonography. After the measurement of baseline intraocular pressure, drugs were applied topically and the intraocular pressure was monitored. The topical application of WIN55212-2 significantly reduced intraocular pressure in the treated eyes. The intraocular pressure-lowering effects of WIN55212-2 were time and dose dependent, and the maximal reduction was 4.7 +/- 0.5 mm Hg at a dose of 100 microg. In contrast to treated eyes, the intraocular pressure on the contralateral eyes was not significantly affected. The topical application of WIN55212-3, the enantiomer of WIN55212-2, had no effect on intraocular pressure. Furthermore, the intraocular pressure-lowering effects of WIN55212-2 were significantly reduced by topically administered SR141716A, a selective antagonist for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. The dose-response curve of WIN55212-2 is shifted parallel to the right by SR141716A. These data demonstrate that like natural cannabinoids, WIN55212-2 also reduces intraocular pressure, and the effects of WIN55212-2 are mediated at least in part by the CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the eye.

  4. Differential effects of the sleep-inducing lipid oleamide and cannabinoids on the induction of long-term potentiation in the CA1 neurons of the rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lees, George; Dougalis, Antonios

    2004-01-30

    Cannabinoids have been shown to impair cognition in vivo and block long-term potentiation (LTP), a candidate experimental model of learning and memory in vitro, via cannabinoid receptor (CB1) activation. cis-Oleamide (cOA) is an endogenous sleep-inducing lipid with putative cannabinomimetic properties. We hypothesise that cOA is cannabinomimetic and perform a comparative study with synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids on their effects on synaptic conditioning via two different patterns of stimulation in the hippocampal slice. CB1 agonists, R(+)-WIN55212-2 and anandamide, but not cOA blocked high frequency stimulation (HFS)-LTP. R(+)-WIN55212-2 and cOA (stereoselectively) attenuated responses to theta-burst-LTP, while anandamide did not. The anandamide transport inhibitor, AM404, attenuated HFS-LTP, an effect reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A but not mimicked by the vanilloid receptor agonist capsaicin. TFNO, an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme responsible for degrading anandamide, failed to block HFS-LTP alone or in combination with cOA. On the contrary, this combination was as effective as cOA on its own in attenuating theta-burst-LTP. cOA effects on theta-burst-LTP were prevented in the presence of the GABA(A) receptor blocker picrotoxin, but not by pretreatment with SR141716A. These findings suggest that cOA neither directly activates CB1 receptors nor acts via the proposed "entourage" effect [Nature 389 (1997) 25] to increase titres of anandamide through FAAH inhibition. The selective effects of cOA on theta-burst-conditioning may reflect modulation of GABAergic transmission. Anandamide uptake inhibition, but not blockade of FAAH, effectively increases synaptic concentrations of endocannabinoids.

  5. Microstructural analysis of rat ethanol and water drinking patterns using a modified operant self-administration model.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stacey L; McCool, Brian A

    2015-10-01

    Ethanol drinking pattern has emerged as an important factor in the development, maintenance, and health consequences of alcohol use disorders in humans. The goal of these studies was to further our understanding of this important factor through refinement of an operant rodent model of ethanol consumption capable of drinking pattern microstructural analysis. We evaluated measures of total consumption, appetitive behavior, and drinking microstructure for ethanol and water at baseline and assessed alterations induced by two treatments previously shown to significantly alter gross ethanol appetitive and consummatory behaviors in opposing directions. Male Long-Evans rats were trained on an FR1 operant paradigm which allowed for continuous liquid access until an 8 second pause in consumption resulted in termination of liquid access. Total appetitive and consummatory behaviors were assessed in addition to microstructural drinking pattern for both ethanol and water during a five day baseline drinking period, after chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure, and following administration of a cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716a. As in previous operant studies, ethanol vapor exposure resulted in increases in ethanol-directed responding, total consumption, and rate of intake. Further, striking differential alterations to ethanol and water bout size, duration, and lick pattern occurred consistent with alterations in hedonic evaluation. Vapor additionally specifically reduced the number of ethanol-directed lever presses which did not result in subsequent consumption. SR141716a administration reversed many of these effects. The addition of microstructural analysis to operant self-administration by rodents provides a powerful and translational tool for the detection of specific alterations in ethanol drinking pattern which may enable insights into neural mechanisms underlying specific components of drug consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor allosteric modulator ORG 27569 on reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats*

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; Qiu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid CB1 receptors play an essential role in drug addiction. Given the side effect profiles of orthosteric CB1 antagonism, new strategies have been attempted to modulate this target, such as CB1 receptor allosteric modulation. However, the effect of CB1 allosteric modulation in drug addiction is unknown. The present study examined the effects of the CB1 receptor allosteric modulator ORG27569 on the reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats. Methods Rats were trained to self-administer 0.75 mg/kg cocaine or 0.05 mg/kg methamphetamine in 2-hr daily sessions for 14 days which was followed by 7 days of extinction sessions in which rats responded on the levers with no programmed consequences. On reinstatement test sessions, rats were administered ORG27569 (1.0, 3.2, 5.6 mg/kg, i.p.) or SR141716A (3.2 mg/kg, i.p.) 10 min prior to re-exposure to cocaine- or methamphetamine-paired cues or a priming injection of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Results Both cues and a priming injection of cocaine or methamphetamine significantly reinstated the extinguished active lever responding. Pretreatment with ORG27569 resulted in a dose-related attenuation of both cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior. SR141716A also exhibited similar inhibitory action on reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Conclusion Negative allosteric modulation of CB1 receptors can produce similar functional antagonism as orthosteric CB1 receptor antagonists on reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Thus, ORG27569 or other negative allosteric modulators deserve further study as potentially effective pharmacotherapy for drug addiction. PMID:25169627

  7. Endocannabinoids in amygdala and nucleus accumbens mediate social play reward in adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Manduca, Antonia; Petrosino, Stefania; Van Kerkhof, Linda W.M.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Zhou, Yeping; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Vanderschuren, Louk J.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The brain endocannabinoid system plays a crucial role in emotional processes. We have previously identified an important role for endocannabinoids in social play behavior, a highly rewarding form of social interaction in adolescent rats. Here, we tested the hypothesis that endocannabinoid modulation of social play behavior occurs in brain regions implicated in emotion and motivation. Social play increased levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NAc), but not in prefrontal cortex or hippocampus of 4–5 week old male Wistar rats. Furthermore, social play increased phosphorylation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the amygdala. Systemic administration of the anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor URB597 increased social play behavior, and augmented the associated elevation in anandamide levels in the amygdala, but not the NAc. Infusion of URB597 into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) increased social play behavior, and blockade of BLA CB1 cannabinoid receptors with the antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A prevented the play-enhancing effects of systemic administration of URB597. Infusion of URB597 into the NAc also increased social play, but blockade of NAc CB1 cannabinoid receptors did not antagonize the play-enhancing effects of systemic URB597 treatment. Last, SR141716A did not affect social play after infusion into the core and shell subregions of the NAc, while it reduced social play when infused into the BLA. These data show that increased anandamide signalling in the amygdala and NAc augments social play, and identify the BLA as a prominent site of action for endocannabinoids to modulate the rewarding properties of social interactions in adolescent rats. PMID:23100412

  8. Effects of cannabinoids on adrenaline release from adrenal medullary cells

    PubMed Central

    Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Hansen, Henrik H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier J; Szabo, Bela

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyse the peripheral effects of cannabinoids on adrenaline release from adrenal chromaffin cells. In pithed rabbits with electrically stimulated sympathetic outflow, intravenous injection of the cannabinoid receptor agonists WIN55212-2 and CP55940 (5, 50 and 500 μg kg−1) markedly lowered the plasma adrenaline concentration. The effect of WIN55212-2 was attenuated by the selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A (500 μg kg−1). WIN55212-3 (same doses as WIN55212-2), the enantiomer of WIN55212-2 lacking affinity for cannabinoid receptors, had no effect on the plasma adrenaline concentration. In rabbit isolated adrenal glands, the release of adrenaline elicited by electrical stimulation was measured by fast cyclic voltammetry. Electrically-evoked adrenaline release was inhibited by WIN55212-2 (0.3, 1, 3 and 10 μM) and this effect was antagonized by SR141716A (1 μM). The non-cholinergic component of adrenaline release observed after blockade of nicotinic (by hexamethonium 100 μM) and muscarinic (by atropine 0.5 μM) acetylcholine receptors was not depressed by WIN55212-2. WIN55212-3 (10 μM) had no effect on adrenaline release. No detectable specific CB1 receptor binding and mRNA expression were found in rabbit adrenal glands with autoradiography and in situ hybridization. The results show that cannabinoids inhibit adrenaline secretion in rabbit isolated adrenal glands; the likely mechanism is a presynaptic CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of acetylcholine release from preganglionic sympathetic neurons. The inhibition of adrenaline secretion in adrenal glands most probably accounts for the decrease in the plasma adrenaline concentration observed after cannabinoid administration in pithed rabbits. PMID:11704653

  9. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol suppresses vomiting behavior and Fos expression in both acute and delayed phases of cisplatin-induced emesis in the least shrew.

    PubMed

    Ray, Andrew P; Griggs, Lisa; Darmani, Nissar A

    2009-01-03

    Cisplatin chemotherapy frequently causes severe vomiting in two temporally separated clusters of bouts dubbed the acute and delayed phases. Cannabinoids can inhibit the acute phase, albeit through a poorly understood mechanism. We examined the substrates of cannabinoid-mediated inhibition of both the emetic phases via immunolabeling for serotonin, Substance P, cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB(1), CB(2)), and the neuronal activation marker Fos in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva). Shrews were injected with cisplatin (10mg/kg i.p.), and one of vehicle, Delta(9)-THC, or both Delta(9)-THC and the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A (2mg/kg i.p.), and monitored for vomiting. Delta(9)-THC-pretreatment caused concurrent decreases in the number of shrews expressing vomiting and Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR), effects which were blocked by SR141716A-pretreatment. Acute phase vomiting induced Fos-IR in the solitary tract nucleus (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNX), and area postrema (AP), whereas in the delayed phase Fos-IR was not induced in the AP at all, and was induced at lower levels in the other nuclei when compared to the acute phase. CB(1) receptor-IR in the NTS was dense, punctate labeling indicative of presynaptic elements, which surrounded Fos-expressing NTS neurons. CB(2) receptor-IR was not found in neuronal elements, but in vascular-appearing structures. All areas correlated with serotonin- and Substance P-IR. These results support published acute phase data in other species, and are the first describing Fos-IR following delayed phase emesis. The data suggest overlapping but separate mechanisms are invoked for each phase, which are sensitive to antiemetic effects of Delta(9)-THC mediated by CB(1) receptors.

  10. Microstructural Analysis of Rat Ethanol and Water Drinking Patterns Using a Modified Operant Self-administration Model

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Stacey L.; McCool, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol drinking pattern has emerged as an important factor in the development, maintenance, and health consequences of alcohol use disorders in humans. The goal of these studies was to further our understanding of this important factor through refinement of an operant rodent model of ethanol consumption capable of drinking pattern microstructural analysis. We evaluated measures of total consumption, appetitive behavior, and drinking microstructure for ethanol and water at baseline and assessed alterations induced by two treatments previously shown to significantly alter gross ethanol appetitive and consummatory behaviors in opposing directions. Methods Male Long Evans rats were trained on an FR1 operant paradigm which allowed for continuous liquid access until an 8 second pause in consumption resulted in termination of liquid access. Total appetitive and consummatory behaviors were assessed in addition to microstructural drinking pattern for both ethanol and water during a five day baseline drinking period, after chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure, and following administration of a cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716a. Results As in previous operant studies, ethanol vapor exposure resulted in increases in ethanol-directed responding, total consumption, and rate of intake. Further, striking differential alterations to ethanol and water bout size, duration, and lick pattern occurred consistent with alterations in hedonic evaluation. Vapor additionally specifically reduced the number of ethanol-directed lever presses which did not result in subsequent consumption. SR141716a administration reversed many of these effects. Conclusions The addition of microstructural analysis to operant self-administration by rodents provides a powerful and translational tool for the detection of specific alterations in ethanol drinking pattern which may enable insights into neural mechanisms underlying specific components of drug consumption. PMID:26037631

  11. Cannabinoids inhibit cholinergic contraction in human airways through prejunctional CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Naline, E; Buenestado, A; Faisy, C; Alvarez, J-C; Salvator, H; Abrial, C; Advenier, C; Zemoura, L; Devillier, P

    2014-06-01

    Marijuana smoking is widespread in many countries, and the use of smoked synthetic cannabinoids is increasing. Smoking a marijuana joint leads to bronchodilation in both healthy subjects and asthmatics. The effects of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol and synthetic cannabinoids on human bronchus reactivity have not previously been investigated. Here, we sought to assess the effects of natural and synthetic cannabinoids on cholinergic bronchial contraction. Human bronchi isolated from 88 patients were suspended in an organ bath and contracted by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the presence of the phytocannabinoid Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol, the endogenous 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the synthetic dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940, the synthetic, CB2 -receptor-selective agonist JWH-133 or the selective GPR55 agonist O-1602. The receptors involved in the response were characterized by using selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716 and SR144528 respectively). Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol, WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 induced concentration-dependent inhibition of cholinergic contractions, with maximum inhibitions of 39, 76 and 77% respectively. JWH-133 only had an effect at high concentrations. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and O-1602 were devoid of any effect. Only CB1 receptors were involved in the response because the effects of cannabinoids were antagonized by SR141716, but not by SR144528. The cannabinoids did not alter basal tone or contractions induced by exogenous Ach. Activation of prejunctional CB1 receptors mediates the inhibition of EFS-evoked cholinergic contraction in human bronchus. This mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation produced by marijuana smoking. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Effects of the cannabinoid CB₁ receptor allosteric modulator ORG 27569 on reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Qiu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors play an essential role in drug addiction. Given the side effect profiles of orthosteric CB1 antagonism, new strategies have been attempted to modulate this target, such as CB1 receptor allosteric modulation. However, the effect of CB1 allosteric modulation in drug addiction is unknown. The present study examined the effects of the CB1 receptor allosteric modulator ORG27569 on the reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats. Rats were trained to self-administer 0.75 mg/kg cocaine or 0.05 mg/kg methamphetamine in 2-h daily sessions for 14 days which was followed by 7 days of extinction sessions in which rats responded on the levers with no programmed consequences. On reinstatement test sessions, rats were administered ORG27569 (1.0, 3.2, 5.6 mg/kg, i.p.) or SR141716A (3.2 mg/kg, i.p.) 10 min prior to re-exposure to cocaine- or methamphetamine-paired cues or a priming injection of cocaine (10mg/kg, i.p.) or methamphetamine (1mg/kg, i.p.). Both cues and a priming injection of cocaine or methamphetamine significantly reinstated the extinguished active lever responding. Pretreatment with ORG27569 resulted in a dose-related attenuation of both cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior. SR141716A also exhibited similar inhibitory action on reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Negative allosteric modulation of CB1 receptors can produce similar functional antagonism as orthosteric CB1 receptor antagonists on reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Thus, ORG27569 or other negative allosteric modulators deserve further study as potentially effective pharmacotherapy for drug addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuronal death enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Stefovska, Vanya; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2000-01-01

    Glutamate promotes neuronal survival during brain development and destroys neurons after injuries in the mature brain. Glutamate antagonists are in human clinical trials aiming to demonstrate limitation of neuronal injury after head trauma, which consists of both rapid and slowly progressing neurodegeneration. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists are considered for neuroprotection in chronic neurodegenerative disorders with slowly progressing cell death only. Therefore, humans suffering from Huntington's disease, characterized by slowly progressing neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia, are subjected to trials with glutamate antagonists. Here we demonstrate that progressive neurodegeneration in the basal ganglia induced by the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionate or in the hippocampus by traumatic brain injury is enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists but ameliorated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonists. These observations reveal that N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists may increase neurodestruction in mature brain undergoing slowly progressing neurodegeneration, whereas blockade of the action of glutamate at α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors may be neuroprotective. PMID:11058158

  14. CXCR2 receptor antagonists: a medicinal chemistry perspective.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Michael P; Yu, Younong

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated leukocyte recruitment is believed to be a key contributor to various acute and chronic inflammatory disorders which can lead to serious pathological consequences. Chemokines are small molecular weight proteins that have been shown to be imperative in the direction of leukocytes to the sites of inflammation. In humans, several of these chemokines (CXCL8 and CXCL1) are elevated in inflammatory disorders such as asthma, arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These chemokines modulate their downstream effects thru G-protein coupled receptors, such as CXCR2, making the identification of small-molecule antagonists of this receptor attractive towards developing novel therapies to treat inflammatory conditions. Since the first report of a CXCR2 receptor antagonist in 1998, there has been a considerable effort conducted mainly in the pharmaceutical industry to identify novel classes of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. Over a dozen distinct classes of CXCR2 receptor antagonists have been reported in the literature to date with a number of these compounds having reached mid-stage clinical trials. This review will provide a broad overview the medicinal chemistry efforts over the past 15 years towards the identification of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. The discussion will focus upon the early preclinical space covering the structure activity relationships (SAR), pharmacology, as well in preclinical in vivo evaluation for the different series of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. In addition, the available clinical data for the most advanced compounds in the clinic will be discussed and along with a perspective of the area moving forward.

  15. Antiatherogenic properties of calcium antagonists. State of the art.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, D B; Heider, J G

    1989-04-17

    Atherosclerosis is an arterial disease characterized by localized accumulation of collagen, elastin, lipids, and calcium at sites associated with macrophage infiltration and altered smooth muscle metabolism. Studies in several types of animal models, especially cholesterol-fed rabbits, have shown that calcium competitors, calcium chelators, anticalcifying agents, and calcium antagonists can reduce the accumulation of atherogenic lesion components and decrease the progression of lesions. Although there are some conflicting data in the animal model studies, it is now apparent that several classes of calcium antagonists inhibit the progression of early arterial lesions induced by cholesterol-feeding in animals. The dihydropyridine class of calcium antagonists may be more potent as anti-atherosclerotic agents than the other classes. Mechanisms involving regulation of endothelial cell, smooth muscle cell, and macrophage metabolism may be responsible for the effects of calcium antagonists on early lesion progression. Recent studies in cell culture-model systems suggest that calcium antagonists may significantly alter activities that regulate lipoprotein-derived cholesterol accumulation by arterial wall cells. Some of these activities are independent of calcium flux across voltage-operated calcium channels. Thus, calcium antagonists may reduce the progression of atherogenic lesions by a combination of decreasing calcium accumulation within arterial wall cells and by altering calcium channel-independent metabolic activities, which affect lesion development.

  16. NK-1 receptor antagonists: a new paradigm in pharmacological therapy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Coveñas, R

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) shows a widespread distribution in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and it is known that after binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors, SP regulates many biological functions in the central nervous system such as emotional behaviour, stress, depression, anxiety, emesis, migraine, alcohol addiction and neurodegeneration. SP has been also implicated in pain, inflammation, hepatotoxicity and in virus proliferation, and it plays an important role in cancer (e.g., tumour cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and the migration of tumour cells for invasion and metastasis). By contrast, it is known that after binding to NK-1 receptors, NK-1 receptor antagonists specifically inhibit the above-mentioned biological functions mediated by SP. Thus, these antagonists exert an anxyolitic, antidepressant, antiemetic, antimigraine, antialcohol addiction or neuroprotector effect in the central nervous system, and they play a role in analgesic, antiinflammatory, hepatoprotector processes and in antivirus proliferation. Regarding cancer, NK-1 receptor antagonists exert an antitumour action (inducing tumour cell death by apoptosis), and induce antiangiogenesis and inhibit the migration of tumour cells. It is also known that NK-1 receptors have a widespread distribution and that they are overexpressed in tumour cells. Thus, NK-1 receptor antagonists are molecularly targeted agents. In general, current drugs have a single therapeutic effect, although less commonly they may exert several. However, the data reported above indicate that NK-1 receptor antagonists are promising drugs, exerting many therapeutic effects (the action of such antagonists is dose-dependent and, depending on the concentration, has more positive effects). In this review, we update the multiple therapeutic effects exerted by NK-1 receptor antagonists.

  17. Endothelin receptor antagonists for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Shi, Zhenghong; Yang, Kehu; Tian, Jin Hui; Jiang, Lei

    2012-09-12

    A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition where blood leaks out of blood vessels over the surface of the brain. Delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) and the related feature of vasospasm, where patients experience a delayed deterioration, have long been recognized as the leading potentially treatable cause of death and disability in patients with SAH. Endothelin is a potent, long-lasting endogenous vasoconstrictor that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of DIND. Therefore, endothelin receptor antagonists (ETAs) have emerged as a promising therapeutic option for SAH-induced cerebral vasospasm. To assess the efficacy and tolerability of ETAs for SAH. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (December 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1950 to December 2011), EMBASE (1946 to December 2011) and the Chinese Biomedical Database (1978 to December 2011). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials we searched additional Chinese databases, ongoing trials registers, Google Scholar and Medical Matrix, handsearched journals, scanned reference lists, and contacted researchers and pharmaceutical companies. We only included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared an ETA with placebo for SAH in adult (18 years of age or older) patients who met the diagnostic criteria for SAH based on clinical symptoms, with confirmation on computerized tomography scan results or angiography. Two review authors independently selected RCTs according to the inclusion criteria. We resolved disagreements by discussion with a third review author. Two review authors independently selected relevant articles and assessed their eligibility according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. We resolved disagreements by discussion with a third review author. We used the random-effects model and expressed the results as

  18. Pharmacophore development for antagonists at α1 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, J. B.; Coban, B.; Griffith, R.

    1996-12-01

    Many receptors, including α1 adrenergic receptors, have a range of subtypes. This offers possibilities for the development of highly selective antagonists with potentially fewer detrimental effects. Antagonists developed for α1A receptors, for example, would have potential in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. As part of the molecular design process, structural features necessary for the selective affinity for α1A and α1B adrenergic receptors have been investigated. The molecular modelling software (particularly the Apex module) of Molecular Simulations, Inc. was used to develop pharmacophore models for these two subtypes. Low-energy conformations of a set of known antagonists were used as input, together with a classification of the receptor affinity data. The biophores proposed by the program were evaluated and pharmacophores were proposed. The pharmacophore models were validated by testing the fit of known antagonists, not included in the training set. The critical structural feature for selectivity between the α1A and α1B adrenergic receptor sites is the distance between the basic nitrogen atom and the centre of an aromatic ring system. This will be exploited in the design and synthesis of structurally new selective antagonists for these sites.

  19. GnRH antagonists may affect endometrial receptivity

    PubMed Central

    Rackow, Beth W.; Kliman, Harvey J.; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2009-01-01

    Study objective HOXA10 is an essential regulator of endometrial receptivity. To determine the effect of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists on endometrial receptivity we assessed endometrial HOXA10 expression in GnRH antagonist, GnRH agonist, and natural cycles. Design Prospective case-control study Setting University academic medical center Patients Nineteen subjects were included: 12 subjects underwent controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) and used either a GnRH antagonist or a GnRH agonist; 7 control subjects underwent natural cycles. Interventions Pipelle endometrial biopsies were obtained 11 days after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration or spontaneous luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in untreated cycles, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess HOXA10 protein expression in endometrial glands and stroma. Main outcome measure(s) Endometrial HOXA10 protein expression Results HOXA10 expression was significantly decreased in endometrial stromal cells in GnRH antagonist treated cycles compared with GnRH agonist treated cycles or natural cycle controls. There was no significant difference in glandular cell HOXA10 expression among the three groups. Conclusions Use of GnRH antagonists may be associated with impaired HOXA10 expression in endometrial stromal cells, and thus may affect endometrial receptivity. PMID:18410932

  20. Small molecule antagonists for chemokine CCR3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Willems, Lianne I; Ijzerman, Ad P

    2010-09-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 is believed to play a role in the development of allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis. Despite the conflicting results that have been reported regarding the importance of eosinophils and CCR3 in allergic inflammation, inhibition of this receptor with small molecule antagonists is thought to provide a valuable approach for the treatment of these diseases. This review describes the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of small molecule CCR3 antagonists as reported in the scientific and patent literature. Various chemical classes of small molecule CCR3 antagonists have been described so far, including (bi)piperidine and piperazine derivatives, N-arylalkylpiperidine urea derivatives and (N-ureidoalkyl)benzylpiperidines, phenylalanine derivatives, morpholinyl derivatives, pyrrolidinohydroquinazolines, arylsulfonamides, amino-alkyl amides, imidazole- and pyrimidine-based antagonists, and bicyclic diamines. The (N-ureidoalkyl)benzylpiperidines are the best studied class in view of their generally high affinity and antagonizing potential. For many of these antagonists subnanomolar IC(50) values were reported for binding to CCR3 along with the ability to effectively inhibit intracellular calcium mobilization and eosinophil chemotaxis induced by CCR3 agonist ligands in vitro.

  1. Experimental evolution of a novel sexually antagonistic allele.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Perry, Jennifer C; Pizzari, Tommaso; Mank, Judith E; Wigby, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary conflict permeates biological systems. In sexually reproducing organisms, sex-specific optima mean that the same allele can have sexually antagonistic expression, i.e. beneficial in one sex and detrimental in the other, a phenomenon known as intralocus sexual conflict. Intralocus sexual conflict is emerging as a potentially fundamental factor for the genetic architecture of fitness, with important consequences for evolutionary processes. However, no study to date has directly experimentally tested the evolutionary fate of a sexually antagonistic allele. Using genetic constructs to manipulate female fecundity and male mating success, we engineered a novel sexually antagonistic allele (SAA) in Drosophila melanogaster. The SAA is nearly twice as costly to females as it is beneficial to males, but the harmful effects to females are recessive and X-linked, and thus are rarely expressed when SAA occurs at low frequency. We experimentally show how the evolutionary dynamics of the novel SAA are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of population genetic models: SAA frequency decreases when common, but increases when rare, converging toward an equilibrium frequency of ∼8%. Furthermore, we show that persistence of the SAA requires the mating advantage it provides to males: the SAA frequency declines towards extinction when the male advantage is experimentally abolished. Our results empirically demonstrate the dynamics underlying the evolutionary fate of a sexually antagonistic allele, validating a central assumption of intralocus sexual conflict theory: that variation in fitness-related traits within populations can be maintained via sex-linked sexually antagonistic loci.

  2. Boosting Adaptive Immunity: A New Role for PAFR Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Marianna M.; Bizzarro, Bruna; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Rios, Francisco J.; Jancar, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor (PAFR) engagement in murine macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) promotes a tolerogenic phenotype reversed by PAFR-antagonists treatment in vitro. Here, we investigated whether a PAFR antagonist would modulate the immune response in vivo. Mice were subcutaneously injected with OVA or OVA with PAFR-antagonist WEB2170 on days 0 and 7. On day 14, OVA–specific IgG2a and IgG1 were measured in the serum. The presence of WEB2170 during immunization significantly increased IgG2a without affecting IgG1 levels. When WEB2170 was added to OVA in complete Freund’s adjuvant, enhanced IgG2a but not IgG1 production was also observed, and CD4+ FoxP3+ T cell frequency in the spleen was reduced compared to mice immunized without the antagonist. Similar results were observed in PAFR-deficient mice, along with increased Tbet mRNA expression in the spleen. Additionally, bone marrow-derived DCs loaded with OVA were transferred into naïve mice and their splenocytes were co-cultured with fresh OVA-loaded DCs. CD4+ T cell proliferation was higher in the group transferred with DCs treated with the PAFR-antagonist. We propose that the activation of PAFR by ligands present in the site of immunization is able to fine-tune the adaptive immune response. PMID:27966635

  3. Enhancer Responses to Similarly Distributed Antagonistic Gradients in Development

    PubMed Central

    Zinzen, Robert P; Papatsenko, Dmitri

    2007-01-01

    Formation of spatial gene expression patterns in development depends on transcriptional responses mediated by gene control regions, enhancers. Here, we explore possible responses of enhancers to overlapping gradients of antagonistic transcriptional regulators in the Drosophila embryo. Using quantitative models based on enhancer structure, we demonstrate how a pair of antagonistic transcription factor gradients with similar or even identical spatial distributions can lead to the formation of distinct gene expression domains along the embryo axes. The described mechanisms are sufficient to explain the formation of the anterior and the posterior knirps expression, the posterior hunchback expression domain, and the lateral stripes of rhomboid expression and of other ventral neurogenic ectodermal genes. The considered principles of interaction between antagonistic gradients at the enhancer level can also be applied to diverse developmental processes, such as domain specification in imaginal discs, or even eyespot pattern formation in the butterfly wing. PMID:17500585

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  5. Mixed antagonistic effects of bilobalide at rho1 GABAC receptor.

    PubMed

    Huang, S H; Duke, R K; Chebib, M; Sasaki, K; Wada, K; Johnston, G A R

    2006-01-01

    Bilobalide was found to be a moderately potent antagonist with a weak use-dependent effect at recombinant human rho(1) GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using two-electrode voltage clamp methodology. Antagonism of bilobalide at homomeric rho(1) GABA(C) receptors appeared to be mixed. At low concentration, bilobalide (3 microM) caused a parallel right shift and surmountable GABA maximal response of the GABA dose-response curve characteristic of a competitive antagonist. At high concentrations, bilobalide (10-100 microM) caused nonparallel right shifts and reduced maximal GABA responses of GABA dose-response curves characteristic of a noncompetitive antagonist. The potency of bilobalide appears to be dependent on the concentrations of GABA and was more potent at lower GABA concentrations. The mechanism of action of bilobalide at rho(1) GABA(C) receptors appears to be similar to that of the chloride channel blocker picrotoxinin.

  6. Discovery of the improved antagonistic prolactin variants by library screening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Gong, Wei; Breinholt, Jens; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Zhang, Jinchao; Ma, Qinhong; Chen, Jianhe; Panina, Svetlana; Guo, Wei; Li, Tengkun; Zhang, Jingyuan; Kong, Meng; Liu, Zibing; Mao, Jingjing; Christensen, Leif; Hu, Sean; Wang, Lingyun

    2011-11-01

    Prolactin (PRL), a potent growth stimulator of the mammary epithelium, has been suggested to be a factor contributing to the development and progression of breast and prostate cancer. Several PRL receptor (PRLR) antagonists have been identified in the past decades, but their in vivo growth inhibitory potency was restricted by low receptor affinity, rendering them pharmacologically unattractive for clinical treatment. Thus, higher receptor affinity is essential for the development of improved PRLR antagonistic variants with improved in vivo potency. In this study, we generated Site 1 focused protein libraries of human G129R-PRL mutants and screened for those with increased affinity to the human PRLR. By combining the mutations with enhanced affinities for PRLR, we identified a novel G129R-PRL variant with mutations at Site 1 that render nearly 50-fold increase in the antagonistic potency in vitro.

  7. Cancer in patients with rheumatic diseases exposed to TNF antagonists.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Loreto; Abasolo, Lydia; Descalzo, Miguel A; Pérez-Zafrilla, Beatriz; Sellas, Agustí; de Abajo, Francisco; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2011-08-01

    To describe the risk of cancer in patients exposed to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. The following 2 clinical cohorts were studied: (1) BIOBADASER 2.0: a registry of patients suffering from rheumatic diseases exposed to TNF antagonists (2531 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 1488 spondyloarthropathies, and 675 other rheumatic conditions); and (2) EMECAR: a cohort of 789 RA patients not exposed to TNF antagonists. Cancer incidence rates (IR) per 1000 patient-years and incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated for BIOBADASER 2.0 and EMECAR patients. The IR over time in BIOBADASER 2.0 patients was analyzed by joinpoint regression. The IRR was estimated to compare cancer rates in exposed versus nonexposed RA patients. Standardized incidence and mortality ratios (SIR, SMR) were also estimated. Risk factors for cancer in patients exposed to TNF antagonists were investigated by generalized linear models. The SMR for cancer in BIODASER 2.0 was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.51-0.86), and the SIR was 0.1 (95% CI 0.03-0.23). The IR in RA patients exposed to TNF antagonists was 5.8 (95% CI: 4.4-7.6), and the adjusted IRR was 0.48 (95% CI: 0.09-2.45). The IR in patients with previous cancer was 26.4 (95% CI: 4.1-171.5). Age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and steroids were associated with a higher risk of developing cancer. The IR decreased after the first 4 months of exposure, without statistical significance. Overall cancer and mortality rates in patients with rheumatic diseases exposed to TNF antagonists are no higher than in the background Spanish population. However special attention should be paid to elderly patients, those with previous cancers, and patients treated with steroids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endothelin receptor antagonists influence cardiovascular morphology in uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Nabokov, A V; Amann, K; Wessels, S; Münter, K; Wagner, J; Ritz, E

    1999-02-01

    In is generally held that renal failure results in blood pressure (BP)-independent structural changes of the myocardium and the vasculature. The contribution, if any, of endothelin (ET) to these changes has been unknown. We morphometrically studied random samples of the left ventricle myocardium and small intramyocardial arteries in subtotally (5/6) nephrectomized (SNx) male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with either the selective ETA receptor antagonist BMS182874 (30 mg/kg/day) or the nonselective ETA/ETB receptor antagonist Ro46-2005 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison with either sham-operated rats, untreated SNx, or SNx rats treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor trandolapril (0.1 mg/kg/day). Eight weeks later, systolic BP was lower in trandolapril-treated SNx compared with untreated SNx animals. No decrease in BP was seen following either ET receptor antagonist at the dose used. A significantly increased volume density of the myocardial interstitium was found in untreated SNx rats as compared with sham-operated controls. Such interstitial expansion was prevented by trandolapril and either ET receptor antagonist. SNx caused a substantial increase in the wall thickness of small intramyocardial arteries. The increase was prevented by trandolapril or BMS182874 treatment. The arteriolar wall:lumen ratio was significantly lower in all treated groups when compared with untreated SNx. In contrast, only trandolapril, but not the ET receptor antagonists, attenuated thickening of the aortic media in SNx animals. The ETA-selective and ETA/ETB-nonselective receptor antagonists appear to prevent development of myocardial fibrosis and structural changes of small intramyocardial arteries in experimental chronic renal failure. This effect is independent of systemic BP.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of antagonist and agonist interactions with dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Duarte, E P; Oliveira, C R; Carvalho, A P

    1988-03-01

    The binding of [3H]spiperone to dopamine D-2 receptors and its inhibition by antagonists and agonists were examined in microsomes derived from the sheep caudate nucleus, at temperatures between 37 and 1 degree C, and the thermodynamic parameters of the binding were evaluated. The affinity of the receptor for the antagonists, spiperone and (+)-butaclamol, decreased as the incubation temperature decreased; the affinity for haloperidol did not further decrease at temperatures below 15 degrees C. The binding of the antagonists was associated with very large increases in entropy, as expected for hydrophobic interactions. The enthalpy and entropy changes associated with haloperidol binding were dependent on temperature, in contrast to those associated with spiperone and (+)-butaclamol. The magnitude of the entropy increase associated with the specific binding of the antagonists did not correlate with the degree of lipophilicity of these drugs. The data suggest that, in addition to hydrophobic forces, other forces are also involved in the antagonist-dopamine receptor interactions, and that a conformational change of the receptor could occur when the antagonist binds. Agonist binding data are consistent with a two-state model of the receptor, a high-affinity state (RH) and a low-affinity state (RL). The affinity of dopamine binding to the RH decreased with decreasing temperatures below 20 degrees C, whereas the affinity for the RL increased at low temperatures. In contrast, the affinity of apomorphine for both states of receptor decreased as the temperature decreased from 30 to 8 degrees C. A clear distinction between the energetics of high-affinity and low-affinity agonist binding was observed. The formation of the high-affinity complex was associated with larger increases in enthalpy and entropy than the interaction with the low-affinity state was. The results suggest that the interaction of the receptor with the G-proteins, induced or stabilized by the binding of

  10. Discovery of Tertiary Sulfonamides as Potent Liver X Receptor Antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zuercher, William J.; Buckholz†, Richard G.; Campobasso, Nino; Collins, Jon L.; Galardi, Cristin M.; Gampe, Robert T.; Hyatt, Stephen M.; Merrihew, Susan L.; Moore, John T.; Oplinger, Jeffrey A.; Reid, Paul R.; Spearing, Paul K.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2010-08-12

    Tertiary sulfonamides were identified in a HTS as dual liver X receptor (LXR, NR1H2, and NR1H3) ligands, and the binding affinity of the series was increased through iterative analogue synthesis. A ligand-bound cocrystal structure was determined which elucidated key interactions for high binding affinity. Further characterization of the tertiary sulfonamide series led to the identification of high affinity LXR antagonists. GSK2033 (17) is the first potent cell-active LXR antagonist described to date. 17 may be a useful chemical probe to explore the cell biology of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  11. Scaffold variations in amine warhead of histamine H₃ receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wingen, Kerstin; Stark, Holger

    2013-12-01

    The histamine H₃ receptor (H₃R) is involved in numerous regulatory neurotransmission processes and there-fore, is a prominent target for centrally occurring disease with some promising clinical candidates. Previous research resulted in the identification of a core pharmacophore blueprint for H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists, which when inserted in a molecule, mostly ensures acceptable affinity. Nevertheless, variations of scaffold and peripheral areas can increase potency and pharmacokinetic profile of drug candidates. The variations in amine scaffolds of antagonists for this aminergic GPCR are of special importance.

  12. Hyperglycemia of Diabetic Rats Decreased by a Glucagon Receptor Antagonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David G.; Ulichny Goebel, Camy; Hruby, Victor J.; Bregman, Marvin D.; Trivedi, Dev

    1982-02-01

    The glucagon analog [l-Nα-trinitrophenylhistidine, 12-homoarginine]-glucagon (THG) was examined for its ability to lower blood glucose concentrations in rats made diabetic with streptozotocin. In vitro, THG is a potent antagonist of glucagon activation of the hepatic adenylate cyclase assay system. Intravenous bolus injections of THG caused rapid decreases (20 to 35 percent) of short duration in blood glucose. Continuous infusion of low concentrations of the inhibitor led to larger sustained decreases in blood glucose (30 to 65 percent). These studies demonstrate that a glucagon receptor antagonist can substantially reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic animals without addition of exogenous insulin.

  13. Barnidipine, a long-acting slow onset calcium antagonist.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, C

    2000-11-01

    Barnidipine is a stereochemically pure dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with a high potency. The drug showed a slow onset and long-lasting vasorelaxating effect in vitro, and strong antihypertensive activity in hypertension models. Barnidipine was shown to have a high vasoselectivity and offered protection in cardiac and renal ischaemia models. The in vitro drug:drug interaction profile suggests a low potential for clinically relevant interactions with concomitant medication. It can be anticipated that barnidipine is an attractive calcium antagonist, offering good blood pressure control without compensatory baroreflex activity.

  14. Rehashing endocannabinoid antagonists: can we selectively target the periphery to safely treat obesity and type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2010-08-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an important role for the endocannabinoid system as a regulator of appetite, body weight, and systemic metabolism, which is overactive in obesity and type 2 diabetes. While initial attempts to target this system using the cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist rimonabant were successful in producing modest weight loss and improving obesity-related metabolic complications in humans, adverse central nervous system side effects precluded introduction of this drug into clinical practice. However, new data, presented by Tam and colleagues in this issue of the JCI, demonstrate that selective blockade of peripheral cannabinoid receptors may be a novel successful therapeutic approach.

  15. Medium-Induced Antagonistic Behavior in Staphylococcus Aureus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.

    1992-01-01

    Antagonism is the production of substances by microorganisms that inhibit or prevent the growth of other bacteria. This paper demonstrates the antagonistic behavior of gram-positive coccus on the B. subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis gram-positive microorganisms, showing that the process of antagonism is sometimes dependent on the nutritional…

  16. TRPV1 Antagonists and Chronic Pain: Beyond Thermal Perception

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Michael R.; Beyer, Chad E.; Stahl, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable evidence as accumulated to support the development of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists for the treatment of various chronic pain conditions. Whereas there is a widely accepted rationale for the development of TRPV1 antagonists for the treatment of various inflammatory pain conditions, their development for indications of chronic pain, where conditions of tactical, mechanical and spontaneous pain predominate, is less clear. Preclinical localization and expression studies provide a firm foundation for the use of molecules targeting TRPV1 for conditions of bone pain, osteoarthritis and neuropathic pain. Selective TRPV1 antagonists weakly attenuate tactile and mechanical hypersensivity and are partially effective for behavioral and electrophysiological endpoints that incorporate aspects of spontaneous pain. While initial studies with TRPV1 antagonist in normal human subjects indicate a loss of warm thermal perception, clinical studies assessing allelic variants suggests that TRPV1 may mediate other sensory modalities under certain conditions. The focus of this review is to summarize the current perspectives of TRPV1 for the treatment of conditions beyond those with a primary thermal sensitivity. PMID:24288084

  17. Antagonistic dielectric elastomer actuator for biologically-inspired robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Andrew T.; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    For optimal performance, actuators designed for biologically-inspired robotics applications need to be capable of mimicking the key characteristics of natural musculoskeletal systems. These characteristics include a large output stroke, high energy density, antagonistic operation and passive compliance. The actuation properties of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) make them viable for use as an artificial muscle technology. However, much like the musculoskeletal system, rigid structures are needed to couple the compliant DEA layers to a load. In this paper, a cone DEA design is developed as an antagonistic, multi-DOF actuator, viable for a variety for biologically-inspired robotics applications. The design has the advantage of maintaining pre-strain through a support structure without substantially lowering the overall mass-specific power density. Prototype cone DEAs have been fabricated with VHB 4910 acrylic elastomer and have characteristic dimensions of 49mm (strut length) and 60mm (DEA diameter). Multi-DOF kinematical outputs of the cone DEAs were measured using a custom 3D motion tracking system. Experimental tests of the prototypes demonstrate antagonistic linear (+/-10mm), rotational (+/-25°) and combined multi-DOF strokes. Overall, antagonistic cone DEAs are shown to produce a complex multi-DOF output from a mass-efficient support structure and thus are well suited for being exploited in biologically-inspired robotics.

  18. Retention and Outcome in a Narcotic Antagonist Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Patients in an outpatient narcotic antagonist treatment program were followed through their course of treatment. Those who remained longer were found to enter treatment with more stable employment records and less recent opiate use. They also appeared more successful at termination, with better vocational stability, less extraneous drug use, and…

  19. Medium-Induced Antagonistic Behavior in Staphylococcus Aureus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.

    1992-01-01

    Antagonism is the production of substances by microorganisms that inhibit or prevent the growth of other bacteria. This paper demonstrates the antagonistic behavior of gram-positive coccus on the B. subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis gram-positive microorganisms, showing that the process of antagonism is sometimes dependent on the nutritional…

  20. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Retention and Outcome in a Narcotic Antagonist Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Patients in an outpatient narcotic antagonist treatment program were followed through their course of treatment. Those who remained longer were found to enter treatment with more stable employment records and less recent opiate use. They also appeared more successful at termination, with better vocational stability, less extraneous drug use, and…

  2. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    treatment; Analgesia; Nociception; Antinociception; Inflammation ; Chemokines; Chemokine receptor antagonists; Opioid analgesics; Animal models of pain...multiplex quantitative analysis of protein levels of these molecules. 2. KEYWORDS: Pain treatment; Analgesia; Nociception; Antinociception; Inflammation ...with a circulating water bath (Model 9500, Fisher Scientific; Pittsburgh, PA). Rats were held over the bath with their tails submerged

  3. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists: Effects on Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Many epithelial and endothelial cells express a cholinergic autocrine loop in which acetylcholine acts as a growth factor to stimulate cell growth. Cancers derived from these tissues similarly express a cholinergic autocrine loop and ACh secreted by the cancer or neighboring cells interacts with M3 muscarinic receptors expressed on the cancer cells to stimulate tumor growth. Primary proliferative pathways involve MAPK and Akt activation. The ability of muscarinic agonists to stimulate, and M3 antagonists to inhibit tumor growth has clearly been demonstrated for lung and colon cancer. The ability of muscarinic agonists to stimulate growth has been shown for melanoma, pancreatic, breast, ovarian, prostate and brain cancers, suggesting that M3 antagonists will also inhibit growth of these tumors as well. As yet no clinical trials have proven the efficacy of M3 antagonists as cancer therapeutics, though the widespread clinical use and low toxicity of M3 antagonists support the potential role of these drugs as adjuvants to current cancer therapies. PMID:22222710

  4. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Onushko, Tanya; Schmit, Brian D.; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years), healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist) at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback) during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%), subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40%) between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical) are likely involved. PMID:26186590

  5. Fine-Tuning Development Through Antagonistic Peptides: An Emerging Theme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Suk; De Smet, Ive

    2016-12-01

    Peptide ligand-receptor kinase interactions have emerged as a key component of plant growth and development. Now, highly related small signaling peptides have been shown to act antagonistically on the same receptor kinase, providing new insights into how plants optimize developmental processes using competitive peptides.

  6. Endothelin receptor antagonists and cardiovascular diseases of aging.

    PubMed

    Love, M P; McMurray, J J

    2001-01-01

    Our understanding of the role of the endothelin system in human cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology has evolved very rapidly since the initial description of its constituent parts in 1988. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is the predominant endothelin isoform in the human cardiovascular system and has potent vasoconstrictor, mitogenic and antinatriuretic properties which have implicated it in the pathophysiology of a number of cardiovascular diseases. The effects of ET-1 have been shown to be mediated by 2 principal endothelin receptor subtypes: ET(A) and ET(B). The development of a range of peptidic and nonpeptidic endothelin receptor antagonists represents an exciting breakthrough in human cardiovascular therapeutics. Two main classes of endothelin receptor antagonist have been developed for possible human therapeutic use: ET(A)-selective and nonselective antagonists. Extensive laboratory and clinical research with these agents has highlighted their promise in various cardiovascular diseases. Randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trials have yielded very encouraging results in patients with hypertension and chronic heart failure with more preliminary data suggesting a possible role in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis and stroke. Much more research is needed, however, before endothelin receptor antagonists can be considered for clinical use.

  7. [Medical economics evaluation of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist drugs].

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Junpei; Hirano, Shigeki; Fukui, Aiko; Funabashi, Kazuaki; Deguchi, Yuko; Yamada, Susumu; Naito, Kazuyuki

    2010-10-01

    At Komaki City Hospital, the drug cost in connection with cancer chemotherapy was re-examined as part of improved management along with the introduction of DPC in July 2008. With due attention to the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, both the change from injections to oral drugs and the change from brand-name drugs to generic drugs were tried between July 2008 and June 2009. After that, in order to examine the economic impact of these changes, we investigated and analyzed the number of medications, the cost of medicine purchased, and the average drug cost per medication of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists between April 2008 and September 2009. As a result, the cost of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists purchased decreased greatly, and the impact of the improvement was mainly due to the change to oral drugs, and partially to the change to generic drugs. Therefore, from the viewpoint of hospital economic improvement in DPC, it was thought that the change to oral drugs(5-HT3 receptor antagonists)is given top priority.

  8. Novel benzopolycyclic amines with NMDA receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Sureda, Francesc X; Vázquez, Santiago

    2014-05-01

    A new series of benzopolycyclic amines active as NMDA receptor antagonists were synthesized. Most of them exhibited increased activity compared with related analogues previously published. All the tested compounds were more potent than clinically approved amantadine and one of them displayed a lower IC50 value than memantine, an anti-Alzheimer's approved drug.

  9. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A.; Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang; Mais, Dale E.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  11. Aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines as 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeeyeon; Kim, Youngjae; Tae, Jinsung; Yeom, Miyoung; Moon, Bongjin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Lee, Kangho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Il Han; Chong, Youhoon; Keum, Gyochang; Nam, Ghilsoo; Choo, Hyunah

    2013-11-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7 R) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain. The 5-HT7 R antagonist SB-269970 exhibited antidepressant-like activity, whereas systemic administration of the 5-HT7 R agonist AS-19 significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. In our efforts to discover selective 5-HT7 R antagonists or agonists, aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines were designed, synthesized, and biologically evaluated against the 5-HT7 R. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-([2'-methoxy-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl]methyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (28) was the best binder to the 5-HT7 R (pKi =7.83), and its antagonistic property was confirmed by functional assays. The selectivity profile of compound 28 was also recorded for the 5-HT7 R over other serotonin receptor subtypes, such as 5-HT1 R, 5-HT2 R, 5-HT3 R, and 5-HT6 R. In a molecular modeling study, the 2-methoxyphenyl moiety attached to the piperazine ring of compound 28 was proposed to be essential for the antagonistic function.

  12. Diversity, distribution, and antagonistic activities of rhizobacteria of Panax notoginseng

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ze-Yan; Miao, Cui-Ping; Qiao, Xin-Guo; Zheng, You-Kun; Chen, Hua-Hong; Chen, You-Wei; Xu, Li-Hua; Zhao, Li-Xing; Guan, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhizobacteria play an important role in plant defense and could be promising sources of biocontrol agents. This study aimed to screen antagonistic bacteria and develop a biocontrol system for root rot complex of Panax notoginseng. Methods Pure-culture methods were used to isolate bacteria from the rhizosphere soil of notoginseng plants. The identification of isolates was based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. Results A total of 279 bacteria were obtained from rhizosphere soils of healthy and root-rot notoginseng plants, and uncultivated soil. Among all the isolates, 88 showed antagonistic activity to at least one of three phytopathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Phoma herbarum mainly causing root rot disease of P. notoginseng. Based on the 16S rRNA sequencing, the antagonistic bacteria were characterized into four clusters, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetesi. The genus Bacillus was the most frequently isolated, and Bacillus siamensis (Hs02), Bacillus atrophaeus (Hs09) showed strong antagonistic activity to the three pathogens. The distribution pattern differed in soil types, genera Achromobacter, Acidovorax, Brevibacterium, Brevundimonas, Flavimonas, and Streptomyces were only found in rhizosphere of healthy plants, while Delftia, Leclercia, Brevibacillus, Microbacterium, Pantoea, Rhizobium, and Stenotrophomonas only exist in soil of diseased plant, and Acinetobacter only exist in uncultivated soil. Conclusion The results suggest that diverse bacteria exist in the P. notoginseng rhizosphere soil, with differences in community in the same field, and antagonistic isolates may be good potential biological control agent for the notoginseng root-rot diseases caused by F. oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Panax herbarum. PMID:27158229

  13. TNF Antagonist Responsiveness in a United States Rheumatoid Arthritis Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Kishimoto, Mitsumasa; Strand, Vibeke; Cohen, Stanley B.; Olenginski, Thomas P; Harrington, Thomas; Kafka, Shelly P.; Reed, George; Kremer, Joel M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate responsiveness according to whether patients satisfy eligibility criteria from randomized controlled trials of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists in a multi-centered United States cohort Methods Biologic-naïve rheumatoid arthritis patients prescribed TNF antagonists (n=465) in the Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America registry were included. Patients were stratified by whether they met eligibility criteria from 3 major TNF antagonist trials. Two cohorts were examined: cohort A (n=336) included patients with complete American College of Rheumatology response criteria except acute phase reactants; and cohort B (n=129) with the complete response criteria. Study outcomes included modified American College of Rheumatology 20% and 50% improvement responses (Cohort A) and standard American College of Rheumatology improvement (Cohort B). Results A minority of patients (5.4% to 19.4%) prescribed TNF antagonists met trial eligibility criteria, and predominantly had high disease activity (78.5% to 100%). In cohort A for patients who met eligibility criteria, rates of 20% improvement (52.3% to 63.6%) and 50% improvement (30.8% to 45.5%) were achieved. Among patients failing to meet eligibility criteria, rates of 20% improvement (16.2% to 20.4%) and 50% improvement (8.9% to 10.8%) were consistently inferior (p<0.05 all comparisons). For cohort B, similar differences were observed. Conclusion This multi-centered U.S. cohort study demonstrates that the majority of patients receiving TNF antagonists would not meet trial eligibility criteria and achieve lower clinical responses. These findings highlight the tradeoff between defining treatment responsive populations and achieving results that can be generalized for broader patient populations. PMID:18501236

  14. Diversity, distribution, and antagonistic activities of rhizobacteria of Panax notoginseng.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ze-Yan; Miao, Cui-Ping; Qiao, Xin-Guo; Zheng, You-Kun; Chen, Hua-Hong; Chen, You-Wei; Xu, Li-Hua; Zhao, Li-Xing; Guan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Rhizobacteria play an important role in plant defense and could be promising sources of biocontrol agents. This study aimed to screen antagonistic bacteria and develop a biocontrol system for root rot complex of Panax notoginseng. Pure-culture methods were used to isolate bacteria from the rhizosphere soil of notoginseng plants. The identification of isolates was based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. A total of 279 bacteria were obtained from rhizosphere soils of healthy and root-rot notoginseng plants, and uncultivated soil. Among all the isolates, 88 showed antagonistic activity to at least one of three phytopathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Phoma herbarum mainly causing root rot disease of P. notoginseng. Based on the 16S rRNA sequencing, the antagonistic bacteria were characterized into four clusters, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetesi. The genus Bacillus was the most frequently isolated, and Bacillus siamensis (Hs02), Bacillus atrophaeus (Hs09) showed strong antagonistic activity to the three pathogens. The distribution pattern differed in soil types, genera Achromobacter, Acidovorax, Brevibacterium, Brevundimonas, Flavimonas, and Streptomyces were only found in rhizosphere of healthy plants, while Delftia, Leclercia, Brevibacillus, Microbacterium, Pantoea, Rhizobium, and Stenotrophomonas only exist in soil of diseased plant, and Acinetobacter only exist in uncultivated soil. The results suggest that diverse bacteria exist in the P. notoginseng rhizosphere soil, with differences in community in the same field, and antagonistic isolates may be good potential biological control agent for the notoginseng root-rot diseases caused by F. oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Panax herbarum.

  15. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship of novel CCR2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Donnely, Karla L; Butora, Gabor; Jiao, Richard; Pasternak, Alexander; Morriello, Gregori J; Goble, Stephen D; Zhou, Changyou; Mills, Sander G; Maccoss, Malcolm; Vicario, Pasquale P; Ayala, Julia M; Demartino, Julie A; Struthers, Mary; Cascieri, Margaret A; Yang, Lihu

    2009-03-15

    A series of novel 1-aminocyclopentyl-3-carboxyamides incorporating substituted tetrahydropyran moieties have been synthesized and subsequently evaluated for their antagonistic activity against the human CCR2 receptor. Among them analog 59 was found to posses potent antagonistic activity.

  16. Anti-antimicrobial peptides: folding-mediated host defense antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2013-07-12

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Antagonists of Plant-parasitic Nematodes in Florida Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Walter, David Evans; Kaplan, David T.

    1990-01-01

    In a survey of antagonists of nematodes in 27 citrus groves, each with a history of Tylenchulus semipenetrans infestation, and 17 noncitrus habitats in Florida, approximately 24 species of microbial antagonists capable of attacking vermiform stages of Radopholus citrophilus were recovered. Eleven of these microbes and a species of Pasteuria also were observed attacking vermiform stages of T. semipenetrans. Verticillium chlamydosporium, Paecilomyces lilacinus, P. marquandii, Streptomyces sp., Arthrobotrys oligospora, and Dactylella ellipsospora were found infecting T. semipenetrans egg masses. Two species of nematophagous amoebae, five species of predatory nematodes, and 29 species of nematophagous arthropods also were detected. Nematode-trapping fungi and nematophagous arthropods were common inhabitants of citrus groves with a history of citrus nematode infestation; however, obligate parasites of nematodes were rare. PMID:19287759

  18. Lead Optimization Studies of Cinnamic Amide EP2 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role. PMID:24773616

  19. From Bioinactive ACTH to ACTH Antagonist: The Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghaddhab, Chiraz; Vuissoz, Jean-Marc; Deladoëy, Johnny

    2017-01-01

    The adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is a pituitary hormone derived from a larger peptide, the proopiomelanocortin (POMC), as are the MSHs (α-MSH, β-MSH, and γ-MSH) and the β-LPH-related polypeptides (Figure 1A). ACTH drives adrenal steroidogenesis and growth of the adrenal gland. ACTH is a 39 amino acid polypeptide that binds and activates its cognate receptor [melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R)] through the two regions H6F7R8W9 and K15K16R17R18P19. Most POMC-derived polypeptides contain the H6F7R8W9 sequence that is conserved through evolution. This explains the difficulties in developing selective agonists or antagonists to the MCRs. In this review, we will discuss the clinical aspects of the role of ACTH in physiology and disease, and potential clinical use of selective ACTH antagonists. PMID:28228747

  20. Drug discovery and chemokine receptor antagonists: eppur si muove!

    PubMed

    Terricabras, Emma; Benjamim, Claudia; Godessart, Nuria

    2004-11-01

    The blockade of leukocyte migration has been demonstrated to be a valid option for the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. Chemokines play an active role in regulating cell infiltration into inflammatory sites and disrupting chemokine-receptor interactions has emerged as an alternative therapeutic approach. Pharmaceutical companies have developed an intense activity in the drug discovery of chemokine receptor antagonists in the last 10 years. Potent and selective compounds have been obtained and some of them are currently being evaluated in the clinic. The success of these trials will demonstrate whether the blockade of a single receptor is of therapeutic benefit. Alternative approaches, such as pan-receptor antagonists or inhibitors of the signalling pathways evoked by chemokines, are also being explored. In the meantime, new relationships between chemokines and receptors will be revealed, increasing our knowledge of such a fascinating field.

  1. Antagonistic otolith-visual units in cat vestibular nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.; Christensen, Carol A.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of neural coding of visual (Vis) and vestibular (Vst) information on translational motion in the region of the vestibular nuclei was investigated using extracellular single-unit recordings in alert adult cats. Responses were recorded and averaged over 60 cycles of stimulation in the vertical and horizontal planes, which included the Vst (movement of the animal in the dark), Vis (movement within lighted visual surround), and combined Vis and Vst (movement of the animal within the lighted stationary visual surround). Data are reported on responses to stimulations along the axis showing maximal sensitivity. A small number of units were identified that showed an antagonistic relationship between their Vis and Vst responses (since they were maximally excited by Vis and by Vst stimulations in the same direction). Results suggest that antagonistic units may belong to an infrequently encountered, but functionally distinct, class of neurons.

  2. Antagonistic Coevolution of Marine Planktonic Viruses and Their Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, Jennifer B. H.; Riemann, Lasse; Marston, Marcia F.; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The potential for antagonistic coevolution between marine viruses and their (primarily bacterial) hosts is well documented, but our understanding of the consequences of this rapid evolution is in its infancy. Acquisition of resistance against co-occurring viruses and the subsequent evolution of virus host range in response have implications for bacterial mortality rates as well as for community composition and diversity. Drawing on examples from a range of environments, we consider the potential dynamics, underlying genetic mechanisms and fitness costs, and ecological impacts of virus-host coevolution in marine waters. Given that much of our knowledge is derived from laboratory experiments, we also discuss potential challenges and approaches in scaling up to diverse, complex networks of virus-host interactions. Finally, we note that a variety of novel approaches for characterizing virus-host interactions offer new hope for a mechanistic understanding of antagonistic coevolution in marine plankton.

  3. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan.

    PubMed

    Sidharta, P N; Treiber, A; Dingemanse, J

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease of the lung vascular system, which leads to right-sided heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. Treatments to regulate the pulmonary vascular pressure target the prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelin (ET) pathways. Macitentan, an oral, once-daily, dual ETA and ETB receptor antagonist with high affinity and sustained receptor binding is the first ET receptor antagonist to show significant reduction of the risk of morbidity and mortality in PAH patients in a large-scale phase III study with a long-term outcome. Here we present a review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, and drug-drug interaction data of macitentan in healthy subjects, patients with PAH, and in special populations.

  4. Design of anticancer lysophosphatidic acid agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Parrill, Abby L

    2014-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its receptors, LPA1-6, are integral parts of signaling pathways involved in cellular proliferation, migration and survival. These signaling pathways are of therapeutic interest for the treatment of multiple types of cancer and to reduce cancer metastasis and side effects. Validated therapeutic potential of key receptors, as well as recent structure-activity relationships yielding compounds with low nanomolar potencies are exciting recent advances in the field. Some compounds have proven efficacious in vivo against tumor proliferation and metastasis, bone cancer pain and the pulmonary fibrosis that can result as a side effect of pulmonary cancer radiation treatment. However, recent studies have identified that LPA contributes through multiple pathways to the development of chemotherapeutic resistance suggesting new applications for LPA antagonists in cancer treatment. This review summarizes the roles of LPA signaling in cancer pathophysiology and recent progress in the design and evaluation of LPA agonists and antagonists.

  5. Agonist-antagonist combinations in opioid dependence: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The potential therapeutic benefits of co-administering opiate agonist and antagonist agents remain largely to be investigated. This paper focuses on the mechanisms of very low doses of naltrexone that help modulate the effects of methadone withdrawal and review pharmacological properties of the buprenorphine/naltrexone combination that support its clinical investigation. The bench-to-bedside development of the very low dose naltrexone treatment can serve as a translational paradigm to investigate and treat drug addiction. Further research on putative mechanisms elicited by the use of opioid agonist-antagonist combinations may lead to effective pharmacological alternatives to the gold standard methadone treatment, also useful for the management of the abuse of non opioid drugs and alcohol. PMID:22448305

  6. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role.

  7. Non-imidazole histamine NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Recently a series of H3-antagonists related to Imoproxifan was realised (I); in these products the oxime substructure of the lead was constrained in NO-donor furoxan systems and in the corresponding furazan derivatives. In this paper, a new series of compounds derived from I by substituting the imidazole ring with the ethoxycarbonylpiperazino moiety present in the non-imidazole H3-ligand A-923 is described. For all the products synthesis and preliminary pharmacological characterisation, as well as their hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, are reported. The imidazole ring replacement generally results in a decreased H3-antagonist activity with respect to the analogues of series I and, in some cases, induces relaxing effects on the electrically contracted guinea-pig ileum, probably due to increased affinity for other receptor systems.

  8. Antagonists of Plant-parasitic Nematodes in Florida Citrus.

    PubMed

    Walter, D E; Kaplan, D T

    1990-10-01

    In a survey of antagonists of nematodes in 27 citrus groves, each with a history of Tylenchulus semipenetrans infestation, and 17 noncitrus habitats in Florida, approximately 24 species of microbial antagonists capable of attacking vermiform stages of Radopholus citrophilus were recovered. Eleven of these microbes and a species of Pasteuria also were observed attacking vermiform stages of T. semipenetrans. Verticillium chlamydosporium, Paecilomyces lilacinus, P. marquandii, Streptomyces sp., Arthrobotrys oligospora, and Dactylella ellipsospora were found infecting T. semipenetrans egg masses. Two species of nematophagous amoebae, five species of predatory nematodes, and 29 species of nematophagous arthropods also were detected. Nematode-trapping fungi and nematophagous arthropods were common inhabitants of citrus groves with a history of citrus nematode infestation; however, obligate parasites of nematodes were rare.

  9. Antagonistic coevolution of marine planktonic viruses and their hosts.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Jennifer B H; Riemann, Lasse; Marston, Marcia F; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The potential for antagonistic coevolution between marine viruses and their (primarily bacterial) hosts is well documented, but our understanding of the consequences of this rapid evolution is in its infancy. Acquisition of resistance against co-occurring viruses and the subsequent evolution of virus host range in response have implications for bacterial mortality rates as well as for community composition and diversity. Drawing on examples from a range of environments, we consider the potential dynamics, underlying genetic mechanisms and fitness costs, and ecological impacts of virus-host coevolution in marine waters. Given that much of our knowledge is derived from laboratory experiments, we also discuss potential challenges and approaches in scaling up to diverse, complex networks of virus-host interactions. Finally, we note that a variety of novel approaches for characterizing virus-host interactions offer new hope for a mechanistic understanding of antagonistic coevolution in marine plankton.

  10. Therapeutic antagonists and conformational regulation of integrin function.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka, Motomu; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-09-01

    Integrins are a structurally elaborate family of adhesion molecules that transmit signals bi-directionally across the plasma membrane by undergoing large-scale structural rearrangements. By regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, integrins participate in a wide range of biological processes, including development, tissue repair, angiogenesis, inflammation and haemostasis. From a therapeutic standpoint, integrins are probably the most important class of cell-adhesion receptors. Recent progress in the development of integrin antagonists has resulted in their clinical application and has shed new light on integrin biology. On the basis of their mechanism of action, small-molecule integrin antagonists fall into three different classes. Each of these classes affect the equilibria that relate integrin conformational states, but in different ways.

  11. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, Philip; Kane, Emilie; Giaid, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) binds to its receptor, UT, playing an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland, and central nervous system. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, however, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) activity leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII), as well as inflammation, high blood pressure, and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  12. An overview of cytokines and cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Raymond P; Young, Howard A; Rosenberg, Amy S

    2009-12-01

    Cytokine-based therapies have the potential to provide novel treatments for cancer, autoimmune diseases, and many types of infectious disease. However, to date, the full clinical potential of cytokines as drugs has been limited by a number of factors. To discuss these limitations and explore ways to overcome them, the FDA partnered with the New York Academy of Sciences in March 2009 to host a two-day forum to discuss more effective ways to harness the clinical potential of cytokines and cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents. The first day was focused primarily on the use of recombinant cytokines as therapeutic agents for treatment of human diseases. The second day focused largely on the use of cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents for treatment of human diseases. This issue of the Annals includes more than a dozen papers that summarize much of the information that was presented during this very informative two-day conference.

  13. Systemic Mineralocorticoid Antagonists in the Treatment of Central Serous Chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Eliott, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is a challenging disease characterized by subretinal serous fluid accumulation. The complex pathogenesis is still not fully understood, but is thought to be multifactorial and involves exogenous and endogenous factors affecting the choroid and retinal pigment epithelium. The involvement of corticosteroids is undisputed, while the contribution of mineralocorticoid pathways is under investigation. This review addresses the proposed pathogenesis models and the evidence for systemic treatment of CSCR with mineralocorticoid antagonists.

  14. Optimization of amide-based EP3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther C Y; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Arcari, Joel T; Bahnck, Kevin; Coffey, Steven B; Derksen, David R; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Loria, Paula M; Sharma, Raman

    2016-06-01

    Prostaglandin E receptor subtype 3 (EP3) antagonism may treat a variety of symptoms from inflammation to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Previously, most EP3 antagonists were large acidic ligands that mimic the substrate, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). This manuscript describes the optimization of a neutral small molecule amide series with improved lipophilic efficiency (LipE) also known as lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) ((a) Nat. Rev. Drug Disc.2007, 6, 881; (b) Annu. Rep. Med. Chem.2010, 45, 380).

  15. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-09-22

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between -295 to -300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  16. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  17. Exploration of a new series of PAR1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Planty, Bruno; Pujol, Chantal; Lamothe, Marie; Maraval, Catherine; Horn, Clemens; Le Grand, Bruno; Perez, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Two series of new PAR1 antagonists have been identified. The first incorporates a cinnamoylpiperidine motif and the second a cinnamoylpyridine pattern. The synthesis, biological activity and structure-activity relationship of these compounds are presented. In each series, one analog showed potent in vivo antithrombotic activity in a rat AV shunt model, with up to 53% inhibition at 1.25mpk iv for compound 30.

  18. Pyrrolidinyl phenylurea derivatives as novel CCR3 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Aiko; Iura, Yosuke; Inoue, Hideki; Sato, Ippei; Morihira, Koichiro; Kubota, Hirokazu; Morokata, Tatsuaki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ohta, Mitsuaki; Tsukamoto, Shin-ichi; Imaoka, Takayuki; Takahashi, Toshiya

    2012-11-15

    Optimization starting with our lead compound 1 (IC(50)=4.9 nM) led to the identification of pyrrolidinyl phenylurea derivatives. Further modification toward improvement of the bioavailability provided (R)-1-(1-((6-fluoronaphthalen-2-yl)methyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl)-3-(2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)phenyl)urea 32 (IC(50)=1.7 nM), a potent and orally active CCR3 antagonist.

  19. Potent and orally efficacious benzothiazole amides as TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Besidski, Yevgeni; Brown, William; Bylund, Johan; Dabrowski, Michael; Dautrey, Sophie; Harter, Magali; Horoszok, Lucy; Hu, Yin; Johnson, Dean; Johnstone, Shawn; Jones, Paul; Leclerc, Sandrine; Kolmodin, Karin; Kers, Inger; Labarre, Maryse; Labrecque, Denis; Laird, Jennifer; Lundström, Therese; Martino, John; Maudet, Mickaël; Munro, Alexander; Nylöf, Martin; Penwell, Andrea; Rotticci, Didier; Slaitas, Andis; Sundgren-Andersson, Anna; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Villanueva, Huascar; Walpole, Christopher; Zemribo, Ronald; Griffin, Andrew M

    2012-10-01

    Benzothiazole amides were identified as TRPV1 antagonists from high throughput screening using recombinant human TRPV1 receptor and structure-activity relationships were explored to pinpoint key pharmacophore interactions. By increasing aqueous solubility, through the attachment of polar groups to the benzothiazole core, and enhancing metabolic stability, by blocking metabolic sites, the drug-like properties and pharmokinetic profiles of benzothiazole compounds were sufficiently optimized such that their therapeutic potential could be verified in rat pharmacological models of pain.

  20. Human glucagon receptor antagonists based on alkylidene hydrazides.

    PubMed

    Ling, Anthony; Plewe, Michael; Gonzalez, Javier; Madsen, Peter; Sams, Christian K; Lau, Jesper; Gregor, Vlad; Murphy, Doug; Teston, Kimberly; Kuki, Atsuo; Shi, Shenghua; Truesdale, Larry; Kiel, Dan; May, John; Lakis, James; Anderes, Kenna; Iatsimirskaia, Eugenia; Sidelmann, Ulla G; Knudsen, Lotte B; Brand, Christian L; Polinsky, Alex

    2002-02-25

    A series of alkylidene hydrazide derivatives containing an alkoxyaryl moiety was optimized. The resulting hydrazide-ethers were competitive antagonists at the human glucagon receptor. Pharmacokinetic experiments showed fast clearance of most of the compounds tested. A representative compound [4-hydroxy-3-cyanobenzoic acid (4-isopropylbenzyloxy-3,5-dimethoxymethylene)hydrazide] with an IC50 value of 20 nM was shown to reduce blood glucose levels in fasted rats.

  1. Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists in Preventing Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng; Zhang, Hao; Du, Bo-Xiang; Xu, Feng-Ying; Zou, Zui; Sui, Bo; Shi, Xue-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Newly developed neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) antagonists have been recently tried in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore whether NK-1R antagonists were effective in preventing PONV. The PRISMA statement guidelines were followed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that tested the preventive effects of NK-1R antagonists on PONV were identified by searching EMBASE, CINAHL, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library databases followed by screening. Data extraction was performed using a predefined form and trial quality was assessed using a modified Jadad scale. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of PONV. Meta-analysis was performed for studies using similar interventions. Network meta-analysis (NMA) was conducted to compare the anti-vomiting effects of placebo, ondansetron, and aprepitant at different doses. Fourteen RCTs were included. Meta-analysis found that 80 mg of aprepitant could reduce the incidences of nausea (3 RCTs with 224 patients, pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.47 to 0.75), and vomiting (3 RCTs with 224 patients, pooled RR = 0.13, 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.37) compared with placebo. Neither 40 mg (3 RCTs with 1171 patients, RR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.60) nor 125 mg (2 RCTs with 1058 patients, RR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.13 to 0.78) of aprepitant showed superiority over 4 mg of ondansetron in preventing postoperative vomiting. NMA did not find a dose-dependent effect of aprepitant on preventing postoperative vomiting. Limited data suggested that NK-1R antagonists, especially aprepitant were effective in preventing PONV compared with placebo. More large-sampled high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID:25984662

  2. A synthetic peptide derivative that is a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lignon, M F; Galas, M C; Rodriguez, M; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1987-05-25

    So far, there are no known peptidic effective receptor antagonists of both peripheral and central effects of cholecystokinin (CCK). Here, we describe a synthetic peptide derivative of CCK, t-butyloxycarbonyl-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-D-Trp-Nle-Asp 2-phenylethyl ester 1 (where Nle is norleucine), which is a potent CCK receptor antagonist. In rat and guinea pig dispersed pancreatic acini, this peptide derivative did not alter amylase secretion, but was able to antagonize the stimulation caused by cholecystokinin-related agonists. It caused a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for the stimulation of amylase secretion with half-maximal inhibition of CCK-8-stimulated amylase release at a concentration of about 0.1 microM. Compound 1 was able to inhibit the binding of labeled CCK-9 (the C-terminal nonapeptide of CCK) to rat and guinea pig pancreatic acini (IC50 = 5 X 10(-8) M) as well as to guinea pig cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 5 X 10(-7) M). These results indicate that Compound 1 is a potent competitive CCK receptor antagonist.

  3. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  4. Antagonistic interaction networks among bacteria from a cold soil environment.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathish; Manasa, Poorna; Buddhi, Sailaja; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2011-11-01

    Microbial antagonism in an Arctic soil habitat was demonstrated by assessing the inhibitory interactions between bacterial isolates from the same location. Of 139 isolates obtained from five soil samples, 20 antagonists belonging to the genera, Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium were identified. Inter-genus, inter-species and inter-strain antagonism was observed between the interacting members. The extent of antagonism was temperature dependent. In some cases, antagonism was enhanced at 4 °C but suppressed at 18 °C while in some the reverse phenomenon was observed. To interpret antagonism from an ecological perspective, the interacting members were delineated according to their positional roles in a theoretical antagonistic network. When only one antimicrobial producer (P) was present, all the other members permitted grouping into either sensitive (S) or resistant (R). Composite interactive types such as PSR, PS, PR or SR could be designated only when at least two producers were present. Mapping of all possible antagonistic interaction networks based on the individual positional roles of the interactive types illustrates the existence of complex and interconnected networks among microbial communities.

  5. Discovery of new muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists from Scopolia tangutica

    PubMed Central

    Du, Nana; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Jixia; Zhao, Jianqiang; He, Jian; Zhou, Han; Mei, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2017-01-01

    Scopolia tangutica (S. tangutica) is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant used for antispasmodics, anesthesia, analgesia and sedation. Its pharmacological activities are mostly associated with the antagonistic activity at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAchRs) of several known alkaloids such as atropine and scopolamine. With our recent identification of four hydroxycinnamic acid amides from S. tangutica, we hypothesized that this plant may contain previously unidentified alkaloids that may also contribute to its in vivo effect. Herein, we used a bioassay-guided multi-dimension separation strategy to discover novel mAchR antagonists from S. tangutica. The core of this approach is to use label-free cell phenotypic assay to first identify active fractions, and then to guide purification of active ligands. Besides four tropanes and six cinnamic acid amides that have been previously isolated from S. tangutica, we recently identified two new tropanes, one new cinnamic acid amide, and nine other compounds. Six tropane compounds purified from S. tangutica for the first time were confirmed to be competitive antagonists of muscarinic receptor 3 (M3), including the two new ones 8 and 12 with IC50 values of 1.97 μM and 4.47 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the cinnamic acid amide 17 displayed 15-fold selectivity for M1 over M3 receptors. These findings will be useful in designing lead compounds for mAchRs and elucidating mechanisms of action of S. tangutica. PMID:28387362

  6. Affinity and selectivity of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wellstein, A.; Palm, D.; Belz, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    The potency order of the catecholamines (-)-isoprenaline (Iso), (-)-noradrenaline (NA), and (-)-adrenaline (Adr) in competition for radiolabelled sites is used for their pharmacological classification. It is shown that the radioligand /sup 3/H-CGP 12177 exclusively labels beta 1-adrenoceptors in rat salivary gland membranes (Iso greater than NA greater than Adr), and beta 2-adrenoceptors in rat reticulocytes (Iso greater than Adr greater than or equal to NA). These models are then used to derive the subtype-selectivity of the classical beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (+/-)-propranolol (prop; twofold beta 2-selective) and (+/-)-atenolol (aten; 35-fold beta 1-selective), as well as of the newer antagonists (+/-)-betaxolol and (+/-)-bisoprolol (betax and biso; 35-fold and 75-fold beta 1-selective, respectively). The ligand with the highest selectivity is ICI 118,551 (ICI), with a 300-fold beta 2-subtype selectivity. For comparison with antagonistic effects in humans at given plasma concentrations, the equilibrium dissociation constants of the ligands are measured in the presence of native human plasma and yield values for the relative selectively labelled subtype in the mean (Ki-values in nmol/l): prop: 20, aten: 250, biso: 24, betax: 23, and ICI: 2.5.

  7. The complex roles of Wnt antagonists in RCC.

    PubMed

    Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2011-10-25

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal of all the genitourinary cancers, as it is generally refractory to current treatment regimens, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Targeted therapies against critical signaling pathways associated with RCC pathogenesis, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor and mammalian target of rapamycin, have shown limited efficacy so far. Thus, Wnt signaling, which is known to be intricately involved in the pathogenesis of RCC, has attracted much interest. Several Wnt signaling components have been examined in RCC, and, while studies suggest that Wnt signaling is constitutively active in RCC, the molecular mechanisms differ considerably from other human carcinomas. Increasing evidence indicates that secreted Wnt antagonists have important roles in RCC pathogenesis. Considering these vital roles, it has been postulated--and supported by experimental evidence--that the functional loss of Wnt antagonists, for example by promoter hypermethylation, can contribute to constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway, resulting in carcinogenesis through dysregulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. However, subsequent functional studies of these Wnt antagonists have demonstrated the inherent complexities underlying their role in RCC pathogenesis.

  8. [Necrotic leg ulcer revealing vasculitis induced by vitamin K antagonists].

    PubMed

    Chabli, H; Hocar, O; Akhdari, N; Amal, S; Hakkou, M; Hamdaoui, A

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists are widely used in thromboembolic diseases. Hemorrhagic complications related to drug overdose represent their main side effect. We report a rare side effect, a severe and unexpected type of skin vasculitis - necrotic leg ulcer - induced by vitamin K antagonist. A 63-year-old female with a history of diabetes developed hyperalgesic necrotic ulcerations on the lower limbs one month after starting an acenocoumarol-based treatment for ischemic heart disease. Histological examination revealed lymphocytic vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis. Etiological explorations searching for vasculitis were negative. In the absence of a precise etiology, drug-induced ulcer was suspected. Low molecular weight heparin was prescribed to replace acenocoumarol. The lesions slowly resolved with topical treatment. The chronological criteria and the negativity of etiological explorations allowed the diagnosis of vitamin K antagonist-induced necrotic skin ulcer. Clinicians should be aware of this rare complication induced by oral anticoagulants because of its practical therapeutic implications. This is the first case of necrotic leg ulcer induced by acenocoumarol corresponding histologically to necrotising lymphocytic vasculitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Muscarinic agonists and antagonists: effects on the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2012-01-01

    Voiding of the bladder is the result of a parasympathetic muscarinic receptor activation of the detrusor smooth muscle. However, the maintenance of continence and a normal bladder micturition cycle involves a complex interaction of cholinergic, adrenergic, nitrergic and peptidergic systems that is currently little understood. The cholinergic component of bladder control involves two systems, acetylcholine (ACh) released from parasympathetic nerves and ACh from non-neuronal cells within the urothelium. The actions of ACh on the bladder depend on the presence of muscarinic receptors that are located on the detrusor smooth muscle, where they cause direct (M₃) and indirect (M₂) contraction; pre-junctional nerve terminals where they increase (M₁) or decrease (M₄) the release of ACh and noradrenaline (NA); sensory nerves where they influence afferent nerve activity; umbrella cells in the urothelium where they stimulate the release of ATP and NO; suburothelial interstitial cells with unknown function; and finally, other unidentified sites in the urothelium from where prostaglandins and inhibitory/relaxatory factors are released. Thus, the actions of muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists on the bladder may be very complex even when considering only local muscarinic actions. Clinically, muscarinic antagonists remain the mainstay of treatment for the overactive bladder (OAB), while muscarinic agonists have been used to treat hypoactive bladder. The antagonists are effective in treating OAB, but their precise mechanisms and sites of action (detrusor, urothelium, and nerves) have yet to be established. Potentially more selective agents may be developed when the cholinergic systems within the bladder are more fully understood.

  10. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates. PMID:26888328

  11. Twisted Gastrulation, a BMP Antagonist, Exacerbates Podocyte Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Sachiko; Nakamura, Jin; Asada, Misako; Takase, Masayuki; Matsusaka, Taiji; Iguchi, Taku; Yamada, Ryo; Tanaka, Mari; Higashi, Atsuko Y.; Okuda, Tomohiko; Asada, Nariaki; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Graf, Daniel; Muso, Eri; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi; Pastan, Ira; Economides, Aris N.; Yanagita, Motoko

    2014-01-01

    Podocyte injury is the first step in the progression of glomerulosclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7) in podocyte injury and the existence of native Bmp signaling in podocytes. Local activity of Bmp7 is controlled by cell-type specific Bmp antagonists, which inhibit the binding of Bmp7 to its receptors. Here we show that the product of Twisted gastrulation (Twsg1), a Bmp antagonist, is the central negative regulator of Bmp function in podocytes and that Twsg1 null mice are resistant to podocyte injury. Twsg1 was the most abundant Bmp antagonist in murine cultured podocytes. The administration of Bmp induced podocyte differentiation through Smad signaling, whereas the simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. The administration of Bmp also inhibited podocyte proliferation, whereas simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. Twsg1 was expressed in the glomerular parietal cells (PECs) and distal nephron of the healthy kidney, and additionally in damaged glomerular cells in a murine model of podocyte injury. Twsg1 null mice exhibited milder hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia, and milder histological changes while maintaining the expression of podocyte markers during podocyte injury model. Taken together, our results show that Twsg1 plays a critical role in the modulation of protective action of Bmp7 on podocytes, and that inhibition of Twsg1 is a promising means of development of novel treatment for podocyte injury. PMID:24586548

  12. Effects of two antagonistic ecosystem engineers on infaunal diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Ortiz, V.; Alcazar, P.; Vergara, J. J.; Pérez-Lloréns, J. L.; Brun, F. G.

    2014-02-01

    The role of ecosystem engineers has been highlighted in recent decades because of their importance for ecosystem functioning, although the interaction between different antagonistic engineer species and their effects on ecosystems have been so far poorly investigated. Coastal areas are good natural laboratories to explore such interactions, since they are often inhabited by macrophyte beds (autogenic engineers) and bioturbator species (allogenic engineers) with antagonistic effects on ecosystem properties and processes (e.g. species diversity, nutrient fluxes, etc.). The main goal of this study was to determine how coexisting antagonistic ecosystem engineers could influence benthic diversity and available resources in soft-bottom areas. To achieve this goal, a two-month experiment was carried out in situ by introducing artificial seagrass patches in a soft-bottom area inhabited by the fiddler crab Uca tangeri. Both the experimental exclusion of burrows as well as the presence of artificial seagrass-like structures (mimics) resulted in higher macrobenthic density and species richness in the benthic community. Resource availability for organisms (sediment chlorophyll a and epiphytes) was also favoured by the presence of mimics. Therefore, the higher structural complexity (above- and below-ground) associated with seagrass mimics promoted positive effects for infauna such as creation of a new habitat ready to colonize, reduction of the crab burrowing activity and the enhancement of resource availability, which resulted in increased diversity in the benthic community.

  13. Does intergenerational social mobility affect antagonistic attitudes towards ethnic minorities?

    PubMed

    Tolsma, Jochem; de Graaf, Nan Dirk; Quillian, Lincoln

    2009-06-01

    Up till now, no study satisfactorily addressed the effect of social mobility on antagonistic attitudes toward ethnic minorities. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of educational and class intergenerational mobility on ethnic stereotypes, ethnic threat, and opposition to ethnic intermarriage by using diagonal mobility models. We test several hypotheses derived from ethnic competition theory and socialization theory with data from the Social and Cultural Developments in The Netherlands surveys (SOCON, waves 1995, 2000, and 2005) and The Netherlands Kinship and Panel Study (NKPS, wave 2002). We find that the relative influence of social origin and social destination depends on the specific origin and destination combination. If one moves to a more tolerant social destination position, the influence of the social origin position is negligible. If on the other hand, one is socially mobile to a less tolerant social position, the impact of the origin on antagonistic attitudes is substantial and may even exceed the impact of the destination category. This confirms our hypothesis that adaptation to more tolerant norms is easier than adaptation to less tolerant norms. We find only meagre evidence for the hypothesis that downward mobility leads to frustration and consequently to more antagonistic attitudes.

  14. Investigational dopamine antagonists for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Han, Changsu; Lee, Soo-Jung; Jun, Tae-Youn; Patkar, Ashwin A; Masand, Prakash S; Pae, Chi-Un

    2017-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating illness with a chronic impact on social function and daily living. Although various antipsychotics are available, there are still many challenges and unmet needs. Thus, many compounds with diverse mechanisms have been investigated, but all approved antipsychotics still require interactions with dopamine D2 receptors. Areas covered: We searched for investigational drugs using the key words 'dopamine' and 'schizophrenia' in American and European clinical trial registers (clinicaltrials.gov; clinicaltrialsregister.eu). Published articles were searched in PubMed, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Web of Science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Library. Expert opinion: The prospect of developing a dopamine antagonist is hopeful. Brexpiprazole and cariprazine, which were agents listed as 'investigational dopamine antagonists,' just received FDA approval. Novel agents such as BL 1020, ITI-007, and JNJ-37822681 have solid published data available, and agents such as L-THP, Lu AF35700, S33138, and SB-773812 are under vigorous investigation. However, the expected benefits of the newly developed antagonists may not be great because they offer little enhanced efficacy for negative symptoms, cognition and functional outcomes.

  15. Synergistic and antagonistic drug combinations depend on network topology.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ning; Ma, Wenzhe; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi; Tang, Chao; Lai, Luhua

    2014-01-01

    Drug combinations may exhibit synergistic or antagonistic effects. Rational design of synergistic drug combinations remains a challenge despite active experimental and computational efforts. Because drugs manifest their action via their targets, the effects of drug combinations should depend on the interaction of their targets in a network manner. We therefore modeled the effects of drug combinations along with their targets interacting in a network, trying to elucidate the relationships between the network topology involving drug targets and drug combination effects. We used three-node enzymatic networks with various topologies and parameters to study two-drug combinations. These networks can be simplifications of more complex networks involving drug targets, or closely connected target networks themselves. We found that the effects of most of the combinations were not sensitive to parameter variation, indicating that drug combinational effects largely depend on network topology. We then identified and analyzed consistent synergistic or antagonistic drug combination motifs. Synergistic motifs encompass a diverse range of patterns, including both serial and parallel combinations, while antagonistic combinations are relatively less common and homogenous, mostly composed of a positive feedback loop and a downstream link. Overall our study indicated that designing novel synergistic drug combinations based on network topology could be promising, and the motifs we identified could be a useful catalog for rational drug combination design in enzymatic systems.

  16. [5-HT3 receptor antagonist als analgetics in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Fiebich, B L; Stratz, T

    2006-10-01

    Various rheumatic diseases like fibromyalgia, systemic inflammatory rheumatic disorders and localized diseases, such as arthritides and activated arthroses, tendinopathies and periarthropathies, as well as trigger points can be improved considerably by treatment with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron. Particularly in the latter group of diseases, local injections have done surprisingly rapid analgesic action. This effect matches that of local anesthetics, but lasts considerably longer and is comparable to local injections of local anesthetics combined with corticosteroids. The action of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists can be attributed to an antinociceptive effect that occurs at the same time as an antiphlogistic and probably also an immunosuppressive effect. Whereas an inhibited release of substance P from the nociceptors, and possibly some other neurokins as well, seems to be the most likely explanation for the antinociceptive action, the antiphlogistic effect is primarily due to an inhibited formation of various different phlogistic substances; in some conditions, like systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, for example, the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists may exert an immunosuppressive effect in addition to this.

  17. Newer calcium channel antagonists and the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D F

    1999-07-01

    Calcium channel antagonists have become popular medications for the management of hypertension. These agents belong to the diphenylalkylamine, benzothiazepine, dihydropyridine, or tetralol chemical classes. Although the medications share a common pharmacological mechanism in reducing peripheral vascular resistance, clinical differences between the sub-classes can be linked to structural profiles. This heterogeneity is manifested by differences in vascular selectivity, effects on cardiac conduction and adverse events. The lack of differentiation between calcium channel antagonists in clinical trials has contributed to uncertainty associated with their impact on morbidity and mortality. Data from more recent studies in specific patient populations underscores the importance of investigating these antihypertensives as individual agents. A proposed therapeutic classification system suggests that newer agents should share the slow onset and long-acting antihypertensive effect of amlodipine. Additionally, a favourable trough-to-peak ratio has been recommended as an objective measurement of efficacy. The newer drugs, barnidipine and lacidipine, have a therapeutic profile similar to amlodipine, but trough-to-peak ratios are not substantially greater than the recommended minimum of 0.50. Aranidipine, cilnidipine and efonidipine have unique pharmacological properties that distinguish them from traditional dihydropyridines. Although clinical significance is unconfirmed, these newer options may be beneficial for patients with co-morbid conditions that preclude use of older antagonists.

  18. Side-effects of mixed agonist-antagonist analgesics used in sequential anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Devaux, C.; Schoepffler, P.; Gauthier-Lafaye, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    1 Mixed agonist-antagonist analgesics have analgesic action but also possess a range of side-effects. 2 Narcotic antagonists do not reverse the non-specific effects of opiates. 3 Under certain circumstances the effects of agonists and mixed agonist-antagonists can be additive. 4 Chronic dosage of mixed agonist-antagonists leads to a lower level of dependence than that observed with the standard narcotics. 5 Mixed agonist-antagonists may not antagonize the respiratory effects of narcotics and may result in potentiation of such depression. PMID:465294

  19. The effects of histamine H3-receptor antagonists on amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakinoki, H; Ishizawa, K; Fukunaga, M; Fujii, Y; Kamei, C

    1998-07-15

    The effects of histamine H3-receptor antagonists, thioperamide, and clobenpropit on amygdaloid kindled seizures were investigated in rats. Both intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of H3-antagonists resulted in a dose-related inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. An inhibition induced by thioperamide was antagonized by an H3-agonist [(R)-alpha-methylhistamine] and H1-antagonists (diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine). On the other hand, an H2-antagonist (cimetidine and ranitidine) caused no antagonistic effect. Metoprine, an inhibitor of N-methyltransferase was also effective in inhibiting amygdaloid kindled seizure, and this effect was augmented by thioperamide treatment.

  20. Peripheral, but not central effects of cannabidiol derivatives: mediation by CB(1) and unidentified receptors.

    PubMed

    Fride, Ester; Ponde, Datta; Breuer, Aviva; Hanus, Lumir

    2005-06-01

    Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) and (-)-cannabidiol ((-)-CBD) are major constituents of the Cannabis sativa plant with different pharmacological profiles: (Delta(9)-THC activates cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors and induces psychoactive and peripheral effects. (-)-CBD possesses no, or very weak affinity for these receptors. We tested a series of (+)- and (-)-CBD derivatives for central and peripheral effects in mice. None of the (-)-CBD derivatives were centrally active, yet most inhibited intestinal motility. Of the five (+)-CBD derivatives, all with CB(1) receptor affinity, only (+)-7-OH-CBD-DMH (DMH=1,1-dimethylheptyl), acted centrally, while all five arrested defecation. The effects of (+)-CBD-DMH and (+)-7-OH-CBD-DMH were inhibited by the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716. The CB(2) receptor antagonist SR144528, and the vanilloid TRPV1 receptor antagonist capsazepine, had no influence. Further, the (-)-CBD derivatives (-)-7-COOH-CBD and (-)-7-COOH-CBD-DMH, displayed antiinflammatory activity. We suggest that (+)-CBD analogues have mixed agonist/antagonist activity in the brain. Second, (-)-CBD analogues which are devoid of cannabinoid receptor affinity but which inhibit intestinal motility, suggest the existence of a non-CB(1), non-CB(2) receptor. Therefore, such analogues should be further developed as antidiarrheal and/or antiinflammatory drugs. We propose to study the therapeutic potential of (-)- and (+)-CBD derivatives for complex conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and cystic fibrosis.

  1. Human brain endothelium: coexpression and function of vanilloid and endocannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Golech, Susanne Andrea; McCarron, Richard M; Chen, Ye; Bembry, Joliet; Lenz, Frederick; Mechoulam, Raphael; Shohami, Esther; Spatz, Maria

    2004-12-06

    The arachidonic acid derivative, 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), was initially isolated from gut and brain; it is also produced and released from blood and vascular cells. Many of the 2-AG-induced cellular responses (i.e., neuromodulation, cytoprotection and vasodilation) are mediated by cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The findings presented here demonstrate the expression of CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptors on cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (HBEC). The expression of TRPV1, CB1 and CB2 receptor mRNA and proteins were demonstrated by RT-PCR and polyclonal antibodies, respectively. The endocannabinoid 2-AG, and other related compounds [anandamide (ANA), methanandamide (m-ANA), N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-arachidonyl-ethanolamide) (AM404) and capsaicin] dose-dependently stimulated Ca2+ influx in HBEC. The selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist (capsazepine), CB1 receptor antagonist (SR141716A) and CB2 receptor antagonist (SR144528) inhibited these responses. The effects of capsaicin, a specific agonist for TRPV1 receptors, were inhibited by capsazepine, but only weakly by CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists. 2-AG also induced phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP); this response was mediated by VR1 receptors. These studies clearly indicate that 2-AG and other related compounds may function as agonists on VR1 receptors, as well as CB1 and CB2 receptors, and implicated these factors in various HBEC functions.

  2. Can angiotensin receptor antagonists prevent restenosis after stent placement?

    PubMed

    Peters, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Restenosis rates after coronary stent implantation in complex lesions are between 30 and 50%. Neointimal hyperplasia promoted by complex interaction between cellular and acellular elements, such as cytokines and growth factors, is thought to be the primary process responsible for restenosis. The risk of in-stent restenosis is increased in patients with a history of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, in long lesions, in total occlusions, in patients with diabetes mellitus, in small vessels, in the proximal parts of the left anterior descending coronary artery and in cases of stent oversizing. In-stent restenosis represents a serious economic burden on society because treatment strategies include expensive approaches such as cutting-balloon angioplasty, rotational atherectomy and brachytherapy. A number of pharmacological agents, including ACE inhibitors, have been unsuccessful in preventing restenosis. Alternative procedures such as brachytherapy, radioactive stents and drug-eluting stents are under evaluation. Although sirolimus- or paclitaxel-eluting stents have been associated with very low restenosis rates over durations of 6 to 12 months, the long-term efficacy and tolerability of this approach is currently being investigated. Although ACE inhibitors have failed in reducing restenosis rates, the selective angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonist valsartan has shown encouraging results in the single-center Valsartan for Prevention of Restenosis after Stenting of Type B2/C lesions trial (ValPREST). The ValPREST trial is the first randomized, placebo-controlled study to have evaluated the effect of an angiotensin receptor antagonist on in-stent restenosis in a moderate number of patients. Compared with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers exert additional effects on the pathophysiological processes which lead to restenosis. Angiotensin receptor antagonists may affect several mechanisms involved in neointimal

  3. Microbial Herd Protection Mediated by Antagonistic Interaction in Polymicrobial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Megan J. Q.; Liang, Xiaoye; Smart, Matt; Tang, Le; Moore, Richard; Ingalls, Brian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In host and natural environments, microbes often exist in complex multispecies communities. The molecular mechanisms through which such communities develop and persist, despite significant antagonistic interactions between species, are not well understood. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a lethal weapon commonly employed by Gram-negative bacteria to inhibit neighboring species through the delivery of toxic effectors. It is well established that intraspecies protection is conferred by immunity proteins that neutralize effector toxicities. In contrast, the mechanisms for interspecies protection are not clear. Here we use two T6SS-active antagonistic bacterial species, Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio cholerae, to demonstrate that interspecies protection is dependent on effectors. A. hydrophila and V. cholerae do not share conserved immunity genes but could coexist equally in a mixture. However, mutants lacking the T6SS or effectors were effectively eliminated by the competing wild-type strain. Time-lapse microscopic analyses showed that mutually lethal interactions drive the segregation of mixed species into distinct single-species clusters by eliminating interspersed single cells. Cluster formation provides herd protection by abolishing lethal interactions inside each cluster and restricting the interactions to the boundary. Using an agent-based modeling approach, we simulated the antagonistic interactions of two hypothetical species. The resulting simulations recapitulated our experimental observations. These results provide mechanistic insights regarding the general role of microbial weapons in determining the structures of complex multispecies communities. IMPORTANCE Investigating the warfare of microbes allows us to better understand the ecological relationships in complex microbial communities such as the human microbiota. Here we use the T6SS, a deadly bacterial weapon, as a model to demonstrate the importance of lethal interactions in

  4. Arginine mimetic structures in biologically active antagonists and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2006-01-01

    Peptidomimetics have found wide application as bioavailable, biostable, and potent mimetics of naturally occurring biologically active peptides. L-Arginine is a guanidino group-containing basic amino acid, which is positively charged at neutral pH and is involved in many important physiological and pathophysiological processes. Many enzymes display a preference for the arginine residue that is found in many natural substrates and in synthetic inhibitors of many trypsin-like serine proteases, e.g. thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, trypsin, and in integrin receptor antagonists, used to treat many blood-coagulation disorders. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by oxidation of L-arginine in an NADPH- and O(2)-dependent process catalyzed by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), exhibits diverse roles in both normal and pathological physiologies and has been postulated to be a contributor to the etiology of various diseases. Development of NOS inhibitors as well as analogs and mimetics of the natural substrate L-arginine, is desirable for potential therapeutic use and for a better understanding of their conformation when bound in the arginine binding site. The guanidino residue of arginine in many substrates, inhibitors, and antagonists forms strong ionic interactions with the carboxylate of an aspartic acid moiety, which provides specificity for the basic amino acid residue in the active side. However, a highly basic guanidino moiety incorporated in enzyme inhibitors or receptor antagonists is often associated with low selectivity and poor bioavailability after peroral application. Thus, significant effort is focused on the design and preparation of arginine mimetics that can confer selective inhibition for specific trypsin-like serine proteases and NOS inhibitors as well as integrin receptor antagonists and possess reduced basicity for enhanced oral bioavailability. This review will describe the survey of arginine mimetics designed to mimic the function of the

  5. Involvement of a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor in the aqueous humor outflow-enhancing effects of abnormal-cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhuanhong; Kumar, Akhilesh; Kumar, Pritesh; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of abnormal-cannabidiol (abn-cbd), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid agonist, on aqueous humor outflow via the trabecular meshwork (TM) of porcine eye, and to examine the involvement of a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor and the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42/44 MAPK) pathway. The effects of abn-cbd on aqueous humor outflow were measured using a porcine anterior segment perfused organ culture model. The activation of p42/44 MAPK by abn-cbd was determined in cultured TM cells with western blot analysis using an anti-phospho-p42/44 MAPK antibody. Administration of abn-cbd caused a concentration-dependent enhancement of aqueous humor outflow facility with a maximum effect (155.0 ± 11.7% of basal outflow facility) after administration of 30 nM abn-cbd. Pretreatment with 1 μM of O-1918, a cannabidiol analog that acts as a selective antagonist at the non-CB1/CB2 receptor, produced a full antagonism of 30 nM abn-cbd induced increase of aqueous humor outflow facility. Pretreatment with 1 μM of CB1 antagonist SR141716A partially blocked, whereas pretreatment with either 1 μM of CB1 antagonist AM251 or 1 μM of CB2 antagonist SR144528 had no effect on abn-cbd induced enhancement of outflow facility. Treatment of TM cells with 30 nM of abn-cbd activated p42/44 MAPK, which was blocked completely by pretreatment with O-1918, and partially by pretreatment with SR141716A, but not by either AM251 or SR144528. In addition, PD98059, an inhibitor of p42/44 MAPK pathway, blocked completely the abn-cbd induced p42/44 MAPK activation and blocked partially the abn-cbd induced enhancement of outflow facility. In conclusion, the results from this study demonstrate that abn-cbd increases aqueous humor outflow through the TM pathway of the eye, and this effect is mediated by a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor, with an involvement of p42/44 MAPK signaling pathway.

  6. Anti free radical action of calcium antagonists and H1 and H2 receptors antagonists in neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    della Rovere, F; Broccio, M; Granata, A; Zirilli, A; Brugnano, L; Artemisia, A; Broccio, G

    1996-01-01

    The blood of the subjects suffering from Neoplastic Disease (ND) shows phenomena of membrane peroxidation due to the presence of Free Radicals (FRs), in a quantity much greater than the one observed in the blood of healthy subjects. This can be detected either by calculating the time necessary for the formation of "Heinz bodies" (Hbs), (p < 0.00001) after oxidative stress of the blood in vitro with acetylphenylidrazine (APH), or by calculating the methemoglobin (metHb) quantity that forms after the same treatment (P < 0.00001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation was not affected by age, sex, smoking habits, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. In this study, by using equal parameters of investigation, we noted that the blood of the subjects with ND who were previously treated with calcium-antagonists drugs and with antagonists of H1 and H2 receptors, gave results completely superimposable on the results obtained from healthy subjects, implying that the treatment had avoided the increase of FRs. Therefore we concluded that calcium-antagonists and the antagonists of the H1 and H2 receptors behave as antioxidant substances, having decreased the FRs damaging activity on the cellular membranes, thus controlling, although to a limited degree, the pejorative evolution of the disease. It is also important to remember that investigations into the ND, even possible screenings, must take into account the above said data, submitting the subjects under investigation to a pharmacological wash out, particularly with those substances which, are considered to be scavengers of FRs. Some of these substances are investigated in this work.

  7. Conformational studies of 3-amino-1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists leading to new spirocyclic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alexander; Goble, Stephen D; Doss, George A; Tsou, Nancy N; Butora, Gabor; Vicario, Pasquale P; Ayala, Julia Marie; Struthers, Mary; Demartino, Julie A; Mills, Sander G; Yang, Lihu

    2008-02-15

    In an effort to shed light on the active binding conformation of our 3-amino-1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists, we prepared several conformationally constrained analogs resulting from backbone cyclization. Evaluation of CCR2 binding affinities for these analogs gave insight into the optimal relative positions of the piperidine and benzylamide moieties while simultaneously leading to the discovery of a new, potent lead type based upon a spirocyclic acetal scaffold.

  8. Antagonist-perturbation mechanism for activation function-2 fixed motifs: active conformation and docking mode of retinoid X receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Motonori

    2017-06-01

    HX531, which contains a dibenzodiazepine skeleton, is one of the first retinoid X receptor (RXR) antagonists. Functioning via RXR-PPARγ heterodimer, this compound is receiving a lot of attention as a therapeutic drug candidate for diabetic disease controlling differentiation of adipose tissue. However, the active conformation of HX531 for RXRs is not well established. In the present study, quantum mechanics calculations and molecular mechanical docking simulations were carried out to precisely study the docking mode of HX531 with the human RXRα ligand-binding domain, as well as to provide a new approach to drug design using a structure-based perspective. It was suggested that HX531, which has the R configuration for the bent dibenzodiazepine plane together with the equatorial configuration for the N-methyl group attached to the nitrogen atom in the seven-membered diazepine ring, is a typical activation function-2 (AF-2) fixed motif perturbation type antagonist, which destabilizes the formation of AF-2 fixed motifs. On the other hand, the docking simulations supported the experimental result that LG100754 is an RXR homodimer antagonist and an RXR heterodimer agonist.

  9. Antagonist-perturbation mechanism for activation function-2 fixed motifs: active conformation and docking mode of retinoid X receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Motonori

    2017-06-01

    HX531, which contains a dibenzodiazepine skeleton, is one of the first retinoid X receptor (RXR) antagonists. Functioning via RXR-PPARγ heterodimer, this compound is receiving a lot of attention as a therapeutic drug candidate for diabetic disease controlling differentiation of adipose tissue. However, the active conformation of HX531 for RXRs is not well established. In the present study, quantum mechanics calculations and molecular mechanical docking simulations were carried out to precisely study the docking mode of HX531 with the human RXRα ligand-binding domain, as well as to provide a new approach to drug design using a structure-based perspective. It was suggested that HX531, which has the R configuration for the bent dibenzodiazepine plane together with the equatorial configuration for the N-methyl group attached to the nitrogen atom in the seven-membered diazepine ring, is a typical activation function-2 (AF-2) fixed motif perturbation type antagonist, which destabilizes the formation of AF-2 fixed motifs. On the other hand, the docking simulations supported the experimental result that LG100754 is an RXR homodimer antagonist and an RXR heterodimer agonist.

  10. Disease-modifying effect of atipamezole in a model of post-traumatic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nissinen, Jari; Andrade, Pedro; Natunen, Teemu; Hiltunen, Mikko; Malm, Tarja; Kanninen, Katja; Soares, Joana I; Shatillo, Olena; Sallinen, Jukka; Ndode-Ekane, Xavier Ekolle; Pitkänen, Asla

    2017-10-01

    Treatment of TBI remains a major unmet medical need, with 2.5 million new cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year in Europe and 1.5 million in the USA. This single-center proof-of-concept preclinical study tested the hypothesis that pharmacologic neurostimulation with proconvulsants, either atipamezole, a selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, or the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist SR141716A, as monotherapy would improve functional recovery after TBI. A total of 404 adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomized into two groups: sham-injured or lateral fluid-percussion-induced TBI. The rats were treated with atipamezole (started at 30min or 7 d after TBI) or SR141716A (2min or 30min post-TBI) for up to 9 wk. Total follow-up time was 14 wk after treatment initiation. Outcome measures included motor (composite neuroscore, beam-walking) and cognitive performance (Morris water-maze), seizure susceptibility, spontaneous seizures, and cortical and hippocampal pathology. All injured rats exhibited similar impairment in the neuroscore and beam-walking tests at 2 d post-TBI. Atipamezole treatment initiated at either 30min or 7 d post-TBI and continued for 9 wk via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps improved performance in both the neuroscore and beam-walking tests, but not in the Morris water-maze spatial learning and memory test. Atipamezole treatment initiated at 7 d post-TBI also reduced seizure susceptibility in the pentylenetetrazol test 14 wk after treatment initiation, although it did not prevent the development of epilepsy. SR141716A administered as a single dose at 2min post-TBI or initiated at 30min post-TBI and continued for 9 wk had no recovery-enhancing or antiepileptogenic effects. Mechanistic studies to assess the α2-adrenoceptor subtype specificity of the disease-modifying effects of atipametzole revealed that genetic ablation of α2A-noradrenergic receptor function in Adra2A mice carrying an N79P point mutation had antiepileptogenic effects after TBI

  11. Behavioral approach to nondyskinetic dopamine antagonists: identification of seroquel.

    PubMed

    Warawa, E J; Migler, B M; Ohnmacht, C J; Needles, A L; Gatos, G C; McLaren, F M; Nelson, C L; Kirkland, K M

    2001-02-01

    A great need exists for antipsychotic drugs which will not induce extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and tardive dyskinesias (TDs). These side effects are deemed to be a consequence of nonselective blockade of nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine D2 receptors. Nondyskinetic clozapine (1) is a low-potency D2 dopamine receptor antagonist which appears to act selectively in the mesolimbic area. In this work dopamine antagonism was assessed in two mouse behavioral assays: antagonism of apomorphine-induced climbing and antagonism of apomorphine-induced disruption of swimming. The potential for the liability of dyskinesias was determined in haloperidol-sensitized Cebus monkeys. Initial examination of a few close cogeners of 1 enhanced confidence in the Cebus model as a predictor of dyskinetic potential. Considering dibenzazepines, 2 was not dyskinetic whereas 2a was dyskinetic. Among dibenzodiazepines, 1 did not induce dyskinesias whereas its N-2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)ethyl analogue 3 was dyskinetic. The emergence of such distinctions presented an opportunity. Thus, aromatic and N-substituted analogues of 6-(piperazin-1-yl)-11H-dibenz[b,e]azepines and 11-(piperazin-1-yl)dibenzo[b,f][1,4]thiazepines and -oxazepines were prepared and evaluated. 11-(4-[2-(2-Hydroxyethoxy)ethyl]piperazin-1-yl)dibenzo[b,f][1,4]thiazepine (23) was found to be an apomorphine antagonist comparable to clozapine. It was essentially nondyskinetic in the Cebus model. With 23 as a platform, a number of N-substituted analogues were found to be good apomorphine antagonists but all were dyskinetic.

  12. Short stature caused by a natural growth hormone antagonist.

    PubMed

    Chihara, K; Takahashi, Y; Kaji, H; Goji, K; Okimura, Y; Abe, H

    1998-01-01

    Severe short stature in a male child due to a single mutation in the GH-1 gene was first reported in 1996 by Takahashi et al. [N Engl J Med 1996;334:432-436]. This missense mutation was predicted to convert codon 77 from arginine (R) to cysteine (C). The child's chronological age was 4 years and 11 months, and his bone age 2 years and 6 months, i.e., equal to only 51% of his chronological age. Body proportions were normal except for the prominent forehead and saddle nose. Pituitary size was normal on magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Serum IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and GHBP were all decreased or at the lower limit of the normal range. Nocturnal urinary growth hormone (GH) excretion was high. Isoelectric focusing analysis revealed the presence of an abnormal GH peak in addition to the normal one. The R77C mutant GH possessed a 6 times greater affinity to GHBP than the wild-type GH, and inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation in IM-9 cells 10 times more potently than the wild-type GH, showing an antagonistic or a dominant negative action. In agreement with the antagonistic property of the mutant GH exhibited, the child did not show any increase in serum IGF-1 levels after exogenous hGH administration. It should be noted that the child in this study is not a typical case of Kowarski syndrome in which endogenous GH is found to be simply bioinactive, as in the patient we recently described elsewhere. Therefore, this patient's condition should be categorized as a new syndrome of short stature caused by a natural GH antagonist.

  13. Sexually Antagonistic “Zygotic Drive” of the Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.; Gavrilets, Sergey; Friberg, Urban

    2008-01-01

    Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic “zygotic drive”, because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic “arms race” between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans. PMID:19096519

  14. Making safer preoperative arrangements for patients using vitamin K antagonists

    PubMed Central

    van Fessem, Joris; Willems, Jessica; Kruip, Marieke; Hoeks, Sanne; Jan Stolker, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Use of vitamin K antagonists creates a risk for patient health and safety. The Dutch framework “Nationwide Standard Integrated Care of Anticoagulation” propagates a shared plan and responsibility by surgeon and anesthesiologist together in the preoperative setting. In our institution, this framework had not been implemented. Therefore, a quality-improvement project was started at the Anesthesia Department to improve perioperative safety. After exploration of barriers, multiple interventions were carried out to encourage co-workers at the preoperative screening department to take shared responsibility: distribution of prints, adjustments in electronic patient records, introduction of a protocol and education sessions. Efficacy was measured retrospectively performing a before-after study collecting perioperative data of patients using vitamin K antagonists. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of predefined safe preoperative plans. Secondary outcome measures were (1) incidence of postoperative bleeding and thrombo-embolic events within the first 24 hours after intervention and (2) necessity to preoperative correction of anticoagulation. Before intervention 72 (29%) safe, 93 (38%) partially unsafe and 83 (33%) unsafe arrangements were made. After the intervention these numbers were 105 (80%), 23 (17%) en 4 (3%), respectively: a significant 51% increase in safe preoperative plans (P<0.001). We observed no significant difference (P=0.369) regarding bleeding and thrombo-embolic events: pre-intervention 12 (5%) cases of postoperative bleeding were documented, vs. 6 (5%) post intervention and the number of thrombo-embolic events was 5 (2%) vs. 0. Also, no significant differences concerning preoperative correction of anticoagulation were observed: 11 (4%) vs. 8 (6%) (P=0.489). This quality improvement project demonstrates a major improvement in safer preoperative arrangements in our institution regarding vitamin K antagonists, using the described interventions

  15. Cardiovascular effects of ghrelin antagonist in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Maria A; Järvinen, Kristiina; Herzig, Karl-Heinz

    2009-08-07

    Ghrelin, a 28 aa growth-hormone-releasing peptide, has been shown to increase food intake and decrease arterial pressure in animals and in humans. Recently, a ghrelin antagonist (GhA), [d-Lys-3]-GHRP-6, was demonstrated to decrease food intake in mice, but its cardiovascular actions have not been described. In the present study, the effects of the GhA on cardiovascular parameters in conscious rats were investigated and the involvement of the sympathetic nervous system evaluated. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) measurements were assessed by radiotelemetry. GhA was administered in doses of 2, 4 and 6 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.). MAP as well as HR was dose-dependently elevated after sc application of GhA. Sympathetic blockade of alpha-adrenoreceptors with phentolamine (3 mg/kg, s.c.) and simultaneous antagonism of beta(1)-adrenoreceptors with atenolol (10 mg/kg, s.c.) abolished the increase in MAP and HR induced by GhA (4 mg/kg, s.c.). Administration of phentolamine alone inhibited the increase of MAP, but not HR; atenolol alone abolished the elevation of both MAP and HR evoked by GhA. These results suggest that the peripheral injection of ghrelin antagonist increases arterial pressure and heart rate, at least in part, through the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, the use of the ghrelin antagonist system as a therapeutic target for reduction in food intake might lead to serious side effects like elevated blood pressure in humans mostly already having an elevated blood pressure as part of their metabolic syndrome.

  16. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  17. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Isnard, Richard; Bauer, Fabrice; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Damy, Thibaud; Donal, Erwan; Galinier, Michel; Hagège, Albert; Jourdain, Patrick; Leclercq, Christophe; Sabatier, Rémi; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-11-01

    Thromboembolism contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF), and atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the main factors promoting this complication. As they share many risk factors, HF and AF frequently coexist, and patients with both conditions are at a particularly high risk of thromboembolism. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are direct antagonists of thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), and were designed to overcome the limitations of vitamin K antagonists. Compared with warfarin in non-valvular AF, NOACs demonstrated non-inferiority with better safety, most particularly for intracranial haemorrhages. Therefore, the European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend NOACs for most patients with non-valvular AF. Subgroups of patients with both AF and HF from the pivotal studies investigating the safety and efficacy of NOACs have been analysed and, for each NOAC, results were similar to those of the total analysis population. A recent meta-analysis of these subgroups has confirmed the better efficacy and safety of NOACs in patients with AF and HF - particularly the 41% decrease in the incidence of intracranial haemorrhages. The prothrombotic state associated with HF suggests that patients with HF in sinus rhythm could also benefit from treatment with NOACs. However, in the absence of clinical trial data supporting this indication, current guidelines do not recommend anticoagulant treatment of patients with HF in sinus rhythm. In conclusion, recent analyses of pivotal studies support the use of NOACs in accordance with their indications in HF patients with non-valvular AF.

  18. The effects of periaqueductally injected transmitter antagonists on forebrain-elicited vocalization in the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, U; Lu, C L

    1993-06-01

    In 15 squirrel monkeys, vocalization-eliciting electrodes were implanted into the following forebrain structures: anterior cingulate cortex, genu of the internal capsule, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, hypothalamus, midline thalamus, inferior thalamic peduncle and periventricular grey. Then, injections of 29 transmitter antagonists were made into the midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG) and their effects tested on the elicitability of vocalization from the forebrain. Vocalization could be blocked completely with glutamate antagonists. NMDA receptor antagonists as well as kainate/quisqualate receptor antagonists were effective. Facilitatory effects, i.e. a decrease in threshold of forebrain-elicited vocalization, was obtained with GABA-A receptor, glycine and opioid antagonists. The facilitatory effect of the opioid antagonist naloxone was limited to vocalizations expressing aversive emotional states. GABA-A receptor antagonists not only facilitated forebrain-induced vocalization but also produced vocalization themselves, i.e. without concomitant forebrain stimulation. No effects were obtained with antagonists of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, with the GABA-B receptor antagonist phaclofen and antagonists of the monoamines dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin and histamine. It is concluded that the PAG represents a crucial relay station of the vocalization-controlling system. In this station, transmission of vocalization-relevant information depends upon the activation of glutamatergic synapses. Inhibitory control is exerted by GABA, glycine and endogenous opioids. Acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin and histamine may play a transient modulatory role; forebrain-induced vocalization, however, does not depend upon the cholinergic or monoaminergic activation of PAG neurons.

  19. The pharmacology of fluparoxan: a selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Halliday, C A; Jones, B J; Skingle, M; Walsh, D M; Wise, H; Tyers, M B

    1991-04-01

    1. This paper describes the pharmacology of the novel alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist fluparoxan (GR 50360) which is currently being studied clinically as a potential anti-depressant. Idazoxan and yohimbine were included in many studies for comparison. 2. In the rat isolated, field-stimulated vas deferens and the guinea-pig isolated, field-stimulated ileum preparations, fluparoxan was a reversible competitive antagonist of the inhibitory responses to the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK-14304 with pKB values of 7.87 and 7.89 respectively. In the rat isolated anococcygeus muscle, fluparoxan was a much weaker competitive antagonist of the contractile response to the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine with a pKB of 4.45 giving an alpha 2: alpha 1-adrenoceptor selectivity ratio of greater than 2500. 3. In the conscious mouse, fluparoxan (0.2-3.0 mg kg-1) was effective by the oral route and of similar potency to idazoxan in preventing clonidine-induced hypothermia and antinociception. In the rat, UK-14304-induced hypothermia (ED50 = 1.4 mg kg-1, p.o. or 0.5 mg kg-1, i.v.) and rotarod impairment (ED50 = 1.1 mg kg-1 p.o. or 1.3 mg kg-1, i.v.) were antagonized by fluparoxan. Fluparoxan, 0.67-6 mg kg-1, p.o., also prevented UK-14304-induced sedation and bradycardia in the dog. 4. In specificity studies fluparoxan had low or no affinity for a wide range of neurotransmitter receptor sites at concentrations up to at least 1 x 10(-5) M. It displayed weak affinity for 5-HT1A (pIC50 = 5.9) and 5-HT1B (pKi = 5.5) binding sites in rat brain. 5. We conclude that fluparoxan is a highly selective and potent alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. The density of rat brain [3H]-dihydroalprenolol binding sites was reduced by 26% when fluparoxan was administered chronically for 6 days at a dose of 12 mg kg- 1 orally twice daily. The down-regulation of beta-adrenoceptors by fluparoxan is consistent with its antidepressant potential.

  20. Evaluation of Toosendanin as a Botulinum Neurotoxin Antagonist

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    an action resembling that of the aminopyridine class of potassium blockers (Simpson, 1986; Adler et al., 1995, 1996, 2000). In this study, we...Biol., Vol. 10, pp.13–18. Li, P.Z. and Sun, G.Z. (1983) ‘Antagonistic effect of toosendanin to botulinum toxins on neuromuscular preparations of mice...presynaptic neuromuscular blocking agent’, Acta Physiol. Sin., Vol. 32, pp.293–297. Shih, Y.L. and Hsu, K. (1983) ‘Anti-botulismic effect of toosendanin and

  1. Antagonistic action of pitrazepin on human and rat GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Demuro, Angelo; Martinez-Torres, Ataulfo; Francesconi, Walter; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Pitrazepin, 3-(piperazinyl-1)-9H-dibenz(c,f) triazolo(4,5-a)azepin is a piperazine antagonist of GABA in a variety of electrophysiological and in vitro binding studies involving GABA and glycine receptors. In the present study we have investigated the effects of pitrazepin, and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, on membrane currents elicited by GABA in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat cerebral cortex mRNA or cDNAs encoding α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptor subunits.The three types of GABAA receptors expressed were reversibly antagonized by bicuculline and pitrazepin in a concentration-dependent manner. GABA dose-current response curves for the three types of receptors were shifted to the right, in a parallel manner, by increasing concentrations of pitrazepin.Schild analyses gave pA2 values of 6.42±0.62, n=4, 6.41±1.2, n=5 and 6.21±1.24, n=6, in oocytes expressing rat cerebral cortex, α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptors respectively (values are given as means±s.e.mean), and the Hill coefficients were all close to unity. All this is consistent with the notion that pitrazepin acts as a competitive antagonist of these GABAA receptors; and that their antagonism by pitrazepin is not strongly dependent on the subunit composition of the receptors here studied.Since pitrazepin has been reported to act also at the benzodiazepine binding site, we studied the effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil) on the inhibition of α1β2γ2S receptors by pitrazepin. Co-application of Ro 15-1788 did not alter the inhibiting effect of pitrazepin. Moreover, pitrazepin did not antagonize the potentiation of GABA-currents by flunitrazepam. All this suggests that pitrazepin does not affect the GABA receptor-chloride channel by interacting with the benzodiazepine receptor site. PMID:10369456

  2. New perspectives on glutamate receptor antagonists as antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chihye

    2012-03-01

    Classical antidepressants elevate the monoamine levels in the brain by preventing re-uptake of monoamines after release. Treatment of depression with monoamine re-uptake inhibitors is associated with low clinical efficacy and remission rate due to the delayed onset of therapeutic responses. Therefore, the development of alternative antidepressants is essential for successful treatment of this disease. Recently, glutamate receptor antagonists including ketamine and 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) have received wide attention as fast-acting therapeutic alternatives for treatment of depression.

  3. [Vitamin K antagonist, direct oral anticoagulants: Where is the truth?

    PubMed

    Laroche, J-P; Schved, J-F

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are now in competition. The companies are trying to replace VKA by DOACs, totally or at least greatly VKA should VKA disappear in favor of DOACs? There are still many questions about DOACs. The purpose of this article is to make a well-considered decision in this area. The aim is not to denigrate one or the other but to share things between these two families of anticoagulants. Physicians using these drugs must have a full knowledge about compared efficacy and safety. We feel necessary to increase distance between effective results of the clinical trials and industrial communication around DOACs.

  4. Substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines as selective antagonists for the orexin 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Perrey, David A; German, Nadezhda A; Gilmour, Brian P; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L; Thomas, Brian F; Zhang, Yanan

    2013-09-12

    Increasing evidence implicates the orexin 1 (OX1) receptor in reward processes, suggesting OX1 antagonism could be therapeutic in drug addiction. In a program to develop an OX1 selective antagonist, we designed and synthesized a series of substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines and determined their potency in OX1 and OX2 calcium mobilization assays. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed limited steric tolerance and a preference for electron deficiency at the 7-position. Pyridylmethyl groups were shown to be optimal for activity at the acetamide position. Computational studies resulted in a pharmacophore model and confirmed the SAR results. Compound 72 significantly attenuated the development of place preference for cocaine in rats.

  5. Esthetic Prosthetic Restorations: Reliability and Effects on Antagonist Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Elie E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramics have greatly improved the functional and esthetic properties of restorative materials. New materials offer an esthetic and functional oral rehabilitation, however their impact on opposing teeth is not welldocumented. Peer-reviewed articles published till December 2014 were identified through Pubmed (Medline and Elsevier). Scientifically, there are several methods of measuring the wear process of natural dentition which enhances the comparison of the complicated results. This paper presents an overview of the newly used prosthetic materials and their implication on antagonist teeth or prostheses, especially emphasizing the behavior of zirconia restorations. PMID:26962376

  6. Lymphocyte homing antagonists in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Saruta, Masayuki; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2014-09-01

    Lymphocyte homing antagonists represent promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several critical molecules involved in the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the intestine, including integrins and chemokine receptors, have been successfully targeted for the treatment of IBD. These agents have shown great promise for the induction and maintenance of remission for both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. This article discusses currently approved prototypic agents for the treatment of IBD (natalizumab, anti-α4 integrin; vedolizumab, anti-α4β7 integrin), and several other agents in the same class currently under development.

  7. Substituted Tetrahydroisoquinolines as Selective Antagonists for the Orexin 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, David A.; German, Nadezhda A.; Gilmour, Brian P.; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L.; Thomas, Brian F.; Zhang, Yanan

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates the orexin 1 (OX1) receptor in reward processes, suggesting OX1 antagonism could be therapeutic in drug addiction. In a program to develop an OX1 selective antagonist, we designed and synthesized a series of substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines and determined their potency in OX1 and OX2 calcium mobilization assays. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed limited steric tolerance and preference for electron deficiency at the 7-position. Pyridylmethyl groups were shown to be optimal for activity at the acetamide position. Computational studies resulted in a pharmacophore model and confirmed the SAR results. Compound 72 significantly attenuated the development of place preference for cocaine in rats. PMID:23941044

  8. Activation of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors suppresses neuropathic nociception evoked by the chemotherapeutic agent vincristine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, E J; Makriyannis, A; Hohmann, A G

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The ability of cannabinoids to suppress mechanical hypersensitivity (mechanical allodynia) induced by treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent vincristine was evaluated in rats. Sites of action were subsequently identified. Experimental approach: Mechanical hypersensitivity developed over the course of ten daily injections of vincristine relative to groups receiving saline at the same times. Effects of the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2, the receptor-inactive enantiomer WIN55,212-3, the CB2-selective agonist (R,S)-AM1241, the opiate agonist morphine and vehicle on chemotherapy-induced neuropathy were evaluated. WIN55,212-2 was administered intrathecally (i.t.) or locally in the hindpaw to identify sites of action. Pharmacological specificity was established using competitive antagonists for CB1 (SR141716) or CB2 receptors (SR144528). Key results: Systemic administration of WIN55,212-2, but not WIN55,212-3, suppressed vincristine-evoked mechanical allodynia. A leftward shift in the dose-response curve was observed following WIN55,212-2 relative to morphine treatment. The CB1 (SR141716) and CB2 (SR144528) antagonists blocked the anti-allodynic effects of WIN55,212-2. (R,S)-AM1241 suppressed vincristine-induced mechanical hypersensitivity through a CB2 mechanism. Both cannabinoid agonists suppressed vincristine-induced mechanical hypersensitivity without inducing catalepsy. Spinal sites of action are implicated in cannabinoid modulation of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. WIN55,212-2, but not WIN55,212-3, administered i.t. suppressed vincristine-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity at doses that were inactive following local hindpaw administration. Spinal coadministration of both the CB1 and CB2 antagonists blocked the anti-allodynic effects of WIN55,212-2. Conclusions and implications: Cannabinoids suppress the maintenance of vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia through activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors. These anti-allodynic effects

  9. CB1 receptor antagonism increases hippocampal acetylcholine release: site and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Degroot, Aldemar; Köfalvi, Attila; Wade, Mark R; Davis, Richard J; Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Rebola, Nelson; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Nomikos, George G

    2006-10-01

    Evidence indicates that blockade of cannabinoid receptors increases acetylcholine (ACh) release in brain cortical regions. Although it is assumed that this type of effect is mediated through CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonism, several in vitro functional studies recently have suggested non-CB1R involvement. In addition, neither the precise neuroanatomical site nor the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are known. We thoroughly examined these issues using a combination of systemic and local administration of CB1R antagonists, different methods of in vivo microdialysis, CB1R knockout (KO) mice, tissue measurements of ACh, and immunochemistry. First, we showed that systemic injections of the CB1R antagonists N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboximide hydrochloride (SR-141716A) and N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) dose-dependently increased hippocampal ACh efflux. Likewise, local hippocampal, but not septal, infusions of SR141716A or AM251 increased hippocampal ACh release. It is noteworthy that the stimulatory effects of systemically administered CB1R antagonists on hippocampal ACh release were completely abolished in CB1R KO mice. CB1R KO mice had similar basal but higher stress-enhanced hippocampal ACh levels compared with wild-type controls. It is interesting that dopamine D1 receptor antagonism counteracted the stimulatory effect of CB1R blockade on hippocampal ACh levels. Finally, immunohistochemical methods revealed that a high proportion of CB1R-positive nerve terminals were found in hippocampus and confirmed the colocalization of CB1 receptors with cholinergic and dopaminergic nerve terminals. In conclusion, hippocampal ACh release may specifically be controlled through CB1Rs located on both cholinergic and dopaminergic neuronal projections, and CB1R antagonism increases hippocampal ACh release, probably through both a direct

  10. Functional assessment of neuronal cannabinoid receptors in the muscular layers of human ileum and colon.

    PubMed

    Manara, L; Croci, T; Guagnini, F; Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Maffrand, J P; Le Fur, G; Mukenge, S; Ferla, G

    2002-04-01

    The notion that specific receptors account for the ability of natural and synthetic cannabinoids to alter physiological functions, prompted this study aimed at assessing their functional presence in the human gut. The effects have been studied of cannabinoids and selective antagonists of their receptors on chemically or electrically evoked contractions in preparations of human intestinal smooth muscle in vitro. Atropine prevented the contractions of longitudinal and circular muscle strips of ileum and colon induced by carbachol or electrical field stimulation; tetrodotoxin abolished only the latter which suggests they do involve activation of cholinergic neurons. The synthetic cannabinoid (+)WIN 55,212-2 had no effect on carbachol contractions, but in a concentration-dependent fashion prevented those elicited by electrical field stimulation - which were insensitive to the putative endogenous cannabinoid anandamide - more potently in longitudinal than in circular strips. The selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716, which had no effect in the absence of (+)WIN 55,212-2, competitively antagonised its inhibition of electrical field stimulation contractions, unlike the selective CB2 antagonist SR144528. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors are functionally present in the human ileum and colon; their pharmacological activation apparently results in inhibition of excitatory cholinergic pathways subserving smooth muscle contraction.

  11. The effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol physical dependence on brain cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Breivogel, Christopher S; Scates, Susan M; Beletskaya, Irina O; Lowery, Olivia B; Aceto, Mario D; Martin, Billy R

    2003-01-17

    The effects of chronic Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on cannabinoid receptor levels and receptor-G-protein coupling were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused continuously with low or high dose regimens of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol or vehicle for 4 days. Following treatment, rats were sacrificed for cannabinoid CB(1) receptor binding analysis or challenged with the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide HCl (SR141716A). The rats receiving Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol exhibited antagonist-precipitated withdrawal signs. Each brain region (cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus and basal ganglia) from high-dose rats showed 30-70% decreases in [3H] (-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)cyclohexanol (WIN55212-2) B(max) values, indicating receptor down-regulation. Most regions showed decreased WIN55212-2-stimulated [35S]guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate (GTPgammaS) binding, indicating desensitization of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. Additional receptor binding assays in cerebellar membranes showed a significantly greater decrease in agonist than in antagonist B(max) values, indicating a lower fraction of coupled receptors after treatment. Concentration-effect analysis of five agonists revealed that the treatment resulted in greater decreases in the efficacy of low-efficacy agonists.

  12. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors fail to cause relaxation, but couple via Gi/Go to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in carotid artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Michael; Challiss, R A John; Standen, Nicholas B; Boyle, John P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize which cannabinoid receptors, if any, are present on rat carotid artery smooth muscle. Additionally, the effects of cannabinoids on carotid artery tone, on cyclic AMP accumulation and on forskolin-induced relaxation were examined in the same tissue.Stimulation of carotid arteries with forskolin (10 μM) significantly increased cyclic AMP accumulation, an effect that was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the cannabinoid receptor agonist, methanandamide.Similar inhibition was seen with the CB1 agonist HU-210 but this inhibition was not mimicked by the CB2 agonist, WIN 55,2212-2.The inhibitory effect of methanandamide on cyclic AMP accumulation was prevented by incubation of the arteries with pertussis toxin and was significantly reduced by LY320135, a selective CB1 antagonist, but not by SR 144528, a CB2-selective antagonist.Methanandamide failed to relax carotid arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine, but inhibited forskolin-induced relaxation of these arteries. This functional inhibition of relaxation by methanandamide was inhibited by CB1-selective (LY320135 and SR 141716A), but not a CB2-selective antagonist (SR 144528).These data demonstrate the presence of functional G protein-linked cannabinoid receptors of the CB1 subtype in the rat carotid artery, but show that these receptors inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation rather than cause relaxation. PMID:10516638

  13. NMDA receptor antagonists extend the sensitive period for imprinting.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    2000-03-01

    Filial imprinting in the domestic chick occurs during a sensitive period of development. The exact timing of this period can vary according to the methods used to measure imprinting. Using our imprinting paradigm, we have shown that normal, dark-reared chicks lose the ability to imprint after the second day post-hatching. Further, we reported that chicks treated 10 h after hatching with a mixture of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) were able to imprint on day 8 after hatching, whereas controls treated with saline did not imprint. We now show that the effect of the ketamine-xylazine mixture can be mimicked by treating chicks with ketamine alone or with another noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (5 mg/kg). Treating chicks with a single dose of ketamine (55 mg/kg) or with a single dose of xylazine (6 mg/kg) failed to produce the effect on the sensitive period. However, prolonging the action of ketamine by treating chicks with two doses of ketamine (at 10 and 12 h after hatching) did allow imprinting on day 8. In contrast, prolonging the action of xylazine had no effect on the sensitive period for imprinting. Chicks treated with MK-801 were also able to imprint on day 8. Thus, we have evidence that the NMDA receptor system is involved in the mechanisms that control the sensitive period for imprinting.

  14. Antagonist coactivation of trunk stabilizer muscles during Pilates exercises.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Denise Martineli; Morcelli, Mary Hellen; Marques, Nise Ribeiro; Hallal, Camilla Zamfolini; Gonçalves, Mauro; Laroche, Dain P; Navega, Marcelo Tavella

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the antagonist coactivation of the local and global trunk muscles during mat-based exercises of Skilled Modern Pilates. Twelve women performed five exercises and concurrently, surface EMG from internal oblique (OI), multifidus (MU), rectus abdominis (RA) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscles was recorded bilaterally. The percentage of antagonist coactivation between local (OI/MU) and global muscles (RA/IL) was calculated. Individuals new to the practice of these exercises showed differences in coactivation of the trunk muscles between the exercises and these results were not similar bilaterally. Thus, in clinical practice, the therapist should be aware of factors such as compensation and undesirable rotation movements of the trunk. Moreover, the coactivation of global muscles was higher bilaterally in all exercises analyzed. This suggests that the exercises of Skilled Modern Pilates only should be performed after appropriate learning and correct execution of all principles, mainly the Centering Principle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Two Potent OXE-R Antagonists: Assignment of Stereochemistry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    5-Oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) is formed by the oxidation of 5-hydroxy-6E,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which is a major metabolite of enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid (AA). 5-Oxo-ETE is the most potent lipid chemoattractant for human eosinophils. Its actions are mediated by the selective OXE receptor, which is therefore an attractive target in eosinophilic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Recently, we have reported two excellent OXE receptor antagonists that have IC50 values at low nanomolar concentrations. Each of these antagonists has a chiral center, and the isolation of the individual enantiomers by chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed that in each case one enantiomer is over 300 times more potent than the other. To unambiguously assign the stereochemistry of these enantiomers and to provide access to larger amounts of the active compounds for biological testing, we report here their total synthesis. PMID:25050171

  16. The use of melanocortin antagonists in cachexia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Jarrad M; Marks, Daniel L

    2005-10-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome that frequently develops in the setting of chronic diseases including cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, AIDS, renal failure and liver failure. Loss of lean body mass is believed to be a significant factor contributing to morbidity and mortality in these chronic diseases; however, there are currently no treatments available that have proven to be effective in reversing the progressive loss of lean body mass in cachectic patients. Evidence from animal models suggests a compelling link between inflammation, the central melanocortin system and cachexia. This review summarises the current evidence supporting the role of the melanocortin 4 (MC4) receptor subtype in cachexia, and discusses the development and use of small-molecule MC4 antagonists, which have proved to be effective in preventing the loss of lean body mass in animal models of cachexia. MC4 antagonists represent an attractive therapeutic approach for cachexia that may attenuate the loss of lean body mass in cachectic patients.

  17. Fires can benefit plants by disrupting antagonistic interactions.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Castellanos, M C; Pausas, J G

    2016-12-01

    Fire has a key role in the ecology and evolution of many ecosystems, yet its effects on plant-insect interactions are poorly understood. Because interacting species are likely to respond to fire differently, disruptions of the interactions are expected. We hypothesized that plants that regenerate after fire can benefit through the disruption of their antagonistic interactions. We expected stronger effects on interactions with specialist predators than with generalists. We studied two interactions between two Mediterranean plants (Ulex parviflorus, Asphodelus ramosus) and their specialist seed predators after large wildfires. In A. ramosus we also studied the generalist herbivores. We sampled the interactions in burned and adjacent unburned areas during 2 years by estimating seed predation, number of herbivores and fruit set. To assess the effect of the distance to unburned vegetation we sampled plots at two distance classes from the fire perimeter. Even 3 years after the fires, Ulex plants experienced lower seed damage by specialists in burned sites. The presence of herbivores on Asphodelus decreased in burned locations, and the variability in their presence was significantly related to fruit set. Generalist herbivores were unaffected. We show that plants can benefit from fire through the disruption of their antagonistic interactions with specialist seed predators for at least a few years. In environments with a long fire history, this effect might be one additional mechanism underlying the success of fire-adapted plants.

  18. Evodiamine as a novel antagonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hui; Tu, Yongjiu; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Wang, Xi; Wang, Zhanli; Liang, Huaping

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Evodiamine interacted with the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine inhibited the specific binding of [{sup 3}H]-TCDD to the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine acts as an antagonist of the AhR. -- Abstract: Evodiamine, the major bioactive alkaloid isolated from Wu-Chu-Yu, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activities. In this study, we investigated the interaction between evodiamine and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Molecular modeling results revealed that evodiamine directly interacted with the AhR. Cytosolic receptor binding assay also provided the evidence that evodiamine could interact with the AhR with the K{sub i} value of 28.4 {+-} 4.9 nM. In addition, we observed that evodiamine suppressed the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced nuclear translocation of the AhR and the expression of CYP1A1 dose-dependently. These results suggested that evodiamine was able to bind to the AhR as ligand and exhibit antagonistic effects.

  19. CCR9 Antagonists in the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bekker, Pirow; Ebsworth, Karen; Walters, Matthew J.; Berahovich, Robert D.; Ertl, Linda S.; Charvat, Trevor T.; Punna, Sreenivas; Powers, Jay P.; Campbell, James J.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Jaen, Juan C.; Schall, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been established that the chemokine receptor CCR9 and its ligand CCL25 are essential for the movement of leukocytes into the small intestine and the development of small-intestinal inflammation, the role of this chemokine-receptor pair in colonic inflammation is not clear. Toward this end, we compared colonic CCL25 protein levels in healthy individuals to those in patients with ulcerative colitis. In addition, we determined the effect of CCR9 pharmacological inhibition in the mdr1a−/− mouse model of ulcerative colitis. Colon samples from patients with ulcerative colitis had significantly higher levels of CCL25 protein compared to healthy controls, a finding mirrored in the mdr1a−/− mice. In the mdr1a−/− mice, CCR9 antagonists significantly decreased the extent of wasting and colonic remodeling and reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the colon. These findings indicate that the CCR9:CCL25 pair plays a causative role in ulcerative colitis and suggest that CCR9 antagonists will provide a therapeutic benefit in patients with colonic inflammation. PMID:26457007

  20. Contrasting effects of intralocus sexual conflict on sexually antagonistic coevolution.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Tanya M; de Haas, Freek J H; Morrow, Edward H; van Doorn, G Sander

    2016-02-23

    Evolutionary conflict between the sexes can induce arms races in which males evolve traits that are detrimental to the fitness of their female partners, and vice versa. This interlocus sexual conflict (IRSC) has been proposed as a cause of perpetual intersexual antagonistic coevolution with wide-ranging evolutionary consequences. However, theory suggests that the scope for perpetual coevolution is limited, if traits involved in IRSC are subject to pleiotropic constraints. Here, we consider a biologically plausible form of pleiotropy that has hitherto been ignored in treatments of IRSC and arrive at drastically different conclusions. Our analysis is based on a quantitative genetic model of sexual conflict, in which genes controlling IRSC traits have side effects in the other sex, due to incompletely sex-limited gene expression. As a result, the genes are exposed to intralocus sexual conflict (IASC), a tug-of-war between opposing male- and female-specific selection pressures. We find that the interaction between the two forms of sexual conflict has contrasting effects on antagonistic coevolution: Pleiotropic constraints stabilize the dynamics of arms races if the mating traits are close to evolutionary equilibrium but can prevent populations from ever reaching such a state. Instead, the sexes are drawn into a continuous cycle of arms races, causing the buildup of IASC, alternated by phases of IASC resolution that trigger the next arms race. These results encourage an integrative perspective on the biology of sexual conflict and generally caution against relying exclusively on equilibrium stability analysis.

  1. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  2. Human homosexuality: a paradigmatic arena for sexually antagonistic selection?

    PubMed

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-29

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Human Homosexuality: A Paradigmatic Arena for Sexually Antagonistic Selection?

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Andrea Camperio; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. PMID:25635045

  4. A prototypical Sigma-1 receptor antagonist protects against brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schetz, John A; Perez, Evelyn; Liu, Ran; Chen, Shiuhwei; Lee, Ivan; Simpkins, James W

    2007-11-21

    Previous studies indicate that the Sigma-1 ligand 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) protects the brain from ischemia. Less clear is whether protection is mediated by agonism or antagonism of the Sigma-1 receptor, and whether drugs already in use for other indications and that interact with the Sigma-1 receptor might also prevent oxidative damage due to conditions such as cerebral ischemic stroke. The antipsychotic drug haloperidol is an antagonist of Sigma-1 receptors and in this study it potently protects against oxidative stress-related cell death in vitro at low concentrations. The protective potency of haloperidol and a number of other butyrophenone compounds positively correlate with their affinity for a cloned Sigma-1 receptor, and the protection is mimicked by a Sigma-1 receptor-selective antagonist (BD1063), but not an agonist (PRE-084). In vivo, an acute low dose (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) of haloperidol reduces by half the ischemic lesion volume induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. These in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical results suggest that a low dose of acutely administered haloperidol might have a novel application as a protective agent against ischemic cerebral stroke and other types of brain injury with an ischemic component.

  5. Safety profile of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists: Spironolactone and eplerenone.

    PubMed

    Lainscak, Mitja; Pelliccia, Francesco; Rosano, Giuseppe; Vitale, Cristiana; Schiariti, Michele; Greco, Cesare; Speziale, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Spironolactone was first developed over 50 years ago as a potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with undesirable side effects; it was followed a decade ago by eplerenone, which is less potent but much more mineralocorticoid receptor-specific. From a marginal role as a potassium-sparing diuretic, spironolactone has been shown to be an extraordinarily effective adjunctive agent in the treatment of progressive heart failure. Also, spironolactone is safe and protective in arterial hypertension, particularly in patients with so-called resistant hypertension. Eplerenone is the second oral aldosterone antagonist available for the treatment of arterial hypertension and heart failure. Treatment with eplerenone has been associated with decreased blood pressure and improved survival for patients with heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Due to the selectivity of eplerenone for the aldosterone receptor, severe adverse effects such as gynecomastia and vaginal bleeding seem to be less likely in patients who take eplerenone than in those who take spironolactone. The most common and potentially dangerous side effect of spironolactone--hyperkalemia--is also observed with eplerenone but the findings from clinical trials do not indicate more hyperkalemia induced drug withdrawals. Treatment with eplerenone should be initiated at a dosage of 25mg once daily and titrated to a target dosage of 50mg once daily preferably within 4 weeks. Serum potassium levels and renal function should be assessed prior to initiating eplerenone therapy, and periodic monitoring is recommended, especially in patients at high risk of developing hyperkalemia.

  6. Emerging interleukin receptor antagonists for the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Al Efraij, Khalid; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2017-09-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease, usually characterized by chronic airway inflammation. Most patients with asthma can be well-controlled with inhaled corticosteroids and, if necessary, the addition of a long-acting beta agonist. Despite these therapies, 5% to 10% of patients with asthma have severe, uncontrolled asthma. Selecting patients based on peripheral eosinophil counts and a history of exacerbations has led to significant decreases in exacerbations and an improvement in asthma control with medications that target IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13/. Areas covered: This review will cover the definition of severe asthma, existing treatment options, biomarkers, and the emerging role of interleukin antagonists in the treatment of severe asthma. Expert opinion: IL antagonists are novel drugs targeting important inflammatory cytokines in asthma. Anti-IL-5 drugs provide the most promise as they have obtained regulatory approval and are available for use. Anti-IL-4 drug results are also promising. There is, however, uncertainty regarding the success of anti-IL-13 drugs development at this point. An ongoing focus of research is to significantly increase our understanding of the biology of asthma, and in particular severe asthma, making more and better targeted therapies. There may also be potential in the future to use these new drugs earlier in the development of asthma, as disease-modifying interventions that might be associated with remission or even cure.

  7. Abnormal reciprocal inhibition between antagonist muscles in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Meunier, S; Pol, S; Houeto, J L; Vidailhet, M

    2000-05-01

    Disynaptic Ia reciprocal inhibition acts, at the spinal level, by actively inhibiting antagonist motor neurons and reducing the inhibition of agonist motor neurons. The deactivation of this pathway in Parkinson's disease is still debated. Disynaptic reciprocal inhibition of H reflexes in the forearm flexor muscles was examined in 15 control subjects and 16 treated parkinsonian patients at rest and at the onset of a voluntary wrist flexion. Two patients were reassessed 18 h after withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication. At rest, the level of Ia reciprocal inhibition between the wrist antagonist muscles was not significantly different between patients and controls. In contrast, clear abnormalities of this inhibition were revealed by voluntary movements in the patients. In normal subjects, at the onset of a wrist flexion, Ia reciprocal inhibition showed a large decrease, and we argue that this decrease is supraspinal in origin. On the less affected sides of the patients the descending modulation was still present but lower than in controls; on the more affected sides this modulation had vanished almost completely. These movement-induced abnormalities of disynaptic Ia reciprocal inhibition were closely associated with Parkinson's disease but were probably not dependent on L-dopa. They could play a role in the disturbances of precise voluntary movements observed in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Inhibition of antipyrine metabolism by beta-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bax, N D; Lennard, M S; Tucker, G T

    1981-12-01

    1 The effects of two beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (propranolol and metoprolol), and of the beta-adrenoceptor agonist, terbutaline, on the plasma kinetics of antipyrine were studied in five normal subjects. In addition, the influence of propranolol on the clearance of antipyrine to three of its major metabolites was investigated. 2 At the same level of beta-adrenoceptor blockade, assessed by lowering of exercise tachycardia, propranolol decreased antipyrine clearance by 37.3 +/- 9.9 s.d. % (P less than 0.001) and metoprolol decreased it by 18.0 +/- 4.7 s.d. % (P less than 0.01). Terbutaline had no effect on antipyrine clearance. The volume of distribution of antipyrine was unchanged following treatment with all three drugs. 3 Only the metabolic clearance of antipyrine to its 3-hydroxymethyl product was impaired to a statistically significant degree by propranolol. However, four of the five subjects also showed impaired clearance to 4-hydroxyantipyrine and three of the five to norantipyrine after propranolol treatment. In four of the five subjects propranolol lowered the renal clearance of antipyrine. 4 Inhibition of the metabolism of antipyrine by beta-adrenoceptor antagonists may be related to their lipid-solubility and extent of metabolism and is independent of their effect on beta-adrenoreceptors.

  9. Non-antisecretory activities of H2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bertaccini, G; Coruzzi, G

    1986-01-01

    Besides the main effect of the H2 antagonists--that is, the inhibition of gastric acid secretion--these drugs possess several other pharmacological activities, which in most cases may be evident only for doses higher than those required to produce the H2 blockade. The non-secretory activities of the H2 antagonists may be classified into true side effects--that is, those independent of the primary action, which may or may not depend on the primary action. They concern the central and autonomic nervous systems, cardiovascular and endocrine systems, digestive system (gut, liver, pancreas), immune system, and so forth. It is obvious that when the actions of the different H2 blockers are completely at variance with regard to the same factor (cimetidine increase the TSH response to TRH, whereas ranitidine decreases it; ranitidine stimulates gastrointestinal motility, whereas oxmetidine inhibits it; ranitidine increases the exocrine pancreatic response to cholecystokinin, whereas oxmetidine decreases it; metiamide and cimetidine increase the activity of histamine methyltransferase, whereas burimamide decreases it), this is a clear demonstration that we are dealing with non-specific effects rather than with H2-receptor blockade. All these effects may be of interest because sometimes they may be useful in potentiating the primary action, and sometimes they may represent adverse reactions. In any case, they characterize pharmacologically the individual molecules of the family.

  10. The evolution of histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Lebois, Evan P; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W

    2011-01-01

    This article describes our efforts along with recent advances in the development, biological evaluation and clinical proof of concept of small molecule histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists. The H3 receptor is a presynaptic autoreceptor within the Class A GPCR family, but also functions as a heteroreceptor modulating levels of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate. Thus, H₃R has garnered a great deal of interest from the pharmaceutical industry for the possible treatment of obesity, epilepsy, sleep/wake, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, neuropathic pain and ADHD. Within the two main classes of H₃ ligands, both imidazole and non-imidazole derived, have shown sufficient potency and specificity which culminated with efficacy in preclinical models for various CNS disorders. Importantly, conserved elements have been identified within the small molecule H₃ ligand scaffolds that resulted in a highly predictive pharmacophore model. Understanding of the pharmacophore model has allowed several groups to dial H₃R activity into scaffolds designed for other CNS targets, and engender directed polypharmacology. Moreover, Abbott, GSK, Pfizer and several others have reported positive Phase I and/or Phase II data with structurally diverse H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists.

  11. Benzocyclobutane, benzocycloheptane and heptene derivatives as melatonin agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tsotinis, Andrew; Afroudakis, Pandelis A; Garratt, Peter J; Bocianowska-Zbrog, Alina; Sugden, David

    2014-10-01

    Two series of analogues were designed, synthesised and evaluated as potential human melatonin type 1 and 2 receptor (hMT1 and hMT2 ) ligands. Their biological effects were assessed by a well-established, specific model of melatonin action, the pigment response of Xenopus laevis melanophores. Compounds containing a benzocyclobutane scaffold and a methoxy group in the "melatonin" orientation were found to be potent agonists, with one of the analogues exhibiting activity comparable to melatonin. In contrast, analogues with a methoxy group in non-melatonin positions or with multiple methoxy groups showed either weaker agonist activity or were antagonists. Benzocycloheptene derivatives with one methoxy group are found to be weak agonists, whereas those with two methoxy groups were found to be antagonists, as were all of the benzocycloheptane derivatives evaluated. The most active compounds were assessed in a human receptor radio ligand binding assay but showed little discrimination between MT1 and MT2 . These results again show that the indole nitrogen of melatonin is not a necessary component for analogue activity and also illustrate that replacement of the indole ring with a 4-membered carbocycle can provide highly active compounds when the methoxy group is in the melatonin position. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Opiate antagonists reduce cocaine but not nicotine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Corrigall, W A; Coen, K M

    1991-01-01

    Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine in 1-h sessions on a fixed ratio 5 (FR5) schedule of reinforcement. Acquisition was carried out at a unit dose of 0.3 mg/kg and responding was then stabilized at cocaine doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. Pretreatments with naltrexone (0.1-10 mg/kg, SC) 20 min prior to the start of self-administration sessions resulted in decreases in cocaine self-administration at doses of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg/infusion, but not at 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. Decreases depended on the dose of naltrexone used, with greater decreases in self-administration occurring at higher antagonist doses. In addition, treatment with the opiate antagonist naloxone also reduced cocaine self-administration at a unit dose of 0.3 mg/kg. A group of rats trained to self-administer nicotine at a dose of 0.03 mg/kg/infusion on the same schedule of reinforcement was unaffected by naltrexone treatment. These results may indicate that an endogenous opiate system plays a role in cocaine reinforcement.

  13. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, Philip; Kane, Émilie; Giaid, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) binds to its receptor, UT, playing an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland, and central nervous system. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, however, this constriction–dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) activity leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII), as well as inflammation, high blood pressure, and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases. PMID:21811463

  14. Arcopallium, NMDA antagonists and ingestive behaviors in pigeons.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Amanda Alcaraz; Campanella, Luciane Coutinho de Azevedo; Ramos, Mayara Caldas; Parreira, Caroline; Faria, Moacir Serralvo; Marino-Neto, José; Paschoalini, Marta Aparecida

    2009-12-07

    This study investigated the effects of local injections of 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H,4H)-dione (DNQX, AMPA-kainate receptor antagonist, 0.8 and 2.7 nmol) and MK-801 (NMDA receptor antagonist, 1.8 and 6.0 nmol) into the nucleus taeniae of the amygdala (TnA) and the arcopallium intermedium (AI) on ingestive and non-ingestive behaviors in free-feeding pigeons. Injections of DNQX into the TnA or into the AI failed to consistently affect feeding behavior; DNQX vehicle (DMSO) affected drinking when injected into the TnA. MK-801 injections into the AI produced a delayed increase in food and water intake. In the TnA, MK-801 increased water intake in the first two hours after the treatment. These data indicate that glutamatergic circuits in arcopallial structures in the pigeon, comparable to the mammalian medial amygdala, are involved in the inhibitory control of ingestive behaviors, suggesting that this can represent a conserved functional attribute in the amniote prosencephalon.

  15. Quinidine as a muscarinic antagonist: a structural approach.

    PubMed

    Ciechanowicz-Rutkowska, M; Oleksyn, B J; Suszko-Purzycka, A; Lipińska, T

    1992-06-01

    The synthesis, spectroscopic characteristics, and single-crystal X-ray structural analysis of quitenidine methyl ester monohydrate, a derivative of the muscarinic antagonist quinidine, are presented. Quitenidine methyl ester monohydrate (C20H24N2O4.H2O) crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with a = 16.69(3) A, b = 12.46(2) A, c = 9.70(1) A, and Z = 4. The crystal structure was refined to a discrepancy factor (R) of 0.097. Substitution of the quinidine vinyl chain with a carboxymethyl group does not influence the conformation. The carboxymethyl group is positionally disordered, a fact that complicates refinement of the structure. The water molecule is bonded to the quinuclidine nitrogen atom, and the hydroxyl group forms an intermolecular hydrogen bond with the quinoline nitrogen atom. The molecular structure of the ester was compared with those of quinidine, quinine, and four other antimuscarinic agents. An approximately linear relationship between the distance from the nonaromatic nitrogen to the plane of the aromatic part of the molecules and the blocking potency of these agents was noted; the greater this distance, the more potent is the antagonist.

  16. Surfen, a small molecule antagonist of heparan sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Schuksz, Manuela; Fuster, Mark M.; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Ditto, David P.; Lawrence, Roger; Glass, Charles A.; Wang, Lianchun; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    In a search for small molecule antagonists of heparan sulfate, we examined the activity of bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide, also known as surfen. Fluorescence-based titrations indicated that surfen bound to glycosaminoglycans, and the extent of binding increased according to charge density in the order heparin > dermatan sulfate > heparan sulfate > chondroitin sulfate. All charged groups in heparin (N-sulfates, O-sulfates, and carboxyl groups) contributed to binding, consistent with the idea that surfen interacted electrostatically. Surfen neutralized the anticoagulant activity of both unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins and inhibited enzymatic sulfation and degradation reactions in vitro. Addition of surfen to cultured cells blocked FGF2-binding and signaling that depended on cell surface heparan sulfate and prevented both FGF2- and VEGF165-mediated sprouting of endothelial cells in Matrigel. Surfen also blocked heparan sulfate-mediated cell adhesion to the Hep-II domain of fibronectin and prevented infection by HSV-1 that depended on glycoprotein D interaction with heparan sulfate. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of identifying small molecule antagonists of heparan sulfate and raise the possibility of developing pharmacological agents to treat disorders that involve glycosaminoglycan–protein interactions. PMID:18725627

  17. Contrasting effects of intralocus sexual conflict on sexually antagonistic coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Tanya M.; de Haas, Freek J. H.; Morrow, Edward H.; van Doorn, G. Sander

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary conflict between the sexes can induce arms races in which males evolve traits that are detrimental to the fitness of their female partners, and vice versa. This interlocus sexual conflict (IRSC) has been proposed as a cause of perpetual intersexual antagonistic coevolution with wide-ranging evolutionary consequences. However, theory suggests that the scope for perpetual coevolution is limited, if traits involved in IRSC are subject to pleiotropic constraints. Here, we consider a biologically plausible form of pleiotropy that has hitherto been ignored in treatments of IRSC and arrive at drastically different conclusions. Our analysis is based on a quantitative genetic model of sexual conflict, in which genes controlling IRSC traits have side effects in the other sex, due to incompletely sex-limited gene expression. As a result, the genes are exposed to intralocus sexual conflict (IASC), a tug-of-war between opposing male- and female-specific selection pressures. We find that the interaction between the two forms of sexual conflict has contrasting effects on antagonistic coevolution: Pleiotropic constraints stabilize the dynamics of arms races if the mating traits are close to evolutionary equilibrium but can prevent populations from ever reaching such a state. Instead, the sexes are drawn into a continuous cycle of arms races, causing the buildup of IASC, alternated by phases of IASC resolution that trigger the next arms race. These results encourage an integrative perspective on the biology of sexual conflict and generally caution against relying exclusively on equilibrium stability analysis. PMID:26755609

  18. The role of ecology, neutral processes and antagonistic coevolution in an apparent sexual arms race.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer C; Garroway, Colin J; Rowe, Locke

    2017-09-01

    Some of the strongest examples of a sexual 'arms race' come from observations of correlated evolution in sexually antagonistic traits among populations. However, it remains unclear whether these cases truly represent sexually antagonistic coevolution; alternatively, ecological or neutral processes might also drive correlated evolution. To investigate these alternatives, we evaluated the contributions of intersex genetic correlations, ecological context, neutral genetic divergence and sexual coevolution in the correlated evolution of antagonistic traits among populations of Gerris incognitus water striders. We could not detect intersex genetic correlations for these sexually antagonistic traits. Ecological variation was related to population variation in the key female antagonistic trait (spine length, a defence against males), as well as body size. Nevertheless, population covariation between sexually antagonistic traits remained substantial and significant even after accounting for all of these processes. Our results therefore provide strong evidence for a contemporary sexual arms race. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  19. Correlation between myometrial receptor affinity, lipophilicity and antagonistic potency of oxytocin analogues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Atke, A; Vilhardt, H; Melin, P

    1988-08-01

    Purified myometrial plasma membrane fractions were prepared from rats treated with oestradiol to induce oestrus. The binding affinities of 11 antagonistic oxytocin analogues to the oxytocin receptor of the plasma membranes were measured. Furthermore, lipophilicity of the peptides was assessed by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. No significant correlation was found between lipophilicity of the analogues and values for antagonistic potencies or binding affinities. Also, receptor-binding affinity did not correlate with in-vitro antagonistic activity whereas a significant correlation was obtained between binding affinities and in-vivo antagonistic potency for analogues void of partial agonist properties. It is concluded that neither receptor affinity nor lipophilicity in the analogues can predict the potency of the antagonists in vitro. However, receptor affinity was found to be a relatively good predictor of the in-vivo potency, while the usefulness of measuring antagonistic potency in vitro is questioned.

  20. Is All Radiation-Induced Emesis Ameliorated by 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    5 - HT3 receptor antagonists ;~// 9-72 Bernard M.I Rabin 0’) and Gregory L. Kingt2) -) Behavioral Sciences and 2 PhYSzo~o~y Dcpiarlrnvni . Arm,. ii - R...RY Exposing ferrets to gamuma rays or X-rays produces vomiting that can be attenuated by 5 - HT3 receptor antagonists and by subdiaphraqmatic vagotomy...Pretreating ferrets with serotonin type-3 ( 5 - HT3 ) receptor antagonists or performing bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy reliably attenuates the

  1. Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists and dopamine antagonists produce different effects on a task involving response allocation and effort-related choice in food-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Sink, K S; Vemuri, V K; Olszewska, T; Makriyannis, A; Salamone, J D

    2008-03-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists/inverse agonists suppress food-motivated behaviors and are being evaluated as potential appetite suppressants. It has been suggested that the effects of CB1 antagonism on food motivation could be related to actions on mesolimbic dopamine (DA). If this were true, then the effects of interference with cannabinoid CB1 transmission should closely resemble the effects of interference with DA transmission. To directly compare the effects of DA antagonists with those of CB1 antagonists/inverse agonists, the present studies employed a concurrent lever-pressing/chow-intake procedure. With this task, interference with DA transmission shifts choice behavior such that lever pressing for a preferred food is decreased but chow intake is increased. Rats treated with IP injections of the DA D1 antagonist SCH39166 (ecopipam; 0.05-0.2 mg/kg) or the D2 antagonist eticlopride (0.025-0.1 mg/kg) showed substantial decreases in lever pressing and concomitant increases in chow consumption. In contrast, IP administration of the CB1 neutral antagonist AM4113 (4.0-16.0 mg/kg) or the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (2.0-8.0 mg/kg) decreased operant responding for pellets, but there was no corresponding increase in chow intake. These effects of CB1 antagonists/inverse agonists were similar to those produced by the appetite suppressant fenfluramine and by prefeeding. In contrast, low doses of DA antagonists leave primary food motivation intact, but shift behaviors toward food reinforcers that can be obtained with lower response costs. These results suggest that the effects of interference with CB1 transmission are readily distinguishable from those of reduced DA transmission.

  2. In dermographic urticaria H2 receptor antagonists have a small but therapeutically irrelevant additional effect compared with H1 antagonists alone.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, G R; Shuster, S

    1993-11-01

    Two studies of the additional effect of an H2 receptor antagonist when given in combination with an H1 antagonist were undertaken in dermographic urticaria. Using a randomized, double-blind, crossover design in 19 patients, a combination of cetirizine (10 mg at night) and ranitidine (150 mg twice daily) was compared with a combination of cetirizine (10 mg at night) and placebo. The addition of ranitidine did not produce any significant difference in linear analogue scores for weal, itch or sleep disturbance. There was a significant depression of the frictional force/wealing response curve with an increase in wealing threshold (P < 0.0001) following the addition of H2 blockade. The wealing threshold was 54.7 +/- 4.4 (mean +/- SEM) g/mm2 for the H1 antagonist alone, and 73.2 +/- 5.7 for the combination of H1 and H2 antagonists. In a second similar study involving nine different patients, comparing terfenadine (120 mg twice daily) with a combination of terfenadine and ranitidine (150 mg twice daily), the weal threshold was 59.8 +/- 6.6 for the H1 antagonist alone, and 73.0 +/- 6.4 for the combination of H1 and H2 antagonists. Thus, in dermographic urticaria, adding an H2 antagonist to treatment with a potent H1 antagonist gives a small, significant reduction in wealing response, but no symptomatic benefit. We conclude that involvement of the H2 receptor in this urticarial disease is minimal, and does not justify the use of H2 receptor antagonists.

  3. In Silico Discovery of Androgen Receptor Antagonists with Activity in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Howard C.; Shanmugasundaram, Kumaran; Simon, Nicholas I.; Cai, Changmeng; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Sen; Rigby, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    Previously available androgen receptor (AR) antagonists (bicalutamide, flutamide, and nilutamide) have limited activity against AR in prostate cancers that relapse after castration [castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)]. However, recent AR competitive antagonists such as MDV3100, generated through chemical modifications to the current AR ligands, appear to have increased activity in CRPC and have novel mechanisms of action. Using pharmacophore models and a refined homology model of the antagonist-liganded AR ligand binding domain, we carried out in silico screens of small molecule libraries and report here on the identification of a series of structurally distinct nonsteroidal small molecule competitive AR antagonists. Despite their unique chemical architectures, compounds representing each of six chemotypes functioned in vitro as pure AR antagonists. Moreover, similarly to MDV3100 and in contrast to previous AR antagonists, these compounds all prevented AR binding to chromatin, consistent with each of the six chemotypes stabilizing a similar AR antagonist conformation. Additional studies with the lead chemotype (chemotype A) showed enhanced AR protein degradation, which was dependent on helix 12 in the AR ligand binding domain. Significantly, chemotype A compounds functioned as AR antagonists in vivo in normal male mice and suppressed AR activity and tumor cell proliferation in human CRPC xenografts. These data indicate that certain ligand-induced structural alterations in the AR ligand binding domain may both impair AR chromatin binding and enhance AR degradation and support continued efforts to develop AR antagonists with unique mechanisms of action and efficacy in CRPC. PMID:23023563

  4. In silico discovery of androgen receptor antagonists with activity in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Howard C; Shanmugasundaram, Kumaran; Simon, Nicholas I; Cai, Changmeng; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Sen; Balk, Steven P; Rigby, Alan C

    2012-11-01

    Previously available androgen receptor (AR) antagonists (bicalutamide, flutamide, and nilutamide) have limited activity against AR in prostate cancers that relapse after castration [castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)]. However, recent AR competitive antagonists such as MDV3100, generated through chemical modifications to the current AR ligands, appear to have increased activity in CRPC and have novel mechanisms of action. Using pharmacophore models and a refined homology model of the antagonist-liganded AR ligand binding domain, we carried out in silico screens of small molecule libraries and report here on the identification of a series of structurally distinct nonsteroidal small molecule competitive AR antagonists. Despite their unique chemical architectures, compounds representing each of six chemotypes functioned in vitro as pure AR antagonists. Moreover, similarly to MDV3100 and in contrast to previous AR antagonists, these compounds all prevented AR binding to chromatin, consistent with each of the six chemotypes stabilizing a similar AR antagonist conformation. Additional studies with the lead chemotype (chemotype A) showed enhanced AR protein degradation, which was dependent on helix 12 in the AR ligand binding domain. Significantly, chemotype A compounds functioned as AR antagonists in vivo in normal male mice and suppressed AR activity and tumor cell proliferation in human CRPC xenografts. These data indicate that certain ligand-induced structural alterations in the AR ligand binding domain may both impair AR chromatin binding and enhance AR degradation and support continued efforts to develop AR antagonists with unique mechanisms of action and efficacy in CRPC.

  5. High antagonist potency of GT-2227 and GT-2331, new histamine H3 receptor antagonists, in two functional models.

    PubMed

    Tedford, C E; Hoffmann, M; Seyedi, N; Maruyama, R; Levi, R; Yates, S L; Ali, S M; Phillips, J G

    1998-06-26

    GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and GT-2331 ((1R,2R)-4-(2-(5,5-dimethylhex-1-ynyl)cyclopropyl)imidazole) were developed as new potent histamine H3 receptor antagonists. The functional activity of these ligands on the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of neurogenic contraction of the guinea-pig jejunum and histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of norepinephrine release from guinea-pig heart synaptosomes were investigated. GT-2227 and GT-2331 both antagonized the inhibitory effects of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine on the contraction induced by electrical field stimulation in the guinea-pig jejunum with pA2 values of 7.9+/-0.1 and 8.5+/-0.03, respectively. In addition, GT-2227 and GT-2331 antagonized the inhibition of norepinephrine release in cardiac synaptosomes by GT-2203 ((1R,2R)-trans-2-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)cyclopropylamine), a histamine H3 receptor agonist. The current results demonstrate the antagonist activity for both GT-2227 and GT-2331 in two functional assays for histamine H3 receptors.

  6. Behavioral and 5-HT antagonist effects of ritanserin: a pure and selective antagonist of LSD discrimination in rat.

    PubMed

    Colpaert, F C; Meert, T F; Niemegeers, C J; Janssen, P A

    1985-01-01

    The newly synthesized compound and putative 5-HT2 antagonist ritanserin, but not the structurally related compound R 56413, resembles pirenperone in that it acts as a pure antagonist in an LSD-saline drug discrimination assay in the rat. Ritanserin exceeded pirenperone in terms of behavioral specificity; the lowest effective dose of ritanserin in antagonizing LSD was one order of magnitude higher than that of pirenperone, but the compound depressed rate of operant responding only at doses that were about 1000-fold higher than those at which pirenperone was effective. Ritanserin exerted effects in an open field test which were reminiscent of anxiolytic drug activity in the rat; its effects were greater than those of pirenperone, R 56413 and the benzodiazepines chlordiazepoxide and diazepam. The results of experiments on antagonism of 5-HT-induced hypothermia and of the 5-HTP-induced head-twitch response fail to support the possibility that the putative anxiolytic effects of ritanserin in the rat can be ascribed simply to a pharmacologically defined action at 5-HT receptors.

  7. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Costanzi, Stefano; Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM dendrimer to

  8. Oxycodone with an opioid receptor antagonist: A review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Goforth, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for putting opioid antagonists with an agonist is to improve pain control, to reduce side effects, and/or to reduce abuse. The combination of prolonged release (PR) oxycodone and naloxone reduces constipation as demonstrated in multiple studies and has been designated a tamper-resistant opioid by the Food and Drug Administration. Bioequivalence of the combination product compared with PR oxycodone has not been established. Several of the pivotal studies provided suboptimal laxative support in the control arm of the randomized trials. Two noninferiority trials have demonstrated equivalent analgesia between PR oxycodone and the combination product at doses of less than 120 mg of oxycodone per day. There appears to be an analgesic ceiling above 80-120 mg of oxycodone per day. Safety monitoring during randomized trials was not been well described in published manuscripts. Benefits appear to be better for those with chronic noncancer pain compared with individuals with cancer when constipation was the primary outcome.

  9. New Hits as Antagonists of GPR103 Identified by HTS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical data indicate that GPR103 receptor and its endogenous neuropeptides QRFP26 and QRFP43 are involved in appetite regulation. A high throughput screening (HTS) for small molecule GPR103 antagonists was performed with the clinical goal to target weight management by modulation of appetite. A high hit rate from the HTS and initial low confirmation with respect to functional versus affinity data challenged us to revise the established screening cascade. To secure high quality data while increasing throughput, the binding assay was optimized on quality to run at single concentration. This strategy enabled evaluation of a larger fraction of chemical clusters and singletons delivering 17 new compound classes for GPR103 antagonism. Representative compounds from three clusters are presented. One of the identified clusters was further investigated, and an initial structure–activity relationship study is reported. The most potent compound identified had a pIC50 of 7.9 with an improved ligand lipophilic efficiency. PMID:24900874

  10. Chroman and tetrahydroquinoline ureas as potent TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert G; Bayburt, Erol K; Latshaw, Steven P; Koenig, John R; Daanen, Jerome F; McDonald, Heath A; Bianchi, Bruce R; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen; Honore, Prisca; Marsh, Kennan C; Lee, Chih-Hung; Faltynek, Connie R; Gomtsyan, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    Novel chroman and tetrahydroquinoline ureas were synthesized and evaluated for their activity as TRPV1 antagonists. It was found that aryl substituents on the 7- or 8-position of both bicyclic scaffolds imparted the best in vitro potency at TRPV1. The most potent chroman ureas were assessed in chronic and acute pain models, and compounds with the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier were shown to be highly efficacious. The tetrahydroquinoline ureas were found to be potent CYP3A4 inhibitors, but replacement of bulky substituents at the nitrogen atom of the tetrahydroisoquinoline moiety with small groups such as methyl can minimize the inhibition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Bexarotene as a PPARγ Antagonist with HDX

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, David P.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    The retinoid x receptors (RXRs) are the pharmacological target of Bexarotene, an antineoplastic agent indicated for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). The RXRs form heterodimers with several nuclear receptors (NRs), including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), to regulate target gene expression through cooperative recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry to characterize the effects of Bexarotene on the conformational plasticity of the intact RXRα:PPARγ heterodimer. Interestingly, addition of Bexarotene to PPARγ in the absence of RXRα induced protection from solvent exchange, suggesting direct receptor binding. This observation was confirmed using a competitive binding assay. Furthermore, Bexarotene functioned as a PPARγ antagonist able to alter rosiglitazone induced transactivation in a cell based promoter:reporter transactivation assay. Together these results highlight the complex polypharmacology of lipophilic NR targeted small molecules and the utility of HDX for identifying and characterizing these interactions. PMID:26451138

  12. Physico-chemical pathways in radioprotective action of calmodulin antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1996-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.9 Gy/s. The fluidity of membrane decreased with radiation dose and in the presence of calmodulin antagonists (CA) like chlorpromazine (CPZ), promethazine (PMZ) and trimeprazine (TMZ) it increased. Radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from membranes. This release was inhibited by CA mainly by CPZ and PMZ. Being Ca 2+ dependent, the changes in the activity of acetylcholine estrase (AchE) following irradiation was also studied. Radiation decreased the activity of AchE in dose dependent manner. Presence of CPZ and PMZ diminished the radiation induced inhibition of AchE but not in the presence of TMZ at the lower concentration tested. It is suggested that apart from scavenging of free radicals, CA perhaps exert their euxoic radioprotective effect through Ca 2+ dependent processes.

  13. Acyclic Tethers Mimicking Subunits of Polysaccharide Ligands: Selectin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design and synthesis of molecules having E- and P-selectins blocking activity both in vitro and in vivo. The GlcNAc component of the selectin ligand sialyl LewisX was replaced by an acyclic tether that links two saccharide units. The minimization of intramolecular dipole–dipole interactions and the gauche effect would be at the origin of the conformational bias imposed by this acyclic tether. The stereoselective synthesis of these molecules, their biochemical and biological evaluations using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), and in vivo assays are described. Because the structure of our analogues differs from the most potent E-selectin antagonists reported, our acyclic analogues offer new opportunities for chemical diversity. PMID:25221666

  14. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of hista